17 Burst results for "Cara Paisa"

"cara paisa" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:02 min | Last week

"cara paisa" Discussed on KCRW

"She's chief of infectious diseases at Children's National Hospital here in Washington, D. C. And someone we visited twice now, as we reported on, Missy. Doctor to be as we welcome back to the program. Thank you. You are kind of our in house experts on Missy s O before we get to the news of the study. Let's talk about where we are in treating it again. This is very rare. But do we still not know why Missy occurs? What are the reasons why a child might get it? We don't know exactly why any one particular child gets it in. Another doesn't But as more and more of these studies come out, we get more and more hints that then can guide us into where exactly? We need to do more research. But it's very clear now. This information from the Centers for Disease Control with the data across the country, showing clearly this temporal relationship. Where you have a surge of virus circulation in a particular community. And then, sure enough, you know, 2 to 6 weeks later, you get a surge of this inflammatory disorder. One of the things that struck me in this study is it really does cement the idea that the kids who get Missy will not have shown that they were infected? They will have been asymptomatic. Yeah, I think it's but you know, we we've known all along and both Children and adults that there's a large percentage of people that just don't have symptoms. Um, and I think what is, you know, concerned us, and this is now solidified in this study is that just because you don't have symptoms doesn't mean that you are now protected from getting a post infectious complication like Missy. On dim fact. In this study, there were higher proportion of the kids that actually did not have recognized symptoms that had the complication Now. That does not mean that you know, every child with asymptomatic disease is going to get miss. See, we don't want parents toe. Be overly concerned. This is still an incredibly rare complication and the vast majority of kids whether they have symptoms or not. In fact, 97% of them are are not going to be hospitalized or have severe disease. Just remind our listeners briefly what to look for if a parent or Guardian suspects Messina Child The most common symptoms are high fever, severe abdominal pain, rash and what we call con junk title injection, which means the white parts of the eyes get very red and inflamed looking. What else jumped out at you from this study, So they did a really nice, detailed analysis amongst different age Children. And instead of saying, You know, there are 50% of Children that end up in the intensive care unit and and have shock, which has been shown in pretty much every center. Actually, then could break it out because of the large numbers that they have and compare. You know the young the very young Children versus the middle aged Children versus the older Children. And so it showed that you know, even though overall 50% of the Children end up in the ICU and have problems with their blood pressure and shock, it's actually the older group that is more likely for that to happen to you and the younger kids. It's less likely to happen, too, so it is definitely a severe disease, but this helps us discern a little bit, who is at the highest risk for the most severe disease. And it also does confirm what you had told us previously that misty disproportionately affects black and Hispanic Children. Absolutely. So, that has been a uniformed message at in almost any center's data. But now you know, when you take it all across the United States, it really is true. So it's it's about equal. If you look a Hispanic versus non Hispanic black, they're both each about 35%. But together. That group is 70% of all the cases. What do you think the public should take away from what we now know about Missy. I think the most important thing and I try to always temper, particularly for parents. We don't want people to panic and think that every child will Have this horrible complication of covert infection, But at the same time, we don't want to diminish its importance and severity so much that people don't think about it, and particularly parents and physicians that see their child with symptoms that are possibly compatible with Missy that they say. Well, it just can't be because it just doesn't happen. Because clearly it does happen. We have, you know, almost 2000 Children here in this report across the country, and you know, the really the most important thing is we need to try to prevent the transmission of covert in our community because that is what proceeds These episodes of surges of Missy and our Children and the very best way we can prevent transmission of Cove in our community is to keep getting vaccinated and get us up to the herd. Immunity. We need So that we don't have large amounts of circulation in any community because indeed, Children are not eligible yet for the vaccine, absolutely. Dr Roberta Debbie as a chief of infectious diseases at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D. C. Thank you so much. Thank you Live Colleges are withholding transcripts from millions of students for unpaid bills and blocking many of them from finishing degrees or pursuing graduate studies. In Massachusetts. Public colleges are holding a majority of the transcripts as Kirk Cara paisa of member station GBH reports. To pay his tuition and fees at the University of Massachusetts Boston, Gabriel Toro worked several jobs as a mental health counselor as a bus boy at a bar and a late night cashier at a diner. Juggling a full load, of course, is Toro also made sacrifices so he could afford rent. And food. I started eating two meals a day I gave up a social life. Which then I think built up TOC actually sacrificing my mental health, a strange from his parents and for a time homeless, Toro says his mental help took another hit when struggling to find a full time job during the pandemic. I got an email saying you messed. Boston was withholding his transcript and degree for unpaid bills, even though he'd earned enough credits to graduate. 23 year old had already taken out loans to.

Gabriel Toro 70% 50% United States 97% Massachusetts Washington, D. C. Roberta Debbie Toro twice Children's National Hospital Centers for Disease Control Kirk Cara paisa GBH both 2 One millions of students University of Massachusetts Bo each
"cara paisa" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

06:04 min | Last week

"cara paisa" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"She's chief of infectious diseases at Children's National Hospital here in Washington, D. C. And someone we visited twice now, as we reported on, Missy. Doctor to be as we welcome back to the program. Thank you. You are kind of our in house experts on Missy s O before we get to the news of the study. Let's talk about where we are in treating it again. This is very rare. But do we still not know why Missy occurs? What are the reasons why a child might get it? We don't know exactly why any one particular child gets it and another doesn't. But as more and more of these studies come out, we get more and more hints that then can guide us into where exactly? We need to do more research. But it's very clear now. This information from the Centers for Disease Control with the data across the country, showing clearly this temporal relationship. Where you have a surge of virus circulation in a particular community. And then, sure enough, you know, 2 to 6 weeks later, you get a surge of this inflammatory disorder. One of the things that struck me in this study is it really does cement the idea that the kids who get Missy will not have shown that they were infected? They will have been asymptomatic. Yeah, I think it's but you know, we we've known all along and both Children and adults that there's a large percentage of people that just don't have symptoms. And I think what is you know, concerned us, and this is now solidified in this study is that just because you don't have symptoms doesn't mean that you are now protected from getting a post infectious complication like Missy on defect. In this study, there were a higher proportion of the kids that actually did not have recognized symptoms that Had the complication Now. That does not mean that you know, every child with asymptomatic disease is going to get miss. See, we don't want parents toe be overly concerned. This is still an incredibly rare complication and the vast majority of kids whether they have symptoms or not. In fact, 97% of them are are not going to be hospitalized or have severe disease. Just remind our listeners briefly what to look for if a parent or Guardian suspects Messina Child Most common symptoms are high fever, severe abdominal pain, rash and what we call con junk title injection, which means the white parts of the eyes get very red and inflamed looking. What else jumped out at you from this study, So they did a really nice, detailed analysis amongst different age Children. And instead of saying, You know, there are 50% of Children that end up in the intensive care unit and and have shock, which has been shown in pretty much every center. Actually, then could break it out because of the large numbers that they have and compare. You know the young the very young Children versus the middle aged Children versus the older Children. And so it showed that you know, even though overall 50% of the Children end up in the ICU and have problems with their blood pressure and shock, it's actually the older group that is more likely for that to happen to you and the younger kids. It's less likely to happen too. So it is definitely a severe disease. But this helps us discern a little bit who is at the highest risk for the most severe disease, And it also does confirm what you had told us previously that misty disproportionately affects black and Hispanic Children. Absolutely. So, that has been a uniformed message at in almost any center's data. But now you know, when you take it all across the United States, it really is true. So it's it's about equal. If you look a Hispanic versus non Hispanic black, they're both each about 35%. But together that group is 70%. Of all the cases. What do you think the public should take away from what we now know about Missy? I think the most important thing and I try to always temper particularly for parents. We don't want people to panic and think that every child will Have this horrible complication of covert infection, But at the same time, we don't want to diminish its importance and severity so much that people don't think about it, and particularly parents and physicians that see their child with symptoms that are possibly compatible with Missy that they say. Well, it just can't be because it just doesn't happen. Because clearly it does happen. We have, you know, almost 2000 Children here in this report across the country, and you know, the really the most important thing is we need to try to prevent the transmission of covert and our community because that is what proceeds These episodes of surges of Missy and our Children and the very best way we can prevent transmission of Cove in our community is to keep getting vaccinated and get us up to the herd. Immunity. We need So that we don't have large amounts of circulation in any community because indeed, Children are not eligible yet for the vaccine, absolutely. Dr Roberta Debbie as a chief of infectious diseases at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D. C. Thank you so much. Thank you Live Colleges are withholding transcripts from millions of students for unpaid bills and blocking many of them from finishing degrees or pursuing graduate studies. In Massachusetts. Public colleges are holding a majority of the transcripts as Kirk Cara paisa of member station G B eight reports. To pay his tuition and fees at the University of Massachusetts Boston, Gabriel Toro worked several jobs as a mental health counselor as a bus boy at a bar and a late night cashier at a diner. Juggling a full load, of course, is Toro also made sacrifices so he could afford rent and food. I started eating two meals a day I gave up a social life. Which then I think built up TOC actually sacrificing my mental health, a strange from his parents and for a time homeless, Toro says his mental help took another hit when struggling to find a full time job during the pandemic. I got an email saying you messed. Boston was withholding his transcript and degree for unpaid bills, even though he'd earned enough credits to graduate. 23 year old had already taken out loans to.

