8 Burst results for "Cara Anna"

"cara anna" Discussed on Up First

Up First

04:37 min | 4 months ago

"cara anna" Discussed on Up First

"And i met another haitian thirty four year. Old roman son canan at the greyhound bus stop. It's out of del rio gas station. He was headed for san antonio. He was a lot more coy about why. And how he got to. Del rio He too had been living in chile since two thousand nineteen and he said he traveled to ten countries to get here. He was with two small children and his wife and he did not want to say why or who was helping him. Get all the way to texas right Just in a couple of seconds. What's the mexican government doing right now. In this crisis share the mexican immigration officials have begun removing people from the mexican side of the border in. See that a kunia. That's across the river from del. Rio there were predawn raids on hotels in a park in the town and authorities are flying in bussing migrants out of the town and even flying back to southern mexico or expelling them to guatemala. Npr's carrie kahn reporting from the mexican side of the border near del. Rio thank you. You're welcome all right. We go next to ethiopia where people in the northern region of gray are victims twice over once because of the civil war there and now because of the ensuing famine. Let's go through some of the background here. The war is between ethiopia's government and rebel fighters for about three decades. These rebels were a dominant force in ethiopia. Politics than a new president took office in two thousand eighteen and things changed. He started to strip that group of its power and influence and the rebels retreated to their stronghold in tigray which is when the war broke out like every war. People are caught in the middle. The un accuses the leaders of choking off the region from medical supplies and fuel and food and the associated press has now obtained internal documents and witness accounts that confirm people there are dying of starfish. The ap's east africa reporter. Carolina joins us now from nairobi in the neighboring country of kenya. Cara thank you so much for being with us q. Describe just what you're seeing. What are the living conditions right now. In tigray hi good morning. Thank you for this. That's a challenging question. Because at the moment the tigray region is under a blackout. it's a humanitarian blockade according to the united nations. But it's also incredibly difficult to watch and to see just what's happening on the ground. There is no phone service. No internet very little transport and so what we have been doing. Journalists are reporting from from afar. Really we are trying to speak to. People who have recently traveled to the region people have very limited internet access and who have been despite the fear of government retaliation despite the fear of perhaps losing their humanitarian access. They have spoken with us and they have described increasingly grim conditions in recent weeks where people yes have begun starving to death because there's essentially no food aid entering the region anymore. There's no fuel entering the region That's the case for. I think more than a month now and also medical supplies so people who have been weakened and this is a reasonably of like six million people people who have been weakened by the war months of war almost a europe are not getting what they need to continue going on and they're dying carol. What are these internal documents witness accounts i mean. Is this just more of of what you just described. What's in those accounts. Sure sure one aid group share with us some internal documents that showed that In more than twenty districts where they operate in the region people are starving to death. We also spoke with someone else who witnessed a child and the child's mother both severely malnourished dying last week and the newborn baby. Wade's one point seven pounds We also spoke with a hospital director a former hospital director who is now outside the region but is in touch with colleagues who sent us some very striking photographs. Children who are severely malnourished and again no international aid can get an journalists are forced to report abroad on this worsening crisis cara anna reporting from neighboring nairobi. Kenya we appreciate you. Thank you and that is up. I for this thursday. September twenty third. I'm rachel martin and i'm steve. Inskeep join us

canan del rio gas station ethiopia mexican government carrie kahn tigray del Del rio chile san antonio guatemala Npr Rio east africa nairobi texas mexico Cara associated press kenya
"cara anna" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:24 min | 4 months ago

