36 Burst results for "Cancers"

Fresh update on "cancers" discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

The Stem Cell Podcast

00:58 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "cancers" discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

"Taking a you know a bit more of an unbiased approach to really try to figure out the allergy that underlines that cuomo advantage this clonmel polices says it's favorite of mom doing air quotes but At that captures. I wish i'd never learned about and i dread about clo- amount of voices because you know it ceded this idea in my mind that all the time there's inflammatory stimuli that are nucleated clone muda genesis all day every day in all my sales at turnover. But that's like mine arrose obviously but in all seriousness. I do wonder whether we need to be more careful in considering the the clinical implications immune to genesis in all ex vivo cultured cell products right. So there's a lot of trials for like exponential expansion of umbilical cord blood like that's i mean. I almost like ready for primetime. i would say Not to mention the entire field of cell based regenerative medicine is largely predicated on the idea of mobilizing expanding cells outside the body Deriving not mobilizing necessarily versus mobilizing dodgers. Right so talk me off the ledge here. Am i overestimating the risks of this kind of future of of in vitro cultured cells vis-a-vis Like you know. Safety are safeguards that inevitably that we can can surmount the risk there. Yeah i think that The context matters. That's the first thing. Stay so Yeah i think you can definitely take a healthy step back from the ledge. I mean think about how many decades have people been receiving bone marrow transplant. Just as an example. I know those aren't necessarily people culture products but you know transfer of cells from one human to another and those people are not all walking around developing blood cancers or cardiovascular disease to our knowledge at least so i. I think that there are situations where you likely want to screen for certain mutations and abundance of certain mutations but i don't know that the clinical hamad police's mutations yet warrant that level of screening it the most people can have an sustain cornel matter process into their ninety s. You know the people that live to a hundred and above and are fine perfectly so worried. About rune yeah. Well at least one right. Well at least you convince dalen to step back from the ledge so that that's a good thank so let's shift gears a little bit away from the science and talk more about actually the people in your lab because i think this is something that we really need to highlight I'm really excited to highlight this. I was looking at your lab website and the composition of your lab is pretty amazing if i if i do say so. It's almost all scientists who actually identify as women and that's certainly these days a bit of a rarity and perhaps in the future is going to become more and more and more common right. Perhaps one day in the future. This is going to be a common reality. And maybe not as much of outlier right and we certainly do have a long way to go in leveling the playing field and ensuring gender equity in biomedical research but we love to get your perspectives as leader of lab. That's predominantly women on how you run your lab and how you decide hire who you do in general how we as a field. The stem cell field can do better actually promote the careers the development of women scientists. That's a really great question and is true for the moment and for the past couple of years My lab has been predominantly women. Right now i think it's.

Cuomo Hamad Police Dalen Genesis Dodgers Cardiovascular Disease Cancers
"cancers" Discussed on Mint Arrow Messages

Mint Arrow Messages

01:45 min | 1 d ago

"cancers" Discussed on Mint Arrow Messages

"We were in the hospital waiting for the diagnosis waiting to find out if it had spread i need is many prayers on this kid as possible and i just i anybody i can think of who was a faith. Even if they weren't just send your good vibes. You know you know if you can pray a whatever you can do and and it moved mountains it ahead. I mean there's looking back. I think my goodness this cancer had to have been in there for a year and that it hadn't spread is an absolute miracle. And when i use an active little ken right yes well did. It hadn't spread and that he had his leg hadn't broke. That's what i was thinking. Yeah all right. No when his listening doesn't really help but let's talk about why that also was miracle that it had broken spread. 'cause sorry i know that in my hand no people listening. Don't know so. A lot of times the cancerous found because you can either see a mass or the limb has broken so and one of his nurses told me when i tell hair my gosh. How did we. How did we win the jackpot of the worst thing possible. I can't ever win the lottery. But not that i play the lottery but if some the you know anyway like why did we get the horrible cancers right. Yeah and you know she said. Actually you are really lucky. Because i hardly ever see kids come in here or it hasn't already spread or their bone has an already broken and i took it back and they went. Wow wow he's really been watching over crew. Today's episode is brought to you by better help. Do you need to go to therapy. Just ask yourself.

cancers ken
The Nutritional Advantages of Oats

Diet Science

02:27 min | 2 d ago

The Nutritional Advantages of Oats

"Week. We're talking about oats. Oh so very good. I always feel that everyone needs to know oats. Yes absolutely so. What would you like to share about oats well other than than the the typical health benefits votes. There's actually two compounds in oats that i don't think very many people know about and so wanted to talk about those today but then also talk about the various types of oats. I think a lot of people have heard of these different types but they don't really know how they're prepared and what makes them different from each other. Good good good topic all right. Yeah so. I think most people probably know that oats Help lower cholesterol. He also helped to lower blood pressure and stabilize blood. Sugar levels have also been known to help people with diabetes. So that's a one of the important things and a lot of these benefits In the past were attributed to a particular type of fiber that's in the oats called beta glue can And that has really kind of gotten most of the attention in previous studies on oats and their health benefits. But we're coming to find out that Oats contain more than twenty unique polyphenol compounds which are like phytochemicals Called evanston reminds have strong antioxidant anti inflammatory and anti itching properties which is why people can use. Oats says a bath like if you get poison oak or poison ivy. Get that itchiness on your skin. The compounds and oats are known to reduce that. Oh so that's why that you know they're known for that And then there's a couple of other compounds called avino kocides that Together with the of the ninian through reminds and the venacuro sides. Which are i mean. Both of them are really hard to say. Yes but these are just polyphenol compounds They've also been shown to prevent colon cancer And also heart disease because they help to reduce the the production of nitric oxide in the artery and And also help with the smooth muscle in the artery. So they're they've been studied widely for this now.

Diabetes Evanston Oats Colon Cancer Heart Disease
Inspiration4 Crew Returns to Earth After Historic Flight

NBC Nightly News

01:50 min | 2 d ago

Inspiration4 Crew Returns to Earth After Historic Flight

"Historic journey to spaces on the books tonight. The spacex dragon capsule the splashdown in the atlantic ocean. Off the coast of florida with the world's first all civilian four member crew give is in port canaveral candice. This adventure has been ground. Baking in so many ways it hasn't been groundbreaking and shows that the sky is really no limit for civilians. And i'll tell you. We heard this gigantic thud here in port. Canaveral as dragon capsule made its way through the atmosphere. And then that just beautiful landing in the atlantic ocean wrapping up this beautiful journey tonight. The return to earth the first all civilian space crew to orbit the earth wrapping their history-making three day mission. We're giving all of our time right now to you science research and some ukulele playing and trying to raise awareness for an important cause for us back on earth the inspiration for billionaire jared isaac men. Who's bankrolling the trip bone cancer survivor. Haley arsenault scien- proctor. The first black woman to pilot spacecraft and chris brown sqi who won his ticket through sweepstakes there last hours in space spent taking in the views snapping photos in the specially designed capsule dome even chatting with bano the blasted off from cape canaveral. Wednesday evening on a spacex rocket their capsule the dragon measuring thirteen feet wide. Their home as they whizzed around earth at seventeen thousand miles an hour. It's been really interesting to see how fluid shifts with my gravity environment mission part science to determine the effects of space on the human body and park charity more than one hundred fifty billion dollars raised for saint jude's children's hospital where arsenal works patients. They're getting a rare treat. Thursday

Atlantic Ocean Port Canaveral Jared Isaac Candice Haley Arsenault Canaveral Florida Bone Cancer Chris Brown Cape Canaveral Saint Jude's Children's Hospit
1st All-Civilian SpaceX Crew Launches Into Orbit

The Adam Carolla Show

01:03 min | 4 d ago

1st All-Civilian SpaceX Crew Launches Into Orbit

"There at it. Elon musk space. Company made history wednesday after its first all civilian mission launched from cape canaveral florida. The mission is called inspiration for sent. Four civilians into orbit Got a geo. Scientists a us air force vet a physician's assistant who was also a cancer. Survivor and jared isaac men. He's the billionaire. Who purchased the flight to help raise money for childhood cancer. They'll be flying about one hundred miles higher than the international space station. They'll carry out some experiments you about balance and testing. Their blood will be there for three days. They're expected to splash down in the atlantic on saturday and they're not docking anywhere so they took the like basically the the sun roof off. You usually have that closed because that's dachshunds. So now they have this giant window above them and they're just like us overeating now. Yeah they went up this morning. We sorry yesterday yesterday.

Jared Isaac Elon Musk Cape Canaveral Us Air Force Cancer International Space Station Florida Atlantic
'Jeopardy!' Hosts Mayim Bialik, Ken Jennings Will Finish 2021 Season

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 4 d ago

'Jeopardy!' Hosts Mayim Bialik, Ken Jennings Will Finish 2021 Season

"Another jeopardy question has been answered sort of the latest decision on any of the new full time jeopardy host is literally a split decision Sony pictures television says Maya Bialik and Ken Jennings will turn to the duties for the rest of the year here's how it will work the Alec who's been named interim hosts will host for shows that air through November fifth after that Jennings of the article share hosting duties to the end of the calendar year depending on their schedules it's unclear what is to happen after that November eighth will mark the one year mark since the show's beloved host Alex Trebek died of cancer I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Maya Bialik Ken Jennings Sony Jennings Alex Trebek Mark Oscar Wells Gabriel Cancer
Comedian and SNL Veteran Norm Macdonald Dies at 61

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:38 sec | 6 d ago

Comedian and SNL Veteran Norm Macdonald Dies at 61

"Macdonald the veteran. Snl star died this week of cancer. Apparently he kept his cancer battle. Very quiet is always jarring. When you see somebody sixty one died of cancer. And then i go. I don't like hearing sixty one year olds diets my age but very sad news. He was just a great great funny guy. Very very successful and Norm macdonald who was famous for his work on saturday. Night live died of cancer at the age of sixty one.

