8 Burst results for "Canadian Wildlife Service"

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"Now or the things you love could be next. Good day chris. How's it going. it's going good yup. He kyle steve. How're you doing chris. Are you sit at home right now. I know that goes kovic stuff. You guys have had lots of restrictions around work and kinds of stuff like that. So are you sitting at home in your officer where you're at right now. I'm at home. Yep yep. I'm working at home quite a bit these days when i'm not field nice. How many days would you say a month. You're putting in like On the backs of wildlife out in the wilderness. Doing your stuff way. I know it's really busy. February march april and then it kind of slows down in. I guess able really right. Yeah well turn the busy times. Tend to be in the fall through the winter and through the spring You know through the summer things bit quieter on the wildlife front. We do do some of our work that time like mountain goat and that kind of thing but Through the winter and spring. Yeah i'd say where we're in the field probably time zero to walk. Yeah yup well. I'm going to talk a little bit about that in a bit but before we jump into it. Let's let's go back and talk a little bit about you chris. I know that you've been in wildlife biology through the ministry. Flynn row for almost two decades. Now you've doing great work on the landscape. Your name always comes up with these great projects but can you talk a little bit about your background that you know how you got started wildlife world and kind of the work that you've done in the past. Yeah yeah for sure why. I think going way back like hunting hunting as a child growing up hunting with my father. I remember running into a wildlife biologist when we hunting actually west limbs lake and it was. I think i was probably fifteen or something. Didn't really know anything about the field. At that time ran into the sky out the out in the bush and he was telling me a bit about his job and stuff and yeah. I'd say from that point forward. That's what i wanted to do. You know so walling. High school. i went to university. I went to college. I actually burda um then university prince george and ya got right away. I worked in alberta for awhile with the canadian. Wildlife service Got a job. Here in dc on south coast initially worked there for a couple years for the ministry and then in region three ever. Since that's awesome. Sorry go ahead. sorry. I was just gonna say i've been. I've been through since two thousand eight. I started working for the ministry in two thousand and five. so what. what was your background in school. What did you take was it. Wildlife volunteer can take in terms of your studies. I took a degree in wildlife management yet at university of northern colombia. Prince george Fantastic so then now with your work. Obviously you're doing a lot of wild sheep. Work involved with moose. I guess it'd be see you guys are jack of all trades. We have ungulates specialists in all kinds of stuff but like in region. Three your senior wildlife..

chris February fifteen Three five alberta two thousand kyle steve Flynn row two decades prince northern colombia limbs lake time zero march april Prince university eight kovic south coast
"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:21 min | 2 years ago

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Radio thanks so much for being with me this morning I hope that you will enjoy the show on mother's day and for those of you who just heard after the first time are you still probably have a little bit of time to go do something about it before your mother is up but it is mother's day is always one of the great days of the year and I'm sure that many of you would look for to do self doing something outdoors but may not be able to sell happy mother's day to all you mothers and that very much includes my wife are starting off I would talk for a moment about what is likely the cleanest air you breathe in your entire life and the cleanest air we have probably three on this continent it may be over a hundred years if not the world and it will be probably the last time I talk about it because every day going forward it's likely that our air will become thirty year again as the world restarts its economic engine which is an absolutely fantastic prospect however when we realize the effect that we have are unarmed wireimage and how quickly if you will Mother Earth and mother nature as we affectionately caller was able to clean up the air it lets us have hope that we in fact can make real progress in improving the quality of our air around the world unfortunately it took this catastrophic event a complete world showdown shut down rather wish to be able to see mountain ranges that haven't been seen in lifetimes to breathe deeply to have nostrils that arose clogged with pollutants suddenly be free and it's it's remarkable the stars at night the formal right now which we have actually I guess it's one day past the formal but the incredible full moon that we have to go out at night and see stars that we've never seen to as I said to see mountain ranges that people have never seen it it's absolutely dynamic in the midst of this we also know that it will begin to go away and that is that is the sad part but maybe we can learn something from this obviously it can't be that we have a shutdown of the world's economies to deliver us the cleanest air of our lifetimes and and frankly of many generations but it can show us it does show us and backed that this can be done and when we look at all of the studies about air quality and respiratory diseases and the whole combination of how clean air affects the quality of life maybe we can be renewed in our efforts to try to figure out how to clean up the air of the world and this is a world issue it's not an American issue we we in fact are the are the leaders in the world on this even though some would have you believe or not we are the leaders in the world I'm trying to clean up our environment and I've said this for the twenty years I've been on the show only prosperous countries only wealthy nations actress good conservation and environmental consider living day to day and struggling to feed their people and people who are living day to day cannot think about whether or not there would burning fire in Africa or their coal fired stove somewhere else out the station is actually contributing or India do the pollution of the world they're just trying to feed their family and so we in America are blessed right now and have been for several generations to be the wealthiest nation on earth so we can take measures to improve the quality of our lives but when the call air quality ever recorded is recorded in Los Angeles is recorded in Los Angeles that tells you a lot the one mountain top that can be seen for over a hundred miles away which is I received a a call from a friend of mine in Idaho who said for the first time in my life I can see the Jarvis mountains which are over a hundred miles away in Nevada where I live in Idaho that tells you something people are taking notice but it will take a huge effort on the part of the world coming out of this thirteen deliver the kind of air quality that frankly we all deserve and those of you left me for a long time no I am not some environmental activists or radical who thinks that we should all drive electric cars and that we shouldn't have any fossil fuels in our system I don't believe that at all I just think it shows us the impact we've had on the quality of air in the world how quickly the air quality in the world can be cleaned up I doubt although I don't have statistics behind me to back this up but I've never heard scientists say if we shut down the world per month the air quality would be fantastic we shut down the world now prolong room in a month our air quality is in fact fantastic hopefully when we come back to a full economic recovery which lets all hope it's very soon that we can figure out ways going forward so that we can see the kind of mountain ranges we can't we haven't seen in our lifetimes and we can breathe deeply the air even in Chicago Illinois we can take a deep breath in the air okay our door along with knowing that we are in fact breeding the cleanest air we we have of our lifetimes and probably several generations before us that should be a goal I guess for all of us how we get there I I really I don't know none of us now but it shows what can happen and it's actually it's actually wonderful to know that there were breeding around the world is is the kind of quality it is right now is just as I said a moment ago and and I said last week it's tragic that it took this pandemic to have us see this kind of air quality and see the kind of sites that were saying because it certainly is fleeting but then a few months we probably will no longer see the kind of sites that were seen so clearly now I want to switch from air quality to take a deep breath soak it in this is the best you've ever is the best you've ever taken at quickly before we go to break I want to talk about the cancellation of the waterfowl breeding ground survey which is in fact a very big deal the surveys have been held uninterrupted since nineteen fifty five and they are the annual survey of waterfowl breeding grounds in North America the players United States the code is Montana Minnesota on up into Canada to sketch one Alberta honesty to Alaska which tell us what the population of breeding waterfowl will be that year within reason and what the status of weapons are this is been going on since nineteen fifty five uninterrupted and also interesting without really without change the method used today are very similar to the ones first used in nineteen fifty five and hopefully and the reason I'm pointing this out is hopefully taking a year off from the surveys will lead to an improved survey method the surveys are antiquated the data is any good or not is often debated as the fish and wildlife service's told waterfowl hunters for for many years running you're going to see tremendous populations of docs the highest we recorded or near the highest recorded and that kind of report back to the fish and Wildlife Service we don't believe you we're not saying these these kinds of populations there must be something wrong because you're telling us the year after year we are going to see really abundant populations of birds and what we see every fall were outside for the most part is a different story if you're hunting the Illinois river your hunting many parts of the Mississippi flyway you will say absolutely the surveys don't correspond with what we see in fact for the field there are obviously always exceptions but the general rule is read the websites if you read the stories if you if you go on and see the podcast and see the commentary of the millions of people about each fall in search of birds which overwhelmingly we are not seeing the kind of populations that the surveys are saying we should be seeing so caps and I would be a huge advocate to this as are many individuals I know that the fish Wildlife Service take this opportunity with the Canadian Wildlife Service to step back into we're not holding the surveys this year and say how can we improve them how can technology which is so rapidly advancing how can technology help us do it in a more cost effective way also in a more scientific way what we do in nineteen fifty five is very different we know it in twenty twenty a lot of times gone by a lot of technological advances have been made incredible technological advances the petition Wildlife Service the Canadian Wildlife Service has not made this adaptation to drones satellites all kinds of things that are standard practice for so many businesses and maybe it's because it's a government run entity versus the private sector and it is no there's no drive for profitability and having a more effective and accurate waterfowl survey apps the cancellation of it this year would lead us in search of the more profitable and well executed waterfowl survey will be back in just a moment much for the great outdoors your listen to Charlie Parker on the outdoor voices Chicago in America seven twenty WGN radio the first this message from our long time sponsors the northwest Indiana and Chicagoland Chevrolet.

