37 Burst results for "Cancer"

Fresh "Cancer" from WAOK On Air

WAOK On Air

00:43 sec | 49 min ago

Fresh "Cancer" from WAOK On Air

"Like a cancer that states the saint will kick off the second half. It's out of the end zone to our right. Ri chard, watching just whistle over his head out of bounds Touch back to the 25. Let's see now if the Raiders Can continue their moment. Um, that they had and no doubt about it At the end of the first five in what you say they scored 10 points. That last 10 45 45. Now you come out and you get points on this drive. You've changed the complexion of the game in just a few minutes. All right. Here they go. Raiders and black jerseys and silver pants and silver helmets Gonna first down in 10 cars under center too tight ends. His own 25. They're moving on the natural grass here in the dome from our right to our left car looks in a four man front hunched under center against the snap drops back three line drive, throw up by rugs on the painted numbers of the 30 Far side. Jenkins covering incomplete, second down and 10..

Raiders RI Jenkins
Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

Outcomes Rocket

06:24 min | 11 hrs ago

Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

"Welcome back once again, see the outcomes, rocket podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health care leaders. I really WANNA. Thank you for tuning in again and I welcome you to go to outcomes rocket dot health slash reviews where you could rate and review today's podcast because he is one outstanding individual and healthcare is name is Dr Rajiv Kumar he's the president and chief medical officer at Virgin Pulse during medical school he realized that many of the worst health problems we face as a nation diabetes heart disease cancer hypertension. Et, CETERA. I related to the collective unhealthy lifestyle, and so he has pledged to make a difference in this industry. He's done and as a frontline physician and now through various different companies, some amazing things and so what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Raji to fill in any of the gaps of the introduction and then a so we could get into the podcast. Reggie welcome to the PODCAST. Think saw glad to be here. So Rajiv, what would you fill in in your intro that I that I left out? I think that was pretty comprehensive. Just, a little bit about virgin pulse. You know what? I think that may not be familiar name to a lot of folks on your that are listening to your podcast. We are an employee wellbeing company. We work with large employers all around the world, and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system a little bit, and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time, and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction. It really is about how do we help people be? Healthier, happier and more productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners for those of you who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse. One of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentleman like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team, you can imagine some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir Richard Branson leadership in his philosophy is if you take care of your employees, they'll take care of your business, and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees. So strong, and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs, it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. What are your thoughts on what should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well, I'm biased but I think it has to be a behavior change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity, diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day, there's so much. We can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet, our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves, and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic I. Think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior, we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie. What would you say right now at at at Virgin? Pulse. Is an example of how you guys are improving health outcomes. Well, I think we really tried to think outside of the box I think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective and they've been around for decades. So we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like they're failures rather than telling them that they're sick what if we actually make them feel successful what if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat what would that do for self esteem for their motivation and for their ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening, and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth, and the problem with that is they take a health risk assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk, your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle, get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating, and so we've said is, is there a scientist out there? Is there a behavior change model that focuses on success? We found a scientist by the name of Dr Bj fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. Equals motivation times, ability times a trigger, and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do. First of all, they have to have the motivation to do it. Second is they have to have the ability to do it, and a third is you have to trigger them. To trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space, we ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability. So we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. Each time you go that takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability a really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says, well, motivation is hard to change. Your motivation waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis, we can't really change somebody's motivation that easily what you can do is changed the behavior you're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action, and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do. That very easily, it doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do, and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it, you can help them build what we call success momentum, and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change, we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action we ask people to do that would trigger then and then when they do it we. Reward them make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some kind of points or some kind of reward, and then we ask them to do something harder the next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum, and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way, which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits.

Dr Rajiv Kumar Virgin Pulse Sir Richard Branson Reggie Dr Fog Scientist Virgin Group Dr Bj Fog Raji President Trump Medical Officer Stanford University Executive
Fresh update on "cancer" discussed on Phil's Gang

Phil's Gang

02:03 min | 51 min ago

Fresh update on "cancer" discussed on Phil's Gang

"Come on Keith Peters the president plans to make a Supreme Court pick by Saturday. President Donald Trump isn't wasting any time on filling the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Speaking to reporters outside the White House Monday afternoon, the president said, We'll make a decision, probably Saturday, but Friday or Saturday If Trump follows through with his timeline, he'll announce the nomination before Ginsberg is buried in a private service at Arlington National Cemetery next week. Mike Rossi, a Washington president, Trump met Monday. Hey, with Amy Cockney Barrett at the White House as the conservative judge emerged as an early favorite for the Supreme Court. Meanwhile, the body of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg will lie in repose this week at the Supreme Court. Supreme Court has announced. Ginsberg's casket will arrive in front of the court just before 9:30 A.m. Wednesday. At that time, a private ceremony will take place in the court's great home that gathering to include Ginsberg's family, close friends and members of the court. After that, her body will lie in repose under the portico of the top of the front steps of the Supreme Court building to allow for public viewing outdoors. The public is invited to pay their respects in front of the building on Wednesday and Thursday. Ensberg passed away on Friday at age 87 after a long battle with pancreatic cancer buying your reporting stocks fell sharply on Wall Street Monday. BBC correspondent Andrew Walker points to a global tumble for market's rising numbers of Corona virus. Infections in some countries in Europe are already being reflected in new official restrictions. Stock market investors a concern that there will be more such measures on that commercial activity will be undermined in both the US and Europe industry. Such travel and hotels have seen mark declines in share prices. Those are areas that were hit very hard earlier in the pandemic. Banks have also been affected by the set off on Wall Street. The Dow down by 509 points that NASDAQ dropped 14 the SNP lower by 38. More on these stories at townhall dot com. Way ever forget that we're one nation under God. Then we will be a nation going under that time for a spiritual awakening. I need to be the man that God made me to be one nation under God, the inspiring new movie so relevant to our times that it's a topic being discussed in this week's news. Our founding fathers Scott in the center of our Nation, Shouldn't you have a place in our school system and in the government Starring Kevin Sorbo, Antonio Sabato Jr and football Great Walker. We can do anything with faith. We.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg President Donald Trump President Trump White House Europe Keith Peters Amy Cockney Barrett Arlington National Cemetery Mike Rossi Antonio Sabato Jr Ensberg Kevin Sorbo Washington Andrew Walker United States BBC Scott
Judge dreadthe fight for Ruth Bader Ginsburgs seat

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:29 min | 16 hrs ago

Judge dreadthe fight for Ruth Bader Ginsburgs seat

"On Friday US Supreme Court. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died of cancer at the age of eighty seven. A candlelit vigil was held the following day outside the Supreme Court. Justice. GINSBURG was only the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court after being nominated by Bill Clinton in one thousand, nine hundred. I. In. Solemnly swear he was a champion of women's rights, and later in life she achieved restore status especially among young women. Now her death has set the stage for a divisive battle to replace her on the court. She was born in Brooklyn to an immigrant Father Dad was from Odessa in in Russia and to a first generation mother she was Jewish John. Fascination is the economist Washington correspondent and she was a trailblazer throughout her life. She was one of only nine women among five hundred men at Harvard law school, and when she arrived. Erwin griswold, who was then the Dean asked women in the class to stand up and justify taking a spot that could have gone to a man. She said the reason she took the spot is it was important that she understood her husband's work that would've made her husband Marty last Mardi was tax attorney well known in his own right he predeceased her but they had a famously loving and productive and equal partnership. She had a relentless work ethic in. Twenty five years in the Supreme Court she never missed today she's arrived four bouts of cancer before this fifth one killed her it was only after she got sick that she called by phone to oral arguments. I. Think People often have this idea that Supreme Court justices are sort of Stentorian wizards ready to shout down lawyer who they disagree with justice. GINSBURG was not like that she spoke very slowly very deliberately, which mirrors I think how she wrote and how she argued and how she thought she was meticulous. She was precise she she was not a showy justice. She came onto the court actually considered a moderate. There are a lot of people on the left who were upset when she was appointed because she was considered sort of two centrist. But as the court steadily moved rightward during her tenure, she has found herself the de facto leader of the courts liberal wing. Junk she spent a long time on the court. What did she achieve? Well, she was on the Supreme Court for Twenty seven years, and before that was on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals, which is widely considered the second most important court in America for for thirteen. So she was a judge for forty years I was age sixty when I was nominated in some people thought I was. Too Old for the job. Now I'm into my twenty-seventh starting my twenty-seventh year on the courts on one of the longest tenured. Justices. So if you worried about my age. It was unnecessary. Before that, she argued six cases before the Supreme Court and she was involved with thirty more as the first director of the US women's rights project. The first of those report court cases was in Reid versus Reid for which she wrote a brief arguing against the law in Ohio that preferred men to women in naming executive estates. She won that case in her first oral argument before the Supreme Court. She argued against the military policy that denied many husbands, officers, the same housing and medical benefits that automatically provided officers. Wise. The thinking was that women are somehow inherently more dependent on their husbands and husbands on their wise. Now, in that case, remember she effectively represented the husband she represented family but she represented the shoes argue in favor of the husband's benefits and she austin said that she was not arguing for women's rights she was arguing for the constitutional equality of men and women. Her death is come at a critical time in American politics. It's just six weeks away from the election. So what impact does that have? Well I think it's a little too early to say that definitively. It looks as though both sides are gearing up for battle, but they seem to be quietly circling each other in two thousand sixteen. The Supreme Court is central to Donald Trump's success I think because. There is an open seat in two thousand, Sixteen Justice Antonin Scalia died, and Mitch McConnell who is then the Senate minority leader rather than hold a hearing on Barack Obama's chosen replacement for Justice Scalia whose Merrick Garland he came up with a rationale disguises the principle which was that the causing election was coming up the speech beheld open. So the voters could decide now that had never been done before it was clearly a power play. It was a live sort of issue for Republicans impelled I think a lot of them who otherwise would have held donald trump at arm's length to decide that just had to vote for him this time I. Think Donald Trump is hoping for a similar effect this time, but he also wants to get the filled as quickly as possible. For Democrats donations had started pouring in, they have been pouring all weekend. Democrats seem riled up by this. I think in their view if Donald Trump managed to get a successor onto the court, this'll be the seconds effectively stolen seat right? The I was Neil Gorsuch. who was given the seat that was held open by Mitch McConnell, and the second would be whoever donald trump nominees to replace justice GINSBURG who gets the seat because Mitch McConnell did not follow the principle he set up in two thousand sixteen. John Do you think Senate. Republicans have the numbers to they have the votes to get in trump's nominee through before the election. Well this is the question on everyone's mind. Right so far Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski Republican senators from from Maine Alaska, had said that they will not vote for replacement before November third they have said that the president who wins on November third you choose the replacement now that only gets Democrats to forty nine and they need fifty one because in the case of a tie Mike. Pence cast the tiebreaking vote Lindsey Graham had previously said he would abide by Mitch McConnell's rule from twenty sixteen. He has now gone back on that apparently because he's angry Democrats didn't roll over for Brad Cavanaugh Chuck. Grassley, who's a senator from Iowa has also previously spoken in favor of McConnell's precedent. I, have a very hard time imagining that when push comes to shove, he'll stand by his. Word and so there really is nothing Democrats can do unless they can persuade two other Republicans to come join them, and if they can't persuade those Republicans and tip the balance what happens. Then what are the consequences for the years ahead on American politics? It's clear that what McConnell did in two thousand sixteen was a tremendous violation of norms I think it's not a good principal to. Uphold I think arguing that this is now how Supreme Court seats should be awarded that in an election year, you effectively have to hold the seat open until the end of the election is a bad precedent but I think there's a difference between saying Republicans should be consistent for the sake of consistency and Republicans should follow this principle because that's how court seat should be given out now. From the Democratic Base, there's been a tremendous push to threaten Republicans with repercussions if. Retake. The Senate and the president in that includes making Puerto Rico in Washington DC states, which would effectively at least in the near in medium-term Give Democrats four senators people have also been talking about expanding the court. So the reason they are Nice Ring Court justices is not constitutional legal. It's just a statute. So if they were minded and had a majority had a president who would sign it into law, they put eleven or thirteen justices on the supreme court. The problem with that for Democrats I think is that it sort of shifts the terms. Of the debate that they are now winning I think the way Joe, Biden has pitched. This campaign is on the one hand. You have the sort of chaotic destructive Donald Trump on the other. You have Joe Biden Palm known figure who will get us back to normal. If, he comes out and endorses expanding the court or State of DC in Puerto Rico, which to be clear he has not done. He is actually a opposed expanded from court but if he comes out if Democrats threaten this, then the debate becomes a lot murkier. Then it becomes the radical change that Joe Biden wants to do right take fifty, two states and putting thirteen on Supreme Court against Donald Trump will keep things as are I think that debate does not play out very well for Democrats. John Thank you very much time.

