35 Burst results for "Cameroon"

"cameroon" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:54 min | Last month

"cameroon" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"As a girl, I walked along the shores of Lake Chad, one of the largest lakes in Africa. It went on forever, touching four countries, Chad, Niger, Cameroon, and my own country, Nigeria. It seemed like an ocean to me at the time with 30 million people relying on its bounty. Sadly, today, as you fly over Lake Chad, you won't see much. It's a fraction of its original size. 90% of this fresh water basin has dried up and with it, millions and millions.

Lake Chad Niger Cameroon Chad Africa Nigeria
"cameroon" Discussed on Gwinnett Daily Post Podcast

Gwinnett Daily Post Podcast

06:53 min | Last month

"cameroon" Discussed on Gwinnett Daily Post Podcast

"Now here's gdp. Sports editor will hammock with a look at sports in gwinnett. This week will hand the kids. The sports editor for the gwinnett daily post and. Let's start with last week's football games will yes. I think the game that everybody's talking about was the one that was on. Espn two We'll national television for football council beat north gwinnett and that one took care of business. Would everybody was looking to see. Was a konso responded with losing Travis honor the number one player in the nation in their last game to an ankle injury. this was their first game without travis and they they did just fine Scored a nice win over their rivals. Air councils plenty to mounted without trabzon the lineup Still a good chance of making a run at the state championship. Another big win. I think was was brookwood. Went in their region opener over. Newton kind of leaves brookwood unbeaten in the region kind of pursuing a region title. I don't think they wanna region since two thousand seventeen so this is a nice way to start a buford got a win over shiloh. But those teams run defeated in eight six say and And then norcross Got another win. That'd be discovery and they extended their strict. they've gone five straight games without allowing a touchdown to their their opposing teams. Great run there rather norcross defense. That continued last week. Five games without allowing touchdown now there are role right now so they always play great defense over there but this is one of their better runs. Wow that's impressive. Well it since. You are the sports editor. You're the one who picks the players of the week. So who've got yet for offense went with lonnie ratliff. It was really a pretty easy choice. He's the quarterback Only played a half against the lakeside last week and he had Us fifteen out of nineteen passing for four hundred seven yards and seven touchdowns school record seven touchdowns on one half also rush five times for sixty seven yards so pretty easy to go with him as offensive player of the week or defensive player of the week was a a really active defensively and over. There linear ben klay poll. He had thirteen tackles last week in a winner habersham but five those went for losses to refer sacks also had another quarterback russia broke up a pass so he was all over the place for the linear defense last week. congrats ben for that honor and football's not the only sport that's happening right now. Softball in volleyball are both in the playoffs. Yeah we're right in the middle of everything in those sports a couple rounds deep already and softball Really what stood out to me. amber read from north gwinnett. She had ended double header shutout against noon. Instead set the bulldogs lead in columbus She pitched two complete game shutouts. They're allowed only one hit in those games and she struck out twenty eight batters between those two games so just really dominant effort for amber. She's having a great year. And i wasn't going to be going back to columbus. They're usually down there all the time. They've made the elite eight buford. There's a seventeen straight trips in a row to columbus for the finals down there so really dominant run for those guys and the accuser. The only team to beat be for the region. Eight six champions punch their ticket down there as well. also had a couple of softbank amendments while we're talking softball this week we had Value martin from brooklyn and. She's a third baseman over there for the bronco. She committed to auburn and field. Who's a big part of that tequila softball team that we talked about. She's a committed to georgia state. She's a kind of a first baseman at the college level but she's a big pitcher for tequila as well at the high school level and the volleyball playoffs got going this week. In the first with first round games and and buford hebron brookwood and parkview. I'll picked up first round win so for that can keep that going deep into the playoffs and swimming is happening right now as well with a couple gwinnett swimmers making the usa swimming junior national team. Who are they yeah. Both of these kids were were high school swimmers last year. There were daily. Push swimmers of the year. Nate stouffville from over brookwood and abby mccullough from parkview a big time swimmers. There were women at the college level now. But they're abbey's at georgia and then nate's at auburn. But those kids were were excellent high school swimmers and really dominated at that level. Both were committed auburn at one point. Abby changed her mind when auburn had a coaching change. But both are in the sec. Right now like you said. They're going to be swimming for the usa swimming junior national team. That's always a great honor for those kids that that on their resume so far under the of lofty goals and swimming going forward as a great accomplishment for them as they head off into college. Is that a step towards the olympics is just kinda. Get your name out there. Making sure you're you're qualifying for national mates in the kind of a swimmer to watch Sort of thing. It's a it's it's still perform swimming's one of those things we have to perform at the qualifying. Meets your resume. only get you so far yet. What have you done for me lately. Kind thing but still a great thing for those kids to accomplish and it really just shows what their body of work has been for the the previous year. We'll him his sports editor at the daily post them. Will i appreciate you when you told me. On the podcast. Right thank you for having me. Why by kia mall of georgia. We provide award winning. Customer satisfaction have been a family owned business for over twenty years. Buying or leasing with us as fast and easy and you can get pre-approved online enforce simple steps we offer top dollar on trade ins and have new vehicle specials that are updated every month and our factory trained technicians make servicing your vehicle convenient with extended service hours. Stop by shop with us on the lot or visit us online at love. My kia dot com. Doing nothing gets pricey. How's that leading stuff. Slide makes things worse double for your ac and putting off your rsa injures mega too. So it's like this. You're other cools at peak efficiency. Were inefficiently cost you. Money never thought the doing nothing gets expensive are as dangerous. Saves you money you call. We come it's cool again. How park clean. Screen trained entrusted techs. Go megadeal we refresh it to factory fresh vex like the day it was new. We call it mega nice kind old. We get maximum years from older system on the other hand. If you're old system costs more to run than a high efficiency replacement one makes more sense. Practically pays for itself i get it goes up energy bills. Go down now. You're getting bates paying more. Because rsa andrews makes it easier than putting it off mega tuneup sufficient installs. Either way are dangerous. Makes you smile. He's banned ease. Dari there are s. andrus dot com. Thanks for listening to the gwinnett. Daily post podcast added to your lexa flash briefing or your google home briefing and be sure to life. Follow in subscribe wherever you get your podcast. This podcast is a production of bg ad group. Darren sutherland executive producer. Jeremy powell creative director. Jacob sutherland director producers jason general and mad golden and casual may copywriter. All rights reserved..

north gwinnett brookwood softball gwinnett daily post norcross football gwinnett buford lonnie ratliff ben klay columbus swimming auburn parkview volleyball shiloh habersham Nate stouffville
4 share ‘Alternative Nobel’ for empowering communities

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

4 share ‘Alternative Nobel’ for empowering communities

"A number of activists along the alternative Nobel for empowering communities the right livelihood award known as the alternative Nobel has been awarded to three activists on an organization working across the globe to empower communities the winners include motto Wong do agenda and peace activist whose work to prevent sexual violence against girls since the nineteen nineties in the lake Chad area of Cameroon the Swedish right livelihood foundation which awards the prize says the twenty twenty one Lawrence proved that solidarity is key to a better future full I'm Charles de Ledesma

Swedish Right Livelihood Found Wong Lake Chad Cameroon Lawrence Charles De Ledesma
Nigeria Beat Liberia in World Cup Qualifiers

BBC Assignment

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Nigeria Beat Liberia in World Cup Qualifiers

"News down African qualifying for the 2022 World Cup where the Leicester City striker Colecchia Natural scored twice for Nigeria, who kicked off their Group C campaign with a comfortable two nil victory of a Liberia well, Nigeria will be with that natural and other top players for their next game, however. As Cape Verde drew 11 with the Central African Republic is on the UK government's covid red list. It means that anyone entering such a country would need to quarantine for 10 days upon their return to their English Premier League club. The two time African champions Every coast were held to a goalless draw in Mozambique, sides kicking off their in Group D Cameroon had a decisive two nil win over Malawi. Also on Friday, Tunisia went top of Group B, They beat Equatorial Guinea three nil. Zambia defeated Mauritania and in the group G Open in South Africa were held nail nail in Zimbabwe, Ghana beat Ethiopia one

Colecchia Natural Nigeria Cape Verde Drew Leicester City English Premier League Club Liberia World Cup Central African Republic UK Mozambique Cameroon Malawi Tunisia Equatorial Guinea Zambia Mauritania South Africa Zimbabwe Ghana Ethiopia
Priya Parker on the Art of Gathering

Good Life Project

02:06 min | 6 months ago

Priya Parker on the Art of Gathering

"So my mother comes from originally banaras. Which is the sort of you know. One of the oldest cities in india and her father who actually would have turned one hundred today. Pass away about a few months ago. Her father worked for the indian government and so she and her four siblings traveled around india lot and when it was time for her to kind of get married she decided she didn't want to earliest not didn't want to have an arranged marriage and she can secretly applied to graduate school and the us and got into a few places and at least in that generation virginia versus iowa vs minnesota. You're sort of just you have no idea what is what and you just say yes and she ended up at iowa. State university begged her parents to let her go and they allowed her to. Was that unusual for sort of that moment. In time it was unusual that she was a woman so the us immigration laws changed in sixty eight and allowed for a changed from country and orc origin to family like unification and so it was after that that a lot of indians kind of came into the country and but the majority of the i kind of indian to come of those families particularly to graduate school. Were men so is very unusual for the first person to be a woman of a family and she went to iowa state and met my father who was born and raised in waterloo iowa. Though the family came from south dakota and a white american like in every way you look at his high school pictures and it looks like the kind of americana like prom picture but he had just recently come back from the peace corps. He peace corps and cameroon and then stayed an extra year and hitchhiked across the sahara and came back and didn't sort of in reverse culture shock and his teacher has professor at graduate. School or from undergrad said. Why don't you just come to graduate school with me and to kind of get over. Your culture shock volunteer at the international students office and i actually recently learned that culture. Shock originally meant when people came to their own country after having experience abroad so essentially mountain reverse culture shock but anyway

Iowa Banaras India Indian Government Peace Corps Minnesota State University Virginia United States Waterloo South Dakota Cameroon Sahara
Record 29 Million in the Sahel in Need of Humanitarian Assistance

BBC World Service

01:29 min | 7 months ago

Record 29 Million in the Sahel in Need of Humanitarian Assistance

"That almost 30 million people in this a hell are in urgent Need of assistance? Yes, that's a rise of five million in just one year. Suffering is driven in large passed by ongoing Islamist violence. The newsroom's Peter Coffin told me more The hell is this broad stretch of West and Central Africa just south of the Sahara Desert. This statement by the U. N and some international charities has specifically mentioned Burkina Fasso, Chad, Mali, Neige and parts of Cameroon and Nigeria, and it said there are now a record 29 million people across those six countries who need humanitarian aid. 14 million are living at crisis or emergency levels of food insecurity, and included in that are an estimated 1.6 million Children experiencing severe malnutrition. Now that's a hell already faces challenges to food production. It's a new, arid place. The Sahara is expanding. But as you mentioned, the U. N has said that violence is really driving the increase in hunger. We know that governments in the region have been battling Islamist militias for the past decade. There are parts of the region under militant control. Just last week, we reported the Chad's president died leading his army against one of these groups, and in the past 24 hours, we've learned that a pair of Spanish journalists and an Irish citizen were killed in Burkina Fasso. But the U. N says it's civilians who really bear the brunt of the fighting. You have those numbers

Peter Coffin Fasso Neige Sahara Desert Central Africa Burkina Chad Mali Cameroon U. Nigeria Sahara Army
The Cabinet Of Curiosities