Snl Star Cancer Macdonald Norm Macdonald
Norm Macdonald, Former 'Saturday Night Live' Comic, Dies

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

Norm Macdonald, Former 'Saturday Night Live' Comic, Dies

"The comedian who both wrote and performed on Saturday Night Live has died norm macdonald is dead his management firm says the comedian died after nine year battle with cancer a battle that he kept private he was sixty one years old when Donald high point was becoming the weekend anchor update for Saturday Night Live a job that he ended up losing something he said in this nineteen ninety eight interview hurt him deeply it wasn't relating I don't like men in the paper for anything other than a funny you know like bacon is for any other reason legend has it that McDonald was fired because of his many jokes about OJ Simpson jokes that were based on the premise that the ex football star was guilty of murder I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Saturday Night Live Donald High Norm Macdonald Cancer Bacon Oj Simpson Mcdonald Football Oscar Wells Gabriel
Jeff Bridges Says Tumor Shrank, COVID 'in Rear View Mirror'

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last week

Jeff Bridges Says Tumor Shrank, COVID 'in Rear View Mirror'

"Actor Jeff bridges says his cancer is in remission and he's recovering from a difficult bout with covert nineteen I'm marches are a letter with the latest Jeff bridges writes on his website that his tumor that was twelve inches is now the size of a marble he also says he and his wife Susan guest and came down with covert nineteen in January while he was undergoing chemotherapy bridges says his wife spent five days in the hospital while he was hospitalized for five weeks as he puts it he was getting close to the pearly gates because of his compromised immune system bridges says he had a tough recovery and needed oxygen to walk around but he got well enough to walk his daughter down the aisle and dance at her wedding

Jeff Bridges Susan Guest Cancer
Eating the Foods Your Genetic Background Needs With Dr. BJ Hardick

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:32 min | Last week

Eating the Foods Your Genetic Background Needs With Dr. BJ Hardick

"I know you work obviously with different clients. All over the place in your clinic is in london ontario. Yes right and talk about your experience working with people and really helping them. Adapt more of a ketogenic and nate lifestyle using intermittent fasting. Things like that sure. Well the first thing just trying to move towards more of a ketogenic lifestyle when you're actually eliminating grains and sugars is even though there's a lot more awareness right now people still freak out when they're told you can't have grains you can't have sugar right and a lot of times people say well wait a second you know. These are foods of the earth. The mother nature gave us pineapples and oranges and pears. And all these things we tell those be bad for you. And i always go back to this and and i think first of all you have to recognize that people have different. Genetic backgrounds are gonna processed foods differently They're going to have different types of metabolism. Some people based on where they're where they're from the world may do better with one type of food than another but in principle when you think about the higher sugar foods and the ones grains that turn into sugars. You know the reality is you know. I'm a northern caucasian. I would not be from a part of the world are pineapples are growing year round saying well what would my culture have thrived now it starts to get a little dicey when through the years. Go on twenty two in me and you find out that five percent this. I said it's not always necessarily black or white. So i do believe in listening to your body and seeing how you should in the first place but the first thing is when you tell people to eliminate these foods that they could. Actually you know a mother. Nature's foods are god's people say well that's not right because i'm supposed to eat those tax and the reality is you have to also differentiate not just. How's your body's supposed to eat but are you really trying to deal with some type of illness or a disease because there are certain illnesses that can do better under certain diet programs even though those changes are associated with the cause of the best one for example is sealy people if need gluten but consuming. Gluten doesn't cause ceac right so same thing with you know if somebody has information and they have gall bladder issues while they probably shouldn't have a ton of fat all at once but just eating fat. Your whole lifetime isn't going to give you those gallbladder so we could go on and on and on about that i. I had a friend who was dealing with cancer not consuming any fruit. Well we've never suggested that consuming fruit gave you the cancer. But we do know that getting into this state where your body's not having relied on sugar is going to benefit the immune system to help nutrition. Yeah exactly so so you have to look at it. I doing this for some clinic. Some clinical name. Or am i doing this because it is just the way my body was designed writers

Ontario London Sealy Cancer
Interview With Patrick Bangert of Samsung SDS

AI in Business

02:01 min | Last week

Interview With Patrick Bangert of Samsung SDS

"So patrick i'm glad to be able to have you with us on the program here today and we're gonna be talking. Ai at the edge particularly in the world of medical devices. Which is i know where a lot of your focus is here. We're gonna get into some of the unique challenges of leveraging data and ai at the edge in the medical space. But i want to talk first. About what kinds of products. We're talking about people think medical devices. Okay well medtronic is tracking my blood sugar on the side of my arm and you know. Then i've got a big cat scan machine kicking around over here. What kind of devices does your work involve with. And and his edge relevant From your experience. Thank you for having me on the show pleasure to be here. We are dealing with medical imaging devices. So if you have a smart watch on your wrist. That's not what we deal with. Even though those are very useful of course to measure your exercise and sleep patterns we're dealing with technologies like an ultrasound and mri is not an x ray. And what's called digital pathology which is where a biopsy is removed and put on a microscopic slide. Those kinds of technologies produce images that are relevant to telling you whether you're sick at all hopefully not or if you are what kind of disease it is. And so the job of computer vision in this case is to detect whether is a disease diagnose what it is to find out where it is to find out how big it is advanced in if cancer stage one. Three how advanced it is. And all of these outputs can of course be created. Virtually instantaneously by executing artificial intelligence models at the edge and the edge in this case is the device itself. Yeah okay so. Some devices are huge. Mri scanners take up a whole room. As some devices are quite small ultrasound. Machines view could transport it in your suitcase and so there's obviously also price difference here but nonetheless. All of these technologies do produce an image that that is then analyzed by

Medtronic Patrick Cancer
9/11 First Responders Have Higher Cancer Risks but Better Survival Rates

Short Wave

01:45 min | Last week

9/11 First Responders Have Higher Cancer Risks but Better Survival Rates

"I grew up in the new york city area. And i remember this period so clearly. Many first responders spent weeks doing rescue and recovery work at ground zero site in the aftermath of september eleventh. What were they exposed to. Well you know just. After the towers collapsed the air was filled with smoke with debris basically all that had collapsed on the concrete glass pipes. I mean everything. Kind of pulverized and burning into this ash. It was laden with all kinds of heavy metals including lead and other toxins. I mean many of us. Remember that plume of smoke and debris that could be seen from space on that day and dr michael crane. Who's an environmental medicine. Expert at mount sinai told me that there has never been anything quite like it be exposure was really dramatic the dust. I mean there was all kinds of carcinogens and combustion products in fibers glass fibers in festus fibers and it was really a witch's brew and given what was in the air. There was definitely a concern early on that it might increase the risk of certain cancers and we have research about that now so how much of an increased risk of cancer is there among first responders. Well some of the most recent data suggests that the total number of cancers is only slightly elevated compared to the general population but scientists have documented like significant increases in certain cancer is a twenty five percent increase in prostate cancer. A doubling in the risk of thyroid cancer and about a forty percent increased risk and leukemia. And there are also a number of rare cancers that are linked to the

Dr Michael Crane New York City Cancer Mount Sinai Prostate Cancer Thyroid Cancer Leukemia
Being Authentic and Present With Yourself

Tara Brach

02:32 min | Last week

Being Authentic and Present With Yourself

"Authentic in such doorway and such a practice you know it is kind of the the emotional real emotional version of of practice of seeing things as they are in honoring man and owning that and it only for me leads to more more solid foundation and more and more transparency one of the one of the images that i think is so powerful for me with with the pandemic is that you know the jewish tradition the word sabbath literally means the one day. We don't turn one thing into another. And i feel like we've been forced into a global sabah and can't manipulate. We can't even dream too far ahead. And so we've been forced our turn to see the miracle in the ordinary to see the beauty in everything and everyone and and And i think you know said if we truly thomas merton new we truly be held each other. We fall down in worship each other and so here. We are forced to to say no. The dream isn't tomorrow. We can't defer life or our best selves or ourselves. It's all right here and that was one other like a powerful thing for me with the pandemic is or did i came upon us. I was very. I had a lot of echoes from my cancer journey An particularly this moment. When i was diagnosed i like anyone else. I went to this appointment with a doctor. Who told me i had cancer and i was alarmed frightened in thought. You must have the wrong folder. Can't be me. And but then when i left that office that day the door i had come through for out. Appointment was gone. No way back to life before that appointment and i also feel that humanity has been forced through that doorway with the pandemic. The old world is gone There's going back

Thomas Merton Cancer
Senator Amy Klobuchar Reveals Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last week

Senator Amy Klobuchar Reveals Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

"Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar's says she has been treated for breast cancer that was detected earlier this year global charge we did that the cancer was found during a routine mammogram she eventually had a lumpectomy to remove it the sixty one year old club chart tells ABC's Good Morning America she completed radiation therapy and may you have a checkup in August showed she was doing well Klobuchar's says the cancer was stage one day meaning it had not spread beyond the breast she said she felt very fortunate to have caught it early after delaying the mammogram because of the corona virus pandemic I'm Mike Hampton

Amy Klobuchar Minnesota Breast Cancer Cancer Klobuchar ABC America Mike Hampton
The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:58 min | Last week

The Ongoing Health Costs Associated With 9/11

"To federal funds established after the attacks of september eleven. Two thousand and one have paid around twelve billion dollars over the years. The money went to first responders. The families of those who died or people have gotten sick as a result of the terrorist carnage. Medical claims have been increasing in recent years. Many from people with cancer marketplace's samantha fields reports on the ongoing health costs connected to that day twenty years ago this weekend. Michael o'connell responded to the world trade center as a firefighter on nine eleven and spent the next few weeks working at ground zero five years later he got sick. I know the exact date. It was december thirty first. Two thousand six new year's eve. He went to bed that night filling healthy but when he woke up the next morning i literally had swollen limbs swollen ankles all my joints were inflamed by body kind of blew up to like twice the size. It was a pulmonologist figured out that he had a rare autoimmune disease called sarcoidosis that was attacking his skin and joints and told him he'd gotten it from breathing in toxins. The material that responders and survivors were exposed to when the towers collapsed was quite toxic. Dr michael crane treats a lot of nine eleven first responders through the world trade center health program clinic at mount sinai so huge huge burning buildings collapsing. Everything inside is burning and it collapses down into a pile and then an enormous. Dust cloud a lot of firefighters. Police officers and others at ground zero started getting sick almost immediately. I with what they called the world trade center cough then. Ptsd and depression. And eventually years later cancers this exposure has a really really long tail anyone who develops any kind of illness linked to nine eleven can get free healthcare through the world trade center health program but michael bearish a lawyer for nine eleven survivors says there are likely a lot of people dealing with nine eleven related health problems. Who don't know they're

