35 Burst results for "Candice"

Fundamentals Matter When It Comes to Elections

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Fundamentals Matter When It Comes to Elections

"Where I'm going to go back to probably the biggest issue that we've talked about on this podcast. Many times, and that is the fundamentals matter. Fundamentals matter when it comes to rice Canada's matter and how Canada's run matters. Walker is an example here Warnock is an example here. Both of them are flawed Candice in the sense that the public in polling didn't trust them. They're 5 unfavor numbers were upside down. And it does appear, though, that walker had a little bit more of a tug on that issue both going down because you could see the breakdown that Kemp out performed walker significantly almost four points or more in this election cycle with upwards of almost a 100,000, 200,000 most depending on where we're at right now. What does that mean? It means that people did not want to vote for Brian Kemp, maybe because of how he handled the past four years as governor, the elections, the pandemic, everything else. And for whatever reason, the refine Republicans could not vote for or did not vote for Herschel Walker. I saw a lot of signs yesterday that says that people were going to be voting for Brian camper and others on the republic ticket, but they simply left the saying it rice off. So again, we'll see what happens right now. Right now currently as we speak here early on a Wednesday morning, the Republican and Democrat in Georgia looked to be headed to a runoff, although there is room right now because Warnock is actually ahead by about 30,000 votes. There is some room that if the numbers broke very, very well for Warnock, he could win without a runoff. That would be, I think, amazing story devastating for Senate hopefuls in Georgia. But it is still there. That means

Warnock Walker Brian Kemp Canada Candice Brian Camper Kemp Herschel Walker Georgia Senate
"candice" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

04:49 min | 2 months ago

"candice" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"Is it safe to say that anyone who opens their mouth and has feelings that are metal are that type or any of them that are kind of silver colored, a different amalgam of metals and don't have mercury or is that just universally what's used? I'd say it's universal unless they have a gold restoration that might be confused with because those are metallic, of course, but for the most part, if it looks dark, it's a mercury based filling. And you know, it never should have been used in dentistry, Candice hit on the reason it was, it was cheap. Anybody can put one in, you can stuff one in with your thumb. Good tooth doesn't have to be dry. You know, you just put it in there. And it lasts. It lasts and lasts. It'll last until the last microgram of mercury falls out and the whole thing cause the mercury is what kind of. You're probably last longer than most of the people who haven't been in their mouths. Probably. Not to be morbid, but that's right. And then what about if somebody has, say, a crown, and sometimes you'll see an old crown, you see a little metal underneath it or something like that. Is this toxic material also used in other types of, of course. Okay. Of course. And you mentioned gold teeth. Like if someone has a gold crown and it's a fashion statement, is there likely mercury in that too or it certainly can be because many of the mercury fillings or the teeth that they were in failed and so the dentist would then put a crown on top of that. Oftentimes using not only the tooth, but the mercury filling as a base for something for The Crown to sit. Okay, kind of an anchor then to put the white color tooth on. Or you know, you can get just about everything dentistry has to offer in one tooth if you're really after it. You can get a mercury filling. And a gold crown,

Candice
"candice" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"candice" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Every time there is a step forward, there's a step back where, for example, senior editors at a major black imprint are suddenly fired from that imprint. Which is something that recently happened at amistad at Harper Collins in the U.S.. And so I'm always curious as to what it's going to take for sustainable change to happen, which is the real measure, like how long can we sustain this, where we have more inclusive editorial culture and every other kind of culture within publishing so that people don't think Africa is a country. I can't believe sending a cameroonian author's book to some Nigerian influencers God bless them. But that was like, that was like the whole plan, but that was like, oh, okay. Let's get a photo. I was like, let's get a focus group together so I can prove why this is so wrong. And so yeah, I think you need those people who are going to just be there and be like, that doesn't make any sense. But again, let me show you in a gentle way. Why it doesn't make sense exhausting. I don't I do and I don't miss it. I would go back into it. People were time I would. I would go back in. I would, I would go back in. I loved marketing so much, and I would go back into that. You are a writer now, full time, and I'm curious, are you working on your next novel? I'm not at the moment because I'm show running one of two TV shows that I'm working on. I'm working on a TV show called champion, which is musical. Of course. Hello. And I am working on the adaptation of queenie. And so there is no time for novel. Because adaptations are hell. Because it's just like, you know, why buy the book if you want to just do your own thing with it? It's interesting. Just get someone to write something different, you know? I do know. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I'm sure. And I'm really candid about that. And I don't really care who hears it because it's like, why buy it? I don't understand why you would do this. And so I think I'm gonna have to earmark my time to get back into novel writing. I think end of next year, I think I just need to TV is a really, really, I feel like I'm trapped in a web, you know? And it's going to take a long time to extract myself from it because, you know, there were so many moving parts. And when you're show running, it's like you have to be there or the time you have to be active and engaged and you have to talk to people all the time. And I just think when I started writing, I never thought I'd end up managing anyone. Do you know what I mean? You just see. I do. And then I'm running the show. I'm grateful for the work. As am I. It's not what the dream was. Do you sleep? Not enough. Not enough. Not enough. And you know, my shows have not yet moved into production, which I know is going to amp things up. Oh yes. Immeasurably. And I'm grateful. I really am grateful for the work, but when I dreamt of being a writer, all I dreamt of was books and that really would have been enough. This is not something I ever anticipated. And of course, I do enjoy it. But it's a different beast. You know, book people, I know what to expect from what people for better and worse. And TV people are just buck wild. Yes. They're just buckwild. They don't care. They're going to do what they're going to do. And they have the, you know, he who has the most money wins. And they have the most money. So it's very interesting to see what happens with adaptations. Are you involved in, are you also writing the adaptation of queenie? I'm writing some of it, but not all of it because, you know, I think my thing is queenie came into the world with me and I put her out there. I was able to be like, this is what this book is about. This is why I care about it. And I think that I've done that work now. And I think that when it's a TV show, it's a different life. It's a different thing. And I would actually be okay to be like, someone else can do that. But there's a really amazing bunch of writers working on it, and that's been it's been so fun and collaborative, and that's been one of the best parts of it. Sitting in a room with other black people just sharing our experiences and really, and men as well. Who were like, yeah, I know this and I understand this, and who asks questions as well, crucially. But when it comes to actually writing the thing, I'd like to back up, I'd like to step away from it. Because I've done it. All right, it's 8 years since I started writing her. I don't need to do it again. I have one final question, which is a question I like to ask every writer that I have the pleasure of speaking with. What do you like most about your writing? That's a lovely question. Do you know what I like most about my writing? I like in my writing the way that I speak, I do what I want, and then you just catch it and take what you want from it. That's what I like. I don't try to write or speak like anyone else. I love that. Thank you so much. Candice

queenie Harper Collins Africa U.S. Candice
"candice" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:01 min | 2 months ago

