23 Burst results for "Canadian Space Agency"

"canadian space agency" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

09:10 min | 4 months ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Since the end of space shuttle program in twenty eleven that was followed by the first commercial crew rotational flight to the station carrying four astronauts aboard a spacex crew. Dragon bath maine resilience. November mark the twentieth year of humans continuously living and working aboard the space nation with one station astronaut. Kristina cook wrapping up a record. Three hundred twenty eight day stay on the orbital outpost the most time spent in space on a single mission by any woman. Meanwhile astronauts bobbing and. Chris cassidy each completed record-tying tenth space walks on the same outing in july and we graduated the first class of astronaut candidates for future missions to the station the moon and mars and accepted more than twelve thousand applications for the next class of artemis generation candidates. It was a big year for our artem plans. Capped off in december with the introduction of eighteen astronauts that will help pave the way for human missions on around the moon including landing the first woman and next man on the moon by twenty twenty four. I fellow americans. I give you the heroes of the future who will carry us back to the moon and beyond we continued testing the space launch system or sos rockets core states for artists one with green one series to verify the core staying just launch ready for two thousand twenty one teams began stacking the solid rocket boosters and practiced rolling out with a mobile launcher. That will be used for the flight and after rigorous environmental testing. We began final preparations. On our orion spacecraft were the crude ornaments mission artemis one is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions to the moon that will ultimately lead to human exploration of mars in october nasa and seven partner countries signed the accords for international participation and eighth partner joined later. We finalized agreements with the european space agency and the canadian space agency to collaborate on our gateway lunar outpost. We worked with private industry on arteries selecting three. Us companies blue origin dynamics and spacex to design and develop human lunar landing systems. We also selected spacex to be the first us company to deliver experiment and other critical cargo to the gateway we announced the first scientific investigations for the gateway will be a study on solar particles and solar wind and one on how to keep astronauts from radiation. We made multiple task order. Awards and payload assignments as part of our commercial lunar payload services or clips initiative need to work with american companies to san science and technology to the lunar surface. We selected astro body to send a golf-cart-sized a robot called viper to the moon south pole and search for water and solicited bids from clips partners to fly a suite of science and technology payloads to the moon in twenty twenty two. We had a steady stream of groundbreaking science missions and twenty twenty october first for the agency. When our cyrus rex spacecraft touched venue and collected sample material when it is returned to earth we hope the ancient material teaches us more about the origins of the solar system as the countdown to ours continues relaunched. The perseverance rover and ingenuity helicopter. On our mars. Twenty twenty mission both maimed by students. Perseverance will be the first mars rover to collect samples for future returned to earth while ingenuity will be the only aircraft to attempt flight on another world. We teamed with the european space agency on the solar orbiter mission that will provide the first ever images of the sons polls and unique insight into how the sun affects the space environment vessel fia. Flying observatory confirmed for the first time. The existence of water molecules on the sunlit surface of the move we identified a molecule in the atmosphere of saturn's moon titan that has never been detected in any other atmosphere this could point to the presence of more complex compounds there that are favorable to life and we celebrated thirty years of our hubble space telescope which continues to enhance our understanding of the cosmos and part literally our review of it massive space technology in twenty twenty helped to advance future exploration science and aeronautics capabilities and benefit life on earth nasa developed sensor suite that could help robotic and crewed nations make precise soft landing on the moon was launched on a blue origin sub orbital rocket we continued developing to instruments to study using lunar resources m solo and trident will conduct chemical analysis and the drill for resources respectively. I'm massive project is making gears housed inside a metallic glass material that can withstand the extreme cold on the moon without being heated to keep them operational we announced twenty partnerships to mature. Us industry developed space technologies for the moon and beyond including a three d. printing system for artists testing of a simple method to remove dust from planetary solar arrays and more our green propellant. Infusion vision successfully proved that space missions can use less toxic fuel for future missions and for the first time an experiment that balances a laser beam from earth offer reflector the size of a paperback book. That has mounted on our lunar reconnaissance. Orbiter receive the signal back. This could enhance laser. Experiments used to study the physics of the universe. Nasa and partner agencies observing our home planet witnessed record-breaking activity in twenty twenty the atlantic hurricane season produced thirty named storms the most ever on record with thirteen bills reaching hurricane status. Meanwhile a devastating wildfire season in the western part of the country saw more than three million acres burned in california alone. Nasa instruments on spacecraft settlements and aircraft provided data to responding agencies including satellite imagery showing smoke and unhealthy aerosols from the fires drifting toward the eastern part of the country. Liftoff physical six michael. Froehlich satellite launched in november. It is the first two identical satellites scheduled to make global sea level observations. For at least the next decade we help you celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of earth day. Virtually with the hashtag earth day at home and online videos activities and other resources available in both english and spanish and people around the world. Help us map out. Coral reefs by playing a video game that uses specialized instruments to capture three d images. That anassa supercomputer then uses to map out reefs at an unprecedented resolution continued our research in the skies aimed at helping the aviation industry operates traditional and next generation aircraft more safely and efficiently'' the wing and cockpit sections of our x fifty. Nine quiet supersonic technology aircraft began taking shape. The plane also received. It's one of a kind engine. The x picky nine is being developed to create a low noise. Sonic boom. That can barely be heard. If at all by people on the ground we made significant progress developing the x fifty seven maxwell our first all electric experimental plane with testing of the high aspect ratio wing the electric crews motors and the propeller assemblies. A pair of nasa research projects flu as part of boeing's twenty twenty eighth. Oh demonstrator program. That could lead to quieter more fuel-efficient future aircraft and fewer operational flight delays. We continue our research efforts to develop an air transportation system for revolutionary new aircraft including using a remotely piloted aircraft to simulate an urgent medical transport mission and we used augmented reality. Software can make useful information about drones and other aerial vehicles. More widely available to airspace operators. Whether it's advancing space exploration making scientific discoveries or any of the other amazing things we do and you're out. Nasa does what it does to benefit. Here's a few more examples from twenty twenty in the midst of staying home recommendations due to the covid nineteen pandemic. We compiled a nasa at home online resource. To help you stay. Engaged and explore the universe around us. A computer simulation used to show that fewer amounts than usual of some pollutants were found in earth's atmosphere do presumably to changes in human activity because the pandemic related restrictions and new traffic management project for emergency response. Aircraft looked at how drones might be used to help responders more safely and efficiently'' assist you during future disaster operations. Those are some of the highlights from what nasa did in twenty twenty for more details visit nasa dot gov slash twenty twenty. Thanks for watching. We wish you a safe healthy. And happy holiday season and look forward to sharing more nasa highlights with you and twenty twenty one..

nasa Kristina cook Chris cassidy spacex european space agency blue origin dynamics san science cyrus rex canadian space agency atlantic hurricane maine Us Froehlich satellite fia anassa golf california michael
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | 4 months ago

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
The Right Tools

Innovation Now

01:08 min | 4 months ago

The Right Tools

"Prior to installation of the robotic tool stowage unit nassau's robotic external leak locator was stored inside the international space station. The tool is an important unit. Used to help astronauts identify dangerous ammonia leaks in the space station's cooling system but deploying the robotic nose was a complicated process that was dependent on the availability of an airlock involved waiting an additional twelve hours to allow the gas analyzer to clear itself of internal gases and required astronauts to travel outside the station. The newly installed robot hotel is now the leak locators home and the leak. Location process is much more streamlined. As long as dexter. The canadian space agencies robotic arm is available. Dexter can use the tool to detect ammonia leaks eliminating the need for astronauts to perform the same task during the spacewalk. Meanwhile the external storage unit provides a warm protected place for critical tools like the leak locator to be stored until they are needed again for innovation now. I'm jennifer poet.