Not Another Horror Podcast

04:10 min | 9 months ago

The Cabinet Of Curiosities

"Let's talk about dr eugene. Boyne de fall victim to mysterious. Infection was his death which in nineteen thirty two investigation but liberty magazine refers to as the strangest the most bizarre and the least no circus tragedy of this generation a result a supernatural revenge before his career as manager. The you bungee duck built savages star attraction and one of the most infamous kosher misguided. Have flat out. Racist circus sideshows in american history. The doctor was carving a place for himself in the history. Books of african exploration by the time he bought the social of tribespeople so america nineteen thirty key becoming much decorated explore having among other adventures served as naturalists on the nineteen twenty four nineteen twenty five black cruise one of two expeditions sponsored by francis citron company to prove that it was possible to cross africa by motorized vehicles of his you buggies. They were actually members of the sarah tribe in modern day. Chad the monica you bunker came from a ringling brothers and barnum and bailey combined. Our bbc circus spin-doctor female contingent practice lip extension stretching. Both there and laura lives over the years with increasing larger wooden disk former circus historical society president. Richard riddles rice at the explorer. I encountered the tribe in africa during the black cruise. What happened upon his particular group in paris at an ethnological show where he used to be their manager before leading them on a tour through the americas and the united states. You buggies were rb. Bbc sensation shown as part of the circuses. African village exhibit. Because you know. Human zoos were thing which visitors walked through in that concluded with lemons from an actor playing captain callaghan a brave and durable who survived being horribly tortured by aether rochas group of savages and the cameroons who were about to fling his ravaged body until steaming pot of boiling water. After a sadist bees had capitated his penis and testicles. Wow where relations. Between the doctor and his star soon grew sour they accused him of pocketing their salaries which i mean in all fairness he was doing and if you're is exchange in sudan attent witnesses say the doctor emerged badly shaken terrified even a few days later the explorer fledged chicago to sarasota. Florida reportedly fear for his life. Surely after arriving to sarasota on october thirteenth nineteen thirty. He died suddenly of mysterious causes in the end coroner's attributed his death to septic pneumonia possibly brought on by an infection from a pimple on his leg but witnesses who overheard the argument in chicago spread rumors that the sarah tries people who put a black magic curse on him. Ape reported quote from one of the u. buggies possibly generated by the circus spin. Doctor he don't die. We made him die ran. Newspapers and help to perpetuate the rumors of a curse. Liberty magazine describes the explores final moments as spent suffering and agony on his deathbed the victim of an unidentified curse the doctor knew he was doomed. And why but his lips remained sealed and they're in a buys a horrible and fantastic tale. Speaking dark tells and death have you ever heard of a doctor labeling the cause of death as fear. Well that is what happened to the twins. Chang and inc

Liberty Magazine Dr Eugene Francis Citron Circus Historical Society Richard Riddles Rice Boyne Captain Callaghan BBC Aether Rochas Ringling Brothers Africa United States Barnum Sarah Chad Monica Bailey Sarasota Laura Americas
The History (and Erasure) of Black Brewers

Kottke Ride Home

05:29 min | 9 months ago

The History (and Erasure) of Black Brewers

"Despite the overarching image of whiteness. When it comes to beer there is a vast history of black brewing culture. Which like so many things has been largely erased from the history books and cultural consciousness. James bennett the second dove into this for a recent peace in eater. He acknowledges the huge influences of german and irish culture in america but points out. That's not the only source when it comes to beer quoting eater. The ancestors of african americans. They were fermenters. They were really good at making their own liquor and making their own beers and also making wine from fruit says the culinary historian and writer. Michael w twitty one of our african 'isms in fact was producing all of these things and one of the reasons why we did. That was because it was related to our traditional spirituality libation twitty. Ads is the heart of african spiritual worship. He recounts seeing this firsthand on a trip to takhar village in cameroon. They pull out a big ceramic vessel full of their traditional beer. He says and even though a lot of takhar our muslim this is one of the traditional religious practices that they keep alongside islam. What beer-drinking may be nonexistent on friday. Would he notes. You better believe that at social functions to honor youth. Celebrate a marriage or the deceased in the ground. Alcohol is poured out and passed among the elders and quotes alcohol and in many cases. Beer was and is important. Spiritually and culturally to many different communities in africa throughout the ages as european colonizers began enslaving people and forcing them to work on their stolen land. The knowledge and skill sets of many enslaved black people surrounding bruin were exploited quoting again. The prevailing image of enslaved black person is that of someone laboring in the fields were being ordered around the big house but american slavery built in sustained a pretty much every aspect of this american life and that included beer again the west african societies. From which so many bodies were stolen. Were no stranger to the mechanisms of fermentation. We know that. Enslaved africans and african caribbeans were brewing beer or were cultivating hops or other grains. That would have been used in the brewing process. Says theresa mccullough of the smithsonian's national museum of american history. Black brewing skill was no secret. She adds advertisements for enslaved. People who were skilled. Brewers -absolutely wanted posters that identified fugitives as skilled brewers or otherwise involved in the brewing industry. As american as apple pie. Peter hemmings enslaved at monticello was a master brewer and quote but even if their expertise was being used to produce beer many black individuals who were free at the time. Weren't drinking much of it. Part of it was because temperance. Got rolled into the abolitionist movements. Most abolitionists were anti alcohol. Seen it as a toxic influence and a tool of the oppressor now. That's not to say that all temperance advocates were abolitionists. Far from it but most abolitionist were teetotalers. But there is also a practical angle. Bennett explains black. People were wary of being taken advantage of by white people while drunk and also simply didn't have the money or time for drinking while they were figuring out more important matters like getting an education job and securing semblance of safety in a dangerous climate then in the second half of the nineteenth century beer and cider went from being a smaller mostly at home type of operation to a profitable business largely. Thanks to the influence of german immigrants in america and of course now that it was profitable. Black brewers were shut out and being that beer was now more something to be purchased at an establishment like a saloon versus consumed at home. Black people were also often refused service. Then prohibition hits and when it was repealed with many federal regulations in place breweries were fearful of being shut down so they leaned hard into patriotic. Branding the kind of whitewashed stars and stripes apple pie type of america that is definitively white as been it says. Advertising has more to do with what we buy than most of us care to admit and by his accounts that adds up with the consumer trends that we saw throughout the second half of the twentieth century as white flight brought middle and upper middle class white people to the suburbs where they could host parties at home and had a bit of bigger budget a lot of them swapped beer for cocktails and thinking that they could get them back with a beer that had as high as cocktails beer. Companies tried to sell the white suburbanites on malt liquor but the attempt flopped most likely minutes opposes. Because it's something of an acquired taste so then a pivot happened quoting again. How did malt liquor go from garden. Party aspirated two boys in the hood levels of despair. The exact y. Is a matter of law but jane. Nicole jackson beckham diversity ambassador for the brewers association has a pretty good idea. The story i've been able to get is that there was some kind of persistent market research saying that. Urban audiences make more purchasing decisions based on. Abc and that urban audiences tend to buy for volume. She says the decision was made to market malt liquor not as an upscale product but a specifically urban products and to put it in a large vessel boom the forty and quotes

Takhar Michael W Twitty James Bennett Theresa Mccullough Smithsonian's National Museum Twitty Peter Hemmings America Cameroon Monticello Brewers Apple Africa Bennett Nicole Jackson Brewers Association Jane ABC
Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion  in international finance Impact

Science Magazine Podcast

11:48 min | 10 months ago

Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion in international finance Impact

"Now we have science writer. Rachel danske with an update on africa's great green wall project which will soon see an infusion of billions of dollars from the world bank and others this project. The great green wall is intended to serve as a bulwark against desertification of the land south of the sahara desert while at the same time supporting communities that live in this region. Okay rachel how're you doing. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me sure. This is a rape big wall. This is a big project. It's basically supposed to be this green band that spans about seven thousand kilometers across the whole hop of africa. It launched back in two thousand seven. Rachel what would you say. The progress has been since two thousand seven now to two thousand twenty one almost non-existent which is why they launched this new round of funding last month. There was an assessment that found that a fraction of the goal had been achieved so far and the goal is for twenty thirty so they realized that time was running out right throughout this piece. You make this really important distinction between planting a tree and growing a tree. Why is that so important to think about when you know thinking about restoring lands or planting trees to help prevent desertification. The first time. I heard it. I just thought well. That's a really good way to put it. And then when racer after another would phrase it that way that we don't plant trees we grow them because that's been one of the missing pieces in restoration. Efforts globally not even specific to the great green wall but just in restoration landscape and forest restoration. Generally there has been this focus on planting trees but little focus really on looking at what gets planted in the first place in paying attention to the species diversity in the planting material and making sure that it's the right tree for the right place. There's also last follow plus maintenance of the tree then there needs to be talked to someone in west africa who was saying that. He's traveled to so many countries throughout the continental. Seen so many trees planted. But where the forests. Yeah that's a really interesting way of thinking about it. Basically tree planting mania that's been happening has come from all these different projects foundations quotas. That are saying oh. It costs a dollar to put a tree in the ground and we're going to offset our carbon. We're going to green the world but no one's looking after these trees and making sure that they live beyond that for sheer gas so now that we know that. That's not a good way to go about this. There's actually a lot of research. That's found some of the best practices for restoration projects. What are some of the recommendations have come out from research. In the past ten years when paper published last year talked about ten golden rules for reforestation. And they think those summed up a lot of the recommendations really well in addition to just protecting existing forests which probably sounds obvious. But there's a lot of research on the new. I don't have the same benefits that existing ones do and it's hard to replace that beyond that involving local communities has been just incredibly important component that researchers are saying was not really part of the focus before because the restoration ecologists are focused on the physical research and they aren't trained to think about how people play into the picture and it's just so important to the survival of the trees because it's people who are planting trees and it's people who are maintaining the trees and if you don't have community by an investment in rye these trees there and interested keeping them there. The trees aren't going to last and the trees only have their benefits when they last going back to trees here for a minute you mentioned keeping old us in place for protecting them. What else is being looked at. So that's when using a diversity of species so that there can start to be restored. Biodiversity rather than just monoculture of trees. They're starting to be focused now. Also on the quality of the seeds. And what you're actually planting. And how do we build. The systems and infrastructure for collecting and improving. Seeds is going to be the most resilient seed for that species but then it's also about the genetic diversity because there can be inbreeding with plants. If you're not collecting from wide enough geographic area than you can start to sort of limit. The gene pool and that can be problematic. You talk about this example in ethiopia of a seat initiative a network that is supposed to improve the quality of seats. Can you talk about how that would work. And how it would involve the community. The provision of adequate trees deep portfolio or pets. Bo is a project in ethiopia that they're calling it a functional trees seed system. It's a multi-pronged effort. They're trying to develop standards for seed collection and sharing that. There's high quality seed that will ensure that the trees that are planted can be their most resilient they're developing maps for how to source those seeds they're trying to strengthen the research system the infrastructure and the the research system to improve seed quality and they're linking all of that to the people who will use the seeds seeds there's technical training for farmers and the local language and there are diagrams of how to store different types of seeds. They're really trying to get that knowledge to the community to farmers and local nurseries to scale up the capacity of local decentralized infrastructure. Is there another model project that people might be looking at to expand as the money comes in. Are there other areas. That are doing good things. Yeah there was one of their project that i came across the one billion trees for africa project. And it's led by this man from cameroon tabby jota. He talked about how he grew up in this thriving economy system and he went off to university and when he came back the lands that he new as a forest with no longer for us. He started planting marina cheese and cola nut trees and mingo trees and all these different trees that would restore some of the soil health that he thought had been lost but also produce food and income generating opportunities for people so that they would be invested in keeping the trees there. He called his approach. The contagion approach. Because it's just sort of caught on. He got a bunch of men and women in this one community to be involved in the tree planting the neighboring communities saw what was happening and he was very clear that it's not like a drastic change where their community sedley rich where they weren't before but the small benefits were noticeable and so the neighboring community wanted to do something similar. And so it's just been a word of mouth approach so as he developed this very grassroots success he's gotten funding from more international sources than use it to do the work on the ground in these different communities mostly in west africa. And he's starting to do more and more with the great great wall which seems very exciting so there are a couple of different findings that we talked about that suggests the way forward for this type of restoration project involving the community diversity of. They're planting making sure that they're not just putting stuff in the ground but they're actually supporting plant growth and the communities around it but another thing that comes up a lot in your story is now we kind of what should happen. Researchers have come to a lot of conclusions that are very useful. But then there's the practice what's actually happening on the ground and maybe even what will happen on the ground. What are some of the biggest impediments to implementing the results of this research. One interesting comment. That i heard was that the implementing partners people with the money don't have scientist on their teams. They don't realize how complicated it is to plant a tree into get it right and to make sure that grows the lack of knowledge in the right places and the lack of communication between the people with the money and the people with the knowledge and also the community who is going to be involved. Those conversations aren't being had something else that a here is the expectations that donors have. They want fast results. And that's not. How trees in general work. But it's especially not how effective restoration works because all of these things need to happen and they take time getting communities involved. There's a lot of upfront investment. That needs to happen. In developing all of this infrastructure and research systems with a lot faster to just go and say just plant a bunch of eucalyptus trees. Because that's what they have the seeds and planting materials for. There's a disconnect between the speed that donors want to see results and the reality of what needs to happen. I've seen that you've written about this project for years now. What do you think you're going to see if you check back in two years. I hope to see that things. Like the pats project and this other effort the one billion trees for africa a hope that they have scaled and and that they inspire or serve as models for other projects. I don't know where. I'm placing bets. It feels like there is enough of a resounding message coming from the research community about the importance of this and the importance for the effective ecosystem function restoration and the community development but also for the climate benefits and if the global fenders governments who want to plant trees for the climate benefits if they are serious than they will start listening to these researchers. This is like thousands of miles. Four thousand miles. That's like the us plus another third right east west a huge huge area to cover an across countries. And all these different people's. How is this. possible. Rachel i mean this is a global scale. This is a huge project. it's huge. It's huge and that's probably why it sounded like the great idea when they announced it. And why didn't go anywhere for ten years but it's the partner agencies that i've spoken with involved in this project. The great queen wall are really clear that it's an environmental program but it's also the social alliance when that's meant to economic development but also really impart some resilience. See into these communities. Who are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. That's why they're really ramping. Up this funding now because they see the value for the planet from a climate change perspective but also for the millions of people across this gigantic area. Pinks rachel thanks for having me. Sure rachel Danske is a science writer based in denver. You can find a link to story on the episode page for the podcasts. At science mag dot org slash podcast.

