18 Burst results for "Campo Flores"

"campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:50 min | 6 months ago

"campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Election. In the rear view, both sides are already gearing up for the next political battle, especially in cities such as Jacksonville. This morning's Gordon deal has the story for speaking with Ari on Campo Flores, reporter at the Wall Street Journal. His species gold in Florida. Many changes turn Jacksonville into political battleground. All right, this is a cool, deep dive here on on what has happened Kind of set the scene for Jacksonville in Duval County. So Jacksonville is that city is actually the largest city geographically in the country on the largest population in Florida, up near the Florida Georgia line. And it's an area that you know has long been a Republican strongholds. It's an area that's gotta has had several Navy bases, you know, heavy military influence. It's culturally part of the South. And so it's long been a place that Republicans could count on to rack up some margins. But that has been changing in recent years and we've seen that shift happened gradually over. The most recent election cycles where it became the GOP margin became narrower and narrower than in 2000 and 18 in the gubernatorial race in Florida. Andrew Gillum, Wanda County, even though he lost the state that was a big deal that hadn't happened in decades. And then this time around is the county went for Joe Biden again, even though by it and lost the state, but but it just shows that there's been a significant Gains a driven in large part by demographics and migratory patterns, but also the organizing efforts by the parties on the ground because this is now become a real true Battleground in the state of Florida, right? So get into those finer points. Then what changed with the demographics? This is an area that has long had certain industries like the insurance industry has long been around. There's been some there's some railroad, obviously the military so but over the years they they really built out some of these sectors. More significantly. So if we have growing, you know, finance sector is growing tech healthcare sector they have. Ah, you know, they're one of the of the few. Cities around the country that has a male clinic. Very prestigious health health institution They have, you know, Deutsche Bank has a significant office. There. There are there's a new There's a financial technology company that's building a new headquarters there. So that has Increasingly grown, and it's drawing more educated professional of some cases. You know, young, professional job seekers who are coming in to take these positions and settling in and they're coming from different parts. Of the country often times of areas that are changed blue. And so that has been one demographic trend that is that has played a role is this good? This influx Younger professionals, college educated, higher income white collar workers that we know are are increasingly associative Democrats. The other thing that's happened is That there has been out migration over time. More conservative rights, more affluent, who have moved to neighboring suburbs that are have become very, very red and you know, and so there's been this kind of a redistribution is well of the population. So those are kind of The major demographic changes of the area's undergone this morning scored in deal with Arian Campo Flores of the Wall Street Journal. It's 14 minutes before the hour coming up technology that worked and technology that didn't work in.

Florida Jacksonville Wanda County Wall Street Journal Campo Flores Arian Campo Flores Andrew Gillum Florida Georgia line GOP Duval County reporter Gordon Joe Biden Ari Deutsche Bank
"campo flores" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:51 min | 6 months ago

"campo flores" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"With the presidential election. In the rear view, both sides are already gearing up for the next political battle, especially in cities such as Jacksonville. This morning's Gordon deal has the story for speaking with Ari on Campo Flores, reporter at The Wall Street Journal. His species called in Florida. Many changes turn Jacksonville into political battleground. All right, this is a cool, deep dive here on on what has happened kind of set the scene for Jacksonville and Duval County. So Jacksonville is that it is actually the largest city geographically in the country on the largest population in Florida, up near the Florida Georgia line. And it's an area that you know has long been a Republican stronghold. It's an area that's cut up has had several Navy bases, you know, heavy military influence. It's culturally part of the South. And so it's long been a place that Republicans could count on to rack up some margin. But that has been changing in recent years and we've seen that shift happened gradually over. The most recent election cycles where it became the GOP margin became narrower and narrower than in 2000 and 18 in the gubernatorial race in Florida. Andra Gillum, Wanda County, even though he lost the state that was a big deal that hadn't happened in decades. And then this time around is a county went for Joe Biden again, even though by it and lost the state, But it just shows that there's been a significant Change a driven in large part by demographics and migratory patterns, but also the organizing efforts by the parties on the ground because this is now become a real true battleground in the state of Florida. All right, so get into those finer points. Then what changed with the demographics? This is an area that has long had certain industries like the insurance industry has long been around. There's been some there's some railroad, obviously the military so but over the years they they really built out some of these sectors. More significantly. So if we have growing, you know, finance sector is growing tech healthcare sector they have. Ah, you know, they're one of the of the few. Cities around the country that has a male clinic. Very prestigious health health institution They have, you know, George Bank has a significant office. There. There are there's a new There's a financial technology company that's building a new headquarters there. So that has Increasingly grown, and it's drawing more educated professional of some cases, you know, young, professional job seekers who were coming in to take these positions and settling in and they're coming from different parts. Of the country often times of areas that are changed blue. And so that has been one demographic trend that is that has played a role in this competition in flux. Of younger professionals, college educated, higher income white collar workers that we know are are increasingly associated with Democrats. The other thing that's happened is That there has been a out migration over time. More conservative, right? More affluent to have moved to neighboring suburbs that are have become very, very red and you know, and so there's been this kind of redistribution is well. Of the population. So those are kind of the major demographic changes that the area's undergone this morning scored in deal with Arian Campo Flores of the Wall Street Journal. It's 14 minutes before the hour coming up technology that worked and technology that didn't work.

