35 Burst results for "Cara"

John Kirby Can't Tell Us How Many Afghan 'Refugees' on the Terror Watchlist Have Been Vetted Before Entering U.S.

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:45 sec | 3 weeks ago

John Kirby Can't Tell Us How Many Afghan 'Refugees' on the Terror Watchlist Have Been Vetted Before Entering U.S.

"Back to the analysis of what's happening in kabul in afghanistan. Returning to this this incredible Press conference today from the pentagon. This is john kirby who's asked a question about the tara threat to america as linked to the refugees stream from afghanistan and his response is stunning cup. Ten play cuts and just one more. How many individuals on cara watch lists have been screened or found at any of the screening points. Either in cutter ramstein or in the us. I don't know we'll have to take that question and get back to you know just terrorists. I'll circle back.

John Kirby Afghanistan Kabul Pentagon Tara Ramstein United States
At Least 304 Dead After 7.2-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Haiti

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | Last month

At Least 304 Dead After 7.2-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Haiti

"A. Major earthquake struck southwestern haiti today. Officials say at least three hundred four people were killed. The destruction is described as extensive with entire towns almost completely destroyed. Cara buck is in port-au-prince. She's the acting country director for mercy corps. She says right now. Rescue workers are trying to figure out how best to help survivors. We definitely are still You know trying to get as much information as we can. We do have a team of nineteen based out of meat. So based out of the epicenter that are on the ground and currently assessing the situation. Communications art extremely difficult at the moment You know right when the earthquake hit it was not possible to to call the team. The phone lines were not going through. the earthquake. had a magnitude of seven point two. It was followed by a series of aftershocks

Cara Buck Earthquake Mercy Corps Haiti AU
Collaboration and Podcast Discovery With Niklas Hildebrand, Co-Founder of Audry

Podcast Movement 2021

00:57 sec | Last month

Collaboration and Podcast Discovery With Niklas Hildebrand, Co-Founder of Audry

"One major advantage of calibration is the one you already see on the slide which is a trusted source. Still today the main driver of podcast discovery is what of mouth or social media. Social media often is very close to what friends and family a few others by number three. Dr discovery is actually mentioning on the podcast. Wall her hearing in host in podcast. The listeners already listening to end Discovering another point of authority of contacted. They wouldn't check out so good example. Podcast all around the cara swisher will of content where all these hoes Jumped from show to show. And you have all these ass experts in all the own podcast within they can mix and mingle again so you can listen to all of them. It's a source in. It's just really good way of being introduced to a new formal content.

Dr Discovery Cara Swisher
EU Court Rules Employers Can Limit Religious Symbols

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

EU Court Rules Employers Can Limit Religious Symbols

"The European union's top court has ruled that employers may forbid the wearing of visible symbols of religious or political believe such as head scarves but the Luxembourg based tribunal says in its ruling the courts in the blocks twenty seven member states should weigh up whether the bond corresponds to a genuine need on the part of the employer it also said that they must consider the rights and interests of the employee including by taking into account national legislation on freedom of religion the case was brought before the court of justice of the European Union but two woman in Germany who chose to wear Islamic headscarves at their workplaces one works as a special needs cara while the other is a sales assistant and the cashier I'm sorry a shockingly

European Union Luxembourg Court Of Justice Of The Europe Germany
Making Things Free Is Ok

You Are The Media

02:35 min | 3 months ago

Making Things Free Is Ok

"Okay paid subscription formats whereas content creator. You're paid for the content. You produce looks ten ten by and fight. The world new share for free can indirectly linked to income or giving your reputation a boost at the same time many cases free is what leads to paid producing work and giving it away for free. Doesn't mean that you become trapped in the expectation that you will do everything for free. So it's champion the word you share for free and recognize that it's this content which helps people become attached to you. And you view. The world wants to come alongside june on the how you can help them. They may well become paying customers. Free for me as it's allowed me to tune into my audience with an emphasis on creating a relationship. Robin just effect in a transaction. Everything has to be a revenue generator in its own right. creating connected. experience means that you'll content can feed into other elements of your business. For instance with the media the mix of events and learning creates the income stream free very often indirect path towards being paid. They ask getting people to sign up to hear your way of seeing things for me. It all starts with the subscribe page anew new the media code uk. Make it too complicated and people won't want to play with you. The monetize cara is being dangled in front of many creators businesses. For instance apple has recently announced their intention to introduce pay podcast subscriptions and use that to services from providers such as sub stock. The ghost are inviting to scale up by encouraging pay subscriptions from narrow audience subjects making notable in road in this area with five hundred thousand paid subscribers across an audience of one million users. It's perfectly natural that people would want to be rewarded financially for the time and effort invested in creating and writing however to make money this way. You need to make an audience in the first place. If you don't have an audience and thing you can make money again for many people. using places. Such as sub stock is a case of sharing for free until they built a sizable audience than ever extending what they do to create special paying subscribers. It's rations of their work or

Robin UK Apple
Runner Cara Enright on Completing the Goggins Challenge

Ali on the Run Show

01:33 min | 4 months ago

Runner Cara Enright on Completing the Goggins Challenge

"Speaking of distance and pain caves. How are you feeling you just completed. The goggin challenged you ran for while you know. I'll let you explain it. I'm like you ran. Four by four equals forty eight. Then you can you explain to us the goggin challenge and tell us how you're feeling yes. So first of all props to any interns athletes out there that was so challenging like physically but also mentally. It was so hard. So we teamed up with ask clark who people might know him from the bachelor. He also does release recovery which is in addiction foundation. And we ran. let's see for. I'm very bad at explaining it as well. So every four hours we ran four miles for forty eight hours so over. The course of forty eight hours. We ended up running forty eight miles which coincidentally was the highest mileage. I've ever seen in my life in one week. And i did that in two days so i was very impressed but it was very challenging. I think the hardest part of the challenge wasn't so much the four miles because four miles didn't seem as daunting it was the only four hours in between the four miles and during that time you want to sleep you want to. We were lucky we got to shower during some of them so it was definitely an experience

Goggin Clark
Hester Ford, Oldest Person in America, Dead at 116

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:51 sec | 5 months ago

Hester Ford, Oldest Person in America, Dead at 116

"The oldest person in america has passed away. Fox cara mchugh has that story. Automobiles were a novelty and theodore. Roosevelt was president in one thousand nine hundred four when hester ford was born in lancaster south carolina. She lived to become america's oldest person and what life hester grew up on a farm. She worked the soil plowed the fields and pick cotton and though she wasn't rich by worldly standards she produced great wealth of a different kind hester bore twelve children in her lifetime. They produced forty eight grandchildren. Who in turn gave birth to one hundred eight great grandchildren who then brought forth one hundred twenty great great grandbabies. Now that's a legacy hester. Ford passed away saturday in charlotte north carolina. She was one hundred sixteen. Karen mchugh fox news. I'm joe chiro fox news.

Fox Cara Mchugh Hester Ford America Hester Roosevelt Lancaster South Carolina Ford Karen Mchugh Charlotte North Carolina Fox News Joe Chiro
Growing homeless camp on Seattle school property concerns neighbors

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:52 sec | 6 months ago

Growing homeless camp on Seattle school property concerns neighbors

"Next week, students will be headed back to Seattle's Broadview Thompson Elementary School for in person learning, but come on Scary Costume Itch says there's a homeless encampment on the school's property. Neighbors say the district told them they would have the encampment moved by September. Seven months later, it remains. I'm calling on the district to enforce its own policy, which prohibits homeless encampments on school property. Just the district plan to move these people to a safer area. Neighbors from the community recently sent a letter to school in city leaders asking that the and cannot be removed because of the increasing environmental damage Crime. And told it's taking on the community in the mayor's office told me by statement that they share the concerns of the community here, and they did release a statement that goes on to say. Decision of whether to address an encampment on school property is up to Seattle Public schools. Cara Cost Image

Broadview Thompson Elementary Seattle Cara Cost
 "Comedy Team Magic"  Interview & Set with Mack & Jamie  Show #58  - burst 02

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

01:21 min | 6 months ago

"Comedy Team Magic" Interview & Set with Mack & Jamie Show #58 - burst 02

"Nobody new music like him and having a hard rock station to work on. That must have been fun for you. Jamie in having that i met mack started working together and key. West are the comic strip from new york opened a annex club in fort lauderdale and they would bring down four comedian new york every week before lauderdale and have them perform in that club and we got windows but through a gal who used to living key west but went up there and was a waitress at the club and she called us and said hey you guys are as funny as any of these guys and you should come up work at this club and we were so freak out. We worked with paul reiser. We work with dennis. Wolfer with sindbad. Jerry seinfeld betty murderer cara leader and murphy. All these people would come down to the fort. Lauderdale club four to turn and we would drive up. Every week was a five hour drive. And we drive up to the weekend shows. And we got so that we were regulators there and so we got to know. These people and rick overton All these great comics. I should go to new york so did you.