International Space Station Nassau Dexter Jennifer Poet
"canadian space agency" Discussed on Small Steps, Giant Leaps

Small Steps, Giant Leaps

05:11 min | 6 months ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on Small Steps, Giant Leaps

"So leveraging on what we have done on board, the space station with our international partners for these. Two decades now. To leverage that into designing and building a mission that's going to allow the human race to go to Mars or build a colony on the moon or or a deep space space station or what have you I think that benefit from the International Space Station will be a measurable because we won't be starting from scratch like we did with the space station. Can you walk us through some of your experiences and what you've observed as the space station has evolved over the past couple of decades? Okay. I like I said I started out as a robotic officer, the Canadian Space Agency. Contributed the space station remote manipulator system, and the special purpose decades dexterous manipulator when we first started with the fledgling space station and the and the arm arrived there on the I assess six eight flight. That we really only had the Arben we didn't. We knew how to operate a, but we didn't know how to operate it as as we do today. In in when we first got the arm on board every time you wanted to operate that system crew had to move it. Right. We designed procedures for the crew when we verified all the trajectories and we understood all the forces and moments and how much the arm take how fast it could move and we did all that Legwork Ford eminem produced a procedure for them to go execute they then they did that. In today's world, the crew hardly ever touches the SRS except to do grapples of free flying cargo vehicles. But the rest of the operations for that system is done from the ground either from Houston or for. Montreal. With the flight controllers doing those activities remotely. So there they are actually operating the arm from Houston for Martha algae and all those maneuvers. The crew to my knowledge is never actually even operated the special purpose dexterous manipulator, the spam..

International Space Station Canadian Space Agency Houston Legwork Ford officer Montreal
Robot Can Sniff Out Leaking Fluids

Innovation Now

01:16 min | 7 months ago

Robot Can Sniff Out Leaking Fluids

"Robots with the right tools can simplify life for astronauts this innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future prior to installation of the robotic tool stowage unit NASA's robotic external. League locator was stored inside the international space. Station the tool is an important unit used to help astronauts identify dangerous ammonia leaks in the space station's cooling system but deploying the robotic knows was a complicated process that was dependent on the availability of an airlock involved waiting an additional twelve hours to allow the gas analyzer. To clear itself of internal gases and required astronauts to travel outside the station. The newly installed robot hotel is now the leak locators home and the leak location process is much more streamlined as longest dexter up the Canadian space agencies. Robotic arm is available. Dexter can use the tool to detect ammonia leaks eliminating the need for astronauts to perform the same task during a spacewalk. Meanwhile, the external storage unit provides a warm protected place for critical tools like the leak locator to be stored until they are needed again.

Dexter Nasa
"canadian space agency" Discussed on Your Space Journey

Your Space Journey

04:39 min | 8 months ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on Your Space Journey

"Roy also looking at something called a mooner expiration accelerated program, right? Yes. And so this leak program right leap. We're looking at doing countries that are going to lunar surface. So we're we're looking at a variety different ways of our area that we got few options on tables. But one of the things we you know we look at doing is you know, why don't we do the dust mitigation right there at source, and if we you know we we put the locomotion system on a small rover we get a little surface. Those those bearing rings and stuff like that in seals Let's proven out there where it's at. It's worst. Then if we bring that back to what we're doing a candidate and three. Right. So we're trying to look at it that way and try to try to look at it dreams of like really going in with the all pro-choice. Can this is incredible. I know these are probably hard to predict but what is your rough time line for like? When can we expect Kenner I'm to to be updated on ISS when can we expect Kenneth? Three to, launch. Time looking at. The Goal Line Right now said at twenty, twenty, six can right and that's like that's just crazy aggressive. We're going full tilt. Were set to do it I mean. There's definitely challenges I'M NOT GONNA lie. We got a lot of stuff the workout and we've got a few little problems to sort out. But. Honestly everything on paper right now looks pretty good. We're set for late twenty, twenty six. Would be would be when we were would be good to go and that's that's the also considered now. It must put up this space David Small Stations Gateway. You're going to have all the all the base points. Preset off those modules they're going to be put together up there right anything that goes up as a payment. So let's say you got an experiment people that you want to be able to have on the gateway and you want that thing running from day one rate link they they launch the P in Halo modulate twenty twenty three, and there's going to be science on from which is absolutely what we wanted to do it. Right. But realize you want to be able to switch that you want to be able to do different stuff. Give everybody shot the banning order. So. Robotics is where we're GONNA do that. I mean that's going to be a big deal in terms of no that Katie contribution, space Robotics Eagle Utilization on. It's GonNa Laos. Allow some move stuff around stack it up move things in and outside of the vehicle bringing off just off logistics vehicles bring stuff inside. So if we WANNA send back stuff back to earthly be pressurized volume, we're going to be dual that stuff in interact with an airlock accenture all that stuff all those interfaces are figured out right now we're deep into that stuff. Setting ourselves up so deliberate or faces for twenty twenty three, get that stuff on modules, and then when the robot shows up on twenty, twenty, six games again, Ken I just want to congratulate you and Canadian Space, agency for all your amazing has his so far. We're so excited about the future in your moment and contribution filner gateway. Thank you so much for taking time to us. Really Pursue Chuck I. WanNa. Thank you as well. I mean I. Honestly. I love doing interviews like this and stuff like that because when I get like when I get those pumps I, just I. Really It really reminds me how fortune I I really look at my job. I'm just I'm just glad I came in where did how did everything.

David Small Stations Gateway Ken Roy accenture Kenner Chuck Katie Kenneth
"canadian space agency" Discussed on Your Space Journey

Your Space Journey

04:40 min | 8 months ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on Your Space Journey

