4 Episode results for "Canadian Federation Of Agriculture"

A supply chain explainer, or why you can or cant find flour

The Big Story

24:38 min | 9 months ago

A supply chain explainer, or why you can or cant find flour

"The the first thing you should know about our guest today is that. He's got flower like in his house and he just bought it in a store. Really all kidding aside. He is living proof that despite what I might see at my local grocery stores Canada's food supply chain is working even for flower but if it is and why can't I find flour. And why can't my friend who lives up in the country? Get fresh bread in order to answer that you have to start with the basics of how Canada's food supply chains operate. I say chains because when you start to have it explained first thing you learn is that there are two of them and those two supply. Chains are very different so from a beginner's guide to those chains to the impact of cove in nineteen breaks and meat packing plants on them to why you should really think about eating fries while you're on lockdown and how much more you might pay for groceries this fall. We're going to walk you through with the past couple of months have done to the journey. Your food takes between farm and table. And we'll do that as soon as Claire tells you what you need to know today. The federal government is pledging two hundred and fifty two million dollars to ease pressures on the country's agriculture industry. Last month the Canadian Federation of Agriculture asked for two point six billion dollars but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the amount being given now is a point. We will continue to work with farmers with a stakeholders and industry representatives with provinces and territories to ensure that food food capacity in this country. And those people who worked so incredibly hard every single day to feed Canadians get the support that they need through this crisis and beyond Alberta plans to double its capacity to test for the current a virus four point five million dollars will be spent on new equipment and technology right now. The province is doing about seven thousand tests day and they want that number at sixteen thousand Quebec. The hardest hit province in candidate is lifting some of the restrictions on private seniors homes for nearly two months. Now residents have not been allowed to have visitors and they've not been allowed to go out and accompanied the premier says now some residents will be allowed to go out on their own and they can have visitors but they have to be outside as of Tuesday evening. Sixty two thousand forty six cases of covert nineteen in Canada with four thousand one hundred and sixty six deaths Jim Jordan Heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Michael von Maso is an associate professor of food agriculture and resource economics at the University of wealth where he also hosts their food focus. Podcast Hi Michael. I'm going to get you to explain something that I probably haven't had thoroughly explained to me before we get into. Why can't buy flour so just start by describing the supply chain to me? What is it? How does it work? Supply chain is the path or the or the series of steps that a product goes from from production to win we as customers get into in the case of food. It's a restaurant or a retail store or it may be try that delivers it to our house. And so the scope or the or the scale of the supply chain depends on exactly what we're looking for so again for food it starts at the farmer but in some cases we might also consider the inputs that that farmer buys fertilizer seed and things like that farmer then sells it to a processor. There may be a step in the middle processor may sell it to a further processor. Who then will package it and sell it into distribution who? Then we'll sell it into a restaurant or into a retailer. There could be more or fewer steps depending on the specific product and it can be food or it can be cars but it is those those steps in the process to get from where it starts to to where we can buy it. And it's not just the physical companies that do it. Is the relationships with between those companies that we define as the supply chain. So how has Canada's food supply chain And I realize I'm asking speak a bit. Generally but but how has that hoped with The covert nineteen crisis. Well if you look notwithstanding some sort short-term demand based shortages that we've seen that. I'm sure we'll talk about. I would say that the supply chain has performed remarkably well. It's demonstrated that it's been robust and resilient and in the face of an unprecedented demand shock. It's bent but not broken and We've still been able to to buy most food products and the supply chain is catching up to give us those products that are occasionally somewhat still shortage so. Yeah let's get into that because if it's performed remarkably well there's also some staples that a lot of grocery stores have been missing like it's been six weeks. I can't get flour. I know some people in cottage country had trouble getting eggs and bread like those seem like pretty basic failures of the supply chain around my wrong. Well I think I I think yes. They are failures of the supply chain and supply based failures. So I think that some of the shortages have been localized and or inconsistent. So I I'm not bragging but I've been able to get flour and so we we have lots of flour and in fact some yeast in our house that we've been able to buy at our local stores and I think often it depends on when you go to the store and so demand has gone up. So why is there a change in demand while there's been a couple of things that have contributed to the change in demand? The first thing is we've seen this dramatic increase in demand at retail stores driven. By the fact that we're no longer buying much if anything in food service so the demand or the the quantity were buying at the grocery store up and the system has to catch up we have kind of just in time system where we were reproduce an order to expected or forecasted demand and when that demand changes the system takes a while to catch up. The other thing that's happened is we had some panic. Buying so people were buying more than they needed to a significant degree. That has decreased. I think we still have the psychology if I see something on the shelf and it's the last item on the shelf. We may buy it but I think people. We have perishable products in many cases. So there's only so much room we have for storage and only so long we. We can store some of these things so I think that sort of panic buying has diminished and the last thing is because we're going to the grocery store less frequently many of us are are buying more things in each individual's shop and that sort of demand comes what I call a little bit lump here and little bit harder to predict so some days demand will be higher and other days demand will be lower depending on how many people come into the store so all of those things have shot the supply chain. And it's not just having the product it's also having the packaging to put that product in so that we can get it to the retail store so demand for flower is a product you brought up is generally low in the summer. We like to be outside. We'd like to Barbecue. We bake significantly less than than we do. Maybe a net pre-christmas time line and so they weren't looking to produce a bunch of flowers and then all of a sudden. We started buying flour so the system had to catch up. It's not like we're short of wheat. But we were to a degree short of some of the packaging that we would put that flower in. And so that's what's constrained getting to the market. So while some stores have white flour Some of the specialty flowers have been hard to find multi grains or whole wheats because as. They're catching up to the increased demand. They focused on the core product. So I would expect to see some of those secondary products show up in grocery stores. Relatively soon I want to ask you about something. You mentioned a couple times now. Which is that. There are kind of two to supply chains one for retailers and one for food service and then at the same time you mentioned that well our home cooking and home. Demand has gone up. Demand for food services obviously bottomed out. So how different are those supply chains? And why can't they just move supplies from the restaurant side of things to the retail side of things so that we don't see these kind of shortages sometimes so there are a couple reasons? That's a great question. The first is those supply chains. Start at the same place. They all start on the farm. The processors while they may have different customers and different relative focus will also be the same but once we get to the distribution step. We see those two supply chains diverge so that companies that supply restaurants are distinct from the distribution systems that supply retail stores and so we have to establish different relationships at we have to divert product. We have inventory in some of those food service companies distributors that has to be rerouted logistics. We have to make sure we have enough trucks to to to do that diversion. I was speaking the other day to the president of Canadian Restaurant Distribution Company. And he said one of the things that they're doing is not only selling some of their products to retailers but helping retailers with logistics because their trucks aren't as busy helping retailers get from suppliers to retailer stores them with that trucking step so that trucking step is not an insignificant challenge. Either so it is. It is it's not just flicking a switch products or somewhere else. It's finding someone who can move that product effectively for you the other thing. I think that that's important to remember. Is that. We don't eat exactly the same products in restaurants as we do at home and a couple of examples are we almost no chicken wings. At home chicken wings are restaurant or bar item and so demand for chicken wings has gone down the size of chickens that we eat that we prefer retail is usually a little bit smaller than the size of chicken that they produce for food service so the products are always identical. We drink more milk at home than we do in restaurants but we eat more cheese in restaurants. Think Pizza that we do at home and so it's not just moving the product. It's also sometimes changing the products that were producing for the different markets in that takes some time the last point. I'll make in that. If I may is that we also package things differently. If you're producing two percent milk for Tim Hortons. You're either putting it into those small cremers or you're putting it into large bags that they put into dispensers whereas if you're producing it for laws or or Sohbi's you're putting it into the variety of retail packaging and so again you have to have that packaging on hand. You have to divert the production system to do that. So you don't just flick. A switch and product moves from one place to the other. There are changes in products changes in packaging and changes in the links in the supply chain including transportation that have required some time to adjust. How much do we want to adjust those supply chains? I mean if it's not as easy as flicking a switch? Do we want to push for an adjustment or will that make it difficult to switch back like some of the things you're talking about sound like pretty fundamental changes in how we do these next? Well I think we do want to switch because if you think about it again to the just in time process for things like milk were producing milk day for things like eggs were producing day and if we if we just shut off that production then we'll we'll be shortchanging retail and not selling into food service. So we want those. We want production to continue. We're also buying more stuff in retail. Because we were spending a third of our dollars a third of our food dollars in food service. We're not doing that anymore. We still need that food so we do need to redirect it into the retail side. It just has taken some time on the flip side as we as we go back and we see restaurants open. I think there are a couple of factors that will that will smooth that process and not lead to some of the same shortages that we've seen as we switched away from food service. I we know it's coming. I think to a significant degree. This is a surprise but we know we know the reopening is coming. We don't know exactly when so we'll have the opportunity to plan for the second point is that it's much easier to ramp up slowly than it is to flick a switch you know. Restaurants went from one hundred miles an hour two zero at literally almost in twenty four hours. We're not going to go up to that same level of demanded restaurants anytime soon even as he's open up again. I think there are a variety of factors. Physical distancing is going to require that capacity in the average sit down. Restaurant is probably going to go down about fifty percent so the only be able to hold half as many people I think also until we get a vaccine there will be some hesitancy on the part of some people to go out and eat in restaurants. You can wear a mask and go to the grocery store you can wear a mask and go to the hardware store and buy things you need. You can't go to a restaurant and wear a mask the whole time and so I think that unfortunately for the restaurant sector that ramp up again will be much more gradual than the ramp down will be and because they'll -ticipant it. I don't expect that. We'll have the same sort of disruption in the system that we did in the initial shock tell me about that initial disruption in the system because it sounds fascinating to have restaurant demand. Go Down to basically zero within twenty four hours like you said so what actually happens at the supply chain level when that when that happens. It's a shock right. It is it is an and anticipated shock. So you'll have producers and in and has been different in different markets and it's been different in different segments because of the both the supply chain relationships and the production process. So if you look at milk as an example that we heard about when it happened. We had markets for milk and cheese that all of a sudden disappeared and we had to divert that milk two processors who could make the products in the packaging that was demanded for the customers that for whom it was demanded. And so we had this sort of realignment within the system in Canada. We have central marketing for Milk. So all farmers sell their milk to the same organization that then allocates it out to processors and so in in that system the the supply chain had existing relationships with all the processors they just had to divert it and those processors had understand which customers. We're going to order how much you know. Retailers had to figure out how they're demand change so that they could order the amounts that they thought they were going to need the new processes had to say. Well yes we can make it. But it's going to take some time to catch up. And they had to say what we have to order the right amount of packaging and the right type of packaging so that we can deliver that so there are all these individual levers in the supply chain that had to be switched and figured out and the logistics had to happen. And so it's a bit like a duck swimming on a pond while we sort of saw some shortages there's been a lot of scrambling underwater. Those feet have been moving very fast to make the adjustments that have been required. Is that kind of the root of the problems that I've been hearing about with regards to lake We have one hundred thousand tons of potatoes. That are going uneaten and that Kinda stuff is that is that disruption caused by the lack of restaurants to get them out like it. Is that all part of the problem. So so so. Potatoes are a great example. And and I was remiss for not bringing it up. So it's like it's a great question sixty percent of the French fries that we eat in restaurants and so we have all of these potatoes that were produced last summer in storage that were targeted for the French fry. Market that product late wings is fairly unique to the restaurant. Market and our consumption of potatoes at home hasn't gone up to the same degree as the demand for potatoes for French. Fries has gone down in the restaurant market. So in that case it wasn't just a transfer of demand. We just eat more potatoes out at restaurants in the form of fries so all of a sudden the product that had home no longer has a home. You can't divert it all and you maybe as to be good citizens of Canada. We should be eating more fries at home. But that's why we had that excess product there. We heard also about dumping of milk at the acute point of turnover that is likely more due to the fact that it was it was much easier to shut off demand than it was to switch product to others and there's just not a lot of buffer in the supply chain to store that milk so the average dairy farm has two to days storage of milk on the farm and milk is picked up usually every two days and processors than pro. It's a it's a perishable product. They process it quickly when it gets to them. And so if they aren't shipping product out the other side. They get full of milk. The farmer gets full of milk and we have this sort of tension in the supply chain. And that's why through it out. So in some cases it's just the process of adjustment in other cases. It is just the fact that that demand has disappeared in the case of French fries. So it kind of sounds like the supply chain as you say as performed remarkably well in his has either adapted or is in the process of adapting to the new normal. But I also finally wanted to ask you about what comes next and one of the things that's been on my mind as it's received a ton of coverage has been the covert outbreaks at meat packing plants. What could happen to the supply chain due to Cova nineteen like? Is that a danger of creating a big meat shortage Are there backups. And failsafes like. What does the future look like if that continues to happen? The meat industry is is a great example and and if we look at beef packing plants or pork packing plants. They are relatively unique in food. Supply chains because there is such a high degree of concentration that means they're big plants with small numbers of plants and that's a that's a competitive and inefficiency driven driven process. The other thing is that because cattle vary in size. There's been very little automation in these plants so they are still labor intensive facilities so you have large groups of people coming to work in relatively close proximity to each other. Not only. Does that happen within the plants but these plants are often outside of large urban centers. So they have to either bus or Carpool to get there. They also sit in lunchroom's they sit in locker rooms so there are lots of places where there is a strong opportunity for cross infection. So that's why those plants have become sort of hot spots for outbreaks. I want to highlight before I go any further that that doesn't mean that our meade is unsafe. It just means that we have to find ways of keeping the workers who process that meets safe in a way that we can keep that meet flowing we have a globally integrated supply chain for meat. And so the plant in high river which opened again yesterday but at reduced capacity represents roughly a third of the beef processing capacity in Canada that being closed significantly caused pain for Canadian beef producers but we have cattle and beef moving across the US. Canada border all the time and globally and we saw an example of McDonalds bought all of their Canadian be from from the plant in high river. They came out and said we're not going to be able to maintain our commitment to Canadian. Beef we're going to be buying from the US until such time. That plant reopens and we can go back. And so we've seen product adjust from different sources to make sure that we don't have any disruptions at the consumer end that said it's caused significant disruption for for farmers who've been used to shipping to those plants. My last question for you is just what should I be watching for over the next weeks and months in terms of disruptions in the supply chain or signs? That actually it's fine. It's getting back to normal. Well I think as you said at the beginning we're starting to see those products come back in stores. As I said I've been able to get eggs I've been able to get flour at my local store. I haven't been able to get specialty flower that I might like. I think we'll start. Seeing some of those specialty products the diversity of products that maybe has disappeared a little bit comeback into stores which will be reassuring to say. Yep The supply chain is coming back. I think if I was looking for any red flags to pop out the things I would be looking at our again in meat processing if more plants close and if more plants closed for longer periods of time then we might start seeing some impacts on probably not supply. Because it'll probably stay domestic and we'll export less but we may start seeing some increases in grocery store prices so I don't expect that to happen but if we see more plants closed particularly in the US and they closed for longer periods of time. Then we might start seeing some concern with with respect to the availability of beef or pork. Michael thank you for taking the time and we appreciate it and my producer. We'll give you our address where you can send that flower. I'm not sure. How can I share but I will? I'll be happy to send you a little bit all right. Thanks so much. Thanks for having me stay safe. Michael von mass out of the University of wealth also the host of the food focus podcast and that was the big story. If you'd like more you can head to the Big Story. Podcast DOT CA. You can also talk to us on twitter anytime at the big story f. p. m you can also e mail us. The address is the big story podcast. That's all lower case and all one word at our DOT ROGERS DOT com. You can type you can send us a voice memo. You can send US video. Whatever you like. We love to hear from you and of course this podcast is available. Everywhere you get podcast Apple Google stitcher spotify and at frequency PODCAST NETWORK DOT COM. Where you can find a whole bunch of other really good podcasts. Thanks for listening Jordan Heath Rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow.