"cara anna" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

"Ember wave. Just press for relief. The united nations is warning of famine in the tigray region of ethiopia. A mother and newborn weighing just one point seven pounds died from hunger at alston last week. The government is accused of refusing to allow food and medical supplies and fuel from getting into this region all of which is happening in a place. That's in a civil war with the central government. The ap's east africa reporter cara. Anna is in nairobi in covering this story. Welcome hi thank you for speaking with me. As best you can determine why is sufficient food not reaching that region This has gone on for almost a year but there was a significant reversal in june. When the tigray fighters retook most of the region at that point ethiopia sort of withdrew their soldiers and declared what they call the humanitarian ceasefire. However what we found is that it's far from the case. Actually the region is now cut off more than ever from the world and that includes In this humanitarian workers and others very very little almost no humanitarian aid is now getting in no medical supplies at least for the past month fuel for the past month And then food. Warehouses are going empty. And this is because you know people say ethiopia's government is just scared that this aid. Instead of going to civilians it'll go to the tigray fighters and people are now dying because of it. Is there evidence that the ethiopian military is effectively. Trying to starve the rebels out then That's actually what people are saying. This is less a military decision but a decision by ethiopia's government. It's senior leadership Just the concerns that the you know they just don't want anything To the extent that even humanitarian workers were boarding these rare flights to the region. They're giving this. They are given this list of things that they are not allowed to bring including personal medication. Multivitamins things like nail clippers and that sort of to us. We included that in the story because that really demonstrated the the level. You know just the the concern that of getting anything to these fighters however you have. Millions of civilians are now being affected. They are going hungry. Windows aid workers come back out. What kinds of stories to tell We have spoken to people Who are describing. Just the effects of this include such things as latrines in crowded displacement camps are overflowing because cash has gone banking services. Cut off. people can't bring much cash to the region so they can't pay people just simply clean toilets and of course that you know can greatly increase. The the people could be getting sick in these camps because of that sanitation is going down because food is running out. People are having to rely increasingly on local communities who can barely afford to feed themselves at this point. These are just some of the things that we're starting to hear. I'm glad that you mentioned displacement camps. There are plenty of people who've been displaced by this year of fighting. Are people at this point able to flee the region entirely. I would say that's increasingly difficult. You saw people early in the war. Thousands of about sixty thousand go into neighboring sudan but now that way is essentially blocked off by by fighters of various kinds so it's increasingly difficult. Just just to leave and so you have is you have this large diaspora around the world especially in the united states who are saying that for weeks and even months. They have no idea what's happened to their families. They don't know if if they're alive or dead and in some cases you know this this weight and this worry has gone on for nearly a year. you know a lot of times in con conflict zones anymore. We get lots of information. From people's phones people will send out videos. People will call out. Is that not happening as much here. The we'll tell the community telecommunications are cut off and there's a very very little internet access so at the moment that ukraine region is is sort of just this black hole more than ever and cara anna of the associated press. Thanks for your reporting really appreciate it. Thank you support for. Npr and the following message come from wise. The modern.

ethiopia tigray alston east africa cara central government nairobi united nations the associated press Anna clippers sudan united states cara anna ukraine Npr
"cara anna" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"cara anna" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Three dollars a month sprint ninety two dollars a month that's what the average family of four is saving a month by switching to pure talk USA your talk will give you unlimited talk text and two gigs of data all for just twenty dollars a month go to pure talk USA dot com enter the promo code half off and you'll save an additional fifty percent off your first month here tuck USA dot com promo code half off beer took USA simply smarter wireless corresponding cara Anna reports a global campaign to win malaria is warning the covert nineteen pandemic is hurting the production and supply of needed rapid testing kits and drugs as the rainy season begins in Africa the statement mentions that the demand for Kopet nineteen testing kids and potential drugs is creating shortages of malaria testing kits and also what they call active pharmaceutical ingredients used in malaria medicines the statement though doesn't mention hydroxy chloride Clint which president Donald Trump has aggressively pushed humanitarian workers and medical personnel believe the corona virus is spreading unchecked and on track through Sudan's most marginalized territory where medical facilities and few are few and far between and we're eaters of conflict of left some one point six million people crammed in two camps breaking news and analysis at town hall dot com there are worries communities are falling behind in filling out the twenty twenty census the center for urban research says the response rate early this month for black dominant neighborhoods what's fifty one percent that compares to just under fifty four percent for Hispanic concentrated neighborhoods in sixty five and a half percent for white dominant neighborhoods the national urban league is concerned that black immigrants blacks in rural communities previously incarcerated men and women and children under age four will be best the census helps determine where a trillion and a half dollars in federal funding goes and how many congressional seats each state caps on my campus apple like many other major U. S. retailer shut down all of its U. S. locations in March because of the corona virus now it's going to shut down eleven stores in Arizona Florida North Carolina and South Carolina because of a spike more the stories a townhall dot com I'm Rhonda roster Pat Boone here for the folks at Swiss America rock solid foundations are vital in life and business and in finance because in the end only what we built on a firm foundation will withstand the storms of life today the economic storms are raging in the foundations of.

