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The right to NOT know a medical diagnosis

Second Opinion

03:11 min | Last month

The right to NOT know a medical diagnosis

"Herald has been sexually active with three people in the last two weeks. He came into the office with symptoms of sexually transmitted infection. He agreed to be tested for multiple infections including HIV. But when the test came back he told me he didn't want to be told his HIV test results. It would be too upsetting this. Dr Michael Wilks. With a second opinion wilt heralds. Hiv result was positive in the US. People have a clear to no information about their health. Even if doctors feel that he person would be harmed by knowing a diagnosis. Say their cancer diagnosis or the results of genetic asked doctors have a moral ethical and legal duty to inform. The Person Courts have held that people have a right to receive information and ask questions about treatments and engaged in what we call shared decision making with their doctor it was in nineteen seventy-two that A. Us Appeals Court in Canterbury Verse Spence defined informed consent as what a reasonable person would want to know about their condition and any risks of treatment. So that the patient can make an intelligent decision and in the US. We respect people's right to make decisions and guide their own care so we would all agree. That herald has a right to be told. His HIV asked results. This would allow him to decide if he wishes to inform his partners begin treatment or refrain from sexual activity completely and of course once he learns he should tell us partners so they can make informed decisions about engaging with Harold and being tested it becomes much less clear what to do when we think about whether people have a right to not know their health information one reason for people knowing their diagnosis so that they can make these informed decisions about treatments. It is hard for a doctor to talk to a person about surgery or chemotherapy. Say for cancer. If the person doesn't even know they have cancer because they haven't wanted to be told it is even more complicated with HIV because the knowledge that they have that they're infected can impact not only them but their past and future partners. So does the doctor have an obligation to tell herald his. Hiv test result is positive and that he needs to make some important decisions or that Aj Nedic test came back positive and they need to know the results because the results could impact their health but it also could impact their family in that case they would have a moral obligation to tell their brothers and sisters and maybe their children so they could all be tested with Herald. I tried to discuss his fear of finding out the result. Perhaps he had some misconceptions but he wouldn't go there. I gently pointed out the negative effects of remaining ignorant of his test results and that it could have a significant impact on his health. He said nope thanks anyways. Doc as he left the

United States Cancer Person Courts Us Appeals Court DOC Dr Michael Wilks Aj Nedic Harold Spence
Officials find 17 bodies in NJ nursing home morgue built to hold 4

WBBM Morning News

02:59 min | 2 months ago

Officials find 17 bodies in NJ nursing home morgue built to hold 4

"Much we're gonna continue on that health right with a CBS news investigation that reveals a corona virus has been especially deadly for one of America's most vulnerable populations as people in nursing homes in a disturbing new development we're learning in over one facility in New Jersey put seventeen bodies in a morgue that was only big enough for for Jonathan vaguely ani reports on these nation wide concerns the Canterbury rehabilitation and healthcare center in Richmond Virginia is one of the hardest hit facilities in the country medical director Jim Wright has lost forty five residents we have been fighting a battle with covert nineteen for the past months now and it is a battle that at times we feel we're losing it's a grim scene repeated across the nation prompting governors in several states including Massachusetts and Florida to deploy the National Guard to run tests experts say the lack of mandatory testing for residents and employees staffing issues and a shortage of personal protective equipment are the biggest problems in nurse sherry Martinez asked us not to identify the California nursing facility where she works one thing that I've been doing is getting garbage bags but I'm over my arms federal officials are also facing criticism for not publicly tracking infections and deaths in these facilities we've reached out to every state but only got complete data from nineteen we also included county data and information from facilities themselves officials confirmed more than thirty five thousand seniors and staff have tested positive more than fifty seven hundred have died it sounds like our most vulnerable the elderly are sitting ducks in these facilities there are people who work there are the most underpaid I used to call the ugly stepsisters of the health care industry because we don't pay enough attention we don't pay the nurse's aides enough some employees presumably fearing for their own safety are refusing to come to work last week at the magnolia rehabilitation and nursing center in riverside California only one nursing assistant showed up forcing the county to evacuate eighty four residents Donna Reno's husband don was a patient there ambulances lined up ready to you know take everyone out and you know get them out of that facility Dan Marino tested positive and he's now running a fever let's have to hang in there and you know hopefully everything will be good for everybody and we know tells me after her husband was evacuated from this facility and actually took a more than a day to locate him she had to call the police department the centers for Medicare and Medicaid which oversees nursing homes says it is now working with the CDC to increase reporting but how they will do so and what numbers will be made public at this point unclear meanwhile Anthony we will continue to make those calls state by

DON Anthony Medicaid Fever California Sherry Martinez Florida CBS CDC Medicare Dan Marino America Donna Reno National Guard Massachusetts Jim Wright Medical Director Richmond Virginia Canterbury Rehabilitation And
Washington, DC - Virginia nursing home's coronavirus death toll rises to 45

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Washington, DC - Virginia nursing home's coronavirus death toll rises to 45

"A Virginia nursing home has been ravaged by corona virus here CBS news correspondent Pam Coulter deaths at the Canterbury rehabilitation and healthcare center have hit forty five with one doctor left to care for dozens of infected patients officials have told families that they're doing the best they can with just two nurses overseeing forty patients at the time in the quarantine when many facilities that care for Medicaid patients are underfunded and understaffed and are particularly vulnerable to covert nineteen outbreaks

Canterbury Rehabilitation And Virginia CBS Pam Coulter Medicaid
Coronavirus Outbreak at Washington D.C. Nursing Home Spirals Out of Control as 42 Die

Politics and Public Policy Today

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Coronavirus Outbreak at Washington D.C. Nursing Home Spirals Out of Control as 42 Die

"One Virginia nursing home is getting hit hard with corona virus forty two residents at a facility near Richmond have died from Kobe nineteen one of the worst clusters of the new coronavirus in the U. S. at least a hundred and twenty seven elderly people out of that facility of a hundred sixty three of the Canterbury rehab and healthcare center have tested positive for the corona virus in recent weeks

Richmond Kobe Virginia Canterbury Rehab And Healthcar
"canterbury" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:52 min | 2 months ago

"canterbury" Discussed on WRVA

"Have been reported to Canterbury rehab and healthcare center in him like bringing the total number of deaths there to forty five surpassing the total number of deaths from the first major code nineteen outbreak at a nursing home near Seattle Washington but director Dr Jim Reid at Canterbury says the number of coronavirus infections among residents and staff has started to decline in some patients who had been critically ill now seem to be recovering governor Ralph Northam is getting high marks for his handling of the pandemic in a new B. C. U. poll seventy six percent approval is rare air for a lot of politicians but that's what BC you found regarding governor Northam channeling of coronavirus former governor Doug Wilder who is at B. C. use as part of what's behind that is north Ms toughest decisions budgetary and otherwise lie ahead of him Brandenburg is with us and it's not going to leave in terms of the effects those effects are going to be with us for a long time Wilder says he believes north Ms response has been inadequate although he would have devoted more money to schools after the shot down net down morning news radio W. RBS president trump says he signaling the re opening of U. S. businesses by the end of the month despite the pandemic not hitting its apex in certain states the president has said this week that he has the authority as president overturned state mandates to do so New York governor Andrew Cuomo says that president constitutionally cannot order the states to go back to business and he said he would need here to re opening order from him that got a rebuke from the president on Twitter but Cuomo said today that this is not the time for squabbles the president is clearly spoiling for a fight on this issue the worst thing we can do in all of this is stored with political division and start.

Canterbury rehab and healthcar director governor Northam Doug Wilder Brandenburg trump president Andrew Cuomo Twitter Seattle Dr Jim Reid C. U. B. C. U. S. New York
Nursing home deaths soar in alarming surge

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 2 months ago

Nursing home deaths soar in alarming surge

"More than thirty six hundred deaths have been linked to corona virus outbreaks in nursing homes and long term care facilities nationwide with an alarming rise in just the past two weeks the Canterbury rehabilitation and healthcare center in suburban Richmond is one of the hardest hit in the country with at least thirty nine deaths so

Canterbury Rehabilitation And Richmond
Coronavirus updates: World hits 100,000 deaths; US has 'not reached the peak,'

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Coronavirus updates: World hits 100,000 deaths; US has 'not reached the peak,'

"The worldwide death toll has hit one hundred thousand according to Johns Hopkins University here in the states the death toll now top sixteen thousand since the start of the outbreak four hundred sixty six thousand people have tested positive the DMV counts more than thirteen thousand positive coronavirus cases with three hundred thirty deaths and breaking news in Virginia this afternoon governor Ralph Northam is forming a new nursing home task force after covert killed thirty nine people at the Canterbury rehabilitation and healthcare center in Henrico county big news from Maryland to governor Larry Hogan ordered a state budget freeze because of the grim financial projections stemming from the

Johns Hopkins University DMV Virginia Ralph Northam Canterbury Rehabilitation And Maryland Larry Hogan Henrico County
Rise of the Moa