Supreme Court Donald Trump Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Mitch Mcconnell Dc Circuit Court Of Appeals United States Joe Biden Senator Senate Justice Antonin Scalia Democrats John Bill Clinton President Trump Erwin Griswold Harvard Law School Brooklyn Puerto Rico Odessa Washington
Portman;s Statement on Supreme Court Vacancy

Ric Edelman

00:51 sec | 1 d ago

Portman;s Statement on Supreme Court Vacancy

"Ohio Senator Rob Portman on Saturday night released a statement that said he looks forward to seeing who President Trump plans to nominee Eight and thoroughly assessing his or her qualifications for the important role of replacing you've a Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. His statement observed that in the more than two dozen vacancies of the U. S Supreme Court during a presidential election year over U S history, the sitting president made a nomination every time Mary Jane Trap, a justice on the Ohio Court of Appeals told three news in Cleveland. The Ginsburg seemed indestructible. It was disbelieve because we always thought that Justice Ginsburg was super woman. She had battled cancer so many different cancers and surgeries. Ginsberg died Friday at the age of 87 after a multi year battle with cancer,

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court U. S Supreme Court Senator Rob Portman Ohio Court Of Appeals President Trump Cancer Mary Jane Trap Ohio Ginsberg Cleveland
New Yorkers Pay Tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg Outside Downtown Courthouse

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

New Yorkers Pay Tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg Outside Downtown Courthouse

"People gathered outside a lower Manhattan courthouse last night to pay tribute to the memory of trailblazing Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Corners, played music lit candles and placed flowers outside 60 Center Street to pay their respects to the Brooklyn born feminist who died of cancer Friday at age 87 outside the Supreme Court. Mourners gathering to pay tribute to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg inspiration So many so many people, a pop culture icon who became known as the Notorious RBG, New York's governor, Andrew Cuomo, directing landmarks across his state be lit up with blue, the color of justice. Announcing Justice Ginsberg will be honored with a statue in her hometown of Brooklyn

Justice Ginsberg Supreme Court Brooklyn Andrew Cuomo Manhattan New York
Democrats break fundraising records after Ginsburg's death

WBZ Morning News

01:02 min | 1 d ago

Democrats break fundraising records after Ginsburg's death

"Bader Ginsburg, closer look from ABC is George Stephanopoulos. Traditionally, you've had more conservatives who seem energized by the idea of a Supreme Court pick. Then progressives and Democrats. But, you know, in the early indications coming since the death of Justice Ginsburg could she could suggest that that is changing huge contributions, breaking all kinds of records Friday night Teo organizations that are working to like Democratic senators. Democratic House members on the political battle over who will succeed Justice. Ginsberg is heating up less than Two days days after after after the the the the justice justice justice justice died died died died from from from from complications complications complications complications of of of of cancer cancer cancer cancer at at at at the the the the age age age age of of of of 87. 87. 87. 87. President President President President Trump Trump Trump Trump says says says says he he he he will will will will nominate nominate nominate nominate a a a a woman woman woman woman while while while while Democrats Democrats Democrats Democrats are are are are battling battling battling battling to to to to delay delay delay delay the process. Publicans will now have to figure out if they have enough votes in the Senate to confirm that nominee by election Day, but it would have to move at a rapid pace. On average. It takes about 70 days for a nomination to get through the Senate were less than 45 days out. From Election Day. That's ABC is Rachel Scott reporting that busy

Trump Trump Trump Trump Justice Ginsburg Democrats President Trump ABC Senate George Stephanopoulos Supreme Court Democratic House Rachel Scott Ginsberg
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Dies At 87

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 2 d ago

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Dies At 87

"She was a civil rights and women's rights legend who in her ninth decade became a pop culture icon. Last night's pancreas cancer deaths of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at age 87. Is being called an election year game changer. It's ah scenario that Democrats have been dreading one that made the justice stay on Three years after her planned retirement. She was just the second woman to serve on the U. S Supreme Court. But Ruth Bader Ginsburg is true legacy may be as the legal architect of the equal rights movement. She graduated at the top of her class at Columbia Law School, not a law firm. In the entire city of New York. Big for my employment as a lawyer. Eventually, she was hired by the American Civil Liberties Union. There she would help lead a movement that changed the nation challenging laws that treated men and women differently in employment, housing and government benefit. Correspondent Karen

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg American Civil Liberties Union Columbia Law School U. S Supreme Court New York Karen
Ginsburg's death sets up tense political fight over replacement

Inside Out with Tami Michaels

01:29 min | 2 d ago

Ginsburg's death sets up tense political fight over replacement

"A champion of women's rights and other causes, has died from complications related to metastatic pancreatic cancer. The high court made the sad announcement late yesterday. President Bill Clinton appointed Ginsberg to the bench in 1993, the first appointment by a Democrat in 26 years and just the second woman ever on the Supreme Court comas Tammy Matanza reports on the tributes coming in. It is a sad day for America, Losing a feminist icon and champion for civil rights and touching tributes have been pouring in across the feeds near Journey. Durkin just tweeting this a short time ago, saying Devastating, Ah pioneer who inspired so many particularly young girls. We must extend her legacy by continuing the fight for true equity for upholding the Constitution and for a country that lives up to its promise. Now, just a skins. Berg's death is just 45 days before the presidential election, which means the Supreme Court Hasn't open seat comma political analyst Ron Dots Our says the implications will be huge that he believes the process for her replacement should be a careful consideration. But I think the politics of it the way this lines up. It would be very, very risky for the GOP in the Senate to try to ram through A nominee before November, 3rd. Now I put the emphasis on November 3rd because all bets are off after the elections. Let's go. Most damning Matanza reporting. The great wheel was dark last

Supreme Court Tammy Matanza Pancreatic Cancer Bill Clinton Durkin GOP Ron Dots Political Analyst America President Trump Berg Ginsberg Senate
Trump, Obama respond to Ginsburg's death

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

Trump, Obama respond to Ginsburg's death

"Past in present on the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg In a statement, President Trump called her a titan of the law and fighter to the very end, he says Ginsberg, known for her brilliant mind and powerful descent, showed that one could disagree without being disagreeable toward one's colleagues colleagues or or different different points points of of view. view. President President also also says says her her opinions opinions regarding regarding equality equality inspired inspired Americans Americans and and generations generations of of great great legal legal minds. minds. Meantime, Meantime, a a relentless litigator and incisive juris is what former President Barack Obama is saying about Ginsberg. Mr Obama in a statement, saying the late justice inspired generations from the tiniest trick or treaters toe law students burning the midnight oil to the most powerful leaders in the land. He says Ginsberg should be remembered for fighting to the very end of her life through her cancer. With unwavering faith in our democracy and its ideals at the steps of the

Ginsberg Barack Obama President Trump Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court
Who Will Replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg? McConnell Vows Vote

KYW 24 Hour News

01:19 min | 2 d ago

Who Will Replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg? McConnell Vows Vote

"Political shift is looming over America's highest court with last night's death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg would come the pancreatic cancer at age 87. Correspondent Steve Futterman takes a look back. She was just fine foot one but was a giant in the U. S Supreme Court. She became a justice in 1993 and loved her job the best but also the hottest job that I ever had. After her death was announced, people gathered at the high court to pay tribute. She was a legend, well beyond her time on the floor as much impacted skins Berg head on the court. She was prominent before her appointment. CBS's Major Garrett she was part of a litigation team that brought a case that changed American law. No discrimination on the basis of sex. There is a movie about this and about her advocacy for that position. President Trump had praised for Ginsburg. What else can you say she was an amazing woman. Now the battle over her replacement. Democrats say the appointment should be made by whoever wins the election in November, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Freeze, insisting President Trump's nominee will get a vote on the Senate floor. Four years ago, He put off a confirmation vote for then nominee Merrick Garland, noting Antonin Scalia's death came too close to the presidential election. Scalia died in February.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg U. S Supreme Court President Trump Antonin Scalia Steve Futterman Senate Majority Senate Mitch Mcconnell Merrick Garland America CBS Major Garrett
McConnell says Trump's Supreme Court nominee will receive a Senate vote

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:10 min | 2 d ago

McConnell says Trump's Supreme Court nominee will receive a Senate vote

"Fly from NPR news. I'm Giles Snyder. Several Republican senators are lining up in support of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is plan to vote on the nominee to replace Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. NPR's Kelsey Snell reports. McConnell has not given a timeline for replacing Ginsberg, who died yesterday from complications of cancer majority leader McConnell hasn't said if he plans to hold a vote on an eventual nominee before the election in November. Much of the timing will depend on how quickly President Trump announces his pick. Supreme Court nominees undergo a lengthy process before an eventual vote on the Senate floor. Typically that involves one on one meetings with senators completing a lengthy questionnaire and extensive background checks all before public hearings and a vote in the Senate Judiciary Committee. McConnell says Republicans were elected on a promise to fill federal court vacancies. Republicans have overseen a broad reshaping of the federal bench in recent years, approving more than 200 of President Trump's judicial nominees. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington Top Democrats say Senator McConnell set a historical precedent when he refused to allow a vote in

Senator Mcconnell Kelsey Snell Supreme Court NPR President Trump Senate Majority Senate Judiciary Committee Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Senate Giles Snyder Ginsberg Washington
McConnell: Trump pick to replace Ginsburg on Supreme Court will get Senate vote

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:52 sec | 2 d ago

McConnell: Trump pick to replace Ginsburg on Supreme Court will get Senate vote

"Are flying at half staff this weekend in honor of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died yesterday of complications from metastatic cancer. She was 87 reaction to her death is pouring in from across the country, including here in Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti calls it a huge loss for the country. For all Americans of every background was a hero, somebody who was a Trailblazer when women weren't supposed to become lawyers. Let alone to become law professors at some of the most important cases that we saw before she became a Supreme Court. Justice begins work, Death highlights and immediate vacancy on the Supreme Court, which Senator Majority leader Mitch McConnell wasted no time and addressing Justin Hour After news of her death, Khan will declare that Trump's nominee would receive a phone. Republican controlled Senate did not give President Barack Obama's pick a vote in the months ahead of the 2016 election.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Eric Garcetti Metastatic Cancer Mitch Mcconnell Barack Obama Los Angeles Justin Hour Senate Senator Donald Trump Khan President Trump
Ginsburg's death ushers new battle into chaotic 2020 election cycle

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:40 min | 2 d ago

Ginsburg's death ushers new battle into chaotic 2020 election cycle

"NPR News on Giles Snyder. President Trump has said to campaign this evening in North Carolina with the Supreme Court in the spotlight, Political battle is shaping out following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at age 87. She died of cancer. Yesterday. Ginsberg was a champion of women's rights, both as a law professor and as a Supreme Court justice here, she is explaining why In this interview from last year. I do think that I was born under a very bright stone because you think my life I get out of law school. I have come grieves. No law firm in the city of New York will hire me and teaching that gave me time to devote to the movement for Evening at the rights of Women and men crowd gathered outside the Supreme Court last night. Two more injustice. Ginsburg from member station W. AM you Jenny Gathright reports America, Murphy says she was one of the first people to come to the Supreme Court to reflect on the news that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg had died. Then the crowd swelled to hundreds. Murphy says she thinks it's important that people showed up as a visual reminder of their support for women's reproductive rights and other ideals. Ginsberg stood for We're not going anywhere, regardless of who is placed In her in her spot and who was elected that we're not gonna move That was the night of many in the crowd say they're bracing themselves for the political battle over Ginsberg, successor on the bench. For NPR News. I'm Jenny Gathright in Washington. Democrats

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Npr News Jenny Gathright Giles Snyder President Trump North Carolina Murphy Washington Professor New York America
'Notorious RBG:' Ginsburg transcended the court to become a pop culture icon

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

01:50 min | 2 d ago

'Notorious RBG:' Ginsburg transcended the court to become a pop culture icon

"Calling Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a relentless litigator and an incisive jurist who inspired generations from the tidy ist tricker treaters toe law students burning the midnight oil to the most powerful leaders in the country. Ginsberg died Friday from cancer complications at the TV at the age of 87 News nation reporting, The Ginsburg felt that equal rights for all is critical. I have three granddaughters like to be take able to take out my pocket constitution and say that the equal citizenship stature of many women He's a fundamental tenet of our society. Illinois politicians weighing in on the pass is passing of justice skins. Berg Mayor Lori Lightfoot said. Ginsberg represented the finest among lawyers in our country, Governor Pritzker said. America has lost a Nikon. And our legacy will endure and 11 district 11th District U. S. Congressman Bill Foster said Ginsburg was truly a pioneer in the legal world and an American hero. Ginsburg was the second woman to sit on the high court, joining Sandra Day O'Connor in 1993. She went on to become its longest serving woman in history. She was also the first female Jewish justice indefinitely. A Liberace two skins, Berg won the respect of many conservatives with her grasp of the law and her carefully crafted opinion. And as the court shifted to the right, her scathing Descents elevated her to a pop culture icon, inspiring legions of young I'm fans and feminists to emulate her famous outspokenness 25 24 3 and her fitness routines, earning her the hip hop inspired nickname Notorious RBG. That's a B C's

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Ginsberg Berg Lori Lightfoot U. S. Congressman Bill Foster Governor Pritzker Nikon Illinois Sandra Day America
Ruth Bader Ginsburg: US Supreme Court judge dies of cancer, aged 87

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

00:44 sec | 2 d ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: US Supreme Court judge dies of cancer, aged 87

"The nation is mourning the loss of you, a Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She lost her long battle against cancer on Friday. She was 87. ABC is Aaron Carter Ski looks back at her life. Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a legal pioneer. Long before she was nominated to the Supreme Court in 1993 by President Bill Clinton. I am proud to nominate for associate justice of the Supreme Court. Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg. At her confirmation hearing, Ginsberg addressed head on her support of abortion rights. This is Something central to a woman's. Life to her dignity. Ginsberg was the court's eldest justice and once joked, emulating John Paul Stevens, who retired at age 90, Aaron Carter Ski,

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Aaron Carter Ski Ginsberg President Bill Clinton John Paul Stevens ABC Cancer
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court's Feminist Icon, Is Dead at 87

AP News Radio

01:06 min | 2 d ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court's Feminist Icon, Is Dead at 87

"Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg leaves a legacy as a champion for women's rights even in her final months eighty seven year old Ruth pater Ginsburg was fighting for women's rights arguing in favor of insurance coverage for contraception despite religious objections from the little sisters of the poor this was the court session in may held online because of the pandemic with Ginsberg in the hospital that day with gall bladder issues yes Austin currently through the wound what was so it was essential that women be providing the service services and with no hassles another significant opinion on nineteen ninety six ruling that ordered the Virginia military institute to accept women Ginsburg was nicknamed the notorious RBG for her defense of equal rights for women and minorities her cause of death was listed as complications from pancreatic cancer Jackie Quinn Washington

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Ginsberg Austin Virginia Military Institute Jackie Quinn Washington Supreme Court
U.S. Supreme Court's Ginsburg, a Liberal Dynamo, Championed Women's Rights