Jacksonville Florida The Wall Street Journal Campo Flores Arian Campo Flores Andra Gillum Florida Georgia line GOP Joe Biden Duval County reporter Gordon Ari Wanda County George Bank
"campo flores" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Arenas and, and condos and that, you know is also one of the most visited places in the US seventy five million visitors a year come to see DisneyWorld universal, and all of that is moving through this very congested area and up the highway is just outdated and in dire need of, of repair the challenges, of course doing all. All of that, while you still have in some sections two hundred thousand vehicles a day moving through. I knew that that was a busy area. But what I did not consider, I guess is the way you described how tight the spaces with developments really close to the highway. So there's not a lot of ways you can reroute traffic or bring in the big acquitted. Exactly. I mean, that's one of the biggest challenges of this, and it's something that, you know, other urban areas are experiencing, you know, the, the interstate highway system in some areas decades ago when it was first being built more was much more room to kind of move around in a lot of those areas of now grown up these dense cities that have emerged right along the highway and ended in. And so, at the real, jigsaw, puzzle for the constructor that, that, that handling the project because you obviously have lots of workers, you need to move in lots of pieces of equipment, lots of supplies and materials, and the under the contract, the, the builder is required to keep the same number of lanes open during the day as there were before the project started. A number of things. They, you know, they made the lanes a little tighter. They took a foot off of each lane. So the cars are crammed a little closer. And they're just constantly having to sift traffic to the left onto the median to the right onto the shoulder create temporary ramps create temporary, as just a constant kind of moving things around so that they can create just enough space to be able to work on say one particular lane. And then when they're doing that shift things over work on another piece of it. And that's been just been continuous orchestration, speak with Campo Flores Wall Street Journal reporter. He's written a piece about this massive reconstruction project in central Florida. Interstate four is it limestone to the causes of these unpredictable sinkholes at times while these cruiser driving whatever into the ground? Another big challenge that the that the project is actually one of the reasons why they've, they've had delays on it. So the, the topography of this area is complicated for engineers because it, it is Florida, it has this porous limestone underneath, and its topography that's prone to having cold. And so you need to be very careful in terms of how you go about drilling or banging pilings into the ground support, you know, the bridges and the overpasses and all of the, the structure of the of the interstate. And so they had one incident in this one congested area near downtown where there is an electrical substation. And because of that substation, which is sensitive to vibration, they had to do a different type of, of support for the bridge and ended up failing repeatedly. And so just it's at the project back required. A lot of kind of revamping of plans to, to get around that obstacle. And it's just one more example of the, you know, the challenges that you have and building building in an area like this, this morning's Gordon Deal with our income Flora's of the Wall Street Journal. It's twenty minutes before the hour coming up a look at the discord app..

Florida Campo Flores Wall Wall Street Journal US Arenas Gordon Deal Street Journal reporter Flora twenty minutes
"campo flores" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Story in about twenty minutes. If you've driven through the Orlando area lately, you know what a nightmare the road construction, is this morning's Gordon Deal has more on a massive project being undertaken in Florida to fix a crumbling interstate for speaking with Orion Campo Flores Wall Street Journal reporter piece entitled, the interstate is crumbling, try fixing the section used by two hundred thousand vehicles, a day, some of these numbers, you put together are just staggering but get explain the scope of this project that's happening in around Orlando. One of the largest roadway projects there is in the US at this point. It's also the largest public private partnership, that's been done in the Florida ever. And it is the, the widening of interstate for going through the Orlando area. It's twenty one miles of an area that, you know, fifty years ago when it was first built was a sparsely populated area and it now one of the fastest growing cities in the country. A dense area with office towers and malls and arenas and, and condos and that, you know is also one of the most visited places in the US seventy five million visitors a year come to see DisneyWorld universal, and all of that is moving through this very congested area and up the highway is just outdated.