"candice" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Need to have noise. I need a lot of music. I watch television, I will say. Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, and I see it in something in the background, but I need to I'm really funny with quite so I'm in quiet right now while I talk to you and I'm very I'm like, what's that? What's that nice? What's that? Who's over there? And so as soon as we finish, I will be I brought my speaker with me on this book tour. So I can have something all the time. But I love distraction because I think I've just got quite a jumpy fast mind and I think the food's into it. What kind of music is best for you to write to? At the moment. So it's usually been sort of UK rap, lots of grime, but at the moment it soundtracks. So Roman Juliet soundtrack, that's a firm favorite west side story dream girls and I'm a grown one and also there's oh my gosh, moulin rouge, that one. That's a very good one. So at the moment, lots of films soundtracks and I love musicals. I love musicals so much. And so it's like, okay, yeah, carry the energy of a musical or the camp or the loud or the excitement and put it into the work. If that makes sense. Yes, I love musicals. I loved any situation where people might spontaneously break into song and dance. And really make important life decisions through lyrics. Like, yes, give me more of that and dream girls is a top ten show. So good. Absolutely. Now, queenie received such a beautiful reception and I know that one of the things that motivated you to write queenie was reading all of these books while working in publishing and not being able to connect to many of them, not seeing anything resembling your life on the page. And now you've been able to give that to black women. And so what has been your favorite moment of having a book like queenie out in the world? And of course, now people person. Thank you. It feels like a privilege, first of all, that is an incredible thing to me and actually I read of being part of something that is a connector of people. That's super important to me, but I get so many people who just tell me that queenie made them feel less lonely and that's the thing that's the most important to me because I wrote it because I was feeling so lonely and when I say that I really want to had something to say, I just felt so sad always in myself and trying to be this girl. It was black girl who was perfect who had her shit together who was really smart who was really good at doing her hair who had the right skin tone who had the right nails who had all of this stuff and who dated properly and behave properly. And I was like, I can't be, I can't be alone in always feeling this. And so whenever I meet somebody who is like, I'm the kind of girl that queenie is. I'm always like, okay, good. Because you know, she's found her people and that's important. That's me, and also when men are reader is always really interesting to me and what their take homes are. But it's always when it's always when women are like, yeah, I recognize her. Absolutely. And not just her, but sometimes her mom, I like that connection. It was queenie when I read it, and I was like, oh, I love that it was a story about a young black woman who didn't have it all together. It was absolutely a mess. He was dealing with anxiety and needing to work on mental health. And then also just having a sort of precarious living situation, which so many of us have in our 20s and 30s. Right. Yeah. So I love that you put that book into the world. I'm curious, how do you measure success as a writer? How do you feel like yes? I've done good and I've made it. Or do you feel successful? Do I feel successful? It's interesting. I don't know what the measure is. I'm not interested really in money as a metric. I'm not really interested in social media following as a metric. I just like to, if anyone goes on social media, I just sort of post some stuff. Very irregularly and my stories are just me doing stupid shit. So it's never like I don't have a curated brand. I'm not really interested in being that sort of person. I think it's knowing that someone has connected to my work, which kind of takes us back to what we're talking about before. But that's the thing for me that makes me feel like I'm important and feel like I can talk to someone because so much of my life just as a person is always trying to find a way to connect with people and I think having sort of like two book style where people can come and say to me oh you've captured what I have gone through and I didn't know who to talk to about it. I didn't even know I needed to talk to about it. That's how I measure I guess what success is to me. It's having found a connection. Those connections can be so important. I read a piece in The Guardian and you talked about how queenie was written about blackness and response to whiteness, but your second book was a book just about black people. How have people responded to that difference in focus? And what are you really proud of in people person? And how you grew as a writer between queenie and people person? Thank you. I've been waiting for someone to ask that. I've had a very interesting response to that. Which I recognized quite early on. So I had lots of reviewers. And all white ones actually say it's not queenie. And it's like, well, well yes, because well, of course, there's a different work. Funny how that works. Yeah, interesting. And so I think that there is something interesting that I'm finding. I want to see plays and when I watch films, there is something about whiteness that is still like what this has to be centered even if it's negatively because it's at least you still recognize that I'm here. And so the lack of that in people person, I think, has really flummoxed people. You know, if there's not even a lens being held up to me, then what's the point? And I found that really interesting. So lots of people who were like, well, where are the white people? And I had a journalist, a white journalist asked me why I had othered the white people in the novel and people passed it. And I was like, in what way do you mean? And she was like, wow, they're just the other. And I was like, I honestly don't know what you mean. I was like, I'm not being rude. I just don't know what that is. And she was like, well, you know, the woman in it. You know, she's described as a white woman. And I was like, well, how would you describe yourself? And she's like, well, a woman. And I was like, well, that's the issue. And so it's that interesting thing of being like, unless I'm writing about whiteness in a way that even is negative positive anything unless I'm signposting whiteness is something that is there that is disruptive, then no one really understands what I'm doing. And that's really interesting. That is interesting. And it's always revealing when you press white journalists. And readers about their inherent biases about who is the center of a narrative universe. Because it reveals time and time again, that what they're really saying is that white people are the center of the universe, so I'm a woman, but you're a black woman. Your womanhood is qualified by your race.

queenie moulin rouge UK
"candice" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

NPR's Book of the Day

02:26 min | 4 months ago

"candice" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

"I know, <Speech_Female> that's why we like <Speech_Female> to read about these <Speech_Female> stories that we don't have to <Speech_Female> experience <SpeakerChange> them with ourselves. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You include <Speech_Male> in this extraordinary <Speech_Male> narrative a quote from <Speech_Male> Samuel Johnson, <Speech_Male> who wrote, I <Speech_Male> do not wish well <Speech_Male> to discoveries. <Silence> For <Speech_Male> I am always afraid <Speech_Male> they will end in <Speech_Male> conquest and <Speech_Male> robbery. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Did these consequences <Speech_Male> ever occur <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> these <Speech_Male> explorers? And by <Speech_Male> the way, I mean city <Speech_Male> Mubarak Bombay, <Speech_Male> as much as I <Speech_Male> mean, <Speech_Male> speaking <SpeakerChange> Burton. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Yes, absolutely. <Speech_Female> I mean, <Speech_Female> obviously <Speech_Female> the European explorers, <Speech_Female> it occurred to them. <Speech_Female> That is what they wanted. <Speech_Female> They knew that <Speech_Female> that was going to be the <Speech_Female> end result. <Speech_Female> For Bombay, <Speech_Female> you know, <Speech_Female> he, I think, <Speech_Female> was surviving, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and then he <Speech_Female> took great pride <Speech_Female> and trying <Speech_Female> to understand <Speech_Female> his land. And <Speech_Female> yes, a lot <Speech_Female> of tragedy came <Speech_Female> out of this, but <Speech_Female> also some <Speech_Female> knowledge. You know, <Speech_Female> the people who live <Speech_Female> there understood <Speech_Female> what was the source of <Speech_Female> the Nile. They understood <Speech_Female> what their land <Speech_Female> was like. <Speech_Female> But nobody <Speech_Female> else in the world <Speech_Female> did. And these expeditions <Speech_Female> did <Speech_Female> map that part of the <Speech_Female> world. And <Speech_Female> Bombay <Speech_Female> went on, so he helped <Speech_Female> Burton and speak, he <Speech_Female> helped speak get to <Speech_Female> the naans, <Speech_Female> which speak <Speech_Female> then named for <Speech_Female> his British <Speech_Female> Queen Lake Victoria, <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> then Bombay <Speech_Female> helped Henry Morton <Speech_Female> Stanley find <Speech_Female> David livingstone. <Speech_Female> You know, the <Speech_Female> famous quote, doctor <Speech_Female> livingstone I presume, <Speech_Female> but that was <Speech_Female> Bombay helping him. <Speech_Female> And then he <Speech_Female> helped vernie lovett <Speech_Female> Cameron be <Speech_Female> the first to cross <Speech_Female> the entire continent <Speech_Female> from C <Speech_Female> to C east to <Speech_Female> west. So it's amazing. <Speech_Female> Bombay, <Speech_Female> you know, <Speech_Female> as so often happens, <Speech_Female> has been forgotten, <Speech_Female> has been largely <Speech_Female> forgotten. So <Speech_Female> that was one thing <Speech_Female> I hope to do with <Speech_Female> this story is to <Speech_Female> remind and to emphasize <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> incredible role <Speech_Female> that Africans played <Speech_Female> in the mapping of <Speech_Female> their own <SpeakerChange> continent. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Candice millard, <Speech_Male> her new <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> book, river of the gods, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> genius, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> courage and betrayal <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the search of the source of the <Speech_Music_Male> Nile. Thank you so much <Speech_Music_Male> for being with <SpeakerChange> us. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you so much for <Speech_Music_Female> having me. I really enjoyed <Speech_Music_Female> the conversation <SpeakerChange> Scott.

Samuel Johnson Henry Morton Burton David livingstone Candice millard Scott
"candice" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

NPR's Book of the Day

05:53 min | 4 months ago

"candice" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

"Find out the headwaters of the Nile River was the space race of the middle of the 19th century. Candice millard's book, river of the gods, genius courage and betrayal in the search for the source of the Nile tells the true life tales of men who trekked into uncharted places contending with the forbidding terrain of heat drought fever typhoid, smallpox, and beetles that burrowed into ears. The men wound up with contending claims, Candice millard, author of previous best sellers, including river of doubt, during just now from Kansas City. Thank you so much for being with us. Thanks so much for having me. I want to get you to tell us about each of these three distinctive personalities. Let's put it that way. First, Richard Burton, brilliant, self taught, much to admire, but kind of hard to like, wasn't he? Yeah, you know, he was one of these once in a century characters. He wrote dozens of books. He spoke more than 25 languages, he was the first English man to enter Mecca disguise as a Muslim. Because his Arabic was so good, but he studied every religion in every culture, but respected none. He was in many ways sort of an equal opportunity offender. Obviously very deeply flawed in many ways, but absolutely fascinating. And shitty Mubarak Bombay, he was kidnapped from his village in East Africa, sold for cloth. Yes. Into slavery in western India, and then he made his way back to Africa. How did he become a part of the story in this trek? Yes, he very quickly became the heart and really the hero of the story and of that expedition. He nursed the men. He helped feed the men. He was always keeping their spirits up, keeping them going. And he did that again and again for expedition after expedition. And really, in many ways, he did more to map East Africa than any explorer ever to enter the continent of his birth. And tell us about John hanning speak in aristocrat, who seemed to care more for animals than people, but he cared for animals because he wanted to shoot them. So speak was what Britain's expected there heroes to be.