Nightclub Stand-Up Comedy Jamie Miami Georgia Dryden Ten Rules Mack&Jamie Comedyteam New York Mack Sindbad Fort Lauderdale Lauderdale Paul Reiser Lauderdale Club Jerry Seinfeld Cara Dennis Murphy Rick Overton
Sister Scientist Tells You What's Fact and What's Crap

Fat Mascara

01:33 min | 6 months ago

Sister Scientist Tells You What's Fact and What's Crap

"Sister scientists know. Nice hi welcome. Fm s cara. Thank you come me. I'm so excited to be here. We're excited to have you. You've been on my radar for years. I love following along with you. I love how. You breakdown science so simply. We have so many questions for you. But i have to ask you because you seem to have a bunch of jobs. Like how would you describe it. You're like an educator. Formulator a bench chemist are you that still. How would you describe yourself professionally. Oh yeah i'm a. I'm a lot of things So yes i am all those things. I am a bench chemist formulator Trade started off that way And now i am doing. I'm an educator so through sister scientists. I do a lot of education for a young women interested in staff and also just beauty consumers and Who are just interested in what you know. What's going on in this bottle here. What's great for my hair. Why is this not working just really educating the the consumer on what what's fact in once crap And then of course. I'm in the entrepreneur show of Ah may contract manufacturing company called in the group and that is where i like to call. That's my my adult job But i work with startup brands in helping to Ita innovate in scale their brands so that they become the next big thing.

Hospitality Workers Petition for COVID-19 Vaccine Eligibility in Washington

KIRO Nights

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

Hospitality Workers Petition for COVID-19 Vaccine Eligibility in Washington

"Workers will be eligible to get their covert shots. This includes first responders agriculture transit grocery store workers As Cara seventies, Michelle Millman reports. Another group of workers wants to be included. Workers are pressuring Governor insulated put them on Tomorrow's vaccine list, Washington Hospitality Association and the Seattle Restaurant Alliance, said the governor a petition with more than 3500 signatures. They want restaurant workers to be added to tomorrow's tier of people eligible for a covert vaccine. Starting next Monday, restaurants will be able to offer in door dining at 50% capacity. A woman has life threatening

Michelle Millman Washington Hospitality Associa Seattle Restaurant Alliance Cara
Women-Owned Businesses We Love: Hint Water

Here's Something Good

06:34 min | 6 months ago

Women-Owned Businesses We Love: Hint Water

"During this women's history month we've been celebrating. Women owned businesses and talking to their founders. Because we know that buying from women owned businesses is a great way to empower women. We learned a lot from these women. And why women entrepreneurs will help us restart this economy. They've told us how they pivoted during challenging times bounce back there examples of resilience optimism and innovative thinking. Today we get a lesson in another topic doubt and we hear from woman who you might not expect would have a lot of doubts. Cara golden the founder of hint water. The unsweetened flavored water that she built into a hugely successful brand. In fact carry even wrote a book about it. Undaunted overcoming doubts and doubters. I had an opportunity to speak with her on are made by women podcast. Here's what cara had to say. You call yourself. An accident entrepreneur. I guess by that. You mean you really weren't intending to start a company but you as you say realize that water just needed to be cooler for lack of a better word. Yeah no absolutely yeah. I call myself. An accidental entrepreneur primarily because unlike many other entrepreneurs out there i. I didn't intend to actually go start a company but what i realized is that just by kind of living my life as a consumer. I started seeing these problems that really needed fixing. And and so that's why i decided to go tackle it. I think there are entrepreneurs that i've met over the years to where they know when they're a kid or they know when they're in college that they should you know go develop something and but that just wasn't me at all and and You know so. I think there's entrepreneurs come in all shapes and sizes. I guessed i sort of didn't know the aspect of actually starting a business raising money. You know figuring out how to not only start a company but started brand new category in a very competitive marketplace. So that is what. I embarked on so a lot of people have great ideas and i think maybe even a lot of people see holes in markets but still to crossover and actually do. It is a different thing. Your book is called. Undaunted overcoming doubts and doubters. How did you cross over to decide to start the company and and did you have doubts early on absolutely Yeah i. It's one of the things that i felt in and really the reason why i wrote. The book was that i think there's this Misconception that that entrepreneurs are are you know very confident and they don't have fears and they never have doubts or don't have doubters donut failures and you know. Especially when i was out speaking about building my company over the last few years i would run into these people who would articulate that and almost you know site that i was so different than they were because they had all these insecurities and walls around them and one day. I just. It really dawned on me that i was no different and and successful people that or business people are athletes. Were really no different than anyone else. Other than the fact that they actually tried and that they knew that there was a chance that they were gonna fail but they felt like they would go and try and so that is really the essence of my book. Is that just by sharing my story of not only building The company but also a little bit autobiography to on growing up as a kid and and kind of the things that you know. I thought about an somebody who read my book early on As a preview of it said that you know just you don't actually say in this book you don't talk necessarily about parenting but you definitely describe this environment that you grew up in which was go and try right like it doesn't matter if you fail you need to just go try and i think it's a lot of what i do. You know as a parent to i for Teenagers and you know. That's that is what i'm constantly saying. What do you tell yourself when you're taking on that next big challenge. I mean obviously not everything you do everything. Anybody does going to be successful. So what did you tell your younger south. And what do you tell your kids say about that. I try whenever anything's a little bit scary for me. I try and figure out how to break it down a bit. And so i don't allow myself to sort of get into a head space of making it so big that it's it you know it's gonna freak me out right and so that i can't move forward and so i think that that is such an important piece for for people to recognize. Is that when things do. Start getting really scary and again like i still fear things i still. You no doubt myself on things that i'm doing but just know that if you could actually just break it down a little bit and start to make steps forward things start to seem easier and even when you do fail right this. This isn't another thing that i've really learned to appreciate that. The next hard thing that you encounter you'll probably have greater strategies and ways to kind of move forward learnings just from that last failure In making this next scary things successful or you know really less daunting what great advice. So here's something could for today. Carol golden reveals the essential quality of all entrepreneurs perseverance. They may have doubts and they may fail sometimes but they try again and when they try and fail and then try again. Chances are they have success the next time that willingness to try is the hallmark of so many women business owners we speak with you can learn about more of them are new seneca women marketplace. We're showcasing dozens of women don't businesses. We love for women's history month you can shop. They're amazing products and learn their stories. Go to shop. Seneca women dot com and there you can also learn about a new credit card from seneca which is the first credit card that rewards you for shopping from women. don't businesses again go to shop. Seneca women dot com to learn more.

Cara Golden Cara Carol Golden Seneca
How To Know When To Strip or Sand Furniture

MAKE SPACE — A Home Design Show by Never Skip Brunch

03:27 min | 6 months ago

How To Know When To Strip or Sand Furniture

"Let's dive into some tips. So the first category is when you get a piece a lot of times you have to strip it down or sand it. So do you know in distribute it versus sandy. Do you have any tips for that while you have to figure out if it's wood or if it's veneer and you're go from there for me. Normally the way i tell is like the weight so if it's pretty like substantial heavier is normally would versus like veneer like md. Ask fours and stuff and then like you can always stay on like maybe the back and just kinda like get a little bit in and then see what happens when you get that. I lay off and you can kind of tell if it is like because you're obviously going to hit the md board pretty quick with your sander. And then if you do then you gotta start stripping disturbs driven out if you hit past the grain into a board that looks like well like either particle board or not would not i will never yeah so in some of it's personal preference. I know even real wood pieces. Some people prefer to strip instead of sand. Cassia ending really does take off like a layer and then if you have certain things like that are more ornate strippers really better because some stuff. You can't stand like i know you're dresser or your nightstand from last season. Had that really intense like brady would kind of crazy now. A super crazy but i took so long for that piece actually ended up taking off the like actually detail of that would. He's because i couldn't strip it couldn't like sand it like there was nothing i could do to get the paint off and so then to remove that actually just like paint over that do you remember neck. turn out so good. I still have another one. That has never finished. So that's all non dance and then another thing. A lot of people wonder about sanding is kind of what grits to use all. Save the secret magic bullet for you to share with everyone you love. But just in general you kind of have to grits. You have your shaping grit so that's gonna be lower numbers like eighty hundred sixty and those are going to be kind of shape the wood and then you have your smoothing grits. So that's higher numbers like one twenty two twenty and that's going to smooth out your would before finish so usually if you have paint that you're just trying to strip you can start with eighty or a hundred you don't really need to go lower than that and then you work your way up if you wanna paint you can stop around to twenty but if you're finishing your would what is. Our magic secrets are manager. Cigaret- that we just found out about getting are amazing sander mirka sedan. Was that if you three. Twenty grit neighbor. The three twenty is like i never realized you should like go above two twenty. Three twenty is like next level against just so smooth. It flake like butter for real. I mean every time. I finish something. And it's with three twenty eyesight. I wish people can actually feel this because it's like nothing you thought before. I don't know it really is like such a game changer. To use three twenty on all of

Brady Sander Mirka
Price for Seattle homes continue climbing in one of hottest housing markets in U.S.