WTOP 24 Hour News

04:01 min | 3 d ago

U.S. Supreme Court's Ginsburg, a Liberal Dynamo, Championed Women's Rights

"Of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She's passed away at the age of 87 from complications from cancer. A little earlier, I spoke with the U of D. C is executive director Monica Hopkins about the legacy of Justice. Ginsburg, obviously like much of the nation were saddened and shocked to hear of the passing of Justice Ginsburg She devoted so much of her life and career to advance in the quality girl. It gives us time to think about her legacy. Both weapon. The A C l U, but parasol she was dedicated to ensuring that we understood about equality wasn't just about getting women. They're equal rights but that it actually have impact were the sexes in total talk a little more about how she worked with the Luo and made some achievements for women's rights. Prior to starting the women's rights project Up the hill, you she actually served as professor Rutgers law. And she, additionally thought important legal battles before the Supreme Court back establish the foundation for currently legal prohibitions against sex discrimination. And then in 1972 later, Ginsberg sounded today. So you women's rights project. And she directed that project throughout the decade of the 19 seventies, but case after case to the Supreme Court and also establishing constitutional protections against sex discrimination, and you know her legacy continues today. Throughout the feelings, work to advance women's equality and employment and education and housing, and in all It's just it is. She was a Supreme Court justice, which is such a monumental achievement, right? But she was so much more than that. He really waas so much more than that. It's securely interesting she became. I've heard and seen, And then the news people calling her a feminist icon. You can see people now carrying tote bags with state against Bird's image on it, she has come to symbolize Stalwart and dedicated vision of equality and what could be achieved through the law. Her legacy she just had such a dramatic and lasting impact. Not only I think on the Supreme Court, but in the lives of many women across the country, and it's great to see that multiple generations have been graced her legacy and what she accomplished on the port and you mention her becoming a cultural icon. It's really fascinating to me because I don't think we can say that about any other Supreme Court justice ever. I mean, there may have been T shirts with faces on them and things but not to this degree. Yeah, One of the things that I think about is the quiet power up Justice Ginsberg had and how she You know, would wear her descent color, which became in pop. I can obviously you know, you see necklaces with her descent color on a she would wear that on days when the court where she would descend on DH. All of those little things but sort of picked up on by people who not only followed exactly what the court was doing, or may have read the brief stores things like that. But I understood some of these decisions and how decisions that are made with the law. And at the highest level of the court of our land. Ah, really impact our lives. Monica Hopkins Thie, executive director of the U of D C sports at

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Executive Director Monica Hopkins Monica Hopkins Thie D. C Professor Bird
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court Justice, dead at 87

Todd Schnitt

00:38 sec | 3 d ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court Justice, dead at 87

"Of a Supreme Court justice Only Scylla. Sarah, the Supreme Court says Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died of med attacks pancreatic cancer. Fallon Lee, where the second woman to serve on the United States Supreme Court, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, was nominated by President Bill Clinton in 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I believe the nation is getting a justice. Who will be a guardian of liberty for all Americans and an insurer of equal justice under law, a staunch advocate of women's rights, Ginsberg devoted much of her legal legacy fighting for gender equality and civil rights.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg United States Supreme Court Fallon Lee Bill Clinton Sarah Ginsberg President Trump
Ruth Bader Ginsburg's last wish: 'I will not be replaced until a new president is installed'

John Howell

01:58 min | 3 d ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's last wish: 'I will not be replaced until a new president is installed'

"Bader Ginsburg has died. Of complications from pancreatic cancer. Ginsberg was a Ah ah liberal icon 87 years old. She had been on the court for 27 years, She had been an architect for women's rights Back in the 19 seventies. She's been battling cancer for a long time. And now tonight The U. S. Supreme Court has announced that Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died of complications from cancer. And of course this is going to be a big Big issue. In a presidential race that was already filled John how with huge huge issues, So now the question is Will President Trump try to get Ah New justice on the Supreme Court before you know the candlesticks of this previous His previous policy of not bringing that up during a presidential election election right during the election cycle. Yeah, that's what he said in 2016 with Mary Garland. Antonin Scalia died, right. Right. So so, yeah, that we'll see. I've noticed people switch sides from time to time is situational ethics are definitely alive. Politically, aren't they? Yes, so we shall see. This is really going to disappoint. My sister was a big fan. She's an attorney in Michigan. But she was constantly centime. Excerpts from Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Down and down and then wanted me to read Maura about her and and so on and so forth. So, yeah, Breaking news is Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Eiji, seven years old battle pancreatic cancer for a long time Supreme Court announced just minutes ago that she has passed away Big topic conversation over the weekend. We'll be back on it. Gonna show apparently dictated this statement to her granddaughter as she is, her strength waned in the last few days. Quote my most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until the new president is installed.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg U. S. Supreme Court Pancreatic Cancer Ginsberg Attorney Antonin Scalia John Eiji President Trump Mary Garland Michigan Maura
"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

01:44 min | 6 d ago

"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Them themselves in their family need to take a particular part of the minimum website which is corona virus hub, and we try to respond to the content on there in response to the questions that come through the support line I'm won't and. Dating on a very regular basis. However, we do also make sure that we've got the Gulf Dot UK links on there because you know sometimes as we now announcements made on a Saturday evening and again, coming back to you and your individual care be guided by your healthcare teams and the information that is being sent to you about any specifics and that relate to you. and. So I I think those would be the things that I would suggest in in terms of making sure that you have got absolutely the right information that is personalized for you. Rosie Mark Thank you so unbelievably helpful I really you know there's so much in there to take away it's been a pleasure speaking to you both take care. Thank you. Thanks. Thanks summer. Thanks again to rosy mark for taking the time to speak with me today for more information on the topics discussed in this episode, make sure you head tone website, McMillan dot org dot, UK food slash talking cancer for resources advice and support. It's also where you can find out more about donating to Macmillan in our next episode talking about managing your mental health through the pandemic subscribe. If you'd like to hear that an every new episode whenever it's ready and if you enjoy the series, why not give it a rating or a review, it helps others find the podcast more easily I'm GonNa be and talking cancer is Macmillan cancer support..

Gulf Dot UK Macmillan Rosie Mark UK
"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

04:12 min | 5 months ago

"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"My mom came with me to every single appointment. She's driven me to hospital. She's hey with me today in. London says dishes so she's got involved. She wanted me to move in with them. I've got a dog who sometimes I can't walk because of the chemotherapy the Amazon and the side effects got the looked after the dog. So they've got involved wholeheartedly. Really did you feel as well? I mean it's something that's kind of coming through. It's quite common taking somebody with you. Indifferent pair of ears really helps to to properly understand what's being said exactly some of whom turns up. She's got little notepad that she writes. She writes down in the Middle Pad and then with the departments that have had you have the appointment with the doctor and also you McMillan. Nason there as well. The the doctors doctor talk she kind of understand but not everything. Then go to another room with Melanin. Andy McMillan nist gives to in Layman's terms makes it more digestible already. Bite size and then minimum our notebook and says this in Comanche about Mason. What could this mean another last year? It's good to have somebody else there. I mean you know this. This is the thing though. Isn't it a New York you know you're used to these environments your the new vocabulary that comes pouring out when you had your first meeting with your oncologist? That was to confirm your diagnosis and to start talking about how they wanted to treat it. Yes so what was said at that first meeting about how they hoped to treat it so by that point at. Hutt my foam diagnosis. So I knew there are definitely cancer and the meteorologist. He basically just explained the type of Kmart. Beyond and what that chemotherapy medication consisted of. And what side effects had probably encounter is just a barrage of information. And it's it's funny until you either have. Cancer are some media? Family has cancer. Are you work in an environment or company that million the involved in cancer? You don't really realize how many chemotherapies the out there you just presume. It's like that's a mall. Everybody has chemotherapy. How did you find out that there were different forms chemotherapy? We told or was it something that you observed found out a thing. Yeah just research online really and also when you go and chemotherapy you in obey with a number of the of the people and above them is a whiteboard with their name and what chemotherapy that on and you look around and nobody is on the same thing and he was like. Oh my gosh. There were so many different types obviously because it needs to be specific to the person and specific to the cancer. You just don't realize it is so I open is yeah. I didn't know that either I did. You know you just wouldn't know exactly so is so eye opening and is partly consideration of the treatment. The you know the kind of person that you are obviously age. What you do you know can we? Can You keep working? Can you know keep working? Are you moving around because tell me tell us then about the treatment that that you eventually agreed on view? The chemotherapy that I'm on is called Flt L. O. F. Teams Ninety for that type of sorry and basically it's an acronym. Epilepsy is mid perform different medications. And I get every two weeks for two days and I have a four times. So it's a period of eight weeks 'em and basically going to hospital on day one and have three medications and then because the chemotherapy that I'm on I come home with off which is in a pump. Which is we expect it to be full of cogs and battery operated or plugged in. But he's just looks like a baby's bottle okay. There's a balloon inside of it yet fully medication and basically the balloon slowly. I guess deflate and push easy medication now. So how was it administered to you? So I've got a pick line in which is basically a Catheter. Straightens in my vein. Okay which is there the whole time. Okay and I'm just so it's just above my elbow a bit. Different to be higher than you would hubbard taken from. And yes. He basically carrying around this baby's bottle full of chemotherapy for twenty four hours and then a district..

Cancer Andy McMillan Nason Amazon Flt L. O. F. Teams Ninety London Kmart Hutt hubbard New York Family
"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

12:58 min | 5 months ago

"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"We're talking cancer with Ben. There was a nurse that came over to me introduce expecting along things on a look down a name Badge and seven Macmillan on it without my God things to start really really real really quickly. Two days after his fortieth birthday benzedrine was told he had cancer of the esophagus. The tube that connects your mouth to your stomach and for someone who loved his food like Ben. It was a devastating blow. We all eat together and I was suddenly taken away from not everybody else would be finishing and it would really highlight to me. I'm not well and I'm not normal anymore. Physically Ben who is a nurse himself is now on Chemo. At the end of which he's going to have surgery to rebuild part of his esophagus. You don't really realize how many chemotherapies the row out there. You just presume. It's like a Paracetemol. We talked about the INS and outs of his treatment. The information he received beforehand and we talked about living with cancer and all the things that keep him going like cooking and baking and later Dany one million professionals is joining me to talk about the treatments available when cancer is diagnosed is mind boggling but they are fairly standard treatment regimes for different types of cancer. Women Millan and we're talking cancer Ben Welcome..

Ben Women Millan Macmillan Dany Chemo Paracetemol
"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

11:24 min | 6 months ago

"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Being so honest with us. It's hugely appreciated. Thank you Bob Dany Fabulous McMillan. Professional is back with me. First of all Dina Max. What a what a story what do you make of how him and his family have dealt with it I mean so many practical tips in there from things that they've done that feel like their original that you could put different slot tone but absolutely amazing How how they dealt with as a family and again experiences very different for different individuals for different families. What are the most common questions that you get About end of life so I think A common question people often ask themselves And family members often debate is how long how long have I got left to live? When they know their time is limited and and that's very difficult because some people ask the question on perhaps they don't really want to know the answer and I think it's always very difficult to give a very specific time And I worked with Palliative care consultant. Who was very good at doing this? And she always used to double check that they actually wanted the answer but then she would say whether she thought they had weeks or months and she So she didn't say you have two weeks or you know she just say. I think it's going to be very few weeks. And I think that gives a good indication without being specific so people are taking the days off on the calendar and getting very upset anxious in those days as well. Max described very eloquently This pre grieving process that I completely related to Give some explanation of what that is. What what he meant by that. I mean he really articulated it. Really well Will you know you're going to lose someone but you don't know when and so you you start the grieving process in in essence and that's different for for everyone in terms of shock. Fear Anger acceptance. There's very good literature around the grieving process. And some people experience all of that some people only one of those things but in essence. It's about you coming to terms with the fact that you're gonNA lose your loved one owner on a practical level. I think because we've mentioned you know when you're in this huge emotional turmoil. Structure is is helpful. What if somebody's just received an end of life diagnosis? What sort of kicks in? How what what steps should people expect? on what would happen. Generally to kind of help them through that I think the most important thing. And that's why Max story is just so important is is being able to talk and I know they were a close family. And some people don't feel that they can talk to friends or family Up about it but understanding what what you want. If you're in the situation where you're facing end of life. When do you want to consider having no treatment? If you're still having treatment where where do you want to be? Who Do you want to support you? Support is out there and you can have those conversations with your gp or even your clinical team that you can have them. You can have them and you can actually undertake something called an advanced care plan where you can document those things so that all those people caring for you like the GP will understand what your wishes are and you can share that with family members. I mean obviously including family members in those conversations is really helpful to talking about including people in the conversations maxes story about how his family filmed conversations with his mom. And just you know they just put the camera on so they've got a lot of normal That they've that they've recorded as well stuff that they've they didn't even realize they were recording quite a unique approach but served as a great example. About how you might approach those final weeks or months I just. I thought that was such an amazing idea. I think one of the things when you're going to lose someone that feels really important. Most people is making memories So reflecting on past memories and often you know you talk about things that happened historically that you remember what Happy Times but also creating memories that you can keep hold off once The the person's no longer around and that's was such such a good idea and Unfortunately because often people don't talk about things openly an half those open discussions they lose that opportunity to make those choices make memories which does seem such a shame. If you've never been in the situation. Contemplating death is a huge psychological Minefield it's how do you? What what? What is your advice if you are? Really Johnnie worried about the physicality of it about the the you know the psychological effects about how you're dealing with it links back to your first question about what people expect There's lots of things of the things they sometimes ask is. What will it be like? What can I expect Named reality some some people Active and doing things right up until the last few days whereas other people are much weaker. I'm perhaps the last couple of weeks are very tired and and in bed and I think that they're very individual things will say based on what's causing you to So so what type of cancer you have. What type of treatment? You've had generally how you've coped through. That might be an indication an and actually if people worried about symptoms you can just talk through some of the common symptoms that that that people can have when they're approaching end of life and what you can do to actually alleviate those so people don't have to be in pain they don't have to feel sick and sometimes people get very worried about people eating and drinking yes And there's this need to try and feed their relative or the left one and make sure they they drink to keep them alive and in reality. It's a natural process. I'm people won't suffer through that. So if they're hungry and they want to enjoy something let them half it if they're not hungry I it doesn't matter We'LL IS IMPORTANT. Is that obviously? You keep their Their mouth comfortable and moist You know because obviously if they're not drinking their mouth will dry. It knows Final few days Max and his family planned His mom's funeral meticulously is quite an undertaking. It sounded like a A really special day. How would you recommend people approach funeral planning because it's not easy? It's not an actually doing. After the event is is can be quite traumatic. I mean I I think that's a fabulous example where they had time where they were able to talk and they were able to planets and actually there are lots of schemes. Now where you can do that while you're well and Y which feels much healthier And in a way Takes the burden of you know sort of how many families though taught tweet other about you know what would you do? It isn't and that would be a really good thing to do. You know if you've got the opportunity as a family and you've gone out. Only relative is to try and help those sorts of conversations but but people don't say you know. I think they are a good example of how they approached it. You can still do it. That way. even after somebody has died so think about the person and the essence of the person and what they would have wanted because in reality you probably know anyway. So I think there's lots of ways that you can approach and there's lots of websites out there that give advice I'm we will have on our website. Marie Curie have advice on their website. There's lots of places people can go to think about how you plan a funeral when you do it. Words of advice for people who have lost a loved one resuming their lives. It's a very strange period. After somebody has passed away the friends and family want is your advice in that period afterwards. How do you get back to any semblance of a normal life? I mean yes. Life does have to go on. But actually the the pain of losing someone can be quite physical as well as emotional And talking talking is a really important thing and if you can't talk amongst people that you care about you know talk to your gp about how you feel. Potentially I loved a maximum sample about texting. Mind and and looking online. If you can't kind of pick up the phone All of that applies are after the event. You need just to be very aware of your feelings and know that it's okay to be sad and if you're struggling to pick up the pieces and carry on without that person around then there is lots of support out there. I think I slept for a month. I was exhausted. I think those are you because you you don't realize how much you're coping And the the energy the emotional energy physical energy that that takes up. I slept for a month. It was. It was incredible. And it's okay to cry. When a particular song comes on the radio you know oil in a place you think. Oh they say would have loved to be here I. It's okay to cry. It's a normal reaction. It totally I used to go into. Mum used to perfume. And every time I go into like DEM's or more like that and I'd get a whiff of it for a long time. I just so and it does take you by surprise abated. And it's good to know that that's okay you know. I've still got the bottle of aftershave that my dad was using before he died and now and again I have and it just reminds me of him. It's just so nice. Oh Dany I could talk to you all day. Thank you so very much again and my thanks. Our thanks to Max for coming in to tell a story if you've been affected by the very sensitive topics we've discussed in this episode. Please contact on McMillan support line on. Oh Eight oh eight. Eight eight double zero w zero open seven days a week. Eight till eight next time. We're talking work and cancer with Helen. The night before I went in to have surgery my boss said to me. I think we'll get somebody else in. I ended up two days after my surgery between payroll from my hospital bed in hospital. They actually confiscate my laptop. I should think so. Subscribe if you'd like to hear that in every new episode whenever it's ready have you enjoying the series why not give it a rating or a review? It helps others on the podcast more easily. I'm a maybe talking. Cancer is cancer. Support podcast.

