18 Burst results for "Camus Camus"

"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

02:48 min | 2 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

"Clement <Speech_Male> says at one point in the book, <Speech_Male> quote, irresponsibility <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is grace. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> to fall out of <Speech_Male> grace would be to <Speech_Male> fall into a life <Speech_Male> of responsibility <Speech_Male> for ourselves. <Speech_Male> Responsibility <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> the fallen state of <Speech_Male> modern humanity, <Speech_Male> and the only way to be <Speech_Male> restored to innocence <Speech_Male> is to commit <Speech_Male> what Camus calls philosophical <Speech_Male> suicide. <Silence> <Speech_Male> I can't help but think of <Speech_Male> earlier this year when we were <Speech_Male> talking about Karl popper <Speech_Male> and his book the open <Speech_Male> society and its enemies. <Speech_Male> And popper <Speech_Male> talks about the responsibility <Speech_Male> that citizens <Speech_Male> have in a democracy <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> do the work every <Speech_Male> day to stay educated <Speech_Male> and stay active <Speech_Male> for the good of the <Speech_Male> society overall. <Silence> And <Speech_Male> one of the criticisms <Speech_Male> to that idea has <Speech_Male> been that <Speech_Male> people love the idea <Speech_Male> of having freedom <Speech_Male> on paper. <Speech_Male> But that staying <Speech_Male> politically active and informed <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> hard work. It takes <Speech_Male> up a lot of time in your <Speech_Male> day. And that <Speech_Male> whenever it comes down to <Speech_Male> it, people are much <Speech_Male> more willing to not <Speech_Male> necessarily have <Speech_Male> much control over <Speech_Male> the political process <Speech_Male> as long <Speech_Male> as they have cheap <Speech_Male> food to eat <Speech_Male> and teams of people <Speech_Male> on apps curating <Speech_Male> the next video for them <Speech_Male> to watch enabling <Speech_Male> their distraction. <Speech_Male> To create <Speech_Male> a system of values <Speech_Male> and then try to maintain <Speech_Male> it, I think <Speech_Male> on paper people <Speech_Male> love the idea of <Speech_Male> morals a la <Speech_Male> carte, where they <Speech_Male> get to choose the direction of <Speech_Male> how they live their lives. <Speech_Male> But to <Speech_Male> live with the weight <Speech_Male> of the responsibility <Speech_Male> of your choices <Speech_Male> that you came up with, <Speech_Male> to live with the guilt <Speech_Male> and the judgment of <Speech_Male> others. <Speech_Male> I think Camus thought <Speech_Male> when writing this book that <Speech_Male> if we can see the character <Speech_Male> of Clements in our <Speech_Male> cells, even just a little <Silence> bit. Then <Speech_Male> maybe by being self <Speech_Male> aware of that fact, <Speech_Male> it can help make us <Speech_Male> a little less susceptible <Speech_Male> to falling <Speech_Male> into the <Speech_Male> delusional innocence <Speech_Male> of feeling certain <Speech_Male> about things. <Silence> Maybe Camus <Speech_Male> also wanted us <Speech_Male> to consider that it's possible <Speech_Male> to accept the fact <Speech_Male> that you're going to be judged <Speech_Male> by others. Sometimes unfairly, <Speech_Male> but that maybe <Speech_Male> that's not too much <Speech_Male> to bear for you. <Silence> Maybe that <Speech_Male> was just too much for Clements <Speech_Male> to bear. <Speech_Male> And maybe his cynical <Speech_Male> worldview <Speech_Male> is just yet another <Speech_Male> defense mechanism, <Speech_Male> so he can deny <Speech_Male> the reality <Speech_Male> of the world around him. <Silence> <Speech_Male> Don't trade your integrity <Speech_Male> as a person <Speech_Male> for a <Speech_Male> few sweet <SpeakerChange> moments of <Silence> denial. <Speech_Male> But maybe Camus says it <Silence> best. <Speech_Male> Camus says he got two <Speech_Male> choices in this life <Speech_Male> in terms of how you're going to deal <Speech_Male> with the judgments of other <Speech_Male> people. You <Speech_Male> can be, quote, happy <Speech_Male> and judged <Silence> or absolved <Speech_Male> in wretched. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Take your pick, <Speech_Male> I <SpeakerChange> guess. <Silence> Hope you love <Speech_Male> the episode today. <Speech_Male> Try to never ask for <Speech_Male> anything, try to just give, <Silence> but <Speech_Male> if you enjoy the show <Speech_Male> and haven't left a review <Speech_Male> on the respective <Speech_Male> app that you listen to it <Silence> on, <Speech_Male> thank you in advance. <Speech_Male> Just trying to keep doing this for <Speech_Male> as long as I can. <Speech_Male> I'm gonna try to do more <Speech_Male> episode updates on Twitter <Speech_Male> at I am Steven <Speech_Male> west. <Silence> <Speech_Male> you seen any of this art <Speech_Male> that's been generated <Speech_Male> by AI recently? <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Male> insane. <Speech_Male> I typed in Albert <Speech_Male> Camus eating a pizza. <Silence> <Speech_Male> One of the, <Speech_Male> one of the, I don't know if <Speech_Male> it's funny or disrespectful. <Silence> <Speech_Male> But it's mind-blowing. <Silence> Anyway, thank you for listening. Talk to you next time.