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:52 sec | 6 months ago

Price for Seattle homes continue climbing in one of hottest housing markets in U.S.

"In Seattle continues to climb and it's not slowing down. Byers Goebbels Cara costume, It says the Emerald City remains one of the hottest housing markets in the U. S tools are on a mission to buy a house in King County in record time. We're here because our kids were here. The couple just arrived from Texas. We're moving to the Northwest to be closer to family. We had four houses. Five houses picked out that we wanted to see today and they're all pending. Linda and Kevin were originally looking in Seattle. But the demand here coupled with home selling above asking price for sent to reconsider, We've decided to shoot for something a little less expensive. And then knowing that we may have to bid higher in order to get what we want. The current median cost of a house and King County is valued at about $680,000, but in Seattle It's closer to 735,000. The Statehouse has passed a bill that

Byers Goebbels Cara Seattle Emerald City King County U. Northwest Texas Linda Kevin
The Mystery Of The Wicked Fairy

Mythical Monsters

05:04 min | 7 months ago

The Mystery Of The Wicked Fairy

"Of all the classic depictions of the wicked fairy ruining a royal christening. The most popular is likely cheryl. Perrault's the sleeping beauty in the would from sixteen ninety seven. The passage reads just when they were all about to be seated. A ferry who was getting on in years entered the palace. She had not been invited because she had not left the tower in which she had been living for more than fifty years. Everyone thought that she had either died or fallen under a spell. Her head trembled more with malice than from old age as she decreed the princess will die after piercing her finger with a spindle but the wicked fairy is actually much older than perot's tale. She is first mentioned in thirteenth century. French epic poem called yuan of bordeaux in it a night in his party. A tense meeting with over on the king of the fairies who tells the night that the wicked fairy cursed him at birth to stunt his height she also appears in the seventeenth century tales of. Marie had trine mel. Do barna viel. Who wrote under the name. Madame dune wa. She coined the term fairytale and depicts the wicked fairy in three different stories. Behind in the would princess may blossom and the blue bird in each a wicked fairy named cara boss the fate of the night presents as dangerous. Take on the standard fairy godmother she avengers every slide against her and her goddaughter often at the expense of the girls rival another young woman who's been blessed by other fairies with beauty grace and talent. It's interesting to note common themes in delwan and perot's choices as they were contemporaries. The wicked fairy is almost always old and forgotten by the royals due to the assumption that she'd been lost to time. Her curses vary but they tend to involve animal transformations and last a set length of time and the person she's punishing is almost always an innocent. It is said that every fairy worth her magic had god child but getting one wasn't easy it required an invitation to opulent christenings thrown by fussy parents with a taste for gold and jewels. Each jerry had to present her gifts to the child which had to be equal in beauty and value only then did one lucky ferry. Get the job. Sometimes infighting between the fairies broke out and the entire castle was destroyed. Being worthy of a godchild was a tough nasty business. And it didn't matter a whit to carrabba's the one ferry who had never had a goddaughter of course she went to the parties and gave the children her usual blessings which reflected her dominion over the night. An owl to act as a pet and messenger a cloak that would glitter like the stars if the princess so wished to caribou. These were enviable gifts. But her sister's the ferries of the day summer spring fall and winter lavish princesses with traits and talents. A perfect singing voice or promises of unrivalled beauty. Even they'd made the same vowed to another princess the month before but cynical shadow loving care boss had given up on a god of her own until the birth of princess i e shah of the day. The princess came into the world bamboo flutes musical bows and liars announced her arrival. All of ethiopia held dances aisha's honor and her parents. Through the expected ferry feast when caribous arrived she was bored by the jubilation and the piles of gifts. She watched only half interested as each of her sisters approached. The princess's cradle to present their gifts. This was a party like any other but all that changed when she saw the child when she looked over the edge of the infant's cradle everything the music. The dancing all faded away. There was nothing but the tiny princess looking back up at her carrabba's took in aisha's large round eyes and wide nostrils with the tenderest affection. She brushed her finger against the princess's soft skin admiring the rich black as warm and dark as a midnight lily under the summer moon. The baby laughed and the fairies heart leapt with joy.

Perot Trine Mel Barna Viel Delwan Perrault Carrabba Cheryl Bordeaux Cara Marie Royals Jerry Caribous Aisha Ethiopia
Mother arrested after 4-year-old girl found wandering New York street alone at night

John Batchelor

00:22 sec | 7 months ago

Mother arrested after 4-year-old girl found wandering New York street alone at night

"Walking alone in the Bronx late at night is under arrest. 32 year old said Icka Abdul Salam, charged with abandonment of a child acting in a manner in jury is to a child and reckless endangerment. Daughters to Dia was seen at the corner of Prospect Avenue and East Wonder to 56 Street and long would just past midnight Saturday morning. She's down the Cara VCs. Ah, third woman now has come

Icka Abdul Salam Bronx
Complaints filed against Seattle Public Schools by teachers' union

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:11 min | 7 months ago

Complaints filed against Seattle Public Schools by teachers' union

"Very different models of learning right now. Seattle public schools telling it's a special education teachers to head back to their classrooms. Next week, the union fighting back filing unfair labor practice complaints. The North Shore School district was one of the first in the state to proactively move toe online learning when the pandemic struck, and now one year later. Students in North Shore are still learning remotely couples. Cara Causton H reports on what some parents sir colleague for North Shore announce on Friday that they will be bringing back K through third grade one day a week starting at the end of the month. But for many families, they want more time in the classroom for their kids. We check back in with the North Shore family that we profiled almost a year ago. The council family, like many others say they are struggling Mom, Jenny says the isolation is taking a toll on her girl, seven and 11 years old. The council's look at other district's returning to class and are calling on North shore to do the same thing. We need to do it. We need to get them back. We need to get our lives back to normal. We need tol alleviate some of that stress and anxiety that they're having, because it's happening, and it appears North Shore will be bringing more kids back in April, But the specifics are not clear. Cara cost image Come, Onis. Here's what's coming up after we check

North Shore North Shore School District Cara Causton Seattle Jenny Cara
Seattle area's Northshore School District releases plan to return some students to in-person learning

News, Traffic and Weather

01:18 min | 7 months ago

Seattle area's Northshore School District releases plan to return some students to in-person learning

"Will be shipping out. It was one of the first school district in the state to proactively moved to online learning when the pandemic started. Fast forward a year and students in North Shore still learning remotely, even his neighboring district there slowly bringing students back Carlos Cara Kostin. Its reports on what some parents are calling for North Shore announce on Friday that they will be bringing back K through third grade one day a week starting at the end of the month. For many families, they want more time in the classroom for their kids way check back in with the North Shore family that we profiled almost a year ago when that online learning got underway. A year later. The council family, like many others say they are struggling as two working parents trying to manage jobs that remote learning. It's been endless and overwhelming. Mom Jenny says. The isolation is also taking a toll on her girl, seven and 11 years old, and she's concerned about their mental health. The council's look at other district's returning to class and are calling on North Shore. You do the same thing for all students. We need to do it. We need to get them back. We need to get our lives back to normal. We need toe alleviate some of that stress and anxiety that they're having, because it's happening. It's here and it appears North Shore will be bringing more kids back in April, but the specifics are not clear. Cara

Carlos Cara Kostin North Shore Jenny Cara
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