Orlando Orion Campo Flores Wall US Florida Gordon Deal Street Journal reporter twenty minutes fifty years
"campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"As we reach the one year Mark today of the fatal shootings at Marjory stoneman, Douglas, high school, the city of parkland, Florida is struggling to heal the community has grieved and erected memorials some families who lost loved ones and students who survived have channeled their anguish into activism, many have undergone counselling and recaptured a semblance of normalcy. But pain and anger still pour forth regularly. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan, what did you see when you visited a really complicated a year later, you know, you have in some regards people recapturing some of the some semblance of normal p than they had before many people have gone through trauma counseling. They've they've commemorated those loss they've grieved. They've come together in all variety of of groups. And so in some sense, David Vance the healing process. It's still very raw feeling there even a year later because obviously the of the gravity of what happens, and and the difficulty of ever getting over that. But also because there are just seems a constant stream of reminders of that day was and how messy the aftermath has been. Can you have just recently mission? A report that was put together by state panel convened specifically to investigate the massacre and to analyze what it was that happened. And what the left says were and what the recommendations would be going forward. And it was this. You know, monster report people more than four hundred pages that just outlined a litany of errors in the way. For instance, law enforcement handle this situation with the gunman before shooting handled the response to the shooting and things like that. They're sorta reopened wounds people. So it's it's it's still a very emotional time for. Did you say to that? There are some folks who are not happy with say updated security measures or safety drills that are taking place. Oh, sure. You know, the whole security response has been so controversial in itself. You know, you have some people, and and including a recommendation and the power report that addressed going taking the measure like arming teachers and having teachers participate in the the guardian program that was set up after parkland under a law that was passed last year. That's a very controversial proposal. There are some people who think that it's just the reality that we live in the other people who are aghast at it and say that. This makes people feel less. Thanks to the teachers now carrying weapons of an inside the classroom. So. It's just been. The security issue has been really really difficult. The school district has come under fire from a lot of parents would feel that they have. Not done enough that they have not responded assertively enough to to what needed to be done. And then there are others. You know, feel like some of these measures are just misguided. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter Ariane Campo florist about his piece entitled a year after parkland making sure to say, I love you at morning drop off. It's been one year since seventeen people were killed at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school. As have the politics here. Exacerbated things in terms of maybe the pain or the hurt at the heart of this in many ways is you know, gun right? And there is a few issues that are more devices in our country, then gods that has triggered quite polarized debates in the state that said something pretty remarkable that in the aftermath of the shooting because of the strength and the widespread nature of the movement that formed in the aftermath of parkland Marjorie led by students they were able to get legislation Pat and a conservative legislature sorry on Wall Street Journal, reporter, Arjan Kimball..

parkland Wall Street Journal Marjory stoneman Douglas high reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan Marjory stoneman Ariane Campo Florida David Vance Arjan Kimball Mark Douglas Pat one year
"campo flores" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on KTRH

"As we reach the one year Mark today of the fatal shootings at Marjory stoneman, Douglas, high school, the city of parkland, Florida is struggling to heal the community has grieved any erected memorials, some families who lost loved ones and students who survived have channel their anguish into activism. Many have undergone counselling and recaptured a semblance of normalcy, but pain and anger still pour forth regularly. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan. Would you see when you visited really complicated picture a year later, you know, you have in some regards people recapturing some of the some semblance of normalcy. Then that they had before many people have gone through trauma counseling. You know? They they did commemorated those loss grieved they've come together. In all variety of groups. And so in some sense, they've advanced the healing process. But it's still very raw feeling there even a year later because obviously the of the gravity of what happens, and and the difficulty of ever getting over that. But also because there are just seems a constant stream reminders of that day was and how messy the aftermath has been can you had just recently the submission? Of a report that was put together by state panel convened specifically to investigate the massacre and to analyze what it was that happened. And what the left says were and what the recommendations would be going forward. And it was this. You know, monster report more than four hundred pages just outlined a litany of errors in the way. For instance, law enforcement handle this situation with the gunman before shooting handled the response to the shootings and things like that just sorta reopen wounds for people, so it's just it's still a very emotional time for for park. Did you say to that? There are some folks who are not happy with say updated security measures are safety drills that are taking place. Oh, sure. You know, the whole security response has been so controversial in itself. You know, you have some people, and and including a recommendation and the power report that suggests going taking a measure like arming teachers and having teachers participate in the regarding program that was set up after parkland under a law that was passed last year. That's a very controversial proposal. There are some people who think that it's just the reality that we live in other people who are aghast at it and say that. That makes people feel less safe to the thought of teachers now carrying weapons of inside the classroom. So it's just been. You know, the the the security issue has been really really difficult. The school district had come under fire from a lot of parents feel that they have not done enough that they have not responded assertively enough to to what needed to be done. And then there are others. You know, feel like some of these measures are just misguided. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter Iran Campo florist about his piece entitled a year after parkland making sure to say, I love you at morning drop off. It's been one year since seventeen people were killed at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school as have the politics here exacerbated things in terms of maybe the pain or the hurt at the heart of this in many ways is you know, gun right? And there is a few issues that are more devices in our country, then guns that has triggered quite polarized debates. In the state that said something pretty remarkable that in the aftermath of the shooting because of the the strengths and widespread nature of the movement that formed in the aftermath of parkland, largely led by students they were able to get legislation passed in a conservative legislature. Sorry on Wall Street Journal reporter Arjan Campbell Flora's stoneman Douglas, by the way has a day of service and love planned for today during which students can participate in service projects one student plans to pack meals for undernourished children and a father says he would visit a garden at the school. That's become a sort of memorial for the students and staff who were killed. It is fifteen minutes now after the hour on.