Camus Karl popper Clement Clements Steven Twitter
"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

04:57 min | 2 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

"Than most people I know at being right about things. But then again, I'm extremely humble as well. I'm one of the best people I know at admitting when I was wrong about something. In fact, I'm wrong about stuff all the time. I'm the first to admit that. Don't feel ridiculous at all saying that I not only have the best strategy for being right all the time, but also the best strategy for being wrong all the time. In fact, I take pride in that contradiction. I actually think it makes me a balanced person. Something I want to make super clear here about what Camus was saying. He is not saying that you are a weak person if you sometimes embody contradictory values at different moments. To Camus, this is part of living in an absurd universe. This is part of being a human being. The weak person is the person who can't see or won't see the built in duplicity and contradiction in their own thinking. The person that's playing some variation of a psychological game that allows them to believe that they're just living universally by a set of values every day of their life. Like if you never find yourself speaking passionately about something you believe in and then catching yourself and saying, oh, but then again, there's that other area of my life that I do almost the opposite of what I'm preaching about now. If you never do that, then you're probably not looking at yourself as thoroughly or as honestly as you could be. And maybe it's impossible for us to ever totally escape contradictions in our values. But one thing we can do chemo thinks is to be more self aware of them. What Clements wants more than anything in this book is the dream of innocence. Like many others in modern society, what he wants is to be innocent of any moral wrongdoing. What he realizes, though, is that nobody out there is innocent.

Camus chemo Clements
"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

04:57 min | 2 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

"Yourself, makes it impossible for anyone to criticize you in a way that fully stings like it should. This is a defense mechanism, and it's a psychological game you can play in your personal life as well. Clements reveals on his deathbed to the person he's been talking to. That this has been his strategy all along after the fall. As he sits in this bar in Amsterdam, confessing his sends to the people around him, telling them about all the horrible things he's done in his life. He's only telling people this stuff because it allows him to judge them. To take away their illusion that they are moral people just as his was and leave them feeling just a little less good about themselves than at the start of the conversation. And if over the course of this podcast, you've felt a little bummed out by some of the negative takes that Clements is rambling about in a bar. Well, then I've done my job as a podcaster here today, conveying the character that Camus was going for. This is Clements and his entire twisted strategy. He wants to transfer his miserable discontent about his own personal struggles onto everyone he meets. He wants to do this because if he can judge people while being impervious to a counterattack, if he can make people in his immediate proximity, leave the conversation just a little more depressed about their place in the world. Then he can leave the conversation, still feeling that sense of superiority over others. Clements is not the voice of wisdom in this book. There may be little nuggets of wisdom sprinkled in here and there because the Camus, people are complex things. But at the end of his life, Clements is a tortured man, so consumed by needing to be better than the people around him, that he doesn't actually do the work of being a better person. He just plays a game that allows him to feel one step ahead, showing people how messed up they are. Now, again, despite the fact that Clements is a cartoon of a person. Camus would want us to ask ourselves, do I see any piece of Clements and this modern hypocrisy present in my own approach to life? Seems obvious Camus saw it in himself towards the end of his. But in keeping with the creation of meaning series, I think Camus would have some words of caution that he'd want to give. That if you think you're going to arrive at some ultimate system of values. And then you're just going to live by those values. Day after day, regardless of the circumstances that you find yourself in. Maybe it'll work out that way, but his prediction is that it's going to be a lot more complicated than that. We live in a completely tragically absurd universe. Nothing out there in the world really makes sense until we decide that it does. And that contrast between the true uncertainty of it all, and our propensity to steer our thinking into certainty as much as we can, that's a dangerous place. They can lead to crusades and nuclear wars and all the rest of it. This urge that someone might have to come up with a perfectly crafted system of values and then try their hardest every day to never deviate from it.