07:02 min | 3 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"This one woman and then. You had like the first African American woman, I Africa marry period, not even counting the fact that she's a woman from Connecticut Jonah Hayes who was to the year when I don't remember what year was when President Obama was in office. She decided to run she has an interesting story to I think she was a teenage mom she worked hard to to overcome that and go to college finish school and graduate school. So then you have her, and then you have the young as ever to be lactic congress. Another woman out of New York, Alexandra Cortes, and you had the there's another Muslim. Lady don't remember which state, but. I think our names rush Shida, and I'm not going to bitch and her last name. I think is lob leave. And then another woman she scratched she checked off two boxes. She's the she's the first lesbian open, lesbian and the first native American in congress. Her name is Sherry David. And then you had another data for the American woman day of Holland to win in the house and then. Oh, those another lady Yana Presley Yana Presley. Doesn't fit. You know, you know, people have a profile of of who they think are how they you should look when you run for office Yana Presley, whereas braved, and she's the I advocate American woman to hope be in congress from Massachusetts. So I say women women were out they were showing out they were winning and not just these women. These these are the women are name Pacific historical aspects because they were the first, but they were so many other women even in governorships that in different states that were winning for the for for to be a woman in that state for the first time. So which says again that all of these peop-? That access name or ran is Democrats in in the parents, you even though some of the holiday contested races that you know, people really down about which was again, the the Gillam in the award. I can Abrahams and jealous in Maryland. We're still still a lot of highlights that ups not not just those particular lows, which you had a lot of is as far as Democrats concerned in the win. And again, it goes back. There's a connection between the the youth vote and these people who ran progressive contests and ran and won regardless of their their just regardless of their religion, regardless of their gender, regardless of their sexual preference. Again, they they won. So there there's a different the cannons. And is a different kind of voter. That's that's that's that's coming. So regardless of what you know, we were concerned about a lot of people concerned about as far as the current administration's concern there there a lot of high that you think about. I'm going to bring back into CVS any comments questions. Boris. Oh, okay. How you know? I in the Barbara out here. Moms guys talking about all the women running. But I think a lot of people view this female wave of of a pry, but if you've been looking at campaigns and looking at who's been working on them? This been in the work for almost twenty years. You know, in terms of well, you remember back when you insurance. My political caucuses this functional that was. Mostly most of the people in there were women. Okay. You know, you know, from the I have I to me I'm seeing a pattern in black, man. We're not all but a significant group of them are disengaging this engaging from all sorts of things. What what what that is? Why do you think that is? Oh, well, a combination of I mean. Well, a lot of black men heavily get involved in conspiracy theories. They rather believe and some of I call it the Jason wedlock disease. Now this guy who's the ESPN personality kind of believe politics, don't matter. But God and just me taking care of my family does. Okay. But you have a lot of these men that that'd be right? Well, they'd be right with the whole range if they weren't if they weren't racist. And you know, you know, there's the part of the reason why I stay kind of concerned about it. And I watch it when I talk to people where when I hear him say because my personal belief is that people indulgent conspiracies that's a substitute for not doing anything. It's easy to talk about blow Bolus. And you don't have to deal with the people who right around. You're actually doing something wrong. But but see so many of 'em..

Yana Presley Yana Presley congress President Obama Africa New York Alexandra Cortes rush Shida Jonah Hayes Sherry David Holland Connecticut governorships Abrahams Maryland ESPN Barbara Jason Massachusetts twenty years
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

03:54 min | 8 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"What happens is the as in kid the white kid the black kid the old the old man the young girl? Everybody is just vibe off of the beat in the feeling the experience. To a certain degree language creates barriers because people don't understand what you're saying. Right. It can. So that's what happens a lot with independent films are independent filmmakers don't have the resources to dub their film. Okay. And every language where you can show your film. So Regina, what what what is the common thread in your project speech to human existence? Well, I mean, I think he, you know, when you have everybody wants to belong I think that's the common thread, and when you have people who don't feel like they belong. They don't have a country. They don't have a race. They don't have parents and that need to belong, and I think that that's sort of. That's universal need and desire. What are they go back to Ryan for second? And I know Regina dresses earlier. But I was wondering about an I think he alluded to it when he was talking about the fan festival. The challenges of getting your film distributed. If you would address that. So. The challenge is getting my distributed clan. Honestly after my first time, I didn't have any challenges with it. Wow. After that. Real sounds arrogant. But I'm just saying I need to. But after the first film blood of a champion. I haven't had any problems on getting my film distributed part of the review of I learned I run. So you don't need any more money this. Well, no always need money for production. Right. So distribution of production are different. So always need financing for projects. Right. But distribution of never had a issue with that. Because. One is that was good relationships with distributors. Right. And the other is I found out what they like and how they sell their moving, right? So the light bulb went off on the went off in my head. When they when I was selling blood of the champion. So I'm like, you know, we sat beside this film. Besides the project on buddy, five millimeter, everything looks great the colors, the colors that and they Zeca tive at coal black entertainment said, listen. Nobody cares. How good your film? Look. Because when WalMart target that's by blockbuster buys these movies. They don't watch. So the focus on who's in your backyard, who's going to sell your movie what the your fans wanna see when they walked down the aisle that'll make them pick it up. We're in was that the same way case with your documentaries. With my back. You memory eilly enough. Just so what's the the BMX documentary? Okay. So what might be left documentary? I promised myself. My my very first to project that I did were documentary, but they never got released. One was about it was called the..

Ryan Regina WalMart
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

04:20 min | 8 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"Me. Get there. Thirty to get my news still main one in four million. You're you're sort of way there. Chagrin? They will make it people. Also from about technology talking about social when I was trying to raise finish anytime dollars. But she's have way back in nineteen eighty five. But we have to keep. With four cans of nickel pilot was the internet. And by the way, you made seven million dollars on this. So. Homerun team. Eighty six that world is done. His gun. Steve burns pledge ten thousand dollars project. He said he's not going to work in the Hollywood anymore. He's doing capable. The whole industry is chain is. So. So there's a one you guys were talking about how hard it is to get financing. And I'm assuming that prior to Kickstarter you had to do your own type of one raising give us an ideal. And I can't remember it was Regina or a Ryan forgive us. The ideal of of what you do now to do them. Sure that their kick started now got really boost life like being for those who didn't know about it prior to that. But what what type of financing it. What type of one reason you did in order to by Mansur film? Well for me. I like I said, I finance the film myself. And I spent I use most of funds for myself, and I got a couple of other people to invest, but I'm actually using crowdsourcing now to distribute my thumbs. So that's where I've had to sort of resort to that same concept to get my film played in in theaters because it's just it's a small documentary. I don't have a, you know, a huge general audience, but I'm actually now using crowdsourcing to get it in theaters. Oh, that's interesting. 'cause that that's the first. Yeah. Heard that. Yeah. So I'm doing now. So I have screenings in you know, in various cities right now in New York DC, the DC area, L Paso and in the Baltimore area. And I'm using crowd sourcing to have screenings there. So if enough people by advanced tickets, I have a screening if there is not enough interest. Then I don't so that's how I'm using crowdsourcing to try to, you know, recruit my money and to get an audience to see my film to have screening. So. You wanna play a website where they could go buy the ticket or find out more information about that. Yeah. Brown babies film dot com, and you can see where it is screening now. And if you wanted to bring the film to your to the're in your area, it's it's it's very easy to do. So and people who host screenings they get a portion of the box office as well. So it's a way to get demand. Get people to get them to people who wanna see it. Right. A Ryan over. I'm sorry. That does. Regina, your phenomena does not so completely different in what Barack Obama instituted with his purse camping way relied heavily mal donations and two dollars here. Five dollars fifty dollars here. This is in pick it up a paradigm shift with in the United States, or you think that we are a country are the for something different there at the mass. For..

Regina Ryan Barack Obama Steve burns United States Hollywood L Paso Brown New York Baltimore seven million dollars ten thousand dollars fifty dollars Five dollars two dollars
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

02:04 min | 8 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"So resume my what my financial state is. Signal. I've been doing Kickstarter before there was text. Six minutes. I would like to get my choice. I've been kicks daughter before the west kickstart. Raised in person. She's having so why go to start. Because women is the new wave. They get. Trump funding. To base the wreckage of the people she's gonna have school these deer right thing. Malcolm X. He got gained simmer. Sames our inside man kings comedy team work. Bonnie work been amassed over three. And I'm going to lead to the people. They wanna know about then in now. So you've done if he is that. The whole Hollywood game. Now studios. They wanna make. Opened on the same day to make choices of dollars this way aren't doing. Well. See the same thing. Why still Brugge George Lucas themselves? You might say to read. Phenomenon said that this path of pimples is going to last the whole Hollywood industry. That's not me. That's still lupus Bloopers to to say say. when I wanted to my new filled coming out. Thank you. Thrill film, Josh Bolin. Sam Jackson, this film that independent film on the independent filmmaker. So I'm feeling to my. Ticks dot com. Five dollars to help.