Candice millard fever typhoid Nile River smallpox Mubarak Bombay Richard Burton Kansas City East Africa Mecca Africa India John hanning Britain
Candace Owens Sounds Off on #MeToo

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:12 min | 6 months ago

Candace Owens Sounds Off on #MeToo

"Four years ago, Candace, you went on this stage. I'm so excited. And you told the world what? That I did not support the me two movement. And turning point, USA's organization, almost burned to the ground, so I'm going to give a lot of credit to you right now, Charlie. So basically, me too started trending, like the online Twitter movement, started trending, because that's all it was really, was a Twitter movement. And it just lacked substance. It was so obvious to me what all the holes were going to be in this. And I basically tweeted that I would not support the me too movement. And that it weakened women. And obviously, it's bad for men. And oh my gosh, the floodgates. First, foremost, like turning point, USA, obviously. Has a lot of young girls that work here, which is amazing, and it's great in college, you know, a lot of young college women, and they took that as Candice Owens doesn't support rape victims, which is what the intention of the movement was, right? To say either you support the movement, me too, or you support rapists, which is what they're always doing, right? Either you support Black Lives Matter, the organization, or you hate black people. And we walked into, I remember Andrew, your PR guy was like, every single person, he's here now for the people that are watching this and not just listening to it. But every single news reporter Daily Beast, everyone wanted us to make a comment and there was so much pressure on Charlie to speak out against what Candace have said. Like you had to say something and just toe the line and say, no, no, no, no, we supported me two more organization. A couple people at turning point quit. I remember that. Quit over employees quit over it. Employees quit were like crying, saying, how could she and not support the me too movement? What you held the line? We did hold the line. Thank you. I mean, the credit is to you. You were, it was very funny. It happened before why WS at first. And it was either a tweet or a tweet, always a tweet always a tweet. And then what was awesome is that you gave the speech AWS and you tripled down. It was like, it was like, all right, I just want to tell all of you. And what was awesome though is a majority of the people agreed. You know, you kind of see in the back row. They were like a little like snobby like weak people. But you were like, you know, we're not going to do mob justice in this

Candace Candice Owens Twitter USA Charlie Andrew
"candice" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

05:47 min | 8 months ago

"candice" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"But I'm a realist. It's going to be a rough couple of years. I think personally, and we got to play Bama what the second game of the season. Correct. And I think it's going to be stomping. But I am not doing it to us. Yeah, no, I don't think anybody confused you on that one. But I'm just excited about it. And I think if I guess our keys in a couple of years, a couple of recruiting classes will be okay. Yeah, to me, Tim, I think he's a good coach, but last year did not help him at all. And I think what last year did is it shortened his leash and if he doesn't turn the program around, at least in direction, you have to start looking ahead going. Is he the guy we want to go into the SEC? So I think there is going to be pressure on sarkisian very quickly if he's not careful. I like the guy very much. I think he's capable, but this is no time to say, well, let's let this thing roll because that clock is ticking. We'll take a break here, more to come. With our next guest, the athletic director at Vanderbilt, Kansas story Lee is next. You are listening to the Paul finebaum show podcast. And we are back. Great to have all of you here and more of your phone calls in just a moment at 8 5 5 two four two 7 two 8 5 which in a busy show already and we mentioned that we were going to have Kansas story Leon the head of the athletic department at Vanderbilt there has been some big news this week updating on facilities and the introduction of a new program. And Kansas, thank you very much. It's always good to have you on. Congratulations on the events of the last week when you've had some very big announcements. Good afternoon. Good afternoon. Thank you. Thank you very much. I appreciate it. Well, tell us all about some of the news we've been reading about. Well, in the last couple of days, we put out some additional detail about the first facility project that we will start later this summer in our north end zone of our football stadium. It will serve as the basketball practice facility for our men to basketball programs. But as you know, as many people know, our footprint is pretty tight. So what I love about this building is that we're going to literally put a building in the end zone that on the outside will provide premium seating and phantom amenities for football, but then on the inside give 90,000 ft² that will be devoted to our basketball programs and serve as like the day to day hub. So we put out some more information about that with the construction timeline. We also announced a partnership with NBC sports around NIL opportunities for our student athletes. And then yesterday we announced that we would be bringing back volleyball as our 17th varsity sport ready to compete earlier than 2024, but most likely 2025. What was behind the volleyball decision, Candace? I've been studying volleyball for quite some time. And once we had an idea of when the basketball practice facility would be complete, it really allowed that thought that dream to come to fruition because it opens up so much space and memorial that allows us to give volleyball the best chance to compete at a high level right out the gate. And again, thinking about how tied our footprint is, we can basically just repurpose our practice gym in the space and memorial. So you're able to do that within our footprint and volleyball is very popular in this region. It's very popular in the country, the SEC just won the national championship this year. We think demographics wise, it's a great fit for Vanderbilt. I only want to provide opportunities for our student athletes to win. And I think we can win at this. Talking to Kansas Lee. Certainly, I would like to ask you about the football program and we've talked to you a couple of times and obviously a change was made after the last two seasons going three and 9 and zero and 9 under coach mason. But in the opening year of carley, I realized it was a transitional year. It was still winless in the SEC and a two in ten Mark overall. How would you evaluate one year and projecting forward? Yeah, I mean, those are not the results that we want. So I think coach Lee and I are on the same page about that. I would rate him very high on the culture that he is creating. So the environment that he's creating, that will lead to winning. And there were it's a big haul. It's a big task, there's no reason why we can't win and win at a high level. But the thing that I've said from the beginning, like if you look at our baseball program, I think it's a great template for success here, right? Because when Tim Corbin came here in 2003, the baseball program had not experienced success for a very long time. And that's no disrespect to the coaches and the athletes that were a part of that. But it was not the baseball program that you see today. When we hired the right coach, we gave him time and resources when we supported him. It's key as you have to hire the right person, and that's no disrespect to prior football coaches, but I do think that Clark believes the right person in this moment..

volleyball Vanderbilt Kansas Paul finebaum basketball SEC sarkisian Bama football Leon Tim Kansas Lee Lee Candace NBC coach Lee carley mason
"candice" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

05:43 min | 8 months ago

"candice" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"And issues of academic eligibility. Other than that, I think there are going to be out of things. And that's probably as appropriate. The individual schools and the conferences can make their own decisions as to how they want to do business. And that's more on the level where I think it should be. And I think a lot of observers feel that we don't need any national standard or national regulation with regard to facilities spending or coaches salaries or any other aspect or media rights deals or any other aspect of this multi-billion dollar business, but somehow people think we need to regulate athlete compensation. I don't feel that way, but I respect those that do. And I recently had a great conversation with a conference commissioner and that conference commissioner had said to me that there needs to be some rationality in the process with regard to athlete compensation. And I really thought about that. And one of the things I wound up with after a considered thought was, when you really think about running a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry on a college campus, that's not really rational from the get go. And when people talk about, hey, only 2% of these players go on to be professionals in the MBA or the Major League Baseball or the NFL stuff like that. That may be true, but if that is true and education is the driving factor here, why are we running this kind of business on college campuses at this level? It's hard to explain. So I don't see how regulating only one segment of the business. That being the athlete is necessarily the way to go. It's the way we've done it all these years and NAA has gotten away with it, but the Supreme Court made it pretty clear they're not going to get away with it in the future. Others have mentioned, I know we're getting a little intricate with legalese here, but some have talked about Congress the NCAA wanting exemptions, whether antitrust or elsewhere. On the antitrust issue, as you look ahead, do you see concerns for college athletics in regard to that as these leagues get bigger and more powerful? Well, if the NCAA schools or anything bigger than a conference act in concert to limit the compensation of an athlete or anybody else, I think that would run afoul of federal antitrust law. I think that was made pretty clear by the Supreme Court, especially the concurring opinion of justice Kavanaugh that in any other business, what the NCAA has been doing would be per se illegal. So I think the answer double-A is rightfully afraid of trying to legislate in this area and try to limit athletes. You know, they have said that right now they've moved the goalposts, if you will, to say that it's no longer amateurism that's going to be their bedrock principle. It's that, you know, athletes can not be employees. And that's not going to stand very long either. If challenged and I may take a period of time for that to get through the court system, but I don't see that surviving either if a school wants to hire a player and athlete as an employee and provide that player with a contract. I don't see why they should be stopped from doing that. I do think that's where this is headed and it makes the most sense to me just like they would sign a coach to a contract or any other employee. And it's cleaner and neater. It's going to take fans a while to wrap their heads around it, but clearly nobody turned their heads away from the TV set or otherwise in the last year with NIL. And we've stopped reporting on, hey, this player is driving this car and worrying about where he or she got to watch or whatever they're wearing. We're out of that business now and that's been nothing but a positive, but because it's an issue in recruiting and because coaches are now having to deal with and living rooms, you know, it used to be that they had to answer questions on education. Then it became, how can you get my son to the NFL or the NBA? They had to deal with that. Now they're having to deal with questions about how much can my son or daughter make in the marketplace. And so that's new and a little bit unsettling for coaches, but it's here to stay unless Congress steps in and does something about it. And I don't see any, I don't see any movement on Capitol Hill to have that happen. One last question about that, Jane. Thanks so much for the time. So for a school wherever that is to sign a contract with a player or a recruit, how would that work and your suggesting, I'm pretty sure that the NCAA wouldn't challenge it or would they right now? I mean, is that something that just has to evolve? What would open the door for that? Well, I think somebody doing it. And then if the NCAA wanted to challenge it, that could certainly happen. But I think it would be something where the association would have to say, look, this is where we're headed. Let's just go ahead and do it. And allow it through the NCAA legislative process and Paul, I think it would work pretty in a pretty orderly fashion. I mean, I think it's pretty clear these schools know exactly whom to recruit and exactly whom to put in the game when they want to win. They know the value of these players. And it almost strains the mind to think that I want to do because I'll use duke as an example. If you take the hospital and the university, both graduate and undergraduate with duke's got over 30,000 employees and they're not sitting in a room scratching their heads, wondering, what do we do?.