Rachel Danske Africa West Africa Sahara Desert Ethiopia Marina Cheese Rachel BO Cameroon Cola East West United States Pinks Rachel Denver
Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

Short Wave

09:56 min | 10 months ago

Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

"So lauren you sent me a picture of one of these century old title logbooks and it's so cool. It's really detailed. You can see where it says one. Am someone's written thirteen feet one fifteen. Am fourteen feet one inch in this. Really lovely old penmanship tracking tied. Did people really do this. Twenty four hours a day every day of the year they did. They had technology. That actually made it easier though In the late eighteen hundreds they developed an automatic system which had this float that rested on the surface of the water and then fed information to kind of a pen that recorded the movement so then people just had to read off the values and put them into the ledgers and this was done in other places to lake near hillary island. The port of liverpool also has a really long running title record. That makes sense because this was the era of ships rights. Watercraft was the way that people and things got around. Yeah exactly you had a lot of ships going in and out of port and so they were shipping companies. That had to keep track of the tide so it can be done safely two day. Some of those old records are archived at the permanent service for mean sea level which is an organization in the uk that gathers ocean data worldwide Andy matthews a data scientists. There told me the data are pretty reliable. You know most of the time. Those woman over on point is a little hand square school saying they. They sweet because the Tyja for was sick. You get little insights now with him. Everybody needs a sick day right. Of course andy says they're trying to organize a bigger effort to find these records. Because you know since kind of obscure they're hard to find yet but it can be anywhere these kind of things now in libraries from people that we all kaisei done coin. Doug well they are. Yeah this is quite the quest and an even bigger issue. I imagine is that when they find them. The data is still stuck on those pages. Yeah his colleagues scanned about sixteen thousand pages. But the numbers are on the page and they haven't been digitized so they're really not usable by scientists. They're trying to use computers to do it through character recognition. But i mean you saw that writing right. It's kind of like the script and the formats can be really hard to decipher so india's hoping that the public will help he recently put the images on zoom verse. A website and so volunteers can kind of in and and read the numbers. Type them up. I love this approach. I mean we're all bored at home looking for something to do this pandemic so why. Not some historical data as tree right. Yeah i mean data entry for a greater good seriously but to get into the nitty gritty of it. Why exactly is an important to look at data from the eighteen. Hundreds to understand sea level rise today an into the future right. What does that matter. Yeah right. I mean it has to do with how complex sea-level rise is because it's been caused by a number of different things. I mean i. You got glacier's melting temperatures causes them to shrink and that water runs off into the ocean and the same thing is happening in greenland and antarctica. Where there are these massive ice sheets on the land and there's so much is melting in gigi tons tapping increasingly fast. And i know that oceans are also rising because the water itself is warming up and hotter things expand so the water slick taking up more space. Yep you got it and actually. This is kind of cool. Sea level rise did slow down in the nineteen sixties and seventies because that was the era of dam building around the world. When you know when these big reservoirs were being constructed. They held back so much water. It was actually measurable. Ooh that is so strange and it really shows how we humans do impact the oceans. That's like a tangible detail of how quickly we can do that. It's a huge scale. But it's not really a factor anymore because you know dams aren't really being built at the same rate these days got it. Yeah anyway since one thousand nine hundred there's been about eight inches of sea level rise and by the end of this century. We couldn't be looking at three to six feet of sea level rise or even higher depending on how much carbon humans emits but. that's globally. The water is rising at a different pace depending on where you are. Yeah how exactly does that work. Because wouldn't the phil evenly kind of like when you fill a bathtub. And here's where it gets a little weird. The earth is slowly changing slowly getting a different shape lake. You know when you've been sitting on the couch while and you kind of get up and the cushion rebounds like morphs back into its old shape. Yeah not all couches but sure theoretically Well okay that same thing happens to the earth's crust During the last ice age Kind of started waning. Eleven thousand years ago. There was a lot of ice on canada and greenland super heavy and was pushing down the earth's crust since that melted the crust has been slowly rebounding. And that's actually not good for the east coast especially around the mid atlantic region. Because you know it's on the same tectonic plates as canada and greenland and when one side goes up. The other side goes down So what you're saying is where i live on. The east coast is on the lower end of the see-saw basically your thinking about that slowly. I mean the east coast is seen more sea level rise than other parts of the country. And then there's a whole bunch of other things that can cause that to you. Know ocean currencies big things that span hundreds of miles in the ocean. They cost the water on one side of them to be higher on the other side. You know so. Because of currents and gravity the oceans themselves are just kind of lumpy which is why sea level rises different everywhere. I am learning so much right now. You're basically saying is that sea level rise is local essentially and if cities want a plan for this and figure out what an who is at risk they'll need tailor-made information for their location. Yeah that's where these historical records come in. You know they reveal what these geologic processes and ocean conditions are doing in each place right right and i signed us refine their computer models. Which are those high powered ways that we get forecast about climate change. I spoke to scientists. Tomas friedrich's at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory about this and he said local records really matter. If we don't have that information for these see to be like a few feet off the local records of sea level so especially when we try to projects like high water levels of like extremes sea levels that's how we call them It's very difficult to to get an accurate picture of that but there is a big issue with a historical records. They already have almost all of the ones that have been digitized. Come from europe and north america So what you're saying is we gotta find more places. More hillary islands so to speak with historical sea level data all around the world. Yeah and this is a problem across many kinds of climate data. actually the southern hemisphere hasn't been covered as well with things like whether stations and other kind of data collection historically So there's just this big effort to find these historical records outside of europe and the us in argentina. They're working to digitize records from nineteen o five that were taken at the port of raise But to go back farther in some countries it means looking at the records of former colonial powers that took control because when countries like the uk and germany and france extracted. Huge amount of resources from colonies often through force. They did it largely through shipping colonialism stealing and keeping a record of it yeah pretty much so right now in france the national hydrographic service is digitizing these title records from dozens of their former colonies from madagascar vietnam Some of those records though aren't as long running you know they were gathered. As part of geographic mapping or you know to study an area where they were putting in port project. But i spoke to one person who is working with the french to stitch together a longer running record dating back through his country's colonial history marbella unika for seafood unique is from cameroon and he's a phd student in france right. Now he started in german archives. Because that was the colonial power in the late. Eighteen hundreds until france took control so he's gathered the french records as well and then he the cameroon records after it became independent in nineteen sixty. Yeah that's really interesting. Project and just a clear example of how the legacy of colonialism continues to impact science today. Yeah yeah i mean. It's digging through. His legacy is how he's kind of finding these records And there's really only one other long-term record in africa and that's from the car senegal so he knows cameroon could be crucial for improving global climate models But it could also be really helpful for cameroon itself. Nieto's just told me that. The country's largest city douala right on the atlantic coast and estuary and it's extremely vulnerable to flooding already. I'm just last year. There was a huge flood that displays thousands after really heavy rains. So when you add sea level rise to that it just makes the flooding issue worse. So he's hopeful that the historical records he's finding will lead to more detailed forecasts about just how fast the ocean is rising there because twala like other cities needs to start preparing now communities need to decide whether to move out of the way or build some kind of protection and

Hillary Island Permanent Service For Mean Sea Andy Matthews Greenland East Coast Lauren Liverpool Tomas Friedrich Doug Antarctica Andy UK Mid Atlantic Canada India
Central African Republic: Surge in violence and displacement

UN News

01:21 min | 10 months ago

Central African Republic: Surge in violence and displacement

"And insecurity in the central african republic or see a are linked to recent nationwide elections have forced more than two hundred thousand people from their homes under two months. Unhcr the un refugee agency also warned that tens of thousands of face dire living conditions. The democratic republic of the congo has taken in tens of thousands of refugees while more than thirteen thousand have reached. Cameroon chad and the republic of congo said unhcr spokesperson. Boris chesnokov we say these reports and estimates coming from local authorities that already ninety two thousand refugees are present inside. drc and they're scattered across forty localities. These are hard to reach remote areas and it's difficult to get assistance already. Scaling up disappoint but we need to mobilize more resources and more funds and this is exactly what we're calling for. May strategies are struggling in basic shelters located close to rivers where they face acute food shortages. Mr chesty cough said he added that they are dependent on catching fish. And what locals can spare. Unfortunately the host communities in these remote areas have extremely limited resources. The unhcr official added one hundred thousand people remain internally displaced inside c. a. r. and unhcr said that the continuing unstable situation has hampered the humanitarian response with the main supply road also forced shot

African Republic Unhcr DRC Republic Of Congo Boris Chesnokov Cameroon UN Chad Mr Chesty Cough
Tennis Player to Watch: Evan Furness

The Mini-Break

03:14 min | 10 months ago

Tennis Player to Watch: Evan Furness

"Guy. I want to talk about today. Who i think has been if not the best player one of the five best players at the it level since the start of the twenty twenty season. And that's evan furnace who you look at his career trajectory for those of you. Who don't know about edmund furnace furnace twenty two years old going to turn twenty three in the frenchman had a career high in the junior rankings of number thirty six so again. That's not gonna blow you out of the water right. Furnace was in this junior slam champion. Who much was expected of. Yeah he made a third round of junior wimbledon in twenty sixteen lost his devan. ac- pass. Yeah he made you know play. A bunch of the junior slammed had good enough results to become a top fifty junior in the world. But how many top fifty. Former top fifty. Juniors in the world have never heard of pro circuit. The answer is quite a few and you know for furnace. It was steady linear progression. You look at you know. He played his first pro tour match all the way back in two thousand fourteen when he was you know a i think sixteen or fifteen or sixteen years old played. One match. Didn't win it. You know you start to look at as he went through the years in two thousand fifteen he was able to play twenty matt or twenty one matches when eleven and ten. That's he's in twenty sixteen. He goes sixteen and thirteen. You know so again. steady progression. His first full season as twenty seventeen. He goes forty two and twenty eight in pro events during that season now he did not believe make any pro finals at twenty seventeen season but pretty quickly found himself making the jump off to To playing a full time to schedule you look at what he was able to accomplish. A four evan furnished during his first few seasons twenty eighteen he makes his first two It finals he bought ends up winning in portugal. Next up david gaz in cameroon. In the end of november he ends up losing two skandal mansuri than hong kong. He ends up knocking off. Julian lens makes another final during the twenty thousand nine hundred season although it is safe to say twenty nineteen you look at the results. Furnish was able to put together. That season You know relatively unsuccessful compared to previous years human thirty three and twenty nine during that twenty nine nine season now during that twenty nineteen season. I believe he also played his largest amount of challenge matches and challenger level events. He really struggled during one thousand nine hundred eighty play you know. You look in his career in his cert- currently six thousand nine hundred nine in challenger events during the course of his career during that twenty nine th season he played i wanna say ten challenger matches and i believe he went to in two hundred eight in those ten challenger matches so that's why his record fell a little bit. He started to try to make the jump at the end of twenty nineteen but then in twenty twenty in the midst of a pandemic given it was very difficult to find playing opportunities. And if you were in the vomit zone three hundred five hundred which normally you probably get into challenge qualities given the limited playing opportunities. You're lucky to find futures events to play last year. That's what a furnace had to spend a lot of time doing and guess what that is. Where evan furnished thrived. You look at what he has done. Since the start of the twenty twenties