Gabriel Toro United States 50% 70% Massachusetts 97% Washington, D. C. Roberta Debbie Toro twice Children's National Hospital Centers for Disease Control University of Massachusetts Bo Kirk Cara paisa both One 2 23 year old each one
"cara paisa" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:04 min | Last week

"cara paisa" Discussed on KCRW

"She's chief of infectious diseases at Children's National Hospital here in Washington, D. C. And someone we visited twice now, as we reported on, Missy. Doctor to be as we welcome back to the program. Thank you. You are kind of our in house experts on Missy s O before we get to the news of the study. Let's talk about where we are in treating it again. This is very rare. But do we still not know why Missy occurs? What are the reasons why a child might get it? We don't know exactly why any one particular child gets it and another doesn't. But as more and more of these studies come out, we get more and more hints that then can guide us into where exactly? We need to do more research. But it's very clear now. This information from the Centers for Disease Control with the data across the country, showing clearly this temporal relationship. Where you have a surge of virus circulation in a particular community. And then, sure enough, you know, 2 to 6 weeks later, you get a surge of this inflammatory disorder. One of the things that struck me in this study is it really does cement the idea that the kids who get Missy will not have shown that they were infected? They will have been asymptomatic. Yeah, I think it's but you know, we we've known all along and both Children and adults that there's a large percentage of people that just don't have symptoms. And I think what is you know, concerned us, and this is now solidified in this study is that just because you don't have symptoms doesn't mean that you are now protected from getting a post infectious complication like Missy. On dim fact. In this study, there were higher proportion of the kids that actually did not have recognized symptoms that had the complication Now. That does not mean that you know, every child with asymptomatic disease is going to get miss. See, we don't want parents toe. Be overly concerned. This is still an incredibly rare complication and the vast majority of kids whether they have symptoms or not. In fact, 97% of them are are not going to be hospitalized or have severe disease. Just remind our listeners briefly what to look for if a parent or Guardian suspects Messina Child The most common symptoms are high fever, severe abdominal pain, rash and what we call con junk title injection, which means the white parts of the eyes get very red and inflamed looking. What else jumped out at you from this study, So they did a really nice, detailed analysis amongst different age Children. And instead of saying, You know, there are 50% of Children that end up in the intensive care unit and have shock, which has been shown in pretty much every center. Actually, then could break it out because of the large numbers that they have and compare. You know the young the very young Children versus the middle aged Children versus the older Children. And so it showed that you know, even though overall 50% of the Children end up in the ICU and have problems with their blood pressure and shock, it's actually the older group that is more likely for that to happen to you and the younger kids. It's less likely to happen, too, so it is definitely a severe disease, but this helps us discern a little bit, who is at the highest risk for the most severe disease. And it also does confirm what you had told us previously that misty disproportionately affects black and Hispanic Children. Absolutely. So that has been a uniformed message at in almost any center's data. But now you know, when you take it all across the United States, it really is true. So it's it's about equal. If you look a Hispanic versus non Hispanic black, they're both each about 35%. But together that group is 70%. Of all the cases. What do you think the public should take away from what we now know about Missy? I think the most important thing and I try to always temper of particularly for parents. We don't want people to panic and think that every child will have this horrible complication of covert infection. But at the same time we don't want to diminish its importance and severity so much that people don't think about it, and particularly parents and physicians that see their child with symptoms that are possibly compatible with Missy that they say. Well, it just can't be because it just doesn't happen. Because clearly does happen We have, you know, almost 2000 Children here in this report across the country, and you know, the really the most important thing is we need to try to prevent the transmission of covert in our community because that is what proceeds These episodes of and surges of Missy and our Children and the very best way we can prevent transmission of Cove in our community is to keep getting vaccinated and get us up to the herd. Immunity. We need So that we don't have large amounts of circulation in any community because indeed, Children are not eligible yet for the vaccine, absolutely. Dr Roberta Debbie as a chief of infectious diseases at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D. C. Thank you so much. Thank you Live Colleges are withholding transcripts from millions of students for unpaid bills and blocking many of them from finishing degrees or pursuing graduate studies. In Massachusetts. Public colleges are holding a majority of the transcripts as Kirk Cara paisa of member station G. B H reports. To pay his tuition and fees at the University of Massachusetts Boston, Gabriel Toro worked several jobs as a mental health counselor as a bus boy at a bar and a late night cashier at a diner. Juggling a full load, of course, is Toro also made sacrifices so he could afford rent and food. I started eating two meals a day I gave up a social life. Which then I think built up TOC actually sacrificing my mental health, a strange from his parents and for a time homeless, Toro says his mental help took another hit when struggling to find a full time job during the pandemic. You got an email saying you messed. Boston was withholding his transcript and degree for unpaid bills, even though he'd earned enough credits to graduate. 23 year old had already taken out loans.

Gabriel Toro 50% United States 70% Massachusetts 97% Roberta Debbie Washington, D. C. Toro twice Children's National Hospital Centers for Disease Control Kirk Cara paisa University of Massachusetts Bo both 2 One 23 year old each one
"cara paisa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:03 min | Last week

"cara paisa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Chief of infectious diseases at Children's National Hospital here in Washington, D. C. And someone we visited twice now, as we reported on, Missy. Doctor to be as we welcome back to the program. Thank you. You are kind of our in house experts on Missy s O before we get to the news of the study. Let's talk about where we are in treating it again. This is very rare. But do we still not know why Missy occurs? What are the reasons why a child might get it? We don't know exactly why any one particular child gets it and another doesn't. But as more and more of these studies come out, we get more and more hints that then can guide us into where exactly? We need to do more research. But it's very clear now. This information from the Centers for Disease Control with the data across the country, showing clearly this temporal relationship. Where you have a surge of virus circulation in a particular community. And then, sure enough, you know, 2 to 6 weeks later, you get a surge of this inflammatory disorder. One of the things that struck me in this study is it really does cement the idea that the kids who get Missy will not have shown that they were infected? They will have been asymptomatic. Yeah, I think it's but you know, we we've known all along and both Children and adults that there's a large percentage of people that just don't have symptoms. And I think what is, you know, concerned us, And this is now solidified in this study is that just because you don't have symptoms doesn't mean that you are now protected from getting a post infectious complication like Missy. On dim fact. In this study, there were higher proportion of the kids that actually did not have recognized symptoms that had the complication Now. That does not mean that you know, every child with asymptomatic disease is going to get miss. See, we don't want parents toe. Overly concerned. This is still an incredibly rare complication and the vast majority of kids whether they have symptoms or not, In fact, 97% of them are are not going to be hospitalized or have severe disease. Just remind our listeners briefly what to look for if a parent or guardian suspects Messina child, The most common symptoms are high fever, severe abdominal pain, rash and what we call con junk title injection, which means the white parts of the eyes get very red and inflamed looking. What else jumped out at you from this study, So they did a really nice, detailed analysis amongst different age Children. And instead of saying, You know, there are 50% of Children that end up in the intensive care unit and have shock, which has been shown in pretty much every center. Actually, then could break it out because of the large numbers that they have and compare. You know the very young Children versus the middle aged Children versus the older Children. And so it showed that you know, even though overall 50% of the Children end up in the ICU and have problems with their blood pressure and shock, it's actually the older group that is more likely for that to happen to you and the younger kids. It's less likely to happen, too, so it is definitely a severe disease, but this helps us discern a little bit, who is at the highest risk for the most severe disease. And it also does confirm what you had told us previously that Missy disproportionately affects black and Hispanic Children. Absolutely. So, that has been a uniformed message at in almost any center's data. But now you know, when you take it all across the United States, it really is true. So it's it's about equal. If you look a Hispanic versus non Hispanic black, they're both each about 35%. But together. That group is 70% of all the cases. What do you think the public should take away from what we now know about Missy. I think the most important thing and I try to always temper of particularly for parents. We don't want people to panic and think that every child will have this horrible complication of covert infection. But at the same time we don't want to diminish its importance and severity so much that people don't think about it, and particularly parents and physicians that see their child with symptoms that are possibly compatible with Missy that they say. Well, it just can't be because it just doesn't happen. Because clearly does happen We have, you know, almost 2000 Children here in this report across the country, and you know, the really the most important thing is we need to try to prevent the transmission of covert in our community because that is what proceeds These episodes of surges of Missy and our Children and the very best way we can prevent transmission of Copan. Our community is to keep getting vaccinated and get us up to the herd. Immunity. We need So that we don't have large amounts of circulation in any community because indeed, Children are not eligible yet for the vaccine, absolutely. Dr Roberta Debbie as a chief of infectious diseases at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D. C. Thank you so much. Thank you Live Colleges are withholding transcripts from millions of students for unpaid bills and blocking many of them from finishing degrees or pursuing graduate studies. In Massachusetts. Public colleges are holding a majority of the transcripts as Kirk Cara paisa of member station G. B H reports. To pay his tuition and fees of the University of Massachusetts Boston, Gabriel Toro worked several jobs as a mental health counselor as a bus boy at a bar and a late night cashier at a diner. Juggling a full load, of course, is Toro also made sacrifices so he could afford rent and food. I started eating two meals a day. I gave up a social life. Which then I think built up TOC actually sacrificing my mental health, a strange from his parents and for a time homeless, Toro says his mental health took another hit. When struggling to find a full time job. During the pandemic. You got an email saying you must Boston was withholding his transcript and degree for unpaid bills. Even though he'd earned enough credits to graduate. 23 year old had already taken out.