Canada lake We Michael von Maso US University of wealth Canadian Federation of Agricul federal government Fries Justin Trudeau Claire Quebec Alberta producer Jim Jordan Heath Rawlings spotify
Farm workers and COVID-19

The Current

21:15 min | 8 months ago

Farm workers and COVID-19

"Hi, I'm Dr Brian Goldman. If you haven't heard my new podcast the dose, this is the perfect time to subscribe. Each we answer your most pressing health, related questions and right now we know you're grappling with covid nineteen on those we bring in top experts to answer your questions about the corona virus and post some of our own. Get the latest evidence in a way. That's easy to understand by subscribing to the dose. It's your guide to getting through this difficult time. You can find the dose wherever you get your podcast. This is a CBC podcast. From the early days of the COVID nineteen pandemic, there have been fears about our food supply and safety of workers who produce it now, number of farms across southwestern. Ontario are dealing with outbreaks as of Monday. Three hundred forty five farmworkers tested positive from at least twenty different farms on Saturday a migrant worker died. He was thirty one years old Chris Rock is with justice for migrant workers. Chris Good Morning Good Morning Mac. What went through your mind when you heard about the death of Bonifazio Eugenia Romero? Actually Mad I'M GONNA. Go back ten years ago. That was the first time you had interviewed me and it was feelings I. It was a very similar circumstance where to Margaret Farmer Chris from nine -Tario. Hydra died in a workplace accident. Back then we were concerned about occupational health and safety concerns, and it was the same thoughts that came to my mind when the passing of benefits Yo- what are the health and safety protections? What are the housing protections that have been put in place over the last ten years, and I would argue that not much has changed in this pandemic. We're seeing an uptake of cases of covid nineteen in the agricultural sector and southwestern Ontario something like sixty workers at the pioneer flower farm have tested positive the before new cases yesterday. What's going on? Our numbers are four forty three and that number still climbing There's two things that we have to remember to remind. People are migrant workers are tied to one employer. They have no labor and social mobility. Many workers are fearful of exerting the rights through fear of being sent home. We know that the conditions and bunkhouses are very cramped others very little social isolation social isolating. There's concerns around the absence of protective equipment. And what's also important part is the accountability process here. There is no regulations for housing for migrant agriculture workers and occupational health and safety protections in the province of Ontario are lacks as opposed to other industries. If you're a minor of your construction worker, you'd have a lot more protections at work as opposed to an agricultural worker. Take me inside one of those bunkhouses. What what do you mean when you say situated? The conditions are cramped in the situations difficult for social isolation. So thank you so the areas that there's a lot of the communal spaces. workers are complaining that they're not receiving enough. Equipment is the bathrooms for instance in many places are so. they're not receiving enough equipment from their employers. To proper to engage proper hygiene you'd have or six to eight men in a room, and then you've got larger open spaces. Workers be forty to fifty people in an area, so there's often a lot of places where there's no privacy. There is no ability to to have your own area of security. To protect yourself for for health reasons to those workers get sick pay. If they were to fall ill with, would they be able to isolate themselves and not go out into the fields to work, but still be paid. Thank you That's also really important question so Ontario up with the with the election of Rob Rob. Cherry Doug Ford eliminated hazard, pay or sick pay for all workers and Ontario is no pay I at this point in time is a provincial level. We also have federal concerns. The fact that workers are tied to an employer. The fact that workers are consistent afraid of speaking up for the right to be sent home. This is a problem with the federal provincial government, and they have to act to protect the interests of migrant workers. What do you mean tied to an employer? Thank you for that, too? It is I that a worker could only work for one employer in Canada. They don't have the ability to move from workplace to workplace. If there abuses or if they're fed up with the conditions, or there's no work if a worker is, it does decide to work at another place that would be considered violation of their immigration rights in Canada, and they'll be sent home and deported. I dear creates a tremendous power imbalance with respect to the rights of agriculture workers here earlier this morning I spoke with a migrant worker named Niko. He's from Jamaica. He works at Sandy. Shore farms in Norfolk Antero there been any cova cases on your arm. Did you. Hear about the death of this worker at a different farm. Yes I heard that. What what? What went through your mind when you heard about that? Will take more safety precautions going. To keep away from this thing I heard. You and I spoke just when you were arriving and there was a lot of talk about trying to keep safe as you say. How has that worked out? Have you been able to do the distancing the physical distancing that that is so important in this situation? Yes most of the time what can we was moss, and so on lows, and so in the bunk house? How many workers are there in the bunkers? It of the speak eight and their space for people to be to be separated their. Yes, well tool kitchen to. Once of four person with the lies. And what about out in the work in the? Space, 'cause they're feeling. You have to wear a mask in that situation or no, no, because actually it does triples photo work together, okay? Do, you feel safe in the situation. So far. Over there so far, what would change that? Do you think W close. But. Is there anything you can do? I mean if if that would happen what what would? What would be your options? Speller. The moment, but I think I would try to say it myself. Is there space to do that though? And our people on the crew. Are they talking about covert? Is that the subject of discussion? There's lots of Meka. And what are people saying? Really don't want to catch. Nobody wanted to know right now. What do to get six? Now scared on no air. Stay safe I hope you you. It does not come anywhere near you. You have a big day. Work ahead so I. Appreciate you talking to us. I think. Chris Rams Group Nicolas says that he personally feel safe but says also that this is the talk amongst the crew that people are worried about this that they're scared. Should he be more worried about the spread of covid nineteen within his group. I think that all workers all agriculture workers Canadian American workers. I should be concerned and I'm glad that you know. His condition seems to be better than what we're hearing other places, but his. His experience is not what we're hearing often we're hearing. A lot of workers who are are terrified about catching the virus and once again is about. About if workers are sick, we have to ensure that they stay in candidate to receive healthcare so it's once again. It shouldn't be incumbent on migrant workers having to exert the rights what steps will both provincial and federal governments take a protect the best interest of our agricultural workers and our food system. What are the steps that you want them to take? So at the provincial level there should be increased safety blitzes. We should be talking about hazard pay We should be having a wage boost for agricultural workers. If they're considered essential workers, they should be provided. The same type of protections were providing to other workers like nurses doctors. We still see. farmworkers is both invisible in expendable, and that's something that we want to change and make sure. Sure that that does change just the floral continuing just GonNa say what's at the federal level. What are you looking for? At the federal level? no-one should be tied to an employer. We have open work permits to start off with, and our longstanding demand has been permanent status on arrival. migrant agricultural workers do not have the ability taxes residency in Canada, and we don't think that's that's. This is systemically discriminatory, and this really tells you about how we value the mark workers who put food on our table, so the government and the provincial government must act, it must end this form of indenture ship, and as Canadians were having a really tough conversation about racism about the legacy of slavery, and we also have to take this step to address the racism that we see in the field of Ontario and across Canada. You think that that's out of those workers are seen has invisible and expendable. This is a conversation that we have a lot of times with workers. They're like. Why aren't people giving US hazard pay? Why don't people see the importance that we do? Canadians would not eat if we were not putting food on your table. Chris Rams. Who could to speak with you? Thank you thank you matt. Chris Chris through with justice for Migrant. Workers Keith Curry is the president of the Interior Federation of Agriculture and the Vice President of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture. He's in calling. Would Ontario Keith Good Morning to you morning? That's been one death. Hundreds of positive test results for Covid nineteen among migrant workers here do you think migrant workers are protected enough in our country? Well I know certainly We're doing everything. We can't organization working with a government officials at all levels to make sure that those protective equipment and barriers are in place for all of our our members, and and and their employees as we've seen to cope with nineteen. There's been a lack of overall of PP's available We've seen the the issues with with the health. Health system getting access to to these this type of Lebanon and we're certainly pushing hard for government to find that equipment for our our members as well because after all. If we don't have workers that are healthy and able to go to work, then then that's a problem for businesses, so we've been. We've been fortunate that lately. There's been a lot of equivalent. Come available. Certainly. Our members are are working hard to secure as much as they can Chris Rams. Roop says that those workers who have been declared essential because they get food into our stores and onto our tables that, despite that essential nature, they are invisible and expendable. When you hear that what goes through your mind. Well. I certainly have to consider the source to start with, and and certainly workers of all whether it's domestic or foreign need to need a watchdog. I appreciate that and we certainly have some unions there. That are trying to advocate to unionize agricultural workers. Do you think that as a country, we treat them as as expendable. Well absolutely not. I think that's a very unfair statement to blanket everyone to everyone that teach mike workers unfairly because I know in an anyone I talked to who has Michael Workers? They're like family. Some cases you're talking about second and third generations of the same family to come back to the operation, and when these these owner operators going vacations and go back to the countries where the workers are from visit them so they. They are like family. They these workers. Sometimes we'll babysit children while the world. The farm operators quote for an evening, but he said, but he says that they're tied to their employer in some way that they aren't. I mean there's not a pathway for permanent residency. But also if they were to leave the employer that they're currently working for because perhaps they don't like the conditions that they could find themselves deported. Is that how we would treat family? Trees family absolutely not, but I I can't speak to all. Of the former program, but there is a there is a situation where workers are tied to an employer. I know in in in agriculture. We actually have just begun this year. A new pilot project that a culture food candidate has began where we employees can work on. Migrant employees can work on a pathway to permanent residency, and often all the government has made some allowances this year for T.F. FW's who has been out of work because of. Allow them to go to different employees, too to maintain working status so there are obviously always tweaks going on in the system to make it make it easier, but for the season leg workers that come in here on a regular basis. You know they they. They come in based on a contract that the countries negotiated with ours, and how they how they are housed. How word I mean I heard Chris talking about the. The housing situation we have at least four different at four different agencies go through housing. There's there's local bylaw inspector. There's public health. Unit looks at service. Candidate doesn't inspection and the Ministry of Labor in each province in an specs. Those facilities will you would. You would know up in calling I? Mean that's apple country there? There are a lot of migrant workers that come in over the course of the year to Prune trees and Is it possible to to safely distance yourself in those bunkhouses where those migrant workers are living. They actually have no choice math this year I mean we. The Protocols Mandate that you have to distance. The quarantine periods is very specific, and and all the inspections are done prior these workers coming in to make sure that those distancing rules are in place. And so you know. To Pin covert on a migrant worker because it's. Because there wasn't the rake is unfair. We've got thousands of people in this province of Ontario who have contracted positive tests and thousands of died, and so this is a human problem. Isn't that migrant worker problem? I? Guess the last question is. How do you balance that? In the concerns for the safety of those workers with the concerns of people who are running farms? The we're hearing about you know. Sixty percent of the asparagus crop for example could end up just rotting in the field because there aren't enough workers there. How do you balance the need for workers with also the need for safety? Well. That's what we've been struggling is. How do we make sure that we have our membership prepared for? Not If you get a break, but when you get an outbreak, and how are you going to handle that? And this is why we've been calling for all the protective equipment that we can get her hands on for for these workers, making sure that our our boys do the distancing like they haven't doing and everyone's been doing a terrific job. Making sure that the facilities are safe, they're clean that workers are protected These workers also integrate with the community. To do the grocery, shopping or other other shopping, so to say that that you know they brought with them is is is wrong in almost every case it's it's a case of communal spread and you know. We have to be cognizant of the fact that this virus seasonal boundaries. With you about this I appreciate your time, thank you. Curry is the president of the Imperial Federation of Agriculture. He was calling would Ontario throughout the nineteen eighties strange phenomenon sweeping North America. They were in a panic. And like people in a panic they want solutions allegations of underground satanic cults, torturing and terrorizing children. The thing is. There were no satanic cults preying on children and nearly thirty years later. The people touched by it all are still picking up the pieces. Isn't a work of fiction. This is a work of history. Satanic Panic? The latest CBC uncover. Available now. Over the past week of at sixty migrant workers are flower farm in Saint Catharines Ontario have tested positive for Covid nineteen Dr Mafa here. G is the acting medical officer of Health for the Niagara. Region in Ontario Dr Good, morning to you. What do we know about how this spread started? Was it from the community was at brought in from abroad. What are the roots of this in in these agricultural areas? Yeah so any agricultural work are coming in from a foreign country is part of the federal government program has to quarantine themselves for two weeks before they can start work, and so also workers cleared that quarantine period. There's no links to travel to anybody WHO's become infected. So this is very much appears to be people who, through their normal activity out in the community, unfortunately became exposed to Kobe nineteen like anybody else in from there, enforcing the infection has spread through the farm. What do we know about the conditions on the farm? There were forty new cases confirmed yesterday sixty cases at this pioneer flower farm. What are the conditions there in terms of living spaces? Yeah, so just want to highlight that not all sixty cases are amongst migrant workers in terms of the living situation for the workers who do live there if they do live in bunkhouses which are communal living in agents where there are multiple people living in a building the buildings I say are relatively modest in terms of furnishing, and so there's of course the difficulty to maintain lots of distance amongst each other similar actually to what we see in households where. Where we often see when one infection is introduced into a household, it enforced spray through the rest of the family on the household. The other factor here of course is that there's are in greenhouses. There's other locations where people are in the workplace where sometimes perhaps distancing isn't happening effectively as possible, and that's why we've also seen infection persons who don't live on the farm. Do we know whether in those greenhouses? People were wearing personal protective equipment masks, gloves, et CETERA. from our understanding people are not unfortunately wearing a mask. Another personal protective equipment since declared the outbreak is something that we have expected to happening from our observation. That is now currying. There are different approaches across the country to working with migrant workers have listened to retaliate Jacko. She's with the group dignified. In Vancouver. NBC The government is requiring incoming workers to spend a fourteen days in self-isolation in hotels which are paid for and food is also provided to the workers, and they're paid thirty hours a week. It's a positive step because on the farm, these workers are going to. They're typically not able to self isolate. They usually live in a really crowded conditions, so it's a good step that the government has taken to ensure that workers at least once they get to. Their farms will be healthy. Start you hear G is. Is that something that we could learn from Ontario what's happening in British Colombia? I think certainly elements of that that we could learn much of that. I think a ready in place here in terms of fourteen days of isolation and the owner of the firm responsible providing food, et Cetera, however -Tario typically that self-isolation is occurring inside the bunk house. Where of course, there are still going to be wristed. Other members who live in that same building could become infected so I think the model of having people in hotels is quite progressive to further lower that risk. I think fortunately the far we have not really seem migrant worker. Infection's coming from infections that have been imported from overseas. It is really largely been community spreads, so do want to caution that I don't see. The positive that is, it's not the primary issue that we need to address to make sure that these workers are safe. What about sick days? How important are having paid sick days so that if somebody does feel ill? They don't feel like they have to continue to go to work. I think that's something that's very important of course right now in public health that we're expecting anybody who develop symptoms to isolate themselves in remain isolated until they've tested negative or if they do test positive that they continue ice, leading up to fourteen days for someone who is here to work in who needs to earn that income whatever their background I think. Think! It's important that they don't suffer that economic hardship because what they're doing is trying to keep others in their community healthy. Just before I let you go. Chris Rock Group. said that one of the reasons why this happens is because of how this country sees those workers. There are essential workers, but in his words they're invisible and they're expendable. What do you make of that? I think is is definitely a fair comment that these workers are fairly essential. I think in general most people in and don't have a great sense of what is happening through the food supply particularly on farms. I think it would be nice. If people had a better understanding, a better I think they would help with the conversation of how to better support. These workers in terms of the broader conversation of the most workers. I think that's quite a complex conversation I. Think there are many. Many rights that have been put in place for these workers, and for example, the enjoy Ontario Health Insurance Program coverage here in Ontario that being said they obviously don't enjoy the same rights. Same Freedom of movement between workplaces do other Canadian citizens and I think it's a broader conversation we need to be having with society of what is the appropriate rights that we should be affording these workers. Appreciate your time this morning, Dr. you're busy, This is an important issue though thank you. Very much, so, thank you very much for having the doctor Mesaba. Her G. is the acting medical officer of health for the Niagara Region. We did request interviews with Interior Minister of Health Labor and agriculture. None of them were available to speak with us this morning. For more CBC PODCASTS CBC. DOT CA slash podcasts.