"So we actually kind of built a ability to go full revolution one and a half times, and like you said, also the joints. symmetric arm right. So you even get into the scenarios where you talk about let's say we have failure one of the joints we've actually, I, mean, we went through that right we have failed join on your now we basically show showed how could actually work around that failed joints and change out that joint be great thing candidate Trias so. Get going back in. History books here reminiscent or whatever but. It was great that we go candidate to where we could actually change that joy fix it up in one mission once they sloppy. Basically, we able to get back unpacking in and then keep going building station. In Canada three, we'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA have a little robot to fix the big room. Mesa. The whole idea is you just want to take all that stuff on the picture. You don't want to have to rely on having to do something dangerous like a spacewalk especially the experience right? Right again on I assess we prove that. Link with. Our. Cameras. Cameras are tough. Free Cameras, Saito. Yes. So why you thinking? Cameras on this one to. Six Color Four K. Cameras, which again is incredible but I've to say I'm really impressed to is just the maintenance of Kenner I'm two. N Even the first one these last for years I mean, they're designed so well on this. Just going to ask. I mean, what is the life expectancy if I can ask them through? I him it's going to be in deep space. Obviously. How do you? How do you? How do you quality control something so well to make it last so long I'm so impressed so far so so so what we're doing for kanter three, I'll start by seeing right three years you're going to baseline fifteen year operational. Okay we already know. You're we're going to this with our eyes open and saying we want more than fifteen years, right Back the candidates to tell you what we did there. Right. We can guard to. Just based on the fact that we built the spares and we had that outfitted in such a way we've got necessary spares on on I S. so we have a critical spare available. We've got the capability to bring stuff up and down with different vehicles whether it's externally or internally inside the pressurized volume Remember we took we brought back latching ineffective, which is it's being piece of equipment Ramsey brought that back inside council. Right and refer may so. Racial Lifespan for the NSS is basically undefined. There's no reason why you can't just keep on going as long as necessary stairs. So it becomes you WANNA have a robust design in terms of building things to last where you want to have a robust design in terms of change parts and having having the tolerance failures to work around stuff so that when you get into a problem, you can work around it for a little while and then set yourself up, fix yourself up and then just keep on going to get. Right, back your nominal baseline, that's the approach that we try to take all the way through this and it's been a great approach me. You see the that. Right. So we can't arm you Rachel candidates they will go up on show they had the luxury of a take off the shuttles and they do a complete refer him make a brand new gate, right? So courses thing work like A. Perfect machine every time. You look away looking at Canadian hardware..

NSS Trias Mesa Saito Canada kanter Rachel Ramsey
"canadian space agency" Discussed on Your Space Journey

Your Space Journey

04:49 min | 8 months ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on Your Space Journey

"So, this whole idea of kind of like giving yourself flexibility in having these two solutions solutions to the wrong things in a different way for onyx being able to do that from the ground. In the next step here, the real big step is going to be when we look at. Operations in deep space right. So you're GonNa talk about a vehicle that's going to be you're listening to be talking to it's going to be unmanned eleven months at a time at least initially. Anyway. So it becomes really important to do everything it can as Thomas. Right because this is one of the things we have to learn about working in these faces you you gotta be prepared to be on your own and be deepened woods here be able to take yourself. So the ideal of that is we're going to set up on gateway. We're GONNA try to have as much time as capability can't to get there we gotta go do the things we know how to do where we could do. So we're GONNA go prove that out on stage. So we're GONNA do yet another upgrade on the candidate to we're going gonNA, bring a tawny and all that different level of control scripting, supervise on any and all that capability. WE'RE GONNA STATION Will prove it out there show that. Okay. Now, Katie robotics can take it to this level. Entry where we can do there and now we go deep space. We can do that stuff because I'm GonNa tell you in deep space is not a place you WanNa do things for the first time. DEFA. You Wanna be able to do things like our vision is. We should be able to walk around reconfigure the system autonomously set that up from the ground. Obviously, set up safe conditions for would be able to trigger have all checking to make sure that everything's going exactly as planned and that it can exceed those steps. The proper safety checks in place and then take that and expanding all the way to the idea of doing things like potentially doing free vehicle captures..

Thomas Katie robotics
"canadian space agency" Discussed on Your Space Journey

Your Space Journey

05:39 min | 8 months ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on Your Space Journey

"Welcome to your space journey where we venture into the future of space exploration and the incredible leaders who are taking us there. Here's your house. Failed. Hello. Thanks so much for joining me today for our around the world series in space. We're going to continue this week with the Canadian space. Agency. But before we go there, I'd like to share a space story from someone you may know her is Cape Pearson. She's with the B, Fifty two. Bass sound of always include beefy confused because we have so many phones about space..

Cape Pearson
"canadian space agency" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:44 min | 8 months ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on Front Burner

"Hello Ashley. Hi, Josh. Start by talking a bit about Julie Patz career before she became Governor General I mean, can you remind us about some of her achievements? She's been to space a couple of times for example. Yeah, and she she spent twenty six days aboard the International Space Station she was actually the first Canadian border right here's where actually you can't see it but I can see it. My sleeping bag was strong. This is where slept during my stay on the International Space? Station. And took part in its assembly by operating the Canadian robotic arm this why telephone booths looking boxes actually asleep station here's one of our space toilet. A astronaut doing some exercise she's also the first woman to serve as a league communicator at NASA between the ground controllers and astronauts and flight. She's also at several positions with Canadian Space Agency including chief astronaut and aside from all of that pilots also pilot was an academic and executive and a computer engineer outside of work a classical pianist and singer she even WanNa. Juno. This year with her choir. Soprano voice and she speaks six languages including Russian speaks French English? Italian German. And is fluent in six computer languages. Ask Me why it is that I've studied many languages and I always reply all because it's Because we're humans and we like to communicate and her her list of accomplishments is long. So it's obviously a really impressive resume. Justin Trudeau selected her for the role of Governor General back in two thousand, seventeen I I must. Express my most sincere appreciation to Her Majesty, the Queen to the Prime Minister Mister Muniz. For the confidence they have shown me but more importantly for the chance the amazing chance a second chance. To serve Canada again. What do we know about why he chose her? Well the national, post did some extensive reporting on this and they said that the Privy Council office was looking at a handful of indigenous candidates for the role. But late in the process, the prime minister's office told them to hold off that they had another idea that they had heard that Julie Pat was looking for a job and trudeau saw this as an exciting idea. She's a woman a trailblazer from Montreal whose charismatic and science nerd someone. WHO's gone to space I mean that's scored extra points with Trudeau who sees himself as a science nerd to rather than using an advisory committee that Harper government had set up to approve appointments trio ditched it, and he had his party, do its own background check and went ahead and the fall of two, thousand, seventeen and appointed pilot, and at the time he said that he felt she would do an extraordinary job and inspire generations of Canadians. Incredibly happy she. Shown herself willing to step up in service to the country. Once again, I know she will do. An extraordinary job. And yet it didn't take very long after receiving that appointment the these pretty shocking legal issues from her past that that arose can you remind us about what those were? Exactly her from the beginning was fraught with controversy I- politics published a bombshell revealing piat had a second degree assault charge expunged data back to twenty eleven when she was living in the US and was accused of assaulting her then husband at the time, the governor, general designate herself won't comment other than to say the charges were unfounded. Then the Toronto Star reported that was involved in a fatal accident at pedestrian stepped in the path of car. I was also also in twenty eleven and an investigation found that she wasn't at fault and was never charged. But all of this immediately raise questions about Trudeau's vetting process and what kind of background checks the party did. Receiving questions on what process leads to these types of nations. He should at the very least answer those types of questions in pride canes with an understanding of what goes into that and I can assure everyone. That there are no issues that arose in the course of that vetting process That would be any reason to expect madame pet to be anything other than the extraordinary governor general she will be. We also now know through reporting the National Post and Radio Canada that there was also a history of problematic behavior pilots last job when she ran the Montreal Science, centre? That was to foreshadow the problems about to come at Rideau Hall. Before I get to some of those problems I'm I'm curious to get a better picture of what exactly the Governor General's position as I mean it's a ceremonial position I was shocked to learn just how large the staff is at the Governor General's office. What exactly do they do? Exactly there's about one hundred and fifty people who work to support the governor-general and also the operations at Rio Hall, which is the second highest office. In the country and its role is the Queen's representative to Canada she does do a lot of ceremonial duties including pinning the order of Canada on recipients giving royal assent to bills greeting the royal family. She also travels the world meeting dignitaries and heads of state giving giving speeches working to advance Canada's agenda on an international stage but one hundred and fifty people it's a, it's a huge institution and it's steeped in tradition They do a lot there but the governor general also plays a really important constitutional role. She supposed to be a partisan offer. She's also someone that Prime Minister can ask to Perot or dissolve parliament triggering an election, and she can settle disputes over who can seek the confidence of the House of Commons. So own this is critical right now during minority government which.