Gabriel Toro 70% United States 50% 97% Massachusetts Roberta Debbie Toro Washington, D. C. University of Massachusetts Bo twice Kirk Cara paisa Children's National Hospital both One 2 Centers for Disease Control millions one each
"cara paisa" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:52 min | Last week

"cara paisa" Discussed on WBUR

"She's chief of infectious diseases at Children's National Hospital here in Washington, D. C. And someone we visited twice now, as we reported on Missy Doctor to be as we welcome back to the program. Thank you. You are kind of our in house experts on Missy s O before we get to the news of the study. Let's talk about where we are in treating it again. This is very rare. But do we still not know why Missy occurs? What are the reasons why a child might get it? We don't know exactly why any one particular child gets it and another doesn't. But as more and more of these studies come out, we get more and more hints. That then can guide us into where exactly? We need to do more research. But it's very clear now. This information from the Centers for Disease Control with the data across the country, showing clearly this temporal relationship. Where you have a surge of virus circulation in a particular community. And then, sure enough, you know, 2 to 6 weeks later, you get a surge of this inflammatory disorder. One of the things that struck me in this study is it really does cement the idea that the kids who get Missy will not have shown that they were infected? They will have been asymptomatic. Yeah, I think it's but you know, we we've known all along and both Children and adults that there's a large percentage of people that just don't have symptoms. And I think what is you know, concerned us, and this is now solidified in this study is that just because you don't have symptoms doesn't mean that you are now protected from getting a post infectious complication like Missy. On dim fact. In this study, there were higher proportion of the kids that actually did not have recognized symptoms that had the complication Now. That does not mean that you know, every child with asymptomatic disease is going to get Missy. We don't want parents toe. Be overly concerned. This is still an incredibly rare complication and the vast majority of kids whether they have symptoms or not, In fact, 97% of them are are not going to be hospitalized or have severe disease. Just remind our listeners briefly what to look for if a parent or guardian suspects Messina child, The most common symptoms are high fever, severe abdominal pain, rash and what we call con junk title injection, which means the white parts of the eyes get very red and inflamed looking. What else jumped out at you from this study, So they did a really nice, detailed analysis amongst different age Children. And instead of saying, You know, there are 50% of Children that end up in the intensive care unit and have shock, which has been shown in pretty much every center. Actually, then could break it out because of the large numbers that they have and compare. You know the young, very young Children versus the middle aged Children versus the older Children. And so it showed that you know, even though overall 50% of the Children end up in the ICU and have problems with their blood pressure and shock, it's actually the older group that is more likely for that to happen to you and the younger kids. It's less likely to happen too. So it is definitely a severe disease. But this helps us discern a little bit who is at the highest risk for the most severe disease, And it also does confirm what you had told us previously that Missy disproportionately affects black and Hispanic Children. Absolutely. So, that has been a uniformed message at in almost any center's data. But now you know, when you take it all across the United States, it really is true. So it's it's about equal. If you look a Hispanic versus non Hispanic black, they're both each about 35%. But together that group is 70%. Of all the cases. What do you think the public should take away from what we now know about Missy? I think the most important thing and I try to always temper of particularly for parents. We don't want people to panic and think that every child will have this horrible complication of covert infection. At the same time, we don't want to diminish its importance and severity so much that people don't think about it, and particularly parents and physicians that see their child with symptoms that are possibly compatible with Missy that they say. Well, it just can't be because it just doesn't happen. Because clearly does happen We have, you know, almost 2000 Children here in this report across the country, and you know, the really the most important thing is we need to try to prevent the transmission of covert in our community because that is what proceeds These episodes of insurgents of Missy and our Children and the very best way we can prevent transmission of Copan. Our community is to keep getting vaccinated and get us up to the herd Immunity we need so that we don't have large amounts of circulation in any community. Because indeed, Children are not eligible yet for the vaccine. Absolutely Dr Roberta Debbie as a chief of infectious diseases at Children's National Hospital in Washington, D. C. Thank you so much. Thank you Live Colleges are withholding transcripts from millions of students for unpaid bills and blocking many of them from finishing degrees or pursuing graduate studies. In Massachusetts. Public colleges are holding a majority of the transcripts as Kirk Cara paisa of member station G. B eight reports to pay his tuition and fees at the University of Massachusetts Boston, Gabriel Toro worked several jobs as a mental health counselor. As a bus boy at a bar and a late night cashier at a diner. Juggling a full load, of course, is Toro also made sacrifices so he could afford rent and food. I started eating two meals a day. I gave up a social life. Which then I think built up TOC actually sacrificing my mental health, a strange from his parents and for a time homeless, Toro says his mental help took another hit when struggling to find a full time job during the pandemic..

Gabriel Toro United States 50% 70% Massachusetts 97% Roberta Debbie Washington, D. C. Toro twice Kirk Cara paisa Children's National Hospital University of Massachusetts Bo Centers for Disease Control One both 2 one millions each
"cara paisa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:39 min | 6 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Louisiana is bracing for yet another strong hurricane just six weeks after Laura came ashore, devastating large portions of the Southwest. Forecasters say Hurricane Delta is churning in the Gulf of Mexico is a dangerous Category two Storm the mayor of Lafayette Parish, Guillory is urging folks to avoid driving in these conditions. Best thing we can do for our first responders for farming for police officer sheriff's deputies. For utility workers trying to get power back up and running. Best thing we can do stay off the roadways unless it's an absolute emergency. Hurricane Delta is expected to make landfall tonight in the same area of southwest Louisiana. Where scores of homes and businesses are already damaged. Delta is expected to weaken somewhat as it approaches the coast this evening. In Massachusetts. The White House Corona virus response coordinator is meeting today with college presidents from member station GBH. Kirk Cara Paisa tells us Dr Deborah Burke's his warning students and the public to remain on guard against the virus. Speaking to reporters outside MIT and Harvard's Broad Institute in Cambridge, Dr Burke said the Northeast and its colleges have some of the most quote militant covert testing in the country. But she also emphasized the importance of wearing mask and maintaining social distancing during the upcoming holiday. We see that from the high holy days, people are just yearning to be together. And believe that if I know you or if you're my family member, you couldn't have asymptomatic Cove it and we now learned that you could. Burkes said She's confident students that Massachusetts colleges won't spread Corona virus when they had home for the holidays because of their low positivity rates. She also said she wishes the government could replicate regular testing across the country. For NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara Pensa in Cambridge. Stocks finished modestly higher on Wall Street, the Dow was up half a percent. This is NPR news. And this is WNBC in New York. I'm showing Carlson, a federal judge declined to grant a temporary restraining order that could have halted restrictions on religious gatherings of more than 10 people. Agudath Israel of America and ultra Orthodox Jewish advocacy group sued the state and argued that the restrictions made it impossible for their community to fulfill for the just obligations. Rabbi. Every Shafran is a spokesman for the group. It was a decision that was that went against what we feel is a very compelling argument about the judges. The judge and the decision is a decision, so we respected for what it's worth. The restrictions apply to areas of Brooklyn and Queens, where rates of positive Koven 19 tests are more than five times the city average. The state and city say strict social distancing measures are needed in those areas to save lives. Because of the ongoing covert 19 pandemic. Broadway will stay closed at least through next spring. Broadway producers announced today that the shutdown will extend through at least May 30th of 2021. And Gotham's Binaca says, Don't expect to see shows streaming online either something like Hamilton, which was already a humongous success for them to make a deal with Disney Plus and have that streaming there. That makes total sense. But most shows even from a couple of years ago, you're not going to find them streaming online. As for fans who bought tickets for shows through the spring theatres are offering refunds and exchanges. Many New York City teachers are awaiting a decision on whether or not they'll receive a final back pay installment from the city. The city told teachers it couldn't afford to make the payments because of the current financial crisis. The two sides headed into arbitration this morning, Gothamist reporter David Crewes says. If the arbitrator decides the money needs to be paid, it won't be without consequences. If the teachers received the money immediately. It could trigger the kind of mass layoffs that Mayor Bill de Blasio has been trying to avoid. Back bay dates to win. Teachers were without a union contract under the Bloomberg administration. The original total sum was $900 million and has been doled out over time. Four payments have been made so far. Our weekend is looking pretty sunny tonight. It'll stay clear. We'll have love about 59 degrees. Partly sunny through the day tomorrow with a high of about 77 degrees. A few clouds you on there tomorrow night Low 63 on Sunday a chance of showers in the afternoon. Slight chance of showers, otherwise partly sunny high near 71 on Monday. Showers are likely. Mostly cloudy high near 62 degrees. It's 69 Sunny here in a Brooklyn at the moment at 5 35. Support for NPR comes from W. N. Y C members and from Hub spot whose enterprise C R. M platform is designed to help marketing sales.