Ontario Chris Rams Michael Workers bunkhouses Canada social isolation Chris Chris Covid Chris Rock Margaret Farmer Chris Dr Brian Goldman bunk house Bonifazio Eugenia Romero medical officer Keith Curry self-isolation president Doug Ford
March 25, Part 1: National affairs panel; Securing Canadas food supply; Stephen Lewis on how COVID-19 could affect Africa

The Current

1:12:15 hr | 10 months ago

March 25, Part 1: National affairs panel; Securing Canadas food supply; Stephen Lewis on how COVID-19 could affect Africa

"This is a CBC podcast. I'm Matt Galloway. This is the current on. Cbc Radio One early this morning predawn vote. The federal government's eighty two billion dollar. Financial aid. Package was passed unanimously by the House. But not before the opposition sparred with the Liberals over the details contained within. We're prepared to quickly pass the measures that the prime minister had announced today date what we were not prepared for. Was the government's attempted democratic power. Grab the government has shown that they're interested in helping Canadians but if they truly want to help Canadians we need to do more. And we need to do it faster. There is a lot to discuss with our national affairs panel. Let's get to it Erin. Wary is a senior writer with the CBC's Parliament Hill Bureau. Meriva style is the parliamentary correspondent for. Lavar Andy Gun Sinclair columnist with the Winnipeg. Free Press. Good morning to you all. We're joining Marie. This finally passed but it was not easy briefly. Just explain how we got to this point where in the wee small hours those who were able to get to the house. We're able to pass this bill right well. Essentially the government was hoping to adopt. Its its aid package. That was announced last week. And if you hours yesterday it ended up taking seventeen more hours than planned so this this new bill that was adopted in early hours as you said essentially brings in All all the the measures aid measures that were announced last week by the prime minister. So help for workers have people who don't qualify for. Ein each take time off because of a quarantine and also helps for businesses but the process became a lot more complicated essentially because I think we saw partisanship come back into what had been so far at pretty non political crisis Essentially I would say to. People were probably are two parties. We're probably to blame so on the one hand the Liberals after these new sweeping you spending powers that people have heard about over the past day at the Liberals asking to be able to spend new money without coming back to get the approval of the parliament in the house comes in the Senate until December twenty twenty one so essentially almost two years from now. That was what was said to be a bargaining tactic in the hopes of you know getting the opposition to agree to something a little less in the in the meantime but maybe not the smartest thing to to do And and the backlash should have been expected on the other hand you had the conservatives who I would argue were also a little bit partisan yesterday I when they leaked that draft of the bill saying that the negotiations were going sour and then with that press conference from which you heard Andrew Scheer bit earlier in your show so essentially we have this sort of tug of war. Yesterday that lasted about seventeen hours house was supposed to come back at noon. The ended up coming back at three. Am some of my colleagues. Who were a little more Mckean maybe has stayed up to watch the debate and the package was eventually adopted at five thirty about five thirty this morning. Now it has to go to the Senate today and hopefully get royal center at the end of Erin worry This is a time of crisis and perhaps Canadians might expect all political parties to be working together. How does this challenge that? I mean I is it just politics as usual When it comes to trying to address prices I mean I think you can. You can take some solace in the fact that they came to a conclusion Or came to the conclusion that they came to. Which is that. There's there's going to be some some pretty extraordinary spending power but with a parliamentary oversight. But I think you know and I think that's that's sort of a look at least on first glance like a fairly decent compromise. I mean I think there were sort of two impulses here that that ran up against each other. One is is the government wanting to be able to act very fast and very quickly to A global pandemic without having to reconvene parliament and the other impulse was the opposition. Saying you know we want to be able to have some oversight and hold you accountable for what you're doing and you know what they've come to. The conclusion is okay. You get some extraordinary spending powers but at the same time you're going to have to you know face the the Health Committee the Finance Committee are going to be meeting. You know by teleconference meeting remotely. You're going to have to report back to The the finance minister is going to have to report back to the parties. You know I don't I think it's I think it's fair to say that the political parties politicians should set aside. Maybe some of the the excesses of politics in normal times. But I think it's it's it's this is sort of an example of the fact that you still need a parliament You still need some kind of accountability function Or you know working so that you know you get some scrutiny. You get some accountability. You know even during what are truly extraordinary time. Clare you or one of those colleagues who was up all night watching. This would definitely watch until as late as I could go. And it's a What I kept waiting for Throat yesterday was some kind of compensation the details around the the package itself. And that's probably the most disappointing part. Is that you know there are some real concerning parking there on the details of this Package and they particularly have to do with the fact that you know people homeless and particularly digits communities They're getting these pockets of money that are rather undefined. And there's no congress out where that's going to go and so in the real concern is that As seeing with corporations in the banks if you give money without real stringent measures than it there's the chance of corruption and mismanagement and so The I of course. There's not much time to discuss this bill. But the fact that we're talking more about powers and limited powers Versus the details. The bill itself I think is a is a general problem for Canadian style. Just very briefly on this point then. When is this money going to get into the hands of the Canadians? Who Need it the most which is the most important question right and I think it was. What was a bit frustrating yesterday for Kitty and sitting at home? Who aren't going to work because their job was cut or because they can't go to work because they're in quarantine and they desperately need this money I was told that you know. Seventeen hours isn't really going to change. When the money comes Premier go yesterday and his daily press conference suggested that the those I yeah I checks might be available around April six. Some people say it might take a tiny bit longer so unfortunately the the help is maybe still a couple of weeks away but I I guess the good news in all this is that it seems like it will be coming soon Given that they've all finally agreed it was interesting. The prime minister has been speaking every day. And one of the things that he has said in the last couple of days is that Canadians aren't doing enough physical distancing and staying home and we saw the images coming at a Vancouver where people crowded on beaches for example. You pointed out that he sounds a bit like a disappointed father. He does He sounds like I mean. Maybe it's maybe. It's what happens when he's been cooped up with three kids for Whatever it is now ten days but I it's it's you know. This government has struck a tone from the start that it needs citizens to take their responsibility to social distance to stay home and that this doesn't this whole response doesn't really work if people don't Adhere to that. And there's been this this sort of second Impulsive of people saying well invoke emergency legislation force people to stay home You know take extraordinary measures to to you. Know not not just ask for people to quarantine themselves or self isolate but force them to and I think the government is running up against the fact that you know a that that would be a very draconian response and be. It's probably not that feasible. You can't really force people to stay home. Why can't you? We've seen that in other jurisdictions? Well it's it's I think it's I think so too on that one. It's it's pretty hard to do in a large country Without a massive expansive of resources. That you you don't necessarily want to spend your time worrying about keeping people at home you WanNa spend your time worrying about You know dealing with the with the health impact dealing with the economic impact. I think the other thing is and for my understanding of how it's worked in other countries is other countries have realized that forcing people to stay home. Forcing lockdowns isn't necessarily as conducive to a solution as as trying to get the public to go along with you and trying to get Broad by and for what you're doing And and so. I think the government's running up against that and it's it's so leaves you in a position where you know the Prime Minister. I it has been extraordinary to listen to you. Know the prime minister of a country. talking to people who have good personal hygiene and Staying home and it's it's it's it's a bit odd and I can understand the impulse for people to say you know no the government the state should be enforcing this. But I think it's. It's probably when it comes right down to it. Really the the best and only option he had. What's it been like where you live or people heeding the advice to we calling this social distancing? Now we're trying to be physical distancing instill in social contact with people. Are People doing that where you are? Yeah I mean in Manitoba. We've seen the lowest amount of People with positive Kobe. Nineteen Diagnosis and I think for the most part because Manitoba got on board quite early and took it quite seriously quite early. Now the issue is is that will that continue and the the challenges Will PEOPLE CONTINUE TO Take things seriously in their everyday lives. You know if anything that this pandemic has demonstrated is that Canadians when called upon and when seeing the evidence in front of them can change their lifestyles and I wrote a book about him. Call Him to say you know. We could change this in environmental way as well and so. It's real evidence that the when there is evidence presented to Katie. And I think that Aaron is right to say that the concern is that if you come in with your coney and legislation and you forced people's due to make a change that tends to not be as persuasive as to present evidence and to Show that the more important thing is to make changes within your own life and and I think that's been probably the most inspiring thing that we've seen here in Manitoba. You talk about the financial aid package new gun and in particular. What isn't in there in terms of the details for indigenous communities? We've been hearing over the course of the last couple of days. Certainly the last couple of weeks of concerns in those communities around the ability do physical distancing but also the systemic challenges that make crisis like this even more pronounced. What are you hearing in those communities about what people are looking for well yesterday There was five cases from Ghana walkie and it's evident that within an indigenous community whether it be urban Which often are inner city? Areas Austin poverty stricken communities or whether they be rural which is rural first nations communities. There are specific. Health challenges that exponentially increase The spread of Khalid and we saw that evidence during an eight point two n one pandemic. So the problem of course is that you have to directly address the issues within first nations that are regularly. Poverty Centered You have to do that in a very direct way. And the fact is that if we don't deal with indigenous communities in a direct way then all of us are going to be impacted by that whether you're in the most rural areas or whether it's the most Privileged areas so the the three hundred and five million dollars that are in the Indigenous Community Support Fund. From this eighty. Two billion will likely not be able to address the issues that indigenous communities are going to be facing when later likely this weekend. We're going to see more. And more cases exponentially increase as you can see in most communities. It has one or two at a time or probably a dozen at a time indigenous communities. You're going to see that two or three times more faster spreading because of the issues are on poverty. Marie what's your take on this needle that The government is trying to thread when it comes to Making sure that it is presenting a message that is coherent that speaks to all Canadians but also respecting other levels of government and the rules that those other levels of government play. I think you're right that that. They're trying to err on the side of encouraging people rather than than forcing them to do so and you guys probably right that if you start off right from the beginning by by enforcing it. Maybe people are a bit Hesitant to oblige by that. But I do think that you're starting to see two things. The federal government losing patient with patients is we mentioned but also Local government sort of taking things into their own hands and and it's true that it would be hard to enforce a formal lockdown of the entire country. But you are seeing it in certain cities where the police is sort of taking things into their own hands. And when they're made aware made aware story of someone who is not respecting their quarantine order for example. We saw it in Quebec City Not Too far from here where a woman was diagnosed with nineteen. She was out and about for a walk while the police intervened and essentially told her to go home. You are starting to see that I think for now. The federal government is essentially deciding to leave this in the provinces and the municipalities hands. And and we've had this entire debate about whether we should bring in the emergencies. Act or not Justin should keep saying you know. It's not out of the question. It's still on the table but there seems to be a divide amongst for now amongst provinces as to whether the government should the federal government should bring it in or not in the divide seems to be between bigger provinces and smaller provinces so you have Ontario Quebec Alberda. Really insisting on their own provincial jurisdiction. Didn't want to have the flexibility to do what they need to do In their own territory where they know what's best essentially is what they're saying but you do have new. Brunswick saying they would like some more uniformity as we're seeing across the country in terms of measures Mister Kenny suggested that the the territory's also would like a little bit more help I think for now. There does seem to be an alignment between provinces as to. What's allowed? What's not allowed On Tearing Quebec non essential businesses schools being closed pretty much everywhere so far you see that uniformity as opposed to in the states for example where you know fifty states are essentially sort of doing what they think is best I but I. I wonder if at some point the impatience that Aaron mentioned From Mr Trudeau is going to take over. And and and maybe he's not going to want to give the provinces so much leeway anymore if he sees that people aren't staying home despite encouraging messages few minutes that we have people often say that you learn a lot about who you are in a crisis and so very briefly. And I'll start with you. Murray what do you think cove nineteen has revealed about Canadians who we are and sort of torn on this question. I want to see. It revealed the positive where you see. Small businesses wanting to help healthcare workers by bringing them food and you see people wanting to help their local business by buying. Let's say gift certificates they can use later on to to keep them. Keep those businesses and business You also see people smiling when you go for a walk but you also see people on beaches in Vancouver who were not listening and so to me. It's to pick one or the other. I'm sort of torn between seeing the best in people but also seeing some really stubborn people out there who don't really want to listen more waving at each other and just kind of hollering from you know from the balcony or from the the patio or something like that Erin what are you seeing? What if we learned about who we are in this crisis? I think broadly speaking it's positive You know I think to the story that went around. It feels like weeks ago but I think it was probably days ago. Time becomes elastic of the the request. That was put. I think in Ontario for for retired nurses to help with telehealth and three thousand or something responded It's I I think there is broadly speaking. It's been positive and that it's shown people have faith in in medical professionals. They have they. Broadly have Faith in in governments to listen to governments entrust what's coming out of governments in this moment And that broadly people understand they have a responsibility. you know personal personal responsibility and then responsible responsibility to each other and then there is that that gap of you know. I. It's hard to say how many people who who you know either. Aren't that informed of what's going on or don't take it seriously and that you know. I think it's very easy especially in in In journalism to think that everyone is is tapped into the news and taking it seriously as you are. And it's you know there's a bit of a realization here that that not everyone is although. I think I think one of the most interesting things. The prime minister said this week was effectively. You know you have a responsibility to know this. You have a responsibility to listen. You have a responsibility to know what's going on and you know that I think is a is a huge point and and we'll see sort of in the days ahead how much it's taken up against in Clare last minute to you. What have we learned about ourselves in this? Well I've already said the the real things that people have noticed or what I've noticed. Is that Canadians can change their life styles when they want to. And there's the evidence is certainly there. I mean we've had a twenty to thirty percent. Reduction of nitrogen dioxide in the atmosphere is result of the industry reduction. And that's actually saved lives In in countries up to seventy thousand people over you know seniors. For example do the lack of air pollution But the the real thing that I think that Canadians have most indirectly. Is that the heroes of this. Fight are those who have been often the most marginalized or the most mistreated by government. Those are the ones who are in the Healthcare Profession Austin police and street level organizations dealing with poverty. That's the stuff that heroes of this country their fighting it every single day and often the people who are making minimum wage serving us our food giving us a stocking the shelves it is those people were most often marginalized. But there have been the heroes of this fight worth remembering. Take care of yourselves all of you. This is a difficult time in a tricky time and we needed to be healthy and be well. Thank you for joining us this morning. Thank you Erin Wary. A senior writer with the CBC's Parliamentary Bureau. Marie Vostell is the parliamentary correspondent for the d'Ivoire Megan Sinclair is a columnist with Winnipeg. Free Press we could turn that question over to you. What did we learn about ourselves as Canadians? In this crisis you can let us know through the website. Cbc DOT CA slash the current. Click on the contact link. You can tweet us at the current. Cbc Or send US An e mail. The mail bag is very full the beginning a lot of comments about the extended version of the of the current you can email us at the current at CBC DOT C. The CBC news is next and then step away from that skid of black beans. Panik fires are clearing a grocery stores hoarding food. Right now wanNA take a breath and ask why. How secure is this country's food supply and is that supply ready for what we're in the midst of that's coming up in about six minutes. I'm Matt Galloway. This is the current stay with us. Good Morning I'm Matt Galloway. You're listening to the current still to come on this extended version of the show humanitarian and former diplomat Stephen Lewis we'll talk about the covert nineteen pandemic at home and abroad but first before you fill that shopping carts food for thought too familiar scene from any Canadians as we live through this pandemic he walked into the grocery store. The item you're looking for. Isn't there yesterday. It was toilet. Paper today might be ground beef or frozen vegetables tomorrow. Who knows? While our country's biggest grossers rushed to restock shelves the perception of shortage food shortage in particular is triggering a very primal question in the brain. Are we going to run out today? We're going to try to answer that question to follow our food supply from farm to factory to the supermarket Mary. Robinson is the president of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture. She helps manage a sixth generation family farm in Albany on Prince Edward Island. Mary Good Morning. Good Morning Matt. Let's start with the operation that you own workers right now are packing potatoes. How is this pandemic affecting the day to day operations on your farm? Well we know the demand is very strong And our crews have been working twelve hour shifts. They go more king. extended shifts in order to try to fill the demand. And what we've done in houses. We've tried to be very clear on our communication with with our team Trying to make sure that they understand What kind of measures? They should be taking personally to make sure they're safe in the workplace is safe. We've been doing things like providing meals during the shift Trying to be aware and sensitive of people's kind of personal situations at home in any sensitivities they might have and all this