NCAA justice Kavanaugh Supreme Court NFL Major League MBA Congress athletics Baseball NBA Capitol Hill Jane Paul duke
Lord Conrad Black Discusses the Current Turmoil in Canada

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:26 min | 10 months ago

Lord Conrad Black Discusses the Current Turmoil in Canada

"Lord Conrad black, welcome back to America first. Thank you, Sebastian, all this glad to be with you. So Conrad, we have I played a full almost two minutes of this ladies, parliamentary common comments, she's the deputy leader of the opposition Candice Bergen, no the other one. And I'm just going to paint abbreviated version now because I was very pressed play cut. Course, we all condemn hateful and destructive acts by you. At any protest. Whether it's beheading the statue of Queen Victoria and Manitoba, tearing down the statue of sir Johnny in Montreal or putting flags on Terry Fox, whether it's burning churches, whether it's wearing blackface, whether it's lesbian up like, are Nazi flakes. We all condemn it. But I'm not talking about that. A standing ovation for that lady is just in Trudeau is I don't know in hiding got COVID doing blackface again, a lord black. How much is this shaking the body politic in Canada? It's a little hard to say right now. I mean, they started out being pillory by the press as troublemakers who had blocked roads. But as you can see, and it has been clear from the American coverage of it. There really good good guys. There's no violence. Nobody's carrying Nazi flags or anything like that. There's no destruction. And they do have a legitimate grievance. And actually, can I just jump in there? There's amazing footage at one of these rallies for the truckers where a ballet clovered individual popped up from nowhere with a southern flag from the United States and was escorted off the premises of the protests because they say we don't need provocateurs. So I very impressive little black. Look at Canada. It's not a file in place. You know, people are reasonable and moderate and polite. And these people have agreements. I mean, it's very skilled work driving these big trucks. It's absolutely necessary to the economy and the distribution of everything. And almost all of them go back and forth across the border all the time. And this absolutely moronic regulation in this country requires them to quarantine for two weeks after they reenter the

Lord Conrad Black Sir Johnny Candice Bergen Terry Fox Conrad Sebastian Queen Victoria United States Manitoba Trudeau Montreal Canada
Limited revelers return to Times Square to usher in 2022

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Limited revelers return to Times Square to usher in 2022

"New New York York City City gets gets ready ready to to ring ring in in the the new new year year with with its its Times Times Square Square celebration celebration but but with with limited limited revelers revelers because because of of a a surge surge in in covert covert cases cases the the entertainment entertainment is is here here but but the the people people are are scarce scarce compared compared to to pre pre pandemic pandemic years years there's there's a a lot lot of of room room inside inside the the pen pen set set up up but but that's that's okay okay with with Candice Candice Frederico Frederico that's that's always always been been my my bucket bucket lists lists have have come come to to New New York York for for my my birthday birthday since since I'm I'm in in new new year's year's day day baby baby so so growing growing up up as as a a little little girl girl you you watch watch it it on on the the big big screen screen and and so so it's it's my my thirtieth thirtieth birthday birthday and and so so so so what what better better way way to to celebrate celebrate my my thirtieth thirtieth in in to to come come and and watch watch it it in in Times Times Square Square the the city's city's code code protocols protocols meant meant only only fifteen fifteen thousand thousand people people could could be be out out here here in in the the pens pens compared compared to to the the usual usual fifty fifty eight eight thousand thousand in in Times Times Square Square I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker

Times Times Square Square New New York York City City Candice Candice Frederico Fred New New York York Julie Julie Walker Walker
Donald Trump Is Pro-Vaccine But Anti-Mandate

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Donald Trump Is Pro-Vaccine But Anti-Mandate

"And recently Joe Biden gave president Trump credit for that operation warp speed, at least to an extent and president Trump sat down with Candace Owens and Candice asked him a couple of questions about the vaccine and vaccine mandates and here is how that conversation went cut ten. Where do you stand on these vaccine mayonnaise? And obviously, I know that you are pro vaccine, obviously, did everything you could to get this vaccine now. I know it was one of the greatest achievements in 9 months to be able to do that. But now it's taken a twist, right? Now we went from this is a good thing and people should have this option to military men, you're going to have to resign because you're not getting this vaccine. Where do you stand on that? Well, I stand on forget about the mandates that people have to have their freedom. But at the same time, the vaccine is one of the greatest achievements of mankind. We would have had a 1917. Remember the Spanish flu killed perhaps a 100 million people. Actually, it ended the First World War because the soldiers were so a lot of people don't know that. The soldiers got so sick. It was a terrible thing. There was no vaccine. There were no anything. I came up with a vaccine with three vaccines, all are very, very good, came up with three of them in less than 9 months. It was supposed to take 5 to 12 years. And we said people have died under COVID this year, by the way, under Joe Biden. Then under you and more people took the vaccine this year. So people are questioning how one of the vaccine work, but some people aren't saying the ones that get very sick and go to the hospital are the ones that don't take their vaccine. But it's still their choice. And if you take the vaccine, you're protected. Look, the results of the vaccine are very good. And if you do get it, it's a very minor form. There's president Trump and Candice Owens. I had a little bit of discussion back and forth on the vaccine and the vaccine mandates and make no mistake president Trump is anti mandate. He has made that crystal clear throughout, but he's also made it crystal clear that he is pro vaccine and encourages people to get the vaccine and get the boosters, and he has not been bashful about that

President Trump Candace Owens Joe Biden Candice Donald Trump FLU Candice Owens
"candice" Discussed on Storybound

Storybound

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"candice" Discussed on Storybound

"If you want anal sex candice i said. Just drive yourself down to las margaritas tick some guy on his third tequila and go for it. Just don't lose your house in the divorce. Like every other woman on this lake by him out sent him to some reasonably priced brand new shit box in a subdivision..

candice
Inspiration4 Crew Returns to Earth After Historic Flight

NBC Nightly News

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Inspiration4 Crew Returns to Earth After Historic Flight

"Historic journey to spaces on the books tonight. The spacex dragon capsule the splashdown in the atlantic ocean. Off the coast of florida with the world's first all civilian four member crew give is in port canaveral candice. This adventure has been ground. Baking in so many ways it hasn't been groundbreaking and shows that the sky is really no limit for civilians. And i'll tell you. We heard this gigantic thud here in port. Canaveral as dragon capsule made its way through the atmosphere. And then that just beautiful landing in the atlantic ocean wrapping up this beautiful journey tonight. The return to earth the first all civilian space crew to orbit the earth wrapping their history-making three day mission. We're giving all of our time right now to you science research and some ukulele playing and trying to raise awareness for an important cause for us back on earth the inspiration for billionaire jared isaac men. Who's bankrolling the trip bone cancer survivor. Haley arsenault scien- proctor. The first black woman to pilot spacecraft and chris brown sqi who won his ticket through sweepstakes there last hours in space spent taking in the views snapping photos in the specially designed capsule dome even chatting with bano the blasted off from cape canaveral. Wednesday evening on a spacex rocket their capsule the dragon measuring thirteen feet wide. Their home as they whizzed around earth at seventeen thousand miles an hour. It's been really interesting to see how fluid shifts with my gravity environment mission part science to determine the effects of space on the human body and park charity more than one hundred fifty billion dollars raised for saint jude's children's hospital where arsenal works patients. They're getting a rare treat. Thursday

Atlantic Ocean Port Canaveral Jared Isaac Candice Haley Arsenault Canaveral Florida Bone Cancer Chris Brown Cape Canaveral Saint Jude's Children's Hospit
Jennifer Lawrence to Play Talent Agent Sue Mengers in Biopic

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Jennifer Lawrence to Play Talent Agent Sue Mengers in Biopic

"Big movie coming out. I know a lot of people have problems with her. I don't. I like the girls work, and I think she's gonna do a great job. Big project about the famed talent agent Sue mengers is being shot around and on the movie will be Jennifer Lawrence playing Sue mengers, listen, this is gonna be, I think this is I know it's very Hollywood and only people in Hollywood my nose Sue mengers is, but nonsense. Sue mengers was, I mean, forget what a colorful character she was. She was a female agent who crashed the Hollywood boys club of being age of being an agent. I mean, there were no female agents like this. She, I know it's for Robert Evans. She was amazing. Big, big, giant personality. Big kind of a New York Jew personality, which I love. I feel at home with people like that. Might go on Apple and might go on Netflix. No one really knows just yet. But Sue mengers, Evans had some great stories about her. She worked at MCA. Icm. William Morris, she represented clients in their heyday. Barbara streisand, Candice Bergen, Peter Bogdanovich, Michael Caine, Diane cannon, Cher, Joanne Collins, Brian De Palma, faith on a Bob Fosse Gene Hackman, Sidney Lumet ally McGraw, Steve McQueen, Mike Nichols, Nick Nolte, Tatum O'Neal, Ryan O'Neal, Anthony Perkins, Burt Reynolds, sybil shepherd, gorby Dow, Richard Benjamin, pull up prentice Tuesday Weld. Are you kidding me? She died about ten years ago. There was a play about her, Bette Midler played her in the play and bet was great. I'm not a Bette Midler fan, but she was born to play Sue