Clements Camus Amsterdam nuggets
"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

05:54 min | 2 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

"Clement says despite what they say, this service is actually what your friends want from you. Camus says, this is symptomatic of what he calls a sort of modern amnesia where we're able to conveniently forget about all the mistakes we make in our lives and just move on as though nothing is really happened. We've all met somebody like this before. You know, a person who has no problem at all, judging everybody else for what they're doing wrong. They'll define a person's entire character based on a single moment. They'll hold a grudge against people for years because someone mistreated them. But when something goes wrong in their life, they'll go to their friends, their friends will tell them it was all the other people's fault. And they'll just continue being the exact same person thinking, no rational person ever has a problem with me. If anybody thinks I should be judged, well, that person's just irrationally holding onto the past. They need to get over it. Make no mistake. This modern amnesia is a defense mechanism against that feeling of guilt and responsibility that comes with always being judged by others. And Clements always found a way to conveniently forget about all the mistakes he made in the past. That is, until after the motorcycle incident. After the woman on the bridge, after hearing the laughter of others, at that point, he says, there came a time in his life where he just couldn't forget about the person he was anymore. For the first time, he was forced to look at himself in the mirror honestly. And what he sees in the mirror sends him into a total panic. Remember, finding a way to avoid the judgment of other people was the main goal of his life now. Once these events make his old strategies ineffective, he tries out like 5 other ones that all fail miserably for him. And this is obviously Camus as an author laying out several examples of ways people in modern society try to avoid judgment as well.

amnesia Camus Clement Clements
"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

04:59 min | 2 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

"Option is exactly what he decides to do. And again, it messes with him and his ego. This is the kind of guy that before these things happen to him, would probably wax poetic about how, you know, if I were there, what I would have done, I would hear the scream in the splash, and without question, I would dive into that water and save the day for everyone. But presented with the actual moment in his life, he realizes who he truly is. This moment again, illuminates weakness in him rather than absolve some of it. The last event that really sends him over the edge into his downward spiral also happens on a bridge. He's walking just like the second event, but this time he hears behind him coming from the darkness, someone just laughing. Just hack Lin and cackling to themselves like a witch flying away on a broom. And to someone is insecure as Clements, the assumption here is that this laughter is directed at him. Now, this laughter on the bridge that Camus uses in the story is symbolic. It represents the fact that we are always on trial. We are always being judged by other people around us. Clements, for the first time in his life, after these events, after the illusion of who he is has been shattered, clamato for the first time feeling the weight of this omnipresent judgment coming from everyone around him all the time. And it doesn't feel good to him. He's once again smacked across the face with the cold backhand of reality. This is just what people do. They judge other people. And nobody's doing this because they're a mean person or something. This is how people keep their family safe. This is how people decide who they do or don't want to associate with. This is part of what keeps society together. But for Clements, this is something he's never really had to consider in these safe bubble that he formerly lived in. Remember, as a lawyer in Paris, he was never the judge or the one accused of the crime. He was always able to play the middle ground there. And in the everyday world, he figured everyone just agreed that he was this remarkable exceptional person just like he thought he was. Once he realizes though, that he is not, in fact, God's gift to humanity. And how vulnerable he is to the constant judgment of others. This leads to a paradigm shifting moment in Clement's life. The biggest priority for him from here on out was going to be to find a way to avoid being judged at all costs, and thus to avoid the feeling of responsibility or guilt for his actions. For Clements, there is nothing more important for your survival in this modern world than to find a way to do that. In fact, he thinks you're downright stupid if you don't try to find a way to avoid the judgment of other people. I mean, why wouldn't you? He says, if you're someone living in modern society and you have no strategy at all to avoid the judgment of others, that's kind of like being an animal tamer that cut themselves shaving that morning, you got blood all over you, you

Clements Camus Paris Clement
"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

"None of these values people see in him from the outside would hold up because he doesn't really care about any one of them. He's just putting on a performance so that he looks superior to others. And it is this moral bankruptcy that would lead to his eventual fall. Camus uses symbolism in the book to accent this fall. It's a fall from way up high. The high rise lofts of Paris, but this overinflated idea of how great he is, falling, tumbling all the way down to Amsterdam below sea level where Clements compares the various canals in the city to the 7 circles of hell in Dante's inferno. Clement sits in a bar in the deepest circle of hell, telling strangers the story of his fall. And here is that story. Three events in his life took him from thinking he's God's gift to humanity to just some random dude in a bar drinking on a Juniper bush confessing his sins to all the people around him. The first event is something similar to a road rage incident in today's world. One day, as Clements is walking around town, there's a guy who's motorcycle stalls in the middle of the road. Clement starts talking to him, it escalates somehow. Now they're screaming at each other. There's a crowd that's forming on the side of the street, watching all this go down. And someone from the crowd sneaks up behind Clements, sucker punches him and knocks him to the ground. Now, this moment was a traumatizing moment for Clements and his ego. Keep in mind, by the way, the kind of modern person we're talking about here. This is the kind of guy whose values have never really been tested in his life. This is a guy that goes throughout his daily life and truly believes that nobody talks bad about him behind his back. That he's always on the right side of the argument that nobody sees through his charm. This is the kind of guy that would probably sit around and fantasize about road rage situations like this and all the cool stuff he would do. Imagine in all the things the dude on the bike would have said to him. Oh. And then he'd be like Socrates just dressing him down in front of the crowd. Everyone's laughing.