Justin Trudeau prime minister Canada International Space Station Montreal Canadian Space Agency Julie Patz Ashley Josh NASA Rideau Hall Rio Hall Juno Toronto Star Privy Council National Post
"canadian space agency" Discussed on That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

04:56 min | 8 months ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

"Yeah I. I did A number spacewalks in my time on the ISS and I for four of them. I was paired with my Italian create Luca Parmigiano and he and I are very different. He's a an Italian air force test pilot and he's quick thinking and where in contrast to me, I'm a little more slow thinking a little more deliberate and we've. Our personalities came together in this series of spacewalks and away that was that we couldn't have anticipated worked so well, because there are elements of what you do when you're doing a spacewalk where you need somebody who's who's quick and decisive, and at other times you need to be thoughtful and deliberate and methodical and. Balanced each other out and that's Forgive me for not knowing this but how does a Russian and an Italian and American end up on the space station at the same time? It sounds like a joke. Right, well, we're in the answer great question because we're point right now of transition. So. A little bit of space history. All right. So the International, space station has been in continuous orbit for more than twenty years and we've had astronauts on board the ISS. Continuously for going on twenty years now and the beginning of the space day, the space station was built in pieces and parts by our our Russian partners as well as the US, and we use the space shuttle to fly the pieces up there in it's big cargo bay, and then the space shuttle was retired not quite ten years. AGO and we didn't have a means to get astronauts from US soil on a rocket to the ISS and so for the last almost a decade, we started launching our astronauts on a Russian Soyuz spacecraft from Kazakhstan the way that they have always done it since the beginning of their space program, which is approximately the same time that we started watching astronauts. Yeah in the nineteen sixties greater than fifty years ago, and so I launched Soyuz rocket and the vehicle, the the the cap selfless commanded by my Russian commander Alexander skirts off and then luke apart. Madonna. Was One of my crew mates and then and then I was the third member of the crew. There are typically six crew members on board the ISS at any given time we launch on rocket and capsule with three of us. So when we got to the ISS, there was already through crew members on board two Americans and one Russian already on board. Then just recently in May we launched spacex Dragon Crew Dragon which was the first time we've launched Americans from American soil. In Florida on an American rocket that docked with the space station I was the first time in since the spatial retired in two thousand eleven. So it's been nearly a decade and so those two crew members Bob in Duggar on board right now they're gonNA come home here in another couple of weeks and So that's a that's that's exciting news for us in our space program that now we're we're launching American astronauts from. From American soil, I launched from Khazakstan landed in Kazakhstan and we will continue to do that. The Russians will continue to launch from. Khazakstan, to put cosmonauts onboard but we'll probably continue to put an American on occasionally on one of their vehicles and we'll put a Russian cosmonaut on our vehicles just to keep that trade going it's good for a relationship. It's also good for us to have multiple ways to get to the space station. So that's kind of the exciting place that we are from any tree. Hitch a ride can like you gotTa Talion can South Korean can African a Kenyan I. Mean Can Anybody So it has a space multiple Dr Fifteen nation partners in the international space. Station the five major partners are. NASA the Space Agency Rush Raw Roscosmos the Canadian Space Agency the European Space Agency which represents multiple countries in the European. Union and then the Japanese space agency. Jackson. And so those are the primary partners. Now while I was on board, we also had an astronaut from the United Arab Emirates Muratti and and they're becoming more and more of International Space Station, program, participant, and so. Those are the major those countries that have national space programs that we see represented in space. We to keep a mix up there. There's always an American and a Russian up on board, and then in that mix, we'll see an Canadian, a European Japanese astronaut in the mix. Okay. That makes more sense. Thank you. Thank. You. GotTa. Have you on speed down now that'd be like space question having..

ISS International Space Station Canadian Space Agency European Space Agency Luca Parmigiano Space Agency US Kazakhstan Khazakstan spacex commander Bob Florida South Korean United Arab Emirates Muratti luke NASA Jackson
"canadian space agency" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

05:22 min | 10 months ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"European Space Agency solar. A little bit of spacecraft is undertaken. It's I close approach to the Sahn reaching a comfortable seventy seven million kilometers from the visible solid surface in the week, following hilly, closest openly position to the sun mission managers tested the spacecraft's ten science instruments, including six onboard telescopes, which acquired close up images of the sun in unison for the first time, so over the project scientist Daniel. Mula says these images are the closest David taking office son. My high resolution images were taken by four major solar telescope. Telescope in Hawaii this year, but of course that was from the ground, so it had to do with atmosphere which blocked out much of the solar spectrum, visible from Space Nassar's Parkas Sola probe launched back in two thousand eighteen. We'll be making closer prejudice to the sun, but it doesn't carry telescopes capable of looking directly at the sun on the other hand solo orbiters, ultra-violet imaging telescopes have the same special resolution as those of Nestled Dynamics Conservatory which takes high resolution images of the sun from an close to worth. Being fifty cent closer means solar orbit is observations already have twice the resolution? The primary objectives of these early images is to prove that solo over this telescopes are ready for feature. Scientific Observations on the spacecraft will be flying much closer to the sun than it's Cardo of it than you. Images collected complimentary data from various parts of the sun, including the foot has vero visible solar surface, the corrosion or atmosphere of the sun, and the White, a more rarefied helius fair around. Scientists will also analyze data from the foreign situ instruments that measure properties in the environment around the spacecraft, such as the magnetic field, and the pilot was making up the solar wind. It's the first time so OBA's in situ instruments have operated at such a close distance to the sun, providing a unique insight into the structure and composition, the solar wind solar orbiter launched on February the tenth and is now completed. Its commissioning phase at is not convinced. It's cruise phase which will last. Last until November twenty, twenty one during the main science face that follows the spacecraft will get as close as forty two million kilometers to the sun surface, which is closer than the planet, Mercury solar orbiter will reaches next perihelion in early twenty, twenty one, but during its first close approach during its main science face, twenty twenty, two solar orbit will swoop within forty eight million kilometers of the sand surface mission managers will then begin using the gravity of Venus as a sort of gravity. Gravity assist slingshot shifting the spacecraft's orbit out of the ecliptic plane, which is the imaginary plan around the Sun, upon which the planets in the solar system over these fly by maneuvers will enable solar orbit to look at the Sun from high latitudes in the process. Gets I ever property of its polls? Steady the activity, the polar regions will help scientists better understand the behavior of the sun's magnetic field, which is important with drugs, the creation of the solar wind which in turn affects. Affects the environment of the entire solar system since the spacecraft's currently some one hundred and thirty four million kilometers from Earth it's GonNa take around a week for the perihelion images to be downloaded for the European space. Agency's thirty five made a deep space and tearing Argentina the science teams will impress images before releasing them to the public in mid-july, meanwhile data from in situ instruments will also be made public later. This shea falling careful calibration of the individual senses this space time. Still the NASR's new water hunting Luna Russia and China launches a major cyber attack targeting Australia. Oh, that mall still to come on space time. NASHES developing and you water seeking Lunar Robotic Rover, which could be exploring the moon, South Pole within three years the vitals investigating Polar Exploration Rover Viper will help pave the way for the return of humans, the Lunar Surface, twenty, twenty four up the US three mission. The program is being developed by NASA using Cyril Commercial American, spaceflight companies and international partners, including the European Space Agency Asia Jackson the Japan Aerospace Exploration, agency the Canadian Space Agency and Acer. Acer the Australian Space Agency. In twenty, twenty four Adams three will launch aboard NASA's new super heavy lift SOS rocket will carry a crew four aboard Nasr's new deep-space Orion capsule to the first modules of the new Gateway Space Station, which is situated near Rectilinear Halo over between the Earth and moon, once docked to gateway to of the atom is three crew members will pre-position human landing system spacecraft for the final leg of the journey from gateway. Gateway down to the lunar surface will remain for up to seven days landing in advance of the human crew will be small flotilla spacecraft, carrying supplies, equipment and scanning out the surrounding area. The water seeking viper robotic, rover will be part of that project to develop a sustainable long-term presence on the moon, though by Pittsburgh Company Astor Body, the two hundred million dollars, four World Viper will use the.