parkland Marjory stoneman Douglas high Wall Street Journal Marjory stoneman reporter Arian Campo Flores Arjan Florida Douglas Mark Arjan Campbell Flora Iran Campo one year fifteen minutes
"campo flores" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"As we reach the one year Mark today of the fatal shootings Marjory stoneman Douglas high school, the city of parkland, Florida is struggling to heal the community has grieved and erected memorials some families who lost loved ones and students who survived have channel their anguish into activism. Many have undergone counselling and recaptured a semblance of normalcy, but pain and anger still pour forth regularly. It's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter, Ariane Campo, Flores Arjan. What did you see when you visited really complicated picture a year later, you know, you have in some regards people recapturing some of the some semblance of normalcy than they had before many people have gone through trauma counseling. You know, they they've commemorated those loss the aggrieved they've come together in all variety of of of groups. And so in some sense, David Vance the healing process. It's still a very raw feeling there even a year later because obviously the of the gravity of what happens and the difficulty of ever getting over that. But also because there are just seem the constant stream of reminders of that day was and how messy the aftermath has been. Can you have just recently the submission? A report that was put together by state panel convened specifically to investigate the massacre and to analyze what it was that happened. And what the lapses says were and what the recommendations would be going forward. And it was this monster report more than four hundred pages outlined, a litany of errors in the way, for instance, law enforcement and the situation with the gunman before shooting handled the response to the shootings and things like that just sorta reopen wounds for people, so it's it's still a very emotional time for and park. Did you say to that? There are some folks who are not happy with say updated security measures or safety drills that are taking place. Oh, sure. You know, the whole security response has been so controversial in itself. You know, you have some people, and including a recommendation our report that suggests going taking the measure like arming features and having teachers participate in the regarding program that would set up after parkland under a law that was passed last year. That's very controversial proposal. There are some people who think that it's necessary. This is just a reality that we live in the other people who are aghast at it and say that. Makes people feel less safe to the thought of teacher is now carrying weapons of inside the classroom. So. It's been. The security issue has been really really difficult school district has come under fire from a lot of parents who feel that they have. Not done enough that they have not responded assertively enough to to to what needed to be done. And then there are others. You know, feel like some of these measures are just misguided. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter Ariane Campo Flores about his piece entitled a year after parkland making sure to say, I love you at morning drop off. It's been one year since seventeen people were killed at Marjory stoneman Douglas high school. As the politics here. Exacerbated things in terms of maybe the pain or the hurt the at the heart of this in many ways is you know, gun writing. And there is a few issues that are more devices and our country, then gods that has triggered quite polarized debates in a state that said that something pretty remarkable that in the aftermath of the shooting because of the the strengths and the widespread nature of the movement that formed in the aftermath of parkland Marjorie led by students they were able to get legislation Pat and conservative legislature. Sorry on Wall Street Journal reporter Ari on Campbell Florus Stillman Douglas, by the way has a day of service and love planned for today during which students can participate in service projects one student plans to pack meals for undernourished children and a father says he would it a garden at the school. That's become a sort of memorial for the students and staff who were killed. Fifteen minutes now after the hour on This.

Marjory stoneman Douglas high parkland Wall Street Journal reporter Ariane Campo Ariane Campo Flores Flores Arjan Florida Campbell Florus Stillman Dougl David Vance Mark Pat Ari one year Fifteen minutes
"campo flores" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Scott. And and and saying that he would continue those low tax low regulation policies that the current governor is enacted on the other side with Guillem you have some running as a, you know, a quite liberal Democrat, perhaps the most liberal that Florida has seen in a democratic nominee in recent history. He calls for boosting the minimum wage to fifteen dollars an hour. He calls for expanding Medicaid coverage to as many other states have done. But which Florida has resisted thus far. And so, you know, it's it's it's his economic message is one of wanting to help out more those who are working class voters. And folks who feel that they have been at the losing end of economic policies by the president on down. I guess it must be asked. When you float those types of things when you mentioned. Expanding Medicaid, or perhaps as you point out on the story. Getting starting pay for teachers to fifty grand a year to pay for that. Well, you know, that's what the the criticism of bet. Republicans mount against Gillam is dead. You know, how are you going to pay for all of this? How are you going to pay for this and not raise taxes in a state that tends to be tax-averse? There is no income tax personal income tax, for instance. And in in Florida, so. That's an open question. How how all of these measures would be funded speak with Wall Street Journal reporter, Oriane Campo Flores. And he's written a piece entitled enclose Florida. Governor's race candidates. Keep sites on their basis. The attacks have gotten personal too, correct? Oh, yeah. It's been a very personal very nasty acrimonious campaign of they have just repeatedly assailed each other on the campaign trail and their debates. The Santa's has continually brought up this FBI probe of the city of Tallahassee that has been hanging over Kim's candidacy for quite some time since since way before he got the nomination. It's a probe in which he has not been directly implicated, but one that has snared some people that he was close to. And so, you know, the the Santa's has really assailed him for you know, for alleged corruption. On the other side Gillam has laid.