Clements Juniper bush Clement Camus Amsterdam Paris Socrates
"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

04:40 min | 2 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

"Now, the person he's talking to. You quickly realize that it doesn't really matter who they are. This person barely speaks over the course of the entire book. They could be anyone. They could even be you. And that's kind of the effect Camus going for here. 99% of the book is just Clements, more or less talking at this person about himself. Anecdotes from his life, his thoughts about other people, his thoughts about his thoughts. Like, if you've ever known anyone in your personal life that's prone to going on long, narcissistic, dramatic monologues about themselves, they'd probably be a big fan of Jean Baptiste Clements and his work. I mean, it truly is a glorious display of narcissism. And without question, some of the first shots fired by Camus at a type of person that is rampant within modern society. Now, what becomes obvious as Clement starts talking about himself? Is that he's not a very happy person. I mean, not only is he sitting in the middle of a bar in Amsterdam, not only is he drinking. But then you find out that he's drinking gin. I mean, that's just nasty. This man clearly doesn't love himself anymore. And as a reader, you can't help but start to wonder what happened to this man that got him down to such a lowly lowly place. And as he goes on what you discover is that what happened to him is that he had a bit of what you could call a fall in his life. That he used to be one version of himself, some events played out in his life that led to his fall, and now he finds himself in a bar in Amsterdam talking to strangers. He starts out the book telling the person next to him about the man that he used to be. He tells this person that before the fall, not too long ago.

Camus Jean Baptiste Clements Clements Clement Amsterdam
"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

Philosophize This!

05:09 min | 2 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Philosophize This!

"Hello, everyone. I'm Stephen west, this is philosophize this. You know, there's a lot of notifications that come up on your phone that just bring up negative feelings. The news app that tells you the world is ending. The bank telling you your accounts overdrawn. Text messages from your family, tell me about God knows what. Look, I got one ambition in this entire world, and that's to make a podcast where I release an episode. It comes up on your phone as a notification, and it produces nothing but positive feelings. Like, wow, looking forward to listening later. If that's a feeling you've ever had with this podcast, then it warms the ventricles of my heart. Thanks to the people out there who give back, Patreon, philosophize this dot org. I hope you love the show today. So one of the things people have requested the most over the years on this podcast are more episodes on Albert Camus. He was a French Algerian absurdist philosopher known for his fiction, nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature. I think 11 different times.

Stephen west Albert Camus Nobel Prize
"camus " Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:32 min | 3 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"And it's the full mix of it. It's usually when if you look up to somebody and it's true for me, at least I think it is for you that you start to look up to basically everybody talk to. Yes. Yes. Good sign. That's a good sign. God forbid it goes the other way. Yeah. You're in trouble. If all of a sudden you start looking down on people, because whatever crazy metric you're using, that would freak me out. I do feel like that's a quality of getting older. When I was younger, I really, I thought it was so smart. I thought I had all figured out. Oh, really, so you're going, your ego is just going taking the nosedive. I would like to say it's my ego taking those dive. Me and my friend talk about it a bunch. We've just always associated it with doing acid for two decades straight. I'm just assume I'm just like slowly spiraling into senility, you know? Like I'm just like, all the confidence, all the like, oh, the certainty when you're having like in college and having the great, you know, I remember, you feel like you're a representative of Camus or some shit. You know what I mean? You read the myth of Sisyphus and now you like it. No, all existentialism and you're certainty in regards to it is embarrassing. But you don't see it in that way. You just feel certain. And then that certainty, it just starts like it starts crumbling a little bit. And then, yeah. You know, I get to actually intensely experience that certainty in many communities, but one and cryptocurrency. Young folks, with a certainty that this technology will transform the world. Yeah. And I mean, this is almost one of the big communities of the modern era where they believe that this will really solve so many of the problems of the world and they believe in it.

Camus
"camus " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:13 min | 6 months ago

"camus " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Gene Erica mentioned that unite the right rally in Charlottesville. And that slogan, you will not replace us. That started getting cited by people who went on to do all these massacres. Leading up to what happened in Buffalo. And that phrase has roots in this other French you know, I mentioned the camp of the saints that French dystopian novel, there's another book that was inspired by that one called the great replacement Lagrange man by the French author renowned Camus and he's the one who popularized this idea that demographic change is an existential threat to white people. And instead of seeing demographic change as a morally neutral reality, they paint it as this dangerous thing that's going to result in white genocide, basically. That's going to blot out and wipe out white people. It's a complete distortion of the reality of what demographic change really means. And it's all rooted in vitriolic racism and fear..