Samantha Fields Michael O Connell Dr Michael Crane World Trade Center Health Prog World Trade Center Cancer Sarcoidosis Mount Sinai Ptsd Michael Bearish Depression
Deadly Passion: How an Obsession Led to Murder

Murder and Mystery in the Last Frontier

01:43 min | Last week

Deadly Passion: How an Obsession Led to Murder

"Once. Esther and jim retired. Esther insisted on moving south to swim. Washington soon after the move to swim esther learned. She had cancer and she died two years later. Esther's death hit jim hard and he decided to move back to alaska where he would be closer to his son. He bought a house in wa- silla on golden dale drive and his neighbors across the street were hanged dawson and his eighth wife. Thirty year. Old terry according to neighbors wheeler became good friends with the dawson's and was a frequent dinner guests at their house. Hank and terry dawson suffered marital problems in the summer of nineteen ninety-three and hank temporarily moved out of the house to live in anchorage. After hake walked out on her teri immediately called her neighbor. Jim wheeler to cry on his shoulder. Perhaps terry considered her relationship with jim platonic but friends say. Jim fell hard for terry. Jim apparently could not keep his emotions to himself because he told anyone who would listen that he was in. Love with terry dawson. Meanwhile terry and hank decided to work on their marriage and hank move back into their wasila home over the nineteen ninety-three labor day weekend by this time jim wheelers feelings for had grown into an obsession and he told several people that he could not stand. Think of terry and hank in bed together. Hank died in the explosion. Only four weeks after returning to live with terry in

Esther Terry Dawson Jim Hard Old Terry Dawson Hank Jim Wheeler Terry Jim Platonic JIM Wheeler Alaska WA Hake Washington Cancer Teri Anchorage
The Benefits of a Plant-Based Keto Diet for Cancer

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:44 min | Last week

The Benefits of a Plant-Based Keto Diet for Cancer

"I wanted to ask you something. Specific about this This plant based kito for cancer. Because i read a very interesting article you had online. And i want you to bring out from that. What is the number one. Food that cancer cells love and that we should avoid. Yeah absolutely well cancer cells. They thrive on sugar. So they are what we call anaerobic and so they don't need the presence of oxygen like he talked about and they break down sugar and they produce a lot of metabolic waste and they literally survive on sugar. And so you know we're going to prevent cancer or we're going to heal cancer. One of the key strategies is reducing significantly reducing the intake of sugar and starch. So now this this brings into an interesting dichotomy here because some people use a vegan diet to overcome cancer and they do but there may be a better way of doing that here. You talk about a plant based diet being different than what someone would call a vegan diet and what plant exclusive diet so so. What's the difference. There so vegan diet is going to be completely devoid of animal products whereas a plan based ketogenic diet. Like what i teach is just. It really means that plants. We're going to be the majority of the diet right. So let's say eighty maybe even ninety percent of the diet plant based utilizing certain animal products that provide high nutrient density and are lower in particularly protein. And we can talk about that as we as we go on. Okay now that may be very interesting to some folks who have adopted a kito die because usually when people say kito. They see the complete absence of carbs and mostly protein and fat. But you're talking about you know a lot of green foods that inherently have a lot of the Have a lot of fiber which you know brings that carbohydrate count down to a low net carbs. Could you explain how that works. Yeah absolutely so when we look at carbs we'd got sugar starch and fibre really the main carbohydrates that we look at now. The ones that we digest and break down into glucose or sugar in our bloodstream or sugar and starch fibers in digestible. By our bodies our gut bacteria will break it down and no produce b vitamins in different nutrients from it but basically fiber is not counted. It's not going to elevate your blood sugar and so you can. Consume high amounts of fiber and fiber has great benefits for helping pull out toxic bile out of our system helping support our microbiome helping detoxify our body so So getting a good amount of fiber when you're when you are when you cancer or when you're trying to prevent cancer is really good strategy and plant foods really provide a great megadose of fiber. We're looking for plant. Foods that are lower in sugar lower in starched we call them. The non starchy

Cancer
British TV Watchers Were Very Confused About American Ads.

Planet Money

02:48 min | Last week

British TV Watchers Were Very Confused About American Ads.

"So a few months ago. A bunch of people in england tuned into some good ole live complete with commercials. Us tv obviously. It was the royal infused. I'm prince harry and meghan petra. Diaz is in south hampshire england. Where the meghan markle. Prince harry oprah interview was going to air the day after it aired in the us. So petra and a bunch of other brits tuned into us tv so that they could get all the royal t in real time. Wait hold wait a minute. Your family cut you off. I hall the first quarter of twenty twenty and aside from all the royal palace bombshells. There was this one thing that really stood out to brits about. us television the commercials. They were not like commercials in england. Very very pushy. Very chelsea by this do it now. Whereas it's like they tend to be a bit of jokey. Petro remember seeing an ad for some kind of medicine and she was like Okay that's a little odd but then there was another one is an element that would have been really serious so either like chronic something paying or whatever it was it was a very in depth commercial about it. And i. This is dramatic. Yeah all over twitter during his oprah interview. British people are saying the same thing. What is the deal with all of these medicine ads in the us. Because england doesn't allow commercials for prescription drugs and it never even crossed my mind. That medicine was say like was promoted. I didn't it. Did not even cross my mind that that was the thing brits were like you lot get bombarded like this daily and american medical adverts are some real dystopia and like how is the cream for your joints going to give you cancer. These are all real tweaks. Yeah breads had a lot of fun with the side effects. Petro is tweeting to and she couldn't tell who the ads were. Even for really so i didn't understand. The advocates ought to sow the medicine to the public. And somebody replies to the tweet saying it's not to sell sell it so that you go to your doctor and convince them to give that to you. Which is the strangest strangest thing. I could think called. One of the tweets was like hold on. Hold on hold on. You are supposed to go to your doctor and tell them what you need like doing. Weird low idea so many people outside of the united states. We're like what the heck is going on over there in america because while there are ads for over the counter drugs in most of the world the us and new zealand are the only two countries that allow drug companies to advertise prescription drugs directly to

England Meghan Petra Meghan Markle Prince Harry Oprah United States South Hampshire Prince Harry Petro Diaz Petra Royal Palace Twitter Cancer New Zealand
It Feels Good to Choose to Live

The Dan Bongino Show

01:55 min | 2 weeks ago

It Feels Good to Choose to Live

"I put something out of my parlor account. You can go check it out. It's right there. It's time stamped at the time I was sitting on the bench. I thought a lot about what's going on with Covid. And I said in my parlor account, I said, you know, yes, A lot of people have died from Covid. Yes, many more will die. And yes, I could be one of them. Living in eternal fear. The above Means I've already forfeited away my life. And therefore I'd rather be dead anyway. I choose to live. And I'm not looking back. Yeah. It feels good to choose to live. You know, we're all adults were all responsible people. We can figure out how to try to avoid getting sick. Sometimes it works. Sometimes it won't World's a dangerous place full of pathogens everywhere. But, you know Although I don't like to bring it up and you know, I don't talk about it much. But when you get diagnosed with cancer like I did a relatively young age No, it changes your outlook on things. And I had a very curable, treatable form of cancer and other people out there who have it far, far worse than I did. But you see things different, especially in the early stages. When you don't know what stage are, and you don't know what kind it is, and, um you don't know what the prognosis is. And you see things different. Just remember I was driving home from surgery when they removed the tumor from my neck. And I was looking at this shopping positive getting ready to build on counter highway and the county I live in. And, uh, you know, I remember thinking to myself If this is serious, like I'll never see what goes up in that shopping plaza. You know what a dumb thing to think about right? But You think about a lot of dumb things when you Something existential hit you. I mean, we all have an expiration date, right? But none of us know precisely what that expiration date

Cancer
Medical Rebel, Dr. Lee Merritt, Explains the COVID Vaccine

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Medical Rebel, Dr. Lee Merritt, Explains the COVID Vaccine

"What is this vaccine. What is incorporated who developed it. Should people be worried about this. Should they be suspicious of it and just kind of go through it from an abc nature because we have people listening to this right now. That are still trying to make up their mind. They're not really sure what's going on. Well you know. It's striking to me. That americans would spend more time researching a new car line before they bought one and taking a vaccine that's made out of synthetic dna or synthetic arsenic and can change your genetic makeup forever. I mean come on this is this is serious stuff. We're dealing with here and this isn't a bad scene it's we. We actually found the term for it's a viral based genetic therapy's these things have been working in development for decades as cancer drugs or gene therapies. They could never meet the safety standard. They never reach the bar for safety. And so now by declaring them suddenly oh back seen their indemnified now that could be safe and up for market that she comfort people but it's the same devices and and these what they do is they've taken a small amount of genetic material and they wrapped in a light bulb protein codes and they are injecting it into us in such a way that it produces the actual spike protein. That causes your genetic material or that your machine to them produce literally trillions of copies of the spike protein. We send go all over the body now. Just and that's the theory is that then you'll get immune to the spike protein. Just the theory of that in my opinion is crazy regardless of the other stuff. That's in it and how it actually functions because you know in nature if some of this is hard to talk about because one of the things. We learned that there may not be viruses. The way we talk about them so just for the moments conversation. I'm gonna mentioned viruses as if they really are just like we were taught What we used to do was we will give you a small piece of the virus and then it would just be a very very tiny piece and it would not go all over your body would be local and you would then recognize that your immune system would see it. Memorize it. Go out and tell your other immune system heart to to remember this so that if it ever shows up again you can take it out. That's how you'll time immune system or the old time vaccines work. This worked by actually kind of hijacking. Your your cells. To produce the very pathogen. That made us sick with colbert

ABC Cancer Colbert
"cancers" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