Florida Gillam Kim Santa Guillem Wall Street Journal Oriane Campo Flores Scott. FBI president Tallahassee reporter fifteen dollars
"campo flores" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Contests this year and waged in the biggest battleground state in the US, it's also drawn national attention for being one of the most rancorous, pitting. Andrew gillum, the liberal mayor of Tallahassee against Rhonda Santa's former congressman who earned President Trump's early endorsement, it's a story by Wall Street Journal reporter Ari on Chempil Flora's Arjan set this up. It is a really unique election for Florida because you have on both sides a very liberal Democrat running against a very conservative Republican in Florida races. You often candidates sort of aiming for the middle because it's a purple state kind of swings from one party to the next. But in this case, you you really have the kind of polar ends of of ideological spectrum doing it out and really focusing intently. In the final stretch on whipping up enthusiasm among their bases and bringing out their most powerful surrogates and just really driving turn out as opposed to making sort of appeals across the aisle, and and and having sort of more moderating voice. Well, all right. So the let's say the most outspoken of the issues for the candidates or what say the top two for Mr. Gill Limor, Mr. DeSantis. Well, so Richard a fantasy the Republican has really run very very closely aligned with Donald Trump. The president endorsed him in the primary and helped deliver that nomination to him in the home stretch, the president campaigned in two different Florida's cities to to to try to you know, drum up support for him. And so, you know, his fantasists message has been in keeping with with Trump's he has said he would protect. Florida from the problems of illegal immigration on the economic front. He has positioned himself as a continuation of the current governors administration or Republican Rick Scott. And and and saying that he would continue those low tax low regulation policies that the current governor then acted on the other side with Guillem, you have some running as a, you know, a quite liberal Democrat, perhaps the most liberal that Florida has seen an democratic nominee in recent history. He calls for boosting the minimum wage to fifteen dollars an hour. He calls for expanding Medicaid coverage to as many other states have done. But which Florida has resisted thus far. And so, you know, it's it's it's. His economic message is one of wanting to help out more those who are working class voters. And folks who feel that they have been at the losing end of economic policies by the president on down. I guess it must be asked. When you float those types of things when he mentions expanding Medicaid, or perhaps as you point out the story getting starting pay for teachers to fifty grand a year to pay for that. Well, you know, that's what the the criticism of bed. Republicans mount against Gillam is that you know, how are you going to pay for all of this? How are you going to pay for this and not raise taxes in a state that tends to be tax verse? There is no income tax personal income tax, for instance. And in in Florida. So that's that's an open question. How how all of these measures would be funded speaking with Wall Street Journal reporter, Orion Campo Flores. And he's written a piece entitled in close Florida. Governor's race candidates. Keep sites on their basis the attacks have gotten personal too, correct? Oh, yeah. It's been a very personal very nasty acrimonious campaign. They have just repeatedly assailed each other on the campaign trail and their debates. The Santa's has.