Dina Max Cancer Bob Dany Fabulous consultant Marie Curie DEM Johnnie McMillan Helen
"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

11:11 min | 6 months ago

"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"I'm hostile bed. Coventry are then one of the star to cry immediately. Do the same thing that those. I'm sorry and it straight away. I think there's no it's gonna be rubbish is so we'll cry together just over a year ago. Matt lost his mom Nand Breast Sarcoma Cancer. She'd successfully overcome it two years before a Max was initially optimistic. We've done once we can do it again. But I didn't actually last too long because I'm just having some trouble breathing and your database told it's it's too late on this time. Nothing's GonNa work. Max Talks about going. Through a period of pre grieving mourning the loss of a loved one before they pass away but it was a period where they could all talk and plan as a family. I suppose lucky in a way that we could on mum's funeral with her. We don't need you like five or ten minutes at a time could get too much for all of us but it was so nice that we knew that the day when exactly how she wanted to go if you'll having to contemplate the end of someone's life perhaps your own then. I think you'll find Max's story very inspiring and later a lovely Mellon Professional. Dany will be here to talk about how to deal with the end of someone's life you need to be very aware of your feelings and know that it's okay to be sad and if you're struggling to pick up the pieces then there is lots of support out there women. Millan and we're talking cancer Max Welcome along. Thank you very much for coming. It's lovely to me e I'm I think we should start by you telling us about your lovely Nand. What was she like? She was full of life as she had bright pink care so everyone says her favorite phrases pink and fluffy so she says to everyone. Yeah so she loved drama say she ran a youth theatre she lived in Cypress. Yeah she was over in England for a couple of months. I think Coventry as where we're from originally and she was one of those like live action actors in Warwick Castle for free just for a few months. 'cause WAY WOW okay. So she was Mary. Queen of Scots. Saw someone lying if you look with bright pink hair yet very much? I get the impression that you quite close family. How many brothers and sisters do you have? Were you around each other the whole time? We already co still. It's my dad and my mom and my sister Ruby and me just as for so and we all live lived apart. My Mom and dad lived in verse. My sister lives in Coventry. At the time I lived down in Eastbourne we lived all over the place but we all met up at least once a month so it was really good. Yeah Okay Now. You got diagnosed not once but twice. Tell us about the first time. Initially it was just breast cancer and it was well while still in the army and I was just about to go to the Falklands to six months so yeah they came visit me down to Southampton as far I was at the time. And that yeah. They broke the news to us and devastating. But we didn't really get down. I I really face anything like this before. And we're really really positive family light if I came back from work or school or something and was negative or saying I didn't like him. Adobe like name enough of that home repulsive family so we were like that straight away. The first glance assay although it was sad for honesty about half an hour. We're like right. We're going to beat this. We're going to really do it. So didn't really feel that real. If you know what I mean. I'm Am for you at that point. Did they come to the radio armed with lots of information and answers to questions that you might have what the treatment might be and and that helps you kind of say. No no no okay. This is going to be okay. I think they did it but I think that. Sort of blind positively hadn't even ask I think it was a bit of a shock of. I didn't really go into much detail really. I was just outright. So how are we going to beat it? And and she did get better yes. It made a full recovery. I think it was nine months to a year she was. She was meant for a checkup and the doctors know they couldn't believe it. They're all. The team has gone started with breast cancer. But then she went ashore. Had OSTEO sarcoma cancer as well and yeah I think she had ten tumors at the time and they'd all gone which was crazy. We were so happy. So this leaves you as a family so shaken but resolute. I'm ready to carry-on And how old is is Nan. How hold is your mom at this point So when she beat the I would have been about fifty two and wish she would be affected by the treatment. What she did she seem to be a self looked with any sort of lasting symptoms. That made life different four. Join get she was. Yeah toad in ourselves sleeping all the time but afterwards no she was back to normal which was right and there was no reason for you to think that this was going to come back now. We didn't think so. Now it's you and I do have something in common because my mom died at sixty two with first time breast cancer and then the cancer came came back and I know exactly where I was when we had the news. It come back. How did the second bit of news come to you then so it? My mom was just had some back pain. She was complaining of back pain so she left it for a bunch of cancer. Say It doesn't say she like no don't need to get that checked and eventually she was is quite need to take some painkillers. And my dad I think then took her in hospital and then that's when they did some scans they found out it come back. Yes Sarcoma Cancer. The second time I mean that must have been so horrendously disappointing for your mom for you and just worked so hard. How was it? How was it for you all at that point being given that news the Yes for a second time? The cancer had come back. Initially it was the same as the first time we well go. We've done at once. We can do it again. Right didn't actually last too long because I'm shocked. She was having some trouble breathing and she had to go into the database. He told us it's too late on this time. Nothing nothing's GonNa work. We then had to stop this positively because as I said before it worked once we. It was sort of blind positive. We can do it that we actually couldn't this time emotionally coming to that conclusion especially if this is your mom especially come to that conclusion as a child must have been really hard. Yeah it was really tough are remember clear as they were sitting Rhonda hostile bed in Coventry. Then I think one me and my sister even my dad's one of the start to cry and immediately do the same thing lows Dr. Sorry and a straight way I think as my daddy said no and then he started crying. He's like no. Let's stop this now with is not strong to be to hold your emotional stiff upper lip or anything like that. That's just have a cry. Then he's GonNa be rubbish is there's no say in it's going to be good for. Let's just if you're GONNA cry cry. It's not apologize for it. Let's just say we will have to cry together For and then yeah she was in for about a day then and we were always just having these conversations talk in and so we don't have very long left until it was. It was widely nice. It was horrible but then it was nice to be that vulnerable with each other. We'll talk about your blog because you've you've written a blog it's it's amazing and and I'm sure has been a great help too. Many people have read it that bit that you are describing Which enabled you to have those really a great quality time with the remaining time that your mom had you describe as pre grieving. What what do you mean by that? Yes I think I don't know if I made up. Maybe I did. I think Max. Yes a weird thing to vote yes. I thought it was really strange because you knew we knew mom was going to die. We given three to six months and so we knew it was going to happen. So you're already kind of sad about that so you know you're GonNa Grieve. Once she eventually goes. Then you're already sat about assault preagreed and at the same time. It's a really really weird transition and I'm sure you were the same when you were in that stage and many people listening to wherever. It's so so strange because if you want to be normal in have the best last few months but at the same time your stupidly sad about it. I think thing is as well is the. It's such a an unfathomable idea that some of these going to die because I don't we don't know what that means. You don't know what life is going to be life when you know when the no here so difficult to pin that down and work out. Our isn't at this time. What did that enable you to do with your mom so we allowed us to have an actual great last few months and we saw so much of our friends and family who came to visit because we are so open with. What's going to happen? But then it's also really helpful for a lot of the actual grim stuffed organized the funeral and stuff like that and you use some of that time to plan. That didn't yes. Oh we we saw. I read somewhere on line and video camera up in the corner of the room. Totally about this is such a great idea. Honesty so happy I read and I said to anyone who's going through anything like this. Just do it. Because I'm not saying let's sit there like act in front of the Cameras. Usually on what you're doing the normal daily life. It was really good. 'cause you watch it back and you just see normal conversations and chats and I made I was really make an effort to get mom to talk about all the stuff like twenty years ago that we didn't really know about even really boring stuff like buying a house and stuff because my dad's memory is all full of oats guy talking and laughing and stuff like that also like that. Yeah they're really hard conversations. I suppose sort of lucky in a way that we could plan mum's funeral with her into so strange and because it's horrible compensate. We don't need you like five or ten minutes at a time because it would get too much for all of us especially in my mom but it was. It was sort nice that we knew that the day when exactly how she wanted to go which is weird. Nice feeling but Having a few if you have the capacity to during final months in a few the capacity to talk about you know dying well Then yes you should and and I think it's amazing that you manage to do that all this time. I'm sure you really should've hung down as a family And use each other is huge support. Did you get help support from anywhere else because emotionally for you even though you've got this framework now which is super helpful. I mean all this time you're still going to work still having to be Max as day-to-day maximum your responsibilities to your other half in your friends. How how did you manage to to cope through this time? So initially I was actually a look back and think I was quite stupid at the start of it so we are really close family And I had the best network around a wider family as well as all my aunties uncles cousins and everything who will live really close to our house and call them anyway..

Coventry Max Sarcoma Cancer Dany Matt Warwick Castle Eastbourne Southampton Adobe Cypress Mellon Professional England Millan painkillers Ruby Mary OSTEO Nan assault Rhonda
"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