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

09:46 min | 3 months ago

Rise of the Moa

"To introduce today's episode. I thought maybe we should begin by reading a poem. Robert Are you game. I'm game for a little little poetry. In fact it's not just poetry. It's Moitri I did not make that joke in my head yet. But maybe because I'm not as perverse as you. This is by the New Zealand. Poet Allen Kerr now's was originally published in nineteen forty nine and it's called the skeleton of the Great Moa in Canterbury Museum Christchurch. The skeleton of the MOA on iron crutches broods over no great waste a private swamp was where this tree grew feathers once that hatches it's dusty clutch and guards them from the damp interesting failure to adapt on islands taller. But not more fallen than I. Who come bone to his bone. Peculiarly New Zealand's the eyes of children flicker round this tomb under the skylights wonder at the huge egg found in a thousand pieces piece together but with less patience than the bones that Doug in time deep shelter against the ocean weather not I some child. Born in a marvellous year will learn the trick of Standing Upright here. You can find that poem by the way. In the nineteen seventy-nine Anthology an anthology of Twentieth Century New Zealand poetry and I really loved the cadence of that poem and also Feel like it. Effectively captures the the weird beauty of these reassembled skeleton remains one sees of the mighty? Moa We just did Marianne Moore in the paper Nautilus. This is another poem like that. I love a good poem. That genuinely ponders biology Like this deals with the evolutionary adaptation of the MOA the flightless birds of New Zealand And the idea of learning the trick of Standing Upright. Yeah now this is going to be a fun. Couple of episodes. I'm really excited about these episodes I think the the Moa one of the things. That's really keeping me going right now to research. Read about the Moa Envision. The more no matter what we`re. I don't know where you are out there as you're listening to this where you are in your previous understanding of the. Moa and other flightless birds But this is a this is a wonderful and weird story that has a number a number of connections to things. We've talked about in the past but also some new angles. We're going to be talking about evolution. We're GONNA be talking about First contact between man and beast. It's it's GonNa be a fun ride and there's no better place to start a fun ride than in New Zealand. The land of avian decadence that's right and the place where where the Mammal is truly debase. That's right because you know. Obviously the rise of mammals is one of evolution's most celebrated victory stories right because in part because we are of course mammals ourselves. And there's perhaps a sense of of the gods and the primordial titans when we consider the age of the dinosaurs that came before us in our own. Mammalian Age That we have ascended in now. Well Yeah I mean. There's very much a case of When you look at the Cretaceous Paleocene extinction event that caused the demise of the non. Avian dinosaurs It's quite clear that their loss was our gain. Yes but it wasn't only our gain the gain of of birds and we often neglect the just the exceptional dominance of birds for this as they the the legacy of of the dinosaur and then they they remain highly successful in widespread to this day. They remain masters of the Air. Frequent masters water and sometimes masters of the land is well now. Why would birds be the masters of the land like they've got the air that seems so much better than the land? Why even bother with the land? Well of course the obvious answer there is that is that to be. A master of the of the air requires a great deal of energy. And if you don't have to fly around you quickly find reasons. Not Too narrowly speaking. Of course we'll so if we're talking about mammals and avian dinosaurs or birds. Why exactly was it that? The loss of the dinosaurs was the gain of these other glades. Well because suddenly you have all of these These these niches in the In in the in the environment that open up this suddenly a bird can can occupy various creatures. Have the ability to occupy mammals included. But this is where we see the emergence of a number of these different flightless birds. This is where we see the emergence of terror birds in the demon ducks. And we'll get into some more examples of flightless birds as we go but yet to be sure we still have some amazing flightless. Land Birds with us today and some of them are are quite enormous. The largest of course is the ostrich. There are two species remaining. There was a third the Asian ostrich that went extinct roughly six thousand years ago. Yeah the two extant species the common ostrich in the Somali ostrich and they're both native to Africa. Yeah and I. Sometimes I feel like we sometimes overlook. How cool ostriches are. I find that it zoos. They for one thing. It's zoo habitat in an and a fenced in area. But then sometimes the ostriches in there with a giraffe seems particularly unfair because the draft of course is the is the tallest extent mammal that we have and It feels kind of like a dirty trick to showcase the world's the world's tallest extent bird with the tallest mammal which towers over right. It's like I'm trying to show off my muscles but then you put me next to a gorilla. Yeah but but we have some other wonderful examples of flightless birds elsewhere for instance. We have emus which are very fascinating to get a chance to look at an email. Just watching e-mu as it goes about its business It's it's remarkable the cassowaries one of my favorites mind to there's a castleberry here at the Atlanta Zoo. Yes see soul the the cast where who we've talked to on the show before with with a friend Jason Ward here in down about Cecil the cassowaries who her member Jason telling us that it's dengue is very like fragrant smells of fruit. Even though it is I mean not to demonize animals but when you get up close to it it is horrifying beast like it's beautiful. It's colors are beautiful. It has the blue and the red and the black feathers. It's gorgeous animal but also if you look at its foot it's foot. Looks like a puppet from a monster movie it is. It is just a killing things. Got These clause in the scaly scabby skin That's a tongue twister. But you look at a castle up close some time if you just WanNa be terrified and audit nature indeed. Yeah they they can. They can prove quite deadly. If you you know the the human comes into close contact with them and their they'd be begin engaging defensive behavior. Oh Yeah don't try to look at their feet up close if there is not a barrier between you. Yeah of course. We have other Flightless bird to consider amazing ones. Of course it's the Kiwi of New Zealand the The Nocturnal Ground Bird. All of these birds are what we call rat. Tights diverse group of flightless birds that were widespread across the scattered fragments of the supercontinent Gondwana. In their Donald Dominance waned over time certainly with the the rise of Homo sapiens. We still have all these various examples that still remain today. And you find you find large flightless. Birds will actually large and small flightless birds everywhere from New Zealand to South America. Without even getting into the the the obvious example of just other flightless birds. There's also the pink win. Yeah of course But wh this raises the question. Why do we have flightless birds? All over the place like this well In the one thousand nine hundred ninety s there was a wonderfully titled Theory Moas Arc. Which would you assume that all of these rats descended from a common ancestor? So in other words the the idea here is that a a flighted ancestor became flightless on Gondwana and then as supercontinent split this one flightless ancestor diverged. Into all these different flightless species okay. So you get one instance of these birds descending from an ancestor and becoming flightless and then the flightless one goes all over the place. And then there's continental drift right to supercontinent splits up and the flightless descendants of that one ancestor all go off into different places and evolve in different directions and they become everything from the ostrich to the Kiwi to the MOA right but one of the the issues with this This idea is that this would mean we'd expect something we'd expect say in New Zealand. Expect the MOA in the Kiwi to be closely related to each other We'd expect that Any any of these rats that live close together would also be closely related but subsequent DNA studies have revealed that this was not the case instead of Moas Arc. The model seems to be one of numerous cases of flighted to flightless evolution around the world so again convergent evolution This repeated instance of a flighted bird evolving into a bird. That doesn't fly which seemed so strange of a of a choice for evolution to make. I mean not to personify it too much. But but what is the advantage there I think we alluded to this earlier. One of the main theories about this is that it's an energy advantage. If a bird doesn't need to fly than it doesn't need to make huge pectoral muscles flapping wings that can get it into the air and if it doesn't need to make those big muscles it can spend that energy on something else. Sorry can just survive on less

New Zealand MOA Kiwi Moa Envision Allen Kerr Robert Canterbury Museum Christchurch Africa Doug Atlanta Zoo Twentieth Century New Zealand Cretaceous Paleocene Moas Arc Anthology Jason Ward Dengue Marianne Moore South America Donald Dominance
Fact Check

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:25 min | 3 months ago

Fact Check

"Welcome kiss myths and mysteries. I'm your host kid crumb. Today we live in a world of doublespeak gas lighting alternative facts. And this begs the question. How do you find the truth? Well deductive reasoning critical thinking. And fact checking out bear with me as I start off an illustration of all of this with the nursery rhyme ring around the rosie pocket full of posies ashes ashes. We all fall down. The word dark comes to mind when you think about it. The first three words ring around the Rosie refers to the sign of infection during the black plague. It was a bright green or yellow ring around a raised. Rats watch the next words pocket full of posies refers to the smell of the infected and how children fill their pockets with flowers to cover the smell. Finally the last words ashes ashes we all fall down. This refers to how the infected eventually drop dead and they were burned to keep the plague from spreading lol talk about dark and it would be if that were the true meaning of this nursery rhyme. But it's not fact. Check ring around. The Rosie is simply a nursery rhyme of undefined origin and no specific meaning and someone long after the fact concocted and invented explanation for its creation. The black plague was a disease. We call Vanek plague and it spread by bacillus usually carried by rodents and transmitted to humans by fleas. The played I hit Western Europe in Thirteen. Forty seven and by thirteen fifty. It had killed nearly a third of the European population. Although some of the details of the plague offered in this strange ring around the rosie poem explanation are reasonably accurate. Sneezing one of the symptoms of a form of pled for example and some people did use flowers incense and perfume oils to try and ward off the scent of the disease the notion that we were behind the creation of this nursery rhyme is extremely implausible for a number of reasons although foot glorious have been collecting and setting down in print. Bits of oral tradition such as Rhymes and fairy tales for hundreds of years. The earliest print appearance of ring around the Rosie did not occur until the publication of Kate. Greenaway's mother goose or the old nursery rhymes in eighteen. Eighty one for the plug explanation of ring around the Rosie to beat true. We have to believe that shoulder were reciting this nursery rhyme continuously for over five centuries yet not one person in that five hundred year span founded popular enough to merit writing down how anyone could credibly assert a rhyme which didn't appear in print until eighteen eighty one actually began in thirteen. Forty seven is a mystery if the rhyme were really this whole than ring around the Rosie antedates chaucer's Canterbury Tales and therefore we would have examples of this rhyme in middle English as well as modern English forms. We're talking about deductive reasoning gear ring around. The Rosie has many different variant forms which admit some of the plague references or clearly how nothing whatsoever to do with death or sees my point and taking a closer look at this nursery. Rhyme is to point out that something that appears to mean. One thing may actually mean something else entirely. Well that's good to know but how is it determined what is true and what is not one of the things. Aside from critical thinking. Reasonable deduction is back. Check in a world of alternative facts. It's important to look and listen with a critical eye on ear. And if that fails fact check this begs an example more relevant than a nursery. Rhyme could the twenty twenty. Us presidential election postponed. There's your question what's true. The date of the. Us presidential election could theoretically be postponed with the approval of Congress and the president. How ever such a postponement would be extremely difficult to achieve in time for the twenty twenty presidential election and not provide much leeway for voters. Now he can see not all answers are straightforward. But a good fact checker will spell

United States Vanek Western Europe Greenaway Canterbury Tales Kate Congress President Trump
The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

Science Friction

09:21 min | 5 months ago

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

"The first three minutes of the universe doesn't expansion simultaneously Teini Asli everywhere not zero second but close the first hundred of a second hotter than the hottest star blew hot bruting rooting halt. The nor Smith Says Earth was not found or heaven above but in a yawning gap. That was grasp but no way there were no vikings kings. No Vanilla no lampshades but there was Lego like for life in the first three minutes of the universe everything started added to come together. ferment began to develop lips to form the word poem. one-star dreamed of turning away and now they're just so it could have time. I'm to shape clay. The universe became a rogue gallery of Jigsaw fighting for space and in quiet moments. Mango juice squeezed from the heavens and sparkled like Shaq suits. There was the first spoonful of the CARTWHEEL GALAXY N G C one. Three six five with its. Jim Like bots spiraled wills sentence hyperion Jupiter's moons pulsars born cramping the styles of the middle. I molecules began collecting just so that the wood Po Quaid could be part of this missing in the first three minutes of the universe. Atoms rose dancing and just like the poet. Rumi said they were dancing like madmen. Happy on miserable and they just kept on dancing lover. Melvin poet and performer Alicia. Sometimes there with her pace the first three minutes of the universe and Tesha Mitchell joining you for science friction. We're at this end of the universe you are about to in Canada. I eight poetry cosmos a biological artist who grows organisms as living artworks and a rat performer. Whose lyrics ricks pulse site with? Science Professor Oren Katz is co-founder of the Tissue Culture and art project and director of the University of Western. Australia's influential art. Science lab symbiotic. Baba Brinkman is a new york-based rep performer and playwright whose awesome Rep God's to science audits range from climate change to consciousness and Alicia sometimes is most recent show. Particle wave gathered audiences under planetarium dimes times. These three creative experiment is pushing the elastic boundaries of both at n science and shared a stage at the quantum words festival in Perth. Recently cently he's Aleisha reflecting on those first three minutes. What we want to do when we passion about and scientists connect with an audience? And I I have that problem I'm full of hyperbole and scientists aren't and I love that about them and they care about the mess they care about the facts and I hear all that and I read all that and then I'm just like oh his blitz. He's some poetry so I remember Reading Steven Weinberg's book the first three minutes of the universe and it's full of great fact so this was my interpretation mango juice squeezing from the heavens technically correct Richt by the way the physicists would disagree in that universe buddies taking a obviously a poetic license. But that's what I as a poet what I can never find the right words and the reason the movie dirty dancing connected so well with me. Is that moment. That one of the main characters is carrying a watermelon win and she goes up to Patrick swayze who she likes and says. I carried a watermelon. And that's all she can say and that is what I am like so often. I can't find the exact words and I love that about science that they can find words really matter and in a scientific communication or scientific paper hyper words mean everything but I love as a poet. I can sort of pie around with that and Taika Pot. Isn't it interesting that you draw contrast because as I often think when I'm reading your work that infect poetry and science scherer conciseness and brevity of language precision each word gets placed with intent. And yet your thinking of the relationship is quite contrasted. I totally understand what you're saying. And Brevity is so true and as a poet and I'm sure poets in the audience. They can understand this. Every word matters this and carries it's white but the thing is how do you communicate dark matter. Or how do you communicate Nebula something in biology or does I mean I can never find the right words. I love in contact. A film inspired by. Carl Sagan's book by the same. I'm Nice Cellular pinup boy. I'm so glad it was there. I didn't know you were gonNA talk about him. When demon haunted world is such an important political inspiring because well the Jodi foster character Elliott Airway says when she's thrust into space they should have center poet and finally why Korea I get to go in space so maybe on Amazon or something? I'll get to go just to ago. Mango juice everywhere. Do you feel like you could take sides. Or is that that's not your raisin for you all the Wanda I'm about to wonder in storytelling. I do understand that sometimes the failure of can you just beautifying science and that is somehow not enough and and that's why I love what so many people do is they take it apart in question and what aren was hanging is just so incredible what they do but I yes yeah so just like the storytelling and I really need to communicate it to audiences so they can just take away a little bit of wondering their pocket full of wonder. Hey John Adams Americans said you never learn if you have a poet in your pocket. I just loved that I said what are you trying to do with. I've seen your show particle wave. which takes you inside a planetarium? Describe it for people but also what you're hoping to do with that piece it's musical visual Poetic Extravaganza yes. I loved canvas of the Planetarium Dome and from when I was young and a lot of you would feel feel the Siamese diaby lie back. And you've got this gorgeous. Almost three sixty canvas above you and so I wanted to use that canvas to sell tell held. The story of gravitational waves got to work with a lot of scientists and I recorded a lot of scientists and I want the general public to coming and have a sense of awe four so it mixes poetry music visuals just to tell the story from general relativity some black holes look lookit to kill an and just sort of pint pitcher and I want people to come out and say well I might go read up on that but I had a science instinct come in an eighteen year old. He said that she walked in wanting to do chemistry and came out wanting to do gravitational wave astronomy. And I'm like my works done. That's enough poet delicious. Sometimes there when you think about rap song lyrics what comes to mind politics. Maybe six drugs love last year. American crime and punishment. Absolutely what about science though not really well here as Baba Brinkman canadian-born and and married to a neuroscientist at some point these graduate in comparatively chat court the science bug big time and he's now a renowned science communicate through he's rap gods to things like climate change evolution human nature religion and culture my first rap theater popularisation project CHAUCER's Canterbury Tales and a An evolutionary biologists in England saw that and he said good job. Now do you think you could do for Darwin. What you did for Chaucer and the first time I was introduced to do a performance which was at the Darwin Bicentennial Mark Pailin? The biologist introduced me by saying. Don't worry I checked his lyrics. You're about to witness the first ever rap performance. That's peer reviewed house like peer reviewed rap. That's the best idea ever confession. Spend my whole life perplexed. By Religiousness Front doorstep debating with Jehovah Witnesses I was a teenaged empirical thinker a spiritual seeker obsessed with rap. I considered it liberal research. This was the medium the Daca thinking speaking flipping ridiculous speech over beats like every weekend weekend my CD collection became my personal gospel. I wasn't apostle I think part of it was an unexpected side effect of doing science. This communication rap projects and that side effect was that I became way more gangster rapper