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on Bird Banter with Boreal Bruce

Bird Banter with Boreal Bruce

18:26 min | 2 years ago

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on Bird Banter with Boreal Bruce

"What do we call this for? Better welcome into episode nineteen of Bird Banter with boreal bricks. And it's been a long time since we've been able to to. We get together Ben at night to out to lunch another episode in fact it was July that our last one was so. There's been a whole lot of stuff of happening at the hilly traverse research and Education Center that I'm looking forward to catching up on so we'll get to it. One of the exciting things that's happened for us is that we had an announcement from Fed nor that we've been in the works writing funding applications nations and Fed nor I gave the green light on getting six hundred and thirty thousand dollars to build a visitor center at the Marsh. So we are extremely extremely excited about that and It's going to be a game changer for us. There's all sorts of exciting programming that we can look at developing And it'll just make things easier to have school groups all sorts of different groups Like having more seniors coming out to see what we're doing at the marsh and Summer Camps and You name it so to the ability to be able to have washrooms and running water for people And space to show people more about our research That we're doing at the marsh so Part of the funding formula Is that Federer's promise of the six hundred and thirty thousand dollars that it's to be matched by the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund and we are are in the process of having our application reviewed Currently by the Hedge Fund so we are crossing crossing everything we possibly can That will be successful with that application and that we could be breaking ground as early as spring of two thousand twenty so that's That Shirley was exciting. News and It was kind of fun because the funding announcement was right up the marsh and Anthony Roda. WHO's the MP for For a writing He came up and did the He he did the official Announcement and it was really neat. Because he was rape near the Hummingbird Garden At the Martian while he was doing doing the announcement he didn't realize behind him hummingbirds were zipping around it made for a fantastic An exciting announcement for a so. We're we're really hoping to To have more positive news as I mentioned and the money that we raised from the catch the ace is going directly directly to fulfil our portion of the funding formula so if it hadn't been for the great success we had with the catch the ace. We wouldn't wouldn't be in the position that we are now to be able to To look very optimistically at breaking ground for this visitor center which I just can't I just can't capture and words what what that's gonNA mean for For the Marsh. So were really looking forward to some positive positive outcomes there The next item I wanted to talk about is that the rim is just about to come out and the Ren is the newsletter for the Hillary Commercial Research and Education Center. And this the issue this this coming issue is. I'm really looking looking forward to getting it to people because there's all sorts of great tidbits In this in this particular issue There's GonNa be a lot of stuff as people can imagine Vote Albany I. We're going to be looking at Chris Sacca wrote a nice article on Looking at The number of birds that we caught in our fall banning this year which was the fall. Banning was quite impressive so He's going to be. He's going to be writing about that and we actually have permission to reprint an article that appeared appeared with the Cornell Lab of our theology written by Alexander in Pennsylvania named Scott Weeden solve WHO's a very Very popular writer in in that part of the world and So that that articles very good and does a great job of explaining our L. banning and People be able to get a better sense of Of What Cha how're research fits into the bigger picture So it's it's going to be a a good good issue and So that would be a justification if anyone's thinking about becoming a member in supporting our research because that is how how we survive as an organization where member organization and we do depend on getting more and more members to get involved. It's twenty dollars for an individual individual membership and fifty dollars for a family membership and for more information about how you can become a member you can do it online all you need to do is is it our website www dot the hilter marsh dot com. So we'll be looking forward to prep getting more members out And I reading about what What has been happening at the Marsh? one another interesting area of research that that happened this October at the marsh was the Canadian. Wildlife Service brought a team of ten researchers to put a solar powered. GPS units on sandhill cranes. And we've always been we've always remarked on how many sandhill cranes that we you have it the marsh and about this time last year we partnered with the Canadian Wildlife Service and we did surveys in the area to let them know what The numbers of sandhill cranes were and at the time I wasn't I didn't realize that they were looking at Sending a team out to ban them but through the through the surveys that we did for the Canadian Wildlife Service they sent out this team and it turns out that the to miss coming area of essentially rate around the marsh within about fifteen kilometers in the Marche in a big circle is holds about a third third of the Ontario population ascent hill cranes. So it was a fantastic spot and When I was talking with the head researcher he was mentioning that they had put twenty one of these units on On on different sandhill cranes so So we're looking forward to seeing The results of the movement of those birds that can easily be tracked And the really exciting setting part about that is because these are as I mentioned. They're solar powered units. They're intimidating that they should have a life expectancy of about five ears just the units themselves. We're not The sandhills can live quite a bit longer than that but they're hoping that the units will give them five years of tracking data and So we're very excited about the possibility of the research that's going to go on with the with these Birds that have those locators on them and moving on to the next thing I want to talk about is and this is one of the things things that when I was talking about the visitor center and just how there's The word about the march is getting out to more and and more people The Ontario Field Ornithologists Is a group of about twelve hundred members. it's an organization that promotes and encourages birding throat Ontario They are planning a trip to come to the marsh next fall. And what what they're hoping to do is they're coming specifically to see the congregation of Santa Cranes and also they want to take in our L.. Banning I research