35 Burst results for "Candida"

Bitcoin Dominance Is Back

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:12 min | Last month

Bitcoin Dominance Is Back

"Ten rotten now bitcoin up. Will we close above twelve thousand eight minutes suggests that possibly not as we are at eleven thousand, nine hundred. and Seventeen dollars. That's right. We did tap at twelve thousand and there is some resistance at twelve thousand had way basically pulled back from that twelve thousand mark. Bicycling high of nearly twelve, thousand, sixty, three pulled back. It's a NAS looking Candida this trend looks superb I love another day to push up through twelve thousand and ready set sail full summa. They got look at the end of the day. We could pull back from here. This resistance I wouldn't be surprised to see a pullback from He. Also being pretty much smoked Ratna bitcoins dominance has increased significantly. One of the big bitcoin dominance moves that I've seen in a long time up one point five percent. Now, that's significant because he actually look at this shot, there's not very many big moves in there as a matter of fact, the shot that I'm looking at here, the biggest move is three percent and that was back twenty seven. Th of July we've got high allies building up into that level Bruce Resistance broken Bam a good push Now's ahead of this. You're ahead of this if you've been listening and following and that's why. Ninety percent of my portfolio is in Bitcoin I I've been watching this setting myself up like this and on pretty happy right now, sixty one point six full percent although market cap is in bitcoins hands too. So you are aware and it's gaining momentum onto a theory will down eleven two point eight percent sitting at three sixty, eight, nine, three, we gotta get up through that three ninety, five region go push up three or four hundred. A two-point upset down mix up paid at one percent rotten out twenty four point three cents nothing for me to be trading. It's pretty ugly bitcoin cash to two hundred and forty dollars. Ninety five cents. It's down three point six, six percent rotten now and dom. Yeah. That trend look. It's something quite as national the daily anymore it was it was looking superb until well. It wasn't last night. Lot Clinton's at forty, six dollars ninety cents down two point three, three percent wrought now, and the dying shot just doesn't look very active. We need to be above fifty dollars for lot couldn't have any chance of momentum continuing on through in when need to get about fifty to really fifty, one, fifty, fifty, two dollars when they're all off because we're at forty, six ninety. V again, flat nothing ready to speak of at one fifty seven, twenty nonsense. It's down one point six, nine percent. It's an ugly looking job. Let's be strike. The trend that was looking very nice there on Donna just yesterday has now gone ahead and said, no, I'm not Nice I. Am the Ugly Duckling Down five point eight percent on. Todd Donna. It really just filed push through it above ten cents still ten point two cents will uphold. We'll have to wait and see. Bonnet was also three point seven, nine percent minutes shine as I got stopped at and that's my third stop-loss. Sorry. My third losing trade in a right this is the two weeks and it's something to consider. Losing a Austin have three losing trades in Iraq. Especially when I'm so selective as have been recently I'm going to go to improperly reduced risk a little bit as the market you know the tribes have been really good but the market has an helps out and we send gone through a transitional period of feels very much like two thousand, seventeen old touch on the minute twenty, nine, hundred, seventy, nine cents on bonnet down three point seven, nine percent sideways it is down to die but the market itself. Saw Wise toodle fifty two in the biggest move on the top ten it's a red one. It's down nine point nine percents link yet it filed ten dollars. We are nine dollars and eighty three cents. So what does this look like to me? What am I doing with this well? I. Position Myself already to be more in bitcoin anything else I was at one stage heavily in Alz on well from that and then I moved back to bitcoin not too long guy I can share that with you on this podcast.

Bonnet Todd Donna Ratna Bitcoins ALZ Iraq Clinton Austin
Over Shadowed

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:32 min | Last month

Over Shadowed

"Welcome to kids myths and Mysteries. I'm your host can't come today cloaked in secrecy or overshadowed by current events. It would seem the only thing on the news today is our political situation as we approach election for President of the United States. And then of course, we have our economic debacle and fifty four million people who are food insecure not to mention some very serious changes in the weather. These have overshadowed something if you've watched or listened to the news you may have noticed the occasional use of the phrase. We didn't want to panic the American people. The truth is those words usually come out of the mouth of a politician who didn't want to face the backlash of his constituents over a particular decision. He made what if there was something that was real and not a political Ploy or conspiracy theory something that could kill you that have been closed off. Secrecy or overshadowed by today's events and it's only now being acknowledged as a threat still played down though. That's something that's a disease. It's a fungus no less than the common name. The one you hear used in the news is candida. Auris as the time of this podcast it remains drug-resistant. It also remains virtually unknown. It is rarely caught early because it's early symptoms are fever and chills that don't improve after antibiotic treatment think for a moment how many times you've gotten a fever sweat it out. So I mentioned candida. Auris is a fungus yeast is a fungus that lives in the body generally a fungus cannot Thrive or grow in the body's ninety-eight-point-six degree temperature that candida. Auris can or body is a sealed system. Candia artists can live on the skin fairly harmless lie, but if a cut is infected, Did with it or it is introduced into the blood it will be fatal in recorded cases. Those that have been diagnosed with candida. Auris and the blood have died within ninety days of the diagnosis wage in one case. It was determined that the hospital room of the victim of candida. Auris was contaminated with the fungus. It was on the hospital bed rails to Sheetz the doorknobs. It was also determined that standard disinfectants used to clean hospital rooms had no effect on the fungus because it can live on the skin. This means a doctors and nurses have to find a way to eliminate the risk of contaminating patients just like the FBI with its Ten Most Wanted list the CDC has an urgent threat list and candida. Auris is at the top of that list or wage was until the coronavirus surfaced yet. This super fungus is not new in emerged in Venezuela that appeared in Spain india-pakistan then turned up in South Africa job. In the United States has been detected in New York, New Jersey in Illinois. So how many in the United States have been affected one of the problems with researching something that is cloaked in secrecy and overshadowed by the coronavirus is getting accurate figures. I have been given a number ranging from thirteen cases to over 700,000 truth more than half. The people the contract candy ours died within ninety days. So the death rate is either 6 or 7 or 350,000 researchers say that as the climate in certain areas has increased or changed or heated up candida. Auris has adapted to the point that it can live in the human body. They have found that it is also related to agriculture as more antifungals are applied to plants to keep them from rotting in these plants are consumed and the incident of candida auris infection. Will increase the fungus can be found on meets manure fertilized vegetables. Although there is no cure for an individual that is infected hospitals are adapting a type of robot that uses pulsating violet light that removes microorganisms including candida. Auris for the average American researchers say it is best to consume organic fruits and vegetables. That's avoiding the rampant use of fungicides that contribute to the search in this drug-resistant

Candida Auris United States President Trump Fever FBI South Africa New Jersey New York CDC Venezuela Spain Illinois
Bringing Democracy to the People With Amanda Litman

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:12 min | Last month

Bringing Democracy to the People With Amanda Litman

"So Amanda Run was founded on the day of trump's inauguration. So tell me a little bit about the organization and why you founded it. So I worked for Hillary's for two years before that for President Obama for the Florida Governor's race in for nonprofit and between the week after election day I, got a facebook message from somebody I went to college with Hey Amanda. You've worked in politics. You know this world I. Want to run for office because of trump president seems like anybody can do this. What do I do and I did? Not have an answer for him. I did not know what to tell him to go. He wanted to be more than just a volunteer and more than just voter. If he wanted to actually lead, there was nowhere that would be guaranteed to take this call. So I reached out to a whole bunch of people. One of whom became my co-founder that's incredible operative, Dross Morales for Cudjoe we wrote a plan we built a website and me launch run for something. As you said on inauguration day we thought we'd got maybe a hundred people who wanted to run for local office instead in the first week, we had a thousand as of today we're up. To more than fifty one, thousand young people across the country who've raised their hands just say I want to run for local office what next so we've built an organization that does best that we find more people who wanna run things like School Board City Council and state legislature and we help them through the process I think it's so cool and one of the things I love so much about run for something is that you proudly self identify as progressive and that you came from the Obama and DNC campaigns and I, think there is this kind of lake mistaken belief that you can't be progressive and be a traditional. Democrat. So what are your? Thoughts on that lay that out for US unpack that a little bit. How does it work for us? I think we define Progressive Democrat really broadly, we look for a set of shared values shared belief that everybody deserves access to affordable healthcare that everybody's sort of access to education that we need to fight for working families that we need to protect organized labor that we need to protect it and for the environment, and we can share those goals and disagree on the tactics that we need to accomplish them. But the only way we get to really implement those tactics or even have a starting place to decide a meme is to win elections. I. So, for us a Democrat or progressive in New York might look a little different than Democrat in Vienna right. But we gotta be willing to win everywhere to run everywhere on our set of shared values and we also know that for most people especially for local elections. Partisan identification is the way they make their voting decision they look at the ballot and they say, this one's a democrat. Cool. That's all I know about them. So for us, right really important to support people running under that party line knowing that that's the way the most voters make up their minds. It's so smart and it makes so much sense because every district of restate the. Issues are different and I think people forget that when we live in these big cities that when you look at some place, a state that isn't sort of a metropolitan city, you get such tunnel vision about what the issues are in the context of your life that you forget that it could be different in the context of someone else's life and especially because what we only work on local elections. So Library School Board, Water Board, University Board and Community College Boards and Yes State House and State Senate. The issues that you're focusing at these levels is often a little bit more but also a lot less partisan it how keeping water clean how are We getting trash picked up are we funding our roads and our schools? The tangible delivery of those issues makes it so that what it means to be a progressive on them are things like my favorite example here we work for the Coroner Candida in Jefferson County. Colorado which factor more than thirteen hundred counties they'll elect corners he was reading on a progressive platform. The thing that he wanted to ensure was that after death trans people were not being this gendered, which was something that the current coroner was doing, and that is a really important thing because the way that gender is recorded on death certificates affects crime statistics and homicide statistics and suicide statistics. All of which are really important especially as they relate to a community that is disproportionately represented in things like suicide homicide. So as you think about what is the progressive value look like an issue like a coroner's office? That's one of the ways in which you can show up and it was a really interesting way to see the way that our values can trade themselves into progressive policies and all kinds of offices

President Obama United States Amanda Run Donald Trump Cudjoe Facebook Hillary President Trump Florida School Board City Council Jefferson County New York Yes State House Dross Morales Co-Founder Colorado DNC State Senate Vienna
"candida" Discussed on Artwork from C.P.

Artwork from C.P.

05:58 min | Last month

"candida" Discussed on Artwork from C.P.

"As on. This. and. Those of you that don't have go. And could celebrate. Canadian thanksgiving enjoy knitting Thanksgiving and yes and could we also swag team by the on and take it out of alcohol gas please and as your cookie, the client and took. And to Kim's and at least announced. All Canadian thanksgiving because I doubt you're going out I, mean I. Spoke to a person Candida this morning. Wait people I recorded. In. This is auto pretends we we call it. And No Mean.

Candida Kim
Frost Protection

Plantrama

04:00 min | 3 months ago

Frost Protection

"GonNa talk about what you can do if an early freeze is predicted for your area. Now, that may seem hard to imagine right now at the end of August where it's hot and Sweaty, but the fact is next month. Those temperatures are going to start going down and depending on where you garden. You might have some very chilly nights. and. If you're not ready to up on your growing season, there are a couple of things that you can do. That's right now our friend. Nikki Deboer, she lives up in Nova Scotia, and it's a fellow garden communicator and chase sort of has a specialty of extending the season. So you should look for Nikki's book about Extending Your Garden, harvest if you're interested in you live in a cold place. Candida or northern Wisconsin or Minnesota, and all these places that get cold early, this is the time to kind of get prepared if you are an in a location where it's possible for you to have a frost in September and your garden is still producing well, this is the time to get prepared and I would say one of the first things to do is to have on hand some of the non woven fabric such as harvest. Guard, there are several non woven white fabrics. They're breathable water goes through light goes through and they make a good protection for plants whether they are put over hoops in a garden to keep them up off the plant or whether you drape them just right over the plan at the last minute because dear, you've seen the forecast and I've got to do something you can just drop them right over I think they are more effective if you. Can Get some airspace in between the plant and the top of the fabric? And another method that you can use if you're in a rural area and have easy access to Hay bales is to line up some Hay bales on both sides of your row or on the edges of your raised beds and then stretch the. Non Woven fabric over the Hay bales, and that makes kind of a little shelter that's insulated undecideds and covered on the top. Yeah and you can just peel back that cloth during the day if you want to when it warms up and then and then lay down again at night now I know the first time. I heard about this I thought how can that tiny little lightweight piece of cloth do anything to protect my plants? It just didn't make sense to me. It wasn't believable didn't seem possible. But it actually does work. Now do you have any idea C l? If it's going to be. Twenty in your garden, it might not work if it's going to be twenty eight in your garden, it might be enough. Do you have any idea how many degrees worth of protection this could actually give you I think it. It really does vary. It varies first of all as to when you put it on if you put it on earlier in the day, it traps some heat in the soil actually it. So it can help hold heat in the soil, which is then released at night and it's not just the fabric. That's holding some heat in, but it's also the fact that the fabric has helped the heat build up in that area during the day. So so I don't know specific degrees than I. Do think it depends on the airspace. How big is it depends on how much soil is exposed and it depends on when you put that covering on in order to help the greenhouse effect that's going on there. Well, it's a great way to extend your growing season's certainly at the end of the season and if some of you have. Decided to take territorial up on their discount offer and you've ordered the seeds that you WanNa plant for your fall and winter growing. This is a technique you are definitely going to want to take advantage of

Nikki Deboer Candida Wanna Nova Scotia Wisconsin Minnesota
a secret wrapped in mystery

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:44 min | 3 months ago

a secret wrapped in mystery

"If you watched or listened to the news, you may have noticed the. Use of the phrase we didn't WANNA panic. The American people the truth is those words usually come out of the mouth will call Titian who didn't want to face the backlash of his constituents over particular decision he made. But what if there was something that was real and not a particular political ploy or conspiracies theory something that could kill you that had been cloaked in secrecy and his only now being acknowledged as a threat still played down. That's something is a disease, a fungus, no less the common name. The one you'll hear used in the news is indeed rs as of the time of this podcast, it remains drug resistant, they don't have a cure. It is rarely caught early because it's early symptoms are fever and chills at don't improve after antibiotic treatment. Think for a moment. How many times have you gotten a fever just sweated it out. As I mentioned KENDEDA RS is a fungus yeast as a fungus that lives in the body. Generally, a fungus cannot thrive or grow embodies ninety eight point, six degree temperature that can deal or a can our body is a sealed system. Artists can live on the skin fairly harmlessly. But if a cut is infected with it or introduced into the blood, it will be fatal. In. Cases those that have been diagnosed with CONDADO RS in the blood have died within ninety days of the diagnosis. In one case it was determined that the hospital room of victim of Candy RS was contaminated with the fungus it was on the hospital bedrooms the phone, the sheets, the doorknobs it was also determined that standard disinfectants used to clean hospital rooms had no effect on the fungus. Because it can live on the skin. This means the doctors and nurses have to find a way to eliminate the risk of contaminating patients just like the FBI with its ten most wanted list. The CDC has an urgent threat list and Candida RS is at the top. Yet. This super fungus is not new. It emerged in Venezuela then appeared in Spain India. Pakistan that it turned up in South Africa. In the United States has been detected in New York New Jersey and Illinois. So how many in the United States have been affected? Will one of the problems with researching something that is cloaked in secrecy is getting an accurate figure. I have been given numbers ranging anywhere from thirteen cases to over seven hundred thousand cases truth more than half the people contracted need. Ours have died within ninety days. So the death rate is six or three, hundred and fifty thousand. Researchers say that as the climate in certain areas has increased, candied orange has adopted to the point that it can live in the human body. They found that it is also related to agriculture as more antifungal are applied to plans to keep them from rotting these plants are consumed incident of data infection will increase. The fungus can be found on meets manure fertilized vegetables. Although there is no cure for an individual that is infected hospitals are adapting to type of robot that uses a pulsating violently. That removes micro organisms including candied office. For the average American researchers, say it is best to consume organic fruits and vegetables thus avoiding the rampant use of fungicides contributing to the surge of this drug resistant fungus.