Baba Brinkman Alicia Vikings Teini Asli Shaq Rumi Smith Patrick Swayze Steven Weinberg Po Quaid Planetarium Dome Carl Sagan Canada Australia Tesha Mitchell Taika Pot Perth JIM
Police identify victim in deadly Frederick shooting

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

Police identify victim in deadly Frederick shooting

"We now know the name of the man who was shot to death in Frederick Friday night police say the victim is forty two year old Olin mark so far police still have not found any suspects it was around ten thirty PM when police in Frederick started getting several calls about shots fired along the west all seen street in south bend street cops arrived in less than a minute to find a man down on the sidewalks as lieutenant Kerr Canterbury with Frederick police EMS got and transported to the hospital the hospital work him for for probably about an hour but they pronounced him dead the shooting happened in a residential area but one that's just a couple of blocks away from the busy Market Street corridor we haven't gotten a very clear picture what happened but we believe there was some type of dispute between potentially two suspects and the victims that led to the shooting no arrests have been made yet

Frederick Kerr Canterbury Frederick Police Ems
"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:00 min | 6 months ago

"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I just I just thought I would be remiss if I didn't call and comment on how chaucer affected US learning it in high school back in the mid eighties. I mean I'm I'M GONNA fly my nerd flag. Hi Back in those days. We'd play Dungeons and dragons. And how many adventures and stories did we tell that started in a tavern with a bunch of different from people that otherwise wouldn't have gone together. That's that's where it all came from still doing it to the day these kids. That's how they started their stories Tall Charleston for Fernando. Thank you so much for your call. Very internal what do you think. I think that's great and I think it's so important actually to remain lane aware of how how alive choices still is in contemporary culture. So for instance here in the UK over the last couple of years. These volumes have been published called called refugee tales which stories told by real refugees here in the UK who told us stories to poets and authors while doing the Canterbury pilgrimage. Mitch Walk and these stories often refer to the contrary tales themselves but also of course conceptually. It's all about that idea of. Let's get a diverse group of the people together and hear their stories and I think lots of Contemporary Authors and I'm people who are not office themselves all really interested in in this very dynamic idea that chaucer had will marry and we'd just have about a minute and a half before the break but I was wondering if you might just treat us with a little bit of another reading from the Canterbury Tales Tales about the from a moment of Winnie talk about a treatise on the astrolabe Yeah so this is a different tax. Not the Canterbury Tales. Yes sirotkin so chaucer wrote this one of the lovely things about this. He wrote his ten-year-old son so it's a scientific tree ties and he had bought his son. This a special instrument called an astrolabe to help him to learn to tell the time and at the beginning of this This tax choice assays but nonetheless. Suffice is to the true conclusions in English as well as suffice suffices to these noble clock is great because these same conclusions in Greek and two Arabians in Arabic and Jews and Hebrew Latin folk in Latin which Latin folk. Tim I out of other diverse languages and written in her own tongue. And I think this is interesting interesting because it reminds us that chaucer was really aware of a multicultural world of learning that. He knew that he was when he was writing. This tax his his main source was a Latin translation of an Arabic sauce. And chaucer was very aware of this world of learning not only from across your across Europe right but also that had been preserved in the Middle East and North Africa and that was also coming from Spain much of which was Jewish and Muslim at the time. So chaucer was very aware whoa this diverse world in which she lived will Marian Turner Professor at Oxford. University's Jesus College Professor of English author of the terrific new biography. Chaucer Sir European.

chaucer Canterbury Tales Canterbury pilgrimage US UK Mitch Walk Professor of English Jesus College Oxford Europe Marian Turner Spain Middle East Professor Tim Winnie North Africa
"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:03 min | 6 months ago

"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"So it's really to show off the shape of their genitals so chaucer as a teenager was being dressed by slightly older woman in these very provocative and fashionable clothes And obviously that's a that's a really interesting anecdote because people don't think about choice like that people think about choice as an old patriarch not as a teenage boy and I think it's also interesting because I was talking. Just before about both the familiarity on the difference of the Medieval on the one hand. We think okay. Nothing changes ranges teenagers. Where fashionable scandalous closed which expose their bodies a bit? An older people go crazy and go. Oh God the youth of today this is terrible. They shouldn't address like this but on the other hand this is so unfamiliar because it makes us think about what it must have been like for someone to live in this very public way so when you live in a great household you don't go and do your job then go home work and life a completely bound up together. So chaucer lived in this household household the household wasn't one place at traveled around the country. They would spend a few weeks hair they would move on to a different area taking furniture and food and animals with them. He lived there He slept there. He couldn't choose what to eat when tweet he couldn't choose what he had to lie down where he was told He. He wasn't paid in money he was paid in kind. He didn't have a room of his own or anything like that. He had no privacy and he didn't have a private identity so that is so different so difficult for us to get our head around what it means to be a person when you have to live in that public way Mary internal. Let's go back to our phones because we have a lot of interesting questions right. So let's go to Fernando calling from Miami Florida Fernando. You're on the air. Hi thanks for taking my call. You welcome go ahead Fernando oh I just I just thought I would be remiss if I didn't call and comment on how chaucer affected US learning it in high school back in the mid eighties. I mean I'm I'M.

chaucer Fernando US Miami Mary Florida
"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

09:10 min | 6 months ago

"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"That are told by important people by people of high social class. Everyone has a story to tell. And if you only listen to stories by one kind of person you're not getting the full picture you know we all need to open our minds and listen to people that we might immediately immediately not think we want to listen to and I think that's a message that is relevant in every era and we hadn't seen that before The what the mid fourteenth century in any you English text. Yeah I think that's true to say so. Choisir has sources which use this idea of the tail collection and so one of the main source sources. An Italian poem called the Cameron by Cascio and this is a tale collection. Lots of people get together and they all tell stories to pass pass the time but all the tale tellers are of the same social class that all gentles that all a high social class and it's really difference is to get together this group that gets together so that it's not just a night only one night. The other people are a merchant. A sailor a partner a cook Camila as you mentioned before these this real range of people and they don't tell stories according to their hierarchical importance they interrupt each other. They so he really puts forth this idea of. Let's have a marketplace of ideas. Let's listen to lots of different kinds of people you know I have to say. I was very very fortunate in my education. I had a extremely brilliant ninth grade English teacher so Mr Tom Rhody. If you're listening I remember. He had us read Canterbury Tales and end the camera and actually side by I side But that was also a long time ago. Solid admit to you that my memory is a little bit dusty. So so let's Let's get a sense of a flavor of of the Canterbury Tales in the original Middle English. So we're GONNA hear the famous opening lines from the general prologue of Chaucer's great work here. It is read. Read by Neville Cog Hill with his jurists oughta the guru of Mac chest bessette to the rotor and by that every switch liqueur of which there to engender this the floor with his Suada breath in spirit. Half every every Holt and half the ten croppies and the younger soon happen the ram his house had called sit and smile the fullest Mac and Melania that slave in Albany with open so appropriate him. Not to your in here. CARAJAS then long island to go on pilgrimage. He's a reading of the original text of the prologue of the Canterbury Tales. Done thereby Neville Cog Hill Mirren Turner explain to us. What's being said here? Yeah so the Canterbury Tales opens by describing the arrival of spring. So it's very timely that we're talking in springtime right now so it begins is by saying what happens every year so when April sweet showers. Here's the droughts of March. Then the flour is born when the West Wing Wet when the West wind pierces the meadows then crops come forth and at this time people want to go on pilgrimage so these opening lines talk about the eternal cycles of life so the fact that spring will always follow winter. There's always going to be facility. The crops grow children are borne. These things have to happen and these things are important in secular life and also in sacred life because springtime in the Christian calendar is also about about Easter following on from lent so sexual on religious desire kind of go hand in hand. But it's a fixed view though of of life exactly exactly so it's putting forward a sense of stability so even though it's about change paradoxically it's also about stability. These things always happen. We can rely I on these cycles of life and that sense that things don't change we might relate also to the futile idea of life. So the idea that you you will do the same job as your father did. And you will work for the same man who whose father your father worked for so that things don't really change where it a fixed fixed world order and we move forward through these cycles year after year. So that's the very opening sentence. But then what's what's so interesting about the Canterbury Tales that chaucer completely subverts our expectations. Because of this Long Beautiful Majesty opening sentence we then get something completely different and if I can just read a few lines lease we then get choices as well befell that in that season on a day in in southern at the top odd as he lay ready to want it on me. Pilgrimage to quantum theory with full devout Karaj at Nicht was come in to that hostelry. Well Nine and Twentieth Anti Company of Sandra Fluke by venture file in fellowship and pilgrims. Were they all so often. This opening about the cycles of life he then and says befell. It just happened that I was in a slightly dodgy pub in a slightly dodgy area just south of the river in London and so we got a complete change of tone and then he says it just happens you fell and by venture just by chance. This group fifth people all came together in for a pilgrimage group. It might have happened differently. It's no longer this sense of the eternal stability things happening inevitably inevitably. He saying it just happens. Something else could have happened but it didn't and this is very much related to a mercantile view of life rather than the fusion. Delighted that I was just talking about is the idea that things happen because of chances and opportunities that you take you can actually see some control and decide side. You'RE GONNA have to have a go at a different mode of life. So we've got this little juxtaposition between feudalism and mercantile life. And of course we're now we've now moved into this mercantile zone. We're in an in a place where things apart and sold and shows himself came from a mercantile background. He wasn't doesn't from the nobility. His father was a wine merchant. Vintner someone who bought and sold things for a living. So how was this this Hutton transition right there in the prologue of the Canterbury Tales. How was that read in the fourteenth century? Was it considered I don't know subversive Revolutionary because he he is sort of as you said he's juxtaposing to completely different views on the the predictability versus the chaotic happenstance of Long. Yeah so I think it's viewed a surprising so what choice does is different to. What other poet? It's a doing and I think that is one of the keys to his long standing popularity that he's doing something different and really right across his poetry one of the key things that he does this juxtaposition putting together different views of life. Different ways of seeing things on one of the really clever things about that is that he can never be pinned down to one point of view or another so what we see in poem off to poem is one speaker will take can idealistic perspective. Another speaker we'll take a very pragmatic or banal perspective on life. And you can't say which one of these abuse is choices. I was just ask you all him though. Different different different. Take his different takes on things. So chaucer is the most of if the idea of the unreliable narrator You know something that with familiar with from lots and lots of tax where you can't trust the narrator and he gives us so many any different narrators so many different material perspectives and with none of them. Can you really say this truly is chaucer so it gives him this great deniability letty on the one hand you know he can always say well. It wasn't me saying not potentially revolutionary thing. That was my relator crazy. If you think I'm not narrator I'm I'm I'm not. He's just a fictional invention but on the other hand for Rita's it allows readers to imagine that that choice also is what they want him to be right across time. People have found the choice said that they want to find so a later. Poet Dryden wrote that he said what soon as I read. Chaucer I found I had a soul congenial to his life and everyone thinks that about your they all think. Oh yeah I really understanding onto. He's just like me but that's because he is so varied and he always presents us with views of life will marry and Turner professor of off at Oxford University Jesus College and author of the new biography chaucer a European life. Hang on for just a moment. We have to take a quick break. We are talking about this new. Take this new understanding Jesse Geoffrey chaucer in the Canterbury Tales..