09:01 min | 7 months ago

"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Absolute pleasure to speak to you. I will thank you so very much. Thank you Dany Bell McMillan Professional. Hello Lovely Lady. It is great to have you back again. What an inspiration errol is. Would you make of his story? Oh absolutely an inspiration. I think For men they're not great at talking of a now. We talked to him about life after cancer. Can you please explain remission versus cancer free? Okay so they are very different things But unfortunately sometimes professionals or public perception intertwine them so when somebody is in remission and you can be impartial remission or complete remission And it's really that remission is really that the Kansas not active partial remission is where maybe you've still got some cancer cells but they're not causing you any problems and complete obviously is the Kansas being held at bay or clear. Tends to come when you've been in remission for period of five years with no active cancer and then your condition may be enough to say you are all clear at that point so it's really important to understand that during this remission period from the moment that you'll cancer treatment stops through those partial remission to clear what are the kind of what does recovery look like You've had this incredible trauma the treatment. Whatever that has looked like for you individually What can period then begin to look like so? It is very different for different people. And we've talked about this. Before different types of cancer and different treatments have different impacts so that makes it very individual but there are common things that people struggle with energy I'm fatigue is a is a big one And that can take some while to actually recede but some people struggle with it long-term anyway. Some people have problems with pain as a result of treatment and unfortunately some people will have long term problems With pain just because of the impact of the type of treatment. They've had on their body. And and pain fatigue can be quite intertwined and then unfortunately have a knock-on effect on your emotional wellbeing. Well I was I was GONNA say because they will talk quite quite openly about the effect that his cancer had On his sex life. How do you maintain your emotional health as well through this other places to go? Is it an again something that you should you should talk about when you go back to see your? Gp OVER YOUR CHECKUPS. I think GPA is a really good starting point. Sometimes people aren't necessarily comfortable with talking openly about things that they find embarrassing would prefer to talk to the GP about two and GP's are Used to talking to people and helping people that have like arrowhead erectile dysfunction after Treatment so certain types of cancer treatment have a physical impact on how your kind of sexual activity happens but also some people have has psychological impact on their body image and so there are lots of different reasons. Why my impact on your sexual health and your sex life which actually has a massive emotional impact and there's there's all the people say that GP can refer counseling you join groups where people who've experienced the same thing and learn how they've overcome some people find that very helpful to once you're in remission you own sort of send out into the big world and let go there will be checkups. What does what what do they look like is that is that a visit to the GP say how you feeling a return to the oncologist for Something a little bit more invasive so that's a really good question because historically people always went back to the hospital for a clinic appointment and then they would have their surveillance tests but things have changed and we recognize that actually for some cancers particularly Kansas that very low risk. Gp's manage and monitor them and so you may just go and have a blood test regularly and the GP let you know the result of that and actually we even have electronic systems now where I can actually look up their own blood results. And there's lots of information that goes alongside that so they know how to interpret them so PSA which is our talks about is one of those where they're in some areas. They have a remote surveillance system that patients themselves have access to for other people is going back to see the specialist on every sort of You'll find it will be three to six monthly the first year and then actually wants your kind of two years with stable disease. You'll have an annual check. So you know the the longer you're in remission so to speak that the less frequently you go but you will always have an annual surveillance tests and that can be a scan a blood test or both whatever is needed all just absolutely overflowing with positively such great guy to be around but he he he has worries that it might come back at so. There are emotional scars that it leaves as well. I think that's what we highlighted is a very common problem and you'll often hear people say once you've had you always have cancer even when you don't have active disease because it's always in the back of your mind and You know when a scan or an appointment coming up people will get more anxious than normal and and that's understandable in reality. You know that fear of the cancer coming back is very genuine and people need to find their own ways of of dealing with that for some people it might leave hypersensitive to any ailment. That might be you know a around Wendy you. When do you know whether it's something serious that you know? It's not just it's not just a cold. It's something you need to go and get checked out as a hard question. No no no but actually There are indications when you've had a particular cancer what the likely recurrent symptoms will be I'm people should be informed of those by their specialists team and the GP should be aware of those as well so You can be more vigilant about those and of course obviously if you have something persists for three to six weeks then you shouldn't hang around really it's always best to get it. Checked out was most. Mina almonds will recede within that time. And it's just you know so if you have a back ache because you've heard you back it shouldn't last for a protracted period Unless you've done some damage but then you would need to seek help anyway but so You know so if you have a back ache and you have had cancer where Secondary Bone cancer risk. Then you should know that if if that back pain persists you should go and seek help. So he should be given information so that you could monitor but equally put get very anxious about every ache or pain A maurienne someday. There are lots of telephone support services now so even the specialist teams the cancer nurse specialists would much prefer somebody just ringing and checking and mortar. Not they can relieve anxiety over the phone. Finally Dany if you're a friend or a relative of someone who was recently in Remission. They can still offer support if there's somebody listening. What's your advice to friends and family? I think I think the biggest advice as to carry on Life with that person you might need to make some adjustments if they're fatigued but tight make big delivered be understanding and still do the things that you enjoy doing together equally some people with cancer CEO. No one more talk about it. You know and I'm struggling with all this. I look okay. It's okay to ask people if they're all you. Okay today you know. Is Everything all right so An most of is normal behavior. So don't be afraid to have the normal conversations that you would you would have and do do the normal things that you like doing with your friend or your family member. Danie thank you so very much and my thanks to Arrow for coming in to tell a story to get more information about what we've talked about in this episode go to our website. Mcmillan DOT ORG dot. Uk forward slash talking cancer. Next time we're talking about dealing with the end of someone's life with Max we're sitting Rhonda hostile bed in Coventry are then one of the start cry and immediately do the same thing that lows Boudin. Sorry Straightway I think as my daddy said no it's gonna be rubbish is so we cry together. Subscribe if he'd like to hear that and every new episode whenever it's ready and if you enjoy the series why not give it a rating or a review? It helps other spun the podcast more easily. I'm an obey talking. Cancer is a cancer support podcast..

cancer GP Dany Bell Kansas Gp errol Coventry Uk Wendy Danie CEO Boudin Max Rhonda
"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

10:13 min | 7 months ago

"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"But he said you need to read this letter. When I looked at the letter that he had he had twenty five percent cancer. And he's prostate. Oh my you are kidding me. But he was the first of forty eight guys that walked into my Garrett was diagnosed with prostate cancer of which two are no longer here. I am so journey. My journey for me you know and dealing with prostate cancer is by talking about every day. Yeah and I decided to set up the mckellar foundation to get mental can and the reason why did that was you know by one hundred of my lady customers in mcgarry and said goals. When when's the last time you went to see a doctor in a year and eighty nine out of the hundred doctors I also same question to my male customers and one and what was frightening about him is not only wind because his wife was moaning. Amy Said and she's decided she's not going to give him any more sex until he gets himself. Checked out Larry's smart journey now to raise this awareness and that's how I've had to deal with the bits and pieces that goes on with it and that and this is I suppose. Lots of people talk about their new normal. Your Journey Newell. The projects that you have in the foundation. The talking that you do is is that the new normal for us this errol now. I think it's just amplifying the stuff of done before but it has to be very direct because not helping people to pursue a career. I'm hopefully helping to save lives and you know and and I can't do that on my own. It's great people like yourselves. The fantastic support I get from my wife Sharon and also family and friends because I found out about prostate cancer by accident while I say to people now is is reading lots and lots of reading to find that because so many different different conflicting things that people talk about. But the most important thing I've learned from the reading I've done is. The numbers are very very high and getting higher one. In eight European men get prostate cancer. One in four effort cabin men get prostate cancer. It's important to talk. This is important to talk it out also as well. Can you explain what? Psa stands right. Psa stands for prostate specific antigen. So that is what is produced inside the prostate in order for you to help with your reproduction and exciting things that men have and dream about so yes so the. Psa We know. And that's the count and that's how they measure whether or not there is something going wrong. This is a simple blood tests and it's important that all men make a point of getting himself tested whether the doctors happy to do or no insist on getting it done because this is something if you try and catch early. You're more likely to stay alive with it. Do you think that what's the work that you're doing in and around prostate cancer in Bringing bringing the discussion to the table getting people to talk more about it has been helpful to you in dealing with the experience that you went through personally often. I think the help has been absolutely massive and I didn't realize how big an issue this was until I started to be involved in and you know and why it's important to talk is because I'm what I've learned from talking. Is that if it's in your family. Then it's very important that the generations know about issues because my dad. When I had the conversation with my dad when I was diagnosed a turnaround to mainly suggests on. I had that issue five years ago. Oh my goodness mainly reaction. Oh my goodness May. That was angry. Upset couldn't speak to him for nearly six months. I'm sure that. What have you come to any conclusions throughout this about why men aren't very good seeking help or being aware of their bodies? Yeah Yeah I have two issues with that. The problem with men as opposed to women is that we suffer with two things ignorance and silence. You know so if we have this issue. We go into denial. We find every excuse to accept that it's not happening and then on top of that we completely shut down. We just go into silence. Women I mean you know. Women are very very good at snagging. Whatever time or do you WANNA put it. You know when they have something wrong for me as a mechanic. If they got problem with their cars they come in straightaway with men we wait. The car breaks down but it is interesting. Isn't it nothing women as well? We can. Because we whether that's to do with puberty and starting periods right through to pregnancy. I think we're much more used to our bodies changing. There's a lot more. We talk about a lot more I am more proactive. But but this is. What you've been doing is made such a huge and significant difference. This is not gone unnoticed. Has IT I hope you hope our can make a difference but I always used the word we because one person's not going to make this change. I know you say way. There was only one and h s hero. Would do I rec- when I when. I told me that they were GonNa give me this award. As I said to them. I will only accepts award. On behalf of all the people at the going through the battles with prostate cancer older people that we've lost fruit issue and for me really. I wouldn't have accepted of the not because I felt that I was taking it on behalf of all the people that are involved in this campaign as well so it's People's award for me more than his personal. I'M GONNA come back to you personally just for a second. Because there's this this is amazing. Work that you do this fantastic foundation. Clearly this work is helping you. Arrow and looking forward into the future. When you were going through that who did you look to for Support? Was THAT FAMILY FRIENDS. Was there any outside? Organizations will else's out there for for for young men in your situation fortunate people at the melon prostate cancer UK but it's forums forums more and more foreign online forums. Yeah see that's a really common thread that we're to WIG IT and you know. Actually there's a lot of very valuable support you get from other people in the same situation. Your in House mustering came from my wife and family. They realized a long time ago that they were happy to share me with everyone so I wouldn't couldn't and wouldn't have got fru. I've got to now without that help and that network and the treatment that you had has there been any lasting impact on you and your health. Yes there has been lasting impact. My situation is that You know I have probably less than twenty percent. Feeling BELOW MY BELLY BUTTON. Erectile function is probably non existent. Okay right but what? I've learned through modern with this. Is that some people will get a lot more than that. It's how you manage what you have. I mean and housed on a day to day basis. I mean you know. That's you love. Your wife is that that's complicated and difficult. If it only difficult if you sit down and and decide to do nothing about it I may not be. What call you same boat. I can still be Mo Farah because that makes sense so you have to you have to improvise the best way possible. But you can't beat you. You know what you have to do is and that's comes to. Why South the charity I say is because by talking drought? You realize that you're not the only one going through this challenge you know and somebody you know a lot of times. People say things to me that our massive help you know so. I'm learning every day to do and I think he's well particularly with with prostate cancer. An with men and they're reticent to talk about talk about things that there are. I'm sure all lots of lots of medicine. Lots of concerns about. What makes you a man that may be gets in the way of of of of going to the doctor and do does that make sense a great great question and I'm glad to have asked the question because a lot of men told me that raw not go through this because if it means they're gonNA lose erection then more issues with continents? And what would you say to those because it is real? That's a real concern. I've had the question and what I have said very frequently is look if you have a chance of being alive and maybe helping somebody. It could be your children. Your grandchildren isn't that more important. Do you ever worry about it coming back. I do worry about coming back. I don't have a prostate now. So you know if the cancer comes back it would be probably more aggressive somewhere else but my challenges is to save somebody from having to go through the battles the ave to go for every day. That's more challenge so I try to be positive and give give the love to other people. You're a magnificent human being. It's been an.

prostate cancer mckellar foundation Newell Amy Garrett Larry mcgarry errol Mo Farah UK Sharon
"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

14:49 min | 7 months ago

"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Hello I'm Annabi and welcome to talking cancer a podcast for Macmillan where I'll be meeting real people to have honest conversations about living with cancer in this episode. We're talking cancer with Adam. Let that if I decide in your brain but we turn away is going to have to operate need some and then the Black Sonya I knowledge is looking at Solomon Lipset. And when we're talking potential BRAINTREE RATIOS WENT. Yeah potentially thirty one. Adam Carroll was enjoying life and enjoying a job that allowed him to work in New York.

Adam Carroll Solomon Lipset Macmillan New York
"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

12:46 min | 7 months ago

"cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"We're talking cancer with Khloe. Once you hear the word she thinks. This isn't good in twenty seventeen. Khloe Dixon was extremely tired. After the birth of her baby girl I she thought nothing of it but it kept getting worse than I start having these headaches and that was like an elastic band around my head. So then I thought right I better go to the GP blood test revealed. Khloe had chronic myeloid leukemia or C. L. Which is a type of cancer that affects her white blood cells? I'm talking to Khloe about her cancer but particularly her diagnosis. What does it feel like waiting for the news? How do you tell your family? And how does having cancer affect your daily life was horrific? I mean holding my girl and thinking I'm not saying thanks year. Awful plus later in the podcast. I'll be having coffee with Dany. One of Macmillan's fantastic professionals to give her thoughts on what to do when someone says those three fateful words you've got cancer you could actually have a conversation with someone and even if they seem silly questions to you. The professionals at the end of the line will not mind in the least women melon and we're talking cancer lowy. Hello.

cancer Khloe Dixon Macmillan
"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