while we're certainly keeping our eye on the reality that seems to becoming and that is that we're probably going to see dwindling numbers in the workforce and how we need to figure out how to address that as a the very beginning of the journey that food takes to get to. Your fork starts on every firm. This is spring and we are coming out of a long winter. You hear that phrase you reap what you so and it really does say a lot about how important this time of the year is how key for you are the next few weeks so. There is such a huge variety of firms across Canada and varying requirements of labor any inputs intending to the crops and harvesting the crop For people who are in those highly intensive labor situations if you think of a peach farmer a Cherry Firmer Broccoli firm. Anyone that needs to transplant plants. they're in a very difficult position right now because as they make their plans to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in this next month or so. They've got to decide how to do that. And how to make sure that they take care of their own people their own families their own work families their own businesses and at the same time. Do the very best to make sure that we have The same kind of food we're used to and I think that's probably an important messages What we're going to see In summer of this year is probably going to see A decent amount of food. But it's going to look different What do you what do you look different while I think the variety could be different If if you're a broccoli farmer and you need fifty Guys that usually come in temporary foreign worker program to be on your firm Cutting Broccoli and you're not going to have those people and that's going to impact your ability to grow that crop so when you go to the grocery store Through this year you're probably going to see the effects of those changes in the labor market. Place how important are those temporary foreign workers to the agricultural system in this country? They're hugely important. And I want to make it clear that Canadian farmers always prefer to hire local. People It it's it's so much easier and and it's wonderful to do but unfortunately what we have seen Is We've seen quite a gap in the availability of Labor. Two agriculture in in two thousand seventeen we brought in fifty nine and a half thousand Foreign workers and these people a lot of them. Come back to the same firm year-over-year so they're kind of extended family members for a lot of our firm family now even with bringing in almost sixty thousand people. We still had a gap of over fifteen thousand positions. That went unfilled. So there's all kinds of opportunity for Canadian to get in and have meaningful work in agriculture and in all of this we are encouraging in in the theme of Cova Times Seek out if you're if you're in a in a neighborhood and area that has farms or food processors people that are local to you opportunities that are local to you and you've been displaced from your normal job reach out to those people by email or phone. Obviously don't go to the firms are the plants But reach out and there's opportunities and see how that might look for you because we we are in different times. We're going to need Canadians to do jobs that traditionally maybe they may not have considered. This is something that's playing right across. The country have listened to Pender Dhaliwal who grows cherries and apples and Oliver in the Okinawan region of BC. He represents hundreds of farmers as the head of the BC Fruit Growers Association. Here's how he describes the beginning of what you're talking about this potential labour-crunch due in particular to travel restrictions along season. I called workers from Carribean reading in Mexico. It's not just borders. That we need is also a Canadian workforce. We get a lot of youth that come from Quebec every year. To help with the harvest is cooperating. Comes once a year in Kaunda and timing is everything? And if we don't get the pruning down the thinning harvesting You know we're not gonNA see the season for another year. Crunches a real thing. Isn't it Mary and if you consider that Canadian? Agricultural and agro-food employs two point three million Canadians in normal times. That's a huge workforce. And when you consider how the play of how cove it's going to be maybe reducing those numbers. It means the Canadians are going to have to give more thought to the roles. They could play in in helping us through this time for people who are listening just finally and maybe they're worried about keeping food on their tables in the next few weeks months. Maybe they being to the grocery store and they saw the scenes that I was describing earlier of the thing that they went to get not being there just briefly. What would you say to them? I was at the grocery store yesterday. Washing my hands diligently and I was to see as much as I saw on. Our shelves were relieved to see as much food as you saw. Yeah I found. There was a full shelves The things that were missing where things like hand sanitizer and soap and things like that. But I can tell you that in Charlottetown here Our grocery stores doing exceptional job of changing how goods flow to them because a lot of the shortages that we saw were not a result of the food now being available it was a matter of every week. The grocery store get so much products based on what their historical sales and their forecasts are going to be and all of a sudden everything changed so dramatically. But I think that's why we saw that kind of alarming Those shortages and shelves with those empty spots. But if you look now I'm I'm really incredibly heartened by how quickly our grocers and our food supply chain have responded to the changes. I think people should kind of Take it easy. Give themselves a little bit of breathing. Space and realise that. Canada. We're blessed. We have huge natural resources. We've gotten incredibly robust agro-food sector but we need to make sure that we keep these people in mind and do what we can to help them as all of them make these difficult decisions and get us through this next year. Murray great to talk to you and best of luck I appreciate your interest not take care. Robinson is the president of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture Manages six generation family farm in Albany Beautiful Prince Edward Island we get Nah go now from the farm to the factory. Next stop on Canada's food supply chain the warehouses and production lines turn berries and canola pork into packaged goods. The Maple Leaf Heritage Plant in Hamilton Ontario puts out thousands of hot dogs and sliced meats. Everyday Chris Bernardi is the chief union steward. He operates robots at that plant Chris. Good morning to you. Good Morning Matt How are you? I'm well thanks? How has pandemic changed life in your plant Well you know. Things have changed drastically This was all brand new to US. Right. This is uncharted territory. And at the very beginning it was. It was quite confusing and scary Employers being very proactive about this Our site leader is actually a former veteran. So He's used to being under pressure and he speaks with me quite often and the union. We usually meet once a week. And I've been speaking via email in person You know the employers had many meetings with myself and the other stewards to keep us updated so that we can help. Share the message. Keep people calm you? Can you do things like social distancing? Can you have what practically has changed in a plant? That's a busy place when we're meant to be to be apart from each other. Well what we started doing now is. We're putting bollards down the hallway to keep traffic separate In our cafeteria we have tables. For Four we actually have mandated that it's only two people at the table now because we're in food production we wear p all the time. So we're we're we're quite safe there right The employers doing many things to keep us socially distance. They're making it clear that this is how we have to be We've changed our sanitation processes. We've hired extra cleaners You know we're we're making sure. All the doorknobs railings. Everything we have more hand sanitizers everywhere. So they're definitely taking steps to make sure that we as the workers are safe not a job that people can do from home and yet we're being told by the prime minister and other stay home if you can. How concerned are the people you're the chief union steward the people that you work with the people that you helped represent? How concerned are they about being at work rather than being at home away from other people I'd say at first they were very concerned about it? Because you know there's a lot of people there and we work very closely together. But as time's gone on we've really sent the message out that we are one of the frontlines and if we don't come to work and we don't produce me than our doctors and our families aren't gonNA eat and they're not going to be able to take care of us so I'd say more people are becoming determined and happy to come to work because we also know there's going to be an economic problem at the end of this And and we we. Hopefully we'll be able to work throughout the whole time without any layoffs. You also have to deal with. And we've heard this across the economic spectrum that people may not becoming into work as much people might be falling. Ill they may need to go. Entice elation or quarantine this could last for weeks could last for months before life is back to normal. How long can the plant keep running as normal if this crisis continues? Well we're we're taking steps now. Actively hiring people who have been laid off from their other jobs so that we can keep production running We're we're working overtime shifts. We have people volunteering to stay so as long as we can keep people in the building. We'RE GONNA keep producing food. You know what I mean. What is it like for you to suddenly now be an essential worker during this crisis? It was sort of eye opener you know. We took these jobs making bunch meet. We didn't think we would be essential workers but to be honest with you. It's an honor to me And a lot of my members feel the same way we are happy to be on the frontline and able to make sure that this country is going to keep eating. Because that's very important is there. Is there anything in your mind? That could shut you down. The only thing I could really see is this out of control even more and we just didn't have the bodies to keep running. You know what I mean but even then I don't see that being a problem because we've got people were hiring where we're making sure that myself all I do is I go to work and come home right. We're all self isolating So you know that may be a shortage of of P. P. which I've heard about in the media is concerned the personal protective equipment. Yeah but we we are well stocked on that. We're still getting our orders from our suppliers So you know as far as I can see and of course I can't. I don't speak for maple leaf but I can see us running through this And being able to be proactive about it and take the steps needed to avoid a shutdown. You know what I mean the same question that I asked Mary I'll ask you. Which is that people might. There's a perception of a shortage and so people go into a grocery store and the thing that they might be used to seeing may not be there and that was happening in the last couple of weeks but to Mary's point people who are working in these stores are working really hard to restock shelves and make people feel good. What would you tell Canadians? Who were worried that they won't be able to get the food that they're used to the food that they want in the coming months. I would say if you don't see your favorite hotdogs or your favorite lunch me today. They'll be there tomorrow We are working around the clock to keep chain running and that as long as people realize. They don't have to panic by because you know like. Mary said we are blessed in Canada. We do have a great food supply. We do have a lot of natural resources. We're going to keep the food chain running and people just have to realize instead of buying ten packages today by one package this week. You know maybe just to pack of hot dogs because we will keep those hotdogs lunch meat. Comes Chris good to speak with you and stay? Well thank you. It's been a pleasure. Chris. Bernardi is the Chief Union Steward and robot operator at Maple Leaf Heritage Plant in Hamilton Ontario. Our trip down. The food supply chain is nearing an end. We've gone from the farm to factories. The last stop is at that grocery store and when those shelves Look Empty. That's when the worry can really begin for some Consumers Ellen. Goddard is an agricultural economist with the University of Alberta She's an Edmonton Ellen. Good morning to you mining. How worried should people be a grocery stores running out of fruits and vegetables and things that people are getting on a weekly or daily basis I guess the question shouldn't be how worried. Should they be? 'cause I think you've heard that from the previous speakers I think the supply is there I hope it continues to be there for the Crops we plant annually but Much of what we eat is it's already in the system. It's the logistics of moving it around and I think people don't need to worry that there won't be food. They just might need to worry about whether they can get it on Tuesday or Thursday Even sometimes wait a week. If you're particularly I guess if you're in Edmond and maybe but it's really about moving around more than it is whether it's going to exist or not. So how can you explain what people might see on some of those empty shelves? You might not be able to buy flour for example because a lot of people maybe are baking at home now. They have been more time. You can't buy in in many stores canned beans or frozen vegetables anymore that they've disappeared. What's behind that first of all A lot of people are not eating out and For most Canadian families they spend usually about thirty percent of their overall food budget on eating at restaurants so they're now eating at home which changes the foods that you buy on a weekly basis Quite a bit and people are looking for things that store one of the most interesting things to me is that people had stopped buying breakfast cereal to a very great extent but when this all happened Right across North America and Europe breakfast cereal became hugely more popular. Because you can put a few boxes of it in the cupboard and it's GonNa be just fine when you take it out in a week or two to start eating it whereas you're a bit More circumscribed if you're if you had switched to eating bacon and eggs for breakfast. Maybe you don't have the capacity to store them and maybe They're not gonNA last as long as a boxer breakfast cereal. So we're changing what we and we're definitely getting into More cooking and more food preparation at home and I think that people are Not Buying as many prepared meals for example from the grocery store. They're thinking that if I by such and such a package of ground beef I can probably make four meals out of it and free some of them and that's more cost effective than than buying Prepared meals that will take up more space and will not go as far as long as those habits change. How well prepared are Canadian stores? When it comes to getting the stuff the choppers wants to be we. We live in a culture where To your point you're used to getting things when you want to get them but now things are different in our stores. They're working really hard to restock things. And they've made adjustments to the supply of food. But what does that say about the the operations themselves? And how well prepared? They offer something like this. I think they're incredibly well. Prepared and we also have a retail sector where many of the big players are truly national in scope. And they've got well established supply chains as as some of your previous speaker said there was a bit of a shock. I don't think the grocery stores were prepared for people to come in and purchase things Quite as quickly as they did but it they have they can adjust and moving around. They just need time to do that. And we may SEE ABSENCE LOWS. We May Always find some things not in the grocery store because people may get an idea that You know we may run out of soap at some point and they may panicked by so And then soap might not be there for a couple of days but it's not that it's not in the system and it's not that it can't be moved around. It's a matter of the stores and The management having the time to figure out the most effective way to do it But associated with that there are some people also involved in moving groceries around the country so we have to hope that that workforce is another workforce that doesn't get decimated by This horrible disease because That could put another stumbling block into the system. We also heard earlier about A potential shortage of temporary foreign workers migrant workers as a result of border restrictions would impact from your perspective with that have on Canada's food supply. That's huge I totally agree with Mary when she said that we are. Our system is dependent on temporary foreign workers at both the processing level at sometimes as well as the primary production level and it's super dependent at harvest time. Because once they're there they need to be harvested to really time sensitive thing and obviously planting is important as well. So yeah it's an. I think the government has recognized that And I think that they're making appropriate decisions now to Allow more foreign workers in however we have to recognize that the logistics are changing for those people as well they Even if they've been coming for years they're not going to be allowed to come if they happen to have evidence of being sick and once they're here. There's another additional cost for the industry in terms of them needing to be quarantined for two weeks. Like anybody else would be when they get here so they some of these things are gonNA add cost to this system and It has to be paid for by somebody to Mary's point. Though I mean we have skyrocketing unemployment in in this country could that change how people think of those jobs yes but will it I I unfortunately in a place where there's quite a bit of unemployment and I I don't know how how people are GonNA think I know that part of the resistance in thinking about working in a non familiar field may be actual fear about whether the Employer is going to take appropriate precautions. I know people are getting worried about leaving their house. So it it's one thing to maybe go into a workplace that you're familiar with. It's quite another to head out and start to work with a bunch of New People in a new environment so we have to recognize that people are scared and that will affect their willingness to take on employment in new sectors. People are scared about a number of things one of the things again. This is what we started talking about is just whether the the supply of food is going to be there. It's encouraging to hear from all of these different sectors. People seem very positive. They seem to believe that supply is not threatened. And you believe that too. I definitely believe the supply is not threatened. However it's not it's not perfect The system and if costs go up we do have to worry about some vulnerable people in our populations we do have food insecure populations in Rights wrote the country at a certain level. And certainly in places like the north and They CAN'T ABSORB INCREASES IN COSTS. So there are going to have to be policies put in place to protect Vulnerable people as costs. Go Up But I do think that as long as the border stays open and our product flows back and forth to the United States. Our supply chains are going to be very secure the priority for government. You also might find more people cooking at home and as you said that could change how people operate and how people live their lives well and it may have an effect on children because people will be looking for things to entertain their children and they may grow up to be more food literate than some of our generations Over the past few years who have never done anything but put food in a microwave so it may be very interesting to see how that all plays a Ellen. Great to speak with you stay. Well thank you thank you. Allan. Godart is an agricultural economist with the University of Alberta. We reached her in. Edmonton lot of uncertainty. Out there right now. I know you have a lot of questions and we have questions to tomorrow. We are going to have a little bit of help in trying to answer those questions. Dr Alison mcgeer is one of this country's leading voices on infectious disease outbreaks. She was with us at the very beginning of this. It seems like years ago but it was really just a couple of months ago when she was here in the studio with me. She's going to be on the phone tomorrow to answer some of your questions. If you have something that you need a clear answer on when it comes to this virus how it affects us how we can protect ourselves. Get in touch. You can email us the current at CBC dot C. A. or Tweet us at the current. Cbc You can also pose your questions on our facebook page to search for CBC radio the current we will do our best to get to as many of them as we can when Dr Alison mcgeer joins me tomorrow to answer your questions about the coronavirus. She's here after the nine o'clock news coming up in about ninety seconds conversation with Stephen Lewis as a humanitarian. He spent years drawing attention to the HIV AIDS crisis. We will talk today about Cova. Nineteen what he thinks of this response here in Canada Abroad. And of course he has a real focus on the continent of Africa. We'll talk about what he's concerned about. When it comes to the pandemic sweeping through that continent Stephen Lewis is coming up in just about ninety seconds. Time I'm Galloway. This is the current on. Cbc Radio One stick around. Hi I'm Matt Galloway. You're listening to the current. So th Africans will soon be under a countrywide lockdown as that government tries to prevent a further spike in covert nineteen cases thus far the viruses spread across. Africa has been relatively limited. That is expected to change soon. Experts warn that the Continents Health Systems and citizens will be in grave danger when it does spread. Stephen Lewis is the CO director of AIDS. Free World he served as the UN Secretary General's special envoy