European Space Agency twenty twenty Australian Space Agency Acer Canadian Space Agency Gateway Space Station NASA Sahn project scientist Nestled Dynamics Conservatory NASR Mula Hawaii Daniel OBA Nasr David South Pole
"canadian space agency" Discussed on The Dark Side Of

The Dark Side Of

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on The Dark Side Of

"In their stories of what lies in the great beyond astronauts don't often talk enthusiastically about the frightening changes that occur in their own bodies amongst them are worsened eyesight shaky balance and downright painful. Dental decay as some of these problems are results of the physical atrophy that occurs without gravity. The solution appears to be motion. That's right spending months and gravitational bliss doesn't mean Nixing the gym routine in fact an astronaut likely triples the amount of time that a very active American spends exercising aboard the International Space Station crew members. Allocate up to two and a half hours per day to exercise regimens but why is sweating it out in space so critical to words bone density according to the Canadian Space Agency in the microgravity environment of space astronauts lose on average one percent two percent of their bone mineral density every month every month. Compare that to a US World Report stating that women in the early stages of menopause lose from two to seven percent of their bone density per year to give a more clear example that means an astronaut on a six month mission could lose as much as twelve percent bone density while menopausal woman would lose one percent over the same time period. This number was confirmed by two thousand nine survey of those aboard the ISS. It revealed that thirteen space station. Astronauts found that their bone strength dipped by at least fourteen percent on the average during their half year stays aboard the orbiting laboratory on the more severe end of the spectrum. Three of the thirteen astronauts were found to have lost nearly thirty percent of their bone strength during those six months. Needless to say maintaining as much bone structure as possible is serious. Business however replicating the weight-bearing measures that keep bones strong on earth isn't as easy in space astronauts. Don't have the luxury to run freely. Nor can they just pop a few calcium pills and hope for the best so they have to try to recreate some of the gravitational load from Earth by using resistance straps to tether themselves to treadmills it somewhat effective but by no means a replacement for the type of exercise exerted on bones while back home and when astronauts do return to Earth? They must be even more careful. Their bones are so fragile that they need both time and therapy to readjust. Given the numerous record of astronauts wobbling and falling as they walk away from their landed shuttle pods. They aren't even allowed to drive until at least twenty one days. After landing this interim is all about reacclimating very gently the pelvis the spine and femurs are especially prone to fractures in other words parts of the body affected by even simple movement. Try Up from a chair gingerly for days at a time. It's an incredible burden to be conscientious after returning from a voyage weeks or more realistically months of physical therapy can lie ahead for astronauts. This can start with simple tasks like bathing. While sitting in a tub rather than standing in the shower they may also wear pressurized suits under normal clothing to keep blood and oxygen moving back towards their brain and neck while the minutiae of. This protocol may sound daunting. It's a breeze. In comparison to the alternatives if bones are not gradually introduced bearing their weight back on earth the effects can be destructive a possible hip fracture or spinal fracture could occur. Meaning surgery followed by hospitalization. Not to mention even more physical therapy to follow while the injury heels such consequences on the more drastic end of the spectrum were outlined by a recent experiment in two thousand fifteen NASA wanted to perform in-depth experiment about the long term effects of space on the human body to do this. They created their most controlled. Study yet. The agency determined the best way to do so would be to use a pair of male identical twins one as the control and the other as the variable to study how the body adapts or changes in space the variable twin would be sent into orbit aboard the ISS while the other remained going about his daily life on earth. The thought was that since the men are genetically uniform changes could be seen as plainly as possible meaning that anything happening to the variable twin would likely be a direct or indirect result of spaceflight. Scott Kelly a fifty year old retired astronaut from New Jersey who'd served missions aboard the discovery shuttle and ISS was the variable beginning in two thousand fifteen. He lived aboard the International Space Station for a year while his twin brother Mark remained. Earthbound both carried out a series of physical medical and psychological tests throughout the months and astounding total of ten research teams. From across the nation documented the psychological molecular and cognitive changes happening to Scott in space. One particularly strange effect occurred in Scots telomeres or Kota genetic instructions within each DNA STRAND. They lengthened in space. This was odd considering that growing older typically shortens these strands not the opposite besides which stress or radiation to things nearly synonymous with outer space can even shorten or weaken. Telomeres even further. So why were they? Lengthening was Scott Kelly getting younger. This was unlikely. In fact upon further examination some scientists believed the telomeres Scott did have might actually not have known instead. They propose that his body may have instead just regenerated completely new stem cells with longer. Telomeres there's no clear cut answer. As to why Scott's body reacted this way one feasible possibility. Though was that his cells were shifting into overdrive to repair the extensive damage he experienced while on the ISS Scott was receiving twenty four times the normal amount of radiation that his twin mark experience by being honored to make matters more confusing once the mission was completed and Scott returned to Earth. His team of scientists found that the lengthen telomeres had shrunk back to their original size. Some even continued to shrivel shorter. It was baffling though. The human body often experiences major re-acclimatisation changes around forty eight hours after landing six months. After Scott's return nearly eight percent of his jeans were still behaving abnormally a modest though hardly insignificant amount in his overall gene expression or EPA genetics. This abnormality combined with Scott's decreased mental performance on cognitive tests comprised mounting evidence that he was worse off both mentally and genetically after his time in space he certainly didn't return from the mission in better physical health one of the scientists dissecting the telomere research Dr Susan. Bailey thought Scott's decreased cognition could be an indirect result of general malaise after spaceflight. Scott himself confirmed that he hadn't been sleeping well. It felt like fighting through quicksand to get adequate rest an observation that seemed to shore up. Dr Bailey's point though. The long term results on Scott's immune system are still being monitored and compared to his twin mark his genetic mutations are likely top of mind for the research team if they behave like most mutations tend to there's a likelihood that the mutated cells will continue to adapt and divide as physicians and scientists. Well no the snowball effect of such mutations often leads to cancer it's critical then to take Nassau's later statement with a grain of salt in response to Scott Kelly's mission it said given that the majority of the biological and human health officials remain stable or return to baseline these data suggests that human health can be mostly sustained over this duration of spaceflight. Mostly sustained this smacks of the agencies ingrained habits of dancing around the gritty realities of a trip to space for now Scott. Kelly seems healthy. And dealing with slightly uncomfortable inconveniences. His overall risk appears minimal however the unknown of his aforementioned genetic mutation and its likelihood to devolve looms in the distance.