Evan Furnace Edmund Furnace David Gaz Julian Lens Evan Cameroon Matt Portugal Hong Kong
Hindou Ibrahim, President of the Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad

Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Hindou Ibrahim, President of the Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad

"Welcome to come home conversations. Today we are joined by. Hindu abraham founder and president of the association for indigenous women in people's of chad hindu is also the co chair the international indigenous peoples forum on climate change and a un sdg advocate. Thank you for joining us today. It's a pleasure. Thanks for reminding me you have been a steadfast champion for human rights and sustainable development. What was the inspiration behind your lifelong dedication to bettering our planet. Yeah i mean. I'm so excited to championing a sustainable development god's because for me the app talking about our life so when we take from the objective one who is the fighting poverty or to the five with the gender or not with climate change. And now the seventeen of them to take patents. She dead talking about how we can improve our life how we can improve our society and how we can make it better than now by respecting people's in climate so for me. It is obvious because roma the communities that i come from we always all the problems and all the crises to get north resort on them. So that's why. I am so excited to championing the sustainable development goals for my peoples in for all indigenous peoples in the end of the day for the planet in gender so we're seeing how climate change is impacting every corner of our planet in many ways. Can you share with us. How climate change is affecting your country and your region so i am coming from saharan regions in coming from chad. Who have a different landscape. Are we have hundred percent visiting the nov and now we have savannah in suheil in the middle and then we have the tropical. Ford is the busy in this hour. So when you need three different In a land lock in when your life is the pump from the ecosystem. You not exactly the impact of the climate change. You do not need in the book or watching. Tv you levi. And now i give example of how we add really impacted an we get any central michigan dishes from ninety nine now check is already on last one point five degree increase and why we see that every day our dry season become much longer. We've evenki very long san in heavy son. That's coming up to fifty degrees celsius when you go through the death at its bauer fifty four degrees celsius in that impact our environment in impact therein therein. Season also check. It's become much shorter. Incoming the higgin construct all the places for example this year where we have all this ahead on the floor you even. In the towns people take the can we go from one neighborhood to another one and sought months before it was the heat in very dry heat. Swear the caps can grow up in an end back with the food insecurity because when you don a half Lateran is cannot penetrate win. It's cannot leave the vegetation who genetic and that impact the food insecure of the and at the end of the day. the letter might impact. It's good shank the social life of peoples. It's create conflict among the communique that fighting to get access to and one of the example. I add you add on the chat. Nature is the wider that we do have at our lake in nineteen sixty. It was twenty five thousand kilometers square. These freshwater chatted check. Cameroon nigeria nigeria Probably and known delek shouldn't came to two thousand clinically squirrel freshwater. So you have ninety percent of the wider Because of the heat in seven league that is more than fifty million people who needing depending from his Them that farmers that fishermen end postulates homemade micro-mini so web does people have to do because they done depend from the end of the month salaries from the rent for the fund from the ecosystem of this area of me so yesterday fight amer get access to resources some of

Hindu Abraham Association For Indigenous Wom International Indigenous Peopl Suheil Saharan UN Chad Ford Michigan Delek Nigeria Cameroon Amer
Atlanta - ICE Almost Deported Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

Morning Edition

03:48 min | 1 year ago

Atlanta - ICE Almost Deported Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

"Week from immigrant women who say they were subjected to unwanted medical procedures while detained at an immigration and customs enforcement facility in Georgia. Some women say they underwent his direct Amis or other surgeries that left them sterile. Members of Congress are demanding a quick investigation and in one case, lawmakers say ice has already tried to deport a key witness. NPR's Joel Rose has more Pauline Benham was nearly deported. Yesterday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement put her on a plane back to Cameroon, a country she left when she was two years old. She was on the tarmac when members of Congress say they intervened. It felt like ice was trying to rush through her deportation. I can't say that for certain, but all of this is extremely troubling. Representative Pramila Gioia Paul is a Democrat from Washington State and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. She wants been in the U. S so that you can tell her story to investigators. Venom is one of a growing number of immigrant women who say they were subjected to gynecological procedures without consent. While they were held at the Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia. The first allegations came to light in a whistle blower complaint this week from a nurse at the facility. Since then, lawyers for other women have come forward with similar allegations. Jaipal says the total is now at least 17. This feels particularly agree just because it is obviously Invasive reproductive surgery. And so for every woman in particular across America, this sends chills up our spine. More than 170. Members of Congress have signed a letter calling for an investigation by the homeland Security inspector general. Ice confirmed that Pauline Venom is still in the country and denied any link between her allegations and her scheduled deportation. Spokesman says she was pulled off the plane because of a paperwork snafu with the Cameroonian government, not because of congressional intervention. In a statement. I says that all female detainees received routine gynecological care, and that quote a medical procedure like a hysterectomy would never be performed unquote without informed consent. Bingham's lawyer says Otherwise. When she woke up from the surgery, the doctor informed her that a portion of her fallopian tube was removed. One win is Bingham's lawyer at the nonprofit Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights. She says, been, um, sought treatment for in irregular menstrual cycle and thought she was getting a routine procedure. Of course. Pauline was very upset and sort of appalled that this had happened without her consent. Win says the long term medical implications are not clear, but the procedure could prevent been him from conceiving a child detention itself takes so much away. I'm a person's life and then for her to have gone through this experience while she was an immigration detention, just rob sir of so much more than her time, wind says been, um complained to the staff at the detention center, but those complaints went nowhere. Irwin is operated by a for profit company LaSalle Corrections, which did not respond to a request for comment. Elizabeth Meth urn is a lawyer who has represented immigrants held at Erwin and other detention centers in Georgia, she says complaints about medical care often fall on deaf ears. They consistently Ignore complaints they consistently act like any complaint is just histrionics. It's ripe for exploitation, right because there's not proper oversight. There's not A proper like Level of humanity. Katherine says lawyers have been raising concerns about medical conditions for years. They're relieved that the public is finally paying attention, even if it took shocking allegations like these to make it happen. Joel Rose.

Pauline Benham Georgia Congress Bingham Irwin County Detention Center WIN Joel Rose Immigration And Customs Enforc ICE Amis Pramila Gioia Paul Pauline Venom Pauline NPR Cameroon Georgia Latino Alliance For Hu Cameroonian Government Homeland Security Representative
ICE Just Tried to Deport Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

Morning Edition

03:49 min | 1 year ago

ICE Just Tried to Deport Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

"Have come to light this week from immigrant women who say they were subjected to unwanted medical procedures while detained at an immigration and customs enforcement facility in Georgia. Some women say they underwent his direct Amis or other surgeries that left them sterile. Members of Congress are demanding a quick investigation and in one case, lawmakers say ice has already tried to deport a key witness. NPR's Joel Rose has more Pauline Venom was nearly deported. Yesterday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement put her on a plane back to Cameroon country she left when she was two years old. She was on the tarmac when members of Congress say they intervened. It felt like ice was trying to rush through her deportation. I can't say that for certain, but all of this is extremely troubling. Representative Pramila Gioia Paul is a Democrat from Washington State and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. She wants been in the U. S so that you can tell her story to investigators. Venom is one of a growing number of immigrant women who say they were subjected to gynecological procedures without consent while they were held at the Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia. The first allegations came to light in a whistle blower complaint this week from a nurse at the facility. Since then, lawyers for other women have come forward with similar allegations, Jaipal says the total is now at least 17. This feels particularly agree just because it is obviously Invasive reproductive surgery, and so far every woman in particular across America, this sends chills up our spine. More than 170. Members of Congress have signed a letter calling for an investigation by the Homeland Security inspector general. Ice confirmed that Pauline Venom is still in the country and denied any link between her allegations and her scheduled deportation. Spokesman says she was pulled off the plane because of a paperwork snafu with the Cameroonian government, not because of congressional intervention. In a statement. I says that all female detainees received routine gynecological care and that quote a medical procedure like a history. Ectomy would never be performed unquote without informed consent. The venoms lawyer says Otherwise. When she woke up from the surgery, the doctor informed her that a portion of her fallopian tube was removed. One win is Bingham's lawyer at the nonprofit Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights, she says been, um sought treatment for in irregular menstrual cycle and thought she was getting a routine procedure. Of course, Pauline was very upset and sort of appalled that this had happened without her consent. Wind says the long term medical implications are not clear. But the procedure could prevent venom from conceiving a child detention itself takes so much away from a person's life. And then for her to have gone through this experience while she was an immigration detention. Just rob serve so much more than her time, Wind says Been, UM complained to the staff at the detention center, but those complaints went nowhere. Irwin is operated by a for profit company LaSalle Corrections, which did not respond to a request for comment. Elizabeth Meth urn is a lawyer who has represented immigrants held at Erwin and other detention centers in Georgia, she says complaints about medical care often fall on deaf ears. They consistently Ignore complaints they consistently act like any complaint is just histrionics. It's ripe for exploitation, right because there's not proper oversight. There's not A proper like Level of humanity. Katherine says lawyers have been raising concerns about medical conditions for years. They're relieved that the public is finally paying attention, even if it took shocking allegations like these to make it happen. Joel Rose. NPR news

Pauline Venom Georgia Congress Joel Rose Irwin County Detention Center Immigration And Customs Enforc ICE Wind Amis NPR Georgia Latino Alliance For Hu Pramila Gioia Paul Cameroon Cameroonian Government Homeland Security Representative America Jaipal
Yannick Noah Interview

The Tennis Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

Yannick Noah Interview

"We've had a week off and. Has Gone to get his haircuts. Catherine's been hanging out with Magnus. The dog I've been stressing about my football team west from job in as they try to throw promotion away. That may or may not mean something to you, and we will be back with tennis podcasts over the coming weeks and months altogether chat in as we normally do, but today we have a very very special interview with the French Open champion of nineteen eighty-three, the world's number three as his highest ranking, but that really doesn't tell the story of Yannick who is unquestionably the coolest man I have ever met Davis Cup winning captain. Three Times Fed Cup winning captain as well and had a hugely successful music career. Once his tennis stays had come to an end I had the chance to meet him just over twenty years ago when he joined the champions tour. Tour retired players who just traveled to will played matches against one another him and John McEnroe and beyond bog, and all these greats of the game, and just got to know him a little bit at that time. He was always suggest to me. I haven't seen him for about ten years, but I managed to get in contact with him through a couple of other people when we were researching and trying to set up interviews full at tennis, relived series, particularly the French Open, so that we could tell that story, and you'll have heard an excerpt perhaps of this interview when we covered his run to that nineteen, eighty three French Open title, but the entire interview. It's just joy, and it will improve your mood, and if you do enjoy the into you tell your friends family, let your social media, and what's that group's now about it because it will just leave them happier than when they started listening to. It has Yannick Noah. I'd like to go right back to the beginning of your of your career, and even before your career and the reason for your career and. I believe a meeting with Arthur Ashe. Yep Absolutely. Our used to leave the group in Cameroon, Africa and We were I was playing detail club tennis was. Not, very, big in Cameroon in the whole country, back nine court, so to play tennis was very privilege radio privilege so. so we used to go to the club at night, but at that time my parents couldn't afford a racket in one day. When I heard that? Some Americans were coming to the club saw. Americans you know so. So Marty Riessen Charlie Pasarell, Tom, ochre, and Arthur Ashe where doing tour in Africa. And they happen to play one day my club. During the clinic they decide. They played with the kids. And I played with Sir and Liked what he saw. I was slim press. You know he was my heroes. At the end of the clinic gave me a racket is racket. Head competition that worth like. Probably Probably what my parents would making every month. and it was you know it was like a dream for me to meeting. Dr Racket Sonya poster. Saying To Yannick I hope I'll see one that. So that was very funny. But the next thing that happened is after this story went to the French Open and he talked to shut. It was the president of the Federation. I told him that he was a little kid was playing. Or was in French. Speaking. Country and And I I. The scholarship came to friends because of author I played in niece for few years. And? The first time I played in Wimbledon That was nine years after we met was in Wimbledon because as for wild card. That was accepted and we play doubles on center court. So that was a beautiful story, so yes, the so mean Africa. And he was a big part of my story. Because and after that you know. For some reason, he was always like you know. Not Too far helping me when I was younger growing up, and then you know played with him at Wimbledon, the first tournament. Back in the days. It was called Super Seris. I was playing Richmond Virginia where he was born. And that was the first tournament I one. Super Series and As I was you know going through the tournament semifinal quarterfinals? Semifinals Playing Roscoe Tanner and these gentlemen comes into locker room sold demand. It comes. It goes Yanic if you win. Arthur is coming tomorrow SEO really worrisome. Is Dad. So that was that was something I beat Roscoe and An author flew to Richmond I played Yvonne in the finals. Won The won. It and Arthur gave me the cup in his hometown, so that was really special.