"cara anna" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:50 min | 3 years ago

"cara anna" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He wanted to find the rest of the body. But in every direction were scattered colonels in stocks, bleached by the sun at a glance much, the landscape, look like bones that is the voice there of Associated Press reporter CARA Anna, reading from her latest story, she's been following one man who's been helping survivors in Mozambique cope with death after cyclone that was the worst storm ever to hit southern Africa. The death toll in Mozambique alone is estimated to be more than six hundred and climbing. I asked CARA how she came across Stephen fund Secca with the Red Cross. I I came across him in one of the statements that aid organizations were making shortly after the cyclone. Hit. Everybody was trying to get a handle on how bad the damage was how many people were affected how many people were lost. And I'm sure the international committee of the Red Cross had a statement mentioning they had forensic investigator on the ground, and that piqued my interest. It wasn't something. I'm mmediately got to. But on the second trip to Mozambique. We caught up with him and manage to follow him for a couple of days, just the image. You paint of him hoping that he can find a small child's skull. I can you just tell me what what his job is. And what is mission is he stays in South Africa? He is the forensic coordinator for the African continent with the international committee of the Red Cross and in Mozambique. He was the only frantically trained body recovery specialists searching rural Mozambique after the cyclone hit and how much time did you spend with him. We were there for a couple of days in rural Mozambique, we sort of followed him around. I was kind of amazed that he was a bit worried that he wasn't giving us enough material. He had described, you know, waiting through thick mud landscape where crocodiles hippos snakes could pose a threats. He described coming across bodies trees bodies found on islands. But the fact that he was worried that we wouldn't find something sufficiently dramatic just amazed me because his work is so fascinating. And the challenge that he had taken on with just appeared. Staggering to me that he was standing in a this Masefield trying to find a skull of child. It seemed like an impossible task. So I tried to describe that. I guess we should say there's so many important jobs after a disaster. Like this many of them focusing on on people who are fortunately still living. Why does he find this work? So so very important. He thinks it's important to find closure. I think hit the term. He used was ambiguous loss of the idea of families across that region. Never knowing what happened to relatives who were swept away. He wanted as best as possible along with the local communities that he came across the common interest was finding closure being able to tell people for certain what happened to their loved ones. Explained that the this kind of more if you can. Well, he we followed him as he went into different communities first of all introducing himself and his work and distributing some of the just the basic materials to help others who are already doing work in the field. I mean, these filters as he explained or just as interested in in dignified burials, even if the people were strangers even if they had washed up from his far away neighboring symbolically, so one of the first things he wanted to do with simply handout tools to help them long things. Like simple, grave markers gloves masks, tags for bodies just to help them out. And as he did his own work. Of course, he especially when he found this mall shinbone of child he was cancelled in take measurements to write down the information to document what he had found a handle it properly, and in the end place it and it makes ship. Body-bag and bury it with bones fit. He believed also belong to the same child. You mentioned one. I mean, really disturbing thing which is that there were not traditional bodybags for for children's remains. What would he do he took a he took a normal size? I suppose body-bag just so much incredibly larger than the tiny shin bone that he found and essentially cut it into a more manageable size and and put duct tape along the seams. And then he drove the local chief to the grave where the vertebrae with a tiny fine had already been buried, and so they did they're in the hot sun, and they dug it up, and you know, quietly place the second small body bag in with it. The grave marker was already there. And it said, you know in Portuguese. It was written in permanent. Get said don't touch the body of child. This. This is such a different type of story than we often. See after disaster. It's just the sheer numbers and the sheer amount of land in these three countries it was affected. I mean, you've decided to bring us just into one life and profile one person doing one thing was that that experience different for you journalistically. It was a different gosh. It was a different experience for sure I've never followed anyone doing this kind of work, and I've had to reporting trips to Mozambique now on a lot of the work has been focused on the many many people trying to deliver aides to people still alive frantic organized frantic chaos trying to help people survive, and this was a very different quiet experience. But just fascinating to see is there one image or one scene. One moment that stands out for you. After following this man, I think it was just the one in in in the field. It just struck me as is an immense task. And I wanted to bring that to life is as much as possible immediately for people, and he said it himself as he stood me looked around the field. He said this is literally like a needle in a haystack. Thank you so much for your reporting. Thank you very much. Carolina has been reporting in Mozambique for the Associated Press. This.