Hurricane Delta NPR Louisiana Burkes Massachusetts New York Brooklyn Dr Deborah Burke Cambridge Kirk Cara Pensa Kirk Cara Paisa Gulf of Mexico Mayor Bill de Blasio officer Lafayette Parish asymptomatic Laura Guillory
"cara paisa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 7 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Morning as a powerful Category two storm near Alabama's Gulf shores with wind speeds of more than 100 MPH. Nearly half a million homes and businesses have lost power. Robert Kraft is the mayor of Gulf Shores, He says some locals who live on the beach didn't leave. We also have a residential beach and residential beaches are uranium residential e, but you also live in and the folks that live in them. A lot of them didn't lead. And so when water started getting into their own, we have to go rescue. So we had to open up several temporary shelters, and we probably have 50 plus people. In shelters because their homes flooded. Forecasters are also tracking Hurricane teddy as it moves west of the Virgin Islands. Teddy is expected to become a major hurricane by the weekend. In Boston A federal appeals court heard arguments today in a case charging Harvard discriminates against Asian American applicants from member station Bgh Kirk Cara Paisa reports. The plaintiff Students for fair admissions, or S. F F A argued that Harvard engages in racial balancing and intentionally discriminates against Asian American applicants by holding them to higher personality standards as if a phase lead counsel said quote Neither Asian Americans have worse personalities or something is awry. Harvard's lead attorney dismissed that idea, noting that in a three retrial, SF never presented a single application that proved intentional bias at stake in this case is more than four decades of president that, says college officials 10 consider race, among other factors when deciding which students to admit The judge's decision is expected as early as this winter for NPR news. I'm Kirk Oropesa in Boston. Stocks finished mixed on Wall Street. You're listening to NPR news, and this is WNBC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson. Online Orientation kicked off today for New York City's Million plus public school students. Xena's on is a community Education Council member in Brooklyn. She spent the first day helping Bangladeshi parents navigate new usernames and passwords. Can you imagine a person who's not fluent in English? Who's spending a child for the first time? In the system the amount off, you know, confusion they might be facing. Education officials say that's exactly what these orientation days or four iron out any technical snags ahead of the first full day of instruction on Monday, more than 40% of students have chosen to learn exclusively from home and the rest will be learning remotely several days a week. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed.

Harvard Hurricane teddy Gulf Shores Robert Kraft NPR New York City Boston Bgh Kirk Cara Paisa Xena Alabama Kirk Oropesa Sean Carlson New Jersey Virgin Islands Governor Phil Murphy Brooklyn SF president attorney
"cara paisa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 8 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Were marching through the streets of uptown Charlotte in opposition to the Republican Convention when police intervened to stop the march from interrupting traffic. Videos taken by protesters show police pushing back the crowd with a line of bicycles. Police say the protesters grabbed at the bikes and assaulted officers. Police deployed pepper spray and arrested multiple people. Thea Altercations Kane as delegates for the Republican National Convention hold a Siri's of private meetings in Charlotte this weekend ahead of the convention's official start on Monday. Protesters say more demonstrations are planned through the weekend for NPR news. I'm Nick Delicate gal in Charlotte. Boston's Northeastern University is threatening to rescind admission offers to dozens of students who said online they planned a party despite the pandemic. Kirk Cara Pez of member station WGBH reports It all started with a social media survey posted on Instagram. The survey shows more than 100. Incoming freshman voted yes to a question about whether or not they're planning to attend parties back on campus in Boston. Northeastern says the university contacted the student running the pole, and that student turned over the names of everyone who responded. Yes, Northeastern then sent them and their families a letter, making it clear the behavior would not be tolerated in order to slow the spread of the virus if the's students refused to sign a pledge committing to protect the campus community Administrators say Northeastern will rescind their admission offers for NPR news, Kurt Cara Paisa in Boston. Johns Hopkins University says the global death toll from the Corona virus has reached 800,000. South Korea, where the outbreak was under control, has a resurgence of infections and is imposing strict new measures banning large organizations and closing night spots and churches. This is NPR. Live from the news. I'm queen IQ him. Re sources are spread thin on the new complex. That's a Siri's of wildfire sparked by lightning storms last weekend. It's raging in five counties, including Sonoma, where firefighters haven't been relieved for gays. Richelle Maria Dylan met with a couple of crews who've been on the fire line since Tuesday. These firefighters rolling opposes the current build fire station. We're so tired, they didn't even know what day it Wass. They were deployed to the Myers fire in general, which had consumed about 3000.

Charlotte Northeastern Boston Kurt Cara Paisa NPR Siri Kirk Cara Pez Northeastern University Thea Altercations Kane Johns Hopkins University Richelle Maria Dylan South Korea WGBH Sonoma official
"cara paisa" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:06 min | 8 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on KCRW

"Good morning. Voting by mail may be vital in the pandemic. So why did the postmaster general cut costs says the election approached? You'll face that question today in the Senate. It's morning edition from NPR News. Coming up the story of Postmaster General Lewis Joy who turned his dad's trucking company into a big corporation and became a big GOP donor. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm David Greene will talk to one of the Republican senators will be questioning the joy. We're asking voters what's keeping them up at night, and this morning, we go to Navajo Nation to meet Deborah Vera's schoolteacher and single mother of six. Also a former Uber executive faces criminal charges He's accused of concealing attack that exposed the data 57 million drivers and passengers. It's Friday, August 21st country musician Casey Musgraves is 32. News is next. Live from NPR News on Corvo Coleman. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy appears this hour before a Senate committee, NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. His testimony comes amid accusations the Trump administration is trying to undermine mail service ahead of the election. Even though D Joy has temporarily suspended recent changes at the Postal Service, including cutbacks and overtime. Both Democrats and Republicans are concerned about whether the agency is prepared to handle a surge in Melun ballots. Many states are urging residents to vote by mail to avoid crowded polling stations amid the Corona virus pandemic. That effort has prompted President Trump to claim repeatedly without evidence that voting by mail will lead to fraud. Tomorrow, The House is set to vote on a measure that would block the Postal Service from implementing any additional changes that would alter service levels through January. It would also require same day processing for melon ballots. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Joe Biden has accepted the Democratic presidential nomination at the close of the Democratic National Convention. He spoke at the online event, promising that if elected, he'll represent all Americans, not just his base of supporters. Massive wildfires continue to burn across a swath of California. Some of them have been declared complex incidents with several blazes. Combining the seas EU lightning complex in the San Francisco Bay area is forcing tens of thousands of people to evacuate. Remember station Rachel Myrow reports. Re sources or stretched thin and firefighters are widely dispersed across many parts of this heavily populated region. This easy, you lightning complex is hardly the largest group of wildfires raging right now. But the terrain between Pescadero and Santa Cruz along the coast is particularly mountainous and dry. Most of the area hasn't burned in 50 years. Evacuees have to make their way out of the area on narrow and wind. The roads for NPR news. I'm Rachel Myrow in Menlo Park. A federal judge in Massachusetts will sentence actress Lori Laughlin and her husband, Mousy McGee, a newly today as part of the FBI's college admissions, cheating investigation. From member station WGBH in Boston, Kirk Cara Pezzo reports they could spend months behind bars. The couple has pleaded guilty to funneling a half million dollars through a phony charity to have their two daughters recruited to the University of Southern California crude team even though neither of them actually wrote Lachlan and generally are the most prominent among dozens of parents, coaches and other hired officials charged in the massive college admission scheme. The sentencing will be held on the line, and the court says it's had the increase its video capacity on zoom. Rick Singer, the ringleader behind the scheme has already pleaded guilty and is cooperating with the government's investigation for NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara Paisa in Boston. This is NPR and 604. I'm Cherry Glaser. With KCIA MW NEWS L. A County health officials are reporting another 57 deaths locally due to cope in 19 and another 1603 cases. Bringing the total number of cases in the county so far to 227,000. Health officials say many of the people who've died due to cope in 19 had underlying preexisting health conditions. High blood pressure and diabetes are the most common but other include asthma, liver disease and cardiovascular disease. There is some good nose, though. On the Corona virus front. Throughout the pandemic, Latino, Black and Pacific Islander residents have been getting sick and dying at rates higher than their white counterparts. But now that curve is bending. His case here. W's Darryl Sandman reports, health officials credit expanded testing and mandates for protective equipment in the workplace. During the height of Ella's caseload. In July, black residents had a rate of four deaths per 100,000 people. And for Latino residents, six deaths per 100,000. Those were several times the rates that white Angelenos were dying. But as mortality rates for all groups come down, the racial disparities are also shrinking. According to the county Health Department. The rate for black residents is now 1.7 per 100,000 people just a little higher than white residents. For Latinos. It's still above 2%. But that's way down from a month ago. Health officials say increasing the number of testing sites all throughout the county has helped reach vulnerable communities. They also credit rules that require workers in frontline. High risk business is to use equipment like masks and face shields. For much of the pandemic ll accounted for more than half of all Kobe deaths in the state, but that is no longer the case. As cases have surged in the Central Valley and inland Empire L A share of fatalities has dipped to 46%. Airbnb says it's banning all parties and events at its listings worldwide during the pandemic. The short term rental comedy is also limiting capacity at properties listed on its website to 16 people. The announcement comes after a crackdown on party houses in Los Angeles earlier this year, which result in the suspension or removal of 28 listings on the site in the Hollywood hills. The largest drug bust in the history of Santa Barbara County, unfolded before dawn yesterday morning, law enforcement officers intercepted a small boat loaded with more than a ton of narcotics and arrested 33 people case here. W's Matt Gillom has that story. £3164. That's how much methamphetamine the panga boat had onboard. Interdiction operation wasn't only the biggest drug bust ever in the county authorities say it was also one of the largest meth seizures in U. S history. Local law enforcement agencies, along with the FBI, the U. S Coast Guard, U. S customs and border Protection and others all worked together on the bust. They tracked the 40 FT homemade drug boat from Mexico to Arroyo came out a beach in Santa Barbara, where a crew was waiting to unload it. 33 suspects who were arrested for conspiracy and transporting narcotics for sale range in age from minors to a 72 year old man. The hail from all over Southern California, with.