Sue Mengers Hollywood Boys Club Hollywood Jennifer Lawrence Robert Evans Diane Cannon Joanne Collins Candice Bergen William Morris Barbara Streisand Peter Bogdanovich ICM Netflix MCA Michael Caine Brian De Palma Evans Bob Fosse Sybil Shepherd Sidney Lumet
Vanderbilt AD Condemns 'Unacceptable' Racist Slurs Directed Toward Parents at CWS

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:31 min | 1 year ago

Vanderbilt AD Condemns 'Unacceptable' Racist Slurs Directed Toward Parents at CWS

"Was the athletic director at vanderbilt candice story lee when she issued a public statement which we shared with you earlier which brought this to light for. The first time. Clinton had tweeted something. But there's a big difference between a reporter tweeting something in the athletic director of the university in question making a public statement so i. I don't know the answer to this. But i'm assuming is not a very very good thing. I have spoken to john cone of mississippi state and the statement that kansas issued is this. I am deeply troubled that some of our student athlete. Parents were subjected to racist slurs. During last night's game this is. This is absolutely unacceptable and disgraceful behavior and such hateful. Language has no place anywhere in our society to the family members who were impacted. Please know that you have my full support. So i was taught as a young journalist never to to make assumptions. Let me finish with john cone statement. We joined vanderbilt in declaring such behaviour unacceptable and indirect conflict with evaluating both institutions and our fan base. The college world series serves as a celebration of the entire sport of college. Baseball highly inappropriate advancements must neither be tolerated allowed to detract from the on the field accomplishments of the student athletes and their teams who have earned the right to participate on this national stage.

John Cone Vanderbilt Candice Story Lee Clinton Mississippi Kansas Vanderbilt Baseball
Producer Candice Madsen Discusses Her Investigation Into the Joyce Yost Murder

Cold

02:33 min | 1 year ago

Producer Candice Madsen Discusses Her Investigation Into the Joyce Yost Murder

"Probably as mentioned in the episode. I received this letter from doug level. And i his name just did not ring a bell back to thousand fifteen. I was actually a news producer. A show producer for ksl. So i had produced countless newscasts where he was featured but the name didn't ring a bell. I was flattered. Obviously when you get reaction to this time out you were flattered by getting a letter from an intermittent. She didn't know know. Okay yeah so. I mean it was a very nice you know. The written the written letter didn't really even. I don't even think it mentioned the murder. The the pamphlet did but the actual handwritten letter was just an inmate. That said you know. Thank you so much for raising awareness about suicide prevention. And so i think hey you know. I'm glad that this message is reaching anyone that needs help so i actually had. I think i put it on my private instagram account or was telling a friend about it and she said. Don't you know who that is. And she's an attorney. And i said no and then i googled the name and i admit i was horrified Because i mean the crime is horrific. But then i thought how come i don't know about this crime and i knew you know once it's like okay. I know the name. He's on death. Row he to the crime. It's kind of you know end of story but then at the time. So i'm you know there's the news coverage because he's in the news because he's trying to get all these witnesses appeal and the appeals and everything but i thought where's the story about what he did and then i couldn't find anything about joyce i mean there was when i'm google. Lean his name pulls up. But i think i may be found one or two articles that told the story of joyce and that really bothered me and i think also i felt a connection with joyce i mean. We're about the same age. We're both single. This horrible crime happens to her. And i kind of felt like she was forgotten. And then you know when i start diving into the case and when i got when i put in the request to get the records right and i started reading the accounts and the testimonies and rhonda's involvement in olive that was just equally kind of horrifying to me. And so that's what i thought. Gosh you know this. When i start having a conversation about what is this and i had the same reaction as you i. I couldn't boot up joyce or remember what level had

Doug Level KSL Joyce Google Rhonda
An Indigenous Long Distance Live Story

Unreserved

02:21 min | 1 year ago

An Indigenous Long Distance Live Story

"One of my favorite stories of this past season has to be the story of candidates. And richard scott more i had been following the almost operatic relationship of candace and richard during the pandemic the married couple normally split their time between canada and australia but cove it kept them a world apart. I watched a couple bond over social media staying connected even through the most difficult of circumstances. Richard from the union wadi wadi nation on the southeast coast of australia and candice is from kettle point in southern ontario. I spoke with the couple in february to see how they made their long distance. Love story work. I started by welcoming them to the show. Thank you so. I can you tell me where you are and what time. It is well arm in australia at the moment. It's nine thirty seven in the morning or just finished work but it's a beautiful morning and for me. It's thursday evening five thirty and we're not only. Are we in a different time zone. Currently run a different day. Alright so canvas you to our earth from different indigenous communities literally a world apart. So how did you meet. How did that happen. Do you remember the moment that you i saw richard. Oh that is a moment. i will never forget I it was actually during planet indigenous festival in toronto. Back in two thousand nine and i remember the opening of the festival and just hearing the digital you. I was like just something. I had never really heard before. And when i went out to the to where the red path stages i remember seeing strong amazing. Powerful group of men That carry their traditions and songs. And and so i had to get closer. I had to go and just be a part of it and just go and see and so i wa. I remember walking closer to the stage. And then i seen richard and hearing him sing in his voice and i was just totally blown away by what i was witnessing and seeing and literally like literally knocked off my feet like i literally just sat down right mice bought like i need to be here to see this and little. Did i know that. I would be spending the rest of my with him.

Southeast Coast Kettle Point Australia Richard Scott Richard Candace Candice Ontario Canada Toronto
Brazil’s Amazon Deforestation Reaches Record Level for May

BBC Assignment

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Brazil’s Amazon Deforestation Reaches Record Level for May

"Says deforestation in the Amazon region increased by 40% in the year to me, 1180 square kilometres of rainforest were lost. Meanwhile, a separate report is warning that illegal logging is set to get worse. As the Amazon enters the dry season. I got more details from our Americas editor Candice Pet Well, this is the third consecutive months of these record figures of deforestation in the Amazon is really raising serious questions about President Jair Bolsonaro's commitments to fighting deforestation. Environmentalists argue that the deforestation levels have been increasing because his policies and his environment minister have been slowly dismantling the legal protection measures. That police and control deforestation in the Amazon. The minister himself is under investigation by prosecutors for alleged involvement in the export of illegal would, for example, to be sold to the European Union and the United States. The Environment Ministry is also frozen funding to the environmental policing body and frozen their normal ability to patrol and monitor deforestation. President Bolsonaro has promised to eradicate illegal deforestation in the Amazon by 2030. Is that even realistic? Well, it's certainly contradicts a lot of what he's been saying. So far since he got into office in 2019. He's repeatedly advocated to develop Mentalist policy for the Amazon has argued the region needs economic development, not protection as some kind of giant reserve as he puts it. So these latest statements have been seen with great skepticism in Brazil. A by his opponents. There's been

Amazon Candice Pet President Jair Bolsonaro Environment Ministry President Bolsonaro European Union United States Brazil
"candice" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"candice" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Candice Mattel Con a new season of WB Easy's Investigative Syriza Motive. You know, at this point, it's not just waiting for the second woman or the third woman. Often our culture is waiting for the 30th woman your venue for watching the National Football League on Thursday night Football has changed. Or will be changing. Amazon in the NFL announced that prime videos recent deal to become the exclusive home to NFL Thursday night Football will now kick in with the 2022 season. Instead of the 2023 season, all games Set to air on prime video is part of a prime membership that will end Fox's coverage of the franchise. They've only had it a couple of years. Haven't they tell you then? But now I've been that long at all, it says here and keeping with the NFL's long standing commitment to make its games available on free over the air television. Give me Each game will also be televised in the participating teams, home market places. Nothing free about prime video or a prime membership is there? No, no. All right, so That's what it's going to be coarse viewership know somebody's gonna call to my attention, then that viewership on Thursday night football Sunday night football in the NFL in general, is Down anyway up next. There are now two new Guinness world records, and both of them are extremely impressive. Next President Biden is hoping the nation can celebrate its independence from Corona virus by the fourth of July. A Texas Democrat, has resigned after using a racist insult on social.