Canterbury Tales Jesse Geoffrey chaucer Choisir Neville Cog Hill Cascio partner Sandra Fluke Camila Mirren Turner Mr Tom Rhody London Poet Dryden West Wing Wet Holt Turner professor Rita Oxford University Jesus Colleg Albany
"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:01 min | 6 months ago

"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And you can join us. Do you know the Canterbury Tales or has it been a while since you read it or you about to have a great our discovering him and tell us what do you think it is about the Canterbury Tales that makes it so interesting and relevant. Today the idea of a bunch of different people from different parts of life sitting around telling each other stories stories really interesting join US anytime at on point radio DOT ORG or twitter and facebook at on point radio well. Joining us from Oxford England is Marian Marian Turner. She's a professor of English at Oxford. University's Jesus College and her. New Book is titled Chaucer a European Life. We have an excerpt of it at on Radio Dot Org Marian Turner Welcome to the program. Hi Thank you very much for inviting me a pleasure to have you so you know this is we have a big diverse audience here at on point. They're probably many great fans of chaucer listening but for those who need a little brush up on his significance in English literature. Can we just start. There just placed birthplace for us The Canterbury Tales in terms of the Canon of English literature at large. Why is it still considered to be one of the most important of a AH books in English literature? Yeah so choice was in fact the person who invented the IAMBIC pentameter which became the building block of English poetry three the form that people such as Shakespeare used in later centuries he wrote an increase agit range of tax so all kinds of different things he could turn his hand to to any genre really and I think that's one of the key aspects of his success across the centuries if you like romances or saints lives is or body vulgar stories or philosophy or short lyric poems. That'd be you like chaucer did it really did all kinds of different things and and I think the contrary titles in particular so appealing because what he does is he gets together this diverse group and he says it matters is to listen to what everyone has to say..

Marian Marian Turner The Canterbury Tales chaucer US professor of English Shakespeare Oxford England Jesus College Oxford twitter facebook
The Pilgrim Trails of Italy

Travel with Rick Steves

08:48 min | 7 months ago

The Pilgrim Trails of Italy

"Hiking for a week or a month on a historic pilgrimage? Trail in Europe has become a popular Peter way for people from all over the world to rejuvenate themselves. It's gotten so that Spain's popular community. Santiago is even starting to feel a little crowded sometimes times. If you'd prefer a quiet or pilgrim route. Italy may have the answer. Sandy Brown and errands Italia have covered hundreds of miles on the historic walking trails of of Italy. And they WANNA help you give it a try. They've recently helped to found an organization called American pilgrims to Italy. And it's designed to help people like you would meet a plan. Pilgrimage hike in Italy in Sandy has written a detailed guide to tracking the way of Saint Francis from Florence to Assisi and then to Rome there joining us now on travel with Rick. Steves Steph's to recommend trails. That Saint Francis may have himself tracked Erin and thanks for joining us. Thanks for having US happiness. So Europe has these these venerable hikes. That are really long and it has these pilgrimage trails. That really have a a a little bit of a different meaning Aaron. What's the difference between just a long multiday hike in Europe that can be famous and established and a pilgrimage? Well to me pilgrimage signifies. This is a long walk to place of spiritual meaning and so to me. The first one that I ever did was the way of Saint Francis and so oh walking along pads in stopping in towns where he had been in there were stories about him had more of a spiritual context to it than just trekking. The camino goes to the supposed tomb of Saint James Ferried in Santiago de Compostela. Yes that would be the goal. People in the Middle Ages walked from Paris all the way to that northwest corner of Spain with that goal in mind Martin. Luther hiked from way up in Germany all the way to Rome. He was told to hike down there. It was kind of personal. What would you call it Sandy? A personal ordeal or a personal. I think you could say a pilgrimage also committed jar and then when he got to Rome he walked up the steps of this Accra scholar on his knees and had quite an experience. Enrollment was life changing for him so life changing that started the reformation. He did a lot of thinking and he got to Rome. I understand when when he got up to the top of those depths he kind of goes. This is all make sense exactly. It's a time when you think about these things. Isn't it now when we think about Italy. You guys are both specializing in Poke Mitch. Trails in Italy Saint Francis would be the the star of these things Send you wasn't St Francis relate to these pilgrimage trails well the VA Francesco Chess. Go the way of Saint. Francis is a modern connecting of the various different sites from Saint Francis Time and so for instance when he had a big experience the stigma experience at Santiago de la Berna. That's connected then with Google where he spoke with wolf and see see where he was born and had his last days. Okay so this is a modern. Lacing together of these stops people who want to get into whether they want to hike an excuse for hiker to actually get into the the whole life in the teaching of Saint Francis they would do this. Walk the name of your book is tracking the way of Saint Francis Triumph floors to CD-ROM. So that's what that would be. And then we hear about the FRANCI. JANA the via French ejecta is an historic walk. And so it's a little different. From the way of Saint Francis in terms of it was put together in the ancient world or in in the Middle Ages actually because there was a priest by the name of Cyrillic that was elevated to the episcopacy and he was supposed to appear in Rome to receive his Palim. which is the symbol of his office and so he walked with a retinue from Canterbury across France Switzerland down through Italy and arrived in Rome and then instructed his secretary to take notes of the way back and those notes were all contained at the Cathedral and Canterbury where they sat for thousand and years and then thousand years later people said well what is this and they put together the Modern Day via French agenda following that same modern modern day Revisit of this now does that relate to canterbury tales at all. It doesn't away because well. In case of Canterbury Tales they were ending at Canterbury Burri and the case of this. They were starting at Cantor. Okay now would. Saint Francis have actually walked on that trail on the difference. You know although it's very possible possible that he walked portions of it in order to get up to the community Santiago Kaz. He did walk. The community. Santiago did only twelve fourteen but the a piece of the way of Saint Francis that's historic that he was summoned to Rome by Pope innocent the third and he walked from. CCD Rome and ended up at the Saint. John Lateran Church. So that's one of the stops on the way of Saint Francis and it follows roughly his okay if you were so inclined you could leave a C. C. N. B. Meditating on in Saint Francis and his teaching and his experience all the way to Rome. That's actually the goal right and then the finishing point would be Saint Peter's or exactly what well we stop at Saint John Lateran But we end up at Saint Peter's then in my book I include the Pilgrimage Churches of Rome. Yeah as an option at the end because there are seven urban historic pilgrim churches. And it's about a twenty five kilometer walk and you hit. All seven of this. Church is quite an interesting walk in modern day Rome but touching on medieval medieval and ancient sites. Sandy Brown is the author of the CICERO trekking guide to the way of Saint Francis and Errands Italia heads and organization that prepares the American travelers to explore the pilgrimage trails of Italy. We have links to their websites with this week. Show at Rick Steves Dot com slash radio so sandy. When you come to Piazza del Popolo I I try to think of it? Like a pilgrim five hundred years ago. Yeah what do you think when you come to Piazza. No Popolo one thing is before you get there you would have crossed the Ponti Mill View. And that's a wonderful wonderful historic place because that's where the vision of Constantine was where the cost went back in three twelve or three ten or something. Exactly yes then and you follow the road in to Piazza del Popolo. And of course would you would say and what I would say. I is go into the Santa Maria Church and look at the car of Agios right right so that's a piece that you have to do and then we would want people to walk along the ancient streets that had toward the Vatican so so there's the street where they made the beads that go on the rosaries uh-huh and that's a street that we'd want people to go and sort of skirts along the top of the You you know a couple of other. Like Piazza NAVONA. Right on the way to Saint Peter's and if you're a pilgrim you would know that I go down this boulevard to that obelisk and then I looked to the left after nicey a dome and then I looked on there and I see a statue and you you would know how to navigate through the city by these long beautiful elegant streets that lead to great landmarks works. Yes and specially the pedestrian streets so by the time a pilgrim gets to Rome. They've walked maybe a hundred or a thousand or seventeen hundred kilometers commodores. So they're also looking for a bed and a cafe and Wanted to do the kind of walk. It'll get him in the most economical kind kind of way to their destination but then when they arrive in Saint Peter's there is a certificate that it can receive if they've walked at least one hundred kilometers. It's the equivalent on the Community Santiago. Is that Compostella. This is called the testimony. I'm okay and so that's a nice treat for us and I was going to ask you about this. I know when you go to community Santiago. You clicked this passport. Talk about the credential in the practical reason for that when you are a pilgrim in Italy heading to Rome so the credential or they called the credence Ya gala. It's of paper. That's like your passport. That's what differentiates you as a pilgrim from. Just anybody else traveling. So certain places. We'll give you discounts on your lodging. If you have your credential in basically every town you stop and you get a stamp along the way and then when you arrive at Your Final Destination Chan that sort of your proof that hey. I'm pretty awesome because I just did this. Really Amazing Walk and these are the stamps to show it in Rome. Is there actually a a regular place that you go and you can. There's there's somebody there and their job is to stamp this credential yes you go to the pilgrims office and I did not have to wait at all we went in. I was walking with with four friends and we arrived. We had to fill out a piece of paper and it was actually quite emotional thinking you know this is. My journey is officially Dinan. I'm filling out this paper showing where I started. And you get your final stamp and then you receive your like Sandy said your testimony them and then you have a souvenir for this gassing to remember and it's probably a beautiful moment

Rome Saint Francis Italy Italy Saint Francis Saint Peter Saint Francis Time Santiago Europe Pilgrimage Churches Of Rome Sandy Brown Piazza Del Popolo Sandy Saint James Rick Steves Saint John Lateran Santiago De Compostela
Lord Bilimoria on the Business of Beer