for HIV AIDS in Africa from two thousand one. Two thousand six Stephen Lewis. Good Morning. Good Morning Matt. How're you doing in the midst of all this well like Most people I think Who are required to stay at home. I am at home I've been lucky Math I've I've Worked from home for a number of years so this isn't as disruptive to life as it might otherwise be but you know roiling beneath the surface there is the anxiety that I'm sure everyone feels. What are you most anxious about Most anxious about the spread here in In Canada and and the desperate need for medical equipment and supplies in order to reduce the possibility of of a wholesale disaster. You have been involved in public life here at home with the Ontario. Mvp candidates embassador under former prime minister. Brian Mulroney you have worked in global health for for a long time as well. If you take a look at what's happening in this country. What stands out to you about how Canada and candidates leadership has responded to this crisis. Well relative to other countries. I think we've responded Reasonably well late It's always surprising to me how much time it takes to rally a government to respond to a palpable crisis But I think the response is is building that legislation. That was passed in the early hours of this morning will help enormously within the economy and I hope particularly that the that the workers who have lost their jobs and the unemployed will find some source of support from the government directly and soon and I think that on the Medical Front. We've had a really sterling response The health system has rallied Well and feels overwhelmed and apprehensive about what's coming but on balance you know. I think we've done reasonably well. Certainly compared to the United States remarkably. Well well I wanNA talk about the United States in just a moment or you courage by the fact that we heard this from the prime minister we've heard from health public health officials as well this directive to believe in science and that sounds obvious to a lot of people. But it isn't in these times. Are you encouraged by that? Culturally encouraged because sciences everything. That situation like this. As it has been a around infectious diseases like HIV and tuberculosis. And the Bulla. Science is always the benchmark against which you measure interventions. And I think science would be everywhere predominant if it weren't for the lunacy of the president of the United States is wrong is their strong strong language and saying lunacy. What do you make of what's happening in the United States? I think at the state governors and many of the municipal mayors are showing much more strength of character and understanding and sense of urgency. Then the White House is showing and and I and I use the word lunacy advisedly. Because I think you you. You've got to be slightly out of control to be able to advocate the kinds of things. He advocates and the kinds of things he says. And it's very discombobulating to the population as a whole and a direct confrontation with the urgency of science. What worries you the most about what's happening so the border well. I'm worried most if I if I may say so about New York. I think what's going on in New York. State is a is a nightmare. And what's going on in the city itself is almost beyond belief It it I think stems. Most people have said from the density of the population. But it's really a nervy That it has emerged as the epicenter of the Corona virus in the United States. And it may well be in a week or two. It will be the epicenter internationally. What are the countries that are getting this right to think because it yes? The United States stands at large In terms of things that could go wrong or are already going wrong. Whatever the countries that are that are getting this well. I get the impression that the nordics are working very hard at putting in place. All of the strictures. We think are important from hand washing to physical distancing the to reinforcing shoring up the medical infrastructure. The whole apparatus of response responding to people I I think If if you look at the list of countries and the number of cases Canada is number fifteen and and That suggests that there are fourteen countries worse off than we are Many of them are very populations of course a but I have a feeling that a couple of the European Union countries like and and Switzerland although they have a significant number of cases that they're working very hard and effectively and the Nordic certainly are doing so. Let's talk about what's happening on the continent. South Africa as I mentioned has a countrywide lockdown starts tomorrow. That's the largest lockdown on the continent. What do you make that effort? Well I think that President Ramaphosa is showing the appropriate leadership in a country that is really terrifyingly at risk. it's It's it's a country where where very large numbers of people live together in townships and then in slums it's a it's a country where over seven million people are living with. Hiv and hundreds of thousands are living with tuberculosis a lung disease which therefore makes people particularly immune immune immune suppressed given the given the likelihood that the corona virus attacks the respiratory system. It's a country with a twenty nine percent unemployment rate. It's a country which has been the sort of center of social and economic reforms and And activity on the continent of Africa. it's It's a country terribly at risk and I think they understand it. And they're doing everything in their power to contain the the impact of the virus than other countries on the continent. Need to wake up. What do you mean by that? I mean roughly. What Dr Ted Rush? The director. General of the World Health Organization said what he said that. that Test task test and he said Africa. Prepare for the worst There are forty four out of the no forty six out of the fifty four countries in Africa. Now have evidence of The Corona virus and The numbers of cases are rising as we talk math. There are twenty five hundred cases on the continent. There are now seven hundred and South Africa alone. Seven hundred The countries are beginning to close their borders. They're beginning to shut. Their schools are beginning to try very hard to to Do the kinds of things that could minimize the impact. But it's slow and and I don't know how to convey this Matt. It's so it's so frustrating but the health systems of Africa are so fragile. The numbers of medical professionals and health care workers are so limited the available bill ability of medical equipment of a laboratory equipment of testing kits and ventilators. And all of this is so minimal on the continent that if the corona virus gets in a brutal and ferocious way as is predicted by some then we will experience again the kind of devastation that we saw during the height of the AIDS pandemic in the late nineties and early southlands and it is just a nightmare. You said that it's also beyond even the healthcare system just the ability to do A. We're being told constantly we should is to wash our hands in some parts of the continent. How difficult is that in some parts of the continent? It's DARN NEAR IMPOSSIBLE. Because there isn't the availability of water. There are countries like Zimbabwe where water is available only in a limited way in certain hours of the day social distancing how do you do social distancing than a huge slum like Cabrera outside Nairobi or in a township That you have outside Capetown South Africa. How do you do social distancing in the famous In the famous Soweto where people live so closely together so the things we take for granted in our western community are not easily adapted to to Africa the strengths of Africa Matt. I cannot emphasize strongly enough the strength of Africa Elisa community level the tremendous capacity of communities as they have dealt with HIV tuberculosis. And Andy Bulla and measles over the years. The strength of the continent is the way in which the community comes together and reinforces each other and works with each other. But boy they are going to be put to the test. He's called Dr. Ted Rose the head of the. Who a singular figure. What strikes you about him. I love his com- intelligence. I I like the way he puts things firmly and thoughtfully he doesn't exaggerate she's not given to hyperbole he's he's measured and so he conveys facts in a way that makes you feel Confident in their authenticity and legitimacy. And that's what we need. It's kind of the. It's the exponent of science. I knew Dr Tetris. When he was minister of Health in Ethiopia and he conducted himself in the way. We're really very lucky to have him there particularly when the African continent is at risk. Do you worry in the work that you've done. Do you worry that The effects of covert nineteen could reverse some of the gains made against HIV AIDS. Some of the progress that has been made on the continent when it comes to dealing with other Things that that could pull people back. Yes I I I really do match and I mean I'm not alone. I'm not a Experts in these things I look at them and watch them with my colleagues and we read everything that comes across her computer but it's noticeable that yesterday which was world. Tb Day there were a number of Strong statements made by organizations in the TV world Making the case that the that the work on TB which by the way has been pretty inadequate now may be further compromised by the ravages of a covert nineteen if it takes hold and that's absolutely the same for HIV. I don't know what we're going to do about the struggle around funding about the inclination of governments to take money away from the infectious diseases and turn it to the corona virus. I mean absolutely understandable but it puts all of the infectious disease areas in an untenable position. The Africa Union has just asked the G. Twenty to give them a hundred and fifty billion dollars as an emergency intervention. And that's what it's going to need but I think at the grassroots level in many countries in Africa there is a great anxiety that the progress that has been made. We'll be compromised. You talked about that grassroots level. A couple of times. What needs to be done to better support those who are on the ground in those communities. I think the support has to come to the community based organizations of which there there is a profusion and and They're easily identified within the countries. They are the elements the the stronger elements of civil society. And and if if it's possible to give them just some theme by way of resources if it's possible to give them something by way of equipment they will use it wonderfully well. I mean that's what one learns from Africa I I understand that. There's ethnic violence I understand that there's conflict But in many many countries you remember there are fifty four countries continent in many many countries. You have working at community level this inordinate strength and generosity of spirit and determination and that's what will get them through this kind of thing. Matt. We're going to watch this unfold on the African continent as you said at the outset. It's been fairly limited thus far but the idea of over seven hundred cases this morning in South Africa is a very significant sign of peril. And we've got to give that country as much support as possible. We in this world are facing this breathtaking challenge and there are many of us who've never seen anything like this before and are trying to wrap our heads around how quickly things have changed and not even when this is going to end but what will wake up to tomorrow How do you see US pulling together to address this challenge? Well you put it Correctly one of the truth surely is that you don't know what will be tomorrow the rapidity with which this Viruses moving is is really Beyond belief and I think the only way you get through it it sounds so trite and such Such a truism. The business of. We're all in this together. Stay well take care. Wash your hands. Keep your physical distance. But I'm I'm I'm really overwhelmed and I must say the. Cdc is doing an excellent job of this of the way in which the community people the key people in communities and just everybody from every walk of life are coming forward to to support each other and to do acts of notable kindness and to support particularly the frontline workers whose lives are quite demonstrably on the line You got a good feeling about Canada. In that context that this is not only a country of moderation but it's a country of social consistency and And I just hope our politicians will pick up the the spirit and and support every possible way. One of the. It's it's easy to feel overwhelmed by something like this. And it's easy to feel people whether they turn the news off or whether they ration what they're listening to or what they're paying attention to. Because you don't know how much of this you can take. What would you say to people who feel you've seen crises? You have seen to your point. Strength Come Out of communities. Perhaps where we wouldn't have have seen that strength. People have risen to a challenge. What would you say to people who are listening who feel that sense of anxiety that feel that that that that overwhelming that you talked about at the beginning you know Matt I feel I think probably just as overwhelmed as everyone else? This is the most obsessive preoccupation in life. You can't move listen. Read Watch except the Corona Virus It's absolutely staggering. I've just never seen anything like it. I remember the last time we talked about. We talked about climate change and and it does as though climate change has disappeared from the map when it remains one of the great Risks of Of the planet. So I guess my feeling is that fair is Great. Strength to be drawn from the collective determination that this thing can be beaten. If to use the phrase we flatten the curve and that as people understand that there is nothing more important than to observe the protocols that the science the medical officers of health etc have asked us to observe. That will get through this. I don't doubt we will. It's just that we don't want to leave carnage behind. How are you taking care of yourself in the midst of this I think Not particularly different from anyone else. I'm I'm I'm just working quietly in my work. Crew it's My my wife and I haven't ventured out of the House for I don't know how many days now and We have a daughter and a grandson who lived with us and we're all keeping appropriate measures of of distance hand washing and cleanliness and and And occasionally watching Watching cereals on television so that we can Calm our nerves. I hope it doesn't sound trite but I do mean it be well and take care of yourself your you see. That's the perfect the perfect Demonstration of today Deanna. She'll do so thank you so much. And so two U. Stephen Lewis is CO director of AIDS free world. He is a former. Un Secretary General Special Envoy for HIV AIDS in Africa former Canadian ambassador to the United Nations This is the current on. Cbc Radio One. My Name's Matt Galloway was yesterday saw signs drawn by kids on people's windows and they just kept saying we got this. We got this. We got this. It's an encouraging. Message to hear from Stephen Lewis and from the kids across this country as well. Well look. Who's here I've been drawn my own signs at home getting very little praise for it. I'M NOT GONNA lie. I maybe an artist of different power host of Q houria not too bad. I've been making macaroni collages. Just of my day bags of chips video game. Lots of free time apparently also spending it looking at things online. Have you seen this thing? It's been passed around the country. It's his video on Youtube of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra playing. I don't understand how they did this. It looks like they're playing in quarantine. Yeah I should say. I'm being Glib we've been we'll keep an eye on kind of the trending stories in this country right now obviously artists across this country of finding such an amazing way to stay creative during this time and in in the world of orchestral music that involves the community itself is large community musicians on stage playing together so they found a way members of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra to play. Aaron Copeland's piece Appalachian Spring together so I caught up with Jeffrey Beecher. He's the principal double bassist in the orchestra. Frankly man he was getting kind of tired of being by himself. Hard to play orchestral music on your own doing a monologue with five or six people so he got together with his his friends over the line. And it's pretty amazing if you've seen the I did get to the bottom of how they did it so we're about to find out. Take a listen to this. Is Jeff Welcome to the show? I agree to be with you Tom. Thanks for having me. Nice to have you before we talk about this beautiful recording. How're you how are you holding up in general You know if I'm honest. My Cue is being back and forth a lot and and I mean that not just My base levels but my emotional quotient of these are really really challenging times and the things that I'm personally feeling in my family's feeling in my family of musicians seem to be feeling. It's it's such a difficult time to remain Both optimistic and to feel connected obviously to one another. It's such a hard time as you mentioned to feel optimistic to feel connected with one another but you've found a connection through this piece of music that you guys made online. I WANNA play a little bit of it. Take a listen to this. uh-huh Some folks from the Tesol. Twenty-nine members performing Aaron Copeland's Appalachian Spring. Jeffrey is one of the folks behind this. And Jeff is hard enough to get five people in sync on a conference call and you've thrown music and instruments and tempo and dynamics into the mix. How did you pull this off? Well you know. The synchronization of heartbeats really is the key to anything. Whether it's a conference call or in this case making music in social distancing the the real the the key about it was Creating what we call the industry a click track which means basically a pulse that everyone who's performing either in quarantine or even on the same stage or studio can align all of what they're doing individually together and creating not as well so it's not just a sort of cold beat but that actually has the one of the other sounds so I- layered all of the score into a program on computer which took about a half a day to do sent that out to all my amazing colleagues then instantly went to their phones in their home studios in in selfie video mode just just recorded as if we were playing together in. I received all those videos in spent three days in the editing cave and you know nine. Am Sunday morning. Had A finished product to show with the wolves. It's such it's such a beautiful video and definitely shows. The you know the connectedness that we can still have with one another. Even though we're far apart I was curious though as to why you chose this particular piece of Music Appalachian Spring the history behind the peace it it. It speaks to the moment that we're in. Which is the profound questions you ask when you're doing with for example the grief of a world war which this piece was written just around. And how do you imagine a prosperous future when you're grieving millions of deaths it? It just speaks to the moment that we're in in a in a really profound way. I think watching this video gave me a sense of of connectedness gave me a sense of normalcy but I have to imagine for you who spends their career not only performing for crowds but next to other musicians very very close to other musicians It must have done something for you to be able to make this recording as well. I I missed my colleagues. Do there are vital nutrients that Sherrod live music As as it only live music can provide and at the same time. We're all dealing with this existential crisis of how do we help? Seven point eight billion friends in crisis and that feeling of powerlessness in deflation in quarantine. How does anyone respond? Let alone an orchestra which it's an art form which feeds off and amplified sociability. So the thought that's been going through my head. A lot is a call the service which is like. Ask Not what your symphony can do. But what you can do. And and honestly the guides of this our astronauts. Chris Hadfield doing you know when he's out in space he's playing Bowie you know. He's he's learning how to be connected to a planet he's not on but is doing such great service on our behalf. So you know musicians and people in culture Humanity Service Industry really and I feel like in making this video as little sleep and little food and my girlfriend thankfully was feeding me some frozen pizza every now and then you know this was a I was on a mission in and I feel so grateful to to hear comments. That are you know a mom? Who's at home with her daughter in crisis and the daughter is just struggling to cope as anyone of any age is in. The MOM is replying with this Cathartic experience that the daughter her music teacher sent her. That video is suddenly turning tears into a hug and the residents. That just means everything to me Jeffrey. I can't begin to thank you enough for talking to us today. And thank you so much for your work. Thanks for your time. Tom Is such an amazing thing. Ever really haven't seen it trust me. It's beautiful it's it's it's such a beautiful piece of music to begin with and to see them sort of in their homes. I. What really struck me. Everything he said is that and I said this to you earlier. Orchestral Music is community music. Not just that. It's music for the community but they themselves are community and when they're away from one another they literally can't play that music anymore so to know that they still can over over technology and seeing what it meant to them is is just as beautiful as the music itself. Tom Thank you very much mckelway. Thank you so much for having you take care of yourself. GonNa come back. I'll be back Jeremy Dutcher. I got film picks. I'm going to be wearing a sweater. Everything's going to happen all of that coming up on the current. Thank you Tom. Power should hear a little bit more of the Trauma Symphony Orchestra performing. Aaron copland Appalachian Spring from their homes For more CBC podcasts Goto CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