Amazon Fox 2023 National Football League fourth of July third woman Sunday night both second woman 30th woman Each game Syriza Thursday night WB President Football Texas Biden Corona virus 2022 season
"candice" Discussed on Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"candice" Discussed on Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

"I don't understand why they did it this way. I don't work anymore. So it doesn't matter but like they. It was my first director. And i'd like been told she was a little bit intense and they had me. I'm very very pale. And they had me in an all white house in like a red outfit like look awful like my skin. They were all of the there was no white balance. It looked fucking terrible. The worst pictures of me. I hate them like. I didn't even re tweet them. And i like literally. My agent was like why. Aren't you promoting the scene owes like have you seen the pictures from the scene. And then he's on he's like oh i'm really sorry i was like yo. You're all in wide against red backdrop. I mean i'm wearing red. All everything in the house is white. Like bright white. So kim kardashian jaundice like i hall. It's awful that other ruin your day..

first director kim kardashian
"candice" Discussed on Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"candice" Discussed on Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

"This is a job like anything else. It's so irrational. That people would do this type of work and not get tested or beyond cpac constantly. Or gosh i just. I don't even know what to say. I mean like is it just because of the cloud because of the name that they continued getting booked and not blacklisted. I'm just i don't understand. I think it's the branding to write like. She's like a really extreme performer. So she maybe thinks that by doing. These extreme behaviors offset that that's like adding value to her brand. But the problem is is no one saying anything. Like i don't know anyone besides myself. That's directly called her out and said this is not okay and i think it's because she's such a performer and they didn't want to get blacklisted. Bum i don't care like she was supposed to do my showcase with me. Actually and greg landscape at the time like he's still was part of toshi and was like you know. I think it'd be great. I'm gonna have her. And i was like fuck. No not working with her. And then we got riley which was way better. You know what. I mean for every reason imaginable but yosick. I refuse to work with someone like that doesn't care about their health and let alone mine. Yeah i just lost the for best gang bang to adriana like a couple of weeks ago. I didn't even think it was gonna be like the gang bang category. I thought that was a weird category for that seemed to be in. But i didn't even know you dominated congrats. Yeah congrats on the nomination. Think ios but i was only in for that with the catholic. Priests for davis williams. Really fun like but it was only three and i just felt like like even when the nomination came out it was. Are you sure it's that category. It's not like best taboo or some other thousand screws. It doesn't feel like a gang to me. Gaming has always been at least five people. It was three people only. There's only three guys. It was me and We'll like me obviously was three guys. Steve holmes john strong and ramon. Well yeah i mean you can't qualify that as a threesome. So it's like. I guess still groups i don't know or even league dp or something would make funds for that like i don't know really what three guys i guess it's kind of a scene you can't really put in category so it just ended up in that one. Maybe if you had one more guy than it would have. You would have had the award me i know. I said the our father like in lyon while they came on my face. Like i just feel like i earned him. Yeah i literally got up. And i had like come over my like. Who fucking does that. Who fucking does that. Give me my trophy. But you know it's so political right like it's it's so political and all the time. Yeah i think it's everyone wants to be like acknowledged for what they do even when you're just giving a blowjob break but it's like that the nomination is great but when it comes down to who's nominated and who gets the award it's who's rubbing elbows or other parts or who's which company is paying avian for i am not as they call it the oscars of porn. It's not voted on the same way as i decided the same way and also nominations themselves are even though like don't see more like i've been nominated every year i was in my career and like they're worth almost as much as the win. You still are like avia nominated like you're still in that like classic performer. Really doesn't fucking matter. I do like it when people cry when they lose..

davis williams three people riley ramon three guys one more guy Steve holmes john strong adriana couple of weeks ago three least five people thousand screws toshi
"candice" Discussed on Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"candice" Discussed on Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

"Because probably so much harder to find car you have to go to like a liquor store or like a or a grocery store and there's just cardboard fucking everywhere. It has never worked. Although i like alice's reaction everyone reacted the way that you do. I would do that show. I guess at the end of the day and maybe people are willing to disagree with me on this. But i'm just really glad we live in a time. Where a few years ago. There was this big training story about jeff. Bezos is dick. And i'm just glad as population we didn't see it. Thank god i'm okay with that. He's earned that money. She absolutely earned. There's no you cannot. I know arguing she. I'm sure she earned it the little turtle man you hear. He's buying the washington football team. Now yeah luckily. He waited until already changed their name. Because otherwise the headline would have been bao's forces. The redskins to relocate been really bad not their first time though historically exactly exactly all right so hate mail info two girls on mike dot com so canvas tape mentioned previously her. Having some issues where foreign companies..

Bezos alice two girls jeff washington football team first time few years ago mike dot com redskins bao
"candice" Discussed on Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"candice" Discussed on Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

"I just i like i will hold the camera like a shoot at all. Oh you all of the. I'll probably have a pa who will. Probably i'll pay around two hundred dollars the day. Yeah and but that's about it. It'll just be really really small operation and that's four one scene with two individuals only for that particular piece. That's tuesday so i'll have two girls and one guy will be in. Both of the scenes got see when we did ours in our budget was around ten. That was for like one girl girl girl scene. That's it yeah. And then. I did another one that was i wanna say closer to eight and that was a boy girl scene. Yeah ater yeah. And that wasn't including my pigs. I was also the talent so like that was for everybody else except for me and then i also got paid for directing stats crazy. That you're working on such a tight budget. That's wild to me. I mean it's different now too because like a lot of so much of the way that porn is shot now even in the last year has changed with like the even the style that they want is more like onlyfans style like coming professional company. They want like the like prep-work for the anal hailing. Give too much about this but like they really want that. Like kind of verse. You talking and stuff like that. So like that helps. I don't feel like. I have to make a feature film but it's still going to be a really tight budget so good luck thank you. Yeah seriously kit. What's the most you've ever been paid for a scene. I'm just curious very scene. yeah Oh i want to say maybe two thousand and what kind of was it. I'm just curious solely. It's interesting because sometimes i would work for companies that did clip sites a lot because fetish stuff and so they would pay you like it was for the day and you would probably shoot like five or six little clip thingies but it ends up working out to be a little longer than a normal day but you get paid quite a bit more so it would be like eighteen hundred a two thousand..

two thousand eighteen hundred two girls one guy tuesday last year Both five six two individuals one scene one girl around two hundred dollars eight four around ten scenes
"candice" Discussed on Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"candice" Discussed on Two Girls One Mic: The Porncast

"Porn. Welcome to the show. That's willing to ask the hard questions like are you okay. I know that's illegal. But kate are. You k- man where to start. I'm adequate. I know no one's really supposed to ask that nowadays. I think it's important especially we're all holed up or not whatever you're doing but that said we do have a guest on the show and i know you're doing the show today but i do want to make a quick announcement before we dive right in. Which is that if that's still longer part of teaching lamb. Summit this awkward say something. Just silence of moment of silence. That is respectful alice. I'm sorry my twenty one gun. Salute is in the shop rate now. Kate owning guns is an a personality. I know that's why you don't have any Also because frankly if anyone knows anything about me there should know that. I am not responsible enough to do that. I do. you really need to get a taser like just for like protection purposes because they live in hollywood but you can't like order them on the internet. If you live in california so i have to like go to a store that sells pepper spray and tasers. And i don't know what store that would be so just not. I've just been risking my life for the last two years instead of googling this i've got nothing the bear store right like huntings door in hollywood which is so known for people that love to hunt. It's a different kind of predator here so long story. Short event is going to continue pursuing cyber. We love her. We want to support her in all she's doing but we're still going to have an awesome show. Nothing has clearly changed on here but we do have a third voice here. And that is candice candice. I'm butchering your last name. Horovitz horseback well. It's technically batch. If you want to polish way but that's awful and i just don't so hornbeck married a pole so i was gonna say as a polish person you do not look polish also part polish now married one although our audience might know you buy a slightly different name which is your stage name. Evil avena low via well we. We went over this in the beginning. Good lord alice. You're both culturally and porn insensitive. It's fine. I mean it difficult. I myself by trying to create a name that wasn't in existence before. And now everyone will have ever butchers. So it's fine so you have not only one but two last names people can butcher your well. I know i didn't think that at all. You're still an adult or not really nowadays. So i do like an only vans and i still have an site so both of those things update but i stopped shooting mainstream. I wanna say like four years ago. I watched you a porn..

california Kate four years ago hollywood today both two last names alice third voice twenty one gun kate last two years Horovitz one candice candice
"candice" Discussed on Females on Fire with Hayley Luckadoo

Females on Fire with Hayley Luckadoo

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"candice" Discussed on Females on Fire with Hayley Luckadoo

"I was recently given and There's so many but something that i was. There's two that i have to give cancer. I just thought school. I'm good the one personally professionally. The personal one is from my grandmother. And she's she's gone now but she was one of my my best of people. I love her but she always used to say. Don't let anyone turn your brown as blue. And i didn't understand it for the longest. And ultimately she was just basically saying was not that you can't cry tears but don't allow someone else's whatever to control your character right. Don't allow someone else to have so much power authority over you that you alter who you are and so. That was something that stuck with me. As i grew up in life. Like don't allow someone else to turn. Your brand is lieu. Don't don't allow them to take you out of character And so that's that's my personal grandma's by super wise money things that i could probably tell you but then the personal one that i just had recently was Set you're bound center bound. I mean your profession my professional one was such boundaries stick to them and always conveyed them to your clients that you're on boarding and so something i know but it was. It was one of those things that i didn't realize the value of it and the person that was saying to it is a is a friend of mine and they are A super ceo. As i like to say they are they are. They actually are like you know celebrity level. Ceo and so they were saying. I wish that i had done this. When i first started out and just really kind of Before i got this level that i am because now it's hard for me to have the uninterrupted time that i need in order to be the ceo. Sometimes they need to be and so when they said that you know like listen create those healthy boundaries for yourself. Stick to them and don't compromise for anyone there. I don't care if you know the president calls. That's your time. Do not because as soon as you start giving that time away to someone else you never get it back. I love that both of those pieces of advice are kind of right along the same minds right like they don't compromise your boundaries and your time and the don't compromise who you are and yes who you wanna be. I love those like kind of a connection. And so you just now. But i'm like you're right the same advice just two different lanes right it is. It is a good advice regardless. Yeah yeah Very awesome. I love it. We'll tell everybody where they can find you where you hanging out on the internet. Where do you want them to go. Hang out quite often on instagram. That is where you can find me. I were almost so if you just type in at candice denise and that's candice with an eye you're gonna find me right. They're pretty much every day. And that's exactly it. You're gonna find me right there easily so instagram for sure and you could also find the of course like i say my website. Where like i'm always there. And that's how you can join my email lists so that can stay up to date on what's happening. What's going on but instagram. And my website is by kid. Denise dot com easy enough those are the two places that you can like find your girl. Yes and we will all of that in the show notes.