Gene Erica Charlottesville Buffalo Lagrange Camus saints
"camus " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:46 min | 7 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Today, Explained

"What do you think about when you hear the word philosophy? Maybe nothing at all, which is totally fine. Or maybe it makes you think of a stuffy seminar room, or marble bust of dead Greek guys, or giant books, written a long time ago, with little to say about your life. But philosophy is meant to be accessible to everyone. At its best, it speaks to issues we all face every day in the here and now. Vox conversations has a new monthly series called the philosophers. Each episode focuses on the ideas of a philosopher or a school of thought from the past, and explains why they still matter today. I talk with some really smart professors, but this is not a college course. We're talking about things that are relevant, and vital, and we're interested in ideas that crystallize the world around us. Check out our episode on how Albert Camus can help us understand the war in Ukraine. Or our newest episode on how Hannah arendt describes the political dangers of loneliness. Listen to the philosophers with me, Sean hailing, every month, right in the vox conversations feed. Check out these chords..

Albert Camus Hannah arendt Ukraine Sean
"camus " Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:31 min | 7 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Today, Explained

"What do you think about when you hear the word philosophy? Maybe nothing at all, which is totally fine. Or maybe it makes you think of a stuffy seminar room, or marble bust of dead Greek guys, or giant books, written a long time ago, with little to say about your life. But philosophy is meant to be accessible to everyone. At its best, it speaks to issues we all face every day in the here now. Vox conversations has a new monthly series called the philosophers. Each episode focuses on the ideas of a philosopher or school of thought from the past, and explains why they still matter today. I talk with some really smart professors, but this is not a college course. We're talking about things that are relevant, and vital, and we're interested in ideas that crystallize the world around us. Check out our episode on how Albert Camus can help us understand the war in Ukraine. Or our newest episode on how Hannah arendt describes the political dangers of loneliness. Listen to the philosophers with me, Sean hailing, every month, right in the vox conversations feed. Check out these chords..

Albert Camus Hannah arendt Ukraine Sean
"camus " Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:57 min | 8 months ago

"camus " Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"Thoughts sometimes painful thoughts. Angry thoughts or thoughts in general can be very different like fantasies, for example. You can fantasize like sexual fantasies. You can fantasize. I was just the humor sake wanted to mention stuff but then people think I'm serious. So I'm not going to mention anything. But sexual fantasies and then I know there's people that have sexual fantasy and they don't want to actually do that in real life. That sexual fantasy serves some kind of purpose in imagination only. And that same way suicide might serve a purpose in imagination only is very unlikely to lead to action. And yet there's other thoughts that may be a more amorphous that do lead to action. And that leap, yeah, that boy, that's a fascinating and that's such a philosophically powerful thought to not exist. Like that question, that's this archer or Camus Camus. Who says basic question of why live? Good question. So that's a great question, actually. And there are other related questions. Some people may have the thought of suicide. Because there seems no point, there's no joy in life. That's one reason that some people can put forward. Sometimes it's not just the absence of joy. There's an active pain and active psychic pain and some people. And that, the inescapability of that is enough to drive the thoughts of suicide. And then there are interpersonal and cultural reasons as well that can show up. But the act, this act of ending of the self is in all these cases, there's no real way to study this in animals, no other animal as far as we know that we can study. Has this concept of, this is myself, the situation is not tolerable, therefore I will end the self. To our knowledge this is not something that can be studied in other animals. So it remains this..

Camus Camus
"camus " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"camus " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Step up. Kate Anderson, God bless you, thank you. I don't know is it come easy? Hey there folks. Exciting news. We're going into the home stretch. That means that my book is launching, I can not believe it. As the author, you work so hard on something. I work really hard on this book. And there's stuff in here, which I promise you is going to blow your mind. Alvin, you've been reading it and you've been having very positive experiences with it. When a friend tells me, you know, what he's reading. Yeah, I've been reading it and it's fascinating. It's blow your mind fascinating. No, I mean, it is. And it's not because I wrote it, it's the stuff that I'm writing about is inherently fascinating. And so, okay, two things. First of all, I've not mentioned this, I don't think before, but one thing you can do is you can ask your local library to carry this book, carry copies of the book. It's already a bestseller. And that would be really helpful. When libraries carry the book. So please, if you can, if you think of it, do that. I also ask you to think about buying copies to donate to libraries to school libraries. It's just important this information get out there and be available. And you'll see when you read the book, if you haven't already done so, if you remember the launch team, also, I want to say that please post your reviews if they're favorable. As soon as possible because there are a lot of atheist trolls out there and they work really hard to destroy books like this. Like they post one star reviews on Amazon and they've never read the book and stuff. So we need your help to please as soon as the links go live wherever it's good read your Barnes and noble or Amazon. As soon as you can, please post your reviews. It makes a big difference. And by the way, if Albert Albert Camus was still alive today, he'd be given this a 5 star review. Yes, he would. That's right. I mean, some of the craziest stuff in the book is the fact that Camus and SARS became believers at the end of their lives. No one seems to know about this. Don't ask me how I discovered it except by God's grace. But when you discover what you think, this is monster news. We've got to tell the world. The world needs to know whenever their names came up and say, oh, by the way, at the end of their lives, they accepted God. People are gonna think that's not possible. Well, you can look it up not only in my book but in the footnotes and the bibliography. I also want to stress we are doing a campaign for lines defending freedom. We really ask you folks to do I've become more and more free in asking, not just for money for these organizations or for people to buy my book because I feel like we're on a crusade..