02:52 min | 6 months ago

"cancers" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"That's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> wonderful <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> do you have any last <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> words for our <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> listeners. Today before <Speech_Female> we go. <Speech_Female> Thanks <Speech_Female> for this opportunity. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I just want <Speech_Female> patients with a soft <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Answer <Speech_Female> to know that we're <Speech_Female> here for you. <Speech_Female> We have a support <Speech_Female> group. We <Speech_Female> have a wonderful <Speech_Female> team that specifically <Speech_Female> targeted <Speech_Female> towards taking <Speech_Female> care of patients with <Speech_Female> joe cancer. <Speech_Female> We have a <Speech_Female> multidisciplinary <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> esophageal <Speech_Female> tumor board. That <Speech_Female> meets weekly <Speech_Female> to discuss these complicated <Speech_Female> cases <Speech_Female> and make sure <Speech_Female> that we're giving our patients <Speech_Female> every <SpeakerChange> opportunity <Speech_Female> to get the best <Speech_Female> care in the world. <Speech_Female> I think our <Speech_Female> outcomes are <Speech_Female> excellent at <Speech_Female> yet we still <Speech_Female> strive to improve <Speech_Female> them so <SpeakerChange> that we can <Speech_Female> move that needle even <Speech_Female> further in the right <Speech_Female> direction. <Speech_Female> We're always here <Speech_Female> for our patients. <Speech_Female> And i hope that they reach <Speech_Female> out to us even <Speech_Female> if they just need <Speech_Female> video visit <Speech_Female> or second opinion <Speech_Female> or anything <Speech_Female> that we can do to <Speech_Female> help them feel comfortable <Speech_Female> as they <SpeakerChange> go through this <Silence> journey. <Speech_Female> Well thanks <Speech_Female> so much for sharing. <Speech_Female> I think is probably <Speech_Female> speak for both of us. <Speech_Female> When i say that we <Speech_Female> wanted to bring a message <Speech_Female> of hope to patients <Speech_Female> today and <Speech_Male> that's under the very <Speech_Male> important parts of treating <Speech_Male> patients at the mayo. <Silence> Clinic <SpeakerChange> is bringing <Speech_Female> hope. <Speech_Female> Yes that's one of my <Speech_Female> favorite parts of my practice. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> do a lot of complex. <Speech_Female> It's oppa joe <Speech_Female> reconstruction <Speech_Female> and there's nothing <Speech_Female> better than meeting with the <Speech_Female> patient face to face. <Speech_Female> You might have gone to <Speech_Female> another institution <Speech_Female> and heard that <Speech_Female> they don't really have a lot <Speech_Female> of options. <Speech_Female> And then as you start <Speech_Female> to visit with the patient <Speech_Female> you have the <Speech_Female> little smile that <Speech_Female> comes across your face <Speech_Female> and you start realize. <Speech_Female> I think i'm going to <Speech_Female> be able to help this patient. <Speech_Female> Maybe they <Speech_Female> came here for <Speech_Female> absolutely the right <Speech_Female> reason. We <Speech_Female> have something novel. <Speech_Female> That's just going to <Speech_Female> help them. And <Speech_Female> i love having <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> knowledge and <Speech_Female> being in a facility <Speech_Female> that has <Speech_Female> the ability to offer <Speech_Female> so many <Speech_Female> different options <Speech_Female> so many <SpeakerChange> patients <Speech_Female> in the right way <Speech_Female> and having <Speech_Female> the whole team here <Speech_Female> present <Speech_Female> at <Speech_Female> all times is just amazing. <Speech_Female> Isn't it <Speech_Female> yeah. <SpeakerChange> I feel like such <Speech_Female> a better doctor <Speech_Female> having huge <Speech_Female> team around me <Speech_Female> that so capable. <Speech_Female> It's <Speech_Female> great <Speech_Female> thank you so much for <Silence> being here today. Chande <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> thank you <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> have a wonderful <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> day. <Speech_Female> Thank you april <Speech_Female> is a safa geel. Cancer <Speech_Female> awareness. month. <Speech_Music_Female> Dr sandra <Speech_Music_Female> black men at the <Speech_Music_Female> research at mayo <Speech_Female> clinic has been sharing <Speech_Music_Female> with us today <Speech_Music_Female> about <Speech_Music_Female> the safa. Jail cancer <Speech_Music_Female> diagnosis and <Speech_Music_Female> treatment. <Speech_Female> I hope that you <Speech_Male> learned something today. <Speech_Female> I know that i did. <Speech_Female> We

"cancers" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:21 min | 6 months ago

"cancers" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Cancer patients a year. There are a lot of studies out there that show that if you go to a high center it's not just the surgeon or the radiation oncologists medical oncologists. It's the actual experience of the center and the volume that the provider stay. But you can have a three times higher chance of dying if you go to one of those low volume centers however the unique thing about mayo which i love is that we always work with local care centers to help people get the treatments that they can get close to home. If it's appropriate in if we can do it we try to keep patients at home in only having come here for things that we offer unique from what they could get at home. I'm so glad that you mentioned that. Because i was going to mention that to how impressed i have been with our surgeons with our in colleges with our care. Teams that It a matter that you come to mayo in. You're a male patient forever. We want to allow people to have the same treatments closer to home whether comfortable and where they have their support system. Yeah one of my federal areas of research and one of my favorite topics is surviving after safa jill. Cancer and after running an assaulted joe. Cancer support group for eight years. We developed the upper digestive disease which is a remote patient monitoring app that follows stations after sokcho cancer. The main goal of that project is to let people go home and be monitored in the convenience of their home not having to constantly come back and not having to stay in touch with us into expensive follow up visits the to let them just remotely stay in touch with us and then only if they really need us. Do they need to plug back in while. That's just amazing. That's another a bit of virtual care that we're hearing about now. I love that yeah. It's nice. I like being able to stay in touch with my patients not was doing well and who's not doing well and have the confidence of knowing that i'm staying in touch with more people. Obviously everyone has limited time with the most important.

eight years three times safa jill one favorite topics a year mayo
"cancers" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:05 min | 6 months ago

"cancers" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Asakusa some are very skilled. Dedicated industry can go in and nearly scoop it out from the inside and prevent you from having to have chemotherapy or radiation therapy or surgery however if cancers advanced a little bit more and it's gone very well into the wall or even into the lymph nodes. Sometimes you have to get chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy and then you're given a four to six week period of recovery and then you have to have surgery. Fortunately we've got all new types in treatments like chemotherapy. We have new types of immunotherapy or monoclonal. Antibodies an all new types of treatment. That might have better success. Rates with regard to radiation. We've got time being therapy. Which might be a little bit. Were exact in have a little bit less. Collateral damage than the traditional type of radiation that we used to get in with surgery we now have minimally invasive surgery which is a lot less invasive quicker recovery lower rate of post store. Kadhamy syndrome. And a lot better quality of life after surgery so it depends on the debts in the stage of the tour. In that tells you what type of treatment you'll be able to get. That's all very very interesting. Tell me a little bit. About how survival rates are changing with these new types of therapies. that you're discussing. Wow well in one thousand nine hundred seventies survival rate was about five percent all comers nowadays. We've made quite a bit of progress. When i talked to my patients at mayo clinic are often try to urge them not to look at survival cours because what we're looking at historically doesn't look very good compared to how things look today. We've made a letter progress with chemotherapy. Radiation therapy and surgery techniques however. We still have a long way to go. So if you look at a patient who has any type of sock joe cancer. Typically those patients are going to have about a twenty percents survival rate all comers however if you look at the cancer that's only in the esophagus meeting. It hasn't spread outside the asakusa. Those patients have about a forty seven percent chance of being alive at five years. If you look at patient if who already have the cancer that spread to the lymph nodes or spread to the area around that area. The biggest those patients have about a twenty five percent..

five years four Asakusa one thousand six week twenty five percent today asakusa about five percent mayo clinic twenty percents a forty seven percent nine hundred seventies about
"cancers" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

01:36 min | 6 months ago

"cancers" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Gio cancer. What are the next steps. What is the treatment like the treatment for software. Cancer depends on your stage so if you present with very early stage safa joe cancer even on the continuum if you have something. That's like free cancer much. Like you're getting your skin evaluated. a dermatologist. Might burners zap the skin to prevent it from training into cancer. We can now do that on the inside of your safa goose. So our gastroenterologist or specially trained go into your august in diagnosed barrettes in something called d. slade disl- asia barrett's is nothing more than the the lining of the safa. Guess is starting to look like the stomach and then display is nothing more than the cells are starting to look normal and they're starting to look abnormal like they might be heading towards cancer but they're not quite invasive cancer and what that means is the endoscopies can go in and burn the inside layer with the balloon that blows up and use energy called radio frequency ablation and that very specific shallow bird sloughs the lining so that newer healthier lining in grow. And sometimes i think that can result in regression of those cells which means improvement to prevent the cancer from me and that's the earliest type of treatment. The next part is if you have cancer. That's inside the top part of the wall or the mucosal if you have a earliest safa joe cancer detected in its at the most superficial layer b..

"cancers" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

03:31 min | 8 months ago

"cancers" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"We have published papers et cetera. So i think that you know there is some info yet. We're not there yet but we will do everything in to try at least and to Try to move to the clinic in a reasonable time. I cannot say will be in in two years or more. I hope it will be a short time. And i think the corona situation. We learned that in many thanks could be scaled up quite quickly and we were a little bit involved in some of the aspects so we really understand that. This part is relatively easy the genome editing. Partisans it's more trick and two personalized cancer patients the more so i think we have some challenges. We are very good and you're also on twitter. So those listening can follow the peer lab at pure lab at p. e. r. underscore l. a. And that's them on twitter or dr. Dan peer it. It's really exciting to hear about the innovations that are coming from your lab. It's it gives hope for people who are suffering from this who have relatives who are because some technology like this in the modern age of rapid deployment of new technologies. if he learned anything in coronavirus. As you said maybe this will happen in their lifetime and for people are affected by cancers that means a lot so thank you very much for what you do and thank you for being a guest today. Thank you so much and thank you very much for listening to the talking. Biotech podcast. brighter review on itunes stitcher. Wherever you consume podcasts media thank you very much for listening and for telling friends. Our numbers grow every week. And it's exciting innovation. That's driving it but it's also listeners. Like you were loyal. Share the stories that science gives us. Thank you for listening to the talking biotech podcast. And we'll talk to you again next week. A talking over. Podcast reflects the personal view of boxer. Kevin and guests are not the news of the university of florida faculty staff ball after all we do science full. They probably are not to be clear that there no university affiliation with this podcast which is a damn shame but i got. That's all our goals so feel free to share this science. Communication effort recommend coutts and support us of the few shows over on patriotic. We invest all funds back into promotion of the podcast for the audience enhanced. Production expand science communication efforts in many ways. Thank you for listening to the talking podcasts..