Florida President Trump Wall Street Journal president Rhonda Santa US reporter Andrew gillum Chempil Flora Tallahassee congressman Guillem Rick Scott Orion Campo Flores Mr. Gill Limor Gillam Richard Mr. DeSantis
"campo flores" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Hurricane, Michael is a massive storm one that weather forecasters are calling unprecedented for the Florida panhandle region, and it comes after hurricane Florence, devastated north and South Carolina last month with extreme winds and flooding. Let's get some details about the strength of hurricane Michael, as well as how people have prepared for the storm from the Wall Street Journal's Arjan Campo Flores who joins us via Skype Ari on first of all, where are you? I am in Tallahassee in the state capital of Florida, which is in the projected path of Michael from what I've heard Michael developed into a major hurricane very quickly. Yeah, that's quite a contrast to what Florida went through last year with Cain, arma, which took a long time to make its way to the state and gave residents and officials plenty of time to prepare for it. This one escalated very rapidly just in a matter of few days going from a tropical depression to a category, four storm. And so. The concern among some officials in the state is that some residents and localities of not had sufficient time to get prepared or to evacuate. If that's what they think is best, how many counties in the Florida panhandle were issued evacuation orders. So there were twenty two counties in Florida. The God evacuation orders that covered roughly three hundred seventy five thousand residents. Now, based on what you've seen and heard, have residents hated the warnings to leave the area. I think it's a mixed bag. The most vulnerable most exposed areas I think has most of the people there have cleared out and of heated the the, the warnings, but there are always hold outs and there are always people who insist on staying in their homes either because they feel like they're secure. They're or they have become sort of numb to previous rounds of evacuations that proved not to be necessary. So that's a big concern for officials because obviously those. Folks will be cut off from emergency services if they can't reach them. Now, when we think of Florida, obviously, we think of the beaches tug about the affected area in the panhandle. It's obviously low, lying and.

Florida hurricane Michael Hurricane Michael hurricane Florence Arjan Campo Flores Wall Street Journal Skype South Carolina Tallahassee Cain
"campo flores" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"This is something we should be aware of, what does it tell us about the path of a storm? So this is for people to visualize. Sometimes people you see a map that has a bunch of strings that are sort of predicting the potential paths of a storm. So those are all individual models that are predicting the path of the storm. There are a lot of models they are. You know, American models, European models. They are extremely long standing and sophisticated models. There are more rudimentary models, so there are a lot of resources out there. And so typically what forecasters will do is they kind of blend these together. They, they have their own sort of strategies about the different weight that might accord to one model versus another, but they will basically take that all all those different predictions and can sort of meld them into let they. Considered to be the most reliable forecast cone that they can come up with the so Arianna. Obviously, a lot of people are worried about hurricane Florence and anxiously watching the latest forecast from the National Hurricane Center in looking at these maps, especially for people who are taking a look for the first time. Do you have any other tips or sources you would recommend? So they're the National Hurricane center's has actually over the years, they keep increasing the the number of tools and maps and resources that you can look at on their websites. If you go to the National Hurricane website, which is NHCD, dot Noah. And, oh, AAA dot gov. Evair you will see the different storms or systems that they may be tracking. And then if you click on a particular storm like hurricane Florence, you will see on there a number of different types of maps that you can look at. So there's not only the forecast cone, which is, you know the one of the most common ones, but there are, for instance, maps that show when you can expect. At what time or what? What day you can expect to. I experienced tropical storm force winds, or there may be others that show what are the areas that could be potentially affected by flash floods or what are the potential rainfall totals. So those are all tools that folks can look at to make determination about what is the risk that they're running in their particular area and and also, you know, you should look at the advisories themselves statements put out every several hours by the Hurricane Center, which tell people if you're living in this particular area or this stretch of coast, you're going to be facing this kind of threat versus another part of the coast where you might experience another type of threat. That's Wall Street Journal reporter Arianna Campo Flores joining us via Skype from Miami with some tips on how to track hurricane Florence. Thanks so much for joining us. My pleasure. Thank you. And that's what's news. I'm Anne Marie for totally in New York for the Wall Street Journal. Enjoy the what's news podcast. Then try the what's news newsletter. Sign up at w. s. j. dot com slash newsletters. That's w s j dot com. Slash newsletters..

National Hurricane Center hurricane Florence Wall Street Journal Arianna Campo Flores AAA Anne Marie w. s. Miami New York reporter
"campo flores" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"With hurricane Florence on a path toward the east coast. Many are watching the latest forecast maps to track the storm, but that can prove a bit confusing for those trying to make sense of the National Hurricane center's forecast maps for the first time joining us now via Skype from Miami with some chips is Wall Street Journal, reporter, Arjan, Campo Flores Ari on first. Let's talk about how much technology has changed in tracking hurricanes and how it impacts the picture. So to speak of what we're actually looking at when we take a look at these maps. Sure. So there have been significant improvements in the technology that's available to forecasters as they prepare these forecasts. The satellites that they're using are much more sophisticated more powerful, more precise, some of the devices that they use. The actually dispatch into storms from aircraft are also more sophisticated the rock computing power that they use to run models. His his much more powerful than it was decades ago. So all of that has allowed forecasters to become steadily more precise in how they they, they forecast, for instance, the path of a hurricane. So what we see when we look at the the so-called forecast cone, which is that map, it shows a steadily widening sort of blob that seeks to capture the potential path of a storm that has steadily narrowed over the years. And so that obviously has significant impacts for folks who are in the cones in terms of the decisions that they make us to whether or not they should back. You wait or stamp place or what measures they should take when it comes to the cone. You also point out that a lot of people mistake it for the entire area that'll be impacted by the storm. And that's not actually what it's showing us. Can you explain a little bit more about what the cone on the forecast map is showing us? Yeah, sure. So the way that they derive the cone is it's basically. Accession of circles and those circles have varying radii and the way that they they calculated is they're trying to predict where the center of a storm will pass and they, they use those models that are predicting the pats combined with the records the previous years of of errors in forecasting to derive a particular radius for a circle. And so that's how they're calculating it and they'd they make the radio so that there is a two-thirds probability that the center of the storm will actually pass through the cone. But obviously that means that there is a one in three chance that the storm will not pass within the gone. We'll actually be outside of it. And so that's what people need to keep in mind that this is a, this is all about likelihood and probability sort of running models, but the affected areas can be far out. Side of the cone. You look in Ari on something else you point out is this so called spaghetti plot without getting too technical..