Hollywood Brugge George Lucas Josh Bolin Sam Jackson Malcolm X. Bonnie lupus Five dollars Six minutes
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

04:47 min | 8 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"For me. This was more of a it was not only business, but it was more. It was my personal at least at the very beginning. It has now become more business oriented, but in making the film, I was at a point in my life where I wanted to do something meaningful, and I pitched this to a couple of different networks and gotten no response. No one was interested in doing it. And I decided to do it myself. And it was just really it was really a calling and and I and I feel this way. Now, I mean, I feel I feel like this is what I was this is part of my mission to make this film. It's like in my spirit, and my soul and. I don't know that I would do this again because you know, I financed. Everything I did as much work as I could myself and put, you know, my heart and soul, and, you know, Bank account in into making the film. I think a little different. But it was such a passion project me. I just felt like I needed to do it. Are there any stories in in the Brown babies story, it is relevant for today's audience? I notice say historical piece, but what could or what can someone to day take from this story? Well, a couple of things and thank you for asking that question. I mean, I think you know, when you we look at like, I it's black history month or black history. We sorta regurgitate sort of some of the same history lessons that you know, we we hear all the time. And here's a story that just few people know about and I think that's just very important. It's not black history. It's not American history it's world history. And you know, we have black children who are just simply abandoned and left to die in orphanages. And I think the world should know that number one every time there's a war in this country. Wherever they're American soldiers abroad their children somewhere, and you know, we've been in in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan for the last ten years. There could be children there too. I just feel like it's an important story about war, and what happens to children who are the products of the war of various wars and people should be aware of that. So I think it's relevant even today. So the Europeans if another form of collateral damage, absolutely unknown, collateral damage of war, absolutely. Very. That you had in Asian with DNA tension for them and financing yourself. So he tells of you actually how. Part your chance assessed. We start with me Tina. Yeah. It was it was critical for me. Because I really I really didn't know what I was doing more. And I decided to make this movie like you said it was very personal for me. And I wanted to do something. And I wanted to do something meaningful with my life. And I wanted to feel fulfilled in my goal was just to see if I could do this. I didn't want to not. Not me not finish the movie. And if I just had a DVD. In my living room. I would I would have been fine with that. But I decided to inter film festivals. And I I was just so fortunate that the very first film festival I entered the American black film festival, I one and that gave me the exposure that that I need it. I think especially if you live for well. Film stuff was to help the specifically they American black stuff. That's helped me out a lot of helping a lot of my career. Every time I've done this. And. I've I've secured distribution for my film through that every time I've made because of that festival. So if a platform where? You know, distributors are looking for content, and they come and makes it they like if they like your movie, you know, you can work out a deal..

Tina Iraq Afghanistan ten years
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

06:16 min | 8 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"So I read the script about two brothers that running illegal gambling operation out of laundry on the Lower East Side in New York, right? Right. He's gonna tiny. I love it to death. But I had a problem with the script because all the prophets in the script for black women. Right. So I meet Italy said that's not gonna work for me. Personally. There will be no black on the prostitutes any movies. I make. So we traced it. But had the script have not been entertaining. I never would even took the next step towards where do I stand with this grip morally because I'm not going to produce any content. It's not entertaining. But usually it can be it can be entertaining and provoking, it can also I guess just Thursday, and it can also I guess always promote the good cause. There are a lot of fans out there, in my opinion may not have much society to value. But they're very entertaining. And always interesting, the top filmmakers to see what their formula is before they take on a planet. That's my formula. I wanna look at his entertaining. I because of his entertaining, no matter how good it is. I don't think people are gonna be interested. You know, every story. I mean, you know, every story has a good and bad dynamic to it. If you don't have if you don't have the gang of story is not interesting to me. Okay. I think it's like where you were talking about race for second. And I was. When I was putting together this this particular show, I was thinking about I don't I don't think anybody ever really notices the casting of certain films, and there was a big do about like actors being cast with Latina actresses and the re in the reason being. Basically what sells? Actually comes to because if they would say, for instance, I can't remember the film. It was Denzel Washington with. Even ended. Thank you. And I remember when I came out a reading something regarding or they only if they would had a like actress as we actress office of him, and because it was her, and I think there was a partner with white. So they had that dynamic than it would attract audiences versus having a a black life. I think the same thing with hitch with little things thing concept is actually a couple of things out there that that I was wondering what the guests think what their thoughts are on race as it relates to making their films. So, wow, the time, you know, he did have some late on what the wasn't that film. Also mean? Oh, okay. But but for so this same film onto the Brooklyn Bridge the crime or do they work for the Latino do then and the and the main character is a the main female character is a Latino woman. Right. Okay. The mess because that's how the story is. So I like to keep my scripts to to real like is it a real situation as a real story, then less keeping making authentic. So I don't think that you should I don't think that we filmmakers to force. So fourth of fourth positions just because we want to make it a racial issue. And and at at at the risk of losing the authenticity of the story. Right. It's hostile. I'm sorry park is not. Is it not possible to develop a story that? Transcends racial categories, or even transcend transcend nationality or if misery and I'm thinking Xinha's, I'm not Jewish. But. Touch me because it was primarily concerned with the human condition, and I'm wondering is it more important that film is true to to those things that are central to our existence or is it more important to have it typically. Representative of the diversity that we see right? Similar with the with the human condition. Very true. But it wouldn't have been authentic. Have we forced black people in the Jewish Holocaust story? Right. It's still would have dealt with the human condition. But you look at it like this often too. Right. Let's say grey to to regimes fill is a documentary with mercy's call Brown babies, and I'm wondering. First of all regarding financing or obtaining financing for that type of documentaries was that hard or how were you able to to pitch the idea or to get it across before you could even get the field made?.

Xinha Italy New York Denzel Washington Brooklyn Bridge partner Brown Representative
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

03:16 min | 8 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"And you know, just retire rich off the cell of screenplay. Clearly, no, we didn't know who we didn't realize then how everything works. So we wrote to he wrote the script I tried to sell it. Nobody bought it essentially will I well, we can just make ourselves. And that's how I got involved in film. I kinda fell into it. And then once I fell into it. And and decided that okay? This is something that I'm involved in something that I'm gonna take seriously participate in you know, I decided to do more research about the business aspect of it have anything works. And then decided that this might be something for me because I enjoy as producer. I enjoy the ability to take idea and then make a reality out of. So my first project from a feature film standpoint was blood of a champion, then confessions of a call girl, then a degree of our peers, and then I did a a documentary on the black mafia family, and now I'm gonna documentary on electric dance music called the draw. You know, busy. Sounds like you're very busy. For them from the guardian too. And is the guardian are you proposing it to be a feature important timers is discovered that he stated as late as a short Bill or motor guardian is a short film. And I actually I've never I've never that was my personal only short-form project. So I liked it. I liked the writer and. I actually did the the guardian because I wanted to go into short form at work specifically web series and wet weather internet, they content. Wanted to have some experience in it. Because I had only done feature work. I've never I had never done a short before. So like most directors are early. So may cause they do a short first. And then they do a feature. Well, I just kinda jumped right into the feature world of at all, oh that was my short that was my first short film project ever. So I did it more as as a test to see if there's something I was interested in doing, and it it turned out. I mean, obviously, the filmmaker partner with he was a great filmmaker. And it turned out to be something that you know, how was proud of. I like people seem to like it is framing in the Orlando film festival October. So it's pretty good before. I open the line for Stephen REEs to be a call on the line. I'm not sure if they have a question that, but I'm going there's a caller with the seventy four. Four area code. So if you have a question or comment free to enter now. Hello seven. Oh four. Oh, hello. Can you hear me? Yes..

Stephen REEs producer Orlando writer partner
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

04:34 min | 8 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"We have a caller from seven three number as they had a question and try to give the opportunity to ask the question if they wanna ask within this on. I have a comment store. Name is Richard. And I'm calling in. I'm the developer of development in DC. I have run properties that I rent to the housing choice sponsor program. I've worked with fish to went to save a veteran on my head starts working with UCLA and DC housing and a lot of the things in the calling real world with and so my question to the panel to the colors that everybody says, you know, the Haitian problem or developments do more. But you know, I have property in some of these neighborhoods, and it's not necessarily a problem because a lot of neighborhoods that are gentrified people's houses were taken people sold their properties to allow them to be, you know, have a higher use or. Different use. And when I went in mixed use communities where thing Thome, the people not just the white people in America people five wrench or someone with about will come to me and say, why did you rent them? They're not about proving their physician proving the life. They're not gonna make this neighborhood better. And so, you know, the from my standpoint is something I guess that's most stomach, and how do you really approach diction that? I know we have some educators in the land feels like, you know, win the neighbors talk to their things that they say are that some of the problems that the people that come in that are in lowering brackets aren't getting Trinity's to get better jobs or or to educate themselves to continue improvements that are happening in the neighborhood that they're supportive of. I wanna I wanna just that's good. The city does have money to provide me before. Whereas if plus with money has a surplus money. And they've had over the rest of money and place. The put meaningful program, you know, living where I live, you know, we have programs that come and say, oh, we have framing, and and we have this and that and we're going to, you know, help get jobs, but not times out of ten one the job temporary job. And to the job is still not a job that fun of me out of poverty. It's gonna be a job where I'm still gonna need a subsidy. And I'm still gonna have to have affordable housing. Now, what we what we believe is that you can still provide affordable housing and also provide program. So that people can take advantage of if they wanna be, you know, if they don't wanna subsidy if they want to own a home, if they these programs with programs have the community involved in the program because a lot of times, we have people come up and tell us this is what you need to do. This is what you're going. To do. And this is what we say. And what there is no community playing around these programs that come into our city neighborhood. So someone who you know, I'm not gonna really some. I mean, really participate in this program because I had no say in what the program was going to be or how it could help me. And that would be a lot of things that happened in the city even with when it comes to low income people, you know, very low income people, you know, decisions I made four not without involvement. Let me debunked couple of real quick. Hey, you know in terms of before housing there are programs. I think that they're very poorly advertised pay which is which kind of speaks to Brandon's point, and yours is that people don't know you've got to meet them where they are sort of like what the you know about administration and HHS is doing with Affordable Care. They're meeting people where they are. They didn't have programming person the sisters trying to help people where they are to get healthier thing to be done with housing as well, especially with housing, but let me also say that the mayor's already pledged to to invest one hundred million dollars of this surplus. We spoke this next year and affordable housing. Additionally, I'm thinking that that's not just some phony place to give elected, but because he's support from other members of the council, namely the bonds and some of the other untraditional support marry into town so for this effort, and and today I've. Read that they they pass a living wage to twelve fifty..