Monocle 24: The Menu

08:47 min | 10 months ago

Lord Bilimoria on the Business of Beer

"Now in the u._k. In particular you will struggle to find an indian restaurant saronto that a dozen serve cobra beer launched by lord karen bilimoria three decades ago the brand success story and is now exported to over a forty countries around the world however lord bilimoria entrepreneurial passan's being all without bumps along the way he joins me in the studio to talk talk about the lessons he's learned how the business of beer exchanging and the brand s- plans for the future but i he explains how the whole story actually begins dennis with bono sticks. That was my first business venture. Because i played polo for cambridge we beat oxford <hes> in the <hes> and i then organized and led the first <hes> indian tour for cambridge university's team and i came back with some sample poodle sticks and i started selling them and before i knew it i was in business and selling them to lily early wide to harrods to the queen's <hes> sadler's and we were in business and that was a precursor because my big idea when i was a student at cambridge was to bring out a beer from india india a beer that would satisfy both lager and ale drinkers alike because i i found i hated physi- english loggers and i loved english british ale but i found that the air was too bitter and too heavy and <hes> didn't accompany food at all older. It was very smooth when you're drinking zone and i found on the physi- loggers were just awful drink on their own and just did not go well with the food because they were bloating so that's been the idea evolved while i was a student at cambridge to come up with this bear that sits in between a logger nail refreshment for lager smoothens a financial combined they would appeal to all types of beer drinkers anywhere in the world have globally appealing taste aced and most importantly a beer that would accompany or food including indian food and curry so what were the first actual steps then in launching that business launching cobra for i was the lucky introduction to india's biggest independent brewery which again the biggest stroke of luck had the best brew master in india a young dynamic brewer from india who'd spent six years in the czech republic in prague had from prague university was a biochemist and knew all about brewing beer had worked one of the top czech beers pilsen during his internship he knew all about i knew nothing about bring beer but i had this idea and i sat in the laboratory with him in bangalore and conveyed this idea to with thirty samples of bottled title beer from england carefully selected saying this is what i like about this year. This is what i don't like about this beer trying to convey this extra smoother less gassy taste of cobra which led to very complex recipe which is what cobras and we've got this craft beer boom in in this country at the moment. We're covers is an ultimate craft beer. It's called malted barley rice rice maize wheat. It's double fermented sco three varieties of bavarian hops. It's a really delicate complex now. On the highest idea we should know more about beer back came the day when you were approaching this brew. No i knew what i wanted. I knew the tastes that i wanted as a drinker as a consumer and i saw that gap in the market and and sure enough when we brought out cobra it did demonstrate straight away that it went incredibly well with food we ninety-nine percent reorders from day one and my hi dream was to produce the finest ever in beer then to to make that a global beer brand and <hes> once you get those reorders in those early days it gives you the confidence to go go on extrapolate that into a global beer brand well. You lost in one thousand nine hundred nine and he didn't have much money for advertising partly due to your student debt. So what do you think think were the main two weeks. How did you manage to get your bottles in restaurants. Then i find that when you start and businesses and entrepreneurs and i think any entrepreneur would probably doubly identify with this you have to cross what school the credibility gap that nobody knows you. Nobody knows your brand. You have zero credibility. So so how do you convince people to supply to finance you to buy from you when you have zero credibility and i find that people will do those do things if you are passionate and have faith and belief in yourself and in your product and your brand and in your idea because that gives is people the confidence and the fates to trust you to give you a chance and i always believed i had something that was going to be different and that was going to be better and that was going to change the marketplace. How many respirators were trying to say no to you. Oh the the word you come across more than anything when you start is a very short word and it's a two letter word and and it's no would you like to buy my no. It's just a no and you have to make note a yes and you have to convert obstacles into opportunities and i could give you example after example of how we had to convert obstacles into opportunities for example we could only import the big double size six fifty bottles from from india because the brewery said you're probably going to fail and we only produce six fifty emma bottles even in india to this day that ninety percent bear sales in india are sold in a standard six fifty. I'm double size bottle and they said if you want more bottles it means ordering different modes change parts for our bottling line investment by us. If you're around in one year's time we'll give you a small bottles but first prove yourself so the big bottles and you go to the restaurants in the u._k. At that time they were i used to small bottles or draft beer now. We couldn't draft all the way from bangalore and the restaurants that what we're gonna do with these big bottles and you convert that obstacle into an opportunity and you say well. That is the way sold in idiots. You'll centric way of nydia and it's a double sized borough so when you're selling you're selling to c._o. Selling more beer and then you win. You serve indian food at the tables often. Your customers was we'll share dishes in the same way they can share this bottle and using a sharing concept you'll find you will sell more and more food and then what is more people at other tables. We'll see how what are they. Drinking looks like a bottle of wine knows auto bottom lines bottle outright and it spreads like wildfire and your weight is also leave the bottles on the table. It frees him up to do other the work so everyone wins your business. Your business grew exponentially during the first years but you'll be since journey didn't go oh all without bumps for example the year two thousand eight hundred. It's difficult for you wasn't it. I always say that <hes> <hes> success is a relative term and success is not a destination. It's a journey and most entrepreneurs will will say to you. It's a very difficult tough and challenging done journey with lots of ups and downs and i nearly lost my business three times and the last time was in two thousand nine <hes> during the financial crisis in the great recession when we nearly lost it. We came very close losing everything and each one of those times that i lost my business often. It was things out of the blue very few people in the world. Very few of the economists in the world predicted due to the financial crisis. There was less than a handful around the world who predicted it so when things come out of the blue it's how you deal with those crises and yes you can look back and one of my favorite things thanks good judgment comes from experience and experience comes from bad judgment so yes. I made mistakes looking back on it with probably had far too much debt. I i did not anticipate the financial crisis. I probably hide some of the wrong people but the things that got me through each of those crises was having a very strong brand. Cobra grew was having the support of my loyalty members who were excellent and my family my wife who stood by me through the ups and downs where i met one year after i started cobra and also the third thing was always doing things the right way with integrity so it's better to fail doing the right thing then to succeed doing the wrong thing. What do human points equity will the best definition of the word integrity and people will say doing the right thing acting honestly <hes> the best definition i ever ever heard was from the archbishop of canterbury ruin williams when he was archbishop canterbury who came to visit the zorostrian center and i'm patron of disaster and community here in the u._k. Given smallest communities in the world and i welcomed him as a patron and then he made his speech and he said lord bill morris has used the word integrity twice in his speech speech and he said the word integrity comes from the latin and greek words intiga integrum and he says is the restaurant parsi communities renowned for his integrity and the word integrity means wholeness. You cannot practice integrity. If as an individual you're fragmented in front of the light you can only practice integrity if your whole and complete and i've never forgotten that and <hes> we've always tried to in in british play with a straight bat and i've found that helped get me through the crises

Cobra India Cambridge Bangalore India India Cambridge University Karen Bilimoria Bloating Prague University Prague Czech Republic Pilsen England Passan Lord Bill Morris Harrods Sadler Dennis
New Zealand, Christ Church Mosques And Mike Johnson discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

New Zealand, Christ Church Mosques And Mike Johnson discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"It's today in New Zealand and dozens of gun owners handing over their weapons to exchange for cash the gun buy back was in response to a government ban on many types of semi automatics New Zealand lawmakers in April rushed through new legislation to ban so called military style weapons after a lone gunman killed fifty one people to Christ Church mosques in March Canterbury police district commander superintendent Mike Johnson says the buyback is not about casting judgment a slow change doesn't make people paid who've got these farms that could New Zealanders about us encouraging them to come in and put taken the proceeds during the six month period so that we actually on a the the intent behind the

New Zealand Christ Church Mosques Mike Johnson Canterbury Commander Superintendent Six Month
"canterbury" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"canterbury" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Private ceremony baptized by the archbishop of Canterbury and I'm Susanna Palmer from Bloomberg world headquarters more up people at the top of door to bank Bloomberg has learned the exit of two board members retail had Frank Strauss and chief regulatory officer Sylvie Mateer it could be announced as early as tomorrow in efforts to stem a downturn Deutsche Bank has already announced the departure of investment bank chief Garth Richie Bloomberg Stephen errant's is a banking reporter in Frankfort he has been in charge of a of a division that's been under performing for a long time so it's really not surprised that he's leaving he's been and at the receiving end of a lot of criticism for a long time to and I think it was just a matter of time when he was going to leave Sheeran's says Deutsche Bank is going back to doing what it was first created to do in the late nineteenth century serve Germany's biggest companies meantime about eighty four billion dollars and maybe as much as ninety billion dollars worth of risk weighted assets will form the basis about bad bank that according to a person familiar with the matter Deutsche Bank would use the bad bank to house on wanted assets trade negotiators in the US and China are moving in the right direction this says Beijing reiterated that as part of a start up again in trade talks it's essential the U. S. remove all existing tariffs for a deal to be reached top trade negotiators in the administration have insisted that some duties a will stay in place even after a deal as a way to enforce it tired of a central bank chairman that won't bend to his will a world leader has ousted the central bank chief of his country we are talking about the U. S. it's Turkey and president a rigid type everyone everyone unexpectedly removed the country's central bank governor after being sharply critical of the Turkish central banks keeping borrowing costs elevated a replacement central bank governor has been named in Turkey global news twenty four hours a day on air added tictoc on Twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries I'm Susan Palmer this is Bloomberg welcome to Bloomberg longtime June also ahead in this hour is the writing on the wall for a stunning ship in administrative law of cracked down on international network of traders suspected of infiltrating banks and companies why you should mark July seventeenth on your calendar and some of rock's most famous rips may be up for grabs thanks to a legal loophole the Supreme Court ended.

China president officer Bloomberg world Supreme Court Susan Palmer Twitter Turkey chairman Beijing Canterbury US Germany Sheeran Frankfort reporter Garth Richie Bloomberg Stephen
Britain, Megan Markle And B. C. discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Britain, Megan Markle And B. C. discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"In Britain today a private christening for royal baby are cheap Duchess Megan Markle and prince Harry keeping that ceremony private despite grumbling from some members of the public a B. C.'s Jennifer Eggleston has details inside a secluded chapel within the Winter Palace to stage a silver baptismal fonts dating back to eighteen forty with water from the Jordan River Archie's royal christening robe a handmade lace replica of the one worn by the queen and Daddy prince Harry bishop of Canterbury leading the service baptize Meghan before her star studded wedding last year and a choir will serenade get the official list of gas charges granddad prince Charles his

Britain Megan Markle B. C. Jennifer Eggleston Winter Palace Jordan River Archie Harry Bishop Canterbury Prince Harry Meghan Official Prince Charles His
The fraying transatlantic alliance