Fungus Candy Rs Cure United States Titian Fever FBI Candida Pakistan CDC Illinois South Africa New York Venezuela New Jersey India Spain
Depression Loves Junk Food

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

09:49 min | 8 months ago

Depression Loves Junk Food

"Hello and welcome to this week's edition of the Green Wisdom Health show. I'm John Lewis. And I'm Dr Louis and we are going to talk to you today about depression. Don't we sound excited about it The name of this show is called. Depression loves junk food and the reason we chose this for all of you out there listening is because we know a lot of you guys are very depressed and we realized that the more depressed. You are the more junk food. You're eating and sadly more the junk food restaurants are open because a good restaurants are not open as of yet in many states so We're kind of left with the drive-thrus now and so Dr Lewis is going to tell us today. About how that correlates. He's going to educate us a little bit about something called biofilms which Many of you probably not heard of. But they're actually one of the causes as to why you want to eat some bad food so it's not all in your head and we're going to help you make sense of it and we're going to help give you a plan to help you make better choices. So Dr Lewis. Can you put all this together for us to teach us about biofilms? You know and I think part of the reason we're doing this show is because you know we're in the middle of this too and it seems like ever since we ate a Brownie. That was not gluten free. And it had all the regular bad steph in it we've been craving more and more junk and we've been feeling worse and worse mentally so we thought with it's happening to us and we should know better We definitely need to educate you guys. So you have a clue as to what's going on with you so Dr Lous pull us out of the whole Pulis. Neal is go down a rabbit hole. Pull out of the rabbit hole and get us back to health and happiness and eating correctly. Well Pete Pete up in Missouri Concordia I think Columbia Concordia. He said I wish you'd just quit talking about rabbit holes. Just get to it so sorry. Pete can't do it. I don't know I re- I refuse to go down there. You know to into depression because I come from a family of very negative depressed people and it's like I'll be damned if I'm going to do that. I dislike. I see what they get you. I'm GonNa have fun and I finally figured out that I'm old and my sleep. Somebody said why do you know you're GonNa die in your sleep? Said because I'd fat at son of a gun trying to take me awake so we're going to have fun at the s There there's a lot that I really really really want to say and you know thinks about it. Is You know just? I don't even know you know we live in an illusion or delusion that we think we can control things and because the Internet makes us really really intelligent not really doesn't it makes you somewhat educated but it makes you an educated fool so we think more knowledge gives us more understanding which gives us more control and it really doesn't so during this time. I'm GonNa tell you what you can't control. You can't control whether somebody else follows the social distancing roles you can't control the actions of others feel like I'm Jeff Foxworthy If you can't control predicting what will happen you might be a redneck. You can't control other people's motives you can't control the amount of toilet paper in the store God is going to be fun. You can't control how long this is going to last and I personally think it's ninety percent crap bowl but that's me Join shooting straight with Dr Lewis and you can see me and my mask. It's made out of crown rule bag and yes. I emptied to sucker and gained three pounds. So That's how much OB- stressed eight because I'm guilty but you can't control how other people react so the the things you can't control a little matter at least I tell people you can't control that you can influence a lot of things you can always control your positive attitude. You can make that. You can turn off the news which it'd be really fun. If everybody did it would get over there. Salama quickly Feet you can find fun things to do at home and Janet just rolls her eyes when I bought another bucket of weird colored pint sock start paint rocks with grandkids. You can control whether you follow the CDC recommendations or not but you do control that you can't control others. You can limit your social media if itch negative unfriendly which there's two or three. I'm thinking about unfriendly but I think that helps me practice my Christianity WanNa deal with idiots such as one or two or three You can control your own social distancing if you think that is really a thing but most importantly you can control whether you're graceful and kind to other people and then and that's what I think we need. More of this is kindness so We'll talk a little technical stuff If you'd like anti I'm sorry my smart Alexa Way out today. Don't believe everything you think. Sometimes it's gone through the wrong map the wrong filter so We won't talk about bow films a little bit. I guess. That's what Janet you know. What is about them while the people have done the consult with me? I'll tell them. Well you're chlorides little on the low side your proteins a little low and if you don't die digest protein you cannot digest bow films and you have what we call a stealth pathogenic usually is yeast fungus buyers. Whatever it can be a lot of different things. But they these little micro organisms organisms they adapt and mutate. And so you have to have certain things that can allow you to get past the bow film and kill the infection and yes your body knows how to do it. It just needs the raw materials in in order for that to happen. So you know when I'm practicing I try to be integrative and holistic which you know that's really really a good thing to be. I don't think a reductionist Way of looking at things has gotten us very far but sometimes when a patient comes in they feel like they have no power at all and they're they're struggling with something they don't understand. Try to get it simple for them. I say well. It's too many toxins not enough nutrients one or the other or both and I get a lot of people when they consult with made that cry and I'll say I'm sorry. Did I say something to hurt? Your painless Nice. And now you're the first one that listened to in acts like you understand what Janet and I've gone through this stuff to people that complain about fatigue brain fog. I love it when I say brain fog. I know exactly what to do And it gets most of them Great Relief and that's the been photo man you've heard me talk about it and People that talk about digestive complaints. Well it's digestive enzymes and you need these things to help. Cut The bow FEM and two more properly in more Thoroughly Digest your food so that does not go down and create leaky gut. I'm mentioned a whole lot of different supplements and there's always somebody won't to hook onto Janet and my train and somebody said the other day. Well you know you said this and this and this about immune system and I would like to introduce my article about bovine colostrum and that helps immune system to. I'm not GonNa let that particular person get on our train and ride it but yes boven colostrum works. I take it. We have it here. You probably never heard me talk about it but if you're not taking SBI which is a bovine derived immunoglobulin. You're missing the boat. I don't care what you've got the ought to be thrown that stuff in your body every day You heard me talk last week. I don't know what we were talking about. Might have been sugar diabetes. Whatever and I said too much. Sugar Equals fewer vegetables equals. Less zinc equals. Poor taste equals more sugar. That's the vicious cycle that we get into and I think that's GONNA lead into why sometimes we get on this junk food journey and that helps feed the things that create bow films like the Candida Fungus. There's actually a book that says cancers of Fungus by Dr Simon Seaney and frankly it's kind of rare to get a book that just blows me away intellectually disguise. What the heck over my head. But I think if I had a bad cancer. I think I'd go see him at Rome Italy but read the book Cancers a fungus in the nurse. You know plenty of research. Studies like out of Johns Hopkins at talks about sugar can contribute greatly to creating cancer because it feeds the yeast fungus and these bow films are not broken down. So how do you break down? Abou- him well one thing you do. Is You take digestive enzymes. Because it has the things to break them down.

Janet Depression John Lewis Pete Pete Dr Louis Dr Lewis Green Wisdom Health Cancer Dr Lous Jeff Foxworthy Johns Hopkins Dr Simon Seaney Neal OB Rome Italy SBI Columbia Concordia
20 Minutes With Susan Neal

20 Minute Fitness

08:52 min | 9 months ago

20 Minutes With Susan Neal

"So Susan. Welcome to the show. Firstly a big thank-you. It's good to be really great chat. We have today so once again. A massive thank you. I think what I like to start wave is if you could give us a bit of a background to yourself and your experience on the Muslim conversation as we go home okay well Almond Aren. I have an MBA and also a masters in health science. And I am a certified Yoga teacher for over twenty years. I also have written seven healthy. Living Books Two of them on Yoga and four of them basically on how to get off sugar and CARBS and overall improve your health weight and Diet Amazing. Not Something I definitely want to touch them a lot as well as obviously we know that it can be difficult to stick of change on lifestyles for the better of God's nutrition said now be a strong theme proud podcast. And I'm very interested to hear what you had to sail nuts but I think what I I wanted to touch on really is not obviously from your backyard. It's amazing to hear that you use ronin practice really to get yourself back to being fit and healthy when you came to the age of fifty and I think if you could give all audience a of background as that period of your life and what you went through on the procedures you put in place nursing so fight to help and they'll be very interesting. Okay so our at forty five for forty nine years I had great help and then at the age of fifty. I lost my help. I had ten medical diagnoses in two surgeries and it was all from. It stemmed from an abscessed tooth and oh I had Depression Ovarian cysts hole in my retina. Candida infection of my gut vitamin D low. I mean just one thing. After another and my health declined. The doctors you know. Put me on adrenal fatigue. Vitamins Hormone Green this that the other they did the two surgeries and then they were like. Um You know that's all we could do for you so I started looking nurse and start looking at a different alternative methods tried acupuncture massage but the one that was effective was I had a colonic. Irrigation which is like a royal enema because my stools changed after they had put me on antibiotics and steroids. When I had my emergency root ca now and the colonic therapists found that I had a candida infection of my call. One and Candida is a yeast and it grows up normally a pencil in on our body but when you take antibiotics that kills the good guys. You're good gut buddies probiotics and you got in. It allows the bad guys to take over. And some of those bad guys could lead to an auto immune disease it could lead to leaky gut and then for me at led to a candida infection. I went to my internal medicine doctor and he did not know how to treat a candida infection. I had to research on my own to figure it out. You have to Candida loves sugar. Carbs refined carbohydrates and alcoholic beverages at loves the sugar. It takes over your appetite and so you have to. You have to start it and you starve it by going on an anti candied diet. Cutting out all the white sugar white flour white rice even fruits. I had to do that for eight months. Go on a candy to cleanse and then I finally got my house back. It's amazing NASA you. You obviously had versa had led up so you really in the Youtube your health back on track and then obviously you did manage to discover a away technique to to actually nurse yourself to health. Did you struggle? With the first eight months of presumed there was a sort of a transition period. Where you're cutting out all of these processed foods and your body is craving them. Can't SIP is very hard. It took a a lot of self control and and I would take. I'd have one good day and then I'd have three bad days and then I had two good days and I'd had one bad too. You know it was like three baptist. You just don't know if you're ever GONNA get your help back if you're ever going to feel good again so you know my heart was just you know compassionate to others. And that's why I wrote of the book seven steps to get off sugar and carbohydrates because I know how difficult it is to fight those cravings. Yes I think we all really do. They win how a new particularly having to completely strip the mouth yacht. What clicks view. Then that allowed you to go from this Yoyo period of maybe being good for one two days and then having a bad day to actually having sustainable change to your your lifestyle and your attrition in your approach to the foods you intake well you know I did not realize how wonderful it was to be healthy until I lost my house. I lost my health. I was like I'll do anything to get this back in once I gained knowledge and I understood what was taking over my appetite. Then it was like okay. I've got this basically you know this bad back bad yeast and my God. I'M GONNA kill that guy and I'm going to get my life back so you have to figure out the root cause of your problem and then gain knowledge to be able to turn things around and so I created a quiz for people to see if they do have candied infection of their of their guts called Candy Quiz. Dot Com and candy is spelled C. A. N. D. I. Quiz Dot COM view foulland than the record. Obviously it does divert but depending on the person but what's through 'cause you found for the majority of people is it's a lack of knowledge. Is it that? There's on that half that half and not really not one hundred ten percent into it is it because they're not realizing the why of how wiser important to be healthy while you hit it on the nail with the lack of knowledge you know because okay it used to be the low fat diet was the style and now it's the Kito Diet and they're totally opposite in which one is right. Yes so you've got you've got to go to a great resource so I'm an R. N. I have a masters in health and who who looks at the research articles to figure out what is the right way to eat and it's basically back to the garden back to the garden the farm the ranch. You want things to look like they did. When it came out of the garden so number one was lack of knowledge. Number two was like me a Candida and action the third root cause for potential. We not eating appropriately or while is an addiction a sugar addiction. Because sugar and wheat go up to like the brain receptors in our brain. That are the same ones that opiate drugs. Goto so they've done. Mri Imaging and somebody who Um has a food addiction can look at food in those same areas light up in the MRI as they do for a cocaine addict so if you gain knowledge and understand okay. I have food addiction. Then you can say you know what I can use other tactics to release that. Feel good neuro hormone from my brain which is dopamine. I can walk. I can do yoga. I can meditate. I can Hug My kids I can pet my dogs. There's so many ways to get out there and get those endorphins released positively instead of through food definitely thing exercise. You've mentioned on for them. Is it such important one nuts? You really do. Not necessarily you are exercising but the feeling awkward. When you're to release it does really give you a rush a therapeutic feelings. I think that's a you've hit the nail on the head as well. Yes send you see once you gain the knowledge and I have a link in my book where you can go and take tests to see if you do have a food addiction and yet once you understand like I understood that I had to fight the Candida. You get to. The root cause will then. It's not a matter of self control. It's a matter of curing the root cause and when she cured that then you can get your normal appetite pack and happier self control so the the fourth reason was an emotional connection with food in many of us do have an emotional connection with food. And you know we may stuff our emotions with food. stuff our anger or hole in her art. We have unforgiveness resentment or whatever it may be and so. I haven't area my book about cleaning out your emotion

Candida Infection Susan Youtube Dopamine Cocaine C. A. N. D.
Joe through a rough patch:	Bidens super Tuesday

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:37 min | 9 months ago

Joe through a rough patch: Bidens super Tuesday

"This campaign sent down trump packing yesterday. Super Tuesday former Vice President. Joe Biden captured a clutch of states on the way to the nomination. The Democrats presidential candidate voters in Texas echoed. The view that Mr Biden presents a decent of reliable candidate in I've known so much about him for so long and he's a man of honor integrity and I think he will be excellent Senator Bernie. Sanders won his home. State of Vermont looks to be ahead in California for all the talk in the party that he would be a perilous pick plenty like his politics. I voted for Berry because he wants to get better rights. Everyone and then free healthcare but after a surge in South Carolina at a super Tuesday showing early promise of Mr Biden's campaign seems to have returned. Joe Has unbelievable sense of the understands people and he's been there and I trust them and it's why voted for him. Joe Biden had a very good night ethnic relative to expectations. And that's what matters most John. Prideaux is economists. Us Senator Bernie Sanders his two one. California which is the most delegate rich state but Biden did really well in other states including Texas which he wasn't projected to win a new few weeks ago. His campaign was being written off as being so dead and buried and people are encouraging him to drop out he now looks suddenly very competitive with Bernie Sanders and maybe even the likeliest nominees the Democratic Party. And how do you think it is that he managed that comeback? I think this result is a surprise. Joe Biden did well in South Carolina. Better even than people are expecting he was top of the polls there for a while but he really beat Bernie Sanders by a long way and this is a terribly cliche overused word. In presidential horse. Race Commentary Jason. But he's carried that momentum into Super Tuesday and done really well and it now looks like a prostitute horse race between him and Barney Saunders and what kind of nightmare standard have well. He didn't exactly have a bad night in the sense that he won. California the most delegate rich state he's done well in Colorado Utah. Put Tonight I tell you with absolute competence. We're going to win the Democratic nomination. I think relative to expectations having won the first few contests in the primary. It's not a very good performance for him if you look at his delegate numbers it looks like at the end of the night. He won't be miles behind Joe Biden but his campaign have been hoping that Super Tuesday would have put him so far ahead that he'd be the presumptive nominee and that hasn't happened. What about all the other horses in the race though well a couple of the horses dropped out before Super Tuesday? Both Pete. Beauty Judge Amy Klobuchar rivals for the moderate slug of Democratic voters dropped and endorsed Joe Biden before these primaries. That appears to help. Joe Biden a good deal. And how do you see that narrowing going forward well? Especially we'll be within Mike Bloomberg stays in. He said he would no matter. How many delegates we win tonight? We have done something. No one else thought was possible in just three months. We've gone from one percent of the polls to being a contender for the Democratic nomination for box. I think his performance was so poor that I'm not sure. He has much of a case to stay. Despite spending about half a billion dollars in advertising he did win American Samoa. That's not a great prize in the Democratic primary. If he works dropout I expect that would help Biden again. And what would really help? Biden is if at Mike Bloomberg puts his political funding his political machine that he's assembled very quickly behind Joe Biden both in the primary and then in the general election. What about Elizabeth Warren? Though you haven't mentioned her I didn't mention have for good reason Jason. She hasn't won a single state. That is a surprise. There are plenty of good things about her candidacy. She's rather skillful politicians. She has lots and lots of detail. Policies which is either a good thing or a handicap depending on your point of view and it looked like she might be just left wing enough to excite the party whilst being centrist enough not to scare to many people but she really hasn't done well she seems to have been another victim of this overcrowded. Primary She's also saying that she'll stay in the race. So here's my advice. Cast a vote. That will make you proud. Cast a vote from your heart and vote for the person you think. We'll make the best president of the United States but it's hard to see much point in her doing so particularly after she lost her home state in Massachusetts so once again in this election cycle the talk in early stages was just how broad The field was and now it's been narrowed down to to Washington heavyweights who've been in politics forever. How do you suppose that's happened from all that? Talk of of change and younger faces and diversity down to kind of a bit of the same old yeah. This is a very odd feature the Democratic primary isn't it? I mean if the two candidates are Biden and Saunders and one of will face Donald Trump in November donald trump will be the youngest candidate that race and the choice will be between three white males in their seventies. That's quite surprising. Given where the Democratic Party field started out and I think the main reason for that is just. There was so many candidates in the race. Jason that quite a lot of potentially rather good candidates got knocked out early on weren't able to pick up enough momentum when able to get any purchase in early primaries so I think that's really the reason why we've ended up with these. Two very familiar figures that both of them started with a bit of an advantage in that they had to some extent a group of loyal voters. They're really only candidates in the race. Who are in that position and in such a crowded field. That's quite a good place to start. And so is what we're seeing here. Kind of coalescing of the fear about Bernie Sanders and the degree to which. He's he's just kind of two out to too far out to to the left. The idea here. Is that Mr Biden is is the safer bet. D Do you agree with that assessment? It certainly looks that way to me. I mean I thought that it would be certainly a risk for the Democrats to run Bernie Sanders against president trump. If you asked Democratic voters they say their number one thing is that they want a candidate who can beat Donald Trump but then that opens up a whole argument about well what kind of candidate can beat Donald Trump and. There's one theory that you need to take on kind of firebrand and a fellow populist like Bernie Sanders. Different kind of populist. And there's another school of thought says. Actually you need to play it safe and Joe Biden is the ultimate sort of play. It safe candidacy. He's not terribly exciting as a candidate but looking at the numbers are lots of analysts thought that he had perhaps the best chance of beating Donald Trump so it looks like the alarm about his candidacy that it just might be taking a huge risk in. What's a very consequential? Election seems to translated into poor results him on Super Tuesday. So as you say we're entering a period where it's essentially a two horse race. Do you have a sense now? That things are crystallizing. A bit how it might go from here. I think one thing we can certainly say is the voters have a habit of confounding the predictions of pundit. There's still quite a long way to run in this thing and room for further slip up so I'd be reluctant to say Candida. Xl definitely be the nominee. That said it's still. It's quite likely that the Democrats will end up with a contested convention in July. And I say that if you look at remaining states is Bernie Sanders or Joe Biden. Probably need to pick up maybe sixty percents of the remaining delegates. That's a high proportion and if I the Santus. All Biden fails to do that. The Democrats end up with a contested convention. So that's still looks like it's a fairly likely outcome. And so what are the things to watch as more primaries play out I think the things to watch our does Michael Bloomberg stand the race if he gets out how does that affect is Bernie? Sanders is Joe Biden. Able to build up such a commanding lead that they can win this thing. Outright get a majority of delegates before the convention or whether we'll end up with contested convention in which case people are going to start to get very interested in the intricacies and the rules of contested conventions. That's something we discussed on checks and balances on the economists other podcasts recently

Joe Biden Senator Bernie Sanders Donald Trump Senator Bernie Democratic Party Mike Bloomberg California Jason South Carolina United States Texas Vice President Vermont Barney Saunders President Trump Berry John Amy Klobuchar American Samoa Elizabeth Warren
Where's Canada's worst housing crisis?