so and basically to do Birmingham area. So we're very excited about that We've always known our bit biased on this vote. We've always known that we're the perfect location because we get so many boreal species And burgers from Southern Ontario are discovering that the marsh is an excellent spot to find some Some of the species that sometimes we to be quite honest about its we take for granted and we see this all the time that burgers in the south are They have tons of cardinals and if we whenever we get a cardinal up here we get a completely excited and on the other hand we have a species such as Kennedy's and Has Bruce Gross and BOREAL chickadee species that Burgers in the south. I would love to have the opportunity to see so so it's GonNa be exciting to have these murders up and the hope is that they'll go home and tell everybody how fantastic are areas for birding which will just intern attract more burgers and I will see the ripple effect that local businesses. We'll see how positive it is to promote birding in area because it'll help their businesses so especially hotels and restaurants will start to see that that Burgers surfing attracted Terry areas just positive economic. Oh come so we actually were getting together on Tuesday night. We're going to have our committees getting together to talk about how we can organize and promote that event. So we're so that'll be happening and sometime around Thanksgiving next year. So as I mentioned were Were were very excited about that. So onto talking talking about our AL banding this year We did We're really excited about our Albany because tem the banning I'm SORTA CAUGHT US off guard a little bit because We've talked a little bit before about so over the years And this is actually the the twentieth year of our Albany. At the marsh we started out specifically targeting northern solid else and over the years. We also have been catching long eared. Owls and boreal owls and we Discovered that the boreal owls move on a four year cycle and we saw that movement in two thousand two thousand and four thousand. Donate twelve sixteen. And we're anticipating the next year would be two thousand twenty but we've had a huge year for Orioles this year We've ended up catching right now. We are standing at two hundred and four banded royals and our record Was Back in two thousand twelve when we caught two hundred eight so we're we're poised to potentially break that record We did have quite a double snow. We had A vote Almost twenty centimeters snow the other night and during the day so oh and there's some nastiness in the forecast ahead of us so We may not be able to get those For Morales else to tie the record in a fifth to to beat the record so we have some very excited benders that are still coming out In hopes that we can can get there. Are this year. We had a a fairly low solid season. We've only managed to Ben Three hundred fifty fifty eight solids which is a little bit below average. Our biggest year was in two thousand seven when we caught a thousand and twenty. But that you're it was quite exceptional and I don't know forever going to see another year like that so so our numbers are just a little bit below average. What we've been seeing though? Is that China. We've been catching a lot of adult house. Normally we catch about ninety percent of our birds are birds in their hatching ear. So those are birds that just they're younger this year so we were So to have so many adults it's Suggested that the hatch wasn't as successful as it normally was read about sixty percent young birds right now so that's about third Less than what we normally would be doing so And for the longer nells. We ended up catching So far this this year we have had Seventeen and the average for long beards as sixteen. And we've only been targeting long ears Since two thousand fifteen so we haven't So we haven't had a real lengthy period to know How that average is going to fit in and how those numbers are going to What those numbers are going to suggest to us? Because I would just haven't been at it long long enough but The Salvator memorials. We've been doing for quite a while and we're very interested to see if this is actually the peak. This year that was was just bumped by a year or if next year is going to be the peak because The suggestion is that boreal owls are dependent on on a rodent has called the redback full and the redback full population Crashes Dependent on the amount of Birch Catkins which are the seedpods. What's that are at the end of the branches of of virtually But this year. The birches are plump with Catkins so and virtually the any any tree that can have a cone or a berry has them this year so Tamarack spruce black spruce. Anything that can have a cone has them and the As I mentioned the berries are just the. It was an amazing blueberry and raspberry season so there seems to be. Just there's so much food available for birds and anything that eats them so it's hard to imagine that the redback full had an issue this year feeding but it was very wet spring and late spring so perhaps that has Something to do with it. Most of the boreal owls we caught About Ninety five percent. Were hatching your birds. So we'll leave that up to researchers and people that are smarter than I am. I always tell people that I don't necessarily know what it means. I just had to catch them. So so it's We'll we'll have to see how that plays out and on the topic. If anybody knows of anybody listening to this is that. Here's the excitement in my voice about boreal owls. Please tell anybody you know. That is looking at the doing their master's in any science bird science field because we would love to attract some somebody that is wanting to do research on boreal. So there's definitely a master's in a PhD potential in the works. We have the facility here we have of and if we get a visitor center built will have more room for researchers to say comfortably and will be looking at. Yeah anything we can do to help. People do research on these magnificent boreal birds the better. So so I'm just sending that out there so I I thought we would do just for a moment is a play the call so the way that we catch the else is we have nets are very similar to the nets that we catch songbirds and as a songbird net is thirty thirty two millimeter squares and the squares. Here's our sixty millimeters across for for the owls so it's almost twice as big in the nets are Twelve meters long and they're there but about three meters high So and we we have a minimum of five nets at our arrays. And we play the call of these owls rate at near the middle of the nets. So what I'm GonNa do here natural which have this so we have a little unit called the a Fox pro and the Fox pro has ability or we have the ability to To record calls on the Fox frozen than we play them at her nets so here. This should be this. Let there there you go. So that's what the Call some of the boreal play next. It's quite a bit different different..