Mozambique Red Cross Associated Press CARA Anna Stephen fund Secca South Africa Africa reporter coordinator investigator Carolina
"cara anna" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:52 min | 3 years ago

"cara anna" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And lost in the debris of cyclone that had claimed hundreds of lives Stephen fund Secca stood in a field of ruined maze where tiny spine had been found. And he wanted to find the rest of the body, but in every direction were scattered colonels and stocks bleached by the sun at a glance much, the landscape, look like bones. That's the voice of Associated Press reporter CARA Anna, reading from her latest story, she's been following one man who's been helping survivors in Mozambique cope with death after the worst storm ever to hit southern Africa. The death toll in Mozambique alone is estimated to be more than six hundred and climbing. I asked her how she came across even fund seco- from the Red Cross. I I came across him in one of the statements that aid organizations were making shortly after the cyclone hit. Everybody was trying to get a handle on how bad the damage was. How many people were affected how many people were lost? And I'm sure the international committee of the Red Cross had a statement mentioning they had a forensic investigator on the ground, and that piqued my interest. It wasn't something. I'm mmediately got to. But on the second trip to Mozambique. We caught up with him and manage to follow him for a couple of days, just the image. You paint of him hoping that he can find a small child's skull. I mean, can you just tell me what what his job is? And what his mission is he space in South Africa. He is the forensic coordinator for the African continent with the international committee of the Red Cross and in Mozambique. He was the only frantically trained body recovery specialists searching rural Mozambique after the cyclone hit and how much time did you spend with him. We were there for a couple of days in rural Mozambique. We would've followed him around. I was kind of amazed that he was a bit worried that he wasn't giving us enough material. He had described, you know, waiting through thick mud landscape where crocodiles hippos snakes could pose threats. He described coming across bodies and trees bodies found on islands. But the fact that he was worried that we wouldn't find something sufficiently dramatic just amazed me because his work is so fascinating. And the challenge that he had taken on with just appeared. Staggering to me that he was standing in a this Masefield trying to find a skull of child. It seemed like an impossible task. So I tried to describe that. I guess I mean, we should say there's so many important jobs after disaster. Like this many of them focusing on on people who are fortunately still living. Wh why does he find this work? So so very important. He thinks it's important to find closure. I think hit the term. He used was ambiguous loss of the idea of families across that region. Never knowing what happened to relatives who were swept away. He wanted as best as possible along with the local communities that he came across the common interest was finding closure being able to tell people for certain what happened to their loved ones. Explain that the this this kind of work more if you can. Well, he we followed him as he went into different communities first of all introducing himself and his work and distributing some of the just the basic materials to help others who are already doing work in the field. I mean, these villagers as he explained or just as interested in in dignified burials, even if the people were strangers even if they had washed up from his far away neighboring symbolically. So one of the first thing he wanted to do with simply handout tools to help them along things. Like simple, grave markers gloves masks, tags for bodies just to help them out. And as he did his own work. Of course, he especially when he found the small shinbone of child. He was careful take measurements to write down the information to document what he had found a handle it properly, and in the end place it and it makes. By the bag and bury it with bones fit. He believes also belong to the same child. You mentioned one. I mean, really disturbing thing which is that that there were not traditional bodybags for for children's remains. What would he do Kita? He took a normal size. I suppose body-bag just so much incredibly larger than the tiny shin bone that he found and essentially cut it into a more manageable size and put duct tape along the seems and then he drove with the local chiefs to the grave where the vertebrae with a tiny fine had already been buried, and so they that there in the hot sun, and they dug it up, and you know, quietly place the second small body-bag in with it. The grave marker was already there. And it said, you know in Portuguese. It was written in permanent. Get said don't touch the child. This. This is such a different type of story than we often. See after disaster just the sheer numbers and the sheer amount of land in these three countries that was affected. I mean, you've decided to bring us just into one life and profile one person doing one thing was that that experience different for you journalistically. It was different. Gosh. It was different experience for sure I've never followed anyone doing this kind of work, and I've had to reporting trips to Mozambique now on a lot of the work has been focused on the many many people trying to deliver aides to people still alive, you know, frantic organized frantic chaos trying to help people survive, and this was a very different quiet experience. But just fascinating to see is there one image or one scene or one moment that stands out for you. After following this man, I think it was just the one in in in the field. It just struck me as an immense task. And I wanted to bring that to life is is much as possible immediately for people, and he said it himself as he stood me looked around the field. And he said this is literally like a needle in a haystack. Thank you so much for your reporting. Thank you very much. Carolina has been reporting in Mozambique.