Arthur Ashe Yannick Noah Tennis Africa Dr Racket Sonya John Mcenroe Cameroon Roscoe Tanner Catherine Football Richmond Davis Marty Riessen Charlie Pasarell Richmond Virginia President Trump Yvonne TOM
Computer Vision for Remote AR with Flora Tasse

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Computer Vision for Remote AR with Flora Tasse

"Art Everyone. I'm here with flora. TASSEZ flora is head of computer, vision and AI research at stream accompany that she joined through the acquisition of another company which she co founded Salerio. Flora welcome to the trauma. Is podcasts Jake you sound sufficient to the thanks for the right Lahser to have you on the show and I'm really looking forward to digging into your recent CV, PR, presentation you did a keynote at the a are VR workshop. I was to see that. There is enough happening at the intersection of AR, VR and machine learnings A workshop at CPR on that topic. Don's happening. This is happening. That's face. Sabatini could smoke shop. Yeah, well, you can tell us all about that, but before you do please share a little bit about your background and how you got started and computer vision how you came to found scenario. Stream love to hear all of it. That's like that. That would be a long story, but I'll try to shut down. So I was born in raise in Cameroon, so Cameroon is in this central is in central Africa and what we saw in the city of Wella, and so I was raised in day. Fred, picking politic country, so you might notice that for my accent. Some French in the and. Yeah so from a very early age, I was very much into special effects in movies and more precisely, Jurassic Park so I was a big fan of the of the movies because of the Daniels. Our seed that disclosed TV steering into dinosaurs and wondering. How can it be like? Why is it so real and I? Asked my dad like. How can they make these extinct creatures look so stick, and then he said Graphics Sack Okay Yeah? That's what I'm GONNA do. That's. My perfect dream you know making the impossible become possible. So fast forward. A few years I did my bachelor mats in the English, speaking parts had to learn English English and then move and did Matt's because I couldn't. They had no causing computer science, so then move out of the country to Africa where I did a master in in Cape Town. In South Africa. Yup was amazing. I recommend. Is a great vacations. And I did my Masters Dad then came to Cambridge for my PhD okay, so twenty twelve arrive in the UK already to make my dreams come true. And so those if needed I a good experience so at. Cambridge I was working at. Had you take a real things in images and turn them into treat content, so I was doing some shape retriever ship analysis from images, and you have to image, and you want to turn into a three D. Shape exactly yeah, that's exactly what I was doing. So far yes, or Trinity Half Years I stumbled upon like a great discovery that if you actually incorporate. And then P. So, if you incorporate language information, you can basically get really really accurate results going from twenty two treaty, and so the addition of that. Yeah so. So, the concept was developed and just looking at images as just. Pixel that you can enter into some features and use calcification on them. Was a concept that those features can actually be semantic features so there's some semantic meaning attached to those descriptors that you are. Thank generating.

Africa Lahser Cambridge Cameroon Jurassic Park South Africa Salerio CPR Sabatini DON Fred Cape Town Wella Matt Daniels UK
"cameroon" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"cameroon" Discussed on WSB-AM

"And lake nyos our sister likes both are formed in the crater is a dormant volcanoes and both are incredibly deep and cold with steep sides there's a ring of the rock of the cold area that keeps up the service the lake from being perturbed by winds and so the water is very still and that allows for the lake to become stratified so that there was no intermixing between the sun warmed waters at the surface of the lake and the cold waters and the deep and this in and of itself is not an uncommon occurrence in land locked lakes let's French scientists soon discovered that the lakes of Cameroon are hiding something else there are magma chambers underneath these dormant volcanoes that art in fact one hundred percent dormant they released a slow trickle of carbon dioxide and to a lesser extent carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide into the depths of the lake and if it had bubbled on up through the water and out through the surface and dispersed into the atmosphere I would not have posed a problem but the bottom of these lakes are so deep and the water is under such enormous pressure and it's so cold that is the gas comes out of the magma chamber it dissolves into solution so that the bottom of the lake becomes in a sense carbonated and the pressure had been building for years if not centuries since nineteen eighty four something caused a portion of the dissolved carbon dioxide to come out of that solution it's like shaking a coke can and popping the top if your coke can was the size of a mountain the chain reaction of.

Cameroon lake nyos
Euro 2020 Championship postponed to 2021 over coronavirus crisis

BBC World Service

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Euro 2020 Championship postponed to 2021 over coronavirus crisis

"Yesterday European football's governing body UEFA did indeed as widely trial decide to postpone your I. twenty twenty two euro twenty twenty one and the confederation of African football is put back next month's African nations championship for locally based players at the request of the organizes Cameroon elsewhere Sierra Leone is called a whole pool sporting activities with immediate effect I don't actually have a case of coronavirus registered in the country just

Uefa Football Cameroon Sierra Leone
"cameroon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"cameroon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was no campaigning in Cameroon's English speaking regions the east coast of Australia which has been dealing with dozens of bush pause now faces potentially life threatening flash floods as heavy rainfall continued for a third day the don polls have provided relief to fire ravaged areas extinguishing about a third of the blazes in the state Phil Mercer is uncertainty Australia is the land of extremes some towns have gone from drought to flooding that day as heavy rain has fallen in New South Wales in parts of Queensland's a huge bush five south of Sydney that burned for more than two months and destroyed three hundred homes has finally being put down by the down pulls some drought hit farmers in eastern Australia have had that best rainfall in it decades conditions along the coast of being wild with reports of waves up to eight meters high love Switzerland are voting today in a referendum on whether to make discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and identity punishable by a little if approved the new law would widen existing legislation BBC world news it's six minutes bus seven G. M. T. welcome to weekend from the BBC world service with me Judy market two guests with me throughout the program last you can book London correspondent for the Sydney morning Herald and doctor HA Halle school over on politics religion and security studies in the west and the Arab world.

Cameroon Australia Phil Mercer New South Wales Queensland Sydney Switzerland G. M. T. Sydney morning Herald HA Halle school bush BBC London
Visiting the Atlantis Dive Resort in Dumaguete

Scuba Shack Radio

05:00 min | 2 years ago

Visiting the Atlantis Dive Resort in Dumaguete

"Today your next dive. I'm GONNA take you to the Atlanta's dive resort in Douma Getty first of all. You'll fly into Manila from the US and it's a long flight for for example direct from JFK. You can fly to Manila overnight and there are a lot of options from various points in the US in the West Coast. Once you get get to Manila. You'll be transferred by the Atlanta's organization to a flight to do Magadan on an airline called Seibu Pacific as I mentioned. It's just the short one hour flight in the morning. Once you get to do a getty the attendance will pick up your bags from the baggage claim and load them on a van. Where you'll it'll take about a thirty to forty minutes Ride to the resort which is down which is just outside the Duma getty city. You'll get to the resort. It's a little short Dirt road down to the resort. Not Very Long. But it's interesting flows through to the resort. And once you get there you walk completely. Threw the resort to the front desk area. Where you'll check in immediately when we got to the place it made us feel at home? We got there at a later in the day. We were there at dinner and we all sat down to dinner and while we were waiting for dinner. They gave us a quick neck massage. While we were getting manning served so pretty interesting the rooms. We were very very impressed with the room. They're really nice. They can have either a king size bed. Ed or double beds Our Room had a nice couch in it. It was a desk spacious so we could lay out all of our stuff. Also Our Room had double sinks in the bathroom very very nice room. The rooms also had a deck associated winning which are sheltered and they had a ceiling fan on top of the deck. A nice place to dry your bathing suits out or some gear. Plus there was a lounge chair out on the on the deck area. Now I did notice that some of the decks also had hammocks on them. Let's talk about the food to Tokyo. Restaurant is outstanding. You will get three meals a day their breakfast which is all car. You can get a Omelettes waffles. French toast If you're going there eggs benedict are pretty good The one that I really liked where the chocolate banana French toast luncheon dinner. There's a menu board and you can get a super salad. There's up to four entrees on their things like chicken beef fish noodle stir FRY PASTA ASTA and then two desserts this talk about diving. Wow it was outstanding you take aac either. A small motor launch or sometimes there's a larger Bach abode. Noser like with the outriggers on it few on the bottom boat. They're very spacious. Die Sites sites are very close. One to ten minutes away and you can get either muck diving or muck and ref- or just just just reef and we were very very amazed at the colors the fish life the biodiversity. It really seems like it's on steroids. Loyd's compared to the Caribbean. There was not a lot of depth there we usually stayed in the sixty foot range and every dive was sixty minutes. It's or more visibility. Came in at about eighty feet. Also we did a trip to Otto island which is about a forty forty five to fifty minute boat ride where we did three dives. The coral on Apo island was fabulous. I think they say there's over six hundred species of quarrel in six hundred and fifty species of marine life on UPO island. Another thing that we did was your trip over to Seibu. Two Oz. Lob Job where we snorkeled with will sharks now the dive locker is pretty spacious. You get a little cubby for your certain in gear. There are showers into dive locker. Rinse tanks and an area for nighthawks analysis and recording. Debriefing area is Outside and you go through a brief between each dive at what you do you come back between dives to shore change out your tanks get briefed and go forward Lord. There's a Cameroon a classroom. And there's an on site SPA and pool if you don't WanNa take die a take a day off a diving you can do other tours. There's a city tour where you can go out and do some shopping you can get up to five dives a day. Atlantis dive resort. We were so impressed that we are planning to go back in two thousand twenty one with the shop trip

Manila Duma Getty City Douma Getty United States Atlanta Magadan Seibu Pacific Cameroon JFK Apo Island West Coast Otto Island Upo Island Manning ED Tokyo Seibu Loyd Caribbean
Seeking asylum Is Tough In Trump's America—And Even Tougher In Japan

Morning Edition

04:04 min | 2 years ago

Seeking asylum Is Tough In Trump's America—And Even Tougher In Japan

"When refugees flee their homeland there's family separation there's also physical and psychological trauma and there's the challenge of assimilation that's true whether the immigrant ends up in New York City or Tokyo this week W. N. Y. C.'s Matt Katz is bringing us stories from a global refugee crisis in his series called unsettled and he's focusing on a country we don't hear much about when it comes to refugees Japan today we need a couple of newly arrived immigrants from Cameroon and Tunisia were broadening the idea of what it means to be Japanese I met a lot of new immigrants to Japan and inevitably we all got around to talking about the same thing the wireless is something else public bathrooms in Japan are super clean welcoming and high tech exceed the and forget myself and I'm just comfortable taking on lifetime hindering him leasing rose recently fled a civil war in her country of Cameroon in central Africa and she's now making a long shot attempts at winning asylum in Japan which is notoriously resistant to immigration she only ended up here because she happened to secure a Japanese visa Japan a country she knew almost nothing about was our fastest way to safety she's been here almost a year now and she's whole areas actually my countrymen if you have to use the public toilet does the worst thing that can happen to you despite our laughter rose has plenty of worries about her nineteen year old son who seeking asylum in Minnesota about the police beating back home in Cameroon that left her with a scar and lingering head injury rose didn't want us to use her real name because her family is still in danger and still talking about the simple joy of using Japanese toilets the excitement of something new that brings welcome solace to cope any where you find yourself you free enough to do a lot of adjustments most of the refugees if not or that I've made I just Japan doesn't welcome immigrants in part because keeping foreigners away he keeps Japan unique strict rules govern life right down to the sorting of trash the thinking is that people just can't come and learn how to be Japanese but as migrants seeking safety or living wage increasingly moved to Japan they're challenging that idea and I don't mean that he'd built Correa from Tunisia she's applying for refugee status in Japan because she says back home she faced discrimination for being gay you know you've only been here a few weeks but do you think like if you were to live here for a long time that you could become Japanese or do you feel like you've always got to be an outsider for me I think I can be one hundred percent believe me because this country if you like connected with long time ago it's not new unlike rose that he knew a lot about Japan before she got here she's a huge fan of anime specially it's music Japanese Sir maybe they do this like rose now he will have a tough time convincing Japan to let her stay of the thousands of immigrants just a few dozen get refugee status each year but in the meantime she's allowed to live freely while her application is reviewed no heed adores Japan she likes how they don't throw their trash on the street that trains run on time that religious people don't push their views on to others she sees Japan as a refuge but for the like minded she chose Japan she didn't randomly end up here like many refugees which she knows it'll be hard to win legal status I'm okay with that when a country's tried to protect freedom and protect its values and its tradition