Campo Flores Ari National Hurricane center pats Wall Street Journal Florence Miami reporter
"campo flores" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"With what's news from the Wall Street Journal. I'm Anne Marie for totally New York. Many coastal residents are tracking the path of hurricane Florence. One of the most common mistakes people make is to mistake the floor, cast cone with the entirety of the area that might be affected by particular storm because that's really just predicting where the center of a storm may pass, but it doesn't encompass a much wider area where you could be experiencing strong winds storm surge and heavy rainfall. We'll have some tracking tips with Wall Street Journal reporter on Campo Flores. But first here are some top stories. The Federal Communications Commission says it needs more time to review information from sprint and t. mobile regarding their proposed merger and that it's pausing the agency's informal one hundred eighty day clock for reviewing the deal. The FCC says the clock will remain stopped until the companies make all their submissions. And third parties have time to review them. The review is expected to continue into next year. More US jobs are available than there are job seekers, the number of available jobs rose to a seasonally adjusted six point nine, four million in July Wall Street Journal reporter, Eric Morath says, the trend is creating more opportunities for US workers. More of them are quitting their jobs, they're willing to look for better jobs, usually higher paying jobs, and that could finally finally put some upward pressure on wages that matters a lot to the fed because that also filters through to inflation. More out says it's also forcing employers to change their habits to like settling for less qualified candidates in tightening labor market. U. s. builders of five g. networks are facing resistance from local communities that aren't too happy about the added infrastructure. The journal reports that millions of Americans are likely to see additional utility poles or antennae as the nation's largest cell phone companies lay the foundation for five g. the next.

Wall Street Journal Federal Communications Commiss US reporter Anne Marie Campo Flores hurricane Florence New York fed Eric Morath sprint five g one hundred eighty day
FCC pauses review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger

WSJ What's News

00:23 sec | 3 years ago

FCC pauses review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger

"The Federal Communications Commission says it needs more time to review information from sprint and t. mobile regarding their proposed merger and that it's pausing the agency's informal one hundred eighty day clock for reviewing the deal. The FCC says the clock will remain stopped until the companies make all their submissions. And third parties have time to review them. The review is expected to continue into next year.

Wall Street Journal Federal Communications Commiss United States Reporter Anne Marie Campo Flores Hurricane Florence New York FED Eric Morath Sprint Five G One Hundred Eighty Day
"campo flores" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Finally subject finally the dates for pass never be the same some tour kind of and gun number reform four it's camille mr like trump a bail has proposed featuring young arming thug teachers havana who are highly trained and a position shared by the nra but he's also suggested no keeping weapons out of the hands of young people in he the mentally gained ill two something positions the nra this week opposes it's the 26yearold the nra new jersey donates native big money charlie to politicians pouf with mostly how republicans long and number any three debate on gun measures by the way would be added yes to a legislative agenda that already includes next proposals the number tsui is to already overhaul talking about immigration his next album and in you know the meantime that the midterm you've got elections perfect are later from this ed year sheeran and finally defence she broke lawyers a record seeking for youtube to spare views nicholas and crews has your execution number one trending for last song week school this week shooting in due parkland leafa florida new rules could face a high hurdle the state's historic in embrace that of your the iheartradio death penalty top which has trending led to the songs second now largest hear death them row all on in iheartradio the u s heart more radio from wall street adan journal reporter arjan campo flores r e on set this up the abu created and nikolic crude england the gunmen nb douglas highschool shooting painted a very complicated legal going forward he seventeen charges of premeditated murder and v state attorney and the kate prosecuting dickhead dead while yet time and now made for a determination a business update on whether and it's brought to to you by pursue the michigan the death penalty economic that development this is corporation the sort of crime if you want that to the take death your penalty business statute to the top was was take created it to a for top ten on the state other hand for business the michigan public offenders office contact at his michigan representing business mr dot crews org has today been in a trying few corners to of corporate america push companies an are effort getting rid of parental to avoid leave policies a trial that would appear uh which they say to favour would moms drag over on for dads years and.