Scott Kelly International Space Station Canadian Space Agency ISS US menopause hip fracture Nassau Dr Bailey New Jersey NASA Mark Dr Susan EPA
NASA: The New Recruits

Innovation Now

00:59 min | 1 year ago

NASA: The New Recruits

"In January. Twenty Twenty Nasr's new class of astronauts participated in the first ever public graduation ceremony for astronauts. These thirteen men and women eleven. Us astronauts and two from the Canadian Space Agency were selected for training in two thousand seventeen among a record number of applicants during the ceremony. Each astronaut was given a silver pin. A tradition dating back to mercury seven when the first in a brand new profession were introduced to the world. Once they complete their first two spaceflights these astronauts will receive their wings of gold before graduating. The candidates spent two years of training including instruction and practice in robotics spacewalking. International Space Station Systems and Russian language. The first to graduate since NASA announced its optimist program these astronauts are eagerly looking forward to joining the ranks of the five hundred people who have had the honor of going to space NASA

Twenty Twenty Nasr Canadian Space Agency International Space Station Sy Nasa United States
Falcon 9 Launches Canada's RADARSAT Constellation Mission

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:38 min | 1 year ago

Falcon 9 Launches Canada's RADARSAT Constellation Mission

"Write us at constellation has been successfully launched into orbit aboard a SpaceX falcon nine rocket the falcon nine launched in thick fog from space launch complex for e at the Vandenberg Air Force base in California. Can I ask if you're ten nine eight seven six five four three two one mission? Our telemetry. How can nine had an on time, liftoff through the fog from Seville from Vandenberg Air Force base approaching max q supersonic close passing through maximum dynamic pressure. We now have three events coming up in rapid. Succession main engine cutoff stage, separation and second, engine start one or SAS one main engine cutoff, this is where all nine engines of F nine will shut down trajectory is looking good staves stage. Main engine cutoff stage, separation and second, engine start one so who's back has begun faring deployment. We have about ten seconds left in the boost back burn confirmation of boost back shutdown. So in order for. Little to make its way back to Vandenberg Air Force base. It has to execute a series of three burns. The first is what we call the boost back burn. And that helps to slow the rocket down and oriented for entry shortly after this, the Griffin's articulating, as they help steer the rocket back to Vandenberg. Those are deployed to help guide the rocket during its descent following that talking nine executes its entry burn and that slows itself down before hitting the dense part of the atmosphere. The entry burn actually cuts the first stage speed almost in half. So that's what we'll be coming up next out about the tea, plus six minute, Mark the third and final burn that stage. One will execute today is the landing burn happens to be everybody's favorite burn and that takes place just before touchdown as the booster touchdown softly, on the ground. So if you happen to be in the greater Vandenberg Air Force base area. I recommend that you head outside because you are very. Likely in range to experience the sonic boom, that comes with re entry. We have confirmation that power is good dejected. Looking good. Started confirmation that stage one entry burns has started. Shutdown stage, one TSA stage, one trans sonic. Claiming burn has begun. South nine hundred handed back at Vandenberg Air Force base. So without good news we turn back into second-stage, our primary missions, as it continues to carry three Radarsat constellation satellites to some synchronous orbit there. We head confirmation a second engine cutoff or Seco now. We're just going to wait for confirmation of second-stage. Good orbit, GNC confirms. Good. First of all. All right. We have confirmation that we have a good orbit for second stage, the Canadian space agency rate, outset constellation mission consists of three identical see bands that have. But you're right observation satellites, designed to support all with maritime surveillance, disaster management, and ecosystem, monitoring for the Canadian government, the one thousand four hundred kilograms spacecraft deployed into a six hundred kilometers high, but the falcon nine states pretend to with after the mission successfully touching down at the van Nabil gave was based lendings on number four.

Vandenberg Air Force Vandenberg Spacex Seville Canadian Government California Van Nabil Radarsat Griffin TSA GNC Seco One Thousand Four Hundred Kilo Six Hundred Kilometers Ten Seconds Six Minute
Lava Tubes Could Aid Humans Life on the Moon and Mars

BrainStuff

06:37 min | 2 years ago

Lava Tubes Could Aid Humans Life on the Moon and Mars

"Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital, One card with Capital, One saver card. You can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new French restaurant and four percent on bowling with your friends. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores, and one percent on all other purchases. Now, when you go out you cash in Capital, One, what's in your wallet terms apply? Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff, learn vocal Bon here ever since Neil Armstrong. I set foot on the moon. Scientists have been toying with the idea of forming potential colonies, there and more recently on Mars to, but extreme fluctuating temperatures cosmic radiation, and micrometeorites showers colloquially known as space dust pose challenges to human excavation of both the moon and Mars, however, Astro biologists are in the process of exploring nifty geological structures the conservative natural shelter from these harsh elements lava tubes. So what are lava tubes? We spoke by Email with doctor Ricardo puzzle Abban of the department of geosciences at the university of pet ova. He's been at the forefront of European research on lava tubes. He explained lava tubes are caves that are carved by flowing lava, that eventually drained out leaving a subsurface void, although there are different types of lava tube formations, these caves often form out of a type of fluid basaltic lava that flows down a slope, like. The side of a volcano as the outermost portion of the hot lava flow comes in contact with the cold air, it cools rapidly forming a hardened crest, but liquid lava continues to flow like water in channel underneath this newly hardened surface. At some point that liquid lava runs out, and cools underneath the surface forming a curvy tube shaped structure, and thus Alava tube is born geologist. No lava tubes from volcanic areas in Hawaii, or Iceland, but they've also become a hot, commodity within the Astro biology community due to high resolution images, indicating that lava tubes may exist on the moon and Mars as well. Many sites thought to be lava tubes are detected by the presence of these curvy channels and more recently, the SETI institute announced the discovery of possible skylights or lava tube openings in a crater near the North Pole of moon using images obtained from Nasr's lunar reconnaissance orbiter, but lava tubes are tricky business. Scientific technology is still playing catch up and identifying these underground habitats, we also. Spoke by Email with Leonardo career of the remote sensing laboratory at the university of Trento. He said the main difficulty comes from the fact that lava tubes are centrally subsurface structures. Very few instruments are capable of performing direct measurements of underground structures. But careers team is working to modernize the technology and bus aid future human settlement of these lunar caves the technology involves using radar, which can detect lava tubes from orbit based on their unique electromagnetic signatures, basically, they can pro below the surface of the moon using low frequency electromagnetic waves, and then measure the reflected waves that come back to them. Those reflections offer insight into a lava tubes characteristics, like its shape size and composition. But one thing is clear lava tubes on the moon and Mars are invaluable is natural potential habitats, or at the very least could serve as convenient storage units between space missions. Meanwhile, back on earth, scientists are preparing for future missions to the moon and Mars through a little cave, diving the European Space Agency, developed a program called Penn Jia. The prepares European astronauts to explore other planets one of its projects concerns, a lava tube in Spain called corona that's eight kilometers long, or about five miles the team has undertaken advanced mapping of the tube to create three D model. That's attract down to the millimetre. They've also been testing out new robots or Rovers to identify how best to navigate these tubes. Developing a greater understanding of the challenges associated with incursions into lava tubes on other planets in the process. Other researchers have also taken an interest in exploring the microbiology of lava tubes by focusing their efforts on the lava beds, national monument in California, this project funded by the Canadian space agency is looking to explore lava tubes habitats of biker organisms, which may leave traces behind through certain minerals, and thus indicate the presence of life once upon a time, which is cool enough. On earth, but would be an amazing find on the moon or Mars. So what's the difference between lava tubes on earth in their lunar, and Martian counterparts? Well, gravity for one, the lower gravity on the moon and Mars seems to impact the size of lava tubes, significantly tubes on Mars can stretch for two hundred and fifty meters in width, or about eight hundred and twenty feet and tubes on the moon can reach a whopping Colombia, or more across that's about two thirds of a mile, the lower gravity. Also stabilizes, the roofs of these tubes and causes fewer collapses, especially on the moon, thereby creating a potentially safer dwelling for human habitation, but otherwise lava tubes on earth are fairly similar in composition and structure to those on the moon and Mars and serve as excellent reference points for researchers. The potential for lunar caves, and possible human settlements has many people excited even the White House is making a bid for moon colonies in the near future, and the possibility of answering whether life has existed or may still flourish in caves on Mars is a tantalizing one for space explorers. But if you're wondering whether or not martians will be found hanging around these lava tubes on the red planet, the answer is likely no, unless you count microbial critters radiation, a dry environment and frigid temperatures make the planet inhospitable to most forms of life while using ground Rovers to access lava tubes on the moon and Mars could be difficult due to surface conditions other devices are being developed to aid these explorations including climbing, and hopping pit bots and flying helicopter, like vehicles likes of which may appear Nasr's Mars twenty twenty Rover mission. Today's episode was written by Terry llegado and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other totally tubular topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcast for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital One saver card earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply.