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May 6, Part 1: COVID-19 causing chaos for the travel industry; Korean baseball hits the airwaves; Georges Laraque on surviving the virus; National affairs panel on agricultural relief

The Current

1:14:44 hr | 9 months ago

May 6, Part 1: COVID-19 causing chaos for the travel industry; Korean baseball hits the airwaves; Georges Laraque on surviving the virus; National affairs panel on agricultural relief

"The theaters have closed. But the show look on play me. Podcast is thrilled to present a new series. The show must go on featuring provocative productions from some of North America's most acclaimed creators for the stage. Sit Back and experience. Everything from chilling thrillers to Gut wrenching dramas to arriver in comedies. Each month experience the exhilaration of theater from the comfort of your own home. Plenty available wherever you get your podcast. This is a CBC podcast Former NHL Tough-guy. Georgia Iraq fought for a living on the ice. It's doubtful though that even the biggest hockey brawls prepared him for his scrap cove nineteen now out of hospital. Former habits enforcer talks about the fight for his life and a close up. Look at the front lines of this pandemic also this morning. How are you feeling this? Lockdown drags on board maybe a lot board the authors of a new book out of. My skull explain. How boredom is shaping us in these strange unsettling times. Maybe to clear your head. He could go for a bike. Ride a bike shop at the new thing. You might want for Italy's blockbuster movie but for bike shop there has been a bike boom across Canada. And later this morning look at whether it will last and what could be done to make it safer on our streets also how. Muslims are coping with Ramadan. Unlike any other and baseball is back sort of later this morning. The rise of Korean Baseball for sports starved North American audience. Chances are you aren't going to Seoul or anywhere anytime soon. Though we begin this morning with a look at a travel industry in shambles in to get us back on the road good morning. I'm Matt Galloway. And this is the current. Today with international borders closed visiting the grocery stores probably the biggest adventure. Most of us go on the pandemic has ended a lot of travel dreams including those of Melissa. O'brien she her husband and their three kids had to cut short. What was meant to be the journey of a lifetime and they're now back at home in the Komax valley on Vancouver Island so we started planning this trip about ten years ago. Almost ten years ago started saving for it and planning thinking about where we were going to go and it was going to be around the world trip The five of US basically stripping our lives down to the bare essentials. We were going to travel. Carry on's and Our plan was to start in Asia to head West until we got home just basically following wherever the wind took us And we had planned to be away for nine months and then found ourselves home after three. Melissa's certainly not the only person who's travel plans were derailed because of cove nineteen Brian Hayes as a medical student at Ub Sees Southern Medical Program based in Colona. Brian Good Morning. Good morning where are you supposed to be today? So I'm supposed to be any country called BOOT can in Central Asia right now. And why were you going to Bhutan so I was part of a team of for? Abc medical students and we were going to pretend to run the countries first mental health symposium and then afterwards I was GonNa do some travel myself around the region. It's a big trip Other side of the world. How much planning goes into something like this? We had quite a bit So we're we're recent. Medical students were only first years so we just started finding in the fall. But there's quite extensive applying for visas memorandum of understanding all the details behind the scenes which I appreciate but quite a bit of work and what this trip mean to you This trip was a really neat community from me one of my passions is to is to work in international development Supporting developing countries. And this trip was going to be one of the first opportunity for me to go somewhere. That is developing new systems such as mental health sports And so it was gonNA give me a taste to see if this is direction at one. My career So I was really looking forward to the opportunity to experience that and to get my feet wet in that field. So it's It's definitely a big loss not able to go at this time. How did you land on on Putin and Himalayas It was a trip that had been Like introduces idea previous student And some of these trips that you be does are re occurring ventures each year with partners on the ground. This was going to be the first year for this. Bhutan trip that have been suggested and the topic of Mental Health From this oppose him topic was selected by local partners. And pretend how did you find out that all of that work And the planning and also just the. The mental preparation for a big trip like that was for not in the trip would be cancelled. It was definitely quite quite hard to kind of wrap my head around. I I mean obviously once you step back and look at what else is going on there. There's context and it doesn't seem as terrible but in the moments that I kind of think about right now being in a different country and having such a great experience Both from professional experience standpoint as well as from personal experience standpoint is something that You know it's it's difficult to swallow for sure. It's something I was really looking forward to and it hadn't travelled much in the last few years is I was really Working hard to get into medical school and trying to drive my career for it that way. When did the plug pulled on? The plug was officially pulled in early March because the the country had its first confirmed case from American tourists and they are because they are relatively Small medical system. They were very cautious but starting the borders. It's all tourist as soon as the first hit as you say I mean in perspective and you know this as a medical student In the midst of a pandemic travel perhaps isn't the most pressing issue or anywhere near one of the most pressing issues but at the same time you invest a lot of time and money and energy into something like this you said it was difficult to wrap your head around and tell me a bit more about that and and some of the things that you went through when in early March this was officially put on ice. I mean it's Part of it is you re look forward to traveling and and I'd had been hoping putting off a lot of travel plans until like I said I've gotten over certain hurdle getting the medical school so having that kind of almost like it was taken away was definitely a bit difficult And then at the same time for me this. The next few years are what? I also have some most flexibility in my career. So what kind of starts look at is if Kobe is going to be an issue for a few years now and travel is put on hold for a while. I don't know when I will have these travel opportunities. Come up in my life again. Where have the same timeframes in the same Opportunities as a medical student to go and learn somewhere. That's really unique opportunity so I mean to me. It's it's kind of evolving thing where it hits me in different ways a little bit But at the same time it's it's helped to kind of Invest Myself into locally around Canada and around my area and clone to fight Kobe in different ways and that helps me kind of stay grounded into what's important as you said when travel may not be the priority and again it's not like you're GonNa go and Swat around on a beach you. We're going there to do work. Do you think at some point in time. You'll be able to do that kind of work again in future. I would certainly hope so. I think there's definitely a place for these kind of interest and I think when about travel being Ruled out because a Cova vid. I think one thing we can keep in mind. Is that The need that we were hoping to go with dress on the ground in country like doesn't go away if anything the need for mental health systems and support has just increased because of the `isolation and the impact. Their feelings Kobe. I mean the whole country is on lockdown so I would hope that these travel plans in these ventures now reaches can still happen for whatever organization down the road because the need is not going to go away just because of a virus virus. He's got a great perspective on this and I hope that you get there and I wish you the best of luck in the work that you're doing in Colona Brian. Thanks thank you very much. Bryan Hayes medical student at the University of British Columbia was in Colona. Bc borders may be shuttered today. But that won't always be the case. Travel will at some point in time resume but that travel industry will likely look very different for the foreseeable future. David Gillan is director of the Center for Transportation Studies and a professor at. Ubs's solder school of business. David Good morning to you. Good Morning. How different do you think we'll start with? Air travel will be for the average passenger in. Say the next twelve months I think he will be significantly different. I think that Just from a scheduling and passenger demand perspective. We're going to see a very slow recovery in in total demand. And you're probably going to see more peaking during the day so the shoulders of the day are going to be pretty quiet but I think the processing through the airports are also going to be significantly changed and this is going to depend very much on. What the evolution is in terms of treatments and vaccines for the for the in nineteen. Let's walk through some of the steps. Quickly. you get to the airport What is that airport going to look like in future will One of the fundamental issues is is distancing from passengers. And if you think of the that you have when you go through trauma where me I go through Vancouver You you have a check in. You've got security. You've got a hold room prior to boarding a flight You've got concessions and and keep in mind that the airports many of them are earning upwards of fifty to sixty percent of their anger could revenue from the concessionary not from flights passengers. And then you've got pre-departure screening which is going to be quite different because now Airlines Yvonne responsible for any passengers they let on board in the boarding itself is going to be different. And then of course when you arrive at an international flights which I think are going to take a long time to come back. you've got bordering health checks and then even simple things like baggage claim so our own experiences. Are that when you arrived in checked luggage? You hang around the excuse me the The baggage belt That's not gonNA happen anymore. And so I think that that's those are going to be the biggest differences and it's going to cau- result in some some real changes in how the airports manage passengers airlines as well. What about on the planes themselves? I mean already. We're hearing about this idea of rear facing seats or the middle seat being taken out. Everybody has to wear a mask. What do you think you'll be like when you sit down on the plane? I initially There will be a lot of nervousness I think that the the the case of of the The mass it's it was pretty clear that trying to leave a middle. Cd empty. Didn't make enough. Lotta sense one is airlines. Would lose forty percent of their capacity and That's just not a moneymaking proposition. And I think secondly that Even if you're middle feed empty or not six feet away from your neighbor so I think that At least moving in the direction of where mass is important but I as I say it's it's going to be quite different. we're used to seeing flight attendants Serving us with the masks on. And so I think just kind of the physical practice of those is going to create Offensive never thing. What about traveling internationally and you think of the intercountry travel. The people perhaps took for granted. Now if you were for example to fly to Europe to Italy to the United Kingdom what sort of restrictions do you think there might be for travelers going into those countries? Would we need to go into quarantine for example would be even be allowed to travel into the countries? That's an open. And what happens within the European Union is is going to be an interesting question because right now you have. Schengen and non Schengen countries and The European Union with the borders. It's fairly easy to go between countries. As you point out we simply took it for granted And I think that's GonNa Change. Would you look at the way in which the disease spread going across borders for so many countries that Authority said going to be really recent to allow that degree of freedom of movement. But I also think traveling internationally which is as I said I think is going to be a long time coming back. Not least of which is because as your previous caller said Countries are not happy about the water tours coming in and importing a disease which may overwhelm the healthcare system. This is interesting. Air Canada which announced earlier this week that it had lost something like a billion dollars in the first quarter of this year said that it believes that there will be significant amount of flying by Christmas. Do you think that that's dreaming in Technicolor That's an interesting point. I I have spoken to to a number of people under seems to be two camps. One campus is the candidate camp. That says There's going to be a lot of pent-up demand because of the isolation and the lockdown and and once people are allowed to engage in some degrees of freedom that they're going to use it in spades There's others who and I'm in this camp that I think that people are going to be a little bit more careful where they go. You're probably going to see more domestic than international travel but I don't anticipate that we're going to see the increase in demand for probably a couple of years because it's a psychological thing as you mentioned you get to the airport and it's not just you sitting on the plane. It's you lining up with all those people. It's you being in the airport or in the waiting lounge with people who are right next to you. Correct that's exactly right. And we're being conditioned to have this social distancing and then all of a sudden we're putting the position where that social distancing is is difficult to achieve. David good to speak with you about this. Thanks very welcome and is director of the Center for Transportation Studies at UPC. He was in Vancouver. Anna pollick is the founder of conscious. Travel it's a tourism consultancy firm in the UK and a good morning to you. Good morning do you see this as a huge reset for for how we traveled? David is suggesting that some of the things that may be people who are able to travel took for granted are going to be if not out the window and then certainly Part for a long period of time absolutely. I think it's the biggest resets in the travel industry since it took off to the war. There's no other demand speakeasies and there's no other Disruption that's that's gone as deep as this either. What do you think travel will look like in the in the after time Well I gave it I I I think obviously we're going to see less of it We the the industry had grown phenomenally since the global financial crisis which was lost in demand that we experienced and it sort of bread. A sense of you know well we can bounce back from anything and it took a while I think fatigue the intensity on the jets this particular pandemic to thinking I think it will take at least a good you before we begin to see More regular international travel My personal feeling is that in some respects. This was inevitable The industry had good so quickly It didn't necessarily have health and resilience. That was necessary to withstand. He's kind of shocks. You were also on this program talk. Will you on the program not so long ago talking about over tourism as well Well let's the irony. I'm in two thousand sixteen seventeen eighteen. Everyone was talking about over tourism. Taylor we were talking about funds floods We've forgotten about that now. And and of course. Everything is just about corona virus The reality is the tow truck. Won't it's absolutely essential in the global economy As an industry in my opinion become somewhat vulnerable and and bloated and because of that didn't have the resilience to the extent. Something this major. This this What I'm hoping. Is that what it will lead to? is less emphasis on continuous volume. Goes too far more emphasis on continued and developing net benefit to the communities that this is go to? What do you mean what do you? What do you mean by that? Well at the moment I mean if we count numbers How many people came across our borders. We count grow spending. We don't necessarily count as intensely the cost associated with that. What really matters to build a An industry which is going to enjoy Community support is to be able to see that it is a host community really benefiting from the sheer numbers of his coming And so therefore we have an industry to look at. How do we create A healthier Form of tourism that doesn't benefit the community to a great extent contributes to the well being of the place the places that hosted isn't as well as the wellbeing of what we heard from Melissa. O'brien earlier she and her husband and their three kids were going to go on this nine month around the world trip and they had to cut short after just a few months have listened to what she said about how. She's thinking about travel now locked. The people have asked if we'll continue our trip at some point or do party to and I don't know that we will be honest. I mean we're still interested in traveling but our priorities have definitely changed before we left on that trip. I mean I never never occurred to us. We'd ever be in a position where we were trapped somewhere honestly we we took that security for granted. I think Just never having lived through anything like this and now having had that feeling. It's definitely something to consider future troubles. Pollock how do you think this will shape how people think of travel in the future? Well Actually I. I personally think that it's probably a good thing that people realize. That travel is a privilege in many respects We got to the point of just assuming this is the lady was saying that we can just pop in a plane and go anywhere in that taste. Of course they would take very seriously and it was planning a long journey of discovery But Lot of trouble particularly in Europe which was Almost impulsive couple. You know let's go. Let's pro from London to niece for a nice weekend to Croatia have a party So trouble becomes relatively cheap in terms of a could by This I think also added to the impact just just beginning to see the negative response to that with over tourism Before sort of as you mentioned travel to a lot of people as a privilege and not everybody can afford to fly especially now when people have lost jobs or lost hours. Do you think you look at. Maybe the road trip coming back. Could this lead to a rise in tourism in our own communities in our own countries so many other effect to bear in mind just because we're focusing on the virus right now doesn't mean to say that the issues around climate change is by you order these other factors that have been affecting else A going to go away. My main concern is that I suspect many of these Change drivers are totally into related. and what they combine that could have a negative effect on on our economy. It's too early to say. Just what the economic Four out just going to be tourism depends on on people having disposable income and if the if the economy tanks then again that's going to affect amount as well I think we recognize that the absolute vital importance recreation Taking a break holidays. I'm not saying we shouldn't do any of that but I think it'd be crazy to think that the way that we do that isn't going to be affected by the events of the Wall Street. He is. It's so interesting there were now at the point in this pandemic people are trying to think about what could change in future and travel seems to be one of those things that will come out of this thinking about in a different way and thank you. It's great to talk to you. Thank you very much and apologies. The founder of conscious travel. It's a tourism consultancy firm in the UK. Any thoughts on what we've heard this morning. Just in terms of how travel will change how you're thinking differently about travel. Summer is on our doorstep fingers crossed. Maybe you're thinking about a bit of a break. Can you not going to be going anywhere far but maybe exploring in your own community? Let us know your thoughts on that conversation you can reach us through the website at CBC dot ca slash the current and click on the contact. Link the news is next and then dramatic backflips flips. Not just for not STA. Korean baseball is back. And it's got a lot of new fans in North America here. That story in six minutes. I Matt Galloway. This is the current on. Cbc Radio One. Stay with us I'm Keith Macarthur. Unlocking Bryson's brain is a podcast about my son is the rare disease that keeps him from walking or talking. We bryson's perfect. His life is really hard and our families. Search for a cure. Oh My Gosh. Maybe signs is ready for this. It's part memoir part medical mystery. We can do just about anything. Modifying DNA heart in my throat. Cure is controversial unlocking. Bryson's brain subscribe. Wherever you get your podcasts Good Morning I'm Matt Galloway. You're listening to the current. Now coming up as a former. Nfl player he's used to fighting adversaries. But the fiercest yet maybe covert we will hear from George Rock coming up but first loading the bases not the stands huddled decide which it about Mita. Couldn't there was no crowd to go wild that you heard the crack of the bat there and that is the sound of baseball's opening day. No Major League Baseball. That's from the Korean baseball organization. League teams from the K B. O. Got Back on the diamond this week and thanks to a deal with ESPN FANS IN NORTH. America can get in on the action. Those are fans before times cheering for the Kia Tigers whether it is the Samsung lions or the L. G. Twins. Korean baseball is definitely a fans game. If you WANNA start following the league there are a few things you should know. Dan Kurtz is the founder of dot net. It's the top English language website for Korean baseball. Dan Good Morning. Good Morning I was opening for having me. Thanks for joining us. How is opening day? Opening Day was for me as a fan located now in the United States it was incredible and almost surreal to be able to turn on my television and watch the K B O on my TV. Normally I'd be in the past years jumping on. My computer streamed through Korean website to watch but to be able to watch in the English language. It was just incredible to me. How did you somebody in Olympia? Washington get so deep into Korean. Baseball started about twenty years ago or forty years ago for me because I was adopted from South Korea. When I was four months old I then returned to South Korean Mike. First Time in the year. Nineteen ninety nine discovered that they had a pro league and then in the year two thousand decided to study abroad there for one year. And then that's when I was first introduced to Mike. I K B O Game. Get to see the bears play or actually on playing right now and it was just. I was Awestruck as soon as I entered the stadium the sounds the crowd. It was something that I had to keep learning more about. And that's why I started my website because back then there was not a lot of English resources for Kibo fans men. I just thought A. Let's try to help other fans out learn more about the league. I want to talk about what happens on the field in a moment but you mentioned the fans and we heard a little bit of the crowd there. What are the crowds like these games? The closest thing that I could say to the North American audience would be like a college football for here down here in the United States a large college football game or you know you think of European soccer games