The Big Story

07:53 min | 10 months ago

Where's Canada's worst housing crisis?

"Wrote on P. is rental market not the type of thing You think about all that often Being out here in Toronto whether you're Vancouver Montreal but it's a It's a a pretty wild place I would say so. Tell me about even just one of the typical kind of stories. You hear from renters right so I've heard quite a bit from families out in Pi and they've been having a ton of trouble for years now. it's a really tight rental market not a lot of spaces particularly larger spaces. If you need three bedrooms. Let's say and they they really just can't find very much at all So UC on facebook all the time families pleading for any sort of tips on vacant units. They find themselves weeks away from Homelessness Day call apartment buildings month after month looking for something and invariably they hear that there's just nothing available. Can he give me some context Just in terms of how tough is it there. In terms of vacancy rate and and how difficult it is to get into these places to have numbers. Yeah absolutely so. If view all the way back to two thousand thirteen the apartment vacancy rate was about seven percent. That's pretty high. It's you know the type of rate where if you need you to place your there's GonNa be some options for you fast. Forward five years to two thousand eighteen zero point three percent so like nothing pretty much nothing yes and The there was literally nothing for three bedroom. Pi's at small enough place that you can count the vacant units quickly so circa twenty eighteen gene Given all the apartments that they have that means they're eighteen available apartments on the whole island so things improved a little bit in two thousand nineteen up to one point two percent vacancy but still the lowest on a provincial basis. It's still a really tight market. There's not a lot available. I mean the thing that really really grabbed me about this is that those are numbers worse than or even maybe now on par with you know the numbers we hear out of Toronto and Vancouver where these are the biggest biggest housing crisis in Canada. And how do people react. I mean you're based in Toronto when you put together a piece explained that no actually. The worst housing crisis in Canada is out east in Cranston Rhode Island. I think it's mostly surprise. You know when when you're based out in these cities you you tend to think you know this is where everyone wants to live in Candida. Therefore there's a ton of competition but in fact I mean there's there's a lot that's going on beneath the surface in. Pi Driving this when people hear about it from year here. We just think it's a place where you go on vacation or something but you know there's a lot of people living and working there and it's it's really tough and people they don't don't realize it mostly what are those underlying things that are driving The scarcity of rental units one big thing is population growth Pi. Okay I has grown a tremendous amount over the past say four or five years on top of that. There's just not been a lot of apartments built. I mean Pe- I compared with say here in Toronto where we're sitting Real estate market is You know prices are a little more modest. Let's say so you know years ago you'd have a lot of options for detached housing under one hundred and fifty thousand dollars Yes so you know developers is there there. They weren't really building apartment. Because you know someone with a middle class. Income Housing was pretty affordable for for ownership right. So that makes sense but then you get years. I'm not really building apartments. An influx of a ton of people and home prices have gone up quite a bit you know for a detached housing. Typical detached housing went up forty percent over over the past year. So now what used to be. Affordable isn't for a lot of people they need to rent and they haven't been building rentals so start with the first problem And I guess it's a really good problem for a place like P I have. Where did the growth in population come from right so The previous liberal government. They're made population growth with a key part of their economic plan. And really. That's that's a good thing right. You know when you're looking at any of the Atlantic provinces. They're really old. They need to get younger. They I need people. In a place like newfoundland their populations decreasing They desperately need people pe- I saw this and they said we got a ramp up these numbers so they started bringing in a lot of people that are entrepreneurship programs to bring in people from outside of Canada the trying to lure native islanders back to Pi. He is well so you know the numbers sound almost kind of funny over the past four years. Pi's population has increased by thirteen. Eighteen thousand. So that's just a fraction of what you would get in a given year and say the GTE shortly but thirteen thousand. That's nine percent increase over four years. That's nearly double the national rate of growth the highest growth of of any province over that spin so thirteen thousand is a big deal on an island of you know give or take a hundred and fifty thousand sure. That's a rough equivalent of that in Toronto would be what like three hundred three hundred fifty thousand people that span yet. Just you know if you were to blow it up Toronto wise I mean it would just be. We wouldn't know what to do with all those And what about the second challenge. I mean you mentioned that Now that houses are more more expensive some people are being forced to rent. Where's the new inventory coming from? Because again you think about how the bigger cities solve these problems like journal can throw up six new condo towers hours right. The developers are all over it. How does that work on an island with limited Limited resources but also just like space. Yeah there are definitely you know. The government airman has responded. There are more affordable units that are starting to come to market. They're throwing millions of dollars at this but A lot of what we're seeing. That's coming on and lot of develop developers are starting to reactor saying we need. There's a huge potential here for rentals. We need rentals but a lot of those are going to be at market rates right so P I like a lot out of a lot of provinces has rent control which for tenants is great. Because you know more or less that your rent increases year to year are going to be pretty limited. Let's I'd say around inflation two percents or so. But when a unit is vacated or a new unit comes onto the market the landlords can set it where they want right so the new listings. That are getting come. Available available in a lot is going to be a market rate. They're going to be a pretty high rate so the average rent in. Pi is somewhat modest. It's like you know nine hundred dollars that includes people who've been under rent control. It's they've rented an apartment for twenty years right on the island. But the new stuff you see you know fifteen seventeen eighteen hundred dollars for pretty modest accommodations so when you talk to people. They're either people who were trying to render. Just people who've lived there for quite some time. Where where are they feeling the squeeze and and what do they think the government should be doing one thing that you hear a lot from people? They're they're they're they're squeezes in a few different directions. One is that I'm just tons of families families that are unable to find the space so families of five. There are crowding into two bedrooms. As I mentioned earlier for three bedroom vacancies couple years ago there was literally nothing available so finding the space for families is has been a real challenge. Another one that I've heard about quite a bit is for students for Upi about about ninety percent of their housing is off campus. The only have a few hundred beds on campus. But what. I've been hearing from students that they're competing with the short term rental market a lot so sites it's like Airbnb. The touristy is still going in September when school starts so a lot of students are having to double up with other people who happen to have apartments wade out. The tourism season. Then get a rental for October. So there's quite a bit precariousness that you're seeing at the start of the school

Toronto Canada PI Facebook Vancouver Cranston Rhode Island Airbnb UPI Newfoundland Montreal
When the fear is worse than the disease

The Big Story

11:08 min | 10 months ago

When the fear is worse than the disease

"Are you scared of the corona virus if so what exactly are you scared of why. How does that fear show up in your life right? You do anything differently or do you just worry. Even if you're not really afraid how do you feel when you see somebody a couple of seats over from me on the bus where amass. What if they start coughing? And you see the latest numbers of cases and deaths in China and other countries. Who are what you blame why? This is all psychology but it is important because fear makes otherwise rational people irrational and it gives the ugliest impulses that people can have an opportunity to take the wheel and for the worst of us. It's not even even here. It's just an excuse. So how can we fight. The other. Viral infection at candidate is facing the one that is so far harming a lot more more people than a disease. That's almost exclusively on the other side of the world Jordan Heathrow this is the big story. Evelyn Kwong a digital producer at the Toronto Star. She also writes a weekly column about social media. Hello Hi how are you. I'm doing all right Before we start because we're going to talk about the real impact of the corona virus and Canada before we do that to give us some perspective. Can you give us an update. It is Monday afternoon as we're talking What is the scope of this worldwide? And what's the scope of it in Canada so right now in Canada as of Monday we have four cases in Canada One and BBC two in Toronto and one in London The latest one was the woman in London and she's in her twenties apparently because she's younger. She had like a you know the immune system is a little bit better. She's actually just home quarantine so they're think those cases are ones they can tackle and that could be solved by the Canadian health system. So actually here. It's not a crazy or like fearful kind of Epidemic or anything. That's happening right now. That's what we're hearing from the public health officials so basically. It's not something that we need to worry about that much in Canada and they didn't really have to suspend any flights or anything but Air Canada just one on their own to make their own decisions to suspend plates for a month from Beijing and Shanghai but they said that's on their own accord The world there are there have been three hundred sixty one deaths as has of Monday afternoon mostly from China and one being the first out of country one being from in the Philippines a forty four year old man just recently they add I think last last week they declared it a Global health emergency only for the reason that countries that didn't have as good as a health system as China wouldn't be able to handle that kind of situation so I think they're kind of seeing that with the person in the Philippines who just passed away. I think that was just on Saturday too. So it's interesting because you said that in Canada we don't have of a crazed fearful epidemic. We definitely do not and our officials are telling that straight to us to use the word fearful and there is fear here there are definitely is fear because a whole different thing. That really reminds me of the two thousand and three SARS situation. Why don't we start with that? Because I should note that you wrote your column on this you also so Spoken about it a lot on twitter. And it's why we wanted to talk with you so start with that. What do you remember about that experience as an Asian woman in Candida well? At that time I was only in grade three but you already feel that and I feel that when you're in when you're that young still to internalize that sort of every day kind of raises them. Which which does happen you know like before the sourcing people would ask me weird questions like if I ate dog but then in two thousand and three it would become this whole different thing where people friends ends of mind would actually start moving across the room and not sitting with me for lunch or really questioning what I was eating and it could be just something normal? Tofu and is Asian food. Because that's what my mom made a home right so it would just be something that I felt really embarrassed about and not understanding my identity fully. I would throw those launches out and not eat them because I just felt so so shameful of having them in front of me and just people surrounding me and other than my own experience I would see my mom kind of. She doesn't have like she can speak English but I think when she has to defend herself in that situation she someone who immigrated here from Hong Kong. It's not her first language so I didn't really know how to defend her being that young and she kind of just told me like let's just kind of void. Everybody if we can you know wanting to be invisible and when you started to hear the news of the Krona Virus Three weeks ago. It's out of China. Was your first thought I was already. I knew there was a huge backlash. GonNa come through not like not just in Canada but America in other Western countries. I I knew that it was coming and it was something that I think tweeted a long time ago even before we had one case here. I'm like I can't not I can't wait but I'm like I just know this is going to happen or something and that totally. Julio did take place as well and as much as we try to you know make sure the misinformation of like you know. Don't go to Chinatown like all that is not real and all. That doesn't need to be sad ed or it's actually not scientifically proven but to this day. We're seeing a lot of implications not just like for personal experience and of course that's important but a lot of small businesses in Chinatown in a town or in Markham to places where there's predominantly a Chinese community. They're feeling crazy impacts from this. Give me some examples so one example is that I mean. I don't know if everyone one knows what six buzzes but six buzzes kind of like I would say a Social Media News conglomerate thing that's four young people and as much as it is great. That young people have something thanks to look forward to. They're spending a lot of misinformation so one example is that they took a photo they were sent before took a photo of this noodle shop in Markham called Wuhan Noodle much is obviously horrified like for most people seeing that it's still going to trigger them to feel type of way. They put it on their instagram. They have one point four million followers and by no means no science behind it just saying like tag someone you would want to eat here or like tag the person that should eat here implicating like you're kind of finding one person you wanNA Wish some harm by eating this place but really when we we had a reporter go out from Toronto DOT COM which is kind of sister paper they went out and spoke to the owner and and they said they've lost two thirds of their business. which is I mean? That's just really sad for someone who said they came to Canada with the dream of opening their little business and you know making their life year. Now they're really feeling the repercussions which are not scientifically based at all. Like if you eat there is not going to change things. They don't have that soup and I think that was the first line that came out of that article. It was a quote by them. Saying we don't have perhaps soup we don't serve that so it's like all the stuff that you're the justify which kind of seems weird when you're in Canada and a lot of Asian people in Asian Jasper. Don't don't eat those sort of things but it's like now. We ought to kind of defend ourselves in that way. Can you explain a little bit about the role that Stereotypes from Western folks around Asian Food in Asian culture. In general play in this This treatment one hundred percent so it started back even like from inception of our country With the Chinese head taxes which basically started because they brought Chinese laborers from China and just use them as kind of like workers for the railroad and other things and if some of them mm died they'd just bring more of such a punishment or something like that and to deter them from bringing their own families to Canada. Because it didn't want Chinese people here they would put a fifty dollar head talks on them. So it's kind of like that kind of started that whole thing and it's been something that has happened in all Western countries but it's kind of overall fear or mystery around Chinese Chinese people or Asian people in general and then when the food starting cub started coming here and America's Wall N. in Canada. I believe there's a New York Times review that in in the sixties Caesar seventies that said Oh. MSG is really bad for you and also Chinese restaurants are really dirty. And that's where the whole notion came from you can obviously find. Videos goes of people eating different foods and different cultures. And that's all they know and of course. I wish that there was a way to show the different health implications of all these things but when it comes to that even to this day people still have that stereotype of you know. Do you guys eat dogs. Like I was literally asa question two years ago by a stranger. And it's like very strange to hear obviously for me But even for anybody because not many people do that and it's just like because you've seen one video on social media now you're going to expand it and say every Asian person does that. It's it's kind of sad so there's always been a fear around Asian food and this whole idea that the things that Asian people aren't really civilized and and gross. Honestly this is gonNA GONNA sound like an extremely white question of meat asks. But when you're speaking with other folks in the Chinese community and you talk about this virus and what you're experiencing in Toronto around it. What are those conversations like there? I mean it's really disheartening. And you can actually see it on social media the good thing about the fact act that we have social media now is that we have people telling their stories you know. Hey my mom just got yelled at by a person who's in a car saying you're infected or like different stories or is that people are sharing about what's happening in the situation. It kind of brings a human lens like how can you really tell someone how sad they felt about this or that because it shows you that this place can be crazy easy like we all like to talk about Canada's sometimes as a multicultural blanket and that's all it is but really there are things that happened day-to-day that and this is not just a just because of krona's ars but it's only elevated because of that so speaking to them I think what I've learned from them and what we have kind of come to realize that we kinda need to share experiences so staring that sorry experience of mine was something that people were like. Wow I can't believe that people who are Kinda confused about how this fearmongering really works. It was just like hey I'm a Girl was born in. Canada doesn't didn't travel anywhere but still I had to throw my lunches because I felt so embarrassed to be part of that or even linked to that asianise that I had so so I think right now all we wanna do is step up and mostly. It's it's angry. People are angry in the Chinese community. People are sad but the way to fight it is with also just sharing their own stories and also hoping allies step in as well. What do I need to do? I feel like there's a lot of misinformation and I wouldn't want I wouldn't wish wish it on anyone to just scroll all through twitter and report stuff and fight people. I think that doesn't work at all. I think one thing is just take it off social media and talk to someone in that community. It doesn't necessarily have to be you. Of course. The Chinese community is really reeling from this but also Asian communities are are as well because they are often mistaken as being Chinese. anyways doesn't like no one really kind of looks beyond the fact that you could look Asian and asks you where you're from so I think it's about speaking with someone in that community and understanding a human level of like. Hey what's going on. I wonder how you feel feel I think that would really change your mind and before for some people who are really active on twitter and just want to give their thoughts and just put their thoughts out there. I think it's good to just reevaluate and check with someone and who's going. Maybe he's probably going through it. You spend an awful lot of time on social media. The point of your column in the Star. was that when something like this happens it makes it worse.