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:09 min | 3 years ago

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We see is that basically it's kind of like an if you build it they will come scenario with the with bacteria so during the deepwater horizon oil spill for example there was a tremendous microbial response to the oil that was released at the subsurface during that during that event because they're adding dispersants to the to the oil as it would rise and that caused it to sort of do you train at about three thousand feet and at that same level the oxygen was drawn way down and when we started to do with when the scientists are to do genetic analysis they basically found a a large abundance in a very rapid response of oxidation of hydrocarbons including methane so I'd say these these guys are relatively ubiquitous they're tolerant to a lot of different conditions the ones that are in the arctic are are designed specifically for cold conditions so they may not do specifically that well but the the genes that they Kerry which allow them to oxidize methane those will probably be there and in fact they operate much more quickly when the water warms Holly you're a marine biologist and coordinated some of the animal studies tell us what types of animals you saw while you were up there we were actually pretty lucky from what I've gathered from other cruises that I've been in the area and that we saw pretty much all of the marine mammal species you would expect to see in the arctic so we saw about twenty maybe polar bears have retreated to some moms that had cubs as well they were all out on the ice flows we sample had whales we saw a pot of nor walls he's a beluga whales outside of Beechey island those who suffer the helicopter we saw and walrus we side all different types of seals my favorite seals is the bearded seal their these fantastic array of whiskers on the front that look like a mustache or a beard that's why they get their names but with the kind of escorted us out they were on the individual pieces of ice as we left an area called pond inlet and so it was great to see this diversity it was kind of a treat if you wanted folks to join you on the bridge you know that top deck where the captain was all you had to say was polar bear and it was like a stampede to the top of the boat and there's just to let you know I want to say there's nine decks at some ninety six stairs from the bottom to the top of the ship so people were tracking it up the stairs to come see you know when their animal side it was pretty great and you had a lot of students with you to write yes we did we definitely did we had a group of eighteen undergraduates that were from minority serving institutions for across the United States how much was great to have them on board and get them to engage in exposed to actual science happening on board at a research vessel let alone an ice breaker and then we also graduate students that were participating as well and they were acting as a student leaders are for each of the core research groups so that they were helping guide the undergrads but their work that was happening on board the boat I can imagine it was a pretty crowded bridge by then with everybody yeah there was it was a pretty big bridge that we all kind of founder spot there was an outside deck if you want to be out there as well or some people would just go out to the to the front of the ship and look from there as well but yeah it was it it was a surprisingly spacious you know but still we were we are all snit family type thing on that but it was and I think that he comb Swedish sensibility after meaner played in well there because they're so even deal in an adult manner than they were quite happy to host a song yeah and entertain the questions from students and so it's a very what warm and welcoming for the ice breaker owns yeah they welcome the students that was the best part is the students really became part of that ship it wasn't just the research they were doing they really got to understand how that ship was functioning and how important it was the cold water you're in Swedish environs and I used to that you you also were you also worked with the the local communities up there to get their observations about the area what kind what kind of changes were they observing hauling well it we were able we did was we went to the community that I mentioned called pond inlet we were able to have a barbecue with them one evening which is great food security is actually a big issue a lot of our two communities it's hard to get food up there it's expensive so we are happy to host a barbecue with them all and and then we were able to speak with many of the locals at that point time but we returned the second day with the group we had toward guides from a group called the card back and that's a local research group that they are actual local scientists they're pond inlet that are doing work doing very sad research projects but then they try to work with other scientists from the lower forty eight or other countries that are interested in doing work up there to kind of bridge the gap between a traditional anyway knowledge and that modern day science per se and the interesting thing was when we brought them on board the vessel and we had actually made a really interesting well we thought we made a really interesting seabird observation when we are transiting from Julie Greenland Rick luck can who is our observer from the Canadian Wildlife Service I'd seen a city sure water and that's a birdie traditionally see on the the northeast coast of Canada AB I'm used to seeing them here in New England but they're not usually up in the arctic so Rick made note of that and then we talk to the folks from the car back they said we see city sure waters all the time here and we're like really they're like oh yeah at least the last five years we've seen them all the time so Rick made note of that and then was going to share that with their contacts at the Canadian Wildlife Service to then talk further with this group and pond inlet and it's just kind of a nod to the fact of how much knowledge these are two communities do happen how important their perspective and there and the details that they've been keeping on their own are so important to stay and to make sure we consider those and incorporate them as we continue to do research up there very very interesting I'm Mara Plato this is science Friday from W. NYC studios talking with a price loosen Holly Marin about their Northwest Passage project and Bryce I mean that you found you do you take I high scores right I understand that you found micro plastics in the ice courts in the arctic yes I that's correct I don't know what to say about that yeah I did I I don't think we knew what to say exactly either objected objectively we knew that this was a possibility because similar similar plastics have been found in ice cores in the in the central arctic in the even further north in the Eurasian in Canada based and so that's actually how we determined that we would try to make these measurements we are sort of following in the footsteps of the of the researchers who would not that on me so well Hey we can contribute just by looking and seeing what's in the Northwest Passage and if I think that that's the shocking thing for me was we went out to this beautiful what's called a multi year ice flow so it's a nice flow that's managed to survive the summer and and freeze again you know basically live another year and so it's thick it was is almost ten feet thick and we had this court in multiple sections and then we brought it back to the vote and Jacob struck in them Sandra DeAngelis the two the researchers who are leading that part of the work they with you some steps to concentrate the other material inside the ice and they were worried initially that if they didn't construct the entire core they wouldn't be able to see anything of it as they began the concentrations steps they actually realize that there was so much material in there that then they had to sort of break it up into sections and what what was remarkable and I think maybe a little bit of a shock to all of us even though objectively we are expecting it was that on the the amount of plastic basically these filaments that show up at this sort of the millimeter to micron scale as well as around beats almost like the microbeads that show up in shampoo and exfoliating body wash those kinds of things were really abundant in the ice much more abundant than in the water and maybe you can even save equivalent abundant as the as the microbes that we often see in the ice itself and then they can say that if I remember correctly they could see the micro plastics with the naked eye it you have to just look through a microscope to see them yeah yeah so yeah I mean you're saying the respondent as the algae was in I mean I I don't want to I don't wanna make too strong a statement of that because we haven't actually done accounting so we have to we have to go through some sequential steps that we couldn't take the couldn't take place on the ship but we we are initially worried that the there would be so much so many allergy is so much back like biotic matter that we wouldn't even see the plastic in fact the plastic was like in every layer was just as abundant and just as visible so it was quite high concentration on but again I want to read a reinforces it it was much lower in concentration in the in the water below energy since I think what we see is that the sea ice is as it is for many things it's a concentrator of the of the plastic material because of the way it both can trap stuff through atmospheric deposition so stuff it's a wafted in on on air masses the come into the arctic but also through it's the way it actually filters the water through this siphoning pumping mechanism that exist throughout the throughout the lifecycle of IT so so once it gets in there then of course it's also trapped it's kind of fruit right frozen in place and we saw so much more to talk about it which we had more time will have to have you come back and talk more about this Brian Bryce loosen Holly Martin both of the Northwest Passage project in both that of the university of Rhode Island in south Kingstown Rhode Island thank you both for taking time to be with us today thank you yeah thank you letters you're welcome talk to where to take a break and then when we come back we're going to talk to birds and bird seed the world in color even better than we do hello dear super vision might shape their super colorful feathers only interesting stuff about how birds see and.