One Hundred Percent Nineteen Year
"cameroon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is Newsday it's ten minutes to the the Cameroon government to shut down more than two hundred and sixty schools has been operating informally in the country's francophone regions the schools and being open to help absorb students fleeing the separatist uprising in Cameroon's English speaking regions the BBC's Gillian and gotta travels to the economic capital dawala were about a hundred unregistered institutions have been closed people's on the walk to school in a suburb of the one but these are not local children there amongst thousands what flavor to the fighting incomers English speaking regions and they have been for memories because there was no one there was getting people's she's gone he prehistorian environment at the close of classes and it's only a in school bullet falling as until Z. gun show up anywhere dies will finally say because you can also then by may have a glass of going shows even though the physical deceive finding is cool is not so easy love come on John it is eleven on this is the second he's attended since his parents brought him to do a his mother Karen condemned towards me how desperate she's being of a hot sauce integration all came in that's cool that was broken this is not a school house more organization so we had to my knees again you see yeah those to feed them the stress off his will is the fourth but this second school he's also operating illegally it's one of many tough opens to accommodate the influx of English speaking learn those displaced from the northwest all I'm blocked a shot with one of them arriving as the children marched to the national on to not declined to to speak to us he fears being shut down because he didn't have the legal documents to operate critics of the government say it is not offering and alternatives for the children when they're cracked.

Cameroon government Cameroon BBC Gillian John Karen ten minutes
"cameroon" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Alright bill on yesterday's show we discuss the feud between forty Niners cornerback Richard Sherman and Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield following Monday's dominating performance by San Francisco Sherman said that may feel didn't shake his hand prior to the game and that him not doing so fuel the forty Niners to victory however video evidence seem to prove otherwise as multiple angle should make fielding D. checking Sherman's hand well Sherman appeared on the pack McAfee show early today it's a quote it's definitely my bad I never want anybody to have to deal with some stuff they didn't do and so you know the question that he's going to get in the annoying nonsense questions about some stuff that happened in a game that's already been done you know sure hold an apology for that I'll probably reach out to me by text or social media got to get a hold of them and talk to him on the phone he definitely deserves an apology that's my bottom end quote Mayfield met with reporters later on this to say when asked if it bothered him all right now I know what I did but that's not the one ten the Cameroon something reporting me is you know gonna my favorite not respect him who is a player he's a great player has been for a while in no way that I mean I like that maybe the reason it's the one time the camera's gone your favorites because the camera captures what's actually there and you played the quarterback position about as badly as anybody in the National Football League here's a fun fact Fauria the craziest again for for doing the research on that seven article up on it Baker Mayfield in that game when his offense of line lost their respective battles two four eight two six that's a good Baker may feel that game as office of line won their respective battles two four eight two sacks he's holding the ball the second longest when a quarterback for the National Football League is QB are is the third worst in the National Football League only Josh Rosen completes a smaller percentage of his passes I mean I like Baker and I was always offended me here but the media and the camera always go against you you sell like Freddie kitchens you felt like selling your over your head you sell like Johnny men's when the focus was a conspiracy of haters and not the fact you're playing football the way it's going to make your own fantasia you got to figure that out you really do and I'm with you Richard Sherman Usha managed.

"cameroon" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The three year old Anthony Pinera arrived at the Santa cedar port of entry Wednesday morning this is been his routine for four months and eleven days as he waits for his number to be called by U. S. authorities so that he can begin the asylum process he left del Salvador because he says as a young man he was the target of games he desperately wants to ask for asylum in the U. S. as in America is a free country it's a country of opportunity it's a country of laws it's a country that has respect for who you are I tell him about last night Supreme Court ruling and he says that he wouldn't think about applying for asylum in any of the countries he passed through Gail says Saddam Central America is the same it's the worst Mexico how many have been murdered same in Central America and South America too we can't go on this day he brought his three bags of luggage he knew his number would be up to. and it was. the border this morning hopeful and excited but under the new rule he will most likely be barred from declaring asylum and be deported back to El Salvador the policy is one in a series of measures aimed at slowing the flow of migrants across the U. S. Mexico border immigrants from a whole lot of countries have overwhelmed the system at the southern border that's Ken Cuccinelli acting U. S. citizenship and immigration services director speaking with NPR's morning edition this will give us the ability to first of all to terror some people coming with asylum claims which is part of the intention the new asylum policy still faces ongoing legal challenges and might eventually be struck down but in the meantime legal learned an attorney for the American civil liberties union says the policy will still put thousands of migrants at risk we're not gonna sugarcoat it this is definitely a step back and we we think lots of people will be put in danger while we continue to litigate this but we have no choice but to push forward it's not just central Americans who will be affected for months thousands of migrants from Africa Asia and elsewhere have arrived in Tijuana after flying to South America and traveling over land to the southern border. Alford who asked me not share his last name out of fear of being targeted by gangs in Mexico has been waiting in Tijuana for more than two months he fled Cameroon because of its ongoing political.

Anthony Pinera Central America South America Tijuana Mexico America del Salvador Ken Cuccinelli Supreme Court El Salvador NPR U. S. Mexico Gail Africa Alford Cameroon director U. S. attorney eleven days
"cameroon" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:36 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Span radio by some cars that I'll take one more question there was a lady just behind you I believe my name is Adelaide Mateus highland Cameroonian service so I'm leader of an organization to call and get back to you as a soul as a person coming from Cameroon I'm wondering how considering the situation going on right now in camera because there have been talks softly genocide grand on in the southwest and northwest of capital and if you look in the issues in Cameroon I think a broader strategic geographical location of Cameroon into golf of DNA hi I'm wondering why there was no mention of those issue I see that if if Cameroon does impresarios is going to be a major issue in the whole region and talking about as China was still we just learned recently that China has acquired a lots and lots of lands in camera and as a US citizen also for me that's a concern concerning now we do have a military how in Cameroon and you has has been really invested in the fight a danceable coal have around so I'm wondering what is the US position as the one well and all of the other political crisis in Cameroon our concern at this time well are you planning on holding another image meeting on this issue very soon thank you this is a repair she spread radio programming from Monday we've already had two requests for more conversations and I know we we have about twenty three minutes left if I'm reading without great and we've got a lot more questions to get through and ask our panelists to take the questions we've just been posed on education on women on faith and on the situation camera in the role of kind in Cameroon you don't have to take all of them and and you don't take any of them if they're not questions you you want to but who would like to start I'll pass I'll start by passing I'll start so obviously I mean I think the questions give us a real sense of the complexities of the issue of security in a in a sort of both local level national and regional level Justin speaking briefly about the kind of education I mean when I teach my kind of intra African Studies course one of the things that I emphasize to my students is it actually when you look broadly at African governments and and particularly local level investment education has been one of the major investments that that Africans themselves have prioritized Matthew cartoon of the St Lawrence university sent and vast gains were made even though the the starting so many people didn't have access to education at independence a lot more people do now it's not enough and I think it does contribute to instability there was recently a a report by believe the international crisis group that was talking about northeastern Kenya in relation to the al Shabab question saying how basically the instability has teachers of lead local schools and kids are not being able to go and get that education that's actually long term helping people be you know potentially susceptible to to these radical ideas and and recruitment to these extremist points of views so I I certainly agree that that education needs to be a priority in the foreign policy issues when it comes to the continent the the issue of conflicts Wilmer mention either Cameroon decide how or back in East Africa there is a regional dimension there and I think we've our panelists here I've talked about this on and off but the role that regional organizations play is really important and so if we think about the role of the African Union and perhaps the inability of the African Union historically to intervene in security questions there is a history of non intervention there there's recently been tried to address but not fully and I think the afternoon has played as prominent a role as it could have played in many thanks but there are bright spots right on eco lost in West Africa intervened in cultivar in two thousand I've been intervene in the Gambia in twenty seventeen and helped transitions there so I think that that shows a lot of promise in this in these regions if we think about women's voices for instance that's extremely important not just in you know counting numbers of women parliamentarians but in how they are being voice within civil society and so recently for instance in Uganda a very prominent female activist on Yonge he was arrested and and given an eighteen month prison sentence for writing a column to the president certainly I know of the officers association which I'm a member of has has been outspoken about that but regional issues has the Kenyan government sort of reached out to Uganda to express discontent of that kind of level of prosecution of an economic for freedom of speech I don't think that those isn't that level so that's just one example I think of many where you know you can look at those kind of individual cases but really think about the more broadly in terms of policy love so I will try to answer very quickly education extremely important but I think I think I'm sure also take ownership of your own policy we are no applications important when I'm guessing with head of state and government the knowledge that fox was being as fish ID trolls civil society and elections on old order thank those important for free can do I will get an important budget versus expecting external players to falls on trees that's exactly what I think and I have tried to avoid like with the city of that that's African going sometimes we did around African Union Iman older populace beds at different ATV I think the license on grazing offer kind you guys to invest more in education so we have discussed about this I had we had invited to prison of muddy did you attend when he was there is sort of personal money came here to do the topic was about this I had a and if you set up with this address to my her and I think too many of the finalists here are soul and we cannot speak enough the body so I think we have decided to focus on six countries today and even those six countries each of those phones with rob being a topical but I'm tired day of the conference all of the binder but but very good one you have to keep talking about those challenges because if they had a full meeting solutions for governments so into movement I'm Paul men and gender extremely important one that is an issue of which was in one of the recommendation I hide but I you know the time to elaborate but speaking but when I'm Powerman I think one of the very best way is to include women in fall my decision making processes such as what happened for example in one that's out of the car now and each OPL with fifty percent of the woman bottle I mean it and through in the US also member of parliament extra so we should not just to look at women and Garson's at he is very in a very five to ninety stick weight into it let's do things fall down you have to put up all we have to get it to work to ensure that everyone is whether a present date and I think the outcome of these these are likely to be bitter finally in terms of covering we can I think I briefly connected the situation with the book what Rahman now also highlighted the challenges and enough west and southwest region regions of Kamerun so yeah I seen the organs or slip from a piece called my numbers at all in focus of income around for some beside all in so my after a very long time so but yes defeat chiefly does issues our critic are but as you can see we don't even have enough time to speak about the six countries that you have identified quickly mind will present more than fifty percent of the African population so no one should ever be overlooked just briefly I think on a couple points here one on the education question a very good question and let me just say it's great to see one of the Ali fellows here this is a wonderful program that invests in young leaders from across the continent and also the organization you're associated with not too young to run is a really great effort in Nigeria to encourage young people to run for office in a country where there aren't enough of them so I would encourage everybody to check that out John Teman of the Freedom House estates is gonna make a lot of progress by telling leaders you should invest more in education and I think it goes in one ear and out the other I think the progress is gonna come when we invest in civil society organizations and probably people like you were going to agitate for that domestically who are going to organize around those issues were good demand those things from their national government and from there local government and of course in Nigeria has thirty six federal states they can be quite powerful themselves and that might be where the advocacy needs to be but I think those kind of vestments and civil society in national available ability to advocate for these things ultimately gets a lot more than whatever sort of rhetoric we might use about how other countries should spend their own money just quickly in a very important issues on gender dynamics I want to highlight what's going on in Sudan right now which is not gonna country focus for us but which also is undergoing a remarkable change one that is very much driven by women who have been leading the protest movement who have been taking great risks and who've been really been out in front in the change that we're seeing the story is yet to conclude in it could go in either direction you know the challenge there is that women when playing such a prominent role in the protests then things get to negotiations and it's all men.