Trinity Richard Thome developer Brandon UCLA America Affordable Care HHS one hundred million dollars
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

04:54 min | 9 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"We why we're trying to stop, you know, drinking drinking kawanzaa stopped doing all this when the reality is that we're not doing anyone nobody else, but we last up for more than everybody else. Why is that let's threat? Let my question because you said that. Take a friend of mine. Affect because we know being black abuse of color in this country that we larger microscope witness stand the reason that we should have that much more scrutiny our behaviors even even if it's not fair that they're not asking your white counterpart you saying who I know like we go why not remove the microscope. Why not revoke? Why are we acting? Oh, just keep the microscope that just that violent. That's unfair. I really remove destroy the the microscope. I don't want. Okay. No. Let's let's see. Okay. So we don't get no let's remove the microscope that availing that is attacking us that it has kind of gender key town. Why why don't we respond? I think oh, you know, what let's get together know, we have to destroy the microscope. I agree with you in my school from our responses destroy them scope instead of saying, you know, what we got to act, right? 'cause I. This question when you say what does that mean? You're in just just like you said before these are nonviolent offenses, especially talk about marijuana possession. We are being incarcerated double triple writes, white not. So the thing is when you if you were to decriminalize marijuana, you're taking them microscope from our black and Brown community because now marijuana just just like all the all the plane now for the most part, you know, when it's about in terms of. On your microscope way in my mind. I it. Let me change. I party, but again your life on the right path. But you said something that was the ring dear to me, touch, my heart. You said if if I didn't courage, you that personal responsibility to take your life in in taking in the way that you wanted to go and now part you well for passing cause it's obvious. You concern with the lease of these? I get that everybody on his phone. So we're gonna Dow down the tone where we with stop Cussing together nature's. So we can have a reasonable conversation. They through a reasonable compensation for our this can actually process what we're saying. When I say moving back to the region question when I say what happens to accountability. I each mainland is responsible for his fate on spite the circumstances in which he was born in. No, I know life is on I know life ain't. Christmas. We all know that everybody on this phone for my at estimating is African can we we've experienced racism, but we all don't have the same background in for us and not have a criminal background. You cannot be mad at us. If we don't understand the mentality of someone who ends up in the criminal Justice system. And we, and of course, we feel the allies have been different because we've made different choices asking you. What we should let me get through. I'm asking you. We is those who are on your side who are saying that hey, the system is messed up. What should we do outside of those nonviolence? Not self medicating offensive. What can we do? Bring more Justice. Without denigrating infant personal stories in personal insults. So that's not question to both of you. But you only have a minute stuff on the phone. Okay. I don't want to. Right. I mean quick response to that is. No, those are by product of the fact that we're black when the police pull over then I'll put those over 'cause he got marijuana on the pulling over 'cause we went for fortunately may have marijuana on. We may have a pistol. We may have crack cocaine or may have had drive on the shores days like that. So we sit the Matic violence racism, the heart of his life is the Premacy teams to devalue and a sump right community. And undermining the community do. Incarceration. Well, we have to do which is here to rebuild our community with no media women coming particularly you brothers, man. I mean, I know you personally, but I'm happy for you. I wish I could've been in the position you are prison became our college. You wanted to hear that they shouldn't feel the same for that either..

marijuana crack cocaine
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

03:03 min | 9 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"So why wait inspect the mother for committed crimes as a restaurant? Let me let me let me let me let me just jump in. I, you know, there's been a historic dialogue between this kind of narrative between personal billion systemic violence, and what we have to realize, but we have to come to grips with is that you first of all let me say this. We're not acting white folks to be personally responsible. Like, I said this physics show that show. This is not not immobile you want. Letting. Let let me let me on the backs of those who are suffering right now, man. My brother, my brother, I got three brothers and sisters. They all been in jail. I've been seen it. You know what I'm saying? I've been the prison. I. Man. I. The death. Bro. 'cause my father. L? Let me down. I'm with I'm with you. I'm with you. But I can't I can't I can't let you silence me. You can't. Because of the matter is a little Asian. If it wasn't for my father. I feel the game in a big win the acid. He told me myself personal responsibility of coming home doing when I do community. Let's now. Do only doing so your personal responsibility and stemming violence, it's interesting to me, why interesting is because the reality is white, folks. Commit just as many crimes on more than black folks telling personal responsible. I don't understand that. Like, I said, I, you know, where I go to school you if the police went there all a lot of them will be in for that. But they don't go there. Why don't they why are they shrink right on the college campus? Let me let me let me really quick no finish. Please. Because. Even when they get arrested. What happened? Yeah. I mean, so so the point is the point is asking something of last book asking the ball, and the and even people is you cannot respond to systemic violence, win, a person responsibility agenda. It doesn't make any sense. And okay. Let me just finish dismisses that blacks aren't person responsible. And I know those folks because I'm one of them, and I live amongst them. So I don't like that narrative. I really don't like that Cosby kind of Taliban that that over kind of not smoking..

Taliban Cosby
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

04:32 min | 9 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"Also kinda like just what Steve said, you know, there are certain there are certain drugs that we could argue that do have this little purpose. Currently now, obviously, for instance, with with rose any opium cocaine. No badminton that was used from attic reasons until the more harmful effects were study and the drug alcohol marijuana. I've always agree that that blackmail across rates for race due to marijuana. Wanna reasons why Carson rates are the highest and when decriminalize that recreational drug use that recreational drug like you say, they will decrease our numbers in criminal Justice system traumatically, but for a second I wanna go back to the actual economic of of incarceration. I had a question for one of my friends for the layman will want witnessed incarcerated black linen or women or really hus- rated peoples wherever actually being put to work for profit. What industries would you actually see this type files, which isn't a railroad construction? Would you see those, you know? Burger King, or what have you where would you actually pinpoint individuals who are across rated, but they're being used for profit. Yeah. That's a that's a very good question. The four profit presence industry is one of the most lucrative industries in the country right now that says he has made three hundred million dollars in contracts and the government last year, but to answer questions Pacific officially there are a host of companies that use prison labor, and you can new research, and you can find it online. But specifically some that I know starbuck chorea secret phone industry global tell link was so for one billion dollars to five equity firm in New York one billion so most popular phone industry in the prison system with over one billion dollars that says a line about our and then there was an effort. There was an a phenomenon going on where they were charging exorbitant amounts for these prisoners reset families, which actually helped them, which makes no sense counterproductive. So called rehabilitative system. Right. They were charging Hanley's fifteen dollars five minute call, you know, it's just ridiculous amounts of money to which made it harder for them, which makes it harder for us. So I mean, it's not just about Jeff though that I'm about their families. It's about their daughters about this son about their mother, you know on. So there are other companies as well somewhere, some of my mind right now in some online, but I know Starbucks, I know, Victoria, secret. Can come to my mom, but I and the global link with for a billion dollars you guys. It's funny because as far as a convict leasing system the end goal, the prison Louisiana is sort of modern manifestation of the comic leases. I've never been myself. But I think pictures, and I've seen videos of the angle the infamous Louisiana state prison, and you know, the the prisoners there have a rodeo and bull come in. They get entertained in the prison makes a lot of money off of the prisoners. Like, I said in certain states on prisoners make little ninety cents an hour. And it's not just how much they make the fact that they they're not allowed to unionize. They're not allowed to organize. They always on time. They are under sort of Milton sort of martial law at all the arguments that will be their prisoners. We describe actually how we can just area. Gone there. Really, quite they're humans. I let's say that they're human that are incarcerated that's very important framing. It is different. Wait, let me the fed that we we're debating that. Right. There shows how we've all been brainwashed. And looking at it. I mean, there's a by product of black oppression. So we legalize mile. Okay. Got committed this crowd. I mean, I think the prisoner the low the the most recent I haven't made with maintain six being the daughter the most ever made was forty three six working working in the kitchen you guys stabbing..