three thousand feet five years ten feet
"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:09 min | 3 years ago

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We see is that basically it's kind of like an if you build it they will come scenario with the with bacteria so during the deepwater horizon oil spill for example there was a tremendous microbial response to the oil that was released at the subsurface during that during that event because they were adding dispersants to the to the oil as it would rise and that caused it to sort of do you train at about three thousand feet and at that same level the oxygen was drawn way down and when we started to do with when the scientists are to do genetic analysis they basically found a room a large abundance in a very rapid response of oxidation of hydrocarbons including methane so I'd say these these guys are relatively ubiquitous they're tolerant to a lot of different conditions the ones that are in the arctic are are designed specifically for cold conditions so they may not do specifically that well but that the genes that they Kerry which allow them to oxidize methane those will probably be there and in fact they operate much more quickly when the water warms Holly you're a marine biologist and coordinated some of the animal studies tell us what types of animals you saw while you were up there at we were actually pretty lucky from what I've gathered from other cruises that have been in the area and that we saw pretty much all of the marine mammal species you would expect to see in the arctic so we saw about twenty maybe polar bears were treated to some moms that had cubs as well they were all out on the ice flows we sample had whales we saw a pot of nor walls he's a beluga whales outside of Beechey island those who suffer the helicopter we saw and walrus we side all different types of seals my favorite seal as is the bearded seal they have these fantastic array of whiskers on the front that look like a mustache or a beard that's why they get their names but we so they kind of escorted us out they were on the individual pieces of ice as we left an area called pond in but and so it was great to see this diversity it was kind of a treat if you wanted folks to join you on the bridge you know that top deck where the captain was all you had to say was polar bear and it was like a stampede to the top of the boat and there's just let you know I want to say there's nine decks at some ninety six stairs from the bottom to the top of the ship so people were tracking it up the stairs to come see you know when their animals it was pretty great and you had a lot of students with you to write yes we did we definitely did we had a group of eighteen undergraduates that were from minority serving institutions for across the United States how much is great to have them on board and get them to engage in exposed to actual science happening on board at a research vessel let alone an ice breaker and we also graduate students that were participating as well and they were acting as a student leaders have for each of the core research groups so that they were helping guide the undergrads but their work that was happening on board the boat I can imagine it was a pretty crowded bridge by then little everybody yeah there was it was a pretty big bridge that we all kind of founder spot there was an outside deck if you want to be out there as well or some people would just go out to the to the front of the ship and look from there as well but yeah it was it was a surprisingly spacious you know but still we were we are all close knit family type thing on that but it was and I think that the comb Swedish sensibility after meaner play them well there because they're so even deal in an adult manner than they were quite happy to host a song average and entertain the questions from the students and the it's a very what warm and welcoming Clara board the ice breaker owned yeah they welcome the students that was the best part is the students really became part of that ship it wasn't just the research they were doing they really got to understand how that ship was functioning and how important it was a cold water you're in Swedish environs and I used to that problem you you also were you also worked with the the local communities up there to get their observations about the area what kind what kind of changes were they observing our well it we were able we did was we went to the community that I mentioned call pond inlet we were able to have a barbecue with them one evening which is great food security is actually a big issue a lot of our two communities it's hard to get food up there it's expensive so we are happy to host a barbecue with them all and and and we were able to speak with many of the locals at that point time but we returned the second day with the group we had toward guides from a group called the car back and that's a local research group that they are actual local scientists they're pond inlet that are doing work doing very sad research projects but then they try to work with other scientists from the lower forty eight or other countries that are interested in doing work up there to kind of bridge the gap between a traditional anyway knowledge and then modern day science per se and the interesting thing was when we brought them on board the vessel and we had actually made a really interesting well we thought we made a really interesting sea bird observation when we are transiting from tule Greenland a wreck luck can who is our observer from the Canadian Wildlife Service I'd seen a city sure water and that's a birdie traditionally see on the the northeast coast of Canada AB I'm used to seeing them here in New England but they're not usually up in the arctic so Rick made note of that and then we talk to the folks from the car back they said we see city sure waters all the time here and we're like really they're like oh yeah at least the last five years we've seen them all the time so Rick made note of that and then was going to share that with our contacts at the Canadian Wildlife Service to then talk further with this group and pond inlet and it's just kind of a nod to the fact of how much knowledge these are two communities do happen how important their perspective and there and the details that they've been keeping on their own are so important to stay and to make sure we consider those and incorporate them as we continue to do research up there very very interesting IRA Plato this is science Friday from W. NYC studios talking with a price loosen Holly Marin about their Northwest Passage project and Bryce I mean that you found you you take I high scores right I understand that you found micro plastics in the ice courts in the arctic yes IRA that's correct I don't know what to say about that yeah I did I don't think we knew what to say exactly either objection objectively we knew that this was a possibility because similar similar plastics have been found in ice cores in the in the central arctic enough even further north in the Eurasian in Canada based and so that's actually how we determined that we would try to make these measurements we're sort of following in the footsteps of the of the researchers who would map that out and we said well maybe we can contribute just by looking and seeing what's in the Northwest Passage and if I think that that the shocking thing for me was we went out to this beautiful what's called a multi year ice flow so it's a nice flow that's managed to survive the summer and and freeze again you know basically live another year and so it's thick it was is almost ten feet thick and we had to kill a core if multiple sections and then we brought it back to the boat and Jacob struck and Sandra DeAngelis the two the researchers who were leading that part of the work they went through some steps to concentrate the other material inside the ice and they were worried initially that if they didn't construct the entire core they wouldn't be able to see anything of it as they began the concentrations steps they actually realize that there was so much material in there that then they had to sort of break it up into sections and what what was remarkable and I think maybe a little bit of a shock to all of us even though objectively we are expecting it was that on them the amount of plastic basically these filaments that show up at this sort of the millimeter to micron scale as well as around beats almost like the micro beads that show up in shampoo and exfoliating body wash those kinds of things were really abundant in the ice much more abundant than in the water and maybe you could even say ever quibbling abundant as the as the microbes that we often see in the ice itself and then they can say that if I remember correctly they could see the micro plastics with the naked eye they do have to just look through a microscope to see them yeah yeah so you're saying the respondent has the algae was in I mean I I don't wanna I don't wanna make too strong a statement of that because we haven't actually done the counting so we have to we have to go through some sequential steps that we couldn't take the couldn't take place on the ship but we we are initially worried that there would be so much so many allergy and so much back like biotic matter that we wouldn't even see the plastic in fact the plastic was like in every layer was just as abundant and just as visible so it was quite high concentration on but again I want to read a reinforcer it was much lower in concentration in the in the water below energy since I think what we see is that the sea ice is as it is for many things it's a concentrator of the of the plastic material because of the way it both can trap stuff through atmospheric deposition so stuff that the wafted in on on air masses to come into the arctic but also through it's the way it actually filters the water through this siphoning pumping mechanism that exist throughout the throughout the lifecycle of IT so so once it gets in there then of course it's also trapped scan for rang frozen in place and we saw so much more to talk about it which we had more time off to have you come back and talk more about this Brian Bryce loosen Holly Martin both of the Northwest Passage project in both that of the university of Rhode Island in south Kingstown Rhode Island thank you both for taking time to be with us today thank you yeah I think you are you're welcome talk to you to take a break and then when we come back we're going to talk to birds and bird seed the world in color even better than we do hello dear super vision might shape their super colorful feathers only interesting stuff about how birds see and.