10:01 min | 3 years ago

"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"I can say that twenty nine years ago when I was diagnosed. This was not part of our discussion. So that must be something that we've learned over the years Decker Lindbergh. Yeah well thanks for the opportunity to talk about this important topic. I do think that it is something that we are paying more attention to these days. You know as our cancer therapies hopefully have gotten better. They're more effective. There hopefully more tolerable to our patients than we can focus on some of these other equally important areas to try to improve not only their quality of life but their overall health as well so focusing on nutrition making sure that people can be healthy while they're undergoing these necessary treatments is really the goal of all of the things that we do in that nutrition space and also with activities stress resilience. Different area What is it? What are the issues when you're undergoing either chemotherapy or radiation? What makes it difficult for a patient to eat what I hear from my patients? Tom Is that even foods that they previously might have enjoyed different during the time of chemotherapy. Or radiation therapy so foods may not smell. The same foods may not taste. The same foods may not be Appetizing like they were prior to this life changing event and the treatments that go along with it so what we wanted to learn with. Terry's help and with the wonderful organizations we had a chance to partner with is. How can we actually ask the right questions for these patients? Who need a different approach to nutrition so that we can meet their needs in in a better way. It seems like that this is obviously been a problem ever since. Chemotherapy came on the scene. Some what's been fifty years ago. Probably Pretty close to fifty years ago but I think in some ways the problem has gotten a little bit better because you're better able to control the the nausea and vomiting. I can remember back in the early days when methotrexate was the treatment for kids with us. Just her coma bone cancer. They were in the hospital. They never do this as an outpatient and they vomited continuously extremely difficult. Problems still have the same problem but not to the same scale right it. It's in some ways it's better. I think. Definitely the drugs have changed the tolerance and the effectiveness have changed and again back to now we can focus on these things that otherwise. Maybe just didn't pay enough attention to prior days. How important do you think good nutrition is to help the patient actually fight the cancer? I think there are benefits to nutrition that we're only beginning to understand and I think particularly in this population where not only are we trying to control or eliminate the cancer but also make sure that people can maximize their ability to experience? Effective life saving drugs. It just makes the issue so much more important. Which is the bigger culprit In general the chemotherapy or the radiation I. I'm not sure that anybody would have the same answer. From from my standpoint I would like to look at the person more holistically so the disease process and the treatments. And how can we individualize? The nutrition needs for that person. Well what does it? Did you learn that you need to change or address when it comes to cancer patients? What is the consortium figured out? So I'll let Terry ad in her comments as well but I do think that understanding that people who are receiving chemotherapy. Radiation therapy cancer treatment have different needs than the general population that that is something that maybe we just don't give enough recognition to so. How can we make sure that we've got the right texture the right odor or or lack of You know so that somebody doesn't smell of food and not want to even he. Does you know. Coffee is very powerful. Has a very strong sent to it and some people may like that some people might be totally turned off from that so we want to make sure that we can individualize for that person. Whatever it is that they want food and beverages that can help them maintain their nutrition status. I remember well for myself. It was a long time ago but I remember the mouth sores being a huge problem but probably a bigger problem for me was the list of foods that I could not eat because they would have an effect on the medication that I was taking. That has to be something that plays into what the consortium will end up recommending. What the consortium Found through the study is that about eighty four percent of the patients experience fatigue and then mentioning mouth sores. We know that over twelve percent experienced that so it really affects. What you put into. Your body are what you choose not to eat at all. What we found is that people that Experience Fatigue Were making their own meals. And so they didn't have the energy to wait for a meal to be cooked in so they went without so further inducing the fatigue. So then what happens? They don't have the energy to attend an event or a family function and they become isolated. So what we hope is that improving nutrition will improve Their experience their life Quality so that they can stay engaged in family events in the community. Art Suspected that there are different levels of nutritional inadequacy based on the kind of treatment and the cancer involved. Right I mean are so. Let's say you had cancer the pancreas and you're getting chemotherapy. And you're getting radiation to your abdominal wall. Nutritional issues would be greater for someone like that as opposed to a a Limpopo patient. Where the the Chemotherapy is much more benign. That's right and I think we have the pleasure of working with our expert colleagues across Mayoclinic to understand the medical side of the nutritional needs of the patient as well as the social elements. That Terry was mentioning in terms of just. Don't feel good enough to make any kind of meal. Whatever it is that I should be eating. Is there a way that you can objectively measure whether or not the patient's nutrition is adequate? There are there are equations that I probably learned in medical school. But don't have at my fingertips. Please don't ask me to think through what are the. What'S THE BASE BASAL METABOLIC RATE? What are the nutritional needs for somebody? That's undergoing the stress of disease and also a treatment and our dieticians our nutrition experts can figure out you know based on all of those different parameters. Not only how many calories should an individual take in? But what should those calories beacon composed of? Excuse me with respect to sugars and proteins and fats and all of those different elements. We are talking about cancer. Nutrition with a member of the board of directors of the cancer. Nutrition consortium Ms Terry MC joint and also gastroenterologist Dr Paul Limburg dime for matter of fact all right here we go myth or matter of fact all patients undergoing cancer treatments should be taking vitamins and supplements Dr Limburg. You're going to be happy Tracy so I do think that there are advantages to some vitamin supplements. But I. I don't think all patients necessarily need to follow that approach. The the best advice we give our patients is to make sure that your clinicians your physician and Care Team are aware what you're taking so please don't be afraid to tell us about what supplements you may or may not be using because they couldn't have positive effects but they may also interact with some of the other medications that we're prescribing. Do you ever remember recommending to a patient that they take a multivitamin or take a specific supplement absolutely And I spent a lot of my career Trying to prevent cancer as well. Tom In that context. There are some very powerful potent Supplements vitamins that seem to have cancer preventive effect so I think in the right context there may be different uses for vitamins and supplements than there may be in the chemotherapy. Radiation therapy patients. I WANNA follow up on that. He said that maybe there was something that we could take to prevent cancer. Is that what you're saying? So there's a field of science called chemo-prevention which deals with how can we prevent the disease before it becomes invasive cells in the body become abnormal sometimes for triggers that we can understand like cigarette smoking sometimes for reasons that we we haven't figured out yet but there are things like vitamin D Cellini calcium in some studies have been shown to reduce the incidence of various types of cancers at least in animal models? And there are some human data to support those preventive potential effects. Anyway at this point there's not a blanket recommendation to take vitamins and supplements to prevent cancer. But we're working. Oh that's what I needed to know because you don't take any. I don't take vitamin supplements to prevent. Okay got it Terry. Tell us who is involved in. The cancer and nutrition consortium because that's what we want to learn more about. Thanks Tracy This was actually An Initiative by Dr Bruce Moskowitz. He's a founder of the effort and he really struggled with his patients that were undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy with nutrition and so he reached out to seven of the world's leading cancer centers to see if we could come together To conduct a research study to develop some measures to help these patients. What did the research find the research included over twelve hundred people We understand that the The largest factor of Cancer treatment is significant fatigue. Next is Constipation poor appetite Reflux indigestion just a myriad of Symptoms that really affect.

cancer Ms Terry MC Tracy This Tom Decker Lindbergh nausea methotrexate Limpopo Mayoclinic Constipation Dr Bruce Moskowitz founder partner D Cellini poor appetite Dr Paul Limburg Dr Limburg Care Team
"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"That's true for any screening test for colorectal cancer. Alright so use easy you Put a sample into a box have the ups guy come. Come pick it up and you're done it. And how long does it take to get the result Once it the sample gets to the lab. The turnaround is less than a week Several days. Yeah You. You put the sample in in collecting device. That's that's well said Tom. Yeah yeah no it's. It's it's from a patient standpoint. The the kit has a very simple collection device. That mounts to toilet sample is is put into the container. The LID is screwed on and it's shipped in the same container to the lab. I would imagine. Though as the case incidences of colon cancer continued to rise that their family members that say. I'm I'm all in testing where we're going to start in. They don't even care if it's color guard or colonoscopy that has to help with people's willingness to go through testing or is that not happening. Well we we looked at the first one hundred thousand color guard tests that were offered post-approval forty two percent of those patients had never been screened before and that was across all ages. That was exactly what we're hoping for And so we. We hope that having access to to attest that does not disrupt work. That doesn't require. Change in daily activities will make a difference in compliance and at the end of the day. It's participation rates that. Let's say you do a thousand tests. How many are going to end up being a positive? Yeah that's That's the positivity rate is about thirteen percent wow But many of those patients have real disease mostly polyps are common and the test detects the large polyps out of thousand patients five to seven. We'll have curable stage colon cancer without symptoms trouble stage pre-symptomatic let's say that Unfortunately it is diagnosed as being cancerous whether it's through color guard testing or a colonoscopy what Howard patients patients treated. Yeah well if it's detected at the earliest stage before symptoms some of those cancers are actually in polyps and they can be treated and discuss publicly without congressional so you read through the Columbus through the connoisseur. Yes conventional surgery. There are many approaches. They're depending on where the tumors located It doesn't in. In most cases it does not require a colostomy fewer than ten percent of patients with colorectal. Cancer require a colostomy. That's that's a myth. That's out there in. Most patients ball function is the same after surgery before and if the cancer has spread is they're usually there are other modalities involved. Chemotherapy may aviation but chemotherapy the mainstay of of of metastatic or colon cancer. That has yes. Yes and there's a lot of progress along those lines in even with metastatic cancer if if it if the spread is early and localized that can be cured also by surgery for example a solitary metastases to the liver or the lung Va. If that's all there is that can be cured with additional reception outside of the Colin boy. There's so much reason for hope but obviously the key is defined at early times it's our. It's our goal. It's our hope to see colorectalcancer. Become one of the least common cancer killers in this country and I think with accurate tools. Broadly in widely used. That's an achievable goal. Dr David Aqueous gastroenterologist colon cancer expert at the Mayo Clinic. Thanks for being with us. Thank you for the latest in health and medical news go to news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot Org..

colorectal cancer Cancer Dr David Aqueous Tom Mayo Clinic Va Columbus Howard
"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

05:51 min | 4 years ago

"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom and I'm Tracy mccray cancer of the Cervix Tracy. There's some actually some good news about this cancer. The number of women dying of cervical cancer has decreased over sixty percent since the introduction of the cancer screening test called the PAP smear which was invented by a Greek physician. By the name of Papanicolau. I said that because my wife is. I know you're very wise points. But according to the CDC there are still twelve thousand new cases of cervical cancer and four thousand deaths due to cervical cancer every year in the United States. Now most of these are women who were either never screened or they weren't screened often enough or as often as they should or they had an abnormal test and didn't have adequate follow up. How in an effort to raise awareness about how women can protect themselves from hp the Human Papillomavirus and cervical cancer. January is cervical health awareness month here to discuss cervical cancer screening. Is Dr Kathy mcglaughlin? Dr McLaughlin is a family medicine physician. Who focuses her research on improving rates of cervical cancer screening? Welcome to the program Dr McLaughlin. Thank you nice to have you on the program so at Tracy said and she talked a as if there was a definite connection between. Hp and cervical cancer. Explain that Sir. This was a really exciting. Finding basically in science world to recognize that the cause of cervical cancer ninety nine plus percent of the time is persistent infection with human papillomavirus or HP there. What do you mean? Persistent infection will use the term. Hp Okay going forward rather than human papillomavirus It's a very common virus of the CDC estimates that about seventy to eighty percent of sexually active adults will have an infection at some time in their life. Most of them won't recognize that there won't be any clinical outcome symptom associated with it. They'll clear and be fine but in a handful of patients that high-risk HP infection persists for years and over a ten to twenty five period of time that can result in precancerous changes of the cervical. Sal Okay Gotcha subsequently cancer or so. It's a it's a virus so even if you knew you had or even if you had symptoms what would the symptoms be a and could you treat it low risk. Hpv is a separate category. That doesn't cause cancer but causes genital warts but the high risk. Hp really doesn't present with symptoms that patients would see your find and after years and years of exposure potentially that would be picked up with some cervical abnormalities on the pap test or on an HP test. It could be picked up that way as well. But they're really wouldn't be symptoms that patients would be watching for and the majority of the time the infection clears without intervention especially in healthy people with normal immune systems. How did you figure out that? Most cases of cervical cancer were were caused by a persistent. Hp infection yeah. I actually don't know how that was figured out. But there was a German virologist who was instrumental in making this discovery a number of years ago and then just through process of studying that virus figuring out that it actually is responsible for a lot of oral head and neck cancers penile anal cancers too. So it's not just women that need to be concerned about hp so what are the symptoms when someone has cervical cancer or HPV. Either one both so if somebody was not getting regular screening and came in and was diagnosis cervical cancer symptoms. They may not be irregular. Menstrual or vaginal bleeding But again most of the time especially if it's a precancerous diagnosis either. Low Greater high-grade cell changes that would not be symptomatic and that would just be picked up through the screening test If you pick this up early on a on a pap test then you can prevent it. From spreading prevent it from getting worse and basically prevent cervical cancer correct. Cervical cancer is preventable through a combination of screening and vaccination the screening itself identifying the changes the prevention pieces following along closely than if a PAP abnormality or. Hp positive test is noted. That person would be put into a surveillance program with some are frequent testing and depending on how that progress potentially have a treatment to prevent the cancer the introduction doctor shoves read a laundry list of some things but the adequate follow up after an abnormal test was surprising to me. How is that falling off of the radar right So in the old days so to speak. The recommendation was annual PAP testing and that has changed significantly in recent years. Recognizing that three or intervals with PAP tests or five year. Intervals with PAP. Hp Biko tests for women thirty over are adequate. Because it's such a slow progressing process but when people haven't come in that's how these situations can happen so screening only works if it's done on a repeat basis and so people who have not engaged regular there is that potential that the infection isn't clearing and just coming back like they're supposed to write and so they had an abnormal pap HIV test. They're giving advice on when to be seen again. And we try to work on not letting that fall through the cracks with You know Online reminders that are patient portals system. Let reminders but it still happens so I heard you say that you can prevent cervical cancer in two ways one. Catch it early before it actually turns into cancer by PAP smear but you also said the word vaccination. Yes that is really exciting so Ten years ago the human papillomavirus or HP vaccine became available in our country. It's been used another country's for longer periods of time it was initially.

cervical cancer Hp cancer Tracy mccray CDC Cervix Tracy Dr McLaughlin Dr Kathy mcglaughlin Papanicolau Mayo Clinic Radio Dr Tom United States vaginal bleeding
"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

03:22 min | 4 years ago

"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"That's damaging the drug that we have the most knowledge about as a drug called doxorubicin or the other name for Adriamycin and the mean risk from a cardiac standpoint with that drug is congestive heart failure. And it's a small risk but it does happen. And we have cardio oncology just here who are specialists in figuring out how to manage that when it does occur and congestive heart. Failure means that the heart just doesn't pump well enough to get the blood flowing throughout the body and one of the symptoms might be swelling of your feet and ankles exactly or difficulty breathing. Are you an exercise program? I just WanNa talk about it anymore. It's very hard for me. It really is hard for me. Actually very emotional at this moment. I. It's psychologically. It is wonderful and terrible to be in this camp so explain a little bit about the psychological ramifications of it absolutely the U. facing a potentially life threatening diagnosis is incredibly difficult. Incredibly stressful causes a lot of Distress in most of our patients and In some patients that evening gets the point of Depression. Are Psychologists and psychiatrists are incredibly helpful And I encourage all my patients. Actually if if they're willing to see someone to talk about what they're going through. Psychologically the fear of recurrence that really lasts for a long time for many. Many patients can be an ongoing problem. So it's not just during the treatment but transitioning into the survivorship fees and then and then thereafter and we need to help patients manage us as as best we can are cancer. Education Center is a fantastic resource. They have phenomenal free educational materials. Also classes So that people can kind of see. What works for them. And whether that's art therapy or music therapy or yoga. Mindfulness Meditation can access those Those resources I really never go away. Tracy mini a year. How many years? They told me to start watching for the heart effects. Eighteen to twenty years after the treatment. So I'm at twenty eight years now and psychologically you never forget it if you want to know more about the cancer survivor program at Mayo Clinic. I am so happy that you're there to help them. And we are on hundreds over one hundred stations across the country. So how can they learn more well and we are working to get more of our resources virtual? Actually we really want to be able to reach more people not just people who actually make it here to Rochester regularly but we want to get our materials online and so that's a that's in process and and working with our it group to do that Certainly anyone who's here in Rochester stopping into the Cancer Education Center is probably the best way to do that. We also have the Dan Abraham healthy living program and they have some great classes. Low cost classes that people can access. And if you're in Rochester that's A. That's a fantastic resource But but I certainly would say cancer education center which is just the lobby level. The GONDA building in Rochester. That's a wonderful place to start in. What a great program the cancer survivorship program Dr Catherine Ready Site. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having me for the latest in health and medical news go to news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot Org..