Kate Anderson Alvin Albert Albert Camus Amazon Barnes Camus SARS
"camus " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"camus " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"The Germans bought into this stupid idea. They thought, hey, we're German, which means we're Lutheran, which means Luther invented Christianity as far as we're concerned. He invented this idea of grace, grace means I don't have to do anything, and that's that. And of course, Bonham wrote about cheap grace and the idea that if you don't really understand grace, you treat it like nothing. You know, you treat what God has done for you like nothing, which means you don't get it, which means you don't believe which means forget about grace. There's no grace because you have an appropriate degree. I really believe for other reasons the church in America today has done the same thing. I think there are different reasons, but there are tons of people who've excoriated people like me and Frank and said, you've made an idol of politics. You've made an idol of Donald Trump. You know, ridiculous things. And the point is no, we just believe that our faith touches everything. It's not some little parochial religious thing that stays in the corner, like the official church is doing China. It's something that has to come out of the church and live everywhere. We have a free exercise of religion, freedom to do that. So if you keep it in this little religious theological corner, then it's phony. It's abbreviated faith. If you don't live it out in the school, on the workplace, on the radio, on the whatever it is, if you don't do that, you don't really believe it. Your phony. So when people talk about, I just want to preach the gospel. I don't want to be I don't want to be political. We think that's just stupid. That makes no sense. Because if you're a Jew in a boxcar going to Treblinka or Auschwitz, you think, you know, I would love it if there was some Christians out there on the other side of this boxcar who believed what they said and would get political and stand up against the system that is sending me my family to death. That means getting political.