Cameroon fifty percent twenty three minutes eighteen month
"cameroon" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Racist hate in one voice our nation must condemn racism bigotry and white supremacy <hes> that was his largest denunciation of weight negativism and this sort of extremist rhetoric and action but i don't think it's too late to dampen it but but we we need this to be the story from now on in order to dampen the level of violence that was monica duffy toft will hear more from her later in the show today but we begin with the world's immigration editor monica campbell who covers the u._s. mexico border and what she's been hearing. There's a collective morning on both sides. I was checking being with people in what is el paso and also in other parts of the border and <hes> one of the pastors that i met when i was in ciudad juarez recently he runs a migrant shelter in that city in he said that he was including prayers for people from mexico and the united states in this weekend services everybody everybody was. You know another ways kind of bracing themselves for something like this. I think just not just along the border but among latino communities and people live poor brown in the united states were bracing themselves for something horrible like this to happen in some ways. It's not surprising with the rhetoric in the country. You recently got back monica from tijuana san diego border where you are an assignment and this week. We're going to be hearing a series of your stories from there called the waiting room. What have you been looking at exactly what i've been looking at how you with the changes and u._s. policy at the border the reality that thousands of migrants are now waiting in mexico. <hes> you hear people say it that it's become this big waiting room. You know and i wanted to go back to tijuana to see the and hear what that's like. How are people managing. These prolonged weights. What's it like for somebody who's just arrived to the border to see other people. Who've been there for nearly early year. I also want to see how people were living. You know the day to day living conditions and how people are thinking about what's next. How long can mm people wait on the mexico side of the border would of those daily calculations like right and despite what we hear about migrant caravans coming from central america. You've found it to be along the border. There and increasingly international mix of people not just central america absolutely i mean it's still large central american people from honduras el salvador guatemala tamala but also people from mexico asylum-seekers people fleeing dangerous parts of mexico arriving to the u._s. Mexico border in this case tijuana and seeking asylum from their own country in being forced to wait at the border in mexico so that is something that's always striking to me. Mexicans being kept opt in mexico wanting to find a safe place to live. It's also a very international increasing international group of people at the border their entire apartment buildings things in tijuana filled with people from cameroon from haiti from cuba from ethiopia <hes> including the person that will hear from next in this first story story. His name is one rochman and he's from iraq a young man from iraq in tijuana and he told me how he he made his way to the u._s. Mexico border incredibly long journey but also wind that is not too unusual to find at certain parts of the border all right monica. Thanks for that setup. What's your story. Rodwin rochman had never done anything like this for one week. He says he trekked through the sharing gap. It's a stretch of rainforest running from colombia to panama. Anyone who's migrated north by land from south america knows about it. It's grueling ruling and dangerous rowen took videos for his mom along the way aardvark by six hours of walking each day. He says in the video the jungles so dense. It's like night under the canopy. There are no roads rowen. Who's twenty eight years old is is drenched in sweat and his following this swampy path dotted with empty water bottles but he isn't alone and points to people with him and oh she's from cuba from nepal to from scuba the three from iraq nepal cuba in the iraqis that includes ruin and his older brother all headed for the united states for ruin that was just one lake in his three month journey north..

mexico tijuana united states u._s. mexico monica duffy toft iraq monica campbell el paso ciudad juarez america cuba rowen honduras el salvador guatemala Rodwin rochman editor south america colombia san diego cameroon
"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

"So he asked for everything and got then some, but maybe it's because what he's asked for he's gotten any scene changes because he came into the program that he feels like he has this ability to change what it is. In the end it comes down to when fica expanded the tournament in allow for more teams to get in. But what it did allow for these teams to get in are usually, unfortunately, with exceptionally European teams, the rest of them are the ones that are underfunded. And this is a problem as whole as you're going to get games like this, because there aren't enough. There aren't enough countries that support their teams. The level the England doesn't I'm sorry if your support at the same while the, the way that US in Germany and England are supported it is your responsibility to handle it the right way. And to move the game forward. Right. Because what today do now, your team thinks that, oh, that team was dirty, you know, our coaches would do one in to touch, you need to play faster. If you do not play faster, is your fault because you're getting kicked instead of blaming somebody else. So the now you, you are an agent in the game instead of being the victim in a game. The manager for Cameroon align Junfa called it a miscarriage of Justice after the game, one of his players rice fhu, Joe said we didn't want to play anymore. We just wanted the game to be over after the second goal there was kind of, at strange moment of protests. Let's focus in on England real quick because they are moving on. I think Cameroon were more dangerous against England than they were against New Zealand against Netherlands against Canada. How would be real work? Moving forward. If I was England, mum about how threatened they were today that back line. Right. Yeah. Yeah. That back that's centre-back pairing a bright and holding a slow and their cavalier on the ball. They like to build on the back. They're very Norway next site. But the problem with Norway is there left side is weak and it's been weeks since Nigeria played on it's been week when France played them and the Mindy is the left back and it has been the problem coming into the tournament. You don't see some opportunity in the middle of that English defense for Norway, I do. But the question is what Norway did so well against Australia was, how quick they transitioned and they transitioned so fast and expert long balls, especially Savak that ball was unbelievable to her sloven to give him that goal the first goal can they do that, because I think this backline can get caught. It's going to be a fascinating match up. It's the first quarter-final that is set in stone, and I'm very, very much looking forward to Norway. And England, of course, we still have one more match to talk about on tomorrow, schedule. That's Canada and Sweden. But coming up next an interview with pharaoh book catch, he's going to give us the entire scouting report on Spain. Spain gets ready to face the US in the round of sixteen that interview next support for left or permitted in the following message come from Allah,.

England Norway Cameroon US Canada Spain pharaoh Junfa Nigeria Joe New Zealand Mindy Savak Sweden France Australia Germany Netherlands
"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Like I think Graham Hansen is like she's just she's now a star while you've been talking about this is now the next starred. They have thirteen players under the age of twenty three. So this is a topic area and they call come the Norwegian league. And then they get drawn out people have criticized the top sorry not being as good, or, and people criticize Soberon for this style play. It's very like they wanna keep possession. In fact, all my Norwegian friends are like we're not going to go very far. We're gonna lose not the other, and yes, they have problems on the outside backs are outside backs are slow, and not good enough, especially Minta like you know how every single team attacks. They're left hand side. And there's a reason for that. Right. We saw France to it. We saw Nigeria do it, and my, my first tweet, I was like that left hand side is a problem. It's going to continue to be a tax. You're gonna see England. We assuming going to get over Cameroon because they are one of the top teams in the world. They're going to have imagined that against Lucy Braun Makita parish. So a very good team. But this team is just building like Germany as the seventh youngest team. These are two teams that are just getting started in terms of their dominance. Caroliina Graham Heinsohn used to play for Wolfsburg's. She's just joined Barscelona. So think about that, like Barcelona attack. If, if you will, you got Graham Hansen, you got, like a Martins. You have I'll show. All you've got a Tony Duggan in there, some of the stars that your liking of this World Cup, plus like half the Spanish national team is in there. So you know that, that, that Barcelona attack is going to be a fun, one to watch once the club season gets going over in Europe. All right. Enough on today's games. We still have the rest of Sunday's action to preview. We'll do that in just a moment. But first, this quick break back here with more ESPN ABC's coverage of the two thousand nine hundred women's World Cup in France. K Markgraff Sebastian Salazar time to preview. Tomorrow's matches we've got England Cameroon and France against Brazil England, the winner of group d Cameroon third place out of groupie. We remember their dramatic late winner against New Zealand that put them through Kate. This is obviously a match for England is the huge favourite where do you think this game will be decided? Ooh. That's a good question. Where does it come down midfield comes onto midfield there? So midfield, heavy right? It's a four three four five one depending if they're in possession, or not in possession. We got to see some different people, they do a lot of squad rotation that one England strength is their depth the other are there wingers Tony Duggan got back in Beth Mead. We saw provided a critical assist whether friend. Kirby will come in, or Georgia's stanway, who was excellent outside of the foot passes on me up Ernie. It was so good. Yeah. She was so exciting, and then the Catholic parish back. Right. So this is a team that in the midfield is so explosive that they are going to find Ingles to play around Cameroon and Cameroon recall. I mean there on that same emotional roller coaster there. One of the third place teams to get in. They won on the last kick of the game. It is a team that has a lot of confidence the team that believes in one another and a team that has gotten better. So it's going to be interesting. But they were they were the lesser of the group link thing about who they played, I think England is better than Canada. And I think I think England is. And those are two teams that Cameron struggled against you but dangerous on the counter-attack right off in in shoot who scored the two goals. Engand the number seven the number three in the number seven are really those wide players to watch for Cameroon. They're very, very dangerous and both of them like to cutting sometimes they can be dangerous..

Cameroon Brazil England Graham Hansen Tony Duggan France Barcelona Soberon Kirby group d Cameroon Norwegian league Graham Heinsohn Minta Nigeria K Markgraff Sebastian Salazar England Lucy Braun Germany Wolfsburg Europe
"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

"So that's something I'm interested to see and New Zealand obscene physically fit they pride themselves on their ability to put teams under pressure can Sinclair, who is one of the many weapon weapons, but everything revolves around her with Jessie, Fleming, standout, and then. New Zealand is competent they can come back. Yeah. I wonder about this New Zealand team. Right. Like they put in such a good performance in that first match against the Netherlands, and then they give goal in the ninety second minute. Yeah. I think when you talk about group plates, always like, well, what do you do? Next. Right. Like, how do you recover? That's a huge emotional recovery for the for New Zealand. Isn't it that disappointment has to still be lingering, but then you have to turn it into motivating and be like, okay, we can do this. We know that Canada is maybe more vulnerable in this area because New Zealand had their chances. They had core finishing. They could have won that game. Yeah. The definitely New Zealand had their chances. And I think Netherlands, very much failed to impress in that same question to you, that asked about Kenda for, for the Netherlands, they're going to face Cameroon, and it'll be it'll be obviously Canada against New Zealand. What is the Netherlands, have to do to get that front three going because they weren't really dangerous at all in the in the first match either. I think they're going to stick to what they. Really do go back to van and coming in. She gets subbed out after a poor performance against New Zealand. I think they'll continue to grow into the tournament, and they started slow in the euro ended up winning it in two thousand seventeen this is a team that needs a little bit of shifts here and there they found a way to win. And that is a huge confidence boost when you're not playing well, my concern with them is their back line. They played against the South African team in lead up and gave up two goals on the attack South Africa forwards are not collectively. When they break it isn't as fastest Cameroon breaks. So I wonder how they're going to handle that, because that back line is very, very slow who concerns you more with their opening day performance Netherlands or Canada orlands playing it's Cameroon was incredibly difficult. I think they might be the fastest team in the tournament. Someone said today Jamaica was I don't agree with that. I thought the way in which they break with so aggressive in so pacey that. I mean, there's a difference between like a player speed and team speed. Right. Like what a team does. Right. Like to make them may have faster players, but Cameroon may counter faster. It's gonna be fascinating to watch. It's going to be huge tests for Netherlands in wonderful opportunity for Cameroon because the way Cameroon places the exact opposite of the way Netherland plays. And Netherland does not wanna play team that place Cameron place. So US fans because we always, you know, in the end talk to an American audience. We do turn this back to the US women's national team. Here's why this group matters. If the US Wynn's group f they'll face runners up from group, b in the next round, that'd be Spain or China. But if the US finishes second in group f was dried, now we can affectively say, all right. That means they're gonna lose Sweden. Right. Because the Titus Sweden with goal differential. Looks like it'll go the US this way, that means they would get the second place team out of this group, and that would be there at this point, Canada or the Netherlands, severe the US who would you rather play their round sixteen. Netherlands, union say that very confidently. I just brutal matchup playing camps you'd rather void. Right. That rivalry weird stuff. It's it's they're just incredibly hard to play against actually. I think they're the best organized offensive side in the tournament by far they that they are unbelievable cannon is a good player. So I would avoid Canada. I think Netherlands, I think the wings can handle Netherlands, veteran interesting. I mean, all these groups are just getting more and more interesting. Every time a game day goes by. It looked it feels like you look at the standings in the morning and then you look at them in the evening and there's been movement..