Canada China Toronto Twitter Asian Culture America Air Canada Sars Hong Kong Asian Jasper Philippines Chinatown Evelyn Kwong New York Times London Candida Markham
Victor Lucas is a Video Game Industry Treasure

Kinda Funny Games Daily

06:27 min | 1 year ago

Victor Lucas is a Video Game Industry Treasure

"If you've missed Victor Lucas before Kinda funny. Yeah period. Because he's been on a bunch of stuff electrically around of course my brand. I've been doing it forever. Twenty five years. This was that honestly at the end of this year. It's twenty five. Full years have been all the threes adulation there thank you. And so it's a surreal thing when you hit twenty five years of the same email address at the same job most part personally. Of course everything has been different as we've grown from a weekly show we went to a daily TV show and then we had all all kinds of growth that way. Yeah and then we've had shrink down a little bit in this sort of Internet age and you have deal with Youtube and streaming and But one of the things that we did this year as we moved into cafe space at the Vancouver Film School so awesome which is an actual public space. That people can come and watch the show in and of course all kinds of incredible guests come through Vancouver uncover. They're working on movies and TV shows and video games and comic books and I've been able to tap into that so we've had people like animators from Spiderman into the spider versed. Uh David haters been on SAM has been on a garbage. I love that K- t- terrible garbage on kind of funny because it's great and I love of days gone by the way I thought that game was awesome and I thought I wasn't going to your favorites a- It's great to have this this forum where people can come in You know chat chat with everybody. That's been my favorite thing because I remember not the last time but one of the first times you came through especially when the new studio it was right as you were like pivoting and I'm doing youtube for the first time I I don't know what I'm doing I I still don't sort of watch. You grow in thrive going from TV and having been thirteen guy forever. Yes because I mean that's how I knew you. That's how I and I know that's how Canada knows you you walk the streets. Candida Europhobes. Celebrity people have grown up watching you. It is surreal and that really happened when we went daily. Well you know when we were a weekly show it was on the weekends and you had to be individual games when we went daily and started talking about all kinds of other entertainment. Suddenly families were watching the show together and I could palpably feel that whenever I walk around and I still get a little bit of that because people were on for so long yeah. I'm grateful to all of our partners. That then all the viewers that have been watching. Yeah that's always my favorite thing when you come by the fact that the chat in the comments are usually put on either the victim who is being like. Oh my God Lucas. Because they know you and they've again bet you've been doing this for so long doing it so well Oh and also you're one of the few people in the games industry. No one ever talked shit about. Everybody loves me. I had a little shit at this year. which is even that like? I think it was the normal thing where it was Okay clearly this isn't every started going crazy understandably. Yeah and it was like all right cool but that's not what Vick we do know. That was the whole thing. That's how vic would do this. Yeah Yeah it as an entrepreneur and I know that you're you have the same kind of perspective is what when you build something you know hard it is to build things. Yeah so when I interview people or I critique things I have that perspective I have that kind of awareness fairness that people don't set out to build shitty things and so you don't have to come in with this binary kind of attitude that this sucks and this is great. This sucks and this is awesome and so much of honestly. I don't want to throw shade at Youtube but so much of what I see on Youtube is is that it's like people just want to pile on the want to celebrate something too much or hate hate something too much. You know. It's funny where we have a bunch of inside baseball questions later about values and how it's all comes together but I do think that a lot of that comes with Youth in not knowing exactly what you're doing so I don't mean you in terms of age but in terms of I'm going to be a reviewer I'm GonNa Review Stuff I look back at my reviews from two thousand seven to two two thousand ten thousand dollars in cringe because like I m being mean and I m being. I am ignoring how long it took these people to make something. Because I didn't know that at the time and that you also want to set set up a you're setting up your own boundaries. On how you're going to look at this stuff as well you're defining your viewpoint and all you have is that moments moments in time and that feels like a totality. It feels like I've got a really greg whole life so I know what game and then Game Rule Ford another five ten years ears and your perspective changes for sure but you know honestly I I say this a lot into People that watch our stuff is Take these opinions in and get to know the individuals which I still firmly believe could Cisco Niebuhr were you know they were the the guy. That's that's what I based reviews on the run on which it was a key part of what electric playground heart and soul was. They were The Best of the In the game and they really understood how to use their personalities to help flavor their material and you get to know them as individuals and you would sort of base your opinion on that and I think that's still holds true to this day. I think it's really important into not just blindly trust any viewpoint or any brand but get to know the individuals and see how your tastes align and then you can kind of use that as a a bit of a guiding star for what you're gonNA sample one hundred checkout. That's the power of what we do now. Right the fact that you go to youtube channels podcasts websites because you like personalities you understand what that personality analogy is the fact that you know to using example from kind of funny this year on the subway one of our best friends was able to go in and post. It'd be like moonlighters. Greg Miller ask game name and I looked at that and I'm like they know me incredibly well so I am is amazing. I grabbed it and I was like. How did I miss this? How could I have not known? This was both ways about the tourist which already it should tell them about. The tourist. Jurist is an amazing game from Shin. And I think it's only on the switch right now and this is the team that brought the fast arm X. Games out there and It is is like a little action role playing game a little adventure kind of mode in there. Some puzzles to solve but lots of Little Fund tongue-in-cheek details the fact that the main character looks like a block version. Asian of David Harbour from stranger. Things I love it. It's so endearing and it's so funny like you run into this DJ and he wants new music so you go into a record shop when you buy a bunch of music and you bring to this party and it gets the party thump in and then you get some money that you know. It's just lots of little sort of clockwork intricacies like that but really make the game charming charming. It's awesome a very very excited to be happy. You're here for the entire run of the shells. Where can people keep up with You can watch all of our content on our youtube channel AT YOUTUBE DOT COM flash. APN TV and You can check us out on twitter. Ep Daily TV facebook electric playground just search electric playground. And you should fight

Youtube Victor Lucas Greg Miller Vancouver Vancouver Film School Baseball Twitter Candida Little Fund Canada Vick David Harbour David Cisco Niebuhr SAM Two Two Thousand Ten Thousand Twenty Five Years Five Ten Years
Deadly fungus spreads in N.J. with more than 100 confirmed cases

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Deadly fungus spreads in N.J. with more than 100 confirmed cases

"There's a fungus among us that's the warning going out from the New Jersey department of health the state has registered more than a hundred fourty confirmed cases of candida or us it's a deadly drug resistant fungus that causes serious infections in patients with ventilators primarily in hospitals or nursing homes and there are at least twenty two other probable

Candida New Jersey Department Of Healt
Deadly Candida auris infection continues to spread in New Jersey, health department says

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Deadly Candida auris infection continues to spread in New Jersey, health department says

"A deadly super bug that's been spreading across the U. S. appears to have arrived in New Jersey the state health department saying at last check there were at least a hundred and forty one confirmed cases of canned data Ormus in the garden state with another twenty two cases considered probable the drug resistant fungus is which is typically found in health care facilities to take care of patients who need ventilators is deadly for about one in every three patients who

New Jersey
Pot or not? Busts highlight growing confusion over hemp

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Pot or not? Busts highlight growing confusion over hemp

"This CBT craze is leaving the war on drugs a bit dazed and confused the extract that's been showing up in everything from candida coffee is legally derived from hemp plants which look and smell a lot like marijuana New York City police boasted this week about what seem like a big bust more than a hundred pounds of plants cops thought were pot they also arrested the man who came to pick them up but the remote farm the grew the plants in the Brooklyn C. B. D. shop that order them insist their legal industrial hemp and the shop owner says if they're in police custody for too long he could go out of business since the government removed industrial hemp last year from the list to be illegal drugs a number of similar cases have cropped up Julie Walker New York

New York Candida Marijuana Brooklyn Julie Walker Hundred Pounds
Christine Sinclair (probably) wont play forever. So appreciate her now.

The Big Story

10:42 min | 1 year ago

Christine Sinclair (probably) wont play forever. So appreciate her now.

"I she is on a very short list of the greatest, Canadian athletes of all time, second. She would probably never admit she belongs on that list, or actually even discuss that list at all. Third. She has been on the field for some of the most heartbreaking defense. Any Canadian team has ever suffered through to the hip fido's, a comprehensive victory of Canada fulltime book of Canada ill, Frantz four. Finally beginning today after almost twenty years of leading perhaps the best soccer Team Canada has ever fielded Christine Sinclair has a chance to reach heights that would have been unimaginable. When she began her career Sinclair is thirty six now, she's been Canada's rock for ever, this might be her last women's World Cup. And it might be Canada's best ever chance to hoist the trophy and it might be our last chance to appreciate a woman who has never talked much never cared about stats never wind about the refs never done anything, but play, great soccer, and she is now poised to become perhaps the best ever at that task. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story Canada's first game and the women's World Cup comes today against Cameroon. So we figured it was time to talk to Stephen brunt of sports net was covered these World Cups for years, Stephen start with just who is Christine Sinclair, where did she come from? What's her origin story? Well, she's from the lower mainland BC. She comes from soccer playing family her to her uncle's played professionally with the Portland at an earlier incarnation of the Portland timbers her dad played. She played as a kid, and, you know, she played other sports as well. But as a was a prodigy Ritchie cows, cap for Canada as a sixteen year old, it does astounds me how, you know, we're, we're talking about the early days of the sport in the country, like candidate didn't have a women's national team till nineteen Eighty-six. Yeah, yes. She played in the ninety five world or the ninety four World Cup. Right. Those game lake back. Then it was if people are soccer people. They will understand what I'm saying. Here's like old time, English soccer like vertical. So. Correct. Big kick, it down the field and the strongest and tallest and fittest would run underneath it, it was dominated by countries that could do that played that way. But it was also dominated by countries that put money into women's sport before other countries did, which is a pattern we've seen a lot, right? Like early success in Olympic women's rowing, for instance, was because we invested in it in nineteen nothing away from those great athletes, but we got on that bandwagon before a lot of other countries said in soccer even a lot of traditional soccer countries declined to invest in the women's game. There was a level of chauvinism in the in the soccer cultures so that, you know, the Brazil's and the Spain's and the Italy's they, they didn't do anything women's soccer, but Germany, did and Norway and Sweden did and we did to a degree. We were we were kind of early adapters in terms of women's soccer and the Americans did after title. Nine rank title nine was huge right into created opportunities for for collegiate athletes. So those were the countries that dominated early and but that was what they was a power game. You know power game of fitness game. And you know in assize game really strength game. How did Christine Sinclair make her Mark on that game on this team? When did she come to one to Candida notice her, I would think I guess the U twenty tournament gonna remember sales change. They change it from nineteen to twenty remediate offered was the tournament in Edmonton, where the golden generation, they, they got to the finals loss to the Americans, a recurring theme here, but played in front of forty thousand plus people in Edmonton to Commonwealth stadium too big TV ratings, so Kara Lang, and most Creedy and, and sink. You know, we're part of that team and his golden generation of Canadian women country embrace them in a way that it hadn't I don't think it'd embrace the soccer team male or female before we men's team that you know got the World Cup and eighty six and they won the Gold Cup and under Hoeger, but I don't think candidate had ever cared about soccer as much as they cared about that team that played in Edmonton. So that was kind of her debut for the Comanche was the most valuable player high-score most valuable player in that tournament. So, you know, and then she joined the national where she played for the national team and. After that, again, with people like Charmaine Hooper, who is a great athlete in her own, right. And the they, you know, they have a fourth place finish the World Cup people then forget that, that they, they did finish fourth, but, you know, I think what really started to put things on the map was what, what came later and end know and the evolution of the of the game and the pollution of the players will it's kind of a chicken or the egg situation because you had Christine Sinclair in his golden generation that kind of took over that team and dragged it in front of everybody watching. And then once you know that it can do good TV ratings, and people are really going to care. It becomes a lot easier to recruit talent bring on sponsors, and all the rest of it that puts you a little bit further ahead. Yeah. In parallel to that. The game is getting more sophisticated evolving, or changing in, in a way that soccer people found pleasing like I was kind of separate myself because I've covered soccer for a long time. But I you know, soccer people I was considered me an outsider. So I, I always kind of separate myself, but that the people who would kind of disdain women's football women. Soccer started to see the ball being played on the ground. More you know more of a passing game as a more sophisticated version of the game and started to kind of give it its due. So those things happen at the same time one is that. Yeah, you have golden generation of Canadian players coming through who had succeeded on stage, a very popular stage, anyway. And at the same time, you had women's soccer getting new respect, of course, you had that explosion with the Americans right where, you know, brandy Chastain and all of that. You know, it became a big deal in the United States. Yes. Also, the breakthrough from American soccer, you know, if you think about it, the US men's national team was pretty good for a long time. But what was the breakthrough for soccer in the US? It was the women you absolutely the women describe that scene because you probably, it's probably embedded in your memory of brandy Chastain. And that's the only thing I remember that time. Yeah, we scored the winning goal and, and stripped off her jersey was wearing a sports bra and had like an eight-pack ill. She's absolutely ripped. Right. Looks like I think it was it was a moment of empowerment for a whole bunch of. People. And I think for a whole bunch of young girls watching it was, I wanna be her. Yeah. I wanna play that game because it was, you know, it wasn't dainty. It was ferocious. It was competitive. It was passionate there were. And there are a lot of great things about women's soccer. Well, and in Canada. It's the women are better. They have men's team and it by an order of magnitude. We could qualify that say the pool shallower again. We were earlier that there is. We, we probably put more emphasis on what you see now is that, you know, England's good now in the Nederlands is getting good is against some of these other soccer countries are kind of saying, hang on, we'll Spain suddenly pretty good. But yeah, I think in Canada, they had the success and be, I think people did start the kind of tune into the fact that someone who might be the best player in the world play for us. So tell me about her that because you've covered her for while now what is Sinclair, like she's known, at least to me and casual observers for being pretty closed off. Oh, yeah. You mean per as a person as a person as an athlete? How, how is she what drives her she's super shy? She doesn't like doing interviews a drink press stuff. If you talk to her teammates tell you, she's not shy that she got a great sense of humor, which she does. But she just just playing that the public role. I remember once I went down to interview her when I was still the globe and mail. She was playing for the, the western New York flash. Again, you know, the leagues have come and gone. Right. But one of those down near buffalo somewhere, and they having an open workout for kids. And I was driving down from the globe. And I'd set it up through Canadian soccer to do this interview I think goes before the twenty seven World Cup. So it looks a low pressure environment is what I'm saying, and it's going to be a nice story and I got stuck in a little bit of traffic at the border. So I got there about three minutes before the interview was supposed to happen. But I was, you know, phony, people telling you, look, I'm coming, right? Look, she was in her car, and she was going to leave. She was honored. I almost had to throw myself in front of her car because she didn't want to do it. She just didn't want to do the interview, and it was, you know, as an awkward interview, and there wasn't much to it, and I've been persistent, I guess with her to try and get a little bit. And I have huge Marijn for as an athlete. So maybe that's part of it as well. But yeah, she's never going to be somebody who talks and soundbite. She's never going to be somebody who kind of thrown horn. It's just not in her. She's, you know, again, MBA seen her. She is a passionate ferocious competitor. And she does have a sense of humor, but it's hard to get past, you know, the veneer, sometimes why did you work so hard to get past that veneer? You know, I think a lot of it goes back to that twenty eleven World Cup which I'm sure we're gonna talk about. But I covered the tell me about the twenty eleven World Cup. You know, key so candidate went into Germany twenty seven World Cup is in Germany and Canada. There's a sense that candidate could be competitive in this turnament, sorta like now, you maybe none, as they maybe expectations weren't quite where they are now but they were pretty darn high. And that was the, you know, the, the moment for that golden generation of players. Right side from Carlisle, who got hurt that, that was that group this, and this was there, a moment and Canada had hired an Italian to coach the team. Caroliina Mirage, and the whole idea was that this was the country's, there's, like finishing school that she was going to teach them more sophisticated tactics and European training methods and this is gonna turn us into a footballing nation rather than soccer h nerve footballing team rather than a soccer team. And Caroline was an interesting like a character from fiction, you know, and they had this whole group of Italian trainers in the system coaches, and there was much intense talk and smoking cigarettes. And speaking of Italian, and she took them off to a training camp. They went to some hotel in, in the mountains in Italy. And we're locked off by themselves and trained and all of this, when you talk to them after the facts, you know. So it sounds like a prison camp. But it sounds nice now but it wasn't fun. But they all say the right stuff that okay, we're gonna we're gonna we're gonna we're way. Better way. More sophisticated. We're gonna play you know, we're we're going to our game has she is we have learned enormous amounts Mer. The opening game is against Germany in Berlin at the Olympic stadium. They know they're going to lose that game. Everybody knows he'll lose that game but they, you know, they compete and sink scores. A goal on a on a free kick. I think not a penalty free kick, but she also gets hit in the nose and breaks her nose spewing blood. And it was real was, you know in this there goes the tournament. Right. So so caroliina Marashi again, who is she was very much into intrigue in whispered conversations? I'm covering this for the globe. And for sports that we were the rights holders I was as close to any team. I think as I've ever been and there's been there. Many whispered conversations was she going to play and they wouldn't let her talk to the media, and she was. Wearing this like the mass that basketball players wherever they break their now.