Kevin twitter next week two years itunes today dr. university of florida Dan two personalized cancer patien
"cancers" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

02:21 min | 8 months ago

"cancers" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Cancel. Okay so this is. This is the part that i'm really curious about. So let's talk about that after the break. We're speaking with dr dan peer tel aviv university. One of my favorite cities in the world. We're talking about the breakthrough in crisper based gene editing specifically sent to cancer cells dealing with particularly aggressive cancers. And we'll be back with the talking biotech podcast in just a moment.

"cancers" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

05:08 min | 9 months ago

"cancers" Discussed on The Bio Report

"So that right there gives you one gives you a dimension however Only you know we think it's even less than twenty five percent there actually medically treated today. We think that that's because of the current will Frankly are mostly from last century. And are you know even their their hard the basically hard on family right to go to a specialist clinic. maybe they don't have one nearby Drop off their dog in cova on the sidewalk. They don't even talk to the clinician face to face that is and they're you know for baby call. It will be in the clinic for a long time for an infusion. It's chemo so it's very onerous and tough We think you know we could do better. And we can bring more tools and increase accessibility. What's the vision for one. Half what trying to do a one health is actually a movement. It's the shared health and disease the oneness across species. So we are looking at you. Know what has In the in the context of oncology we're looking at what has moved forward the human world that we could lift and bring back to the dog and on the other. You know if you think of it on both sides of the leash then walk. Can we learn finchley from the pet dogs. Cancer journey which happens at a vari accelerated speed bright which You can basically the lifetime of the dog right is shorter than ours so you can just see things and again a similar journey right with metastasis and whatnot What could we learn you. Could we interrogate. Could we find where are the biomarkers similar and then look at for example combinations of drugs right we understand that cancers multifactorial and that you know likely the you know kind of where we really want to be headed. I mean in the broader. Our community is towards combinations. And but there's lots of questions and frictions to learn really at the clinic level with a with a mammal..

cancers
"cancers" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"cancers" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"So here we go. Today's topic is a really interesting one has after all the talk about vaccines. We think about vaccines about for covert nineteen now vaccines for. Measles have been in the news. What about vaccines for cancers and other types of insidious diseases where this kind of a prophylactic treatment may be of use and so we're going to talk that talk about that today with Dr Adam snuck is in the fish is an assistant professor at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. So welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me. Well, I really appreciate having you on you. Been in the news recently in the popular press, which is where I originally found the story and I didn't know much about this. But as I began the peel, the onion I really thought this was getting work. So let's talk about a vaccine for cancer. You know cancers are a very complicated thing. It's not just one disease. It's many different kinds of cell prolific disorders and so when we're talking. About the kind of cancers that you've been studying, what are we referring to with gastrointestinal cancers? So gastrointestinal cancers, those would be pretty much anything along the gastrointestinal tract. This'll be a Safa guests in stomach, the attesting, which would be the small test in the large intestine rectum also a pancreas and liver, which sort of innovate with the GI tract and the gall bladder and bile duct. These would all. Qualify as a GI cancers and do all of them have any shared commonality from like a cellular side that gives them kind of a common identity. There are similar similarities and differences rectal cancer we kind of lump it together as colon rectum, thinking of it as one disease but it's actually a couple of different diseases within colon cancer. There are a variety of different diseases they do have some similarities. ESOPHAGEAL and gastric cancers actually frequently undergo this this process where the normal tissue source to look like colon cancer and then turns into gasser cancer or suffered. Gio Cancer is meadow pleasure where the the cells actually start to look differently and even acquire some characteristics of normal colon and colon cancer. When I know that colon cancer has several committed steps that have to happen at a genetic level before it turns into A. Fully metastatic type of cancer in. So is that kind of the where the road splits like that you've made a couple of these committed steps and then it goes in separate ways from other types. Exactly. There are a couple different sort of genetic pathways that a cell or tissue can go down in order to develop cancer based on the different mutations that occur colon cancer almost all of them have a mutation ABC. Tumor suppressor founded in eighteen percent of colon cancers as being mutated But within that arc, there can be some branches after that with different rotations at the are piled on top of that ABC mutation. And how prevalent are these cancers? Can you give us some sort of sense of how many people are affected and how many people have our die from it? Yeah Gi cancers are actually among the most prevalent in the the world. There are about five million cases of GI cancer in the world, each year and one point five, million deaths in the US Colin. A pancreatic cancer are actually the second and third leading causes of death from cancer behind only lung cancer, and these unfortunately are some of the most difficult to treat cancers. For example, more than ninety percent of pancreatic cancer patients will die of their disease in less than five years, and unfortunately, these cancers have also not responded very well to some of the new immune therapies entered the clinic in the last five to ten years. And really that's where we're going with your work. You know we've spoken about immunotherapy as before on the podcast and and they always. Key off of having some sort of a a virus or some sort of a vehicle not always I, guess but where's there's some sort of engineered entity they target a cell that has some sort of an antigen signature. There's something that's there that the cell can recognize that says I'm problematic in. So what is that in gastrointestinal cancers? Right arm your system needs some kind of molecule to identify the cell said, it should attack and hopefully differentiate those cancer cells from normal cells. We generally think of these molecules, one of two different varieties either neo antigens or self antigens. New Antigens are basically new to the immune system that's the they they their name. These are typically mutated versions of our own protein switch drive the cancer forming process, or they could be viral antigens like H V, proteins which are found in cervical cancers. Neo Antigens tend to be a bit more difficult to target because it could be fairly unique to each patient in its is harder to come up with a therapy that you could apply to a lot of different patients. Self Antigens on the other hand are completely normal proteins. They're made in some of our tissues and cells and by cancer. In Gi cancers, there's several under investigation. The two most studied ones are called ca in colon cancer and muck one in a variety of different GI cancers and you may have you may have already answered this kind of, but if there is this neo antigen. Why doesn't the body recognize it and say, this isn't self so I need to mount a defense against it. There's a couple of reasons. One is that in some cases are music actually does this is actually pretty common in melanoma where patients will have immune responses against their melanoma proteins that you can measure right in their blood, but they're melanoma is still growing typically this because it's form some other process to overcome that One of the common ones is expression of checkpoint. These are molecules, inhibitory molecules that actually suppressed. Immune system, and so when the Mississippi tries to come into the melanoma, for example, it's blocking those immune responses from working properly pity one is the common one that we know about and is targeted with some newer immuno therapies in other cancers. Maybe those responses never really form maybe that tumor isn't very image to begin with So the can actually be a variety of different reasons. Yes I. See what you're talking about here. The bet tumors are essentially self tissue but once in a, they'll create a signature that says. That makes it unique to either the cancer or the virus, and so that that's what these immuno therapies can key off of, and so you've been looking at one that's called a Guana Lille cycle see or Maybe you have another way to say that but it what is that molecule do and why is this a useful candidate? Yeah slickly see we typically call GCC celebrities say it's a somewhat newer self antigen that we identified in Japan answers a little over ten years ago during my PhD Thesis Work It is a molecule that typically plays an important role in intestinal faces. So regulates water and electrolyte balance in the intestine. Many people are actually indirectly familiar with its role. There are equal I out there in certain parts of the world that produce toxins that bind to G C and over activating it. Resulting in large quantities of water secretion into the intestine, and if you've ever experienced traveler's diarrhea in Mexico, for example, that was actually due to a bacterial toxin that bound to and over activated GCC. And remarkably, pharmaceutical companies have actually found a way to take advantage of that. There have been a few different drugs that have been developed. FDA approved to treat chronic constipation, an older individuals.

cancer colon cancer Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center Th Gio Cancer cervical cancers gastrointestinal tract GI melanoma Philadelphia assistant professor US FDA ABC Dr Adam ESOPHAGEAL Japan Mexico
"cancers" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"cancers" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Cancers with no coding and no bleeding and why is this important well it's important because number one there's three million Americans with skin cancers basal cells and squamous cell cancers and they're often cancers of sun exposed areas which means it's very visible this man's very prominence big businessman deals with high political officials in anybody businessman or not businessmen doing with high political officials are just going through daily life doesn't want to walk around with half their ear missing in this man did not want to walk around with half is here missing which is what most surgery would do would be cutting off the top portion of his ear and for us to that looks like you can get our skin cancer booklet you'll see results of surgery and results of our treatment all there for you there's no cost there's no obligation you can come into our office at thirteen eighty four Broadway or call our office at two one two choices together he booklet DVD sent to at no charge you could tell us what kind of book that you want whether it's for brain tumors or body cancers are breast cancers or prostate cancers skin cancers lots of information to send you if you come to our office at thirteen eighty four Broadway you can pick up more information that we can send you and you can pick up information for your friends and neighbors and loved ones which would encourage because you are learning a lot and you can pass on this information so for this man with his basal cell cancer did extensive cancer was the foreman cancers eating through the left superior part of his ear he just did not want to have his ear cut off for half of his ear cut off and he came here to set by a big surge in sex you believe it or not it was sent from a big surge of it one of the biggest hospitals in New York who felt that the best treatment for skin cancer is it is that one of these hospitals billion dollars most prestigious famous hospitals he sent the patient here for evaluation and consideration of treatment and I met with the patient he decided to proceed with our treatment in the middle of this crisis and now he's had a few treatments pinpoint treatments painless treatments easy treatments and now cancers already gone there's nothing visible he's doing great he is so happy and content police have our treatment for his basal cell cancer of the year with no coding and no bleeding and no hospital no deformity of the cancer's gone is there is there and that's how he wants to be a that's how I think everyone wants to be.