Louisiana marijuana Burger King Steve opium Starbucks New York cocaine Hanley Wan Pacific Carson Jeff Milton one billion dollars three hundred million dollars billion dollars fifteen dollars five minute
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

04:41 min | 9 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"So we saw we won't let all the guys off who had been no sort of places. What about the guys that? Did they don't mean? What about the social assault that has been taking on to economic violence and the political? So we really have a deeper analysis to what's really going on in particular over saying, no black black afresh. But also get I always say argument those crazy etcetera etcetera, but you know, it's the pressure. On the on the mind that's contributing to the predator behavior. And we really have to get back to organizing and doing the working community at the height of civil rights move, the height of the black hog movement prime. Humidity wasn't weird 'cause we was organized. We was fighting just one state that our community cry became what it is in relation to blackmail in the black community. Okay now. Yeah. Let me let me first say that. I find it interesting. And I I have this conversation a lot. And I think it is. You know, it it's a question that that needs to be addressed. I, unfortunately, I think not unfortunately. But I think that there are other questions that I just just to be honest a little bit more important this time and enter the quite honest. You know, I'm not a not a law student, nor nor my lawyer, and I can only speak to what I what I do know I won't try to love. But but what I do know is that my decriminalizing marijuana Flickinger treating as a medical issue rather than a criminal issue. It would drastically decrease the population of prisoners that are going into the prison system. What to do those that are in? I would wanna get a group of illegal Scott. Together, folk like that who know how to work lot. I don't know how to do that right now. So I can't answer that question to that sense. But I can't say that by by by focusing too much on that question. What's gonna happen with the folks that are in did misses out on the larger part part that and that they shouldn't be there in the first place, and let me give you just you know, I I go to Princeton. There's more drugs at Princeton. Then then then the blackout live on in Newark, New Jersey, I live in Norton jersey, I live in, you know, live in the belly of east, but I go to Princeton. I and I see more drugs at Princeton than I do a lot. So the point is is that there is and I don't wanna to overlook the racial dynamics here. I don't want us to why aren't the police raiding the dorms at Princeton where I go to school while they rating the black wild live. I think we have to ask that question, and we have to be very intentional and carefully now. And even in. The questions that we add. So what should we do business? I don't know. I think that that's a question that can be addressed along the way. But I think the more important questions are why in the hell are these folks who carry not one on the in a dungeon cage in it being treated like animals because they had a a drug on. I mean, it very and it's not just about marijuana because I don't want to stop it there any drug should be treated as a public health issue. It is not a crime. You're not a criminal when you're either addictive drug. You have a drug on you or you're selling it is in the public health issue if something that is not unique to black community or the Brown community off oaks white black Brown. According to his book, there is no there's no disproportionality between racists and using drugs or selling in fast. There is it would be life cell and use. At a highly. But that is not known that went. I don't there's not a argument hear about the medical nature of substance abuse and people self medicate, but I would have to take issue with you whether or not you say people fill drugs are not criminals. That's to me that's a separate issue. And I don't see those people who sell drugs is if learns who are necessarily victims of society, perhaps their reasons that pushed him or which meant them to feel that they should engage in practice. But I don't think they necessarily are self medicating at the same rate as people who use drugs for the mental health issues or usual recreationally..

Princeton marijuana assault Scott New Jersey Newark Norton jersey
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

05:10 min | 9 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"Okay. That was interesting. Glad to have. Yussef on the line. Now, I know that you and now actually met at the students. They get mass incarceration national conference that was here in DC. I think a couple of weeks ago. Good segue to I think if I'm not mistaken it with the first national conference that they had. And I was wondering if you could tell us what the the goal of the conference was and what happened at the conference. What the objectives were? Oh, I can't say what was the go. Actually, I was brought in by some formula of incarcerated in folks that I was a friend of a friend who works with Eddie who's approved political prisoner just hit. I mean, you know, it was about bringing awareness. But unfortunately, a lot of is really connected to a lot of cliche. These slogans mass incarceration industrial conflicts, which they have they have meaning wherever the meaning is not really connecting to black oppression exploitation thirsty. Women need to say our servitude seller lists except as far so. So we we talking about Indian mass incarceration, we're not any black oppression. We we're we're losing sight on the on the big ago. No massive concentration who out of black the first. I think. Okay. I was looking at Stephen had question 'cause he's ties into me. So if I can. Point of the conference for minus ending, and I'm also not official member of family. Some speaking someone who's close to the organization, but not a member for my understanding. It was the first and story event, and it was a par- partially to organize students a critical mass of student to address the issues Laco pression matching in the context of mass incarceration black pressure at the context of industrial complex, and and and the war on drugs physically and a host of other things and it it's really brought aware. It is it also allowed us spaces to organize his as students activists folks who are been incarcerated, and it was very eclectic group of folk who got together, and it was mainly to organize around these things. So that we won't just keep complaining that would begin to begin to to do more. Adult person that was there. Maybe it made great steps. But again, you know, part of a group phony across if people's movie whether that we initiate, your speaking out was fortunate a lot of the folks who were having this conversation. So have the folks at the table of myself, I to be a part of the panel of the world or something like that. And basically I had to we had to force myself to be a part of it too occurrence that was their basic laws because they didn't know what was I did know years in prison. My father's thirty years in prison. Uncle. Sixteen years in prison. So we add up the dishes speech for self. We look at the the pressure within our community that we have. So folks are talking about talking. You have to take you from factual community vice versa. But we have to have a finger on the pulse. But what's really going up? Those those still should be applauds, but the work has yard just those those walls. I agree up. Stevedoring somebody asked you the same question. I asked now earlier we were talking about before you got on the line. We're talking about a big ties, and then also criminalizing some offenses, particularly non five pences. And and oh lying on this probably part of the feedback. You got to get got a question for our callers and her questionable or even if we criminalize what do we do with the current amount of inmates that are in prison now for nonviolent crimes? Do you suggest we just released those people broke alone? Or what are you? What's your suggestion? You in. I mean for me. I mean, that's a tricky question from I don't I don't I don't recognize the legitimacy of America shit as illegal parts see those who who govern runs. They they are they are the real criminals as should be locked up. So we when you break it up like myself, I was convicted of with the rob. So that's that's the violent crime. But more important try I did not commit. So we won't. So when we break it up like that..

Stephen Laco Eddie America official Sixteen years thirty years
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

05:42 min | 9 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"So and we are allowed him to write for lows that hold our neighbors as criminals, so what's your? What's your address, your really the fact that that the the criminal Justice system is somewhat industrializing somewhat corrupt would do you offer as a potential remedy to that set without alone? Primos love free. Yeah. Well, let's look at how it works now. And maybe actually give some statistics to kinda ground us in our thinking and discussion, so we can see exactly because some folks are under the impression that the criminal Justice system right now focuses on criminals or serious criminals. But that that is actually just it's simply not the reality. The reality is that like I said most folks who are arrested who are in prison incarcerated actually are in there for a non violent. Offense such as marijuana position. And that is actually one of the most popular ways, she'll get last up into get imprisoned. So I I think we need to frame this correctly. And we need to we need to say that we need we need to we need to be interpreting what's happening, and it's topper life. Because most folks have things that everyone in prison is in there for murder rape or or some kind of serious events. But the reality is, of course, that they're not, and I'll get you some statistics in two thousand African Americans throughout seven states constituted eighty to ninety percent of all drug offenders to prison, and at least fifteen states African Americans are mid to prison on drug charges that rate from twenty to fifty seven times bigger than that of white men. And although the majority of illegal drug users and dealers are white, and this is a coding to Michelle Alexander's book, the new. Crow. Seventy five percent of all prisoners convicted for joke. Offenses are African American or like being I mean, just give a few more out of it. Two point seven million prisoners five hundred thousand are non violent drug offenders. I'm not good at math. But that somewhere quarter a little less than a quarter. Almost one out of every four a mathematician, would shoot me. But it's almost one in four five hundred thousand two point seven million are in different nonviolent drug offenses and the majority of them being arrested for simple marijuana possession in the nineteen nineties. Marijuana accounted for properly eighty percent of all growth interest. And in two thousand five four out of every five drug arrests were presenting rather than distribution that is eighty percents eighty percent of drug arrests and two thousand and five were possession. So I think we need to frame how we president. How do the criminal Justice system? How we do. What? Are doing we all know that you know, most most most people that are are not arrested for from Thailand products. Or at least a significant amount of weakens day, actually say that they are rested for nonviolent offenses. So I think that framing to be right. And I think we need to these stigmatize a lot of folks that are actually incarcerated and that we need to be honest about what the police forces and legislation actually doing and they all the. For. Big on them. So fairly sounds like you're saying personalized not necessarily stigmatize. Because know, I'm I'm guessing advocate all aware of law, and no sports and. To the low, and I don't move do. With someone in the wrong out of a row. Match even. That. Yeah. That's that's. Yeah. I I it sounds like you're seeing more not necessarily be stigmatize. But the criminal is in in the ways things now, you know, we most of our where the laws, and and I personally believe it has to be some type of accountability for one's actions. I understand there's something else that play like mental hills, or or some type of efforts or socioeconomic status factors that our employees live. We we still haven't address the core issue for what's more issue. Excuse me. I said what is the core issue for you? The core issue for me is accountability is one of them. And we all know the racism exists. We all know that there ever conditions out there and the winter state of our fate of low. I mean, I think perhaps we need to look your perhaps decriminalizing some of these offensive as opposed to be stigmatizing alone. Oh, yeah. No. I I'm totally actually my article I have a section called euchre move -ation..