FT World Weekly

12:39 min | 1 year ago

The fraying transatlantic alliance

"Hello and welcome to this edition of weld weekly from the financial times. I am answer venture Johnny the world news editor and this week, we're looking at transatlantic relations as the Trump administration appears to turn its back on its traditional European allies in a sign of Washington's shifting allegiances, the US president on Monday, welcomed Hungary's, illiberal leader, Victoria, Alban to the White House days, after his secretary of state abruptly cancelled a meeting with Germany's Angela Merkel joining me on the line from Washington DC is Dmitri, Sevastopol, oh, the F, Washington bureau chief and from Belene guy. Chaz on our between VERA chief my first question goes to you Dimitri. Donald Trump was fool of praises for Victoria ban on Monday. He congratulated him for his quote block up against refugees from Syria, and he's work to protect the Christian communities. Can you give us a bit of details and explain why this visit is so important and telling we'll, I think one of the things that we've learned about Donald Trump over the last two years. This is one of the things that many Europeans have concerns about is, he seems to want to solve up to leaders who are far -tarian strongmen, you know, very hard line. You know, there's a long list, whether it's early on in Turkey or on in Hungary Kim Jong on North Korea, who Donald Trump said he fell in love with or Vladimir Putin in Russia Trump when he meets these leaders at least publicly doesn't criticize them for some of the things that they're doing their own countries to threaten democracy on the other hand, he seems willing to criticize Anglo Myrtle, or Theresa May or president McConnell, France. So there's a kind of cost me come seems to like something to these strong, tough solitary leaders. And yet, he at the same time he seems to be dismissing some of the concern. Means pushing away, European allies of America who have helped maintain the kind of peace across the trans Atlantic now for seventy years. As you said, the relationship has fuss deteriorated since Donald Trump kimchi office. The US needs key. European is have diverge on a number of issues. Can you list them for us? I mean, it's really wide from climate change trade, Iran. Well, I mean, from the very beginning, it's a long list, one of the things that President Trump today early in his presence. He was he withdrew the US from the Paris climate accords which sent ripples across Europe and the rest of the world later on in his tenure, he withdrew America from the around nuclear deal that America and some of its European allies had signed with Tehran in twenty fifteen on that has led to convert more bellicose stomps on Iran. He also has been incredibly critical of NATO now in criticizing NATO. He's not the first president, President Obama and President Bush frequently said that NATO allies needed to pay more for their defense. I remember travelling to your puts on rump sell the Robert Gates and they were constantly sending this message of Europeans. But Donald Trump has done it in a much more aggressive way. And I think one of the most heading examples was last summer in Brussels out of NATO summit, he was very critical. Angela Merkel both in public meetings and in private meetings and he's shocked many of the leaders who were in the -tendance. So I mean, there are other issues there as well to do with hallway and five G telecom networks and other things. But I think there's some of the main ones that have really created a false lines in the transit onto relationship guy intending to, you know, defense. Secretary of state. Mike Pompeo cancelled a meeting with medical less tweak invoking rising tensions in the Middle East. What was the reaction in betting? I think those zoo Hora that it was seen very much as a snub, it was supposed to be his first trip to Berlin, since he became secretary of state, and it was very hotly awaited. And he just didn't turn up. And I think there was shock that he then went on to Britain. And even so they all Tricia Canterbury. So, you know, even just in Welby was more important to him as a priority. Angela Merkel those real dismay, lots of Coventry in the German press, basically saying that the US German relationship is now, basically in TATA's on, what are we going to do about this, this feeling of crisis really in a relationship, which has been one of the main pillars of Germany's post-war identity really for seventy years now. Why do you think that Mr. Trump targeted Gemini, in particular among its European on is what's your assessment of that? Well, they're personal reasons as well as political reasons. The chemistry between Angela Merkel and Donald Trump has never really worked. You know, she really comes across as associate professor, and he's like the naughty boy who didn't do his homework, he doesn't like being lectured, and Michael does have a tendency to lecture, one of the first thing she did when he was elected president. She sent him a message saying will look forward to working with you, but very much on the basis of our shed values of respect for human rights, and democracy, and so on that was perceived. As a real slight to Donald Trump. Basically a smackdown saying you're going to have to behave need didn't take Hymie to that. But there are other aspects. It's not just the chemistry America is very antagonist very exercise by Germany's failure to meet its commitment, which gave in two thousand fourteen to spend two percent of its GDP on defense. It's nowhere near that target and in fact recently published its budget estimates for the coming years, and it looks like it's actually going to go down as a percentage of GDP is spending on the military. So that was seen as a real red rag to Donald Trump's bull. And he's also, I mean, there's a very famous interview he did with playboy magazine from the ninety s where he complained about how many German cars that were on Fifth Avenue in New York, and he's had Macedo and BMW in his science for many, many years. So it didn't surprise the Germans a tool that he started talking about imposing. Import tariffs on European cars, and he's been complaining for longtime about the size of the German, current account surplus, which, of course, a lot of Germany's allies in Europe of also join attention to over the years. What do you think all the far reaching consequences for Germany? What are the Germans, what kind of lesson? They're drink from this facility longer term. Do you think there's a realization that Germany, and Europe must be more independent from a defense point of view, or, you know, foreign policy point of view? What is your sense? Absolutely. I was at a conference, whether we're talking about this and one speaker said Germany's success is built on three elements integration with the EU the transatlantic security guarantee on Germany's access to open Mockus worldwide and Trump threatens all of those three things. So there's a sense, here that there's, it's kind of existential threat posed by Trump's America first ideology tool. All those things that have made Germany, such a huge success over the last few decades. So that definitely is a feeling that they have to respond in some way. I mean it's very tentative at the moment, though, I mean, for example, that talking about developing much more of a kind of foreign policy. Competence in the EU and more of a sort of independent defense posture, and, you know, maybe getting rid of unanimity, and you decisions on foreign policy, so that they can have more qualified majority voting not come thing, but it's all relative tentative. And even when they do talk about building up their defense capabilities that gets them in hot water with the Americans. We wrote the story saying, how America was criticizing the latest initiatives for military cooperation between EU countries, the Pescara the permanent structured cooperation initiative, and EDF the European defence fund because they feel that it's not really compatible with NATO that it produces. Much duplication and diversion of scarce defense resources and it sets up a necessary competition between NATO in the EU. And so the sense of frustration in Europe over this is light. You tell us we need to do more far defense, and then we try and do it you complain. So the relationship has Radi scrunchy at the moment as we can see on the number of different fronts. Exactly. So they have this quantity move from the US. Do you want to jump in Dmitri? It's true that every time Europe speaks about more independence on the security from the US gets angry and gets a letter warning. But on the other hand, you know, you get a sense that the US is kind of retreating from Europe. What's your interpretation? Well stuffing element of Donald Trump getting a little bit of taste of his own medicine, sometimes when the European say that they want to their own defense capabilities. But I think it's also important to stress that this issue between the US and Europe on defense spending it really isn't just Donald Trump issue. And he is the one who is addressing it in a much more assertive, much more aggressive on some people would say overly aggressive way. But it's something that has stretched back now for more than a decade in the US the US than constantly saying to the European countries, particularly Germany because it is the biggest economy in Europe that they need to spend more. So I think it's an issue that's not going to go away, even if Donald Trump loses the election in twenty twenty I think a democratic president will be much friendlier to traditional US allies and I was just in New Hampshire on the campaign trail with Cory Booker and Beethoven, Joe Biden on all of them were talking about the need to rebuild on to strengthen American alliances with Europe. But notwithstanding that I still think. Whoever's president after twenty twenty is still going to put pressure on Europe to spend more money on defense, and if Germany and some of the other countries who haven't miss this two percent target haven't reached it, then I think you're still going to have tensions on that issue just to go back to one thing that guy said, I really do think the car issue is critical. I mean Donald Trump has how the being his bonnet about cars for a long time at the end of this week. He's going to potentially decide whether to put tariffs on imports of European cars. So this really is something that's a trade relationship is something that really gets him. And also when he was in Europe last year. Another thing that he criticized glimmer pool for is the Nord Stream two pipeline that will bring Russian gas into Europe and Donald Trump and some of his team are saying you want us to spend money to defend you against Russia, and yet, you're buying Russian gas on the other hand, the European say, hold on a second. You're the president who has criticized by the Putin, for orchestrating a campaign to interfere in the American elections. So there's a lot of things crossing the Atlantic and. It's very hard to see how any of this gets any better while Donald Trump is in office tensions, are escalating in the Middle East over Iran, with rising threat of war, and some echoes of cheese than three when the US in some European countries disagreed, on whether to war with Iraq. Dictates us Adam Hussain to meet you what all the broader security ramifications of this poor transatlantic relations. Are we entering a new testing phase? Well, the big question that's emerged in the last few days in Washington is are we returning to the early years of the Bush administration where it appears that there was a constant drum beat among Iran hawks for the US to take military action against Iran. Now, we know that on both in the national security advisor has asked the Pentagon to dust off its war plan for Iran. Not the caveat there is at the Pentagon has funds for everything, and there periodically dusting them off. But when a story comes out that they're dusting them off, Iran at a time when Mike Pompeo secretary of state. John Bolton and others are being very aggressive in the rhetoric towards around it raises questions as to whether the US is contemplating taking most reaction, and I think, not something that would be a huge divide across the transatlantic. I mean as much tension as two walls, when George W Bush invaded Iraq. You remember relations then between George W Bush Gertrude or Germany were extra very odd because since the war in Germany. But I think we would see something that will be exponentially worse. If the US did take any kind of military action in Iran. So people are watching very closely right now to see whether this is just on both in on the hawks making bellicose noises. Just too scary round or whether there's actually something fundamentally happening behind the scenes. My thanks to Dmitri and guy that was really fascinating. And that's it for this week till next week goodbye.

Donald Trump United States Germany Europe President Trump Angela Merkel Iran America Nato Mike Pompeo EU Vladimir Putin George W Bush Washington Russia Middle East Dmitri Syria
"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Is a different tax. Not the Canterbury tales our tax. Yes, she'll Sirotkin so chills to wrote this one of the lovely things about this. He wrote his ten year old, son. So it's a scientific tree ties, and he had bought his son this special instrument called him Astrolabe to help him to lend to tell the time. And at the beginning of this this taxed tros assays, but nonetheless, suffice to the true conclusions in English as well as the fight the suffices to these noble clock is great because these same conclusions in Greek and two Arabians and Arabic and to Jews in Hebrew unto Latin folk in Latin which Latin folk Cottam, I out of other diverse languages and written him in her own tongue. And I think this is interesting because it reminds us that Chaucer was really aware of a multicultural world of learning that he knew that he was when he was right? This taxed his main source was a Latin translation of an Arabic sauce and Chaucer was very aware of this world of learning not only from across your across Europe. But also that had been preserved in the Middle East North Africa. And that was also coming from Spain much of which was Jewish Muslim at the time. So Chaucer was very aware of this diverse world in which she lived will marry Turner professor at Oxford University's Jesus college professor of English and author of the terrific new biography, Chaucer or European life. Hang on for just a moment. Gotta take a quick break. This is on point. Wait can be Forni topic. But life kit is here to give you the facts the scale measures the gravitational pull of the earth at a given moment in time the scale doesn't measure health happiness success effort or self worth here at life kit. We're rethinking wake find it. Wherever you're listening or at NPR.

Chaucer Canterbury Middle East NPR Spain Europe professor of English professor North Africa Oxford University Turner ten year
"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"canterbury" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"So Chaucer as a teenager was being dressed by a slightly older woman in these very provocative and fashionable clothes, and obviously that's a that's a really interesting anecdote because people don't think about choice alike that people think about choice as an old patriarch notice a teenage boy, and I think it's also interesting. Because you know, I was talking just before about both the familiarity on the difference of the medieval so on the one hand, we think, okay, nothing changes, you know, teenagers were fashionable scandalous close, which expose that bodies a bit an older people go crazy and go God the youth of today. This is terrible Asian dress like this on the other hand, this is so unfamiliar because it makes us think about what it must have been like for someone to live in this very public way. So when you live in a great household. You don't go do your job, and then go home work and life a completely bound up together. So choice lived in this household. The household wasn't one place at traveled around the country. They would spend a few weeks hair, and then they would move onto a different area. Take you left furniture and food and animals with them. He lived there. He slept there. He couldn't choose what to eat when tweet. He couldn't choose what to wear he had to lie down wherever he was told. He he wasn't paid in money. He was paid in kind. He didn't have a room of his own. Anything like that? He had no privacy, and he didn't have a private identity. So that is so different. So difficult for us to get our head around what it means to be a person when you have to live in that public way and Turner, let's go back to a phone because we have a lot of interesting questions coming right now. So let's go to Fernando who's calling from Miami. Florida Fernando you're on the air. Hey, thanks for taking my call. You welcome. Go ahead for Nando. I just I just thought I would be remiss if I didn't call and comment on how Chaucer affected us learning it in high school back in the mid eighties. I mean, I'm gonna fly my nerd flag high but back in those as we'd play dungeons and dragons, and how many adventures and stories did we tell that started in a tavern with a bunch of different people and otherwise wouldn't have gone together. That's that's where it all came from. Still doing it to the day these kids that's how they started their stories all from Fernando. Thank you so much for your call very Turner. What do you think I think that's great? And I think it's so important actually to remain aware of how how alive choices still is in contemporary culture. So for instance, here in the UK over the last couple of years these volumes have been published called refugee tales, which stories told by real refugees here in the UK who tell stories to poets and authors while doing the country pilgrimage woke on these stories often refer to the contrary tales themselves. But also, of course, conceptually it's all about that idea of let's get a diverse group of people together and hit their stories, and I think lots of contemporary authors, and and people who are not office themselves oral really interested in this very dynamic idea that that show Sahadi will marry and we just have about a minute and a half before the break. But I was wondering if you might just treat us with a little bit. Of another reading from the Canterbury tales about the from a moment of on when he talks about a treatise on the Astrolabe. Yes. This is a different tax. Not the Canterbury tales our tax. Yes, she'll Sirotkin so chills to wrote this one of the lovely things about this. He wrote his ten year old, son..

Chaucer Fernando Canterbury Turner UK Sahadi Nando Florida Miami one hand ten year
Fire in the heart of France