Iheartradio Rovers Nasr Capital One European Space Agency Neil Armstrong Seti Institute Geologist Department Of Geosciences University Of Trento Spain Iceland California Leonardo Hawaii Apple White House Penn Jia Colombia Terry Llegado
"canadian space agency" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"AM expanded newsfeed on news ninety six point five. WDBO? I was just reading the Bio's of the three people. They're going to be launched into outer space from Russia later this morning in an hour. There is a Russian a Canadian of French Canadian and a American the American his his name is McLean. Oh, no. Her name is MacLean and MacLean sorry about that. Her name is McLean. She is a thirty nine year old US army Colonel and former combat helicopter pilot who served in operation Iraqi freedom she earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical aeronautical engineering at the us military academy at West Point earned a master's degree in aerospace engineering from the university of bath and a master's degree in international relations from the university of Bristol. Both of those in England. Nasa selected her as an astronaut candidate back in two thousand thirteen. So she'll be on the the international space station, which is good that she has that master's degree in international relations. She can do to diplomacy while she's up there. Right. Maybe she can get the whole Russia thing figured out for a smarter Russia Russia now the guy in charge of the mission. Oleg Hanina Netco, probably not right. Veteran cosmic has five hundred thirty three days in orbit. He'll be in the center seat of the craft. He is fifty four years old. And then there's the guy from the Canadian space agency, David David Saint Jacques Sanchez. Sorry. And he's forty eight. That's a he. Right. Yeah. David. Yeah. Because I know candidate they do things differently. Five forty one on Orlando's.

Oleg Hanina Netco Russia David David Saint Jacques Sanc astronaut candidate MacLean US Orlando university of bath university of Bristol Nasa England five hundred thirty three days fifty four years thirty nine year
"canadian space agency" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"If so is this kind of Emo, you pretty common or should it. Carry more weight as of confidence on the NASA side lunar catalyst was extended last year in space launch complex seventeen was demolished this summer of sensitive to make way for moon express. How significant are these votes of confidence just trying understand whether the space agency's view of express is more optimistic than the general feeling now among space enthusiasts and if so why that would be. Moon. Express is a really interesting case. Because in some ways, they did blaze some interesting trails on the regulatory front or at least from the outside looking in. That's what it seemed like they did do or did say that the did. And we got some paperwork to prove it that they did do some legwork on the regulatory front to be able to fly to the moon as a private company, you know, they were kind of one of the first companies pushing for the licensing that we needed to do under the outer space treaty to license a private company to fly to the moon and land on the moon. So there was that bit. And I think that that did lead them some early credibility among NASA among the Canadian space agency journalists among a lot of people. I think that did give them some early credibility because it's like, hey, they wouldn't be doing the boring policy parts if they didn't have something here to back it up since then we've seen no real hardware. We have not seen anything real that. They've showed off. We haven't seen any plans for what they will build at space launch complex seventeen. You know, that is more of a marketing effort from space Florida who is helping them develop that site. But we haven't seen any plans for what they want to develop there. So that's kind of curious. I'm going to remain heavily heavily skeptical until I see some real hardware that is getting ready to go or even some construction down at slick seventeen there. The fact that they ever said that they were gonna hit a Google x prize date and are now years out from flying is meaningful. It means. They were quite frankly, spinning some hot garbage BS of PR there. And I'll say that sometimes the PR arms of space agencies or government agencies. Whatever it may be they can get swept up just like anyone else. So if they're seeing things without having the the real technical. I'd know that that's just a mockup and not flight hardware. I think it's easy to get excited about it's easy to grab some headlines. Like that. I don't want to be too cynical about it. But you know, there's doesn't seem like there's a lot behind the scenes they're going on that we have seen yet. And I think you know to harp on it, again, the fact that they were saying last year. Oh, yeah. We're going to definitely fly to the moon by the end of the year. We're going to definitely fly by March thirty first and they're now like two years out there new date is like two years from now that is really really a bad look overall. And I think they're depending on people's short memory in the age of the internet to let the story all by the wayside. But if you're really big space fan, I don't think you can let it, and I don't think you should let it I think that's important for me. The credibility checks are bouncing out of the moon express account. And it's going to take a lot to get me back trusting that when I deposit one check that it's going to clear successfully. All right. We got a handful of Boeing Esa less questions to dive into first from John. He sent me a link to the technical piece from a couple of weeks ago about the shadowy op Ed campaign, smearing SpaceX. This is some interesting reporting from Eric Berger about these eggs that have been going up all over the country. John s is there something significant to this is unexpected or significant I wonder that if a company like Boeing was seen being gauging this practice the conspiracy theorist will question what they're capable of. And equate this practice sabotage. I don't think there's anything. I mean, this is a very weird story. Don't get me wrong. But I'm not concerned about this at all. I think there's levels to this. And I don't wanna just let all my cynicism come out in this episode. But I guess the questions are leading me that way..