Alvin Albert Albert Camus Amazon Barnes Camus Sartre
"camus " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"camus " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Okay. Fluctuating to be challenged. I'm going to challenge you. I don't know who you are. But i'm going to challenge you. I often talk my nor my bugbear is People who claim to be intellectual who have a philosophical bias against faith. It's wrong it's a philosophical bias. It is illogical but on the other side there are people in in the world of faith who have somehow in a knee jerk way adopted a bias against the things of the mind against the intellect. There are people christians. There almost nas ticks Who don't want to hear about reason they just wanna be kind of floating in the ether. as though faith and reason are opposed to each other. So tell us elijah stevens. You've made the film send prove. Why do you see that in the church. Anti-intellectualism i think that happened. During the great awakenings. It was not a part of the church until like people like finney came along and said look to reach the frontiers. We need to make this stuff. Simple emotional end. God use that but it stripped out the mind and so in the american wait wait wait so finney in the nineteenth century during the second great awakening right. He kind of emphasized. Let's keep it simple. Let's not go into the intellect because we're trying to reach the people on the frontier. I mean he actually made a strategic choice to do that. Yes and that kind of split. The church part where you have high intellectualism on one side and low focus on the power of spirit and then high focus on the power of the spirit and high emotionalism. And it's like there's this divide but that hasn't always been the case you go back right. After the apostles you see a group of apologised ride rise up there debunking. The gods in enroll writing letters to the emperor's. We still have those to this day. And so what what we need is to bring the intellectual and the supernatural back together so that we can talk about it intelligently. We don't make mistakes in mistake. Natural phenomena for supernatural ones and at the same time. We're able to articulate what god has done in a way that open minded people would be willing to accept. It's fascinating to me that people get these ideas about christianity or about anything but science. That are just bad ideas. They're wrong right and they run with it And it's almost like they've got these invisible enemies you have. There are people. I know who just they hate the intellectuals or the cultural elites to the point that they are just reacting against them rather than meeting them on the ground and showing them right where they're mistaken but we'll so. I came up with a theory when we were talking about. Materialists and if you say the only thing that exists is matter There is no such thing as anything. Transcendent any god then logically. I mean if you want to get serious then nothing matters. If there's only matter nothing matters in other words there's no love there's no good there's no evil but they never wanna go there. They act as though i can have those good things and have my scientific materialist naturalist view but logically. They can't right and this is where we see. The rise of existential ism from is win going. There's no god you go. We'll how do. I live my life in this world and what they're forced to is. Just you create your own values. And that's what we're seeing in western culture as we become post christian post truth is everyone is creating their own values and it's actually tearing down the structures and institutions that gave rise to the west and where we're losing our ability to pass onto the next generation truth white so explain. What is existential ism. Existential islam is. How do i live in light of reality. So there's christian existentialist like kicker guard who i have to live as being before god and then there's atheist one who go. There's no god. And i've just got to figure this out and they all end up talking about the greatest philosophical question is whether or not i commit suicide like it becomes really dark really fast. Most tension list. We think of as like the french. Existential yes khumbu sar tra-. Yeah now. now i'm going to blow your mind. I think i'm going to blow your mind. You ready for this life stevens. You ready ready ready. Ready in my new book is atheism dead. I show something that i know. Almost no one knows this. And i'm so excited. I could burst. Camus and sartre both french atheist existentialism. They're probably the most bold about looking into the abyss. There is no god. How can i live right. Both of them at the end of their lives came to faith in the god of scripture. Really you're shocked. Everybody should be shocked in my book. I give you the details. But i was shocked and what i thought to myself. How is it possible. I've never even heard of this right. Now camus died. I'm sorry shark died. Nineteen eighty or something like that and there was. There were some people who wrote bitterly. They were angry. They felt betrayed. That sort had come to some kind of eight but nobody knows the story of camus. It was written by. There was a minister in paris. Who literally didn't write about this. Until he was ninety. Two years old so he wrote about this maybe twenty years ago and nobody heard of it you know it was like way past the death of of camus camus died at age forty seven car crash but i find this stuff so exciting that the two people who looked most rigorously into the horror of there is no god came out on the other side saying this is not possible there has to be something and they both concluded yes can move. Wanted to be baptized Sort i believe was accepted into the church On his deathbed but even before that he wrote about it we'll be back talking about interesting stuff. Sent proved dot com folks. Eric metaxas here. Joe biden.

finney elijah stevens camus Camus sartre stevens camus camus paris Eric metaxas Joe biden
"camus " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"camus " Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"I exhort you to take advantage of it because these deals usually don't last i i don't know who's doing this promotion or why but all i can tell you a great price and usually if a book sells incredibly well maybe amazon will discount it. You know three months in or something like that on but to be able to pre-order it at a price like this where it will never go lower than this price that is. That just doesn't happen so this is one of the reasons i'm pushing it. I'm thrilled because i've mentioned this that we want people to preorder the book and if you pre-order it. Obviously you're going to get that insane price. I i'm guessing you're going to want to buy christmas presents. And whatever get it at this price. You don't wanna pay thirty dollars. You wanna pay fourteen ninety seven so but yes if you sign up for the launch team. When you go to eric metaxas dot com. You will be able to read the book immediately. If you sign up for the once team you'll get an electronic copy of the book email to you elettronica. I don't know how they do it but they do it. And you'll be able to stop reading the book today. And you're going to be freaked out. By what i put in this book folks. I have stuff in here. i mean. Here's a headline regime. Pulsar and albert camus. Two of the leading. French existentialist atheists of the twentieth century. Actually that's wrong there too. They are the two leading french existentialist of the twentieth century. But they're also probably two of the most famous of the twentieth century the most outspoken dedicated to this atheist view. Both of them and almost no one knows that either of them came to faith both of them at the end of their lives independently. One row nineteen sixty around nineteen. Seventy eight came to christian faith. Now that is a headline gigantic headline. No one knows this. No one knows this. Some people may have heard that camus. Sorry that start came to faith but camus. Nobody heard of it. A guy wrote a book about it forty years after the death of kim. I mean it's it's insane so please go to Indexes dot com. Sign up for the newsletter. Please we're gonna have free excerpts and all kinds of stuff and also we'll send out the my interview with jason jones about the book the johnson mira video about the book Sign up preorder. The book please folks tell your friends honestly. I think you're gonna want to copy and you can't do better than this price and it helps a lot if you preorder. Yes thank you very much. Great audience Oh don't forget. J. p. is coming up in the second hour and he's and today say endgame. We're gonna be talking to jp against his book as game. It's about saving marriages and think this is very important. In fact it's so important that i'm going to give you a link if you go to endgame book dot com. Aw org dot org a sorry. Endgame book dot org. Yes and use the code. Eric you get fifteen percent off. Endgame book dot org write that down and game book or fifteen percent off the book. jp against the author. It's about saving marriages and sort of amazing solutions. That he's come up with that have worked. Well anyway we'll talk about that with him in the next hour actually in a few minutes and a couple of minutes in the next segment. I didn't know okay thanks..

eric metaxas camus albert camus Pulsar amazon johnson mira J. p jason jones kim Eric
Interview With Author David Yoon

What Book Hooked You?