three thousand feet five years ten feet
"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on Science for the People

"Hi, everyone. Just a quick note about today show. It is a live show and the meeting for the American Association for the advancement of science is loud and proud. So please don't mind. The crowd noise. We promise our guest this week are worth it. We've snagged three amazing experts to talk about micro-plastics rafting barnacles and bird poop because science with people. There's always room for bird coop. Okay. So we're about to get started. And the way this works for all the people who are enjoying science. When people the first time signs of people is an interview only podcast. And so I'm going to give an introduction. And then I'm going to start asking these fabulous scientists questions about classics, and it's going to be depressing. Amazing, and I brought this plastic coffee, and I feel bad or any? I'm just gonna don't don't look. Okay. So welcome to our science who the people live show. Thank you. I'm bethany. Berkshire science writer at science news and society for science and the public today. I am delighted to be here on the podcasting stage at the American Association for the events of science. And we've got the invitation to record a live show here. I just started digging through the program, and it's it's so wonderful to be here. It's like an embarrassment of riches in terms of content. But a couple of the sessions really stood out to me and all of those were on plastics. We are surrounded by plastics right now, they're plastics in my coffee there plastics in our smartphones. They're plastics in the chairs you are sitting on the close. We are wearing it. Plastic wrapped the food you probably ate for lunch. If you ate lunch, please eat lunch, and that classic eventually ends up in the environment. And as scientists have found a truly shocking about of it ends up in the ocean. When a lot of us think of ocean, plastics, we might think of like whole plastic bottles and tennis rackets, and I don't know boats. Big chunks, but a lot of the plastic in the ocean is actually way smaller than that. These plastics are micro-plastics which are smaller than five millimeters in size. That's about how. The size of a LEGO give or take I should've brought my goes, but small plastics can have big effects. So today, we're going to talk about plastics in the water where they're going. How much there is how we track it. What on earth we need to do about it? And I'll just go ahead and tell you guys right now that they found plastic in the beer, so we'll start there. To to cover this incredibly depressing topic. I'm here with Jennifer, Jennifer, Provan, sure, Chelsea Rochman, and Christina Simpkin. Jennifer provider is unit head of the wildlife health group at the Canadian Wildlife Service Chelsea Rochman is an aquatic ecologist at the university of Toronto and Christina. Some cannon is a marine ecologist at the Smithsonian environmental research center. Thank you so much for being here. Even though I know here's another session on plastics right now when I'm sorry. Thank you for having us. So I wanted to start a little bit with the scale of the problem. Chelsea do. We know how much plastic is in the ocean by weight or volume or tanker trucks Wales. So measure, we don't know how much plastic is in the ocean. In terms of in general, we have some estimates of how much is floating on the surface of the ocean. And we have estimates of how much enters the ocean every year. So the number that we're often given is that we estimate and this comes from Jamba. Wchs work that eight million metric tons of plastic enters the ocean each year. And so the elephants are the blue whales is that if we lined people up along all the coastlines around the world shoulder to shoulder, and they all had five plastic bags, and they threw them all in at the same time. That's how much enters every year..

Chelsea Rochman American Association Berkshire science Christina Simpkin Jennifer Jamba Canadian Wildlife Service Smithsonian environmental rese tennis writer university of Toronto Provan eight million metric tons
"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