cancer New York
"cancers" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

10:51 min | 1 year ago

"cancers" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"The moment? I'm embarking on a career break which is very new. But before that what's in police words from a great message to police and then Devon on call police detective and then as a detective sergeant. So what's in quite a few different areas police over the past eight years and have you been involved in many situations. Is that in terms of dealing with people with mental health issues and crises. I would probably say every single second that I clocked in and would yeah huge huge huge amounts. I mean From one of the earliest memories of when I when I joined the police The lady who is trying to kill us and like fill the a pocket full of stones at jumping and savor pullback from reservoir pullback in literature on a daily basis so you have that with people from self harming people and others and people who had lost yeah massive massive amounts say probably good ninety percent of the general stuff the people in emergency services deal with people who are in some form of a stage of of crises from mental health or genuine mental illness. That's just not had support. I any kind of diagnosis. To be. Honest is probably a good time to talk to you about this since you're sort of just moved away from that sort of work. What's your what's your opinion? In terms of the situation on the ground in terms of staffing and funding. I mean as a police officer always allowed to be political. So it's the genuine trayvon sir especially coming away from a career break is it's very very low number. Aloe the they have been. Since we kicked into an austerity period. I would also say the biggest on diagnose problems people working in the emergency services mental mental illness. Bits within that. Somebody's WHO's a supervisor item number of staff that Komo National Mental Health breakdowns have in big big issues on a daily basis. You deal in everybody else's like issues and trying to support pull them and using safeguards and not a check and balance for you so so I would say it was two fold. In the moment I'd say an emergency services point of view it's probably the lowest and morale up. I've ever seen it from being in that police in emergency services kind of family to be honest. What do you think you'll be moving towards awards in the future from emergency services and a mental health? Some point always people say numbers is an answer and I think okay so it is in one sense because it can support me agency. Working is is a big part that The people at the police and paramedics especially I'm not just saying Nathan like vitamin degrade. Ah they don't predominantly people form of a crisis. They don't have the adequate training and skills so quite often you. The last line of defense for that person and social care will kind of say doesn't Meow re-met and then you're affectively leftover full safeguard care for that person. Now there's there's a huge amount of charities and other agencies out there that support people using a relying on those who are in the exact same position from being low funded is is very difficult difficult but I think Malaysia working. I've worked a lot wave. Children and children's services is getting a lot better Sharing of the riskin enchanted support is getting better but I think they will become Momo specialized so I think those areas will really take pot. So for example. Boise me too much. More acquisitive crime used to the big thing so burglaries robberies people. Getting you know like phones taken from them when now to save garden on rightly so so is the biggest impact in emergency services so it the training needs to reflect it in that because the people who are suffering on the frontline because they don't know how to help the person that they're trying to help so if we solve them to know how to help up person might help them as well so I think a lot more specialist training in on numbers will hopefully help a little bit so -mergency services please been part of your life but also fitness is a huge party. Offi Life Yeah. That's also seems like it's kind of like whole career in itself ready. What part fitness player and helped me people have better mental health huge? I mean so for me. I've been very lucky that I've words in a large amount of things police increase like. Pull it through. What's it's riots? Where to the aftermath of the bunch bomb in seen number of things that I won't go into an my big poll through through our all of that has been like fitness Historically what you life on Mars and cop shows it was whisky and cigarettes that got people through with me is like weights and running but genuinely having like a big push in fitness you get surrounded by an awful lot of good positively which sometimes when you struggling within your own heads having some form of structure of just something to do and having some positive some instant positive come back when you've watched in a world of negative and wherever that's from the circumstances are genuine. Illness is really strong thing so for me. Fitness has been like a genuine outlet over the past eight nine years and then some of With a lot of how to tend to do even more good for the people so yeah I mean a joke so my whisky and cigarettes. How did you get into powerlifting? Because that's your main things across for is now functional fitness. But you've kind of done things So policy that it was the first thing I've been reasonably successful I walk into a really old scary. What you call like saw Austin's wet Jim in Manchester Sta and saw this thing called polythene so it was three lives? And you just try and lift the heaviest that you can you can do. But while it's an individual sport so when you go allowing you do something you just on your own and you that way you would often train in big groups of people and the competitions. It was always about you trying to get better than what you did. Last time is not so much about you trying to be other people. So he's an incredible positive situation to be in and around and found out that have been called by some guys in Iceland. Excellent for such a small mon- quite strong so like of got three times putting weight lift into different lists like double bodyweight in some. There's just quite well and WanNa starts do powerlift in and work on a training program and competes in and having their award from that it actually helped me structure like professional life and things are money. Start to get a lot better at that but he wants to really old Jim saw. I thought that was interesting. Thought I was reasonably good at it. So what do you enjoy most about that. And now yes I mean we got into it because if if I'm what we created a bowel cancer and that got me into doing crossword which is so ridiculous. In so many ways you do gymnastics do Olympic lifting you. You do. Running away invests even on the world's worst you do do swim. You saw many things and that became like another level of a challenge to see if in a couple of years I could try try and catch the elite guys in cross fit for me powerlifter an estimate about two years to be one of the highest levels and cross fit like internationally which manage to do a couple of weeks ago and on that path. Now so but it's just the variants of and is an absolute huge global phenomenon. Now I'm and people seeing it from netflix documentaries to really high in cost athletes have millions of followers but it's an incredibly positive environment and you literally tested all the time time. Climb ropes swing rings. Lonzo's different things. Povey just look Quaco when you do some of it. Yeah because I mean that sounds quite different my perception of what the Word Cross it. I think I was either thinking. Initially of like a cross fit trainer thing some version of you know we use it if you do soups and then you could you do repairs for like you do these groups of four things like none of which involves and if what you're talking about. Yeah what would you say is the appeal pair of the gym in general what. Jim is very personal to every single person that goes in Narran. And why you would go in there. I think depending on the kind of Jim as well the massive appear Pingu is is escapism. So once you go in there. It doesn't matter whether you're a C.. Over compnay whether you're a policeman You know whether you work in TESCO. It doesn't matter who you you are. What your daily thing is when she come into that Basil? Everyone's on a pretty even playing field and you do see an awful lot communication between people that you wouldn't necessarily put together in other places places. I think not breach. Just really fantastic sense of community especially in a functional fitness world. You'd be surprised the people that work out next to each other. I'm and when you actually find other backgrounds and what they do it's amazing and it creates another level of connection. I think people often lack a bit of structure in the life so so when you come into a class for example the lead in the happy to be lead but from a natural physiological standpoint massive sense of dolphins working out can make you hopping. Might as you walk in when you when you leave. It really can make you happy in another sense of accomplishment even if you just survived that class you know you survived five men really well tell me about battled cancer because that's why we sort of heard about you. What is it first of all so? Oh it's a functional fitness fundraising competition. So it's designed that everybody no matter your level of fitness whether you've currently go undergoing any form of cancer treatment to certain level of check that you can come in do our events Every works out all at the same time whether you're an athlete fleet whether you somebody like London event we had a team of four completely blind males we have a team of people that have got singular. I'll just double limbs. Everybody does the the same thing they all fundraise for charities and what is the functional fitness aspect of. It understands what that means. Yeah so it's not quite cross yes fit because if you Google crossfire you'd be terrified at some of the things that you say even though that's not possible you would be genuinely kind of thinking. Oh my God that's way too much so we're not that what it does. is we use things things. Like really lightweight sandbags after run up and down with you have to carry your partner on the back. You have to jump over them you have to roll up and down is basically. Like a giant spoils bowls Dave rattles. We've some equipment so we use things like a kettle bell. I don't bow and very lightweight plates. So you'll you'll never taught the scary equipment and you'll see in a gym..

Jim Komo National Mental Health Devon powerlifting Google netflix officer supervisor Illness Nathan Momo WanNa Malaysia Boise London partner Dave Iceland Lonzo
"cancers" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"cancers" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Cancers are cancers of the throat mouth nasal fair exports box area majority of related to a virus human papillomavirus, and many people believe it's related to oral sex catching that virus. How do you know, how do you make diagnosis of human papillomavirus was a test on on the biopsy specimen of the south could be done at the same time as the biopsy and the success rate. The cure rate is higher in men and women, but mainly men that pedantic and men who have. Have human papilloma virus had in that cancer. Is about fifty thousand people a year have cancers the head and neck area, many are smokers, but actually the past it was smokers and drinkers Costa, the minority now the majority are human papillomavirus so chosen how things change in medicine and the FDA meteorology or the study of who gets cancer is changing constantly changing and many things. Just don't stay the same. They do evolve with time and their studies looking at lower doses of radiation and lower doses of treatment because you seem to be more curable than smoking drinking related to head and neck cancers, we treat both and we have a lot of experience. We actually have a whole team here at thirteen four Broadway to treat had a neck cancers and other cancers for patients who wish talked about a woman who's ninety two years old. She's widowed. She has two children. This woman has vaginal bleeding seen by or gynecologist got to college. I was relaxed. To perform certain usually for women who has vaginal bleeding because the DNC that get some scrapings of the tissues from the uterus. If that's where the presumed sources, obviously, the woman needs a powerful exam. Vaginal bleeding can have a abnormality anywhere the vagina the cervix adjacent tissues or the end Dmitri, which is the lining of the uterus. Remember the lining of the uterus opens up through the cervix into the Jonah? So usually cancers of the end Dmitri, which are more common. Do have some bleeding and bleeding comes to the outside through the vagina. And that's what causes women alarm many women see their doctors or come to us because of agile bleeding for this woman had closed or static China and the biopsy could not be easily performed. So she came to us with no cat scan. No pet scan and no pain, but bleeding now she's also lost weight. She went from one hundred and twenty four pounds to one hundred eighteen pounds. Her height is five foot four. Says no headaches is no car. She no shortness of breath. She does use hearing aids and her arms and legs are okay. But she's a little bit unsteady. She's fallen a couple of times we've offered to evaluate her balance as well. She was seen by surgeons you seen by gynecologist. No one wanted to touch her. So she came to us and she came with her sons who are really devoted to her hopelessly devoted beautiful, beautiful beautiful devotion. And we talked about evaluating her all shed with the to colleges was an ultrasound or choke thickening of the lining of the uterus. So uterus is where the baby grows with the fertilized eggs. Egg comes from the mother or the sperm comes from the father and the sperm fertilizes, the eggs, and then usually the egg lodges in the wall of the uterus where it grows into a baby. Now this lining the end to meet him as what turns into cancer known this woman, who's ninety two her end Dmitri lining was markedly thickened, and that's. Why they're gonna colleges sent her to me because he assumed that that was cancerous was good assumption. We got more sophisticated tests, including pet CAT scan and the pet cities can actually showed the lining of the uterus. Sliding up consistent with cancer the patient her doctor got ecologist. Her two sons did not want her to have surgery or biopsy. Ninety two could be devastating. Her gynecologist sent her to us, and many many doctors send their patients to us. I know listeners save lives. But doctors also save lives by sending their patients to us. And I examined her. We got a pet scan the pets can lit up in the uterus. Consistent with cancer of the lining of the uterus. We offer treatment she accepted five treatments. She has had those treatments after actually the second treatment truly it takes about ten minutes. She comes in walks in gets a treatment turns rounded coast to the park or goes to Macy's goes to launch what she wants the second. The bleeding had stopped and she's very happy. She's finished off five treatments now. And the plan is to return in about six weeks for a checkup. Of course, she has my number and my name, and my Email you can Email too, by the way, it's Gill GAO at our S N Y dot org. Gil at R S N, Y dot org at R s and y arson wise for radio surgeon York dot org. Can right also. And I met her children. She worked hired. She was her husband sold uniforms for waitresses, and she did a bribery and with through their work. The two sons went to law school. So really a story of a beautiful family here in America and their devotion at ninety two to her mother.