Mozambique Red Cross Stephen fund Secca Associated Press CARA Anna South Africa Africa reporter coordinator investigator Carolina
"cara anna" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"cara anna" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Com. I'm Greg Clugston. In washington. There's tension on the streets in the capital city of Venezuela opposition protesters are confronting security forces on a main avenue in Caracas venting their anger over a nationwide blackout. They're protesting shortages of basic necessities and voicing opposition to the government of president Madero. Police are on the scene in riot gear. A police officer is dead after armed assailants attacked any Bola treatment center in eastern Congo. It's the second attack on aid workers in two months. Correspondent cara. Anna reports the latest attack occurred hours before the World Health Organization director general visited the center treatment center does remain open. And he encouraged the workers there to continue the fight to contain. This outbreak Congo has already reported six hundred Ebola deaths. House Republicans have embarked on another effort to raise questions about the origins of the special counsels. Russia investigation Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, the top Republican. On the House Judiciary committee released a transcript Friday night aimed at raising questions about the origins of special counsel, Robert Muller's probe of ties between the Trump campaign and Russia, the transcript was from a private interview with Justice department official, Bruce or according to the transcript as the Associated Press reported in August or toll blah makers, former British spy Christopher Steele told him that Russian intelligence believed it had Trump over a barrel, implying the Russians might have compromising information on Trump or said, he gave that information to FBI and Justice department officials Mike Rossier Washington in Alabama yesterday..

Greg Clugston Trump Congo Russia Christopher Steele special counsel Justice department Representative Doug Collins washington House Judiciary committee Mike Rossier Washington Caracas Robert Muller Madero Venezuela cara Associated Press Ebola president officer
"cara anna" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"cara anna" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Authorities say one police officer has been killed correspondent CARA. Anna reports. The Ebola outbreak is occurring in a region that health workers are comparing to a war zone are dozens of armed groups active in eastern Congo. And in addition this region has never seen a whole outbreak before so you have a population that is quite traumatized wary of outsiders last month assailants forced Doctors Without Borders to suspend its operations. Britain's Home Secretary is facing criticism after the death of a UK teenagers baby in a Syrian camp. The baby's mother who left London as a fifteen year old to join the Islamic state group had pleaded with authorities to return to Britain. But her passport was revoked after. She showed no remorse for affiliating with ISIS. Former UK official Andrew Mitchell reacted. On Sky News if she's left in in. Turkey in the statelessness solve Syria or elsewhere. She will be consulting with people who wish us ill. And it's right that we should take responsibility. The challenge faces other European countries as the final ISIS stronghold in Syria is on the brink of falling giving its fighters and they're often youthful. Spouses, no place left to hide sportswear maker. Adidas says it will give the same bonus to any of its sponsored players on the women's World Cup winning soccer team as their male counterparts. The announcement comes after American players filed a federal discrimination lawsuit against the US soccer federation over equal treatment and pay President Trump met with tornado survivors and first responders in Alabama yesterday..

Britain Syria UK ISIS Adidas Ebola Anna officer Sky News soccer London Congo Turkey Andrew Mitchell US Alabama Secretary Trump President
"cara anna" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"cara anna" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"In eastern Congo has come under attack by armed assailants. Correspondent CARA Anna says it's the second attack on aid workers there in two months. The attack killed one off the therapist the mayor of the Kemba said security forces eventually repelled the attackers. This attack comes just days after the center was attacked in late February and only a few days ago. The center reopened Congo is dealing with the world's second deadliest Ebola outbreak in history with six hundred reported deaths a week after tornadoes ripped through the region. President Trump traveled to storm ravaged Lee county, Alabama, he met with tornado survivors and first responders in a Baptist church. I want to thank everybody. It's been an incredible ordeal. What you've got through the first responders. I've been somebody first responders right here. And you've been incredible law enforcement has been incredible. The top Republican on the House Judiciary committee is raising new questions about the origins of the special counsels Russia investigation, congressman Doug Collins of Georgia released a transcript Friday night of a private interview. With Justice department official, Bruce or in the interview or said, he passed along to FBI and Justice department officials information he learned from former British spy Christopher Steele. Steele had been hired by political research firm to investigate potential ties between then candidate Donald Trump and Russia, but Collins skeptical of steals information calling it unverified and salacious and Collins says the information from Steele is what the FBI used to obtain a secret warrant to monitor communications of Trump campaign aide.

Donald Trump Christopher Steele Doug Collins Congo Justice department FBI CARA Anna Trump Bruce Russia House Judiciary committee Kemba Ebola congressman Baptist church Lee county President Georgia Alabama