Soccer Canada Christine Sinclair Germany Stephen Brunt Portland Jordan Heath Rawlings Cameroon Brandy Chastain Spain Stephen Charmaine Hooper Italy United States Frantz Candida Basketball Ritchie Cows
Europe's changing political landscape

FT News

10:15 min | 1 year ago

Europe's changing political landscape

"Voters, go to the polls over the next three days to select members of the European parliament in Strasbourg members of our Brussels bureau, discuss why these elections matter, and how they are likely to affect the upcoming appointment of senior officials. It's does day, which means the first voters in the Netherlands, UK are heading off to the ballot boxes. And we must be having votes across the twenty eight Member States for the next three days and on Sunday, we'll get the results. Alex, jim. What are we expecting tappan on Sunday? How is this all going to work, this vast Eurovision type exercise of democracy? It is fast. It's across so many countries, so many political cultures that it will take quite a long time, actually for the results to shake out even after the results come in a lot of these political alliances that we have in Europe, the center ride the centre-left, the liberals, the greens, the conservatives to the right of that the far-left all projects emotion. So they'll keep home trying to build alliances steel parties in the weeks after the election to so we weren't necessarily get a clear snapshot, but you'll have. An idea on the night of a what's happened to the mainstream of pro. European politics, since director, elections, started in nineteen seventy nine there's roughly bean a majority for the center. Right. And center, left combined pro EU parties used to make up roughly, seventy five percents of the parliament, this time at least is that into shrink to a degree that makes it much more difficult for the center to operate in Brussels, is the first question. Secondly. Is that going to be because populist anti EU parties have done a little better could we end up in a situation where France Italy? Poland the UK have the top parties as either very euro skeptic, all all-star to the entire project. And how does the EU deal with that? Those are the two main things and. And it feeds into this massive haggle, we're going to start in the immediate aftermath to fill all top EU jobs that are becoming vacant this year. Kim, we have had weeks and weeks of projections and forecasts from national countries about polling. Do we already have a sense of who the big winners will be on the night, regardless of some of the nuances of the margins? We can tell the people who are going to be celebrating on Sunday night already, as one of the things this fascinating unique about the European elections. Is that we can see straightaway how individual parties have done on the nights? But then these unusual parties have to find a way to fit into political groups political families within the politics self, and that's going to be a convicting exercise with obese a highly going on. But we will clearly have some national winners newses unbutton includes when Europe's most prominent politicians, one of the things will discover on Sunday is, whether you're probably Kamar, political party and president of annual Macron has finished. First place or whether it's the fall Russell on us. United Marie lapenne those finished in first place. That's an issue, which has ramifications for the formation of the European parliament. And what happens in the coming years of you policy-making, but it also has really big domestic front vacations for my crime FRANZ. I mean Jared just from Boise in the polling so far. We know we're gonna have situation where we're going to have more fragmented parliament where both the main center left group associates Democrats on the made center, right? Group, you're People's Party are going to be in a weakened position compared to now. The question is how we can under who is really good to be the one who reads the benefits can maybe going to the UK, it seems like for is probably going to emerge victorious. Whatever happens given the sort of bounce storming need. He has, but they could be some smaller winners like the lib Dem's who sort of come out of nowhere an identity. And I guess, in terms of the parliament, they will help out people like I knew Macron, because they'll say in his group despite the French president's sort of reluctance to keeping the Brits in. So there's elements. Surprises here. What are the sort of blacks meant could we foresee? What if you look at the polling at the moment, it's been reasonably steady because it's a massive aggregates of lots of political battles going on the EP are ahead this, the centre-right group, but not by much. The social democrat group sent to left has benefited from the u k still taking part, they get a lot of labor MP's that making ground in countries like Spain that coming closer to the EP. It's within something like twenty seats and if they can do a little bit better. They could complex to knocking the EP off the top spot, which they've held since nine thousand nine the liberals are expanding Emmanuel Macron, the French president is planning to make some kind of a lion's with them to maybe change the name change look at the potty up put like a hundred seats and then you have a lot of snow. Smaller groups in the mid tier, the published led group of conservatives, the greens, the fall left in the forty to sixty range, and then you've got two more far right groups, which may be in the fifty range or plus now if you look at old past European elections, and what happens between the polling and the results will tends to happen is governed parties to worse-than-expected than in the polls, smaller parties do better than expected. The centre-left do worse than expected, and the populace do better, the anti EU parties do better. So feed that in and actually I think you see kind of bunching of all the groups with probably the EP still there'll thereabouts is the top party, which is the first take away from this as they move into this kind of discussion about what happens with the jobs. Why does the cultivation of the parliament matter? For the jobs for somebody on the outside. How does this get divvied up on the first one and the probably the one all looking as European Commission? President job is up person gained emerged from some of the four or five spits and candidates. We've seen already. Situation where among different political groups in the parliament has not actually any agreement of wall process should be used to appoint the president of the European Commission. We have a situation where the sense right, the European People's policy has thrown his weight behind this system called the lead candidate Spitz and conduct system where basically that group has champion candidate in this case selection. It suggestions Manfred. Vaber veiled, perspective, new cushion, president the socialists and Democrats, they've also bought into that system, there need candidate is France Timmermans, but other political groups in the parliament are much less keen on national leaders in the European Union who are the ones who coast, chiefly should go and find a candidate B commission president, that also opposed to this will all need to be reviewed in the light of the results. And what happened already on Monday when political leaders in the parliament meet and pour over this and basically, in a way mount vaber in fronts. Tunes face will be decided at the ballot box. But also at that meeting on Monday, so on keys. Okay. We have a day with will meet in the morning, and the European Council would meet in the evening. Is that the day when we actually will get some clarity or is this actually good drag on for a long, while yet, maybe we'll get a stalemate other African define that as clarity, but you could have a situation where enough of the political parties, a stand up and say, look, we're not fighting anyone put a spits in Candida. So maybe you could have the center right the center, left the greens, and that's enough over block to make sure that you couldn't nominate someone else who didn't run as a lead candidate in this election because they wouldn't be able to get a majority in the parliament's going to blocking minority simile on the European Council side, you could have eight ten twelve leaders who say enough of this within into this S and Canada idea. We don't like Manfred vaber all fronts Timmermans will have a merges in that top spot, and we're unwilling to do so you can have a situation where the two institutions. That have kind of equal Sade some degree in who, eventually emerges the leaders are supposed to nominate some on the parliament approve, but it could be in a situation that birthday look with stuck with a blocking minority that we can't bring together, and that could mean we're in for a much longer process than people think the, the hopes of getting a whole package together in June might be a little bit to Optimus tick, or you could be in a situation where they look and think, well going to block you minority in parliament, but they can't get a majority for this bits and confidante and the spits dot com. Get a majority in the cancel, so maybe we need to move on. And that's the real test of those couple of days, a lot spends on how those two main maltings before those two main political families performing the election, right? I mean, that's in a way, the simplicity of the system is really helpful particularly well even if they finish the largest group thought does automatically Herdman favors legitimacy. It makes it harder for DP as. A political lines to assert, the commission president and determine socialists, really at some say, I mean, should case, the democratic exercise while the vote is due on Sunday. Really does not coming to put you both on the spot, Jim who's your candidate? Who's your name for the European Commission? President. What's your hunch, Christine ago onyx I think marketer might make it. Okay. So two candidates nor promise permission to candidates. None of whom are running formally or informally for this job have been called by the F T in all honesty. The truth is that woman, and we barely ever had a Dutch. Gone gone. Rogue names, but the truth probably is the most people around this town, asking the same question and coming up with five or six differences. We don't really know yet.

Parliament European Union European Parliament President Trump European Commission EP Europe Brussels UK Emmanuel Macron Manfred Eurovision European Council Netherlands Tappan European People Alex Member States Strasbourg
Recycling in Canada is broken. Can it be fixed?

The Big Story

09:59 min | 1 year ago

Recycling in Canada is broken. Can it be fixed?

"So raise your hand, if you've ever tossed something into your blue box without being a hundred percent sure that it was actually recyclable. Yeah, I can't see you, but I don't need to ninety five percent of you have hands up. It's okay. I do to our producer. Claire. However, does not clear. Are you lying now? I'm a really good recycler. Actually, I'm I'm a big nerd, when it comes to recycling, what does a big nerd about recycling? Do. Nerdy recycling research, like what like looking online of what can be recycled? And what can't a love that stuff? That's amazing. You wash out your jars to write all the time. Obviously. No. Shame. Okay. It would be easy to say that we are the problem here by we I mean, knee and the listeners, not Claire, obviously. But you and me and that misunderstanding or laziness or carelessness are to blame for what is right now a crisis in Canada's recycling industry, but it goes deeper than that. In fact, it goes all the way across the world to China, it goes into corporate engineering offices, where new packages are designed it goes into city halls across the country, where municipalities are trying to figure out what happened to their once profitable programs, and how they might save them, and they are also trying to figure out how they're going to get rid of tons of plastic that nobody wants anymore, so. Yeah, recycling and Candida is a mess just like the blue box that I put out on the curb with all the stuff that doesn't belong in it the question in both of those cases, is the same. Can't we do that better? How? Jordan heath Rawlings, and this is the big story. Jeff Lewis is the environment. Reporter for the globe and mail. He is based in Calgary. Jeff before we get into the long and complex investigation into what's wrong with recycling. I tell me the most surprising thing. You learned when you started talking to people about what we do with recycling in Canada. I think it was the fact that we actually don't recycle as well as many of us and certainly myself included, thought we did you know, the, the star that really I found jarring was, you know, the fact that only nine percent of the plastic waste generated each year in Canada is actually recycled. I remember as we were reporting this another of my colleagues, did some quick calculations and, and we actually put the comparison into the story, but that's the weight of twenty four C N towers, I'm still turning. It over my head, and I have trouble sort of, you know, wrapping just, just sort of wrapping my hands around it. I felt really bad while reading your story about all the times. I've felt good for throwing just everything. I've got in the blue box, you know, I think I think we all, you know, have that very complicated relationship with recycling in a way. I mean, there's even a term for it in, in the waste processing industry if you can call it that I mean, people people call it wish cycling, right? This idea that you, you kind of stare at something quizzically, you know, in the moments before you toss it into the bin and you think, well, you know, while someone else will deal with this. And you kind of put it in, you know, with the best of intentions, most of the times, I mean, there are some, flagrant examples where, where that's not the case. But most most people think that they're doing the right thing with the stuff that is an amazing term, by the way, it, accurately describes exactly what I feel. Yeah. I mean it's again, it was sort of one of these things that I was actually surprised. To hear that this is sort of a, a bit of an open secret. I think in, in the industry, it's not that people aren't well intentioned. It's, it's that, you know, we've created these sort of systems, whereby it's increasingly difficult to, you know, have confidence that you are doing the right thing, and you guys chronicled kind of how things have recently made it even more difficult. So what happened in Canada's recycling industry and win well to, to, to answer that. I mean, you really have to look at, and I sort of get an understanding of, you know, that, you know, when we talk about Canada's recycling industry, just as when we talk about, you know, the American recycling industry or any recycling industry around the world. I mean that this is actually a global industry, right? And what we're talking about when we're talking about recycling is, is we're actually talking about commodities, and that's, you know, in this case use paper cardboard plastics, the various grades of plastics. I mean these things are. Are traded internationally just the same as you know, oil or copper nickel, and, and it's sort of counter-intuitive. But think about it that way. But when you realize that you can start to sort of, you know, piece together exactly how Canada's recycling, and she has changed. And so, so it's sort of a long long winded way of getting at I mean candidates recycling industry has really been turned on its head. I mean, and, and the, the impetus for that was these sort of import restrictions that China imposed at the outset of twenty eighteen and those in and of themselves were sort of the culmination of years of sort of steadily tightening markets for these commodities. And so, essentially the markets shrunk, very quickly for these commodities and created a glut of these products in North America at the same time, you know, anytime there's a glut of. Thing, the, the, the price falls. So you had revenues for these programs. These municipal programs start to, to evaporate, making it harder for these companies to and, and municipalities that are involved in this to sort of fund upgrades to their programs at the very time right rhino. China was telling them that, hey, you know, you need to stop stat sending us. You know, you're your, your contaminated, filthy junk, what kind of a dent does it make, I guess, first of all, why did shaina make that decision? And what kind of a dent does that make in the global market? Is that a sea change type thing? Yeah. That, that is, that's an absolutely, you know, see change type event. I mean it's really turned things you know, upside down China for years, had had sort of, you know, mocked up the world's, you know, recycling and, and concern started to grow in China over these sort of environmental impacts that, you know, a really a lot. Are largely unregulated recycling industry have grown up and people were, you know, you started to see large quantities of plastic discarded, plastic being burned, you know, and, and, you know that stuff when you burn plastic released furans dioxins, which, you know, pretty pretty nasty stuff, right the atmosphere, and so you saw like going back to previously. So the, the recent restrictions came out in two thousand eighteen at the outset of two thousand eighteen called national sword, but previous to that in twenty twenty twelve twenty thirteen there was a there was a policy called green fence, and don't ask me why, you know policymakers in China, you know after these names for, for the, the policies, but, but if ectively it was a steady steady tightening of what China was willing to accept, and what really sort of what has been described me as sort of a tipping point was the release of the film called plastics China, which actually was banned in the country. Because it really detailed at follow two families in the country who were involved in this sort of unregulated business of hand, sorting recycled plastics, and, and, you know, trying to eke out a living processing this stuff and sort of, you know, really kinda dodgy conditions and that sort of seemed to have galvanized some of the, the reaction that we saw. So what happens after China stops taking that stuff to other countries step up, does the market crash? Well prices crashed right. For a lot of the what's called the mixed plastics, which is, you know, plastics are, are numbered one through seven right and one and two, plastics are, are pretty much a clear pop bottles. Or your, your clam shell berry packages that you get at grocery stores, and then three to seven is sort of a bunch that's sort of just called mixed. And, you know, you have PVC and some other some other sort of varieties in there. So those prices for the mixed plunged and prices for mixed paper, low grade paper, also plunged, what we've seen and, and the data sort of bears this out is that as China has sort of clamped down. A lot of that material is shifted to other southeast Asian countries. But then subsequent to that sort of shift. We saw even those countries though, secondary markets are now saying well, hold on. If China doesn't want this stuff. You know why, why am I gonna take this? Right. So we've seen restrictions similar restrictions crop up in, in India, and Malaysia and Taiwan. All of these countries are saying, oh, well, you know, we, we don't really want to be a refuse dump for for Europe and North America. And so again, so what we've seen, you know in the flip side of that here in North America. We've seen stockpiling initially you saw a lot of stockpiling. So that, that involves people, people cities municipalities, just basically putting trailer loads of dense bay. Sales of plastic and cardboard setting them aside and used warehouses, and, and, and the like

China Canada Claire North America Jeff Lewis Calgary Producer Candida Jordan Heath Rawlings C N Towers Reporter Europe Shaina India Taiwan Malaysia Ninety Five Percent Hundred Percent Nine Percent
Trudeaus Welcome To Canada: Three Years Later