NPR News NPR Rachel Myrow Lewis Joy Senate Windsor Johnston FBI Postal Service Steve Inskeep Santa Barbara County Deborah Vera Boston Santa Cruz Kirk Cara Paisa Casey Musgraves California GOP David Greene President Trump executive
"cara paisa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:46 min | 8 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kiwi I North Islands. It's six o'clock. Good morning. Voting by mail may be vital in the pandemic. So why did the postmaster general cut costs says the election approached? You'll face that question today in the Senate. It's morning edition from NPR News Coming up the story of Postmaster General Luis de Joy who turned his dad's trucking company into a big corporation and became a big GOP donor. I'm Steve Inskeep. I'm David Greene will talk to one of the Republican senators will be questioning the joint. Or asking voters what's keeping him up at night, And this morning, we go to the Navajo Nation to meet Deborah Vera's schoolteacher and single mother of six. Also a former Uber executive faces criminal charges He's accused of concealing a hack that exposed the data 57 million drivers and passengers. It's Friday, August 21st country musician Casey Musgraves is 32 theme news is next. Live from NPR News on Corvin Coleman. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy appears this hour before a Senate committee, NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. His testimony comes amid accusations the Trump administration is trying to undermine mail service ahead of the election. Even though D Joy has temporarily suspended recent changes at the Postal Service, including cutbacks in overtime, both Democrats and Republicans are concerned about whether the agency is prepared to handle a surge in Melun ballots. Many states are urging residents to vote by mail to avoid crowded polling stations admit the Corona virus pandemic. That effort has prompted President Trump to claim repeatedly without evidence that voting by mail will lead to fraud. Tomorrow, The House is set to vote on a measure that would block the Postal Service from implementing any additional changes that would alter service levels through January. It would also require same day processing for melon ballots. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Joe Biden has accepted the Democratic presidential nomination at the close of the Democratic National Convention. He spoke of the online event, promising that if elected, he'll represent all Americans, not just his base of supporters. Massive wildfires continue to burn across a swath of California. Some of them have been declared complex incidents with several blazes. Combining the seas EU lightning complex in the San Francisco Bay area is forcing tens of thousands of people to evacuate. Remember station Rachel Myrow reports. Resource is air stretched thin, and firefighters are widely dispersed across many parts of this heavily populated region. This easy, you lightning complex is hardly the largest group of wildfires raging right now, but the terrain between Pescadero and Santa Cruz along the coast is particularly mountainous and dry. Most of the area hasn't burned in 50 years, and evacuees have to make their way out of the area on narrow and wind the roads. For NPR News. I'm Rachel Myrow in Menlo Park. A federal judge in Massachusetts will sentence actress Lori Laughlin and her husband, Mousy McGee, a newly today as part of the FBI's college admissions, cheating investigation. From member station WGBH in Boston, Kirk Cara Pezzo reports they could spend months behind bars. The couple has pleaded guilty to funneling a half million dollars through a phony charity to have their two daughters recruited to the University of Southern California crude team even though neither of them actually wrote Lachlan and generally are the most prominent among dozens of parents, coaches and other hired officials charged in the massive college admission scheme. The sentencing will be held on the line, and the court says it's had the increase its video capacity on zoom. Rick Singer, the ringleader behind the scheme has already pleaded guilty and is cooperating with the government's investigation for NPR news. I'm Kurt Cara Paisa in Boston. This is NPR. Live from Q E D news on Brian What? Good morning. There are fewer than 600 firefighters battling California's largest fire complex, the Ellen you lightning incident in the North Bay. This set of fires has burned 215,000 acres killed at least five people and injured several others. Cal Fire Division chief Ben Nickel says it's an example of how under resourced the state is in battling massive fires. Right now, we came into this event short on crews and to begin with and now with the fire activity across the state, they're even more at a premium. One of the fires in the Ellen you fires is just west of Healdsburg, an area Cal fire says It's now prioritising. You heard my colleague Rachel Myrow reporting for NPR a moment ago on a set of fires in Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties. Firefighters are also focusing on a group of about 20 fires along the eastern edge of the Bay Area. Called the EU lightning complex that has scorched over 157,000 acres since Sunday morning, and his 5% contained Cal fire says the Lightning sparked wildfires are burning across a vast area of rugged terrain in the hot, dry and breezy weather is adding to the challenge. Agency spokesman Jake Miller says that overnight humidity levels usually go up and slow down the spread of fires. That's not happening now, and that's making the fire burned for 24 hours a day and not really allowing firefighters to catch up or get in front of the plane. To first responders have suffered minor injuries. Evacuation orders are in place in pockets of Santa Clara, Alameda and Stanislas counties. I'm Brian, What news?.