nra tsui sheeran youtube murder attorney kate michigan adan journal reporter arjan campo
"campo flores" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Us for what they are demanding from us is to keep them safe in the first place and the only way we're going to do that is to finally finally hass some kind of gun reform mr trump has proposed arming teachers who are highly trained and a position shared by the nra but he's also suggested keeping weapons out of the hands of young people in the mentally ill something the nra opposes the nra donates big money to politicians mostly republicans any debate on gun measures by the way would be added to a legislative agenda that already includes proposals to overhaul immigration and you know that the midterm elections are later this year defence lawyers seeking to spare nicholas crews execution for last week school shooting in parkland florida could face a high hurdle the state's historic embrace of the death penalty which has led to the second largest death row in the u s more from wall street journal reporter arjan campo flores r e on set this up the obviously nikolic crude the gunmen india douglas high school shooting at a very complicated legal out going forward he tape seventeen charges of premeditated murder and vive state attorney and kate prosecuting dickhead dead while yet and made a determination on whether to pursue the death penalty that this is the sort of crime that the death penalty statute was was created for on the other hand the public defenders office at his representing mr crews had been trying to push an effort to avoid a trial uh which they say would drag on for years and years and be an agonizing experience not just for the families but for the wider community instead have mr crews plead guilty to all these counts and be sentenced to life in prison without possibility with parole as a way of avoiding the death penalty so that sort of the question that needs to be a kind of worked out in the coming week does the age of nicholas cruise sector in here as to why some people may not be in favour your means nineteen like if this was a forty two yearold guy who would committed this with people feel differently thank you no i think given that he is older than eighteen years old it makes him an adult and folks mind that there are some that would have that would be with dr that consideration nn i mean he was obviously not just he's not just a young man but.

mr trump nra florida murder attorney nicholas wall street journal reporter arjan campo india douglas high school kate eighteen years
"campo flores" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Of the hands of young people in the mentally ill something the nra opposes the nra donates big money to politicians mostly republicans any debate on gun measures by the way would be added to a legislative agenda that already includes proposals to overhaul immigration and you know that the midterm elections are later this year defence lawyers seeking to spare nicholas crews execution for last week school shooting in parkland florida could face a high hurdle the state's historic embrace of the death penalty which has led to the second largest death row in the u s more from wall street journal reporter arjan campo flores r e on set this up the abu created nikolic crude the gunmen nb douglas highschool shooting painted a very complicated legal going forward he seventeen charges of premeditated murder and v state attorney and the kate prosecuting dickhead dead while yet and made a determination on whether to pursue the death penalty that this is the sort of crime that the death penalty statute was was created for on the other hand the public offenders office at his representing mr crews has been trying to push an effort to avoid a trial uh which they say would drag on for years and years and be an agonizing experience not just for the families but for the wider community instead have mr crews plead guilty to all these counts and be sentenced to life in prison without possibility with parole as a way of avoiding the death penalty so that sort of the question that needs to be a kind of a two worked out in the coming week does the age of nicholas cruise sector in renew as to why some people may not be in favour your means nineteen like if this was a forty two year old guy who would committed this with people feel differently think.

nra florida murder attorney kate nicholas wall street journal reporter arjan campo forty two year
"campo flores" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"campo flores" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Of the hands of young people in the mentally ill something the nra opposes the nra donates big money to politicians mostly republicans any debate on gun measures by the way would be added to a legislative agenda that already includes proposals to overhaul immigration and you know that the midterm elections are later this year defence lawyers seeking to spare nicholas crews execution for last week school shooting in parkland florida could face a high hurdle the state's historic embrace of the death penalty which has led to the second largest death row in the u s more from wall street journal reporter arjan campo flores r e on set this up the abu created nikolic crude the gunmen nb douglas highschool shooting painted a very complicated legal going forward he seventeen charges of premeditated murder and v state attorney and the kate prosecuting dickhead dead while yet and made a determination on whether to pursue the death penalty that this is the sort of crime that the death penalty statute was was created for on the other hand the public offenders office at his representing mr crews has been trying to push an effort to avoid a trial uh which they say would drag on for years and years and be an agonizing experience not just for the families but for the wider community instead have mr crews plead guilty to all these counts and be sentenced to life in prison without possibility with parole as a way of avoiding the death penalty so that sort of the question that needs to be a kind of a two worked out in the coming week does the age of nicholas cruise sector in renew as to why some people may not be in favour your means nineteen like if this was a forty two year old guy who would committed this with people feel differently think.

nra florida murder attorney kate nicholas wall street journal reporter arjan campo forty two year