where you have crowds singing chanting cheering and it matter if your team is either winning losing or down by fifteen runs. The cheering crowd. Noise is still the same everybody that I've taken to a baseball game. That's never been to a baseball game. They want to go back. That sounds very different than the genteel. North American Major League Baseball experience. I yes I am a Major League Baseball Fan. I go to. Mlb Games have gone to Mariners Games because of proximity where I am now I grew up in Philadelphia phillies fans to them. And even when they're winning in your hometown team is doing well. It's kind of like a sterile. Okay all right. We're watching the game where you're singing. You will lose your voice. If you're if you're going over there cheering for the team that you WANNA win. I mean you will absolutely come out of there not being able to speak and not being able to hear frankly because the speakers are loud the crowds loud. It's just. It's just one experience that everybody has to go and experience so in these pandemic times. What's happening with the crowds? Are there any crowds at all? They're no crowd so I've been watching the Games. Preseason and now since the regular season started yesterday. I've been watching the Games and it is just odd for me as a fan. That's been to these stadiums to see nobody allowed in the stadiums. It is quiet on on TV. So I can only imagine how quiet it is on the field for. When the players out there I was watching preseason game on TV. They had the tell the coach. Hey you gotta wear masks new with a new pandemic rules. They had to wear masks when they're on on the field and you could easily t-r-u-m-p. Do into the coach. Get your mask on before you come on out in the coach and say okay. I'll be right back. I want to talk now about what happens on the field. This is a very similar sport but there are some differences as well. Have a listen to this East of the Toronto Blue Jays hitting a huge homerun gained five of the two thousand fifteen. Lds against the Texas Rangers. When he did that people know flip in the air. He was criticized for that. Move by some people in the League in Crean Baseball League. What happens when it comes to players and home runs while specific league to that. Batista that I was living in South Korea at that time. And that's all that you know. Everybody goes that the backflip heard round the world. I saw that I heard about it. I talked to my Korean baseball friends at the at the time. What's the big deal you know because the K B O backflips? No big deal. It's not it's not offensive to the pitcher major leagues. You Flip Your Bat. You'RE GONNA get drilled the next time or you're going to get your teammate. Hit by a pitch. And you don't want that to happen so the guys just have not been doing it here in the major leagues you go to the K B O. You can flip your bet. You can have a little bit flare. You can have fun when you're up when you're up at the plate and you hit a home run you can watch it a little bit. You're not going to get nailed. You don't have to worry about getting hit by pitcher. Your teammates getting hit by a pitch. It is you're allowed to show a little more exuberance and for me as a Fan. I'd say why not because they just go to run. It's GONNA TAKE UNTIL THEY SPEAK INTO FOOTBALL. You score a touchdown. Where do you think that comes from? I spent because I'm sports starved. Half an hour so last night watching highlights on your website of Korean baseball and you see these backflips from everybody. Where does that sense of exuberance come from? They're just happy to play the game. I guess eight and it goes back to one of the stars from early ninety s and he literally then came out to say young jong-hyok he played for the Samsung Lions. And you just basically said it was so sterile kind of the played very quiet on the field and he just wanted he. He was a kind of didn't fit in with conformity and he just wanted to show some flare twenty years thirty years later. People are still doing it whether they hit home. Run or not. This is a league that now people are getting exposed to all around the world. There's a Canadian who's in this league. Jv Romak who's from London Ontario. Tell us about him. He is a slugging star. I just saw one of his preseason highlights. He just hit. They plan a pretty large stadium in Inchon his home stadium. He just crushed ball. It literally went into the grass and the backstop blake where they have like the picnic area and it just rolled kept rolling and then the TV folks. Ask like wow. I've never seen that happen. He plays from S K Burns and he is. He is the prototypical prototypical slugger for that team. And he makes things have been for them. They hit a lot of home runs. And it's a lot of them belong to him. Do you think that part of this? The the excitement around this is that Major League baseball isn't on and there's not really any sports at all In a major league sense that are on television right now here in North America and so people are desperate for things to watch when we get out of this pandemic. Do you think that what people are seeing now in the Korean Baseball League will continue in that that that sense of excitement? That people are witnessing. We'll turn them into lifelong fans at the League. I think for some they might baseball fans already. They might say hey. I found another baseball that I can follow and ESPN has decided to carry it through the end of the season. So they'll continue. There's some others that are like you know what I just did. My my fix until regular pro sports that I enjoy combat. My hope is that even if they just gain a few more fans it's fans that they probably would have never reached you. Somebody's going to be like. Hey I like the twins now and so they might wanNA head to Korea. They might want to trip. Go attend a game and see what it's really like in person I think. I think it's been great for this league. Who's your team? My teams deduce on. Why do you love them because they were burst game when I went to it? It's I mean it's just as simple as they were the first team that I got to see a guy by the name tyrone woods hit a monster home run and is like you know what I got to find out more about this team. More about this de more about this league more about the player if it would have been. Lg Twins who happen to share the same stadium. I probably would've enjoyed picked. Lg Twins but it just so happen. Twenty years ago I went to Deuce on bears game. Then enjoy this moment for a sport that you love. Thanks for talking to us. Thank you very much for having me on. Kurt's is the founder of my K B o Dot net. It's the top English language website for Korean baseball as you can imagine. Many Korean Canadians are thrilled to see their national game on North American screens. Hito Kim as the program director of the Korean Can Baseball Association. Hito Kim Good morning to you come on now how are you? I'm great your organization's more than forty years old. This is your moment. What is it like to see Korean baseball? The mainstream honestly. It's amazing something that I happened looking. Forward to my whole entire life I'm not a huge Katie. Oh Fan and MLB fan and there are a lot of things that are coming up between like cream baseball in terms of interests. That Americans are showing. I think this will mail on the illiterate for those who are walk. Who Loved Baseball in Canada as Dan was saying? The game is the same but how it's treated in. The atmosphere in the stands is completely different. How would you describe what it's like to watch one of these Games Phil when I I watched ninety ball game in Korea? I was want kid so I wasn't really sure expect from when I even know about it but I could enjoy that much fear. It was exciting at Rim of the game. The food there is amazing whole bright variety that P blake environment for people who doesn't know baseball necessarily fan of baseball can go ahead and enjoy the game. So these are the foods different when you go to a baseball game here and traditionally. It's you know hot dog and a beer or something like that. What do you get If you go to a game in Korea they saw Disley so special in a way that you can Order delivery food. They have like cooking or Korean barbecue. You can do within the stadium. So that's like a whole different level of Variety of foods. What about the players? I mean we're talking with Dan about those backflips and again. It seems like every player has their own signature backflip. What do you think's going on with that? So basically I is. Part of the game is make gave him a little bit more exciting in Korea. The baseball scene is not as big as America. Right like it is a smaller country so a lot of people know each other like the players who play in high school. They're Lee does go up to professional level as well so I think it makes the game more exciting. It brings us forward momentum going for defense and it's the tweet to watch for a lot of baseball fan there's cheerleaders as well right for sure. Yeah there are cheerleaders leaders again. There are people who flake mascots per each of the teams like each of the cheerleaders. Uh they have big like big big of a fan base as a professional baseball player. Stop Big and love and enjoy. Enjoy watching the matter leader. Damascus the mascots are stars as well. We have for sure there. like each of the Mascot special unique unique personalities and like they do bring fans into the game all they do a lot of us. It's similar channel the in that case in baseball Where they can bring excitement? The fans are such a huge part of this. What is it like watching these games without any fans in the stands because of this pandemic? It's very unfortunate At the end of the day like I would save cream. Baseball experience. Eighty percents with being this. The fans watching the players. Of course. There's a big thing but it's very unfortunate that we cannot actually show that the whole World or America rather but at the same time it's something that gives opportunity For fans at home to watch the baseball game so I think it's still a huge thing that we have a leak going on while condemning is happening while at the same time is very unfortunately we cannot out of fans going play. What actually being able to participate live at the game. These are the these Games are on here in Canada. In the middle of the night you get up to watch them. I definitely do It is it was a little bit hard yesterday when I tried to watch them because it was like. Am in the morning. But I definitely was Interested enough and it was my favorite team that I actually played so without actually helpless on giving me the urge to wake up in the morning to watch those games. Who's your team Mike came Samsung Lions. I think it's more familiar to all the people in America because they've Samsung and like every new car. A lot of people use the Samsung phone something. Tv What do you? What do you love about that team? it was my mother's team so my mom taught me how to play baseball on. How do they experience baseball? And her favorite team offense on and so ever since naturally ever since I was little. Okay my mom multi and loved it as a fan. We know I mean. There are chants and songs. Does that do the Samsung Lions have kind of like a chance for the team? Yes stay deathly do And each of the players have their own vong so when they come up to hit They step into the batter's box. Everyone tents that those songs and it's very exciting to see and it's very enjoyable to. Can you sing the Samsung Lions Song? I quickly so players detained a lot so I do not really remember. I quickly because I haven't been to the game for a year or so. Sounds like you're trying to avoid singing on the radio. What would give me a flavor. What would it sound like? What would what would one of the chance? Be who would be like really similar to some of the National Long Korea and then they would In Corporate Lake Premium players name on this very simple ously neon and then you would clip with the B and all of that fantastic. Enjoy this moment for your sport. It's suddenly you a lot of other. People are up in the middle of the night watching baseball from faraway. Thank you very much. Nobody is the program director of the Korean Canadian Baseball Association. He is in Toronto. This is the current on. Cbc Radio One. I'm Matt Galloway sticking with sports sort of Tom. Power the host of Q. Is here hello. Tom Met you. Never ask me to sing on the Radio. I could do you have. Do you have a song lead baseball that you'd like to sing? No one time you actually did make me sing a song about memory live on stage when you were hosting metro morning in Toronto. I did indeed because when you ask somebody on the radio to something. Sometimes they'll do it. I'm going to keep that in mind to sing. Tiempo yellow ribbon around the old oak tree never going to happen. We want people to continue to listen. Turn the radio off here not to talk about baseball but basketball now. Yeah I'm here to talk about a pretty amazing story. Wesley King is a children's author in Nova Scotia. One day he was sitting in his boat he gets a call from Kobe. Bryant Kobe Bryant wants him to work on a children's book with him so he plies to Los Angeles and they work on it together. I mean of course. Kobe Bryant died earlier this year and tragic helicopter crash but before death. He was working on this children's book series. And now it's coming out. Check this out how are you? I'm doing all right. Thanks thanks so much for making the time before we get going. It just occurred to me that we've all been mourning. The loss of Kobe Bryant doesn't as an icon or someone we were a fan of but it's rare to meet somebody who's morning him as a friend. I'm so sorry thank you. Yeah I mean it was certainly a new experience to be morning a friend but also in of the public In the grocery store and see your friends as looking at it you release it was It was and continues to be just a strange experience. How did you guys meet in the first place? How did he reach out to you? Yes random I suppose turned out somebody to give it to one of my pucks inkling towards getting into chill storytelling he. He read them all and became a fan and reached out to me. But much to my surprise I was sitting on a fishing boat in rural Nova Scotia. When got the email that nickleby? Brian wanted to talk about writing a book together. So clash of world's they're a little bit and we hopped on the phone that night we It awesome it's on play to La days right in four years ago. Do you have any idea how you got his raider funny? Just descending read the books I don't know who actually gave it to Probably other big denna gratitude. But he just got the first one he read every single one of my books before even arrived. voracious reader. I mean. In retrospect I of course things use a big big raider a big sandwich children's storytelling offer head so we obviously connected on a bunch of things right away. It's uncommon for any athlete to have a side project like this especially for one like Kobe. Bryant I mean. He didn't need to write a children's book series. He could've to just lay on a beach for the rest of his life. Did he ever talk to you about why he was so interested in telling stories like this? Yeah he developed a real passion for it. You know even as a kid in Through high school it had the teachers started affected him. But I I think the real triggering moment was just as kids you know. He was phenomenal. Coach Phenomenal Dad. A venue to sort of share some of these values with the world large knew we had a captive audience especially of maybe young impressionable readers and he wanted to give them the of messaging me as on his own daughters. And so that was really sort of pure motive behind it that that also just let itself into what we started doing okay. So you're on a fishing boat. You got a plane to Los Angeles. You get off the plane. Pay Me a picture of when you met Kobe Bryant for the first time in real life I mean I guess now. It seems like the most typical Canadian coming to L. A. Moment ever because I had loafers shorts a softball. Sheridan ball cap on and I went to this like high-powered office in Newport beach. Walk into this. Last sort of office. his office and he's sitting monitors this massive celebrity deaths county by twenty pitcher. A Black Mamba Snake. On the walls the super villain type archetype Erin stands up and gives you a hog and says are you ready. Let's do it and we sort of sat down and started going but I look back on the scripture because here I am going to L. H. The first time aware loafers in shorts and a ball cap out but I think he liked that sort of very honest approach at each other so that worked out. Tell me about the series. The wizner he set up the premise. In just a couple of words here. Sherri. Yeah so just down the down in luck basketball team that visited by this match coach. Some challenges them to look inside themselves to confront fears insecurities to become the ball players and ultimately the man that they can be. I'm so it's very sort of positive uplifting story about how we can work on ourselves to become what we dreamed be. What are the stakes here? Like what's the conflict in this new series? They're interesting there's no. There's no obvious dealer. Susan the typical narrative arc that a lot of young leaders could use to this is more moving inward and using magic to sort of challenge on the doubts and insecurities. There's stories in here about things. Like Body Image. Like assume responsibility for families all these types of issues that manifest themselves at these magical cool challenges that we had to confront identify in our everyday lives again and this was sort of along those lines of the Momma mentality but just encouraging kids to believe in themselves in other sort of pure message of Hart Hall. What were your writing sessions like little blogger little Zany at times? You know Kobe like throat ideas. So that I you know. We just be sitting on couches bouncing ideas back and forth remember. One time I came back. He called me up. I was in the Mediterranean Sea. Sailboat is like can you come to? La like tomorrow like well. I'll do my best eye. Dr Africa Ghana playing goes in L. A. Like three days later and his office was just covered. Posted not just been writing. Maniacally posted moats everywhere and that helped shape. This next part of our books it was all very sperm model. So I guess if you have that hard work that mob mentality that he said that UN ending drive. It's also going to be there and every part of your life not just basketball. Oh absolutely I mean he. He became a mentor. Figure for me but not for what people might think mental cigarettes prioritizes life. It was family. I you know I was waking up at five. Am Who's coaching his daughter? Scheme or our values taking them out the school spending time with them throughout the running all these businesses publishing books. Doing all this stuff. I mean he was this source of constant energy than I admired so greatly higher. How're you finding doing interviews in promoting this book After his passing a bittersweet I guess is the word slump because obviously it brings back memories the mentality that life prior to January twenty six courses changed so dramatically Colombian I had talked about writing books in perpetuity citizen Katie. Reading books forever. This was sort of my future plans and and more than that. It was losing a friend. So that part's hard on the plus side. You know what I'm seeing. You know the book what Went Number One New York. Times again been translated again being spent on the world. So casillas values in his message. Continue to live on that legacy they spread. You know. That's the sweet part of it so it's been about. I guess if you'd like to tell me more about how your attitude towards life changed after you heard about Kobe passing in different ways and I. It was a sucker punch to the stomach. I was down. I was in day for weeks. Munson and only automated with the realization that this is so contrary to the way that that Kobe ripta's likes like Kobe believed in this conference. Moving on and getting back up no matter what comes out you. That's of shook me out of that a little bit and I'm trying to impart some of those those values back in. Maybe a little bit like the book that we described. But it's tough. You know this is again sort of a a mentor to close friend and you. WanNa balance these things and of course the whole world weird right now so growing viruses change the way that we all reflect on the world in perspective. Societas The dust settles little bit. Get Back Wesley. I really appreciate your time again. Sorry for the loss of your friend and and thank you for talking to us today. Thank you for having me Tom. Power and conversation with the Children's author Wesley King coming up on the current former. Nhl Enforcer George will rock. He is recovering from Kovic nineteen. He has a very serious message to share especially for anyone who thinks they are too young or too tough to be infected. What has he been through? And how could that shape? How you think about this virus. We'll find out coming up in about ninety seconds. We'll be joined as well by our national affairs. `penal let's talk about including the announcement from the Prime Minister of aid for the agriculture sector. Nowhere near that sector was asking for and so what needs to still flow from Ottawa. We'll find out. I Matt Galloway. This is the current on. Cbc Radio One. Stay with us Hi. I'm Matt Galloway. You're listening to the current if you're young and fit and healthy it's easy to think that covert nineteen isn't much of a threat. The most vulnerable we know are the elderly and people who are already sick or have compromised immune systems even for one of the toughest guys around though this virus has been an ordeal am in Uh spittle. Sell them one in. Thanks for your help You putting your health at risk just to help me. You guys are just amazing I it's unbelievable what you guys do every day to help me. That's former. Nhl Enforcer George. Little Rock in a video recorded Saturday from his hospital bed. He's wearing a gown. His condition was so severe he had to be put on a little. Rock is now at home in Montreal recovering and that is where we have reached in. Good morning good morning not feeling way better way from the first few days I was adopted. Now I still have pneumonia obviously in my lungs but just the fact that it could Greece but in now and my breathing is getting much better night and day from the first few days. How bad did you feel when you were recording? That video of me watching it and seeing photos of you in the hospital. But how bad were you feeling then? It was hard because at that time I was at the peak of a the virus and that was getting. I was getting fevers. Continuously and my breathing was really hard and they were pumping three leaders of Jane through my nose so to talk while you getting that must just pump was really hard to talk and to breathe at a time. I should've saved my talking more. I was getting it because every time you talk it takes Jane and they they were blowing it through my nose so it was a thing to do but at the same time of what is bored out of my mind and my old. I in in In the hospital and nothing else to do and I wanted to do it. Sensitively sensitisation campaign. Because I was one of the people that never thought I was going to get it that that it was a bit blown out of proportion and happen to have to happen to me this way to win this and all serious. It was and how contagious thing. Go back to the beginning. When did you start to feel sick on a Sunday on a Sunday I Because I was delivering food to the elderly and I was getting let grocery a lot of people and on Sunday like the full week of picking up stuff doing delivery. I thought having chills and and my breathing was not that good and and I started to worry and it. It was ironic because the next day on Monday I was supposed to work in the CSS. Be this deal. People retirement home art. They're struggling and I was in that and I was. I applied the forms to be an employee to go into work to help them out so Sunday night. I called a girl then. I say you know what I'm sick and I don't think I could come and I don't think