NASA Boeing Google Eric Berger Florida John s two years
"canadian space agency" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Simulate the really put it through a very strenuous test programme with a lot of integrity there's not much else you can do say how far out is opened so were unique we're not like hubble that in a lowearth orbit that was accessible by the space shuttle for servicing we are going to be about a million miles from earth out past the moon at a point called rosh point too we go out there for a couple of reasons one again we want to be really cold we want to get ourselves as far away from the sun uh it puts the earth between us in the sun on it also helps with observing efficiency whereas hubbell once in orbit you'll ram behind your theaters will be in you whatever your observing the youth come back around we acquire that and continue our observation we can do continuous observations that saves time we can make an observation hubbell makes that may take them days we can do in a matter of hours because of where we're going to be located to make this mission a success nasa with support from the european space agency and the canadian space agency needs several crucial ingredient some board which can foldout in space operates at extremely cold temperatures among work to none aiming to precisions or else it's game over one vital piece of kits is the mira and many telescopes rely on these reflective dishes to focus the captured light the further you want to see the bigger the merit required and j w s t has the biggest mira ever maids scott willoughby vice president of northrop grumman his team off responsible for building this the mirrors guard the team sahgal mirrors that vin in effect form which cold one primary mirror and there was a couple reasons we did that in in one of them is that the with of mirror the diameter of it is six and a half meters about the same heights as four people standing on each other shout as will the top of the rocket we want shen is only five meters across so if we built one six and f meter there it wouldn't work that idea building multiple segments allows us to put some of those segments three of them on one side and.

hubbell nasa vice president northrop grumman scott willoughby five meters
"canadian space agency" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on Probably Science

"Now what like if they're a price to pay look what is chinese nasa like i don't know what are they like the chinese the whole world knows about nasa like our nasa csa isn't it earth canadian space agency on the can race i thought that was the joke what are the what's the canadian space agency up to what chris hadfield was the commander of the international space station and he was a canadian astronaut he was with the canadian species what are those freeloaders making they just jump on our rocket we don't have rockets dude we don't have rogge who have to get rides up through russia we what we don't have the means to send people to space right now as the country what working on it but we're paying like 50 billion a pop to let russia to have russia weren't using oeberg cosmonaut yes to get to space is is russia hooper in in russia russia's hoover drives you though it it mercer you drive hoover i guess is delicious which is also the his that's how it works as little as that gobert as you will be the joke but then it was like inc mustache on the front of the rocket but so audio but so what is chinese nasa let's not nasa what's it could look it up what is i feel like we should not vote gets a massive organization that will probably have a huge bearing on the rest of our lives here amazing china bedrooms there has been there have been sour all like space arms races of sabrerattling as far as like who's gonna lay claim to different things in but what's the conversation i wonder like in china like when we argue with each other about spending money going to mars or going back to the moon or building a national is the chinese the china national space administration is the name of their nasser equivalent.

chris hadfield commander rockets rogge russia china nasa hoover nasser
"canadian space agency" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lines are open and available so please feel free to be part of the conversation again the number is eight six six seven three three six seven eight six or you can email us forum at kqed dead org or tweet us our twitter handle is at kqed form and you can also post questions or comments immediately in our website kqed or ugh forum let me go back to change goodwin i was reading about two minutes faced travel on aging that uh you put out on twitter there was just released on monday and sacked uh i assume it's still up the maybe tell us what it is because when i was reading liz this is talking about managing aging and slowing it down or maybe even reversing is yeah there have been some outstanding observations made about space travel uh we work with the canadian insugents health research on the canadian space agency and what they found is the astronauts in some respects that rates of aging is twenty four times faster in space than it is and this is a staggering of survey shen so that that muscles waste away which rickles soccer pina the bones lose that density in their strength and we've all seen the images when they land back on earth has to be helped out of the space captial in the rest of it but the great thing as the sweetest six months after that they've been rehabilitated which means that these age light changes could be reversed what does that tell us we can slow down on aging one of the great things about eight friendly is that it was a futuristic idea it solve problems before they knew what the problems were because he was suckered visually idea and opening spaces for all the people making a aging a mainstreaming process is getting to improve diana said wishes isolation uh loneliness also it's going to help people to become more physically axes space videos got a great message in an age friendly space with a view to slow down you rates of aging asking to make your healthy i falungong that seems an unlikely idea but actually that's the truth of it.

goodwin twitter liz diana kqed rickles two minutes six months
"canadian space agency" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"If if you're sixteen in half think is a number if you're if you're sixteen and a half a young you've never lived at a time where people haven't been in space how many people are espace right now six six anecdates international right so we got us we have two americans right yeah so international is the first word in the name of the stage sharing international space station so there's always an international crew up there the right now there's two americans peggy whitson and shane kim bro one french astronaut to mop us gay and three russian cosmonauts and so you you have member we had crewmembers for um and i'd have to look at the exact number but i mean countries all over the globe have flown crewmembers on board the space station elia almost in it tina thinks the number eight league eighteen has the latest and you've had well over two hundred individuals traveled to the space station and it is this global effort he have fifteen countries that are considered the main partnership so these two countries that signed all the papers and did everything back in the nineties due to form this partnership and you have five main agencies you have nasa here in the us the canadian space agency right to our north the european space agency which actually incorporates a lot of different space agencies from all over europe into one larger conglomeration i'll the russian space agency rose cosmos and the japanese space agency cold jackson the japan aerospace exploration agency 10 so lots of agencies but all of this alphabet soup comes together to make the station possible and so everything that gets done just about is done in this big collaboration so you have these countries with drastic language barriers cultural differences sometimes governmental differences all working together on this massive multi billiondollar peace science research rajic i think it's fair to say that space exploration is really a global interest rate amine exploring the cosmos is not just at u s unique faint it is really an international effort to make that possible it's something that will.

elia us europe jackson space exploration peggy whitson tina japan billiondollar eight league
"canadian space agency" Discussed on The Pod Delusion

The Pod Delusion

01:57 min | 7 years ago

"canadian space agency" Discussed on The Pod Delusion

"Oh yeah absolutely basically this this platform was developed by the canadian space agency uh to lift all canadian user access to a new space environment so basically the way it works is that once a year we have the announcement of oppportunity uh canadian scientists engineer canadian company uh can apply put in a proposal and if they're selected by your review board then the next year they can fly on the uh on the french but not only from tenants by the way uh but the deal with the french face agencies that we can fly from anywhere around the world where where two connects fly so this gives our scientists access not only to middle latitude launch base but also to power to pick what torio launches oh wow that's amazing and i i watched handling testfire the from kenny basement then kind of test were you pull on right into every section beginning and all these won't be mainly uh qualification flight we uh uh the way space work it's it's very uh uh cartesian we have to go step by step first before getting user on board we wanted to make sure that aid the base was responding to all the requirements for launching building uh also that can swork coming within you fly chain you idiotic new instrument within the the control fighting so they wanted to make sure also that these were uh qualified and worked well in the canadian environment let me say so or the two balloons basically the small one and the large one were launch uh just check all of our procedure and making sure that we were really to host scientists as early as next as this year in fact in august two thousand fourteen to get you hang year lunch and how many lives today the shepherd like you know that yet.

the deal kenny basement engineer