06:35 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Author David Yoon

"This week. I'm thrilled to have david yunan. Whose newest book super fake love song is out now. An conversation that we pretty much covered all talk about his newest book a his debut his writing journey and a lot about what he was like as a young person so really enjoyed talking to david. Hope you enjoy listening listening so david. What book hooked you. What book hooked me It's it was when i was in middle school. I don't know exactly how old i was. But i remember talking to my librarian and i was like i don't know to read their so many books in the school library and she just pulled out the halloween tree by ray bradbury and If you read this book but it's it has these awesome woodcut Drawings in it and it came up a long time ago. Like in the sixties. I want to say and this is way before like killington and the newspaper from the nightmare before christmas. But it's kind of there's a character in it. That is the skeleton dude with. I think he has a pumpkin for a head. I know he doesn't but he's like this very skeleton like figure and he's very creepy and he's very Theatrical like jack's kellington was and he challenges This group of boys on halloween when their trick or treating to to give up a year of their lives to save the life of their best friend Pippin who's at homesick can't trick or treat and so they travel around the world and learn about like all these Reports and customs that surrounding death and they wind up in mexico and they eat The sugar skulls and that is like. I'm going to give up a year my life to save my friend and It was just so it's like super atmospheric and super moody. This is awesome so then at of course read all very bradberry. I could find reading stuff. I shouldn't have been reading and so middle school time. Was that in age. Like were you a big reader. Then was it hard to get you to read or was it something where you pretty much constantly always had some sort of book. You're working your way through. I mean i was always reading. Yeah for sure Is reading a lot of stuff But then that book kind of it was like my first sorta grownup book. I guess and after that i started reading a of piers anthony fancy novels and i read like fifteen close and i was like wait a second. It's kind of the same story over and over again and that's florida and Then i started reading a lot of stephen king which i know i shouldn't have been reading And my dad was a weird guy to he. he He studied victorian like them. He he focused on the metaphysical poets. Okay it adds seoul university in career and then when it came to the united states he studied library science all things. wow and so he was like you need to be reading old man and the sea You need to be reading. Was it on human bondage and then lady chatterley's lover and was like that. I don't think i should be reading this. But he didn't care he's like the crazy. Daddy shows like the horror movies to his kids because he wants them to to Have a good sense of the canon. Anna is exposed to a lot of stuff that i probably shouldn't have been but i'm grateful for it and i would imagine while it was definitely helping Definitely helpful for your reading life to have a dad like that and that was kind of pushing it but was there any sort of rebellion there. That because you were being forced to read so many books were pushed upon you that reading. You rebelled against or turn against it because it was it was assigned by by dad I don't know it's hard to remember like like reading moby dick before high school. Sure looks like there's no way. I'm gonna finish so even if it did come from like a friend i don't know if i would have just cause but it did. It did feel like homework for sure At the same time like my older brother. I have one older brother. And he was a big reader to He used to read at the dinner table and it was like a problem. You know But i you know. I'm a little brother saw. I'll read to on just like him. I want to compete in everything we do. Because we're siblings. So he also turned me into the reader just sort of inadvertently and so when you got to high school especially when those are when in in those english courses you're being assigned full size novels and things like that. Didn't you find and really getting into what's canonized literature. We'll call it. Were you kind of a step ahead. That you think In those courses because dad already sorta had you on that home regiment of a reading those types of books. That's a funny question. Because i just realized really recently i mean my dad passed away like over a year ago. and so It just when you're when your parent passes away and makes you think a lot about your relationship in like your whole history. And i was like dude. My dad was like an outsized influence in in my interest in writing in books. I never appreciated him fully for that. He just kinda did it sure Yes and when. I hit high school. It was english. Classes where my absolute favorite My english teachers were my absolute favorite. My locker got broken into one time. So isis i was like no lockers and i used my english teacher's classroom as my locker That's how much we trusted. Each other's liked each other so that was sort of the year of You know camus. And ray bradbury. Shirley jackson and margaret atwood. That's like when i started really getting into those guys and and then i was like all right. This is this is really important to me. Plus i also had study hall. Not how i had studied hall but Journal i wrote in my journal pretty much every day so and so i take it

David Yunan Kellington Bradberry Ray Bradbury David Seoul University Chatterley Pippin Piers Anthony Stephen King Jack Mexico Moby Dick Florida Anna United States Shirley Jackson Camus Margaret Atwood