The Big Story

25:10 min | 1 year ago

Trudeaus Welcome To Canada: Three Years Later

"You supported it at the time, and the numbers would suggest you did you probably remember the first government plane of Syrian refugees arriving in Canada. This week. Canadian airports will be the sights of some first tentative steps in Canada refugees who have fled Syria are slowly beginning to arrive. Now, this is a wonderful night where we get to show not just a planeload of new Canadians. What Canada's all about we had to show the world how to open our hearts and welcome in people who are fleeing extraordinarily difficult situations. Justin Trudeau's brand made a virtue of Canadians welcoming accepting and supporting refugees from around the world and particularly from Syria in the months after Donald Trump when the two thousand sixteen American election with anti immigrant rhetoric Trudeau leaned further into this strategy. You may remember a famous hashtag welcome to Canada. And all the victory laps the liberal government. And to be fair, many of us took and reaction to the global praise. We received for our efforts that was a while ago. And as much as many of us might like to hold onto our image of goodhearted always welcoming world beloved Canada. It's time to ask some questions. Have we lived up to our promise to those refugees? We sponsored them and publicly welcomed them. We gave them jackets and a years worth of sponsorship. And how have they fair is that image of the welcoming Canadian really still who we are a recent survey found for the first time that forty percent of us believe there are too many visible minorities coming to Canada included in that forty percent are seventy one percent of conservatives. The conservatives are currently leading federal election polls by a healthy margin. So have we changed or has this sentiment always being here? And finally, what is it like for people fleeing their home for a better life to arrive in Canada today? And. Jordan, heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Nncholas Kyung is the Toronto star's immigration. Reporter he's been in touch with many Syrian refugees since they arrived in this country. Do you remember back in January of twenty seventeen the hashtag welcome to Canada tweets from Justin Trudeau who can't? Yeah. What did that symbolize back then? And what kind of story did that spark about Canada immigration? And I think that was a different time and era. Trump was elected and his I think it put Trudeau in the very contrasting image. And I think he felt the need to distinguish himself from, you know, our leaders south of the border with all these regular what we call quote unquote, irregular migrants crossing the border. You know, I think he wanted to stick to his image of being an yell liberal leader progressive, you know, I think that's what behind, you know, his tack on on Twitter in the last couple of years has Candida in reality. Walked that talk. When it comes to welcoming, refugees, and emigrants definitely initially. We did right after the liberals were elected. I'm sure you remember the. Image of Ellen Kirti the Syrian child who lying face down. Dad, you know, on a beach in Turkey, and I think that image actually touched hearts of Canadians, and you know, and then we had a, you know, after ten years of the hopper government who whose government had always been criticized as being anti refugees and immigrants because of all these changes they made on immigration policies. So it was very refreshing the beginning to to have a new leader who's actually friendly to refugees and open your doors to refugees. And and and think you know, that actually received a Trudeau received a lot of accolades from, you know, a lot of Canadians, but then, you know, something out of his control, you know, no one anticipated that was the election of Trump, and the kind of implications of his travel bans, a his anti immigration immigrants, especially to do with the undocumented, including the dreamers that actually driven a lot of. Undocumented, you know, migrants south of the border to cross the border into the states. And I think you know, it started off being just trickling in you know, in in Manitoba and a little bit in Quebec. And then when the word God out and just you know, they just coming in in droves. Yeah. And I'm sure that liberal government also was caught off guard by it. And then, you know, I think the sentiment changed. I was actually talking to a friend this morning about how the idea of, you know, who is more deserving immigrants the idea the introduced in ten years by Jason Kenny, I think, you know, he was the first one who introduced you know, who is more deserving immigrants. You know ranking, you know, permanent residents skilled immigrants would be about, you know, try someone trying to be sponsored round under feminine family reunification, and then you have the real refugees and a bogus refugees. And I think that that concept actually was introduced. And then, you know, now, you know, we would hear, you know, even refugees criticizing the the regular migrants crossing from the states as jumper, and average is also criticizing I think, you know, it's very interesting to see how that legacy of dividing even amount migrant groups and advocates are we seeing a change in more than just perception have the liberals made any recent changes to that policy. I'll definitely and I think what is interesting last Monday. I'm sure you remember somewhere burried in their three hundred ninety two and ninety seven page a federal budget. Yeah. There were some changes about how to close that loophole in what we call the safe third country agreement for those, you know, audience who are not familiar with what the safe third country agreement is basically, then any asylum seekers from seeking protection in, you know, if they first arrived in the states that cannot, you know, just cross the border into Canada and make. An Silom claim and vice versa. Glad there's a provision in that agreement that actually if you know a migrant actually cross between of the official ports of entry. Meaning that if they manage to sneak in to the country than they're not down by that restrictions. So that's what we are seeing when the word got out, you know, a lot of people knowing that someone successfully managed to get through the border, you know, some would say irregularly or some, you know, conservatives with them illegally causing the different change in the policy in the last two years. You know, you've heard a lot of criticisms from advocates general public, you know, veering that, you know, all of a sudden we'd closing down a border like what the stays in a Trump has done between Mexico and the US like is it a demarcation of a new trend. You know, or is just you know, an election maneuver, you know, before the Tober election. We don't know we'll have to see I feel like there's kind of. Of a contradiction in terms of the way, we like to think of ourselves and hold up. I know I've done it myself. I've got many friends and acquaintances who do it who really treasure that idea of candidate being incredibly welcoming immigrants and refugees from all over the world. And then you start to see these signs that not only are the loopholes being closed, but public perception has shifted, and I wonder in your work have the people you talk to who are refugees or who work with refugees. Have they seen the same kind of welcoming that we like to talk about on the ground in practice. You know, as interesting, you know, when when we talk about public opinions, you know, the issues about discrimination and racism, you know, I think it has never gone away. But I just feel now with the issue over the irregular migration from the states with, you know, all the nationalist movements in we're seeing in Europe, South of the border in the states and. You know, we had last year we had a mayoral candidate. I'm not going to name her because I think as you know, I just don't want her name be heard, you know, running for mayor as the mayor of the city. I think you know, it's just a matter of you know, in all this public polls people just become more vocal. You know, we have always heard about Canadians being polite being nice in. I came as an immigrant myself when I was twenty three years old that was like longtime ago as a newcomer, you know, you always could feel it, you know, from body language from you know, it doesn't have to be verbally someone is being discriminatory, but you just being more sensitive more where an edge just feel though sentiments always there. But you know, it's just a matter of one I think the volume of than the volume meaning the number of immigrants coming the source country. They're coming from. Meaning, you know, they're more, you know migration. Global migration the move on movement always from developing country to develop country. These people are looking forward, you know, that alive. Not a worse life, right? Yeah. So the source country, meaning that, you know, the major source would be from Africa from the Middle East and from Asia, and I think that, you know, ratio combination and the volume definitely, you know, a contributing contributing factors to promote that kind of nationalist populist movement. Plas-, you know, you have you know, politicians playing contra and divide. My feeling is those sentiments just coming about surface. Now instead of being, you know, hidden, you know, you know, now, you, you know, you would hear you know, even politicians talking about the idea of political correctness. And I think, you know, even back in the nineties, you know, those would be considered like French opinions menaul, you you know, is publicly debate. I'm not all I'm like, you know, four for public dialogues on you know, how politically correct should Canadians b but I just feel the way, you know, you talk. About these issues. You know, you have to be really careful you don't want to see what's what has happened in Europe happening in Canada because we are way more diverse in our population. If we have die kind of divisive emotions among as we would be in bigger trouble than just, you know, one community against another because it would be like a chaos like many communities against many different communities and the two and some years since we really started welcoming a large amount of Syrian refugees. What have we seen in terms of what their lives are like what issues they faced how well they've settled in Canada because I feel like we heard a lot about them when they first arrived. And we welcome them. With open arms says we love to tout. And then obviously, there's a whole process that happens away from the cameras. Uh-huh. We actually at the the star. We actually did last year was the third year at a third verse ary of their Saruman of the first wave of Syrians arriving. And we did, you know, do, you know a series of stories to look at how well they have integrated. They have not integrated and one of the, you know, I in general like, I think my observation as, you know, just like any migrants, you know, you have the issues about adjustment to a couch her to new language about finding jobs finding housing it is no different from if you and I would move from Toronto to toback or two I think you back would be a better example because of the language difference. But the thing is, you know, we would have, you know, the, you know, already support social support network of friends and sometimes families to help us out. But I think for refugees under the big difference is they don't come here by choice. If you remember when you know initially when the series arrived. Which interview a lot of Syrians? And you know, they didn't you never heard of Canada before they didn't want to come. And if they had a choice some of them actually wanted to go back and six months when the war was over. Really? That's what they told me. But for a lot of immigrants, I think especially immigrants they come here by choice to come here with the skills. They wanted to make a bad alive if not for themselves, if as we heard about, you know, doctors driving cabs phenomenon before, but at least, you know, for the second joined they raised generations. They wanted them to succeed to have a good education. But you know, that's by choice. You know, they always have the choice to go back before refugees. They don't have that choice. What kinds of resources are available to them? And and one of the reasons we're talking to you today is because there's a a story out of Calgary of a nine year old hours that story. Yeah. Of a nine year old Syrian refugee girl who took her own life, and she was being bullied at school. Which is I mean on the one hand is something that not just refugee kids face. But I wonder what kind of resources are available for. For those folks who might be going through that because I can only imagine what that would be like in combination with trying to integrate, and, you know, a language barrier and everything else before we before you answer your questions. I just want to talk about little bit of the terminology the terminology of refugees. Okay. Because I think there's a lot of inner confusion among the public. You know, they think refugees refugees refugees, but they're actually different categories of of refugees. You know, what we talk about this Syrian refugees that, you know, a lot of community groups have sponsored in the last few years, we call those sponsored refugees, meaning that the regard the destination by UNHCR the UN United Nations refugee agency, so to find them as legit refugees. And they are being they had to go through medical clearances and security clearances by Canadian officials before they are being resettled as permanent residents in Canada. Meaning that when he arrived there already permanent residents, right? But I I think. Sometimes people confuse, you know, confuse them with refugees who come across the US border. We call those, you know, you know, technically illegally as asylum seekers because they are status still undecided. Meaning they still need to go before a refugee judge to get present their claims why they need Canada's protection, and you know, and then we'll be a positive or negative decision. So there are different surfaces afford to you know, though, the Syrians who are sponsor to Canada, and those asylum seekers who actually just come here for protection when we talk about, you know, two Syrians, they're known to kind of social and community services available available to them as no different from. You know, any, you know, if someone come as an architect or a lawyer they're eligible to any, you know, housing surfaces a counseling, including mental health counseling, employment counseling, and they get helped to rage. The kids go to school to enroll the kids in schools and. Everything that you can think of you know, and for your initial settlement. But when we talk about the asylum seekers because you know, their status in Canada, still uncertain. So there's actually very limited government surfaces actually available to them. Yes. The kids can go to school. They can apply for a work permit to work in Canada. But before or you know, you know, there's an outcome. You know, whether they've been acepted as refugee or not they would not be able to let's say to get, you know, housing support or you know, some of the other services. Yep. So, you know, it's so it depends on which group we're talking about, you know, there's, you know, again, you know, comes down to that different labellings of refugees and migrants when you talk to people who don't know much about your line of work and find out what are some of the biggest questions, you get or or myths that you have to tackle. Because I feel like this is an issue that everybody has an opinion on right now. And it's really nuanced. I can tell you that covering emmigration the right for prob probably the most polarizing beat and initial sperm. There's no gray area people either for it or against it. You know, for every story that you know, I've filed in the paper, you know, run into paper somehow people can find a way to criticize. No. And and you know, you have a bleeding liberal. You're you you have a bleeding hearts, and you know, about being a left wing propaganda all these stories, but some of the biggest may have is really interesting that has been going around for God to be like eighteen years now that refugees in a refugee claimants, they actually could get over three thousand dollars of government benefits a month, which is a myth because longtime ago eighteen years ago. I I did a story about government-sponsored refugees, and they receive a startup check of you know, for to cover the first month last month, rand and other benefits. But is only one time. You know, I forgot about the amount. And that each month they would from then on word they would receive a welfare check of. I think. At the time. It was five hundred seventy dollars, and then words Scott out, and you know, spread on the internet that these people were, you know, these people referring to Reggie claim is actually the God, you know, over three thousand dollars tax payers dollars from you. And I every month instead of like, you know, didn't say it was a huge portion of that was a one time when time benefits, and then, you know, even today, I still thought to see those Email not emails, but those inflammation recycled online, and your and other baked one would be how come, you know, the queue-jump queue-jumping thing as Sean? Yeah. But people don't realize that you know, these different programs being sponsored two candidates process. You know by different unit within immigration Canada. You know, the the asylum-seekers they are being dealt with by the immigration and refugee board immigration programs handled. I and again, you know, immigration units within immigration. So it's not like, you know, I cannot jump the keel because I'm not in the. Q? How can I jump the queue? This is just very interesting. But then, you know, you have all these, you know, the the for example, immigration applicants who got caught up in in the backlog, which I'm playing how come refugees the chewed have met with more respect than, you know, by the government and the who actually come here with my skills eager to contribute to the your economy. It's, you know, very fascinating, those kind of comments and criticisms when you talk to refugees on the Silom seekers of these days, how aware are they that they are the most divisive issue in the upcoming election potentially that there's this huge conversation going on around them. I think there is you know, not enough awareness. I think you know, one is a lot of them. They're just so occupied by getting the protection in the process, you know, talking to their lawyers trying to collect, you know, a police report from Hungary or from Czech Republic to prepare for the claims. Like, I'm talking about the the the more recent arrivals. And then, you know, the those who have been here but longer there ups, you know, they're occupy their occupied by, you know, the next step is the settlement housing, you know, how their kids are doing in school. Maybe some of them have to do with post traumatic stress disorder. You know with the mental health challenges, depression, you know, that was that in after, you know, the first twelve to eighteen months, and, you know, I've probably, you know, Canadian politics would be the last thing they have. In mind to be honest. But they do, you know, if you talk to any refugees, I think especially those already being granted status in Canada. They always praise them about how grateful they are here to be given a new life. How safe their kids would feel, you know, if you talk to, you know, refugees who are here, you know, GT keel, refugees, they'll talk about you know, how happy they are to be able to themselves. You know, they only have good things to talk about China. And they they don't take new lives for granted. I think that's the best part about, you know, sometimes, you know, no offense to Canadians khanate Canadian Canadians, but there are dissents of talking about the sense of entitlement. Sometimes I think, you know, maybe Canadians may have a stronger sense of entitlement than some of these refugees who don't take what they receive a granted easily. Do they feel the ground shifting? I mean, we've mentioned new polls in new campaigns that that show that Canadians in general are starting to take a harder. Line on immigration and refugees. Do they feel that that that's happening? Definitely for example, last last week the Ontario budget actually completely strip any funding for legal services for immigrants and refugees. So I went out to talk system advocates and talk to you refugee claimants who actually got caught a by the funding cuts. You definitely feel the ground shifted a little bit that you know, is not as open as friendly during the time when we opened the doors for the Syrians, especially when you talk to because during the the border crossing some people crisis from the states, we I did talk to a lot of people who cross the borders and why they're here and what their circumstances were the feeling towards Canada. And I I'm been in touch with some of them to what is interesting as you know, when they first arrive, you know, they were so grateful, but it's slowly slowly, you know, especially the the ones who are. English speaking, for example, a Nigerian family that I've kept in touch with because they they do look you to watch the media the TV, and they understand the language. So they are able to observe the transit the changes. They would tell me, you know, when they first got here, and you know, it's an open door policy, and they talked about that tweet by by Trudeau, right? And then now, you know with all this, you know, changes they do feel that you know, there's a shift in the they they don't see necessarily as Canadians attitudes immigrants shifted, but more like in terms of at least from the policy government policy perspective, it has shifted. How important is it for Canada to keep that image that Trudeau showed the rest of the world with that tweet weather or not? And I'm saying this whether or not we actually live up to it on the ground. But in the fact that that's what the rest of the world holds up Canada has and I think you would get a different response. If you talk to people in Berta versus you know somewhere into Perez. Versus the rest of Canada, or you know, incubating, and you know, we all heard about the the the Bill twenty one to the Bill to about secularism. Yup. I think you you get a different response. If you talk to, you know, different people from different provinces that image is out there. Like that is not I'm not outsiders. Yes. People just we know that which has more which provinces tend to be more insight candidates, quite divisive for sure. But like, I mean that is you see all those tweets and Facebook posts from Americans every time Trump does something horrible on immigration, or whatever that says, you know, what Canada's not like this. But is interesting. I think in the recent these two months I've seen in different American publications including newspapers, I think there was the story in New York Times as well about, you know, the the the shifts, you know, they mentioned all mentioned about Trudeau's tweet ragged at the, you know, what was happening recently, you know, in terms of his policies, and you know, they made a great big feature about the changes. We, you know, you know, burried in the but federal budget announcement and the close of the in the safe third countries and slowly and slowly, you know, because the star we do have like an immigration Facebook group like where we have members from you know, cross the border around the world. You started to see sometimes, you know, I see the tweets from people that I follow. They follow me about those sentiments like slowly, you know, I think people outside of Canada started to notice those changes as well as good is it bad. Like, I I don't know like I can't judge. But definitely I think people notice those policy changes. But what I would like personally would like to people to to see is the context the context of we are having an election coming those policy changes are driven by politics and just how ugly politics can be. And you know, and I hope hopefully, people would see that you know, what we could blame politicians, but just don't blame. Those people the vote Orebro people who need protection who was just wants a better life a safer life.