09:13 min | 3 years ago

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Section leader with wildlife inherited service department of natural resources and Josh homeopathic. Did I say that correctly? Josh allen. All right waterfowl program manager who gets to deal with the public. From also wildlife inherited service department of natural resources. Welcome gentlemen. High Bill bill's kind of sitting out this round. He's sitting here in the studio in the background. And we'll be here in a little bit more from Bill later right now, we're gonna talk Paul and we're going to talk to Josh. And we're gonna talk about the symbiotic relationship between the US fish and Wildlife Service and the Maryland department natural resources federal government regulate migratory game birds as they have for over a century. That's right. And, but we share responsibility for those migratory birds with with the states the government of Canada and the person of the Canadian Wildlife Service and the provinces in Canada. So my my job title, indicates what part of what that relationship is as the flyway. Representative for the Atlantic flyway. I'm the fish and Wildlife Services liaison between the service and the states and provinces in the Atlantic flyway for managing migratory birds, and since we share those responsibilities. It's important that we work closely together, the the Atlantic flyway council is a coalition of state agencies provincial agencies and the territory of Puerto Rico. There are seventeen states in the Atlantic flyway in the Atlantic flyway council six provinces, and again, the territory of Puerto Rico, and my I'm the liaison between that group and the fish and Wildlife Service and Josh can tell you more about what the Atlantic flyway council is about we'll get to that. In just a second. What is a flyway somebody tell us what a fly way is. Well in the in the couple of several decades, right after the migratory bird treaty act was signed migratory bird hunting regulations were set along latitude, no gradients. So the south had one set of regulations on the north and middle latitude states heats had their different regulations in a twenty years after so that now that was nineteen thousand nine hundred thousand eight hundred eighteen hours anniversary earlier this year, a great one hundred ten of the act so twenty years or so later, Frederick Lincoln did an analysis of banding information banding data on waterfall that indicated that there were pathways specific pathways that ducks took from Canada down to the US and points south of for some species on their annual microphone migration route. And he he developed the term fly ways to characterize the major migration pathways the four major pathways. The birds take going north to south on migration in one thousand nine hundred forty eight the fish and Wildlife Service decided hey, that would be a pretty good way to manage harvest regulations for these game bird species. And so the service at that time switched over from latitude, no gradients to flyway management and just shortly thereafter, the four flyways. The the states and provinces in those fly develop those flyweight councils and the the Atlantic flyway. I think was nineteen fifty two was when the flyweight council came into existence but shortly after forty eight when we changed our system of managing regulations and management is based on the fluctuating population great levels of each of the waterfowl species. Yeah. Level wonder why we have you know, why are we allowed to bluebills one year and three the next or one canvasback or whatever it might be. And I mean, you know, you gotta stay up on it because all based I guess on population levels right population levels into some extent. Habitat conditions got to influence those population levels. Yes. Win flyway system of regulations was first established there are differences in hunting regulation season length. For example, is your it's longer in the Pacific flyway short- shorter in the Mississippi and Atlantic flyways that was all based on two two main things one is how many ducks there were in the flyway second. How many hunters there were in the flyway? So in the Pacific flyway, they have they had and they still have lots of docs, not very many hunters. Right. So they have a long season and a slightly more liberal bag lemon in the Atlantic. Flyway? We have quite a few hunters not not a whole lot quite a few hundred not all that many ducks. So we have a much shorter season. Mississippi flyway has lots of docs. But also lots of hunters fifty percent of the duck hunters in the country. Flyway? So they typically have regulations that are similar to the flyways in the central flyway is somewhere in between. They've got a lot of docs, not all that many hundreds. But quite a few there in between. And that's that's historically been the way we've managed ever since. And you have to believe he said seventeen states six provinces and Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico, Tori, and that's in the Atlantic a lot of management territory, and it is Josh we have the epicenter of Canada goose wintering right here in the Delmarva peninsula. Correct. Yeah. That's that's absolutely true. There are we have the epicenter of the wintering ground. But it is it is certainly shared resources as birds travel south from the from the nesting grounds in Canada. And that's what makes the flyway council and interacting with the other states and our peers council so important. So the question gets asked, and I've been asking I'm sure you guys hear it all the time. How can they kill so many more states north of us and how can they kill more in Canada than we're allowed to kill right here in Maryland. And you guys have FAQ frequently asked question. Site on the Maryland department natural resources, which I find to be very good at answers. A lot of those types of questions. But it's basically there's a difference between a state like New York compensatory where the geese passed through as opposed to where they spend the most of their winter where they're most susceptible is that answer that question kind. Yeah. That's that's very close to the answer. So we we monitor harvest a course through the banning program that we offer and also through the ports collection survey, most waterfowl, hunters, maybe sometime in their career have received wing envelopes from the fish and Wildlife Service were were diary survey. And so those are the things that. Both the states and the fish Wildlife Service used the monitor harvest, so we know kind of the proportion of the harvest that occurs in each state and Maryland, of course, has of the the goose harvest we have the we and most of them, you know, of that harvest. I think were because this is where this is where they stay for the longest period of time, the hunting season overlaps that stay and they're very susceptible. Plus the fact that Maryland hunters are very good at killing Maryland, hundreds of very good at killing gays have absolutely not necessarily everybody's good at shooting them. But we're good at kill it. Well, that's right. You know, there are those days. You know, you you wish you'd spend a little more time on on the sporting clays ranger to skeet range. Sure. That's that's for sure. But yeah, we have experienced goose hunters we have well developed outfitting business. And and you know, this is basically the. The southern terminus for this this population against now. There's a few that still go to Virginia and North Carolina. But as we know that's changed a lot over the years. It used to be used to be North Carolina and points south back in the day. And it's switched to Delmarva. And and probably still changing a little bit. But but for right now, we're we're still the the center of the wintering ground for sure got it. Here. We are in the first segment we'll be switching up here in a minute or two, but it is time for me to tell the.

Atlantic flyway Atlantic flyway council Josh allen Wildlife Service Canada fish and Wildlife Services Bill bill Atlantic Maryland Puerto Rico Canadian Wildlife Service US fish Wildlife Service Mississippi North Carolina program manager Section leader Delmarva
"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