cancer candice denise candice instagram Denise
Seattle Storm sign perennial WNBA All-Star forward Candice Dupree

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Seattle Storm sign perennial WNBA All-Star forward Candice Dupree

"Storm lost All star Alicia Clark to the Mystics last week after she signed a free agent deal. Now the storm filled her spot on the roster with another all star, Candice debris. I knew that teams were interested, but for me, it was like money and winning. Those were my my two big things, so it was pretty easy to help narrow down a lot of the teams and Seattle was the best fit to pre average is a little more than 14 points a

Alicia Clark Mystics Candice Seattle
"candice" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"candice" Discussed on Untangle

"So i guess. Kansas is an entrepreneur that is passionate about creativity and lifelong learning. She's the co founder of mastermind. A new live learning platform for creators. And she's the creator of game. Changer sessions a community passionate people who want to create the future we want and who are interested in designing mental models to thrive rather than just survive. So i'm absolutely delighted to have my friend. Candace factor with us today. Hello and welcome kansas. It is so amazing to be here. Thank you so much for me. And i'm particularly excited to be talking with you right now when there is a palpable shift in the world and there's a palpable sensation amongst us that the future in the possibility of the future has changed. The twenty twenty. One may actually be different than twenty twenty. You can feel this. You certainly can and i love that. Our conversation is on the week that we welcome such a light and such brightness into the world certainly in terms of leadership in america but just in general i think the notion of collective consciousness being focused on a reset is very very powerful so much so that even more powerful than our own individual markers. I hosted a phenomenal guests. This week canal. Who said the new year is actually more important to him than his very unbirthday. And i think what he means by god is when we all are focused on a reset. There's the power of the collectives in being in the same place at the same time. That's where we are in january. Yeah there's definitely sensation with on the horizon with the new year here was a new change of leadership that there's a new horizon new possibility that many of us are feeling simultaneously. And they're right. There's a palpable power to that. That were all making your new year's resolutions. We're all looking ahead for brief moments. None of us wanted to look ahead and now we're like oh we can do that now. Absolutely although wedding. I will say is i like to acknowledge the past. I feel as if we don't actually spend the time reflecting on the past. We sort of bring the baggage of the past with us. The very first thing. I would like to do around setting intentions for a new year and celebrating. The new is actually making peace with the old. I'm really interested in giving people some prompts in some exercises to really have deep reflections around with the past be the past few months the pasture but spending that time to kind of say. Hey what ally noticing about what was what. Don't i want to karen with me as we entered this new time. What do i need to make peace with in order to allow all of this abundance. That future has to really now fast. It's interesting one speaks to the audience from. Oh my intention with this episode is to actually give you a foundation or framework guideposts that you can use for your own to vision. Twenty twenty one and so candice. If you were going to frame this as an exercise for the audience what would you recommend doing. Yeah by. I would say the first thing to do is to actually spend the time looking deeply to twenty and there's so many interesting ways you can do one of the things i love to do is actually just to scroll back through my photos and just create the markers of what were those milestone events and the milestone events are both some of the highs and also sung the lows and that may show up in photos that it also made show happen just going through each month than remembering although i find personally that very hard so maybe it scrolling through your calendar and using some those markers as reminders for what actually happened. And what did i feel in those different months and just creating some space for us to started. Has some data is really really powerful. And then once. You're looking at the highs and lows whenever the prompts word that you used your calendar your photos the next thing i like to do is actually instead of just looking at data plebiscites and do some real reflections around. What is the seems. What are the actual lessons learned from. I think for most of us are really really difficult here

america This week today january twenty first This year fourth function single both each month twenty twenty one One first thing this year Twenty twenty twenty twenty past few months One of the four sessions
2021 Golden Crappies

Watch What Crappens

05:11 min | 2 years ago

2021 Golden Crappies

"Birdie a welcome to the crappy awards twenty twenty one inc warranty Virtual crappy this is where the crappies began. Wow y- tonight just like the old days you guys. Twenty twenty one has been quite a year. I'd like to congratulate everybody. I mean twenty twenty with quite a year. Twenty twenty one. You know. it's had some shit to already. Twenty twenty was quite a year. So congratulations to everybody for making it through so much has happened in one year. I just think to what it was like before. The whole corona virus thing. I mean things were so great. I was just like sitting alone in my house eating too much. Playing mario talking to no one watching housewives way. Yeah still pretty much. Do that but seriously This year a virus spread across america causing illness. Sadness and loss but enough about kim zolciak. Okay i know. Just think the biggest plague facing this country before this. Jack's taylor guys you know. I spent a good amount of twenty twenty just playing animal crossing. Which as you it's a game about a bunch of animals stuck on an island up. Some of you may not original named the real house. Believe sorry they laugh to sued new york city already. The punchline about to land and the country has gone through a lot you know. I mean besides the corona virus. We've had political upheaval. I mean america's now even more trillions of dollars in debt. I mean no one in government watches housewives. And if they did they'd get fifty girlfriends and force them all to give america hundred bucks on your birthday. I mean we'd still be in debt but lady liberty would have a gucci bag to show for it. You know the on a serious note. The nation was very shocked a few weeks ago when an angry mob raided the capital. And all you gave them was a pizza. Jennifer eight in and we finally got a new president this week and the nation breathes a sigh of relief. Now look i know all of you have different political opinions and that's fine. My personal opinion is thank god that the orange thing left on my. Tv's ram be read mid no but you know the thing is i mean current events were one thing but so much actually happened in the world but it seemed like so much more happened on bravo. Yeah i mean house was getting fired. So many housewives got fired a record amount. I mean it was a slaughterhouse and it was not the organic kind either. there was a lot of botulism in that meet. Okay housewives caster transforming faster than derek kinsley space. Have you seen that thing. It looks like an elbow anyo on below deck mid hannah. Ferrier was fired for smuggling valium onto the boat and then on vanderpump rules jackson brittany were fired for smuggling food via onto bravo and then we have of course. Our trustee good old friend alcoholism. Okay got real outside of new york trying to convince that she's alcoholic then you've got the real housewives of orange county trying to convince bronwyn that she's not an alcoholic and you got the rest of us sitting over here like what. What are you idiots fighting over k. Do you try and tell the mailman. He's a mailman. You're alcoholics okay. Do your jobs less talking more. Drank he here here here here if we had if we had like a good old fashioned like golden girls mom's earthy monologue clap would be right there and when i can figure this thing out i will move to that button so another thing that happened. So the massive fight between candice amani that sent to'mix ratings through the roof which just goes to show that audiences crave conflict so as a result bravo will now be rebranding top chef as the gail simmons thunderdome of ham my head teddy mellon campus fired in public. Outrage breakout over her diet. I mean people were really furious when they found out that customers were getting thin with starvation. Lots of exercise in a crazy woman bullying them day and night. Berating them for their food choices. They called it all in with teddy. I called it my child head

America Kim Zolciak Derek Kinsley Mario Jackson Brittany Taylor New York City Gucci Bravo Jack Ferrier Jennifer Bronwyn Hannah Candice Amani Orange County Gail Simmons Teddy Mellon Campus New York
"candice" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"candice" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"Could put the money in. Png stock pretty good or bitcoin And they they exactly have a great weekend at. We'll talk all right. Thanks rosa everybody. Ej x. d. two and The full the full complement of the derosa household. The puppy what was the puppies name. What do you say the puppies name was i. I didn't i didn't catch it. We're going to stay here. I told you got A busy second half recovery is gonna join us and just a little bit from oak lawn and then we'll catch up with rich. Hang little santa. Anita and mike welsh as well to do the gulfstream action including that tropical turf and right now. I'm just delighted to be able to have kansas hair. Join us and candice delighted her audience and fans with the news. And i want the light. It's probably too broad because there's going to be some people. I'm sure that were equally disappointed that they're not going to see her as regularly Commenting and and You know giving opinions on the international racine because she's gonna go toward mainstream news and I it's just To me an exciting story candice hair happy new year. Happy new year steve. Thanks for having me not at all. We have not talked since. I think A a night school edition a couple of years ago and saw this and so many people were just tickled for you. Talk about the what went into this decision and and the opportunity to to rip and read for me. I think it's.

mike welsh rosa candice Anita kansas steve
Lebanese judge charges caretaker PM in August port explosion

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Lebanese judge charges caretaker PM in August port explosion