Canada Justin Trudeau Donald Trump Europe United States Toronto Goodhearted Turkey Jason Kenny Twitter Syria New York Times Facebook Jordan Calgary Ellen Kirti Nncholas Kyung Middle East Africa Reporter
"candida" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"candida" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Well, it's already sick. And nearly six hundred people at hospitals across the United States. It's a drug resistant superbug fungus. And there's a lot of concern. It could be spreading. It's called Candida Ariss, it preys on people with weakened immune systems, and it can be deadly these type of infections are becoming more and more common. Dr Kevin Kavanagh is chairman of health watch USA, a patient advocacy group nightmare bacteria CRA has popped up. Now this organism. And I think we'll see more in the future and patients are going to start to become afraid to go to healthcare facilities unless they have trust in silicon to tell them when these infections outbreaks are occurring. Dr Cavanaugh says hospitals do not have to let patients for the federal government. No if they have an outbreak. According to the CDC most cases of Candida always have been reported in New York City, New Jersey. And the Chicago area so far there have been no reported cases in California. Chris Edens, KNX ten seventy NewsRadio. New York City is ordering mandatory measles vaccinations in Brooklyn's, Williamsburg, neighborhood, reporter Jedi. Angela says the orthodox Jewish community. There is the epicenter of the operate. Message today for all New Yorkers is to take measles seriously. Mayor de Blasio declaring a public health emergency with measles cases, growing at an alarming rate and Passover around the corner. A major concern for the city is people congregating will cause the dangerous disease to spark even more department health will issue violations and fines to people who remain unvaccinated. The city can't legally physically for someone to get a vaccination. But officials said people who ignore the order could be fined a thousand dollars coming up our here on Kanak attorney general William Bartels lawmakers or adapted version of the report will be next week right now, your traffic.

New York City measles United States Dr Kevin Kavanagh Dr Cavanaugh Candida superbug Chris Edens Mayor de Blasio CDC New Jersey CRA William Bartels Chicago Angela
"candida" Discussed on Collective Insights

Collective Insights

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"candida" Discussed on Collective Insights

"If you can orchestrate a specific treatment, why wouldn't you do that may eat there faster? Hopefully, if you can do that and more specifically meaning. Clearly starring as a fairly expensive medication. So from an expense point of view. It's also tends to be constipated. So if you don't need to go down that road, why go down that late trade. Yeah. And then one of the things that I so appreciate about your approach. Is this reverence for how the body responds and this ability to adapt the treatment plan sue the information that the body is giving us back. So when patients say, I'm sicker after taking coal stare mean. What's your response? We need to stop it immediately. Let that reaction subside. And then we can either try miniscule doses. Or we'll switch to something that you can handle and. I appreciate your pointing this out because. You have to work within that being's ability to process what you're giving it one of the most important principles of treatment is. Both the binders and the anti fungus have the ability to make you worse. If you overdo binders, you're actually going to be pulling toxin into the body faster than that body can get rid of it. You're gonna get worse. It's literally making you more toxic so one of the common conscious this that people use is especially if they come to this from the line world where they're used to if you take an antibiotic and you get hurt spree action or you get worse. The reaction has long been fabulous for killing bugs. This is great now, I I can I can go down a slightly divergent road here and say, we're increasingly aware that that might not be so great that having someone having an excessive amount of toxic. The process is rarely a good strategy kennel. Always avoid it. But it is not something to be sought. Now that's much much more relevant in the mold world where if you are taking a in. It is making you even a little bit worse. Not going to work. You're simply become increasingly toxic. That will begin to shut down all of your organs of detoxification, and you will get aggressively worse worse. I honestly say I've not had a single patient light their way through it. So you often have to really tell patients some the gecko any worsening is not acceptable. Please. Don't get into your head. Oh, I'm just a little bit worse. I'll just put up with this. If if that's what I have to put up with to get my way through. I will vary. Erroneous thinking really important that they. Immediately begin to really trust and listen to their body. So that it can guide them with the correct dosing. You recently brought to my attention. Also that when you treat with antifungal z- these these bugs, so whether they're fungus or bacteria, whatever we're treating they have the ability to make O talk or when they're fungus. They have the ability to make micro-toxins they have the ability to make biotoxin and that if we treat with a medication that puts them on alert and more likely to release more toxin. So this is part of the mechanism of how we might be increasing the toxic burden when our intention is to get rid of what's producing the toxin. So do you have strategies for that? Of course. Remember, one strategy is job one in treatment is to get patients on the maximum binders that are specific to what they have that they can take comfortably and without side effects. Once the binders are up if you kill fungus or or Candida. At a pace that they can keep up with. They will be fine. If you kill it too fast, or too, suddenly, then you're gonna overload that system with the toxin that is not a good strategy. So. From my perspective de first thing that needs to be done is the use of the correct binders to a point of comfort. And then if you proceed slowly with killing strategies for the fungus, you usually will do okay. Can you speak to the marquan testing? So the the nasal swabs for both bacteria and for drug resistant bacteria, and then for fungus and also other mucosal system..

Candida
"candida" Discussed on The Overwhelmed Brain

The Overwhelmed Brain

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"candida" Discussed on The Overwhelmed Brain

"I really really don't know what happened in the last few days. But for the first time in a long time maybe ever. I wanted to entertain friends at home. My entire life was never about inviting people over to my house. I mean, I can invite a friend and that's fine. But a group of friends that's odd for me. And another thing I also really don't know why my skin looked the way it did after shaving this morning. I mean, I'd never seen it look that. I don't know healthy younger and the third thing I had a lot of energy after I woke up this morning, I even went to work out and working out in the morning. Is this something unusual that I never did before and now I'm doing it now. It's really weird. I used to hate it, but now I look forward to it. Strange things are happening, and I'm not sure why the only change I made was that I started taking probiotics now. I'm not making any claims here just started taking them a couple of weeks ago, but they do find it odd that soon after I started taking them, I'm calling up a bunch of friends to come over and enjoy snacks drinks in discussion. It's just not like me. Usually an introvert strange, but like anything that changes in my life. I like to pinpoint the reasons for the change. I want another. Why? So that I can repeat what's good and stop repeating what's bad. Like I said, I'd never seen my skin like that. At least at this age. I'm forty. Eight wasn't the probiotics too soon to say, I'm not a doctor. So all I can tell you is that whatever's happening going to repeat what I'm currently doing to make sure I keep going in the right direction. I take two probiotic capsules every day, a us, the Kaya -biotics candied complex probiotic. Supplement because I wanna make sure I keep the Candida in my body decreased. Haven't been very good at regulating my blood sugar level. So and need help, and probiotics are away to help at least with the Candida and the overgrowth of bad bacteria. And aside from the Candida formula tonics also have a multi back embody plus formula. You know, I read that as soon as you start taking probiotics, a host of beneficial microbes quickly, begin to.

Candida
"candida" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

10:31 min | 2 years ago

"candida" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"Candida? Oh, what about Canada Canada right is pardoning anyone convicted of possessing thirty grams or less of marijuana now that the country has legal national marijuana. Marketplace. Oh, that's it. They're out Canada's legal medical marijuana since a one and the prime minister there has spent two years working toward expanding that to include recreational marijuana. And so if you've been in cute, you're now pardoned like it you like that guy Trudeau. Right. He is he is. My god. US Senator Dianne Feinstein and fellow democrat Kevin delay on daily on our set to face off in a scheduled debate. The Wednesday event is Feinstein's first appearance with an election opponent since two thousand. Oh, I guess and she does there's no question. She has the kind of name recognition where you just go. I know that name. And so here's a chance for you to see her in action. See if she's still got it. It offers a chance for daily on they say here to directly attack her as he searches for a badly needed boost. She's leading in the polls. The election other democrat. Yes, okay. The election is November sixth and I've already received a probably do it this week. I'm going to do it this weekend to I finally got all my stuff in the mail the mail. Mail in ballots should be at your house already. And then you know, you have to deal with that a lot take a second sit down. I'm not in. Well, I guess you're are you voting in San Francisco. No, I vote for emergency. Well, for the general elections that are happening than the Marin county Santa Cruz county. Okay. Over one hundred San Jose massage. Parlors are closing our prostitution crackdown. Is it wrong? Yeah. I mean is it wrong to be prostitute? No. I think that they've been doing it since the beginning of time men and women, and you know, it's a free country. Why is it that you can be a prostitute? If you're in a in a porn to pay for that. Because there's a camera. That's the difference. You're getting paid to have sex one hundred and seven massage parlors have been shattered. As a result of an undercover investigation conducted by the San Jose police departments vice unit and clearly there's a market for it. So yeah, I just you know, a lot. We're such a bunch of puritan ninety percent of the massage businesses that were covertly investigated. Fifty four of sixty were confirmed to be offering more than a massage. Oh, well, guys. I guess you're gonna have to find it somewhere else. Yeah. Well, she said, no, that's why they're at the massage parlour. Massage right? How about a fast? I love those back back back back back. Jaylo was the first woman have a number one movie and album in the same week. It was in the year two thousand one do, you know, the movie made in Manhattan, the wedding planner? No, I don't either. What is it jaylo? I see. Yeah. I remember. I think when she first started to get really huge we were at the other office. And we got some magazine that had like a big lay out of her in it like all these. And I just remember looking at those pictures, I think you and I were looking at a museum. I just like damn that chick is booming. Like that is like, she's just everything you want and a woman everything I want a woman anyway. Right. Yeah. It was before the whole booty thing was alone up, and I was just like damn like that girls going places. She certainly has. Six better now than she's ever looked. She's amazing O J lo how do you do in your mazing? Sarah. It is is a lot of work. Sure. Happy to. The era guy and the kids career she's producing seen TV maggie's acting on American idol anymore. Right. No. But she does a lot of producing different shows. Yeah. She's Latin shows too. I see. Good for her. Way to go day low. J lo data from the block by the rocks. That I got I'm still I'm still Jenny from the block had no idea. We liked her that you guys would froth. So hard off of that story. Yes. He went and went Starbucks is named after a character in Moby. Dick, the founders almost named it after the boat in Moby, Dick, the what was the votes. Do you know the name of the boat from Moby, Dick, Sarah Clark? No, I don't you're so GD close. I'm like, yeah. You're that's close. I wouldn't have gotten that the P quad. Because I haven't read that book in a million years. Not since I had to read it. Exactly. Right. I went back and read it now, maybe I'd actually enjoy it. I hated everything I had to read at school. Yep. My whole thing in school was like look at me, pulling it with minimal effort, and that's just ridiculous. I just I'm so upset with myself that I could have done. Well, instead, I was like I don't even have to try it. I'm getting right by all this stuff. Look at me. All right. I know. But you know, what I mean like not what you should aspire. I agree. She's. By the way, there's a shake shack opening at the Marin county mart. I heard that. That's lurks. Berlin, ding. So try me some shake shack. Yeah. That place. So it's hard to get into any of the restaurants there. So packed all the time. Leave early. Sheesh. Get there when they open. What time is that? I'll be there half hour before eleven eleven thirty. I have a four year old at home, and she loves her hide and seek not good at it. In fact, she's terrible at it. But she loves it. Like, she if she can't find you as soon as she does find you. She's like, okay, you go. Now, I'm gonna hide in this spot. That's a good spot. I'm gonna hide there you go go when they'll never find me. You'll never find me. I'm it's so this is not how it works. You know, she'll be five in two weeks. I just you just what the anyway, a twenty four year old guy named Jesse van Lawson in greenburgh, Pennsylvania. He was a fugitive with an outstanding warrant for burglary and receiving stolen property in earlier this month, the cops went to his girlfriend's apartment to try and find him. She said I haven't seen him in almost a week. Better four year old son told the different story. Oh, the police report when the kid found out why the cops were there. He said he's hiding from you in the electrical room come on. I'll show you. And then he led the cops digesting jesse's hiding spot. Oh, that's great. Jesse was arrested and hit with additional charges for flight to avoid apprehension and endangering the welfare of a child. Well, that's kid who knows how to play hide and seek. Sure. Right. Behind there. Sure, this is where we had. I'm not trying to evade you play with my. The foods that most Americans know how to cook. Oh, I know. I know the ones I think you do because you're at the top of the list with your scrambled eggs, scrambled eggs, fried eggs, slightly more. Not everyone can turn them the fried eggs or harder. Not really good at it. But it's harder. It is harder for sure. And it's so annoying because I am pretty good at it. But still every now and then you do break an egg. And I'm like, I think I'll have that one. Okay. Yeah. I just I don't want to give my kid the broken another good egg. How about spaghetti? What a good mom. You. Are. We knew you were a power mom, right? You can have the whole all of the broken egg. What about spaghetti? That's easy one. It's not on the list hamburgers. Is number two grilled cheeses, number three, mashed potatoes, rice, MAC and cheese steak, pancake or waffles are always a good Goto at night. If you're you know, felling delicious. No one's going to bitch foods that Americans know how to cook. There. It is rice well rice assemble a right either race cooker too. So it's even easier. He's dumped the crap. Think about it just beeps at our later golf, well, the racist on boy, I made some good rice tonight. You know, how people get online and they love to make their comments about things. Right. Yes. Here's your chance to comment without having to go online are you in Buffalo Wild Wings introduced pumpkin spice flavor. To their wings. I'm not crazy for pumpkin spice that. I don't wanna I'll take the regular. I don't mind sweet and savory though together. So maybe it's good. I I mean, I'll try it. How about that? I'll I'll pathway. I'll give it a try. And if I like it I'll go all right. Thank you many. Thanks for the Americans will spend half a billion dollars on Halloween costumes for pets this year. Will you put a costume on rascal on Newton Newton? Sorry fat. Kitty. No, all right. I don't do.

marijuana Jesse van Lawson Senator Dianne Feinstein Sarah Clark Dick guy Trudeau Moby San Jose massage US Canada Marin county Santa Cruz Candida San Francisco golf prime minister Starbucks Canada Canada San Jose Jaylo
"candida" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"candida" Discussed on Science Friday

"And it sounds like that want to be simple, right? But from the from twenty-five years of hospitals working on things as simple as washing hands, there have been studies after studies that show that healthcare personnel actually aren't all that good at washing their hands even when they know someone's watching them to see if they do it. So these things that sound very simple. They're actually hard to do, Tom. You agree to add to what Mariners saying, it'd be. Visions and healthcare providers when they think of Candida Candida as you mentioned at the beginning candidate Alba cans, very calm and Candida in our intestinal track which can cause bloodstream infections and does and, and in fact, very common cause of bloodstream infections in hospitals is not something the healthcare providing community worries about transmitting. So as mentioned, it's almost as though you infect yourself with the organism that's in your GI track because you were the barriers have broken down because you're in a healthcare facility and you're getting treatment, whereas this. So this organism Candida wars is not acting that way. And so part of this is just the awareness. We don't generally react to a candidate species with intense infection control and disinfection. And so part of this is just getting the healthcare community more aware that for this particular organism, which is a Candida that normally you don't react to. You here you have to react and on top of that, as you probably mentioned at the beginning, you know, to me, the definition of a superbug is something that's highly resistant to the available treatments. You know, unfortunately, unlike the 'Bacterial world in the fungal world, we have really three main antifungal 's that we can use for invasive infections. This organism has been found to be resistant to all three in some thankfully, rare situation. So that leaves us with no options. And that's really the other big concern is that if this is able to get a foothold and set up shop, so to speak and become more globally spread than we're going to worry about our ability to be able to treat the serious infections. We hear all the time ameren that drug companies don't want to get involved in something if there is that money to be made because there are not enough people being infected to sell drugs to will that change. Now, if people start hearing about and panicking about. I wonder. I mean, we've been panicking about bacterial superbugs and the loss of antibiotics for quite a while now. And yet most of the companies that once made antibodies have moved out of that manufacturing space because they say with actually fairly good data to back them up, that it's not in their economic best interest to make antibiotics. They just don't make there are in money back. So at this point, though, Canada or is highly fatal to people has really high mortality rates. There aren't all that many cases does that therefore mean that companies are going to rush into the space to make these drugs when they haven't rushed into the space to make drugs for bacteria. Superbugs that seems unlikely to me tweet coming in from David Ecker says, how much of it is airborne this new canopy spread? I think you mentioned is from by the skin Dr Keller much kinda be sprint through the air yet to good question in honestly. Candida in general, we don't think of as an airborne fungus. There are plenty of other fungi. In fact, most fungal infections that do invade do come in through the lung. But in this case candidate generally does not. Again, it's been it's in our intestines and it's on our skin. So it's transmitted by touch, but there's still a lot unknown about Candida orison. And so I think we still need to understand whether there is the potential for this to be aerosolize, but it certainly not the primary way that it spread is this and we're getting a bunch of tweets saying the same thing. Is this something I should be worried about it home or where we only talking about hospitals as the places where this is being spread? Yeah, I think that's a really important question because no, I think the the shorter answer is this is not something that I want the general public to go home and be concerned about this is right now. One of these organisms that is very healthcare associated that is really sit in healthcare settings, but. Both the hospitals and the longer term care facilities are having issues with this..