NPR News NPR Rachel Myrow Postmaster General Luis de Joy Senate Windsor Johnston California Boston Postal Service Steve Inskeep Santa Cruz North Islands Bay Area Casey Musgraves EU President Trump San Francisco Bay Deborah Vera Kurt Cara Paisa executive
"cara paisa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:36 min | 8 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Good morning In a Democratic convention speech, Joe Biden asserted. The nation has a great purpose, which he promised to restore, he said quote I will be an ally of the light out of the darkness. It's morning edition from NPR news. Coming up the story of Postmaster General Luis de Joy who turned his dad's trucking company into a big corporation and became a big GOP donor. I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm David Greene to Joy appears before a Senate panel today. We're asking voters what keeps them up at night in 2020. And this morning, we go to Navajo Nation to meet Deborah Vera's, a schoolteacher and a single mother of six. Also a challenge for schools here in L. A. As they try to reopen in person. They need more nurses for covert testing. It's Friday, August 21st country musician Casey must graves is 32 theme news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. Joe Biden has formally accepted the Democratic presidential nomination, accusing President Trump of cloaking the country into much anger, Fear and division. Here and now I give you my word. If you and trust me with the presidency, I will draw on the best of us, not the worst. I'll be an ally of the light. Not the darkness. It's time for us for we, the people to come together. Biden's 22 minute acceptance speech came on the final night of the party's virtual national convention. Biden turns 78 in November. If successful, he would be the oldest president ever elected in the US The Republican National Convention kicks off next week. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy is to appear before a Senate committee today. Lawmakers have questions about recent changes implemented at the U. S Postal Service and how they might affect the November presidential election amid an expected surgeon mail in ballots. Separately, NPR's Kelsey Snell says House Democrats believe the Postal Services Board of Governors skirted background checks when they hired to joy for the top job to Democrats on the House Oversight Committee have sent a letter questioning Postal Service Board of Governors member John Barger about his influence over the process. Representatives Raja Krishnamurthy and Katie Porter site former postal officials who say Barger at a Louis to joy to the candidate pool, circumventing an outside hiring firm contracted to find candidates and conduct background checks. Julie had been a major donor to the Trump campaign. Now he's under scrutiny for changes he's made at the Postal Service that have slowed mail delivery and cause concerns about the ability to process a surgeon mail in ballots ahead of the November election. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington Later today, a federal judge in Massachusetts will be sentencing actress Lori Laughlin and her husband as a result of the FBI's college admissions, cheating investigation. Kurt Cara Pezzo with member station WGBH in Boston, says Lachlan and fashion designer Massimo JIA. Newly could spend months behind bars were paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to get their daughters admitted to the University of Southern California. The couple has pleaded guilty to funneling a half million dollars through a phony charity to have their two daughters recruited to the University of Southern California crude team even though neither of them actually wrote Lachlan and generally are the most prominent among dozens of parents, coaches and other hired officials charged in the massive college admission scheme. The sentencing will be held on the line, and the court says it's had the increase its video capacity on zoom. Rick Singer, the ringleader behind the scheme has already pleaded guilty and is cooperating with the government's investigation for NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara Paisa in Boston. This is NPR news from Washington. The Trump Administration has formally submitted a complaint to the U. N. Security Council, accusing Iran of breaching terms of the 2015 nuclear agreement. As Linda Facil O reports, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is urging the U. N to reimpose full sanctions on Tehran. The U. N Security Council has one month to adopt a resolution calling for the renewal of sanctions relief to Iran in order to prevent a snap back of sanctions, however, the U. S can and is expected to veto such a proposal. Meanwhile, Russia and China maintained the U. S. Doesn't have the right to pursue snapback sanctions since it withdrew from the nuclear agreement in 2018, U. S allies Britain, France and Germany agree with, UM, although they have formally accused Tehran of violating the nuclear accord. A power clashes are expected in the council in the coming weeks, and a few countries have signal they might not implement sanctions if they are restored for NPR News and Linda Sue Low in New York. At least four deaths are being reported by authorities in northern California, where multiple wildfires continue burning out of control. They include fatalities in Napa and Solano counties in the San Francisco Bay area. Or than two dozen injuries are reported. Some have been firefighters a state forestry and fire protection spokesman says 50,000 homes are threatened in the state by more than two dozen large wildfires being fanned by gusty winds. Wall Street futures are lower this morning, down futures or down eight points. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR News in.

NPR News Joe Biden Washington Postmaster General Luis de Joy Dave Mattingly Senate Kelsey Snell NPR Postal Service Boston John Barger Steve Inskeep GOP U. S Postal Service University of Southern Califor Postal Service Board of Govern Postal Services Board of Gover President Trump Kirk Cara Paisa David Greene
"cara paisa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:36 min | 8 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. Joe Biden has formally accepted the Democratic presidential nomination, accusing President Trump of cloaking the country into much anger, Fear and division. Here and now I give you my word. If you and trust me with the presidency, I will draw on the best of us, not the worst. I'll be an ally of the light. Not the darkness. It's time for us for we, the people to come together. Biden's 22 minute acceptance speech came on the final night of the party's virtual national convention. Biden turns 78 in November. If successful, he would be the oldest president ever elected in the US The Republican National Convention kicks off next week. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy is to appear before a Senate committee today. Lawmakers have questions about recent changes implemented at the U. S Postal Service and how they might affect the November presidential election amid an expected surgeon mail in ballots. Separately, NPR's Kelsey Snell says House Democrats believe the Postal Services Board of Governors skirted background checks when they hired to joy for the top job to Democrats on the House Oversight Committee have sent a letter questioning Postal Service Board of Governors member John Barger about his influence over the process. Representatives Raja Krishnamurthy and Katie Porter site forward postal officials who say Barger at the Louis to joy to the candidate pool, circumventing an outside hiring firm contracted to find candidates and conduct background checks to joy had been a major donor to the Trump campaign. Now he's under scrutiny for changes he's made at the Postal Service that have slowed mail delivery and cause concerns about the ability to process a surgeon mail in ballots ahead of the November election. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington Later today, a federal judge in Massachusetts will be sentencing actress Lori Laughlin and her husband as a result of the FBI's college admissions, cheating investigation. Kurt Cara Pezzo with member station WGBH in Boston, says Lachlan and fashion designer Massimo JIA. Newly could spend months behind bars were paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to get their daughters admitted to the University of Southern California. The couple has pleaded guilty to funneling a half million dollars through a phony charity to have their two daughters recruited to the University of Southern California crude team even though neither of them actually wrote Lachlan and generally are the most prominent among dozens of parents, coaches and other hired officials charged in the massive college admission scheme. The sentencing will be held on the line, and the court says it's had to increase its video capacity on zoom Rick Singer, the ringleader behind the scheme has already pleaded guilty and is cooperating with the government's investigation for NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara Paisa in Boston. This is NPR news from Washington. The Trump Administration has formally submitted a complaint to the U. N. Security Council, accusing Iran of breaching terms of the 2015 nuclear agreement. As Linda Facil O reports, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is urging the U. N to reimpose full sanctions on Tehran. The U. N Security Council has one month to adopt a resolution calling for the renewal of sanctions relief to Iran in order to prevent a snap back of sanctions, however, the U. S can and is expected to veto such a proposal. Meanwhile, Russia and China maintained the U. S. Doesn't have the right to pursue snapback sanctions since it withdrew from the nuclear agreement in 2018, U. S allies Britain, France and Germany agree with, UM, although they have formally accused Tehran violating the nuclear accord. Take power. Clashes are expected in the council in the coming weeks, and a few countries have signal they might not implement sanctions if they are restored for NPR News and Linda Sue Low in New York. At least four deaths are being reported by authorities in northern California, where multiple wildfires continue burning out of control. They include fatalities in Napa and Solano counties in the San Francisco Bay area. Or than two dozen injuries are reported. Some have been firefighters a state forestry and fire protection spokesman says 50,000 homes are threatened in the state by more than two dozen large wildfires being fanned by gusty winds. Wall Street futures are lower this morning. Down futures are down eight points. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR News in.

NPR News Joe Biden U. S Postal Service Washington President Trump Dave Mattingly Kelsey Snell NPR U. N Security Council Boston Postal Service Board of Govern Postal Services Board of Gover University of Southern Califor Tehran Kirk Cara Paisa U. S John Barger Trump Administration
"cara paisa" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:06 min | 9 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Windsor Johnston. President. Trump continues to claim without evidence that mail in balloting would lead to voter fraud in the November election. Speaking at the White House today, Trump said, the nation's voting system is not equipped for it. We don't have a rigged election. I know that And you have to be very careful when you mentioned As you constantly do, Russia or you mentioned China or you mentioned Iran or others. That attack are Election system, and when you have this mail in voting, it's a very susceptible. It's is something that can be easily attacked. The president was abruptly evacuated from tonight's press briefing by the Secret Service after a shooting was reported outside of the White House. Trump returned a short time later, saying that authorities had shot a suspect. The White House was briefly put on lock down following the incident. Judging California is ordering that ride sharing ABS, uber and lift reclassify. It's hundreds of thousands of drivers in the state as full time employees. NPR's Bobby Allen reports. The ruling is a setback for the companies, which have long defended treating its drivers as independent contractors. California Superior Judge Ethan Schulman ruled that uber and lifts thousands of contract driver should be given the same protections and benefits under labor law as other full time employees. Last year, California passed a law to protect gig workers. It made it more difficult for tech companies to hire contractors for full time work, but uber and left say the law does not apply to them. Shulman says that is not true. Writing that the companies are depriving legions of workers of the basic protections given to them under state labor law, uber and lift say they plan to appeal. The companies say drivers prefer the flexibility their contractor status gives them. Bobby Allen. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco A national survey shows that 40% of first year college students say they plan to stay home this fall because of the Corona virus pandemic. For Cara Paisa of member station W. T V. H reports. Of the 1800 students contacted for the study, four in 10 are likely or highly likely not to attend any college this fall. The trend includes highly selective colleges like Harvard, which announced last week that 20% of freshman differed enrollment. Jason Simon is CEO of Simpson Scarborough, which conducted the survey. It's just a really, really highly volatile time. There's still a lot of students who are rethinking what their plans are and are Waiting. For the last minute to try to make any of those decisions. That might be because the survey also found that a vast majority of students don't trust other students to follow public health guidelines for NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara paisa in Boston at the close on Wall Street. Today, the Dow was up 357 points. This is NPR news, and this is Casey AR W News on a Monday, August 10th on Larry Parole. Thanks so much for being with us this afternoon issue thing Rather, here's what's happening at 70 for health officials said today that L. A county continues to make progress and slowing the spread of the Corona virus Hospitalizations. And deaths, especially keep trending down. Daily Hospitalizations are now averaged about 1600 patients. They averaged 1900 just last week L a once accounted for more than half the deaths statewide, fueled by nursing home fatalities. Now the county makes up less than half the deaths. Here's Barbara Ferrer, who heads the public Health Department. This progress that we've made is essential as we continue building what we call our new normal. This month so that we can get to a point where we're able to reopen our schools for in person learning, and more of our neighbors are able to get back to work for a reconfirmed another 19 deaths from Cove in 19 and more than 1900 confirmed cases today, she said. She believes that these new numbers are accurate and that she was cautiously optimistic. But she stressed that L. A county has not yet received any backlog update from the technical glitches with the state's database. An error involving the state's medical program, and its automated system for renewals has triggered huge drops in coverage. That's despite the governor's executive order earlier this year that was supposed to protect people's access to safety. Net programs during the pandemic Medical provides health insurance to about 12.5 1,000,000 low income Californians. A spokesperson for the California Department of Health Care Services, which oversees the medical program, said it's still assessing this week how many people may have been affected, but that the department had sent notices to 200,000 people. The department also says some benefits have already Been restored. Big changes are coming to the modern day shopping mall with indoor malls closed at the moment due to the pandemic has KCR W's Matt Dillon reports, one Orange County complex is taking a creative approach to retooling retail for the covert era. The high end stores of South Coast Plaza are the camping from the air conditioned indoor mall to a parking garage attached to it. Yes, on the second floor of a parking structure, which counts as an open air venue for retail, you can browse clothes by Dior Crystal from baccarat or Harry Winston Diamonds. The fame. Costa Mesa Malls. Pandemic pivot is called the pavilion. Well, it may be in a parking garage. The wall separating boutiques are permanent, and the floors and furniture plush South Coast Plaza even stocked it with fresh flowers, So they're sent not exhaust fills the air. Shopping at the pavilion is by appointment only mask required customers contact the stores. They're interested in browsing and tell them what they'd like to see. The store sets up shop in a boutique space in the pavilion and at the agreed upon time, the customer and a concierge Mito look at merchandise or try it on at this case. Yardley's Matt Dillon reporting, Disney is taking a step back amid a surge of Corona virus cases in Florida. Disney says it'll reduce operating hours and all four of its Florida attractions but not right away. The shorter schedules will begin next month and last through October. That's according to the Hollywood reporter. L. A is mourning the loss of a dream maker, a man named Julio Gosden ski. If you've ridden the old timey carousel at Griffith Park, you probably met, maybe even saw him. He started working.