Marijuana Michelle Alexander Crow president Thailand murder rape eighty percent Seventy five percent ninety percent
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

05:17 min | 9 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"So that's that's a very specific example of many scholars and activists have come to call this a nominee off the prison industrial complex where they're locating the Pacific kind of a happening that is connecting prisons to profit. And where where comic literally become a sort of a way for corporations to make money in the same way that it happened or similar way. I I should say rather than it happened during slavery. So although we live in a very different looking world, right? There was no corrections corporation of America in the nineteenth century. However there were playing patience, and there were there was the same kind. Of system where you were using cheap labor, or at that time, it was literally free labor to to make profit, and we all know the history of this country, and how was built on that kind of late ac- in that kind of reality. And so I think we we look at it in that sense. We look at it as the president does complex as a way for corporation to literally make money off of prisoners and pay them nearly nothing. They have a little literally. No, right. You know, then then the clear comparison, and it's funny because a lot of folks are wondering whether job point, and yes, a lot of the jobs did go overseas, you know, to other America, and to China and do other places where people are desperate to work for money, and they'll they'll take cheaper wages, but a lot of times. People miss this act that a lot of. Jobs, actually, I've gone into the prison system. Not whether it's not Stephen reach. I had a question about CC. I'm from Tennessee, some some of with it. So I was wondering how you felt about the fact that legislators who right below can actually host stock in CCA who actually incarcerate the people who break to lows. Yeah. I mean that that just goes to show, you know, how big business and government are. I mean, some folks in bed together or they just simply have a a symbiotic relationship. You know, it goes to show how closely high legislation and raw and politics is profit and money making and it goes to show the sort of corruption that can easily happen when you have that kind of tau. And fortunately, it's always actually expense of the those that are at the bottom of the totem pole. It's always a expensive black and Brown, folks. Oh, poor folk expensive. You know, those who are who are producing. So I think that's a very good point. And I think that that's something that a lot of not a lot. But some scholars are pointing out some people everyday football coining out that that we need to pay more attention to the why why is it that politician can have that kind of power to you know, to to literally legislate law in a way to to source the interests of big business. It's a it's a it's a problem that we're having not just in our prison system. But in all all in my opinion of politics. I mean, even the fact that you have to raise an astronomical amount of money to become president United States. What does that mean? And how is that connected to it? So I think that you're raising really good point that we also need to address is how legislation as. Into it. And how politicians have often literally built their careers off Cup on crime rhetoric. We can look at Ronald Reagan and his infamous, you know, welfare babies and Kratz crack mothers, and and it's tough on crime rhetoric in you know, we can we can trace that even to Bill Clinton and his three strikes in you're out. You know, so it we literally have a political atmosphere where people are getting both by putting folks in prison and just let me point out really quick. And I'll let you let me just point out. Most of these folks that are being put in prison being put in prison for nonviolent offensive non-violent. Yes. That's my next question. What do you propose that we do with people who break the law understand their social and economic factors that play into a guess the the situations that would lead one to be on the wrong side of the low? But what is your suggestion of how we handle these types of people we can't just allow them to willy nilly break below the end of the day. We sent our legislators to represent us..

CCA Ronald Reagan president Stephen America Tennessee Bill Clinton football Brown United States China
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

03:07 min | 9 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"Well, that's some kind of actual context to that statement. And to that cliche. We is quite true. And I think when we. What we see after the thirteenth amendment was passed with a convict leasing system in place. We see a way of maintaining slip slavery, except now it is legal. And I think it's important to know how that is is now legal in was legal because if you read the thirteenth amendment as I'm sure of many of us know, it actually, you know, allows for a certain kind of car Surra slavery. You know, it says that basically slavery is not allowable except for the punishment of crime that is literally apart of the Surtees amendment. So that is very interesting to see how slavery in one sense. I can't say ended but on paper it was declared the over yet. There's a huge caveat even within that document that allows in able for a certain kind of car slavery slavery to continue in prison systems. I think that's that's that's where we can trace it back. And I'm like, I said, I'm not a historian. I'm sure historians can do a much better job of articulating that framing it. But for me in an article that that's where I basically began where we see the beginning of the car surreal situation here in America. So basically when the slave resistant India, then the prison system began is this what I'm hearing from from my readings research prior to the thirteenth amendment and probably more. Specifically, the emancipation proclamation. Though, the prison system as we know it did not exist. There was punishment. There was corporal punishment. And you know, but but as far as a very systematic organized prison system with a significant amount of the population incarcerated, I it just did not exist prior to the ratification of those in. We see that the actual building of the prison system. I believe activist teens amendment was ratified. It looks. It was a sort of white backlash to black reconstruction. Right. I mean, we have progress in one sense, and we have a very serious backlash. And and always the question of what to do with negro and the answer for the most part was to keep them in flav through prison labor. So it's almost like, you know, we think about interest service, which feel to me a form of slavery because some of those people never stopped being indigenous servants..

India America
"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

Cara Live!

05:37 min | 9 years ago

"cara" Discussed on Cara Live!

"Student at Princeton seminary. Hello now, you there. I'm here. Thank you for having. I great to have you. And we'll have I think later on. I hope he joins us you to court, and he's from Detroit, he's the author of the window to my. So and his latest work is restoring the neighbor back to. The. Also, if you if this ever show in your area every screen in your area, he has a documentary about himself. Call Detroit native son, hopefully you sell for join us. And if you so let me start let me go one more thing. Never mind. So let's start discussion. And I I'll tell you audience. How I how we derived at this topic of mass incarceration last month. I was at the black policy conference at Harvard, and I missed the session on the epidemic volley, but I saw Yussef documentary while I was watching the documentary. I realized that I was a Bolivia's to the plight of incarceration, and personally, I've never given a lot of thought about how the US prison system began or the growth of the system and then while back while I got it. Well when I was leaving. And I was on my flight from DC to boss, I mean from DC back to see from Boston. I was reading this Kartika little which was written by now who have on the show tonight. And the article again, it's called prisons pot and profit supply of Posey massive patience, and one of the things that intrigued me about the article was the historic aspect of the prison system. And maybe that's where our discussion should begin. So I'm I'm a lover history. But I had not done a lot of research on this subject until you know, I read now fees, so I'll let now tell us about his findings regarding prisons proximity abolition slavery, ended development of the prison system. And that's a lot now. It is. And I guess let me start by giving a caveat. I'm not a historian. So is there any historians listening there with me? But I, but I will say a few things that I that I do know based on my reading my research as a frame in my article, I think is important when we think about and talk about mass incarceration and the proliferation of our prison system here in the US, it's important to have a sort of historical grounded and to start at the right place. So for me as I do in my article, I start with labor, and I think that's where we find these seminal beginnings of where mass incarceration came from. Where where what is connected to? And I think making those connections are truly important. So basically after the emancipation proclamation with many of us know was signed on January first eighteen sixty excuse me. Excuse me. I'm sorry. That was then refers eighteen sixty three and there was a sort of, you know, this sure does your does your a emancipation of slaves though, we know that what for many slaves. It was not a reality. With simply a document. There was a lot of hoopla about what what to do with with these newly freeze lease and more specifically after the passing the congress ratified the thirteenth amendment which was came out of the emancipation proclamation in eighteen sixty five they're they're believe is where we begin to see a the spring the spring up of prisons specifically in the south. So we see the the Friedman the slaves that were, you know, former sleighs and now they're free being put back into a prison system through what? Historians have come to call the convict leasing system, and the convict leasing system is very interesting because it was pretty much, and and and not too many words, it was in a new way to maintain the old system, and, you know, white southern plantation owners, basically purchase prisoners to live on their property and work under the control many times in harsher conditions than slavery. You know during this time putting this where literally purchase they were leased as you MS and blows for for numerous jobs. I mean, we're talking coal mining iron forging steel making and railroad building and a host of other things. So I think when we I mean, you hear people say a slave built this country..

Detroit US DC Princeton seminary congress Harvard Kartika Posey Yussef Friedman Bolivia Boston