cancer vaginal bleeding Dmitri Costa Macy FDA China bribery America Gil DNC Gill GAO arson one hundred eighteen pounds twenty four pounds ninety two years ten minutes five foot
"cancers" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"cancers" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Radicalization in some Paolo the biggest hospital and South America in Brazil using this Detroit pediatric cancer cases in hepatitis c. it's amazing and global, and we are so far behind here. So we're excited, bring some fresh voices to the table soon to work intravenously. That's what we have. Some of the biggest impact on aggressive cancers, aggressive line conditions. Year and my question one hundred eighty just prophylactically you to three out that is exactly how they're starting to use it and do studies on it as kind of a vaccine. A longevity, quality of live anticancer vaccine. We will have you up. I love it. I'm going to bring him in next week and I don't think it's a legal, hey, man, you mistletoe. So Eric. What am I call it? He's actually of the head medics there who has trained in mistletoe with me. So I might have you to talk. Awesome. I have no idea if I'll be just as unicorn or not, but it's fun. You are boring. On that note nation account. One more question for you. If someone came to you tomorrow based on everything, you know, as a human being as a medical professional, whatever you've experienced, I want your advice what, what I want from better at everything I do as a human being. What are your three most important piece of advice would you offer. So I'm kind of simple and I've been asked if it might might wrote comment to this would have been historically to find your joy, find your life purpose and find what you're express, what you were grateful for. But a kind of clump those in one these days because they happen for me simultaneously and most people who practice any one of those find that the other thing that I think is really critical are very survival on this planet is to get out side, get off the grid and lay on the ground or swim in the ocean or stare off into the stars because the average American today spend less than fifteen minutes a day outside. And we are so disconnected from the rhythm of the nature around us that we are. It's no wonder the cell signaling has gone. Walkers rights are circadian, rhythms are upside down inside out. And of course, even looking at you got my little blue lenses through this. But you know, we are very much we can still use the power technologies that we have to enhance our response to them. And I believe that that's people like you who helps teach us how to use our technology wisely. So those are kinda my three.

Paolo Detroit South America Brazil Eric fifteen minutes
"cancers" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"cancers" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"So it's a really diverse or heterogeneous population of of diseases on the overall outcomes are are not nearly as good as they are in pediatrics certainly there are subsets of adult cancers, where that we do really well in in that's, you know, certain breast cancer and prostate cancers, and and things like that because overall survival and disease outcomes are not as good and adult cancers, it is it is ripe for discovery. Right. And so it it is an area where looking for alternative approach. Because that traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy for many of those diseases is not as effective, you know, it's an area where thinking about how do we how do we what are better more effective approaches to this disease is are not as good at it? Because they're different cancers that are harder to to cure or is it partially because a lot of it occurs. An older people who already have worn down systems and other areas that therefore they can't take the side effects. Or is it just that you know, if an eighty year old man gets cancer his five year survivor. It wasn't as good as a child's to begin with any up. It's really a combination of all of those things, right? The reality is yes, many adult cancers because they are more slowly growing our more advanced by the time, they're diagnosed they are more likely to be metastatic, right or to be located in more places beyond their original spot or certainly to be locally what we call locally invasive. Right. So you know, if you think about pancreatic. Cancer, for example, number one, it grows more quickly than some other adult cancers, but often is much more locally invasive in his liver and other other locations on by the time. It's even diagnosed and some of them are in locations that are more difficult to surgically respect and you're right. The tolerance to treatment on is is much different in adults than in kits particularly in older adults. What are you most excited about with respect to the sort of the future of where we're going with pediatric cancer? And what do you what do you think is the the big thing that that you're most excited about forty discussed? Or is it something else? Yeah. No. I think I I really think in pediatric cancers the future of immune based therapies cell, immune based therapies and targeted therapies in using those together with initially together with standard. Chemotherapy, I think we'll see continue to see improvements in in survival. And also, I think in some cases, we will see in for kids with more aggressive cancers, newer or less toxic therapies being introduced much earlier on. And so our overall outcomes will be much better seems like that would be a real, plus because, you know, given that, you know, seventy five percent or more get toward surp- that that's a reasonably that's much better diagnosis. I think the most people think cancer is. But I think what also most people panic about especially parents is that I know what my child's going to have to go through to get that seventy five percent shot. So I would imagine the idea that we could have less said a toxic or less or or therapies with with fewer side effects that were easier to take would probably be a real leap forward. Absolutely, absolutely. Now. I think particularly if it's without having to compromise on on survival response because I mean, it's you know, depending upon when they get it. It's such a hard to lose. A couple of years, you know, at sixty if you have to go to the hospital, and you're not as active for a couple of years terrible. But if we carry wonderful, but if you're nine in the nine to twelve is a big deal. So it's a yeah. I can imagine that there's a lot more anx-. They're absolutely now for sure, Jamie. I can't thank you enough for joining us. This has been fascinating. And I salute I'm going to try to convince you to come back again because I'd love to spend a whole other hour talking about the wellness aspects. And and what we need to do for people after we've finished training them. But thank you so much for joining us shirt. Thanks for having me. If you like this podcast. We'd really appreciate if you might think about writing a review on I tunes, or wherever you get your podcast every little bit helps, and of course, subscribes you. Don't miss any of our future episodes..

Cancer Jamie us seventy five percent eighty year five year
"cancers" Discussed on The Show About Science

The Show About Science

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"cancers" Discussed on The Show About Science

"And i'm very same for another abso saw that science this year house snake and today we have them be talking about cancer with st jude's and we're gonna how find a cure and also we're gonna talk about how you can help to find here this is gonna be an awesome episodes statehood hello hi this is best stuer how are you i'm good so fast could you introduce yourself i would walk energy myself my name is back to her i am one of the doctors here at st jude's children's research hospital and could you tell us what st jude's is yes so st jude is a cancer research hospital for children so we treat a lot of different cancers here both cancers of the blood and cancers of the brain and cancers of all different parts of the body and one thing that's cool about st jude that we also tree other duty this too and so there are some blood disease is like sickle cell disease or haemophilia um and so we have a lot of different patients that come here to st you to get treated and thank you to the place where you can come and go at medicine and treatment and care from doctors and have research done and you don't have to pay so there's no money that you have to pay to come here to st jude so how do you treat the cancer well kanter is treated in a lot of different ways and it really depends on what type of cancer it is because we wanna make kind of a perfect treatment or a customised treatment meaning that each patient that has a certain type of kanter is gonna get a type of treatment that's directed towards them and this type of treatment can involve for certain cancers getting some medicines called chemotherapy um that help to treat the cancer cells sometimes we have to do surgery where we go in and actually do in operation and take that cancer out and then sometimes we do something called radiation where we use radiation beams that also are directed towards a cancer cell and so just kinda depends on what type of cancer it is that will help us give the best treatment so i know we're supposed to be talking about cancer but what i heard.

cancer st jude kanter
"cancers" Discussed on Biden's Briefing

Biden's Briefing

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"cancers" Discussed on Biden's Briefing

"Whoa cna biden's briefing the briefing security collection of featured articles essays and toast that i think are worth listening to so here's today still rules no blood test may identify which breast cancers will recur by maryland marquee own san francisco chronicle a blood test five years after breast cancer treatment helped identify some women who were more likely to relapse long before a lump or other signs appeared a preliminary study found it was the largest experiment so far to use the tests called liquid biopsies for breast cancer results suggest they may someday help reveal which women need longer preventive therapy and which ones can be spared it it could be providing an early warning sign for some women that cancer is returning said dr joseph sperone o of modifier einstein center for cancer care in new york on the other hand if you had a negative test there was a ninety eight percent chance you would not have a recurrence in the next two years and perhaps could skip further treatment he said speranza led the study and presented the results friday at the san antonio breast cancer symposium the test cell search sold by men arini silicon biosystems looks for stray cancer cells in the blood breast cancer survivors may be tempted to rush out and get it but doctors say it's still too soon although it's been used for about a decade to monitor certain patients with advanced cancer during treatment its value for helping to predict breast cancer relapse risk is not well established and insurers won't pay the six hundred nine hundred dollarcost the new study should spur more research said doctor massimo christo finale a breast cancer specialist at northwestern university in chicago who has used the tests and consults for another company developing one the study involved 547 women in longterm follow up from an earlier cancer drug study twothirds of them had cancers fueled by estrogen and in most cases it had spread to lymph nodes but not more widely all had surgery and chemo.

cancer new york speranza breast cancer chicago cna biden maryland san francisco chronicle dr joseph sperone san antonio ninety eight percent five years two years
"cancers" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