Rochester Adriamycin Education Center Cancer Education Center doxorubicin Dr Catherine Mayo Clinic Dan Abraham Tracy
"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

10:35 min | 4 years ago

"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"Cancer Therapies is the director of the Melanoma Research Lab Doctors Mira Markovic. Welcome to the program. Dr Markevic thanks better. Very nice to have you Here and always nice to know when you are seeing one of our our patients because you're sort of one of the melanoma Google around here and historically Melanoma has been easily curable. Easy to treat if it's caught early but once it metastasized once it spreads elsewhere. It's been a very difficult problem Forever as as long as I can remember. Yeah you're absolutely right Tom. This is William Ostler. Even defies melanoma cancer gives cancer a bad name to father. Madison wonder reasons has been as the malignant melanoma. The the cell itself is extraordinarily evolutionary resistant to all sorts of noxious stimuli. The cell originates from essentially nerve cell origins and it involves on the skin of the body where it acts as a producer of Melanin to protect the skin from ultraviolet radiation in doing so. The cell is bred to be resistant to various noxious influences like ultraviolet radiation chemical influences from the skin and so forth thus when a cell like this becomes malignant loses its ability to be controlled by the environment for regulated growth. It becomes very difficult to treat and as you well know the last thirty years. We've had very little IF ANYTHING UNTIL FIVE YEARS. I've never heard explained that way. That's that's very interesting why it is so resistant to to treat resisted to so many things. Yes it basically you know. It has the genetic equivalent of an elephant for for inept very small package a lot of genes available to protect itself and it uses very efficient. What's the current standard? How you said until five years ago so until five years ago what was happening. So basically in our field melanoma metastatic malignant melanoma doctor said which is imminently curable disease. When caught very very early when it becomes metastatic it is essentially life ending unfortunately with for most patients up until five years ago All we really had was treatment that could barely control the pace of growth of this tumor. And we've had a treatments that unfortunately could only prolong survival. In a matter of months with average survival times. Being on the order of seven to nine months. Depending on which study really wants it had had metastasized. The survival is very limited extremely limited in what I normally unfortunately within our practice as as time as you know you would see a patient for Thanksgiving odds of seeing that patient again next Thanksgiving would be relatively low and there's been a lot of work in this field because of that the other interesting thing about melanoma metastases anywhere brain liver in ICAN even go to the bone and as you know we've seen it in the bone and the reason that we have had to operate on it sometimes in the past is because it will grow so much that it compromises the integrity of the bone worried about a fracture but the interesting thing about it is when you look at melanoma metastatic to bone. It's black just like the original tumor really. It is oh and looking at the prep for speaking with you. I come across the phrase immuno-genetic tumor saying that right correct correct. You're absolutely right. Yeah I know it's it's Kinda interesting story so back in the eighteen eighties You know when Thomas Edison was still working in his shop and you know I think Albert Einstein was in his teenage years. A guy named William Coley was a physician and hospital in New York City. The predecessor Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Who had this ingenious idea to infect a sarcoma which is a different type of cancer with bacteria and he could demonstrate resolution of the tour that idea produced in the late one thousand nine hundred eighty s or eighteen eighties. I Apologize What what was known at the time collies toxin the first treatment by wish the harnessing of immune system could be narrowed and directed towards the cancer. This isn't the days prior to started toxic chemotherapy. Prior to what in the fifties and sixties we would refer to as the dawn of set of toxic chemotherapy. The problem is with the introduction of cytotoxic chemotherapy with the drugs that kill cancer. Melanoma re continued to be resistant and a lot of us that were devoted. A substantial part of their professional lives at joined understand and treat this disease had to really start looking at alternative options to treat That were not chemotherapy but that involved immunologic treatments the tumor as immuno-genetic because for time in Memoriam we've known the D. Museam does recognize the cancer but it cannot do anything about it and I would say the last probably fifteen years have truly been a renaissance in the field of cancer immunotherapy specifically in Melanoma metastatic melanoma management research. So what have we got now? And how does it work well we? I've got a few things I've got a few things. We said. Therapy chemotherapy. Nanomedicine start with immunotherapy so basically you know five years ago twenty eleven is sort of the watershed year. I think in our field. I think everything. In metastatic Melanoma Knowledge Prior to twenty eleven is referred to as the Jurassic period and everything since then is really knowledge new newly generated and Lee Incorporated into practice fundamentally what we have now learned is We've gotten insights as to how to regulate the body's immune system so it can overcome the ways by which the tumor protects itself from immunologic destruction in very creative ways. Some work that was originally done at the Mayo Clinic About seventeen years ago Here by now Dr Han Dong. Who's one of our colleagues so immunologic therapy in today's setting that has led to average survival times now in the two year? Mark Relative to seven to nine. Months is a big step forward. But it's still not cured if so what we're doing right now in the realm of immunotherapy is trying to understand how do the eleven hundred regulators of immune system respond in patients that are treated with a immune drug? X? And how the system the body response to that in those do well versus do poorly. And how do we take advantage of that? A lot of work within our group and others in dissecting the environment of the tumor the battlefield between the immune system into cancer also the systemic circulation blood state autoimmune system that some people lend themselves to more a greater response sooner therapy others and does not and then various Sort of moving knob says to adjust inflammation as her immunity to destroy the tumor. So basically when you talk about an immunotherapy you're you're saying that the body's immune system does recognize the fact that melanoma shouldn't be there and it's cancer and the new moon system wants to get rid of it but it can't so you're jacking up the system in a way pretty more Tom. What's interesting about. It is jacking up alone. Probably helps you with a tire but not with the cure of cancer. So what what we've learned. Is that the so if you can imagine. This is a recipe that has about eleven hundred ingredients in it and we're trying to make it taste well for a unique audience as an analogy and in doing so. Each intervention produces a counter intervention by the body's immune system probably an interestingly What we're learning recently in mechanism. Not all that different than how. The Placenta protects the baby from the mother's immune system so a multitude of different regulators protect the fetus from being rejected from the MOM's immune system. The melanoma is alive organism in many ways a parasite into the body once it becomes metastatic so it is actively co-opting the regulation of the Systemic Immune System in a way that allows it to survive. The task for us is to understand how it's doing that overcome at at the battlefield and also overcome it throughout the body where the immune cells are being made to fight it so you have increased the survival for patients with metastatic melanoma from seven to nine months to what now an average of two years and I can tell you we are Might my fellows those come to train with us. Now are very disappointed. When we don't create a complete remission patients with metastatic melanoma which six seven years ago was an impossibility and on her. So we talked about Immuno therapy chemotherapy. The World of chemotherapy is always changing. I suppose when drug companies are involved correct correct. So what's different in chemotherapy? So it's interesting about melanoma again coming from from a disease in which nothing has worked for very many years there has been a a series of almost generational expansion of people that have tried to sort of practice not And some of them have immunologists from DB -nology background and others have also been pharmacologist people that that have developed in their scientific lives into into understanding according to human genome and what that means and so since the development of the Human Genome Project Days of our awareness of the multitude into Heterogeneity of the genome that led to the Tumor Genome Atlas as as to identify mutations unique to various malignancies one of the early findings in around two thousand two thousand one that was published by the Welcome Fund was that a certain series of genes were necessary for the survival of melon sites. The normal cells and these genes were extensively. Hyperactive in the context of malignant melanoma. Are these considered the genes of the patient or the genes of the tumor. These are the genes of the tumor. The gene's cancer. If you think of cancers disease in general cancer is really a genetic disorder a disorder of mutated genes that allows the cancer cell to live in a different way relative to its normal counterpart. Does it go from me? The patient having cancer genes to the tumor having its own genetics. Absolutely so what what happens. Really so the is. What is the intervention That takes place and malignant melanoma. It is very simple answer. It's ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet light takes These cells that.

metastatic melanoma cancer Memorial Sloan Kettering Cance Tom Google Mira Markovic William Ostler Dr Markevic metastasized Madison William Coley Thomas Edison sarcoma director New York City Albert Einstein
"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

03:37 min | 4 years ago

"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"These patients are protect potentially susceptible to developing for example. One of the most active drugs that we use as a drug called Adriamycin in it which belongs to the class of drugs called anthocyanins which can cause significant effects on the heart down the road. Certainly some of the treatments we use can cause impaired fertility. Some of them can cause neuro cognitive effect or a skeletal effects or even propose or even predisposed to other malignancies so these are things that we try to make the patients aware of and monitor for in the both the patients and the physicians caring for them need to be aware of the significant potential for long term effects. You're the principal investigator for the Children's Oncology Group. I didn't even know about this group until we booked you as a guest. So tell me a little bit about that group. What do you do? So that children's oncology group is a cooperative group which seeks to improve curate and lessen the long term side effects as well as understand the causes of and develop better treatment modalities and Basically do everything surrounding improving the curate for children with cancer. The children's oncology group is a group of approximately. Gosh it's over two hundred institutions both in the United States and we have some Members of the C O G in other countries. Australia New Zealand Other countries other countries in the world also but mainly in the United States and Canada. We have randomized trials. We have phase two and phase one on experimental treatment drug treatment trials. We have epidemiology trials those trials looking at the causes of childhood cancer And it's just very exciting. The advances that have been made through cooperative group trials in curing so many children with cancer so given this collaboration has helped in generating funding for these trials so it funding is always an issue. There's never enough. Funding is the bottom line. Is there ways that children or the parents of these children can get the kids involved in clinical trials if they're added hospital where that's not an option? Should THEY TRAVEL? Or should they ask their physicians? Can we do this here? How does that work so in order to be involved in a clinical trial? The patient does need to be seen and treated at an institution where that clinical trial is in fact open and available and is the funding for pediatric cancer. Research hopefully growing is that growing as well. Well unfortunately the funding has been flat for a number of years now and obviously were trying to get philanthropic organizations and at the risk of omitting a few. I won't mention any but there are certainly feeling excellent philanthropic organizations but the money is certainly never enough and the funding has been unfortunately flat. And that's the reason why you have childhood cancer awareness month so we can talk about that. We've been talking about the importance of research and clinical trials in fighting childhood cancer with pediatric hematologist oncologist. Dr Karol Art. Thank you for joining us. Dr Arndt thank you for having me. Thank you for the latest in health and medical news. Go to news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot Org..

Oncology Group cancer Dr Arndt Adriamycin Dr Karol Art United States principal investigator Australia C O G Canada
"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

10:41 min | 4 years ago

"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"That's a big number. Although pediatric cancer deaths have declined by nearly seventy percent over the past four decades cancer remains the leading cause of death from disease among children. September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and here to discuss the topic is Dr Corolla. Aren't Dr Arndt is a pediatric hematologist oncologist and the principal. Investigator for Children's Oncology Group at Mayo Clinic. Welcome to the program. Dr Aren't Nice to meet you. Thank you good to be here. It's just the most terrible topic. The saddest things children getting cancer and luckily the rates seem to be declining or are they accelerating well. The rates are probably approximately the same as they've been we do. Have as part of the children's oncology group research something called Childhood Cancer Research Network which is an attempt by the cooperative. Group Children's Oncology Group to get information and create a database of every child under age twenty one diagnosed with cancer in the United States to be able to determine just that whether in fact the incidence of cancer is increasing or decreasing. You've you'll hear some times that someone was diagnosed with childhood cancer even if they're an adult. Are there specific cancers that are indeed just childhood cancers or are there are king adults diagnosed with those types of cancers? Or what makes it a childhood cancer? I guess so. Certain kinds of childhood cancer are or certain types of cancer in children are most commonly seen in children but can indeed be seen in adults for example neuroblastoma is typically thought of as a childhood cancer however adults can get neuroblastoma. It's much much rarer in adults but they can get it. Similarly there are certain tumors in particular bone tumors like OSTEO Sarcoma or Ewing Sarcoma which are commonly seen in teenagers and young adults but they can also happen when they're in their twenties or thirties so the Toronto as a as a parent of young children cancer is the last thing I'm thinking about when I when I see my kids but parents out there. What are the sort of typical signs and symptoms? That should alert them in the back of their mind that something untoward may be going on. Well there's no one particular sign or symptom that should bring up the diagnosis or thought of cancer. In contrast to adult cancers that for example appear in the breast colon or prostate childhood cancer even certain kinds of cancer can appear in lots of different areas in the body The most common form of childhood cancer is leukemia. Leukemia often presents as persistent. Fevers or power or bruising or swollen lymph nodes but sort of vague nonspecific symptoms and. That's not the first thing pediatrician thinks about. When a pediatrician sees a child with fever but unexplained fever unexplained joint pains? Make you think about that law last for a while make you think about something more serious such as cancer for bone tumors in my area of interest and expertise bone sarcomas and a lot of times? These are considered to be so called. Sports tumors because teenagers are often very active in sports. And it's perfectly normal for normal child to have an injury or a sprain or strain and I would say that if pain from a strain or a strain doesn't go away with conservative management. After a couple of weeks then you need to start thinking about more sinister in serious causes such as cancer. So I would say unexplained symptoms Or for example weight loss. Fevers night sweats lumps bumps. Those kinds of things is there because there's so many different types of cancer that there can be from top to bottom. I guess you know when it comes to children or kidney cancer you know whatever bone sarcomas like you mentioned. Is there a certain cause of cancer in children? Is it more likely to be a genetic issue so most of the time? There's really no explanation as to why a child gets cancer. It's just one of those freak random things and I often when I meet a family one of the first things. I make sure that they understand is that there's nothing they did or didn't do that. Caused their child's cancer which I think is very important in terms of genetic causes there are. There is a particular syndrome called Lee from any syndrome which is a family familial cancer syndrome which the Classic Syndrome is cancer diagnosed in two first degree. Relatives Prior to the age of forty five in those typical cancers. Typical sort of classic case is a child with Rob Demise Sarcoma whose mother might have had breast cancer diagnosed at very early age or Osteo Sarcoma and breast cancer so there are families that do have a predisposition to get cancer there are certain cancers that do show up as I mentioned. Us juicer coma grabbed my breast cancer. There are also other more rare kinds of syndromes that can predispose to childhood cancer but most childhood cancer is not considered to be genetic given the advances that we read about every day in in cancer other any new treatments on the horizon that you can talk to us about well. That's such a broad question Certainly immunotherapy is a hot topic. car T. cells for refractory. Leukemia are things that are being investigated. Probably one of the most striking advances that have been made his been immunotherapy in high. Risk Neuroblastoma So we are exploring new agents. Chemotherapy drugs but also new approaches such as immuno therapies. Why is it that children get neuroblastoma? More than adults. Probably because NEUROBLASTOMA is considered to be one of those tumors that one could call an IM- Brian all tumor which excuse me arises from so-called embryonal rests in the body that are there at the time of birth and something just goes awry and the immunology is something on the horizon. A bright spot on the horizon for children with neuroblastoma correct explained a little bit more so one of the recent studies that actually led to approval of a drug that was specifically developed for treatment of children with Neuroblastoma. There's a drug called dinner toxic map which is an antibody specifically directed against the neuroblastoma cells when given in conjunction with other drugs that stimulate the immune system. We did a randomized trial. In the children's oncology group which demonstrated that those patients treated with very aggressive therapy plus immune therapy specifically including the dente. Cab had a significantly improved survival rate an event for survival rate and better outcome than patients that did not receive dinner Tux Map. So that's very very exciting in that led to approval of that drug by the FDA this year so Dr Arndt myth or matter of fact since nineteen eighty only. Three drugs have been developed specifically for pediatric cancers. That's not very many. Is that a myth or is that a fact. That's actually fact. Wow they're the three drugs have been the dinner toxic. Mab that I mentioned previously. Which is the antibody to treat Neuroblastoma Cofer Bean which was specifically developed for treatment of recurrent childhood lymphoblastic. Leukemia and Irwin as Which is a form of disparage. Ace used to treat children with leukemia. Specifically who are allergic to the standard form. Which is e. Coli Spare Giannis. It doesn't seem like that's that's not a lot of advances in night since nineteen eighty y such a shortage of it or is it a shortage. Well the problem is that as we've mentioned earlier. Childhood cancer is relatively rare compared to cancer in adults and so it's really not on the priority of industry to develop drugs specifically for the indication of pediatric cancers. Most drugs that we use in pediatric oncology are not specifically FDA approved for treatment of a particular childhood cancer. They get approved for adult cancers first and then we use them to treat childhood cancers so we certainly have drugs they were not developed specifically for childhood cancer. Like the three drugs that we mentioned now. The the good part is that Congress passed a law a number of years ago called the best pharmaceuticals for children. Act which was an act that allows drug companies to have six months additional of exclusivity before the drug goes to market and is the the a patent is expiring allowed to be marketed by other drug companies if they do studies and children and so that was that was something that was a glimmer of hope in drug development for children that if the industry or company decides or agrees to develop the drug for children or look for childhood indication they get an additional six months of equis exclusivity so given these medications. Are they freely available or they best administered in for example cancer centers in the country? So it's important it's in the best interest of the child. I think for them to be treated at a cancer center or at a place that has access to randomized clinical trials which is really what have significantly improved the outcome of pediatric cancers over the years and to be a center..