he believes me that I was sick. I think she thought that I just backed out that I was scared. She's like well. If you feel better it can still come and I'm like I don't think I'm GonNa feel better tomorrow so the next day on Monday. I go to hospital because I don't feel better and I wonder what's going on with me and I want to do the test and diaspora didn't want to. They said no we don't need to. It's not important and it did an x Ray. And when they did the x Ray they they say you loans have been implemented and they give me quite as behold no so when they sent me home. Things got my breathing worse than worse than because Asmaa. I started to worry a bit. The ospital calls me back and they say There was a mistake and your X. Ray. We saw him over. Something has to come back a mistake in your x Ray. Yeah it the way they read it the way Dr Read. It knows told me that there was nothing. Just a billion information another doctor. And you ran you some x-rays that mistake you have pneumonia. And I'm like what so I'm at home? May breathing's getting worse and worse so I ended up going back on Thursday morning and my branding is very bad at that time and when I got off the different mad and I'm like listen. I've been doing delivery for elderly people. Everybody's wondering if I'm sick what I have so I could tell them so they could go get check. I wanted to be tested. The doctor Said No. Can I please get tested now? So then I could know what happened was from my breathing. They do the test and they see a double double pneumonia. And I'm an and then the also Diagnosed WITH COLVILLE SO. I tell all elderly people so I've got time right away to kind of meet your next thing tank and and because that. Ospel that I was with the one designed to keep pacing with Dr Saint Tank. They put me in an ambulance and they sent me to shop in a room with two other elderly people that were plugged into a tank. Also much older than me but they were really struggling much more than me and I could sit them all the long run in front of me in this room suffering and I was plugged with three liters and and when I got that was supposed to be there for two weeks. It must have been really. It must have been really scary. I mean I don't know whether you felt your around other people. You're in this hospital where they're treating the people but you ever feel like this could really turn for you know I. I never thought once my life was going to be censured. I actually the one thing that that I was vaulted and after a myth is when I was at the hospital I oxygen and then I started reading better. I you know I would've loved to have the opportunity to go to private clinic or you know to do something else but the minute that I was diagnosed and no longer at any resources that could do on my own. I had to go to the blend and let them take us. I do all and being on the floor where it was only people that wouldn't affect it. I'm not slow and in the room with three two other people. So you know that was not a fun place to be but again at the I really needed that oxygen and I wasn't on the verse. Actually I remember when I got there. The first day was so bound on Thursday. That the doctor. Can you see me and they would considering sending me to ventilator? That was on Thursday the first day because my breathing was so bad. How WE'RE THE STAFF MANAGING? We were hearing. That hospitals are overwhelmed. Your in Montreal and the cities not been successful and flattening the curve. There's a lot that's going on. How are the the the staff managing with everything? Start when I was that was unbelievable bike because first of all a lot of us. That wasn't that floor and they would tell me the nurse that that I saw that. Were down on a voluntary basis and There was smiling. Some of them they got sent home and when they were finding back but they were very very good because it. I'm not proud to say that on. That Florida was one so I was the only one that was able to go to the bathroom on his own. While the other ones have to get nice Bush chains because they need a lot of help even just to take medication. So that's why I knew as soon as they need Dr Jane Anymore. I'd be able to just keep doing my treatment at home because I was the only way to treat him my pneumonia when I was there is by. Give me one cortisone today. You're you're a young fit guy. You're a tough guy. I mean that that was your role in the NHL was to be an enforced or did you ever think that you could get sick. No no not ever since ever since I became began in two thousand nine. I'm never sick. I've been sick twice and desires. I thought it was so blown out of proportion and I was like it's never going to happen to me. It's impossible I'm healthy. I was actually running a training for my third marathon and you know things were so good and I was doing of volunteer work. People were afraid to go out of the House. They could give you a grocery shopping. I'll do it for you. No problem well you want me to go I'll you don't? I wasn't afraid of anything I was like. There's no way it's going to happen. What is this? What is this touchy now? I mean in part of this. Is you putting that video but also speaking to us? I mean what? What's the message that you want to send people who might think that their immune from this? Yeah what not be stupid like me and and gives me a big those of humility to realize that you know what doesn't matter. Yes the elderly. The life is more dangerous. They get it but it doesn't mean that other age even younger and we're healthy that we can get it and the scary report about it and just so people understand if you get it. It's not your life. Necessarily you gotta be scared about because I was not of line. Is that people around you. Down my that that that that could be affected by because the older because they're free condition because when I got permission two days ago that all the elderly better delivered the food they got tested and everybody was negative. That was my biggest cared when I learnt when I got it. Got it and that told everybody and even when they did the post at I got. It is to make sure that everybody that I saw the week before all got checked and then make sure I didn't forget anyone because that's the biggest scared of it it. It wasn't like that got it. Then that was you know I was going to recover from it. I knew that I would is that people that I saw that. I don't know their condition. I don't know if they have pre condition and I WANNA make sure they get checked to make sure that it in at and get him infected. Everybody was flying and to me. That was the biggest really when you hear that Quebec is looking at easing restrictions. They're talking about reopening schools and allowing some businesses to To start to open up again. What goes through your mind while the schooling thing I to me. It makes no sense. I was flabbergasted amendment than in our Berta those third of the case that there is a Montreal and they're still not opening the school some timber in Montreal. Considering the fact that when I went to the hospital didn't WanNa test me at I either. The wind all about at all the symptoms. Because they said they don't have enough and fast they don't even have enough deaths for the nurse to get tested before they go home to their family so to be in a safe environment. You send kids at school. You have to be able to get all of them but this problem testing much. There's not enough so if there's not enough guesting fall the kids in going back to school and we're talking about elementary school for nuts for a year twenty days all left. How does that make sense to put at risk? Those kids those teachers the parents and actually the teachers. They don't even want to be there. They have to go because they're gonNA get fired so when I saw that because of the situation that I went through that the told me they didn't want to talk to me. It does not make sense for twenty days. Do we open school and take a chance to live through a second wave because of that decision just before I let you go and just a few seconds left. There's a t shirt that you've been wearing and I have to say this carefully so that you'll get in trouble. The T shirt says stay the PUCK home. Tell me about that what the message is that. You're trying to send just people know this is not my foundation. Just people can't decide that I created this to make money or whatever no. I bought the t shirt because stayed up Rome. It's hockey held the home nest and go bar down the hockey. The dose to foundation teamed up together do raise funds to Give all the centers that take care of homeless people across Canada. The with the money they give it to all the wholeness so when I got the t shirt I just sent a message if people want to do something for the homeless by a t shirt it goes to those two foundation did disperse it to the home and stay home. Yeah Yeah exactly and and you know to me that because when I got home that was already waiting for me and I was like it comes at the right time because I have to stay home anyway. So I'm GonNa work at these shirt and they'll give the message. It's funny by by the way the last thing I want to say now that I'm home every time somebody brings me something all the neighbors. Everybody will look outside. It's almost like oh my labors. They gotta be they want. WanNa be the person that is gonNA catch me if I get out of my house. Like medallion right base watching everything that I'm doing Iran it's like I'm E. E. T.'s. Your neighbor let's see what he's GonNa do somebody's coming. I'm glad I'm glad you're home and that you're on the mend and that's an important message to people that the you're not immune you're not you know protected from this just because you're young and fit charge and take care of yourself anything not think. Churchill rock played thirteen seasons in the hockey league. He was released from hospital on Monday. And is recovering as you heard from cove. Nineteen at home. This is the current on. Cbc Radio One Gal Galloway. So many of us are staying home and in many ways. Our relationship with food has changed. Were spending more time in the kitchen. These days we're thinking about where food comes. Perhaps in a different way and now help is on the way for farmers and factories that process that food we're responding to pressing needs in terms of processors in terms of predictability and support for farmers and for producers. We know that there is more to do. And we will keep working with them to determine exactly how we can best help. We will be there for our agricultural producers because they are so important to all Canadians as the Prime Minister Justin Trudeau yesterday. Promising new relief in funding for Canada's Food and agriculture sector as we discussed yesterday on the radio though. It's not anywhere near what the industry wanted to talk further about that. I'm joined by our national fares paddle. Katie o'malley is a freelance parliamentary correspondent. Who writes for politics? She's in Ottawa? Murray mandaric as a political columnist with the Regina leader. Post Regina Good morning to you both. Katie. Let's talk a little bit about this emergency funding for the agricultural sector. How much money was promised yesterday at the The total amount of money was twenty two hundred and fifty two million dollars split between the seventy million dollars for food pro processors. That's to basically help. These companies or factories. Make sure they have protective gear in place Take the steps needed that they can continue to operate or begin operating again complying with social distancing protocols as well as there's a there's a fifty million dollars free surplus back program that will allow the government to basically buy surplus product particularly livestock produce and distribute that. So that basically so that farmers and livestock producers are forced to to euthanize animals simply because they can't afford to keep them on the late and keep them alive. There's also there's also money for Recovery Fund and extended credited loan so it's basically a suite of measures that are aimed at helping farms stay in operation as particularly for those that aren't able to to be eligible for any of the other benefit programs that have already been rolled. What's your sense as to how farmers and Scotch Ruin And across parts of western Canada will react to this money. There's a lot of money two hundred and some million dollars but it's not what the Canadian Federation of Agriculture was asking for There's a real sense here that it was written for everybody except farmers and you have to understand the fastness the size of the industry out here. It's it's still the biggest Industry in Saskatchewan non-oil not anything else. Not Potash anything you hear about it. It's still agriculture in terms of good true contributor to our economy and the problem with that being is that it's almost impossible for any government to offer the level of support aid needed. There wasn't anything very specific for the pulse grain and oilseeds industry here. Which is the bulk of the farm commodities? That kind of sketch and we're coming off the absolute worst year is it is. It was a horrible harvest last year with the fall rains early winter. So in essence the two thousand nineteen crop is still being harvested right now. There's incredible frustration over that and anything with the Trudeau. A name attached to it in the farming community automatically spurs even more frustration rightly or wrongly fairly or unfairly. So in answer to your question the reaction to this has not been good out here. No the question One of the questions for the Prime Minister yesterday was why this took so long. And whether this had anything to do with the fact that the slow response was saying somehow tied to the fact that the Liberals have no seats in Alberta and West. Is that realistic decent. Oh absolutely you know. As I said earlier it was written for everybody else in the country. Perhaps accepts sketch with farmers are out BERTA. Farmers amount hct farmers in that sense and farmers here almost get that right now. There is a sense right now that That they do get what they pay for. And there's so little expectations coming out of the federal government And particularly the under this particular Prime Minister And I it is very visceral in terms of of the dislike here the copen nineteen crisis and everything else going on has put all that on hold politically and otherwise but if you're looking at the farming communities sketch when you're looking at ground zero of the frustrations with the Federal Liberal government molly. How does the liberal government try to thread that needle again as you said? There's there's concerns around farmers having youth ANAIS livestock. We've seen images of farmers pouring milk down the drain because there isn't a source for it to go to restaurants and hotels being closed. What sort of pressure is the government under to come up with an experience? It's definitely under tremendous pressure and in this is in no way meant to diminish the issues in the crisis being faced by the agriculture sector. But there are other sectors as well. You mentioned the hotel hospitality sector. They've been putting a lot of pressure on the government to basically bring forward targeted aid. That will help them. Specifically you've also Got Airlines. There are There's the oil and gas sector there are. There is no shortage of sectors. That feel this sort of one size fits all emergency benefit packages and we proposed in brought forward so far. They don't see that a sufficient and they don't see those as addressing their specific respective concern so farmers are definitely an an and producers in general are definitely on that list. I think there is there are there are a number of sectors and areas that are really competing as far as those priorities go and the government is basically trying to turn the vote as quickly as possible. One thing I found really interesting is every time that they well every time. We've had three incidents so far but every time the government brings forward one of these kinds of Massive comprehensive allegedly comprehensive aid packages. It always turns out that something huge was overlooked and they have to adjust it and they have to bring in legislation and make changes tweets so as to Basically to help the largest number of people so I am quite sure. I the prime minister who is very clear that this was an initial payment. He started this was kind of phase one of what the culture sector can they see? But I'm you know I would expect them to announce some more some perhaps additional money but also ways to make sure that the money that is out there can be accessed by the people that wanted and that's something that all with with the student payments the emergency wage subsidy end with the overall emergency data presumably coming after pressure from opposition parties. Murray mandaric How people in Saskatchewan feel about Justin Trudeau and the Liberals what vote the Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer? How are they performing during this crisis? Based on what? You're hearing well the odd thing is. I don't think that they were gaining much ground. Until maybe the last week or so in terms of everybody had parked their politics somewhat Understanding knowing the magnitude of cove nineteen. And what had to be done to deal with it? So you weren't hearing quite is much partisan Politics two issues have Really incited the political chatter. I think once again we're talking about right now and I think Haiti makes brilliant point in terms of how massive The needs are in all areas and agriculture in particular. And how you just can't address everything. There is that sort of Frustration but I think the Conservatives and perhaps be sure are starting to hit the right buttons at least out here in terms of Reuniting the frustration with the the other issues obviously the whole gun legislation and that brings back the whole nineteen ninety-three fight even though I think what's being proposed right now so far removed from the national gun registry that That it's not even a fair comparison. Nevertheless that's not how people think out here sometimes when They're in that vein and I think that. Might sort of reignite sort of The conservative leadership race. 'cause they're starting to talk about it here. There actually hasn't been surprisingly little talk about it out here. Perhaps because we don't have a candidate from out here that's embraces and interesting thing because Sheer leader of the party but is on his way out and there are questions as to how long he can hang around and whether the race needs to be postponed or perhaps accelerated. How do you think people in the Party feel about what under shear has brought to the table? I think in general just to address Murray's point I think the reason why you don't hear the issue of Western alienate. Being stressed or emphasized in the campaign is first of all as he says. There's no there's no clear Western candidate as in one from Western candidate who is vying for the leadership but also because frankly it is basically that is a baseline assumption within the conservative. Party is that everyone feels. The West is hard done by. Everyone feels the West needs more equity. It's not even if there's no controversy you wouldn't find a leadership candidate who would say anything different so it's not one of the areas on which the different candidates are trying to a basically highlight their differences because when you're running for leadership of a party you don't really. WanNa focus on all this stuff you all you want. You want to highlight what it is that makes you differ from the other candidates and that's kind of why we're seeing a different discussion going on in the race in terms of how it it amazes me that the Conservative Party you might recall. It took them a long time. They were basically the same time. That Japan finally announced that the Olympics weren't going to take place in two thousand and twenty. That was the same that was the same data. The conservative said that you know what maybe we're not going to be able to have this leadership race by the end of June and it was seen as being an obvious decision that they just prolonged even when they did kind of change the time. Line a little bit. They didn't adjust for example the they didn't extend the nomination period. Which could have given other candidates may be more chance to To meet the threshold for raising money and signatures the the time basically stayed intact even though there's a little bit longer before the vote itself happened so I think I think there's ten days left is other ten or five days left to sell memberships and then that the cap is put on and no one who joins the party after that can actually vote so. This is a huge. There's a lot of pressure on all the remaining candidates before candidates in the race. And I think that that's that's really driving what you're seeing now. As far as sheer MR sheer goes. I'm not sure. His performance has been particularly impressive to conservative for outside of western Canada. And the really is a feeling that the sooner they can get a permanent leader in there the better and the choices that are in front of them are the choices that are in front. There's no possibility that other people could be added to this mix not unless the Conservative Party were to do an astounding about facing a reversal which not to take. That might not be a good idea. It's something that we've seen them leading. Murray mandaric is there the possibility or the desire? Do you think from your part of the country to see different candidates In this race I think that there might have been or could have developed into something But it's an almost inside issue and And the junction to basically the overall frustration with with the liberal government et CETERA. I think there's a lot of westerners particularly conservative Westerners that want to see Politics get on with it and do something to defeat Trudeau because that is the sentiment in the conservative camp and it so attached to a lot of industries like farming sector. That we're talking about So I think there's more of a driving force to get on with it. MR O'Toole is seemingly making some headway in this province in Alberta and such There seems to be a general satisfaction. I'm sure it would be Far Better if they had a row nab rose or someone else that was sort of a Western candidate to put forward those those sediments and maybe better in terms of some of the real dissension settlements from the exit movement. Otherwise but right now. I think there's an overall sentiment that they do want to get on with a replacement for Edgy Scheer. Because even here. I don't think they've seen Andrew shears being terribly effective. Katya molly just a few seconds left. If you're Justin Trudeau in the liberals are you happy with the fact that that race is set as it is in the like three seconds. I'm not worrying frantically about how I'm going to get all this money out the George all the industries that what it yes. Maybe I'm a little bit happy but again kind of dwarfed by the context the context. It's in it's not politics as usual. Certainly and we'll see whether that returns in the short or long term. It's good to speak with you both. Thank you Katie. O'malley freelance parliamentary correspondent. Who writes for I- politics mandaric is a political columnist with the Regina leader? Post your thoughts on this welcome in terms of the performance of various parties but also what we were talking about in terms of just what people in farming communities and in the food sector need the federal government announced two hundred fifty two million dollars yesterday. Canadian Federation of Agriculture. Asking for a couple of billion dollars if you are in that sector and its number of different sectors we'd be happy to hear from you can reach us through the website at CBC dot ca slash the current and click on the contact link or send us an email the current at CBC DOT CA. I'm Ed Galloway. You've been listening to an extended version of the current. You can find part two of today. Show in your podcast feed for more. Cbc PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

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