Trump White House California NPR Bobby Allen President Matt Dillon California Department of Healt Florida Cara Paisa Windsor Johnston South Coast Plaza Disney Harvard Jason Simon Kirk Cara
"cara paisa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:28 min | 9 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From W. H Y Y in Philadelphia. I'm Terry Gross with fresh air. One of the summer's hit films streaming, of course, is the old guard. Today we talked with the director Gina Prince Bythewood, The first black woman to direct an adaptation of a comic book movie is about a small group of immortal warriors who have lived for centuries. They have been killed many times, but their wounds heal and they spring back to life. But they experienced the pain of each death. Thie oldest, played by Charlie's. Therein is feeling despair because in spite of their efforts, there is still so much war, famine and suffering. Prince Spieth would also directed love and back. A hyper sexualized image first. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston. President. Trump continues to claim without evidence that mail in balloting would lead to voter fraud in the November election. Speaking at the White House today, Trump said, the nation's voting system is not a quid for it. We don't have a rigged election. I know that and you have to be very careful when you mentioned As you constantly do, Russia or you mentioned China or you mentioned Iran or others that attack our election system. And when you have this Mail in voting. It's a very susceptible it's something that can be easily attacked. The president was abruptly evacuated from tonight's press briefing by the Secret Service after a shooting was reported outside of the White House. Trump returned a short time later, saying that authorities had shot the suspect. The White House was briefly put on lock down following the incident. A judging California is ordering that ride sharing ABS, uber and lift reclassify. It's hundreds of thousands of drivers in the state as full time employees. NPR's Bobby Allen reports. The ruling is a setback for the companies, which have long defended treating its drivers as independent contractors. California Superior Judge Ethan Shulman ruled that uber and lifts thousands of contract driver should be given the same protections and benefits under labor law as other full time employees. Last year, California passed a law to protect gig workers. It made it more difficult for tech companies to hire contractors for full time work, but uber and left say the law does not apply to them. Shulman says that is not true writing that the companies are depriving legions of workers of the basic protections given to them under state labor law. Uber and lift say they plan to appeal. The companies say drivers prefer the flexibility their contractor status gives them. Bobby Allen, NPR NEWS San Francisco and National survey shows that 40% of first year college students say they plan to stay home this fall because of the Corona virus pandemic. Her Cara Pensa of member station. WGBH reports of the 1800 students contacted for the study for in 10 are likely or highly likely not to attend any college this fall. The trend includes highly selective colleges like Harvard, which announced last week that 20% of freshman differed enrollment. Jason Simon is CEO of Simpson Scarborough, which conducted the survey. It's just a really, really highly volatile time. There's still a lot of students who are rethinking what their plans are and are waiting for the last minute to try to make any of those decisions. That might be because the survey also found that a vast majority of students don't trust other students to follow public health guidelines for NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara paisa in Boston at the close on Wall Street. Today, the Dow was up 357 points. This is NPR news. Live from the news. I'm terrorist. Siler Governor Gavin Newsom today shed little light on yesterday's sudden resignation of his state public health director. Cuties politics editor Scott Shaffer note. She was on the job less than a year. Dr Sonya Angel was a key part of the health team battling the pandemic. Her resignation email to department staff said little about why she left. But it came less than a week after a serious glitch in the state's computer system for tracking positive test results for covert 19 glitch. Newsome said he didn't know about when he announced a decline and positivity rates last week. We would not have put out those data points had we known that so by definition, we weren't aware I was unaware was made aware later that he Evening, Newsome said. The backlog of nearly 300,000 test results has now been cleared. And it appears the rate of positive test results is in fact dropping. I'm Scott Shaffer news. Security announced 20 layoffs today, representing roughly 5% of our workforce. A number of other employees had their hours reduced. The nonprofits leadership blamed a sharp decline in corporate sponsorship due to the Corona virus pandemic. The organization's science department lost three journalists leading ladies Corona virus coverage in an email to staff President and CEO Michael Disip said recent cost saving measures were not enough. To offset the need to lay some people off in the next fiscal year, which starts in October. Membership revenue, which held steady this year, is expected to drop next year to maintain editorial independence. No one from senior leadership team has reviewed this report. I'm Tara Siler in Oakland. This's news. Thanks. Terra Support for NPR comes from the Chris Key Foundation, expanding opportunities in America's cities through grant making and social investing More at Chris Key dot or GE. And by the listeners of Tomorrow's temperatures under sunny skies. Eventually, it'll clear out. Looks like it should get up to 78 Mountain view tomorrow. Conquered, expecting 88 is a should see high of 80 here in San Francisco. We're expecting a high of 64 tomorrow. This is cake. Public radio. It's seven or six now..

NPR Trump White House Bobby Allen California Ethan Shulman President Scott Shaffer director San Francisco Terry Gross Newsome Philadelphia Gina Prince Bythewood Charlie President and CEO Cara Pensa
"cara paisa" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:51 min | 9 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on KPCC