"The Lebanese prosecutor probing last summer's politics plays number read file charges against the caretaker prime minister and three former ministers the full of the most senior individuals to be indicted so far in the investigation which is being conducted in secrecy judge buddy someone filed the charges against her seventy up and former finance minister Ali Hassan Khalil as well as two former ministers of public works old fool which touch with Candice this negligence leading to death over the August fourth explosion at Beirut's pulls the incident led to more than two hundred deaths and injured thousands the explosion was caused by the ignition of a large stockpile of explosive material that had been stored at the port for six years near a heavily populated area top security officials and politicians knew about the stockpile and its whereabouts and did nothing about it I'm Karen Thomas

Finance Minister Ali Hassan Kh Buddy Candice Beirut Karen Thomas
The Trump vote is rising among Blacks and Hispanics, despite the conventional wisdom

Morning Edition

04:38 min | 2 years ago

The Trump vote is rising among Blacks and Hispanics, despite the conventional wisdom

"That President Trump did better than some people expected with black and Latino voters. We say it appears because votes were still being counted. The election results looked very different on Tuesday night than they do right now, and they may look different again, but we can say The president made a bid for black and Latino voters, and some responded, including in the very closely fought state of Nevada. NPR's Leila Fadel reports This year was the first time 29 year old Amanda Sandoval voted. I woke up early. I arranged for my mom to take my kids to school, and I got there half an hour early, and I waited in line and I voted, and it was a huge moment in my life because this election is so important, it's more important than any other election. In history because it's going to dictate so much of our future. She's a trump supporter. So is her husband, and neither of them voted in 2016. But this year, the self described conservative Mexican Americans chose the president because of their anti abortion stance as devout Christians as well as trump supporter of school choice and promises of a better economy. Part of what may be a record turnout in Nevada. And in this purple State. Latino voters have been the backbone to every single democratic presidential win here. Black and Asian voters are also key. And while Biden will win black and Latino voters by landslides across the country, which could deliver him the election and Nevada Trump appears to be getting more not less support in black and Latino communities. Both campaigns have heavily invested in courting communities of color and Latino communities, in particular in Nevada. Musil Harvey is a fellow at Columbia University's sociology department. It's a glaring indictment of the Democratic Party than in the midst of Ah recession and the major pandemic that a lot of minority voters. I did not believe that their lives would necessarily be better off under Joe Biden that Donald Trump Despite the outsized economic devastation, death illness is in the midst of this pandemic for Latino and black communities. There's hardly a better indication of Democrats. Inability to speak toe ordinary people about things. They care about this that in midst of the milieu we find ourselves in they still lost minority voters, Garvey says. Minority voters need to be treated as individuals. They are some conservative, some more liberal, some who want limits on immigration. People are less concerned at the end of the day when they're casting their ballots. Whether or not a politician likes them or with it or gets it or if they're woke or not, versus this person going to make my life my life going to be better or worse in the next sort of four years. We really are not a monolithic group that Sander Dixon she heads empower 3 60. It engages and mobilizes black voters in Nevada. She's hoping for a record turnout. She's a Democrat that runs a nonpartisan nonprofit and believes Nevada will go to Biden because of black and Latino voters. But she says she's a little disappointed that her party hasn't fully figured out how to really engage black voters on issues beyond identity. And so because of that, you can get all of the turn out that you want, but you're seeing the results. Of not putting in the work to engage them when it's off cycle to inform them and educate them about issues to make sure that you're actually connecting to the pain that they're having at the time and you're able to turn that into Democratic results, she says. Voters she engaged said racial justice was important because it's been a fight every generation battles a given, but most important to the voters, she spoke to you on Election Day. We're healthcare education jobs, So the political parties need to engage voters early and often on the issues that matter to them. On Wednesday, she was waiting for election results and paying poll workers in Candice's. You're so welcome. Thank you so much for everything. Among them was Dante Walker. Thie 21 year old almost didn't vote. He jokes that he was like the people he end up trying to convince to cast their ballots. Like I don't think I will have a voice or my wish would be heard if I did vote or it mattered if I voted, so that's one. He describes himself as very churchy his work to engage voters the Lord's work. I came to my decision because I passed in my church, she said. Whoever spoke unity at the election is the one who's supposed to vote for Bytom was the first person who was said immunity, so he chose Biden, his cousin, just six months older shows trump his family, not a monolith and political parties need to understand that because even if Democrats take the overwhelming majority of black and Latino voters, thes elections come down to a few 1000 votes in places like Nevada. Leila Fadel.

Nevada Leila Fadel Amanda Sandoval Musil Harvey Biden Donald Trump Sander Dixon NPR Joe Biden Columbia University Garvey Democratic Party Dante Walker Candice Bytom
Cardi B SLAMS Candace Owens After She Calls Her an 'Illiterate Rapper'

The Rubin Report

04:28 min | 2 years ago

Cardi B SLAMS Candace Owens After She Calls Her an 'Illiterate Rapper'

"It's blowing up right now. So this is candace owens versus Cardi B. and not just doing this to be silly I. Did they actually got into something kinda substantive here it started when. Canvas was on Ben Shapiro's Sunday special. Let's take look the clip. I completely agree with your assessment about Cardi B. It is one of the biggest insult if Black Americans are not insulted by the fact that Joe Biden who has been hiding in his basement you know for the entire year maiden appear to come up because he was going to do an interview with Cardi B.. We we have nothing better to offer. I. Mean this be tend to. Donald Trump saying I'm going to give no. Interviews, but he came up and he decided to give an interview to Justin Bieber right I mean I wish I actually just be I'm sorry. I know you are a Christian Man I. Don't want to put you in the same boat as Cardi B. but it it would be absurd white America would go what what is this why? Why are you being interviewed by Justin Bieber and it's because you're pandering right? You're pandering you look at Cardi's instagram easy. She has millions of followers and you think. Okay. This is an illiterate person, and if I if I appeal to this a person and she does a group like she literally did in the middle of this interview, they think she's cool. She's hip just by sitting here and and taking this interview walking will vote for me. It's basically saying black people you are stupid. You are dumb and you're so foolish I mean do you think what if she just said in the middle of the interview Joe Biden? Can you name one Cardi B. Album? Not Jimmy favor just one Cardi B. Lyric. He couldn't do it. Of course he's not because he's being handled and they're saying black people like this person this is what they're into, and so here you go talk to her. Okay. So Cardi, b. e. then heard what candy said and she hit back she did a couple of videos I think four videos on instagram shows on camera, but you could hear her talking in the exact quote that she said she's talking about. Canvas she says, she has an identity crisis just because she is black doesn't mean she gives a F- about blacks and you can hear also saying the candidates owns husband George. as part of a group that she like into an upper-class kkk of the UK now first off. I was at Atkinson in Georgia's wedding George a great guy they are a fantastic couple. The wedding was one of the most spectacular weddings I've ever been to and it was just filled. With love and there were black people and white people and there were straight people and gay people and there were Republicans and Democrats, it was it was a truly just a just an absolutely wonderful wedding with with a meeting of Families George comes from an upper class family in the UK. Candice comes from Philly from mostly lower middle class family and that everybody was just dancing and having a great time. So this nonsense from Cardi, B. But anyway, that's what her. Take on what candy said was, and then you know candidates. So she's not just going to sit there and take it. So campus followed up with a couple tweets and I'm going to read to you she said Malcolm X. warned us years ago about the puppetry of interviews like Cardi B. and Joe Biden, he always spoke out against the White Liberal game of using entertainers pawns. This isn't really about you Cardi B. This is about black America Waking Up to Democrat racism. She went on and another tweet to say never listened to a person that has private security but once the public police defended never listened to a millionaire that made it here in America but trashes our country. These Hollywood idols are frauds leading sheep down paths they never took when they discovered success. So so candidates makes what I think are pretty cogent salient points and Cardi B. Then jumps back in. Cardi visas well, paying taxes is something that as much as I hate, it's a reality I will always have to pay but I rather might tax money go to free education than police funding use my money on something useful your president us our tax money to fund is empty camp in ruts. So trump uses his campaign a. Uses the tax money to fund his campaign is that is that right? Well, can't jump back in and said one your tax dollars or ready to go already go to free education. Jesus. That is true to know campaign uses tax dollars for funding. That is illegal that is also true and three defunding police initiatives has led to two hundred percent increases in black men getting shot in inner cities stop supporting black people dying.

Cardi B. Cardi Joe Biden Donald Trump Justin Bieber America Ben Shapiro Candace Owens UK George. Hollywood Jimmy Georgia Candice Philly Malcolm X. President Trump
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 2 years ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Obesity Raises the Risk of Death From Covid-19 Among Men

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Obesity Raises the Risk of Death From Covid-19 Among Men

"Obese men are more likely to die from the corona virus than overweight women KCBS TVs Candice Crone, researchers examined the health records of nearly 7000 patients at Kaiser hospitals across southern California who tested positive for the Corona virus between February and May. Obese men age 60 and under our atleast three times more likely to die from the virus. Woman had no increased risk of death associated with obesity. This is CBS News.

Candice Crone Kaiser Hospitals Obesity CBS California