FT World Weekly

10:10 min | 1 year ago

Fire in the heart of France

"We're looking at the five that so nearly destroyed the cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris and implications for world heritage. And for France. Joining me in the studio is the F FTC architectures correspondent, Edwin Heskitt and from Paris across Banovic demands, Victor it's a couple of days since the shock. It's still standing essentially unaltered. I'm how rave is the damage. Well, I think now the the fire is being put out the damage is very very severe to the roof, but it was mainly to the wooden roof and that spot that was on top of that roof, which plunged through the volt of the cathedral into the middle of the cathedral. But the damage to the treasures and artworks inside it's surprisingly minor. It seems in most cases. So I think given the extent of the fire, and that's a horrendous blaze that we saw on that Monday night really things are better than people might have expected. Nevertheless, I mean, there is sort of question about the stability of certain parts of the stonework. Called the stone towers, the bell ties a largely intact. And of course, rebuilding the roof will itself be a very very major project and even the amazing stained glass window survived. Apparently. Yes, not all of them. I mean, you can see that some of the smaller windows, especially high up clearly broken shattered on the disappeared. But the great rose windows for which no pa- them is famous. I still there. There was sort of three major rose windows on the west and the north and the south, and they still seemed to be entitled whether almost certainly smoke damaged, but they're not broken and people are rushing forward to volunteer money to rebuild it. We seem to be up to two billion euros and a few days. That's right. Even when the father was still raging the Pino family offered one hundred million euros, and since then the promises have been rolling in lousy from tycoons big companies in France. But also some foreign companies apple that it would donate some money, and then also sort of French government institutions that does not as public subscription that's going to take place in France. And. People will get tax breaks for donating small amounts of money. So yes, very large sum of money has already been promised. I think we're up to about eight hundred million years at the moment. Now, president mackerel has already said that the whole thing will be rebuilt, but Edwin new wrote in the paper that restoration will take more than just money. It requires a meticulous forensic examination and deep thought about what exactly is to be restored. What do you mean by them? Well, I think there were two questions first there's the situation as it is. I mean, suddenly this becomes a kind of mix of a crime scene and the disaster area. But it's not like an earthquake where you can just bring a bulldozer shovel everything up. Everything has to be mapped out for Ensley because every piece of stonework every piece of gloss is a valuable antique, it might be something hand-carved from thirteen hundred. So the first very long very meticulous arduous exercise is just going through all the damaged stuff on the flaws as collapsed in from the roof woods, the timbers the bits of glass metal the gargoyles. Collapsed in and cataloging all that that's an incredible amount of work before we even get to start reconstruct. And then of course, there's the second issue, which is what exactly it is. You're going to reconstruct isn't a meticulous copy of the church exactly as it was the moment before the fiber account, or do you take it back to state in around nine thousand nine hundred or in eighteen hundred do you strip out some of the worst of the Victorian nineteenth century excessive restorations in additions? What are you building? What is not your damn? You know, what does the base and the French have a record of actually adding modern bits two ancient buildings. I'm thinking of the famous gloss permit in the middle of the Louvre. Do you think they'll take similar opportunity to do something modern with not damore as it to sacred to do that kind of thing with either leave? They just announced before we came on air that there will be a global call for designs for new spa. The spy that fell in so dramatically was actually nineteenth century addition. And it looks like there's going to be a contemporary replacement for that. And. Mean restoration as well as being very difficult technical task. And the task of reimagined nation seems to be a very dangerous thing in itself because actually as far as we can see this fire was set off by restoration efforts. And that's not an isolated incident as it absolutely isn't. I mean here we had the Glasgow school of art which burned down twice during restoration projects. Almost unbelievably. But we'll wait. There have been examples of this happening. And it's a very dangerous and very delicate moment in the life of a building. Because everything is exposed there naked flames there the conditions of building sign, which are always unpredictable. So you're right restoration is necessary. So the building doesn't fall down and remain safe. But it's also arguably the most vulnerable moment the buildings life when it's going to strip naked. And I don't want to turn the focus away from Paris too much. But I'm in here in Britain, people are very worried about the restoration the palace and Westminster including the virus. Yeah. That's right. And the amazing even though that's only one hundred fifty years old one hundred forty as as on by fire. Wasn't it? It was it was originally. But it's a far more complex. Building the church effective is a bond. That's one big space, but parliament is a warrant of rooms and sellers, and it's very heavily used in a way that the church is one big space used by congregation and tourists, but it's much more simple. Use in a way, so Victor turning back to France. I mean, what's the current mood in Paris? Because on the night, it seemed like an almost incredible blow was going to happen to this most celebrated of cities is it now a kind of relief or shock. I think people are already starting to move on to sort of daily politics after twenty four hour break that was declared by the main political parties to grieve as it were not them. I think you know, there's also a financial impact on the city because I think it's the most visited tourist site in Europe and possibly the world something like twelve million people year, go to see no predom-. So obviously, there will be an impact on tourism in the city and people are concerned about that. But yeah, people have already slowly begun to move on. And you've got some of the anti-government protest is Alasia in protest is. Complaining that these big French companies and tycoons able to four large sums of money overnight for not done, which they're not able to do to help the poor. You know, it's very return. If you like, no, more, French politics, but just on the business of restoration. I mean, I think the French have quite a good record of interesting restorations and not necessarily wanting to be totally conservative and just put back. What was already there? I was talking to Jack Lang yesterday. The former culture minister who was one of the people in charge on the fronts from Mitterrand of that Louvre restoration which did have an ineffective short time. I think within five years like the proposed rebuilding of Notre dumb, and he was sort of raising the question that. Yeah. You could use new materials, even if you recreated the spa as that. We were saying it's the nineteenth century structure, you could recreate it, but it wouldn't have to necessarily be in the same materials. So I think you could have a situation where you might not have Aspira tool. You might have something else. You know? I'm quite impressed by the the people are not necessarily talking about totally copying. What was that the main pieces that were lost were? Actually wouldn't beams that they call the forest up in the roof, the huge number of very large oak beams that we used to hold up this leadin roof, and you know, I imagine they'll be looking for some imaginative solutions to replace that. And on the politics of it. I mean, these kinds of vents can take on. I'm fortunate simple IQ import and president Macron was already trying to recover from the relation thing. Had a big speech. Shut your for the very night that as it turned out not dumb. Almost burned down. Do we get have a sense of how this is playing for the president to be hard to say but early to say, you know, he immediately sort of caught the popular mood. I mean, he had cancel counselor speech with any half an hour to go on and brew house to the speech, apparently, the speech was actually prerecorded. So he didn't make that speech. It didn't make those announcements any very much focused on the issue of no predom-, and how to save it. And so on which I'm sure at the time was absolutely the right thing to do both from personal point of view, ethical bundle view from a political point of view. And I think everyone. Appreciated that the questions, you know, how long that will lost. And as I said already a day or so later couple of days later, we've got people sort of wanting to move on and get onto day-to-day politics, and attacking the rich and attacking the government and so on. So I think the moment the effect is pretty much neutral for Matt grant, you know, he did what any president would. I think have done which is to not continue with his normal business politics for a short time. He's getting to resume that probably next week. And you know, that's what people would want him to do. But I I think they would have been surprised if he had done anything else. The one thing where the government and micro might benefit is that this might not be the moment for the Asia. No, all the sort of Cassar the records who appear with them on these much is to lay waste to central Paris, which they threatened to do this coming Saturday. And this might be considered. You know, I think by the people who Paris as a particularly provocative and unpleasant thing to do when the symbol of French culture and religion has just been laid waste by fire. And then let's send by thinking about that. I mean victims said that Notre Dame was possibly the most visited tourist site in the world. I suddenly think Paris is said to be the most visited city in the world. I mean, I guess Paris's a number of symbols the Eiffel tower and so on, but this for it share ancient nece must be almost unique nurses in French. But in European culture, I think so because there isn't an equivalent over here in London, for instance. Because here we have the split between some Paul's and Westminster and Canterbury cathedrals world as the kind of the head of the church the mothership. So it embodies all of these things. So there's a sense that this building is France, we have nothing really to compare that to there's no building of similar significance. Maybe the pulse of Westminster that you mentioned. And then there's the residual kind of animosity towards politicians that goes with that. Which isn't there according to them and architecturally is it fair to say that it's unique because I guess FRANZ has these grand cathedrals as well on things of shots were ruling and so on, but I suppose it's the combination of its ancient is and it's. Centrality to Paris. I think necessarily what its position on the diversity in that site with the public square in front of it makes it it is century FRANZ. It's the place from which distances are measured. It's very consciously the heart it's going to physical and metaphysical heart of the country. So yes, absolutely. Is there?

Paris France President Trump French Earthquake FTC Edwin Heskitt Glasgow School Of Art Alasia Eiffel Tower Europe Ensley Franz London Britain Mitterrand Banovic Edwin New Jack Lang
Colbert recaps the subtle Trump disses at Bush’s funeral

WBZ Midday News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Colbert recaps the subtle Trump disses at Bush’s funeral

"Pilot who survived is said to be in fair condition. In the cause of the crash is being investigated pedestrian was injured earlier this afternoon when two cars and an MBA TA bus were involved in a crash at Hyde Park avenue and Canterbury street in roslindale four victims with non-life, threatening injuries were taken to area hospitals. Visitors to the state house today, get a dose of virtual reality. With a message WBZ's Carl Stevens reports from beacon hill, there's a large blue cube here in the corner of the state house. It contains AT and T's it can wait virtual reality simulator put on a pair of goggles. And you get a real sense of frightening sense of what can happen. If you text and drive. There's a portion where you here are some testimonials, and then there's

Hyde Park Carl Stevens Roslindale AT
"canterbury" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"canterbury" Discussed on WLAC

"News. The archbishop of Canterbury has declared that God is gender neutral gold. Gold is non binary, according so God, gold canoes any bathroom in in the hair off the gold is free to he doesn't have to go to the or she or what did they say? Or whatever they call it. They go goldies non binary gold is gender neutral and the entrepreneur mckendry wants to revise the book of common prime presumably the bible to provide gender neutral language for God. Because they think the idea that gold is masculine is a barrier to evangelizing young people. Because. Obviously young people don't like talk seek masculinity. And when you look at what God is afflicted humanity with over the generations plagues of locusts at all the rest of it the flood that's about as toxic as masculinity. Get so the now relaunching God as gender neutral. According to the archbishop of Canterbury, actually strikes me is pretty gender-neutral himself as indeed remarkable number of Anglican and Episcopalian, bishops that also while we're talking about I must what what's this story. Airbnb. You know, the thing that's where you go and stay in you decide you're not going to say at the Ritz-Carlton, you're gonna stay in some guy's house via vacation, and you go and Airbnb, and you look at the place, and they got nice pictures, and they provide you the house until super nonpolitical except that they're not doing it. It for Jews. They don't want like if you want to for example, if you'd like to go and spend Christmas in Bethlehem. Then you can't go and stay in an Airbnb house owned by an Israeli owned one because Abby NBA suddenly decide to get political there. No, political you can go and stay in crown prince, Mohammad bin Sultan, one of his houses. If you don't mind risking getting chopped up by his lads when they get a little bit frisky, you can go and the the nobody minds that, but they don't want you Airbnb does not want you staying in Jewish owned houses. And there was actually a funny tweet. I want to see if I can find this tweet because it did give me a giggle about how the reason Mary and Joseph slept in the stable. It's because Airbnb wouldn't list any of the Jewish owned houses in Bethlehem. And so that is how that is the latest intervention from Airbnb which was previously admirably known. Oh, yeah. Then why did Mary and Joseph have to stay stable. They couldn't get. They couldn't Airbnb is blocking all listings by Jews. So that's just something to think about if you're planning your trip to Bethlehem to celebrate. And actually doesn't that mess up the whole the whole Nativity thing because it's like God is the father, and Jesus is the son. Is it just gold now who is Z Z? Yeah. Gold is gold is now gender neutral. We'd no word yet on whether the archbishop of Canterbury thinks Jesus is gender neutral as you'll ever know if you've been to a co conclave bishops of the Anglican communion, there's a lot of gender neutrality about what's interesting. I don't wanna pick on the I mean, basically, I will pick on them slightly. I am Anglican church of Canada myself and the Episcopalian church and the church of England. Essentially post, Christian churches. Let's let's be up front about it. The things they're interested in nothing to do with the word of God. And they still have some terrific buildings. And they've still got some terrific churches, and the liturgy is beautiful in the book of Common Prayer and the King James bible is beautiful until this CD. It rewrites it and makes it all gender neutral language, but there is no future for churches that go down this path. We have fashions at the moment. We've got actually something. That's this story about it today. The school a school in London Christian parent, confronted the governors of had child's primary school. She objected to the Pride Day celebrations. This is in kindergarten. A kindergarten. She didn't she she. She didn't want the she was barred from entering her five year olds school to discuss the kindergarten being given four hours of detention after his mother objected to the LGBT quasi event. They were holding. Okay. So they were having that Pride Day thing. And they were doing the whole LGBTQ scene. And they've got a the the the principal's daughter at this school was wearing a t shirt that said why be racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, when you can just be quiet. So in other words, shut up about it. It's beyond discussion. They take kindergarten in detained him for four hours. And then refused to let the mother into the school to bring kindergarten a home, right because like pride days mandatory, these fads, this is fashion, and the fashion will change. We if you look at what happened to the Women's Day March where the founder of the women's March, which was supposed to be some anti-trump women's rights thing and got hijack basically by this Linda Sasso, American Muslim who's all hot for sharia because she's hip hop. Fashions change, fashions move on feminism Lauria Steinem style. Feminism has been superseded by groove here concepts like transgender is and and Islam and all the rest of these fashions, and what's more pathetic than Chacha's, which is supposed to speak for the timeless word of God for the values that endure be owned the fashions because God, whether he's male female, non binary, whatever I am the way the truth of the truth and the life. No one. Unto unto the light except fhu him, and and that is what they are abandoning when they get hung up on fashion. And if you're wondering why people say when when people do decide they need religion in their life, the way, they go for the Islam thing. Why would you? I mean, if you suddenly decide your life is empty and meaningless, and you've just been floating around on the fripperies of pop culture, and this and that and you're looking for something to give meaning to your life. Really gonna find it in the pyschopath leeann church these days, whether they just talking about climate change and transgender bathrooms like everybody else. Do you think? Well, like, I'd like something that's made of a bit stunned stuff and like Linda saw so you get halt for Americans sharia, there is no future for these posts Christian churches desperately trying to get themselves a bit in the non binary transgendered action..