"The country is significant. We want to hear from you if you're worried about how this is affecting your kids, Are you concerned? They're losing out on much more than just their education. Comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at once. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Winter Johnston President Trump continues to claim without evidence that mail in balloting would lead to voter fraud in the November election. Speaking at the White House today, Trump said, the nation's voting system is not equipped for it. We don't have a rigged election. I know that And you have to be very careful when you mentioned A CZ. You constantly do Russia or you mentioned China or you mentioned Iran or others. That attack are Election system, and when you have this mail in voting, it's a very susceptible. It's is something that can be easily attacked. The president was abruptly evacuated from tonight's press briefing by the Secret Service after a shooting was reported outside of the White House. Trump returned a short time later, saying that authorities had shot the suspect. The White House was briefly put on lock down following the incident. A judging California is ordering that ride sharing ABS, uber and lift reclassify. It's hundreds of thousands of drivers in the state as full time employees. NPR's Bobby Allen reports. The ruling is a setback for the companies, which have long defended treating its drivers as independent contractors. California Superior Judge Ethan Schulman ruled that uber and lifts thousands of contract driver should be given the same protections and benefits under labor law as other full time employees. Last year, California passed a law to protect gig workers. It made it more difficult for tech companies to hire contractors for full time work. But uber and lift say the law does not apply to them, Shulman says that is not true. Writing that the companies are depriving legions of workers of the basic protections given to them under state labor law, uber and lift say they plan to appeal. The companies say drivers prefer the flexibility their contractor status gives them. Bobby Allen. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco A national survey shows that 40% of first year college students say they plan to stay home this fall because of the Corona virus pandemic. Her Cara Pensa of member station, WGBH reports. Of the 1800 students contacted for the study, for in 10 are likely or highly likely not to attend any college this fall. The trend includes highly selective colleges like Harvard, which announced last week that 20% of freshman differed enrollment. Jason Simon is CEO of Simpson Scarborough, which conducted the survey. It's just a really, really highly volatile time. There's still a lot of students who are rethinking what their plans are, and are waiting for the last minute to try to make any of those decisions. That might be because the survey also found that a vast majority of students don't trust other students to follow public health guidelines for NPR news anchor Cara Paisa in Boston. At the close on Wall Street. Today, the Dow was up 357 points. This is NPR news and from KPCC News on Nick Roman with the stories we're covering at 704 Los Angeles County has more than 210,000 known Corona virus cases, but the actual count might be far higher. KPCC Junkie 48 says We're still waiting for complete numbers after a major glitch with the state's data gathering system. The system that tracks California's Cove in 19 cases has been fixed, but there is a backlog of 295,000 records that needs to be reviewed by county health departments. It's unclear how many of those cases are from Ella, but officials say the data should be available later this week. Ellie County's public health director, Barbara Ferrer, said other metrics like lower hospitalizations. Make her cautiously optimistic. The pattern is, cases are slightly down. The positivity rate looks like it's slightly down, and hospitalizations are also down as well. All good news for Allah County Forever said the number of people dying every day has remained stable at about 37. Since the pandemic began, nearly 5000 Angelenos have died from the Corona virus. Covering health. I'm Jackie 40. A Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia, who lost his mother to cover 19 last month, has now lost his stepfather, 58 year old Gregg O'Donnell, died Sunday he'd been in the hospital with a severe case of covert 19 for weeks. It was on a ventilator for much of that time. You've been married to Garcia's mother, Gabby for 27 years. In a statement, Mayor Garcia described O'Donnell as a goodhearted man and the best husband. Our mom could have ever hoped for..

NPR California President Trump White House Bobby Allen Robert Garcia Gregg O'Donnell Facebook Washington Cara Pensa Winter Johnston Barbara Ferrer Harvard Jason Simon Secret Service WGBH
"cara paisa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:21 min | 9 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The comedian Chelsea already knows how to make pretty much anything. She does hilarious like her standup comedy. Her former character Gina on the show, Brooklyn 99 So how did she pull off the comic relief when her new movie involves a single woman who is about to turn 40 and worried she's going to end up alone? Find out in just a minute. Plus, the world usually seems to agree that pretty much everything Beyonc does is astonishing Songs, choreography, videos using music to call for Social justice. Her latest project is getting less of a glowing review Our cue this music channel will discuss that's all coming up on cue. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston. President. Trump continues to claim without evidence that mail in balloting would lead to voter fraud in the November election. Speaking at the White House today, Trump said, the nation's voting system is not equipped for it. We don't have a rigged election. I know that And you have to be very careful when you mentioned A CZ. You constantly do Russia or you mentioned China or you mentioned Iran or others. That attack are Election system, and when you have this mail in voting, it's a very susceptible. It's is something that can be easily attacked. The president was abruptly evacuated from tonight's press briefing by the Secret Service after a shooting was reported outside of the White House. Trump returned a short time later, saying that authorities had shot a suspect. The White House was briefly put on lock down following the incident. A judging California is ordering that ride sharing ABS, uber and lift reclassify. It's hundreds of thousands of drivers in the state as full time employees. NPR's Bobby Allen reports. The ruling is a setback for the companies, which have long defended treating its drivers as independent contractors. California Superior Judge Ethan Schulman ruled that uber and lifts thousands of contract drivers should be given the same protections and benefits under labor law as other full time employees. Last year, California passed a law to protect gig workers. It made it more difficult for tech companies to hire contractors for full time work. But uber and lift say the law does not apply to them. Shulman says that is not true writing that the companies are depriving legions of workers of the basic protections given to them under state labor law. Uber and lift say they plan to appeal. The companies say drivers prefer the flexibility their contractor status gives them. Bobby Allen, NPR NEWS San Francisco and National survey shows that 40% of first year college students say they plan to stay home this fall because of the Corona virus pandemic. For Cara Paisa of member station, WGBH reports. Of the 1800 students contacted for the study, for in 10 are likely or highly likely not to attend any college this fall. The trend includes highly selective colleges like Harvard, which announced last week that 20% of freshman differed enrollment. Jason Simon is CEO of Simpson Scarborough, which conducted the survey. It's just a really, really highly volatile time. There's still a lot of students who are rethinking what their plans are and are Waiting. For the last minute to try to make any of those decisions. That might be because the survey also found that a vast majority of students don't trust other students to follow public health guidelines for NPR news. I'm Kirk Cara paisa in Boston at the close on Wall Street. Today, the Dow was up 357 points. This is NPR news. This is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm Lance. Lucky New Jersey's long term care facilities will start lifting restrictions, allowing indoor visits and resuming some activities for residents after months on lock down The state will allow essential caregivers to spend time indoors with residents who have either tested negative for covert, 19 are asymptomatic or have recovered from the virus. Previously on Ly outdoor visits were allowed. State Health Commissioner Judy Person, Kelly says facilities that made safety benchmarks can resume activities like limited indoor dining, haircuts and outdoor outings. We recognize and appreciate that contact with family, friends and fellow residents. Is essential for the emotional, emotional well being of nursing home residents. State is also providing state and federal dollars to support facilities and increased pay for certified nurse's. Voters in Connecticut will head to the polls tomorrow to take part in the state's primaries and choose their party's nominees for offices ranging from President on down to registrar of voters. WNYC sees our own Venugopal has more On top of everything else. Connecticut residents have been dealing with power outages from nearly a week. Tens of thousands of people are still in the dark, but good government groups are cautiously optimistic that the state's primary will go off smoothly. Point to the utility company ever source, which has promised to restore power to nearly everyone by tomorrow, and they're reassured by the 300,000 or so absentee ballots that were requested for the primary. It's 10 times the usual number, which means many voters have already cast their ballots and also that the results of the primary likely won't be.

Trump President White House NPR California Bobby Allen Connecticut Cara Paisa Chelsea Gina WNYC Windsor Johnston Brooklyn Harvard Washington
"cara paisa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:02 min | 9 months ago

"cara paisa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Also recommend strict limits on social behavior. The pandemic poses an existential threat to many cast wrapped residential colleges and summer, reversing course on they're reopening plans. In part because of the cost associated with testing and other safety precautions. In Boston students already arriving back on campus. Thousands more are expected in the next 2 to 6 weeks. But it's unclear how many exactly for NPR news I'm Kirk Cara paisa in Boston. A new survey shows a rebound in U. S manufacturing following a sharp slowdown last spring. Details from NPR. Scott Horsefly, the survey shows. Both factory orders and production accelerated last month, continuing a rebound that began in June after a three month slop as the Corona virus took hold in the United States. Surveys suggest factory employment is still feeling negative effects the pandemic, But July's reading showed improvement from the previous month. Manufacturers in a variety of industries report business is picking up, but Warren prospects for the future remained very uncertain. Some report extra cost for safety measures designed to keep factory workers healthy. Food and beverage manufacturers are enjoying some of the strongest demand while factories that make transportation equipment continue to struggle. Scott Horsefly NPR NEWS Washington Wall Street stocks closed higher Monday, The Dow gained 236 points. U. S futures are mixed in after hours trading. This is NPR news. A Fed survey shows US banks tightened their standards for all types of loans in the second quarter loan officer side in a range of reasons, including a deterioration or potential, declining capital decrease liquidity in the secondary market. And concerns about legislative policy changes. The feds surveyed loan officers at 75 domestic banks as well as 22 US branches and agencies of foreign banks. The Trump Administration aid has been fired over her tweets against gay marriage and LGBTQ rights. That story from NPR's Michelle Kelemen merit. Corrigan served as a White House liaison for the U. S Agency for International Development and has been the subject of controversy for her anti LGBTQ views. In a Siri's of tweets. Corrigan accuses the media and Democrats of attacking her for her Christian beliefs. Let me be clear, she writes. Gay marriage isn't marriage Men aren't women, and she claims that the US is losing influence because quote we refused to help countries who don't celebrate sexual deviancy. A spokesperson for Yusa says merit Gorgon is no longer an employee at the agency. House Democrats said her history of homophobic and xenophobic rhetoric created a hostile environment. Michelle Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington President. Trump says his administration plans to sue Nevada over a new law to send mail in ballots to every voter in the state. Trump has repeatedly claimed without proof that voting by mail will lead to rampant.

NPR United States Corrigan Scott Horsefly Michelle Kelemen Trump Boston U. S Yusa Kirk Cara Nevada Washington Warren Siri White House liaison U. S Agency for International President officer