cancer Childhood Cancer Awareness kidney cancer breast cancer neuroblastoma Oncology Group Leukemia Fevers Dr Arndt FDA Dr Corolla Investigator principal Mayo Clinic Congress United States Toronto Ewing Sarcoma Osteo Sarcoma
"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

13:58 min | 4 years ago

"cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"Mayo Clinic Radio. Presents conversation about gynecologic cancers with gynecologist Doctor Jaime Gomez the show hosts? Are Dr Tom Shives? And Tracy McRae. This podcast was recorded on September thirteenth. Twenty sixteen. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic. Radio. I'm Dr Tom Shy. And I'm Tracy mccray Tracy the PAP test you've heard of that. Probably had fewer near day should have and that was developed by a Greek physician by the name of George Patton Nicolau. My wife is Greek. And she's going to really like me for this. So it came into use around the nineteen forties. But actually he had discovered that you could find malignant cells under the microscope. Actually in the twenties or early thirties but nobody never got credit for it. Nobody believed him. Dull around the nineteen forties when it finally came into use. And of course that test is called the PAP test or the PAP smear and is now used worldwide for the detection and the prevention of cancer of the cervix and other diseases of the female reproductive tract. What he did what he showed. Was that by gathering just a few cells from the vagina inside the vagina vaginal tract and looking at them under the microscope. You could actually tell whether or not a woman had cancer of the cervix pretty amazing breakthrough. Absolutely the PAP test changed the lives of millions of women and now researchers are working on a screening test for endometrial cancer. Also known as uterine cancer research funded by the National Cancer Institute and Mayo Clinic is developing a screening method using DNA from a Tampon for early detection and screening of endometrial cancers now unique is that DNA from Tampa. How so and and we're talking about uterine cancer as opposed to cervical cancer and the two are connected but the cervix is just the opening of the of the uterus with baby-boomer is now in the age risk category for endometrial cancer. The number of women diagnosed each year is increasing here to discuss this new minimally invasive screening method for endometrial. Cancer is the woman leading the research. Director Jamie baucom Gomez. Welcome back to the program. Dr Beckham Gomez thank you. Dr baucom Gomez Pretty Exciting stuff and truly unique tell us about this using a Tampon to diagnose endometrial uterine cancer absolutely. We're very excited about this. We've known for decades that abnormal cells from inside the uterus can be picked on picked up on PAP smears but it's not very commonly picked up that way there are other markers that are not naked That are not necessarily visible under the microscope. Such as molecular markers that we can actually now test for these are changes in DNA so DNA mutations DNA methylation which is where the gene is actually turned off because of a change to. What's kind of hanging onto the DNA called methyl groups And we can pick those Those changes up not only in the actual cells that are the cancer cells but when those cancer cells shed and flow down through the cervix into the vagina they can be picked up Those those signals can be picked up on PAP smear and we're actually taking it to the next level of Trying to pick them up on the fluid in the vaginal canal because it's in that fluid it's in that fluid and And the reason that we're focusing on detecting this using a Tampon is data. Tampon is a common hygiene product that most women use in fact The tampon business in the United States in two thousand fifteen one point five billion dollars so we know using using that as a surrogate that this is a very common while accepted collection prod collection device. It's not a special Tampon by any means the kind you just buy it the convenience store. Well we're doing from from the research standpoint we're just using the common over the counter regular about Tampon As we develop this test further a likely be something a little bit more specialized so tell us how this works a you you tell the woman To use a Tampon put a Tampon in and then take it out when and then bring it to you is that how does it work so right now. We have clinical trial open In which we are collecting Tampon samples from women who are coming in with abnormal uterine bleeding That are paramount of puzzle or postmenopausal. So it's still in the research phases And before they have a biopsy to determine whether or not there is what the cause of that admirable pleading is on. We're asking them to collect a Tampon They're doing that in the clinic. We time how long it's been in the vagina because that's also part of the test need to figure out exactly how long it It needs to be in the. What's the minimum amount of time? And then the then the Woman goes on to have her clinically indicated biopsy in. How's it doing so far Well so far we've enrolled almost a thousand patients to that to this clinical trial And we're working on the combination of markers DNA methylation mutation Markers a table a test in prospectively in those in those samples with this sounds were some somewhat similar to Coa guard where you take a stool specimen and look for abnormal DNA DNA. That will tell you whether or not the patient has colon cancer. Same principle absolutely. So guard is a combination of mutations. One mutation and Three methylated genes. And they're all they also look for fecal called Hemoglobin so much a colt hemoglobin doctor. Yep exactly so fecal a call him Gordon. They're looking for blood as well. So but it's a multi target DNA test that is self collected and exactly. That's exactly what we're trying to To do with this type of a test. is develop something that is highly patient accepted something that provides women with high access meaning. They could collect the sample at home and potentially mail it in. That's our ultimate view or ultimate vision. I should say that would make I would imagine. Make a big difference for anybody could take part in that. I mean it could be that someone notices that they're not feeling writer. They've got some symptoms but they don't end up going to see a physician. This would be a good step to get that ball rolling absolutely. We know that decreased access to healthcare Does worsen survival in certain cancers. So that's that is something that we are hoping that ultimately we impact so uterine cancer itself. What are the symptoms? Who's WHO's at risk for this particular problem? Yes so there are very well known. Risk factors for uterine cancer. Obesity is probably one of the largest risk factors for wearing fur and mutual cancer Also having diabetes hypertension Those are also hyperloop. -demia those are risk factors having a family history of Uterine Cancer Colon. Cancer Stomach Cancer Those symptoms those cancers tend to If there are families where you can actually see high numbers of those cancers and that's consider Lynch Syndrome are some families are diagnosed with Lynch Syndrome? Which is a genetic condition that puts women at higher risk for uterine cancer? You don't hear about very many women. Dying of uterine cancer. I know it happens but it must is not all that common so it must be very treatable if you can. Just make the diagnosis right. It is It is fairly treatable especially in early stages early stages typically the treatment surgery alone Even in advanced stages There are potential cures but usually it requires extensive surgery radiation and chemotherapy and the side effects of those are oftentimes long lasting. And what are some of the symptoms of endometrial cancer? Yes so symptoms. Ninety percent of women with endometrial cancer will present with some sort of abnormal bleeding or abnormal vaginal bleeding Postmenopausal women I About Even though ninety percent of women with cancer will present with abnormal vaginal bleeding. Only ten percent of women who come in with postmenopausal bleeding will actually have a cancer. Well that's a good thing. It is a good thing it is but also all of those women undergo an Mitchell biopsy which is an invasive procedure and. We're looking to try to help void that as well. It's it just as interesting just as an exciting just as incredible caller of art so We wish you all the success in the world. But now we'll expand our discussion to other reproductive system cancers because September is gynecologic cancer awareness month so Dr Gomez why Why is Ovarian Cancer? The the worst of all of these so ovarian cancer has kind of a long standing nickname. And that is that. It's the silent killer The signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer can be very vague. Despite the fact that it's already in its advanced stages the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer typically fall into four categories or for For symptoms and that as abdominal bloating distension Change in appetite or society basically getting full fast when you eat Bowel changes Whether it's swinging constipation or diarrhea And then bladder changes Frequency a frequency of urination or urgency. So let's go over those. What's more loading Just WanNa make sure that that all of our listeners have. These bloating is one but that everybody has that at one time or another and you sort of write it off yet. We're talking about something that's constant that's persistent for. You know. Probably more like two weeks or so rather than an intermittent type of process But you're right. That's why these scientists. These symptoms are quite vague. All right and then you had bowel changes Bladder problems and a number two and I had to do with eating society full fast. So is ovarian cancer in a sense somewhat. Like cancer of the pancreas in that because the the ovaries are so deep-seated that tumor has to get fairly large before it does cause any symptoms and by that time it has often metastasized or spread elsewhere. Yeah there are different patterns As far as the spread of ovarian cancer but most often the GI type of symptoms the bowel changes and even the early Feeling full early in a meal. are probably related to the Matassa metastatic deposits that are on the surface of the small intestine large intestine and sometimes even the stomach. So what's this a five year survival rate now for women with ovarian cancer and compare that to? Let's say a decade ago. Are we better? We're better yeah. We've definitely made a lot of progress. I think it's it's hard sometimes to go through to actually dissect what the Five Year. Survival is for ovarian cancer in general because most ovarian cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage One of the most important prognostic aspects is thorough surgery In the beginning of the diagnosis out. Good you can get it all out. That actually improves five year survival And some studies have actually shown that at five years More than fifty percent of women are still alive who were diagnosed with advanced stage disease. Where is it usually go to from the ovary it starts there? Then where does it spread? it likes to go to an organ that's inside. The abdomen called the mental It is an organ that hangs down off of the stomach and large intestine. So it surgery if you can if it's a metal to the surgery hasn't spread to too many places or too far away from the ovaries chemotherapy. And what about radiation is it? Ever part of the regimen radiation used to be part of the regimen for ovarian cancer but it has It has fallen out of favor. Because we've shown that chemotherapy is actually more effective so treatment for ovarian cancer is a combination of surgery and chemotherapy. Sometimes we give chemotherapy first and then surgery in between two courses of chemotherapy. And what's the average age of the woman diagnosed with ovarian cancer most often? The woman that segments with cancer is going to be in her early sixties so it is yes. September being gynecologic cancer awareness month. We've talked about endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer What's up next cervical while cervical cancer? Also one of our specialties. How deadly cervical cancer so cervical cancer actually the mortality in the United States as well as in other developed nations has dramatically decreased with the introduction of the PAP smear Back in the nineteen forties We also now have the vaccine against the Human Papilloma virus which causes most of most cervical cancers That vaccine or those vaccines. I should say because there's actually a series of them that are that are available those vaccines. We don't think we've seen the impact of them yet. because those are vaccines that are currently indicated for For Young Women Ages Eleven and twelve and men too and Manitou. Yup exactly if enough people love of young people get vaccinated weekend pretty much. Wipe out cervical. What percentage of cervical cancers are caused by this virus ATV? Almost all of them are caused by high risk type of virus. Seventy percent are caused by two specific viruses. Hp Sixteen at HP eighteen in the vaccine. Good against both of those. It is all three. Vaccines that are available are include. Hp Sixteen Eighteen. What's hard to believe but women can also get cancer the vagina often. Do you see that so vaginal cancer is much more rare than than cervical cancer but it is also most often caused by those same viruses the HP viruses the key of that HP. It's it really is a cancer vaccine. I think people tried to diminish it a little bit saying Oh it's a sexually transmitted disease thing but it's it really is a cancer vaccine. Yes it is all three of the vaccines that are available are against The include HP sixteen eighteen As.

Cancer Ovarian Cancer uterine cancer endometrial cancer colon cancer National Cancer Institute Dr Beckham Gomez PAP Doctor Jaime Gomez Mayo Clinic United States HP Tracy mccray Tracy Mayo Clinic Radio Dr Tom Shives Dr Tom Shy Tracy McRae Dr baucom Gomez