Airbnb Bethlehem archbishop of Canterbury Jesus mckendry Canterbury Mohammad bin Sultan Linda Sasso pyschopath leeann church Mary Lauria Steinem Abby NBA King James bible Anglican church of Canada Chacha
"canterbury" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"canterbury" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"News. The archbishop of Canterbury has declared that God is gender neutral. Gold is non binary, according so God gold canoes any bathroom in in the hair off the gold is free to he doesn't have to go to the all she or what did they say? Or whatever they call it. They go goldies non binary gold is gender neutral and the entrepreneur if he wants to revise the book of common prime presumably the bible to provide gender-neutral language for God. Because they think the idea that God is masculine is a barrier to evangelizing young people because. Obviously young people don't like toxic masculinity. And when you look at what God is afflicted humanity with over the generations plagues of locusts at all the rest of it the flood that's about as toxic has masculinity. Get so they're now relaunching God as gender neutral. According to the archbishop of Canterbury strikes me is pretty gender-neutral himself as indeed a remarkable number of Anglican, and the pyschopath Lian bishops did also, well, we're talking about I must say one was this story Airbnb, you know, the thing that's where you go and stay in decide you're not going to say the Ritz Carlton insane. Some guy's house fee vacation, and you go an Airbnb, and you look at the place, and they got nice pictures, and they provide you the house until super nonpolitical except that they're not. Doing it for Jews. They don't want like if you want to for example, if you'd like to go and spend Christmas in Bethlehem. Then you can go and stay in an Airbnb house owned by an Israeli owned one because Airbnb is suddenly decided to get political. They know political you can go and stay in crown prince Mohammad bin Sultan of his houses, if you don't mind risking getting chopped up by his lads when they get a little bit frisky. The nobody minds that, but they don't want you Airbnb does not want you staying in Jewish owned houses. And there was actually a funny tweet I wanna of saving and find this tweet because it did give me a giggle about how the reason Mary and Joseph slept in the stable. It's because Airbnb wouldn't list any of the Jewish owned houses in Bethlehem. And so that is how that is the latest intervention from Airbnb which was previously admirably known. Oh, yeah there. Yeah. Why did Mary and Joseph have distinct stable? They couldn't get. They couldn't Airbnb is blocking all listings by Jews. So that's the thing about if you'll planning your trip to Bethlehem to celebrate. And actually doesn't that mess up a whole. The the whole Nativity thing. Because it's like God is the father, and Jesus is the son. Is it just God? Now who is Z Z? Yeah. God is God is now gender neutral. We'd no word yet on whether the archbishop of Canterbury thinks Jesus is gender neutral as you'll ever know if you've been to a. Conclave of bishops of the Anglican communion. There's a lot of gender neutrality about what's interesting. I don't wanna pick on the I mean, basically cow we'll pick on them slightly. I am Anglican church of Canada myself. And the episcopal church and the church of England, essentially post, Christian churches. Let's let's be up front about it. The things they've interested in nothing to do with the word of God. And they still have some terrific buildings. And they've still got some terrific churches, and the liturgy is beautiful in the book of Common Prayer and the King James bible is beautiful until they see rewrites it and makes it all gender neutral language, but there is no future for churches that go down this path. We have fashions at the moment. We've got actually something. That's the story about it today. The school a school in London Christian parents confronted. The governors have had child's primary school. She objected to the Pride Day celebrations. This is in kindergarten. A kindergarten. She didn't she she she didn't want. She was barred from entering have five year old school to discuss the kindergarten being given four hours of detention after his mother objected to the LGBT quality event they were holding. Okay. So they were having that Pride Day thing. And they were doing the whole LGBTQ scene. And they've got a the the the the principal's daughter at this school was wearing a t shirt that said why be racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, when you can just be quiet. So in other words, shut up about it. It's beyond discussion. They take a kindergarten in detained him for four hours. And then refused to let the mother into the school to bring kindergarten ahome, right because like Pride Day is mandatory these fads, this is fashion, and the fashion will change. We look at what happened to the Women's Day March where the founder of the women's March, which was supposed to be some anti-trump women's rights thing and got hijacked basically by this Linda Sasso, American Muslim who's all hot for sharia because she's hip hop. Fashions change, fashions move on feminism, Gloria Steinem, Sal. Feminism has been superseded by groove here concepts like transgenderism, and and Islam and all the rest of these fashions, and what's more pathetic than Chechens, which is supposed to speak for the timeless word of God for the values that endure be owned the fashions because God, whether he's male female, non binary, whatever I am the way the truth the truth and the life. No, one Helmuth unto unto the light except through him. And and that is what they are abandoning when they get hung up on fashion. And if you want bring why people say when when people do decide, they need religion in their life, the way, they go for the Islam thing. Why would you? I mean, if you suddenly decide your life is empty and meaningless, and you've just been floating around on the fripperies of pop culture, and this and that and you're looking for something to give meaning to your life. Yeah. You really gonna find it in the episcopal million church. These days where they just talking about climate change and transgender bathrooms like everybody else. What do you think? Well, I'd like I'd like something that's made a bit stunned stuff and like Linda saw. So you get halt for American sharia, there is no future for these posts Christian churches desperately trying to get themselves bit in the non binary transgendered action. It's pathetic and a month before Christmas, even by the standards of the Episcopalian church and the Anglican communion communion. It's even more pathetic, by their standards open line. Black Friday, Mark Stein in for rush. And we will take your calls straight ahead. You're listening to the network..

Airbnb Bethlehem archbishop of Canterbury Jesus Linda Sasso Anglican communion prince Mohammad bin Sultan Anglican church of Canada Mary Gloria Steinem church of England pyschopath Lian King James bible Canterbury Ritz Carlton Joseph
College football scores this week

CBS Sports Radio

01:08 min | 1 year ago

College football scores this week

"Not a power five conference accomplishment. It's an accomplishment. So if if there is a a balance somewhere in the middle, I'm more toward give them credit and props for what they're accomplishing. Then downplaying the significance of it because they're not in a power five conference. Well, the team that is by far the best team in the nation right now that is Alabama handling Mississippi State today. Let's go to Tom Canterbury in Tuscaloosa. Patriots with thirty five seconds remaining here in third quarter. Alabama continues to hold on to a one nothing lead over Mississippi State talked to you last Bilo. Threw his second interception of the season. A knife. Cast by Willie gay junior player for to be safe resulted in the second turnover of the day for Alabama. The first one coming up in the first half deepest has been suffocating Alabama. They have five sacks. They've only given up five first downs. Mississippi State and only one hundred thirty six yards, but the Alabama has not been playing up their normal. Standard is probably the best seven

Alabama Mississippi Tom Canterbury Tuscaloosa One Hundred Thirty Six Yards Thirty Five Seconds
"canterbury" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"canterbury" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Doctors diagnosed diseases more accurately the work is supported by the european organization that operates the largest particle physics lab in the world i spoke to the father and son professors philip antony butler from the university of canterbury in christchurch i started asking philip how it felt the scanning is slow it's sort of mri type speeds so i needed to stay motionless as i could actually saw the result i felt ecstatic i didn't think i could set the that still for that long and not have any motion showing up on the images so foot didn't twitch and what did the scan show that showed that i had a normal ankle as a radiologist i can differ that fair though we could see the bone and very very clear we could meizhou the calcium within the bone we could measure the fat and the water within the soft tissues and we could do all of that at the sub millimeter resolution the sort of mike from resolution so from my medical background i'd say we're getting information we'd get off a cat scanner plus information we'd get off an mri scanner plus something would get off jillian and system so we're getting boats of molecular information from that you get off other scanners and we're getting an phenomenally high resolution and so what would that mean for doctors well we've done a lot of research on the previous few years on small scanners outs fiszman scanners and we've been looking at at the roma's as the things that cause heart disease and stroke and we know we can see things and those at the rumors that are very hard to measure in other ways and so as he heads towards the clinic at will help prevent heart disease.

christchurch mike philip antony butler university of canterbury
"canterbury" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"canterbury" Discussed on WLOB

"Thinks about diversity then let's see if he still thinks that anyone who fears the invasion of europe by middle easterners of a certain persuasion are bigots and if they're just eurosceptic rightwing maniacs and let's see what he thinks about diversity after three months in an african village run by boko haram we'll see if he liked that now if it was a podcast i would take off from here and then graphically described what would happen to him in that village in that hut in the straw the archbishop of england the archbishop of canterbury this is how out of touch these people are with reality but since i can only do what i did that's what i did some asking you do you currently listen to this show but you also listen to other podcasts and i've asked you what you listen to this show if it were different on a podcast i mean there are new stories right but you don't really want to hear that i mean go on the drudge report fox news michael savage and you could see all the news in about how long about how long it takes you to ignore someone's commentary about a few million seconds you can read the headlines look at the pictures and you can decide whether to click on a story you know it's click bait every turns click with pictures the whole world is click bait the whole world of the internet has become click bait through headlines and through pictures that you know that so where does that leave us talk radio are we now the silent movies of the media are we in the past or are we still on the forefront of news and commentary it's something people are asking and i have my own opinion i would say if you're stuck on the trump mula thing you are the silent movies you're in the silent movies there's no not a talking if you're going to do is collusion mueller trump komi everyday everyday everyday everyday till people want to pull out their eyelids you're actually in the silent movie business and you're not going to ever be in a talkie if on the other hand you're willing to take a chance and be creative on talk radio and let it.

europe england archbishop of canterbury michael savage million seconds three months
"canterbury" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"canterbury" Discussed on Channel 955

"But can do my phone again feeling anxious be only can pay china find a way to canterbury is there some ratty keaveney sometimes in and muscleman kids cavein sometimes lacking now kid hey what do you want to hear mine by bazi dearborn zone i can do that channel nine five five more in the middle of sixty minutes of nonstop.

china sixty minutes
"canterbury" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"canterbury" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"In april with its sweet showers pierces to the root all of nature's starting to manufacturer sweet sap it is then that people want to go on pilgrimages that's the beginning of the canterbury tales and if we think of life being renewed in the spring and poetry helping us to go on that pilgrimage it's kind of interesting to me the scholar in the poet in me get to come together in making those kinds of connections so february is african american history one and march is women history ma and april is national poetry month as well as national jasmine so for me these are just times to focus so i love for people enjoy poetry i certainly am an african american every month of the year and a w woman as well so i think these months or design and thank you for talking about national holocaust but they're designed to just give us more focus and more being to the point and so it it kind of like spearheads our experiences not that they're not valid and certainly being practice every month of the year but i love the idea of a national poetry month to really celebrate so maybe that's the word to celebrate what we've learned from it and so i'm going to end with this point southern love i would love to be like a good pot of greens pick the tenders parts separate from the hard stem wash gently and thoroughly removing every bit of dirt and grime rinsing over and over and over and over with a clear clean water of forgiveness season with savory meat herbs and spices and then simmer simmer seven.

canterbury
"canterbury" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"canterbury" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"But can do a phone again anxious fade to be paid thing china found a way to canterbury is there somebody will get not gonna in song in someone cavein sometimes lacking ninety four nine is your shot at one thousand dollars now text the keyword many two hundred two hundred you'll get a text confirming entry plus iheart radio info standard data and message rates apply that's money to hundred hundred.

china one thousand dollars
"canterbury" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"canterbury" Discussed on Channel 955

"But consumer phone again anxious fade only china find a way to canterbury is there some bratty roar in some cave in bed john someone but the cave sometimes i feel lacking now you can tell google home to play channel nine five five which is.

china google
"canterbury" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"canterbury" Discussed on WCHS

"Couch secost thirty two thousand dollars uh i'd steep canterbury the prior administration director of this court uh was solely responsible for a thirty two thousand dollar couch and i again i think it's absolutely outrageous if you step back uh the courts started renovations uh in about two thousand eight i wasn't elected to the court until two thousand and and thirteen so ninety six percent of the entire renovations work completed by the time i even came to the court but mr canterbury was in charge of all these renovations uh most of which uh he did a pretty good job with with a lot of things but i will never ever come on this show or any show and defend the excessive and outrageous expenditures ever st justice steve this is not a quarter of all know what he's under rosier but steve canterbury says about the he says that you chose the particular material for the celts he has a different version of that story well let's be clear about this and let set the stage as far as this not being quarters wall but you have very smart listeners out there and they can put two and two together mr canterbury he was a rogue employee who uh i started an investigation of various expenditures and when i became the chief justice in january of this year i had a third vote and i fire mr canterbury and we have continued the investigation and some of the things that i have discovered in some of the things that i found are so troubling to me that i have personally contacted the state's attorney's office and let me be clear about that hoppy that is a step that one makes uh lightly that's a pretty serious thing and he's well aware of of investigations and looking into things he is a disgruntled fired employee who is uh out there trying to uh discredit the court and.

director chief justice mr canterbury attorney steve canterbury thirty two thousand dollars thirty two thousand dollar ninety six percent