13:58 min | 5 years ago

"cancers" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"Mayo Clinic Radio. Presents conversation about gynecologic cancers with gynecologist Doctor Jaime Gomez the show hosts? Are Dr Tom Shives? And Tracy McRae. This podcast was recorded on September thirteenth. Twenty sixteen. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic. Radio. I'm Dr Tom Shy. And I'm Tracy mccray Tracy the PAP test you've heard of that. Probably had fewer near day should have and that was developed by a Greek physician by the name of George Patton Nicolau. My wife is Greek. And she's going to really like me for this. So it came into use around the nineteen forties. But actually he had discovered that you could find malignant cells under the microscope. Actually in the twenties or early thirties but nobody never got credit for it. Nobody believed him. Dull around the nineteen forties when it finally came into use. And of course that test is called the PAP test or the PAP smear and is now used worldwide for the detection and the prevention of cancer of the cervix and other diseases of the female reproductive tract. What he did what he showed. Was that by gathering just a few cells from the vagina inside the vagina vaginal tract and looking at them under the microscope. You could actually tell whether or not a woman had cancer of the cervix pretty amazing breakthrough. Absolutely the PAP test changed the lives of millions of women and now researchers are working on a screening test for endometrial cancer. Also known as uterine cancer research funded by the National Cancer Institute and Mayo Clinic is developing a screening method using DNA from a Tampon for early detection and screening of endometrial cancers now unique is that DNA from Tampa. How so and and we're talking about uterine cancer as opposed to cervical cancer and the two are connected but the cervix is just the opening of the of the uterus with baby-boomer is now in the age risk category for endometrial cancer. The number of women diagnosed each year is increasing here to discuss this new minimally invasive screening method for endometrial. Cancer is the woman leading the research. Director Jamie baucom Gomez. Welcome back to the program. Dr Beckham Gomez thank you. Dr baucom Gomez Pretty Exciting stuff and truly unique tell us about this using a Tampon to diagnose endometrial uterine cancer absolutely. We're very excited about this. We've known for decades that abnormal cells from inside the uterus can be picked on picked up on PAP smears but it's not very commonly picked up that way there are other markers that are not naked That are not necessarily visible under the microscope. Such as molecular markers that we can actually now test for these are changes in DNA so DNA mutations DNA methylation which is where the gene is actually turned off because of a change to. What's kind of hanging onto the DNA called methyl groups And we can pick those Those changes up not only in the actual cells that are the cancer cells but when those cancer cells shed and flow down through the cervix into the vagina they can be picked up Those those signals can be picked up on PAP smear and we're actually taking it to the next level of Trying to pick them up on the fluid in the vaginal canal because it's in that fluid it's in that fluid and And the reason that we're focusing on detecting this using a Tampon is data. Tampon is a common hygiene product that most women use in fact The tampon business in the United States in two thousand fifteen one point five billion dollars so we know using using that as a surrogate that this is a very common while accepted collection prod collection device. It's not a special Tampon by any means the kind you just buy it the convenience store. Well we're doing from from the research standpoint we're just using the common over the counter regular about Tampon As we develop this test further a likely be something a little bit more specialized so tell us how this works a you you tell the woman To use a Tampon put a Tampon in and then take it out when and then bring it to you is that how does it work so right now. We have clinical trial open In which we are collecting Tampon samples from women who are coming in with abnormal uterine bleeding That are paramount of puzzle or postmenopausal. So it's still in the research phases And before they have a biopsy to determine whether or not there is what the cause of that admirable pleading is on. We're asking them to collect a Tampon They're doing that in the clinic. We time how long it's been in the vagina because that's also part of the test need to figure out exactly how long it It needs to be in the. What's the minimum amount of time? And then the then the Woman goes on to have her clinically indicated biopsy in. How's it doing so far Well so far we've enrolled almost a thousand patients to that to this clinical trial And we're working on the combination of markers DNA methylation mutation Markers a table a test in prospectively in those in those samples with this sounds were some somewhat similar to Coa guard where you take a stool specimen and look for abnormal DNA DNA. That will tell you whether or not the patient has colon cancer. Same principle absolutely. So guard is a combination of mutations. One mutation and Three methylated genes. And they're all they also look for fecal called Hemoglobin so much a colt hemoglobin doctor. Yep exactly so fecal a call him Gordon. They're looking for blood as well. So but it's a multi target DNA test that is self collected and exactly. That's exactly what we're trying to To do with this type of a test. is develop something that is highly patient accepted something that provides women with high access meaning. They could collect the sample at home and potentially mail it in. That's our ultimate view or ultimate vision. I should say that would make I would imagine. Make a big difference for anybody could take part in that. I mean it could be that someone notices that they're not feeling writer. They've got some symptoms but they don't end up going to see a physician. This would be a good step to get that ball rolling absolutely. We know that decreased access to healthcare Does worsen survival in certain cancers. So that's that is something that we are hoping that ultimately we impact so uterine cancer itself. What are the symptoms? Who's WHO's at risk for this particular problem? Yes so there are very well known. Risk factors for uterine cancer. Obesity is probably one of the largest risk factors for wearing fur and mutual cancer Also having diabetes hypertension Those are also hyperloop. -demia those are risk factors having a family history of Uterine Cancer Colon. Cancer Stomach Cancer Those symptoms those cancers tend to If there are families where you can actually see high numbers of those cancers and that's consider Lynch Syndrome are some families are diagnosed with Lynch Syndrome? Which is a genetic condition that puts women at higher risk for uterine cancer? You don't hear about very many women. Dying of uterine cancer. I know it happens but it must is not all that common so it must be very treatable if you can. Just make the diagnosis right. It is It is fairly treatable especially in early stages early stages typically the treatment surgery alone Even in advanced stages There are potential cures but usually it requires extensive surgery radiation and chemotherapy and the side effects of those are oftentimes long lasting. And what are some of the symptoms of endometrial cancer? Yes so symptoms. Ninety percent of women with endometrial cancer will present with some sort of abnormal bleeding or abnormal vaginal bleeding Postmenopausal women I About Even though ninety percent of women with cancer will present with abnormal vaginal bleeding. Only ten percent of women who come in with postmenopausal bleeding will actually have a cancer. Well that's a good thing. It is a good thing it is but also all of those women undergo an Mitchell biopsy which is an invasive procedure and. We're looking to try to help void that as well. It's it just as interesting just as an exciting just as incredible caller of art so We wish you all the success in the world. But now we'll expand our discussion to other reproductive system cancers because September is gynecologic cancer awareness month so Dr Gomez why Why is Ovarian Cancer? The the worst of all of these so ovarian cancer has kind of a long standing nickname. And that is that. It's the silent killer The signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer can be very vague. Despite the fact that it's already in its advanced stages the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer typically fall into four categories or for For symptoms and that as abdominal bloating distension Change in appetite or society basically getting full fast when you eat Bowel changes Whether it's swinging constipation or diarrhea And then bladder changes Frequency a frequency of urination or urgency. So let's go over those. What's more loading Just WanNa make sure that that all of our listeners have. These bloating is one but that everybody has that at one time or another and you sort of write it off yet. We're talking about something that's constant that's persistent for. You know. Probably more like two weeks or so rather than an intermittent type of process But you're right. That's why these scientists. These symptoms are quite vague. All right and then you had bowel changes Bladder problems and a number two and I had to do with eating society full fast. So is ovarian cancer in a sense somewhat. Like cancer of the pancreas in that because the the ovaries are so deep-seated that tumor has to get fairly large before it does cause any symptoms and by that time it has often metastasized or spread elsewhere. Yeah there are different patterns As far as the spread of ovarian cancer but most often the GI type of symptoms the bowel changes and even the early Feeling full early in a meal. are probably related to the Matassa metastatic deposits that are on the surface of the small intestine large intestine and sometimes even the stomach. So what's this a five year survival rate now for women with ovarian cancer and compare that to? Let's say a decade ago. Are we better? We're better yeah. We've definitely made a lot of progress. I think it's it's hard sometimes to go through to actually dissect what the Five Year. Survival is for ovarian cancer in general because most ovarian cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage One of the most important prognostic aspects is thorough surgery In the beginning of the diagnosis out. Good you can get it all out. That actually improves five year survival And some studies have actually shown that at five years More than fifty percent of women are still alive who were diagnosed with advanced stage disease. Where is it usually go to from the ovary it starts there? Then where does it spread? it likes to go to an organ that's inside. The abdomen called the mental It is an organ that hangs down off of the stomach and large intestine. So it surgery if you can if it's a metal to the surgery hasn't spread to too many places or too far away from the ovaries chemotherapy. And what about radiation is it? Ever part of the regimen radiation used to be part of the regimen for ovarian cancer but it has It has fallen out of favor. Because we've shown that chemotherapy is actually more effective so treatment for ovarian cancer is a combination of surgery and chemotherapy. Sometimes we give chemotherapy first and then surgery in between two courses of chemotherapy. And what's the average age of the woman diagnosed with ovarian cancer most often? The woman that segments with cancer is going to be in her early sixties so it is yes. September being gynecologic cancer awareness month. We've talked about endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer What's up next cervical while cervical cancer? Also one of our specialties. How deadly cervical cancer so cervical cancer actually the mortality in the United States as well as in other developed nations has dramatically decreased with the introduction of the PAP smear Back in the nineteen forties We also now have the vaccine against the Human Papilloma virus which causes most of most cervical cancers That vaccine or those vaccines. I should say because there's actually a series of them that are that are available those vaccines. We don't think we've seen the impact of them yet. because those are vaccines that are currently indicated for For Young Women Ages Eleven and twelve and men too and Manitou. Yup exactly if enough people love of young people get vaccinated weekend pretty much. Wipe out cervical. What percentage of cervical cancers are caused by this virus ATV? Almost all of them are caused by high risk type of virus. Seventy percent are caused by two specific viruses. Hp Sixteen at HP eighteen in the vaccine. Good against both of those. It is all three. Vaccines that are available are include. Hp Sixteen Eighteen. What's hard to believe but women can also get cancer the vagina often. Do you see that so vaginal cancer is much more rare than than cervical cancer but it is also most often caused by those same viruses the HP viruses the key of that HP. It's it really is a cancer vaccine. I think people tried to diminish it a little bit saying Oh it's a sexually transmitted disease thing but it's it really is a cancer vaccine. Yes it is all three of the vaccines that are available are against The include HP sixteen eighteen As.

Cancer Ovarian Cancer uterine cancer endometrial cancer colon cancer National Cancer Institute Dr Beckham Gomez PAP Doctor Jaime Gomez Mayo Clinic United States HP Tracy mccray Tracy Mayo Clinic Radio Dr Tom Shives Dr Tom Shy Tracy McRae Dr baucom Gomez