12:11 min | 3 years ago

"canadian wildlife service" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"That's our that's our master producers voice says now more on Al analysis is going to be back. What did you say? More on a moron hunting or more. Call me more on anyway. Josh switched seats. Bill. Harvey Bill is the game birds section leader of the wildlife, natural heritage service department, natural resources and. You know, he's sitting back here over our shoulder. Just glaring at us, you know, trying to correct all the mistakes that we made especially mind coming into the next hour. But. Phil talk about your the man on the ground. You're the boots on the ground guy. Talk a little bit about that on the on the I think it's worthwhile to spend a few minutes talking about the the goose populations. We have in the flyway. The one everybody thinks about that that so important in Maryland is the Atlantic population. These are the birds that NASA northern Quebec mainly on the Ungava peninsula, which is about a thousand miles north of Maryland. And then in the in the fall, they leave the breeding grounds and eventually they get to Maryland, which is the primary wintering area for those birds. In the. Sort of in the eastern part New England area of the flyway. There's other geese that nest in labrador Newfoundland that are also migrating geese and these birds when they come south in the winter, they winner long the New England coast south to about Long Island, and then in roughly the last hundred years or so there's the well we all call the resonant candidate geese that that are really only here because people put them here. There's game agencies move geese around, you know, and the thirties forties and fifties there some people's attribute the resident geese to release of decoy flocks when live decoys were made illegal in the thirties. And then there's a lot of people that if you just by para geese and want to put him on your farm pond. Those are birds that also didn't typically migrate. So they and these birds of they've been around for a long time. But the the numbers really exploded in the really about. When I started here Maryland in the late eighties to one plus one resident Guzzi qu'ils twelve. Yeah. Exactly. God and one of the really important things with with with the increase of resonant gays when I first started in the late eighties for decades prior to that the goose were monitored and really managed by surveys were conducted in the winter, and for many years, basically, you were those were all Atlantic population are migrating geese. So we know what we're looking at in the late eighties. When resident goose numbers really started to increase and the AP and the resident birds mix, you know, when you're flying from the air, you certainly can't tell them apart. So at that time, it became really really important that we start to work on the breeding grounds where when we looked at a goose from the air. We knew it wasn't Atlantic population goose, so we had some good reliable numbers to manage the population. And that required that required going to the nesting grants, which is what you did or. Do still. Yeah. For about I flew the so the monitoring the really the most important prop monitoring that. We do is the spring survey where we estimate this the size of the breeding population. So when the geese leave here in late February or early March, it takes them about two months or so to get to the breeding grounds. It's all uphill. It's all uphill. Yeah. And. They actually are starting to mass not until about late may or early June. So every year we go up with a small plane. We're usually there about the middle of June, and we so and and pretty much all the geese nest at about the same time because the summer and spring is so short so were there about halfway through incubation and we fly about. Usually takes about six days of flying. We fly at about one hundred feet hundred and fifty feet above the ground with a pilot to observers, and we count on either side of the plane for a certain distance out the number of geese, we see the numbers single gays, the number of pairs, and the number of groups that gays and from those long narrow transacts that we do throughout the area. That's how we estimate the number of pairs and the total population. That's quite a quite a feat. Yeah. Jackson things you're this. This survey is is another good example of the cooperative nature of of flyway business. The it's flown by a US fish and Wildlife Service pilot an airplane the observers are Canadian Wildlife Service and Maryland DNR Representative from the Atlantic flyway council. So. That's a good again a good cooperative. Good cooperative effort. How many others how many other states do this? Any states in the flower? How many go the well? It's it's. How many other representatives Maryland because we have such a vested interest in AP geese we regularly. I spent twenty years or so flying the survey because it's. Because it's really important to us but on a regular basis, both Maryland and other states as well. San people up. In the first week in August, usually the second part of our monitoring. In addition to the pair survey that we do is we send crews usually two helicopters, and and to cruise they go up there the first week in August to actually ban geese. And again, Maryland, we regularly send people there, but other states do as well. So it's, you know, it's a as Paul said, it's a real cooperative effort, and one thing he didn't mention was in addition to personnel and aircraft. You know, a lot of all the work in the north is really really expensive. And so the funding for all these surveys. It's a it's also cooperative from the fish and Wildlife Service, and then each state contributes, a substantial amount of money to the monitoring to pay for what we do is that where is that where bird stamps dollar birds? Part of the nine dollars goes to every year. Yep. Sure. Which is vitally important as well. I mean, you you gotta have the money to rent the planes and pay pay the people salary to do the work. And it's it's it sounds intriguing. But I imagine it's somewhat exhausting as well. To be up there for that amount of time. Doesn't sound like there's you know, doesn't sound like you're going to Vegas now, you're not going to Vegas. But if you're interested in wildlife and wild things, I mean, it's it's it's, you know, two way far north there's very few people. The only people really are the in you. It's the live in villages along the coast. So it's I mean, it's been a great experience. Sure. Absolutely. Absolutely. Maybe put that on the bucket list for sure. So you've got a population. I mean, doing based on our servers, what is this historical population or maybe the past decade or give us give us some numbers about where we were. And where we are how we had a moratorium here right during the time of your tenure where we closed the candidate goose season for five years, and we went from. Down the one bird, and then nothing and then back to one bird. And he had to check all of them in you had to, you know, going send a toenail samples or something of every bird. I mean, it was you know, it was tough. They're coming back from the moratorium. But I was just for a little perspective. We started doing the surveys and the north in one thousand nine hundred ninety three and at that even prior to that time, the the population had likely been declining in one thousand nine hundred ninety five the survey estimated only forty thousand pairs and at that time. And about three years before that it was around one hundred thousand pairs so at that time the flyway council, and it was supported by the fish and Wildlife Service decided that we really needed to close the season to give the the population a chance to rebound, and it was closed from nineteen ninety five until two thousand and one. And during that time, they had several least a couple of good really good breeding years. The adults were surviving at a high rate because there was no sport hunting either in the US or Canada. And we saw the population really increased quickly and the hunting season resumed in two thousand one. And by that time the population had increased to two over. Over one hundred thousand pairs. In the in about the last twenty years, or so we've we've basically the population's been pretty much stable ever since we resumed hunting in the range of one hundred fifty two maybe two hundred thousand pairs, and and we've been in these moderate regulations which for us. Amount of to about fifty day season where the tuber limit. There's been a number of years in the last ten that the production was below average because of late late springs and thaws which which tends to depress the productivity of the geese. And the last couple of years we've seen the number of pairs drop pretty substantially. Whereas this year, the the the estimate was about one hundred twelve thousand and three years ago was about one hundred ninety thousand so we're we're we're starting to see the population decline, and we're concerned about that. But in in to put it in perspective. You know, we're hopefully, we're making changes now. Well, before we get into the level like we were in the nineties where we had to actually close the hunting season altogether. So we're we're airing on cyber caution and conservation with the. The proposal or the I guess it's set in stone for next year with the thirty day one bird season, it's already been established. And that's what it's gonna be. It's not exactly set in stone. But it's it's it's fairly close to that. So in the win the technical section flyway council we met in late September and the recommendation that came out of the technical section. That was supported by the council was for the for the hunting seasons in the zone in the parts of the states that have a Atlantic populations zone zone is is that's where most of the Atlantic population. Geese are harvested in each of the states where about ninety percent of each state's Atlantic population goose harvest occurs. The recommendation was for a to go too restrictive season, which for Maryland in two thousand nine hundred twenty would be thirty days. Season with a one bird. More on that. When we come.

Maryland Wildlife Service US Atlantic flyway council Harvey Bill Josh Phil flyway council section leader AP Vegas New England Long Island NASA Canadian Wildlife Service labrador Newfoundland Jackson Ungava peninsula Paul