Candida Mariners Tom David Ecker Alba Dr Keller Canada twenty-five years
"candida" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"candida" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To really find details of infection prevention that you with candidate or is. He just can't slide, just going back to the future is, what you're saying, is it healthcare wise and cleanliness washing hands. Possibly using more toxic and it sounds like that ought to, be, simple right but from the from twenty-five years of hospitals working on things as simple as washing hands there have been studies after studies that show that healthcare personnel actually aren't. All that good at washing their hands even when they know someone's watching them to see if they do it so these things that sound very simple through actually hard to do Tom you. Agree Yeah I think to add to what Mariners, saying. It be Physicians and healthcare providers when they, think of Candida Candida as you mentioned at the beginning candidate Alba cans are very common candidate in our intestinal track which, can cause bloodstream infections and does and is and in fact very common cause of bloodstream infections in. Hospitals is not something, to healthcare providing community worried about transmitting so as Merrin mentioned it's almost as though you infect yourself with the organism that's in your GI tract because you were the barriers have, broken down. Because you're in healthcare facility and you're getting treatment whereas. Dish so this organism Candida wars is not acting. That way and so part of this is just the awareness we don't generally. React to a candidate species with intense infection control and disinfection and so part of this is just, getting the healthcare community more aware that for this particular. Organism, which is a Candida that normally you don't react to Here you have to react and on top of that as you probably mentioned at the beginning, you know to me the definition of a superbug is something that's highly resistant to the available treatment. You know unfortunately unlike, the bacteria world in the fungal world we have really three main antifungal 's that we can use for invasive infections this organism has been found to be resistant to all three, in some. Thankfully rare situation so that leaves us with no options. And that's really the other big concern is that. If this is able to get a foothold and set up shop so to. Speak and become more globally spread than we're gonna worry about our ability to be able to treat, the serious infections you know we hear all the time Marinette drug companies don't want to get involved in something if there's not money to be made because there are not enough people being infected to sell drugs. To will that change now if people start hearing about and panicking about I wonder I mean we've been panicking about bacterial cell bugs and, the loss of antibiotics for quite a, while now, and yet, most of the companies that once made antibiotics have moved out of that manufacturing. Space because, they, say with actually fairly good data to back, them up that it's not in their economic best interest to make antibiotics they. Just don't make their RND money back so at this point though Canada or, is highly. Fatal to people has really high mortality. Rates there aren't all that many cases does that therefore means that companies are going to rush into the space to, make these drugs when they haven't rushed into the space to make drugs for bacteria superbugs that seems unlikely to me tweet coming. In from, David Ecker says how much Of it is airborne this new canopy spread I think you mentioned is. From by the skin doctor chiller much is going to be sprint through, the air Yeah that's a good question and honestly Candida in general. We don't think of as an airborne fungus. There, are plenty of other fungi in fact most fungal infections. That do invade do come in, through the long but in this case candidate, generally. Does not again it's been in our intestines and it's on our skin and so it's transmitted by touch, but there's still a lot unknown about Canada Oregon and so I think we still need to understand whether there is the. Potential for this to be aerosolize but it certainly not the primary way that it spread is this we're getting a bunch of tweets? Saying, the same thing is this something I should be, worried about is home or we only talking about hospitals as the places where this is being spread yeah I think that's a really important question because. No I think the shorter answer is this is not something that I. Want the general public. To go home and be concerned about this is right now one of these organisms that is very healthcare associated That is really set in healthcare, settings..

Candida Canada Merrin Marinette Tom Mariners Alba David Ecker Oregon twenty-five years
"candida" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"candida" Discussed on AM Joy

"Candida is a very low barrier entry country they by a lot of our stuff but in donald trump's mine as to today's point somebody has to be screwing us over right and look the us is a consumer driven economy that is part of why we have our structure our economic structure is the way that is we're china is an export led economy but what trump is doing is capitalizing on the fact that most americans don't understand these nuances larry cudlow who understand the is capitalizing on these nuances if you look at singapore singapore's high tariffs but there's a reason for that because they want less car fewer cars in their country they want certain things there's a reason why countries make choices that they make right driven by the structure of their economy their economy and it cannot say it enough donald trump and his daughter manufacture their goods not in ohio in china and ao monacco in ethiopia he chinese steel built those towers guy guys chinese concrete not american steel he didn't even do it he's globalist tear it down throat let me throw the paper sold a second downhill next anymore reveal very personal i don't get the snake out period player seem to be turning in i mean we're actually talking on building a wall around the country and yet you have been reaching out to people who don't necessarily re this gaza iran cuba more americans house words center which you can see how other people live seems useful at worst and incredibly pleasurable interesting at best.

Candida donald trump us china singapore singapore ohio ethiopia cuba larry cudlow ao monacco iran
"candida" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"candida" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Job offer away actually they are all almost universally happy that i'm teaching negotiating skills because their employees need these skills at work and they want their their candida job candidate to try to negotiate even if maybe they can't give any higher salary they love to see the candidates try and so the biggest fear that people have is that job offer will be taken away if they seem to greedy i've never had a student tell me a job offer was taken away entry level jobs fresh out of college never taken away of never had a hiring manager told me that they would take that offer away so i think that fear is just in our minds will remember also than the same conversation that someone said not only has it never happened but it's expected that the hr people expect you to ask for more that's why they offered you less yes you have to consider that they may not be giving you the best salary that they could that they may be shooting at the lowest end of the range that they have available and some jobs think about it like sales or other jobs where you're going to actually go shit on the job that hiring manager might be disappointed if you don't go sheet and they may think maybe i hired the wrong person so if it's expected as part of the job that i would absolutely negotiate it and come in strong and wellprepared well it's powering here utah 'cause i think most people would say i you know i don't wanna be the one i don't wanna be that guy like there's only one guy that does that but lots of people do it and it's in many ways expected and in the world won't come to an end if they say no you just buy the shirt or you don't new go home that's right it's okay if you don't buy the shirt it's fine you'll find another shirt somewhere else.

candida
"candida" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

Rooster Teeth Podcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"candida" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

"Right yes i believe it was a child in a car seat though to really think so it's just a weird set of likes to typically almost impossible things but they have not had a crash where the killed people what was i even be like explaining to the family like little timmy got hit by a plane yet like when are you in a plane crusher cook rush both we both i think when you and i were texting about it like if you so many qualifiers when you're talking about south west safety record because so many bizarre i mean that so many it's so few incidents that but they're all like very bizarre when they do happen i guess how much anxiety when i fly southwest only because i don't have a reserve seat tonight i don't like everyone rushing in and check in early candida a good boarding number of just being able to go onto the plane whenever you're ready to go because you have a seat there waiting for you so do they think piece of the propeller puff flew off i believe that's what they said it was still trestle number one of the blades but then it just exploded things through the cowling and everything mechanical environment you don't want interrupt dad the south light like what are they looking there looks like the fan blades yeah the vine one of them broke and basically went back to the designed to survive but strikes up to certain sizes or but could fly into them and everything stays cool but just the fight the one obe snapped off in the whole thing exploded is men too i think easy pieces solitaire stronger than a bird.

candida
"candida" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"candida" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Objected trustworthy journalism matters we hear from listeners like everyday that marketplace helps you understand the financial forces that affect our lives so that you can make better decisions that this is your chance to be part of our efforts to raise economic intelligence across the country when you support marketplace today your donation will be matched dollar for dollar for dollar by our friends at the candida fund as a nonprofit news organization counting on your help that we can continue to grow and keep getting better don't miss out on this chance to make your donation go twice as far become a marketplace investor today in whatever amount is right for you you do it by going to marketplace dot org tomorrow jp morgan chase city group and wells fargo will report earnings for the first few months of the year and you know what twenty teen is shaping up to be a pretty good one for the big banks marketplace's aaron schrank tells us why unemployment is low consumer confidence is high and those first quarter profits will be padded by tax cuts says analysts stephen bigger at argus research banks or one of the biggest beneficiaries of the cuts in corporate tax rates the average bank and they're going from high twenties or low thirties rates all the way down to a low twenties rate the volatility of the market was another boon for big banks says morningstar analyst jim senegal last year the sp five hundred only moved one percent up or down on eight occasions that's happened twenty three times in the first quarter this year a big banks make a lot of their money from trading activities and generally higher volatility is good for trading and don't forget interest rates the fed bumped its benchmark rate last month and signalled more hikes to come higher rates basically main more.

aaron schrank candida jp morgan stephen bigger morningstar analyst jim senegal one percent
"candida" Discussed on News Talk 710 KNUS

News Talk 710 KNUS

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"candida" Discussed on News Talk 710 KNUS

"A couple of times he spoke about his meeting with the prime minister of canada justin trudeau this week at a special donor evening event and he has a few different things that he that he said in that meeting or event and one of them was that prime minister trudeau and hamid met and trump had a conversation where trudeau insisted that the trade deficit was on candidates side and that canada does not have a surplus with the united states to which president trump responded saying that no we do have a trade deficit with you guys and he did not know he just insisted because he presumed that it would be the case he was shooting from hip it does to some extent depend on who you ask in that a few years ago candida did for many years have a trade deficit or trade surplus with the united states and we had a trade deficit so some may say that that's just kind of carried over a few years ago it was the case therefore must be the case today but the us trade representative actually says that there's a difference in what's true and what president trump was claiming in that there actually is a surplus on the us side for the first time in like thirty something years the united states has a surplus i don't know why president trump wouldn't touted as some sort of victory on his part that in the last couple of years we've had a trade surplus with canada instead of a deficit but you know it's unfortunate that president trump would go into a situation and not know the facts before meeting with the canadian prime minister a trading partner and then just speak out in such a way that he admits now he doesn't know who did not know what was true or what wasn't true that is the unfortunate component but at the same time it's like he didn't know something that doesn't really matter in that michael barone was talking about two he meant made mention in this the trade deficit is fairly well and irrelevant measure of how we are performing and trade that's because trade balances out with financials with financial flows that come into the united states investment dollars it balances out i've talked about it before it gets.

prime minister justin trudeau trump canada united states candida representative partner michael barone hamid president
"candida" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"candida" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"The relief of it all twenty years after their last winter olympics try of women's hockey team usa beat its nemesis candida and side note it literally comes on the 38 verse three of the miracle on ice which i i didn't even know his birthday was the same date as the miracle on ice now he knows that the special date but how about that two incredible victories for the united states of america in olympic hockey on february twenty second because that's the date that it wasn't beyond chang so the game started all the 21st on the east coast here but clearly it was thursday yongjiang so awesome just absolutely amazing and we are we're still trying to scrape together some post game sound the reaction i've seen a bunch of it on nbc on tv i'm sure it service at some point on westwood one maybe not before we get off the air here but we've reached out to team usa without a member of the team on the air before and at some point will bring you a an interview with a victoria's member just a a fantastic victory an epic finish all the tension all the drama that you want in sports but at the same time it was twenty years in the making we're not talking about a victory that was just this last week it's not a a week's worth of work that culminates with this gold medal game this is twenty years in the making and it goes back to the days of ninety eight and the torch that's an been passed m if you don't know of again you don't know about these women they know each other really well not only because of the rivalry and because of how often they cross paths in international competition they also play friendlies against one another because they are the top two teams in the world and so they want to skate against one another to be able to get better and then in addition a lot of these women play on proteins around the world and they play with members of teen kheddeda right so not only is there no they're no secrets right there's extremely familiar with one another but it's a rivalry that scott chapters and layers and those of the best time and so that's bondar question on this show after twenty years.

united states america hockey nbc candida westwood gold medal scott twenty years twenty second
"candida" Discussed on The Basketball Friends

The Basketball Friends

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"candida" Discussed on The Basketball Friends

"Two the president said welcome to an emergency pod it is trade deadline lot happened today i'm tom average you're welcome to the basketball prints podcast we have all maligned pay great fiveperson team there seared so eats them in canada i'm guessing toronto fighter with your good good how're you and you are you guess great tennis one one justin theroux infirm also candida welcome to the show thanks for having me i am not in brought up you are in where it uh wouldn't affects okay there is a hockey team merriman stipulate that the rate at chee we got we got him back like uh i think in two thousand eleven so uh and they're are actually doing good will which i that's what we're talking about right and ordinary stray i'm here i'm here trade just ran up the stairs in in la your meniscus is still intact i hope yes yes mob in his is still intact i'm ready to play for the cleveland cavaliers get he's an over there in beef feel connecticut that is jay toy i'm here hey guys guys guys and gals we have a ridiculous trade deadline is everyone okay i felt like my head was spinning for about an hour there i feel like we can all exhale and say that yes elford payton got moved for a second round pick to phoenix.

president basketball canada chee cleveland cavaliers connecticut elford payton toronto tennis justin theroux candida hockey jay phoenix
"candida" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"candida" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"On the president and say that they want him to be that candida oh it's so he so confident about winning this race he's not even bothering to turn up for that nomination of them and yet when one assumes orchestrated behind the scenes a e e didn't want lavalle nato's stand is that is that in a sense of slight suggestion that to putin test is aware that something could go wrong at the last minute well i think alexander only would argue and he does argued that the kremlin's afraid of him on the economies of freight of real competition i think it certainly true that this race is carefully choreographed there's no suggestion i don't think that this is a real transparent fair and free in objective uh competition atmosphere you can has control of all the resources in the country and most importantly he is the man who is seen every day on the state media alexander von the is never shown on state television uh certainly not in the news and in fact the fact that he was blocked from running for election yesterday didn't make any of the bulletins on state television i think that's that's important and that's telling i also think that's precisely why the kremlin doesn't want him to run because if he were to be a candidate for the election he would have to be given a platform on state television and he would certainly use not to criticise mr putin directly invite personally servants within muscat thanks it's coming up to seventeen minutes paul six rotherham has the business news versus mortgage the big time of year for the movie business robbie it is indeed yes a very important time of year because it's when many bigbudget films or released an industry at the moment is think perhaps its biggest challenge since the invention of the television set streaming services such as netflixing amazon prime video or eating into cinema audiences and revenue so what does the.

president nato alexander kremlin mr putin rotherham state media paul amazon seventeen minutes
"candida" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"candida" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Well as the candida free pressed always a column entitled western front the israel national news also his opeds have appeared at fox nation is well daniel greenfield at back i worry today mm great thank you so much for having me on good having among senior peace your entire attorney general replaces the left with the rule of law your highlighting track that looks as if he's going into a myriad of vaw areas in which he believes were has found that dumb well entirely too many instances of political motivations have driven these leaks that seem to be spewing from the doj give us a more of your perspective on this well sue um during the obama era the justice department essentially became a political organization much what it was doing was not and then we were waited to prosecuting crimes in the conventional sense but in prague various social policies uh whether was on campus whether it was um and certain local areas like ferguson and this was not about prosecuting criminals instead it was about pushing particular social policies so for example there was the movement of billions of dollars into a slush fund that would be directed to a left wing political organisations uh been this was uh wherever you might think of this this is not in any way something of the justice department should be doing it shouldn't be funding money to thing organizations so what was this left wing it's the money's supposed what was the fund what was the left wing organization to whom the obama forces were were fumbling this cache so what the should did so obvious he normally congress has to appropriate money uh the white house kanter start giving away money to people without actually having some authorization from congress that's how the constitution works administration got around this using the justice department to basically intimidate companies that have been accused of wrongdoing greatly are wrongly and then saying to them uh uh you can just go to trial with this or you can make you can reach a settlement now but instead of reaching a settlement that would normally be paid out to you know.

candida doj ferguson congress israel daniel greenfield attorney obama prague kanter
"candida" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"candida" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"This is what was for innovative rewrite it's a joe like as a movie starts like this it starts like this with like they are they are hammering in how privileged he is like they're giving us every every opportunity to go back ham he's such a jerk like i can't buy the botlikh they even laugh off but candida uganda kinda he just like flippantly besides where he's gotta go right right and for ford the movie to to to to move in the direction that it does is like it's laughable that this is what this movies about right because because like i guess let to me what the movie was trying to set up in the beginning was like oh he's not racist like he he he wants adventure he's this way he he is a white boy whose like whose try who has this weird like privilege sense of i'm going gonna help the world like i'm going to help the poor black people in africa man i really do love forrest whitaker speech at the and by the way it's the best part of the move is so great is the best possible how of the moment it's so great and it's is over here and i'm like i'm on your on this guy side this murderer and has been captured on his i'm on i i f are lazio i mean my now no they took they data gallo wakes him up and it's like you deserve even says you deserved it yeah you deserve to die mike he does deserve to die he does i mean mother he deserves horrible to have it to him because my thing is you don't go when the woman gets.

mike candida uganda africa forrest whitaker gallo