Netherlands New Zealand Cameroon US Canada Kenda Sweden Sinclair Jessie South Africa Jamaica Fleming Cameron Spain Wynn China ninety second
"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

"It really is interesting how the underdogs now don't seem to be as big of an underdog as they were even three or four World Cups ago. Again, that is due to the growth of women's football. Yes, it is not due to some of these federations. Let's always just keep that in mind. Let's move on to the second game from today's doubleheader, Canada and Cameroon. And it almost almost gave us another shocking surprise, again, Canada wins the match one nothing, but they come into this tournament as the fifth ranked team, according to fee for Cameroon forty. Six. So another huge ocean between these two teams. And yet the theme of the tournament, though, set pieces is really the only difference at least on the scoresheet between Canada and Cameron Kate, would you see? I salad Cana. They're giving up a lot of possession unnecessarily, but they're giving it up because they were put under pressure that they weren't used to seeing, I think I was almost kind of laughing in my head because when I don't mean that mainly but when you play Canada's the United States player, you know, the first thing you need to do is to match them in tally because they are coming for you. They're getting the ball. They get party you so be it. But they have this physical presence that imposes on you. And it does it does make you a little bit tentative, you're like, okay, I have to match that and you have to amp yourself up to be prepared for it. I saw Cameroon side that said alright. Can't here you go. And I thought Canada really struggled. And so the key when you playing a team that super fast and physical is you have to match that mentality to start with. And then you had to put the ball on the ground. If you have that capability to do so. And they struggled in that first half in the second. And half. I think they didn't see possession so easily upon physical confrontation. They are able to hold the ball a little bit more. And I thought they played better in the second half, and yes, they were awarded by can you should be can not being marked and Cameron almost scored in the same exact set up on the other side with the player not being marked back Cameroon was much better and more organized, and again that mental endurance piece, I think, is the biggest difference with these players able to play overseas and not in their domestic leagues because a lot of times they don't have them. And if they do they're not professional is, especially for Cameron and Argentina is they have developed a mental endurance to withstand, a lot of these moments that they didn't four years ago and definitely not eight years ago. How worried would you be from a Canadian perspective based on their performance that you saw today? And the fact that you could only get one goal past a camera inside which we should say, yes, they're ranked forty six in the world. They did get out of the Dacian be ranked. He's okay. But they got out of the group phase the last time. Around. So we rented sixteen they have they have players like we mentioned on yesterday show, who are playing all over Europe there, they're not maybe the super underdog. But, but how would you be about Canada? I'm not worried if you're Canada, because Kansas score. A lot of goals to start with right. Like they don't. I mean, they've had you didn't think they would dominate this game a little more easily a little more healthily than they did. I thought they would dominate the game more on the wings and they did. I thought the thing that I saw missing from Canada was a realization that combination play can unlock teams at our super aggressive because nor to be aggressive, you need to end -ticipant where the ball's gonna go. That means to me, you're watching the ball, a little bit more than you are maintaining your shape. Right. And also that takes discipline, when you are prepared side, that comes with months and months of experience of training together, which we know Cameroon came together, five months ago and has had limited preparation, right. So they don't have that organization. So you do end up watching the ball a little bit more because it hasn't been drilled. Into enough of your style, how to maintain it when this player on the far side has the ball, your little more worried about the player..

Canada Cameroon Cameron Kate football Europe United States Argentina Kansas eight years five months four years
"cameroon" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on KCRW

"Most of the people hunkering down in this migrant shelter are from Honduras Guatemala, but Cubans and Venezuelans are also passing through as well as people from at least three African countries and Gola Uganda, and Cameroon everyone at this shelter is waiting for their turn to request asylum, at a US port of entry loans from Cameroon in central Africa, as the good mystery believe me, an omega, so every little poem, like other African migrants asked that his last name, not being used because he feared retribution against his family at home. He's waiting to have what's known as a credible. Fear interview with US authorities. It's the first step in the asylum process. Tom Ridge from Uganda says she's bracing herself for that interview. It's so painful very painful this way come to show my stir the waiting process begins like this, when migrants seeking asylum arrive in what as they first give their names to Mexican authorities. They're giving. Number and put on a list, a list now, more than ten thousand names, long each day, US authorities tell Mexican officials how many people will be allowed off that list across the border for an initial hearing, El Paso. Masika from Uganda said before getting on that list. He and two friends had tried to present themselves to US authorities as soon as they arrived, but they were sent back to go back and then wait for the time that we up to going, some of the people in this group had flown from Nairobi Kenya to Brazil then headed north through Colombia and Central America on a journey that in some cases, took several months, it was a rough journey Masika claims. He was attacked by members of a street gang in Mexico City because of this kind of gun fins, getting us because we have blocks and then we don't days, punish kind of thing putting out gun so Knauss shelter director one Feo Garcia says the long wait time has created tension at the shelter tension, compounded. A few months ago when there was a threat to close the border completely K splint list. And he says that prompted some migrants to leave what is and cross illegally although. Africans are now part of the migrant population here. Mexican officials say the vast majority are Cubans an analysis by the Cato Institute finds that citizens of Cuba are now among the top three nationalities making a silent requests at US borders here in what is fifty two year old pedal. Lewis Tamayo said he was a dissident in Cuba. He said, even if his application is rejected. He won't enter the US legally time on the saints up with honest, people don't slip in the backyard or the window says they go legally through the front door..

US El Paso Uganda Cuba Cameroon Lewis Tamayo Tom Ridge Feo Garcia Africa Honduras Cato Institute Mexico City Guatemala Kenya Knauss Central America director Colombia Brazil fifty two year
"cameroon" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Now transitioning from DR Congo into Gabon Gabon has one of the. You know, one of the richest countries in Africa and most of this congress around central west Africa, very rich, forest wise, they are dense vegetation have a lot of oil Gabon. Howes oil has all of so many resources in Gabon for some for some reason Gaborone has been ruled by one family for since gaining independence, Omar Bongo, and now his son Ali Bongo. And maybe you have to be named Bongo to be president in Gabon. I you know, I was nicknamed Bongo when I was little I might name was Omar Bongo. So maybe I will become the next president of Gabon. If I choose to be because I'm a Bongo man or stay in govern. And out that joke. And this is from Gabon appear. I can then he is one of the legends of Gabonese music, the artists he has a formal PHD in music. He went to study in France. You know, he started getting blind, and then he actually taught himself debris and did all this stuff. And then he's one of the creators artists, of course, out of Africa, and he represent he sings not just a about the Shusha issues in in Gabon. But he also represents the issues around the backup people who are the pygmies out of is central and west Africa Cameroon and all those areas. So he sings in here. He sort of tries to advocate for their survival. And also, the cultural in music and all those aspects so Pierra dang is just an amazing artist. If you have some time, you must check him out, check out his music. He's a great artist ESPN with his classic track from nineteen eighty three April goo. Yes. And that's a Gaborone there. One of the richest countries out of Africa. And this is Pierre I condemn from the legend of music EPO..

Gabon Omar Bongo Africa Gaborone west Africa Africa Cameroon president Howes France ESPN Gabonese Pierra
"cameroon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Us. The territory has all the resources the natural resources southern come rooms Ross a wealthy country. The historian professor Verka Jake Afonso was then a student in British southern Cameroons. Also, the forests wrestler hunting those along the coast on the major revise Rodrigue fishing with the mind of the people were peasant farmers. In nineteen sixty both Nigeria and French Cameroon goes independence. So in nineteen sixty one the British Cameroons caught between these two largest states. We given every friend of a plebiscite decide their fate. But the bogus economic report was made about southern Cameroons that it would be economically or Neville mentality itself. Love it would become independent in its own right? I'm this was taken up at the United Nations that only two questions would future in the planet to vote to gain independence by joining the Federal Republic of an Ajaria gained independence by joining the Republic of Cameroon, the southern Cameroons will lead by their premier John. And he had done a deal with the French Bank leader of Cameroon Amadou a heat Joe that if United the two countries would be a federation preserving the autonomy of the British territory. I'm Jay campaign that unification would be of two equal states in that federation nothing would change very much in southern Cameroons. We will still be running our affairs. I'm so many people believe that voting for unification was almost gaining that independence for joining the Cameroon Republic had its risks to. For start the country was in the midst of civil war nationalist militants who had fought against French colonial rule continued to fight the government of the newly independent state government, which after road had maintained very close ties to FRANZ. Oh, this was used by the pro Nigeria campaign is a reason to vote for them. And that campaign was led by the main opposition leader, Email Enderle was out with the slogan that go into French maroon was suicide out that people were going to lose everything the whole contra will eventually become fridge. One traditional leader. The fun of Byford didn't think much of either option the fun of bath foot said gray internet. Julia was you're going to drown. I'm coming to finish Cameroon was to be roasted in fire source. Southern Cameroons would not be better either way the time Becker Chica fan so was a student as a teacher train. Inning college and they still a teenager and technically underage. He was deemed educated enough to get a vote in the referendum initially. I was for the independence of the territory. But since that that option was denied, I was feeling that would be better off in Nigeria and definitely the majority of people would have voted to go to Nigeria where they have similarities in everything the colonial culture education, the political system the democratic nature of the country at the time. But there was one factor which deterred people from voting to go to Nigeria. It was what we call the Inca factor in Nigeria egos were the third largest ethnic group in Nigeria and dominated the politics in the east of the country and over the years, many egos it settled just over the border in southern British Cameroons in the fear of Ebo domination became a prominent feature of the campaign, the Ebou community income maroon was a very dynamic group. They were in every aspect of the economic life. They were occupying territory here and their farms and farming. They were in the markets controlling stalls. My Jody of people said if they went to Nigeria the now will have every right and that territory. It would be suicidal. So that's just what's kept people from voting to remain in Nigeria in February nineteen sixty one voters went to the polls, no pictures show, huge queues at polling.

Nigeria Cameroons French Cameroon Republic of Cameroon Cameroon Republic Cameroon Cameroon Amadou professor Verka Jake Afonso Rodrigue Ross Federal Republic Byford French Bank United Nations Enderle Jay Becker Chica Julia Joe
"cameroon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"There. Come those moments in life, where everyone might hate you. And you have to be willing to to believe that on you're on the right side of history. And you know, it'll be fine. I'm Rebecca Cosby, stay tuned for witness black history month after the news. Hello. I'm David Harper. With the BBC news, President Trump says he expects to be able to announce next week that all of the territory once held by the Islamic state group in Iraq and Syria has been retaken. He told a meeting of countries that have fought I asked alongside the United States that Washington would stay tough with any remaining fighters and would defeat every last one as correspondent in Washington. Peter Bowes explains Mr. Trump has been changing his position his attitude his assessment regarding so called Islamic state over recent weeks has been shifting it was back in December. When he first said that the group was indeed defeated the reports around with the time that he wanted to pull US troops out of Syria within a month. But since then he has taken a slightly more cautious view. And even now he is saying that he will wait for he says official word before he says perhaps as early as next week. He believes he could declare the. That group ISIS has been defeated Turkey's foreign minister Matthew Chevy show. Lou has stressed that Ankara would oppose designated safe zone for Kurds in Syria. If what he called terrorist elements were protected Mr. Chevy show. Lou said there was little clarity on have the American proposed area would operate anchor regards the Kurdish white PG as a terrorist group while Washington has supported it in the fight against the Islamic state group. The United Nations has appealed to all sides in the crisis in Venezuela. Not to manipulate humanitarian aid for political ends, the UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric told reporters in New York. Thanks humanitarian action needed to be independent of political military or other objectives. President Maduro sees opposition efforts to arrange foreign aid as part of a strategy to stabilize his government. The United States says it will cut millions of dollars in military aid to Cameroon over allegations of. Of gross human rights violations by security forces more details from Tracy Burcham marine security forces have benefited from millions of dollars of US, military aid, mainly for training and high tech equipment. Hundreds of American troops. Have also been stationed there to advise and train local forces in their fight against the Islamic state group, Boko haram and other militant fighters in the region last may the US ambassador to Cameroon Peter Henry bothering accused the Cameroonian security forces of targeted killings and offer detentions and burning and looting villages. The US says the Cameroonian government must investigate the abuse allegations and hold the patriotism countable. French warplanes have carried out fresh attacks. In Chad on what the military says was an armed rebel convoy that arrived from Libya last week twenty acts of around fifty trucks were destroyed by the Asterix which have so far failed to halt the advance of the convoy, French military says it's trying to prevent the destabilization of chats BBC news. Accident. Investigators say they've successfully recovered a body from the wreckage of a plane that went down in the sea between France and Britain carrying the Argentine international footballer Emiliano Sala his transport correspondent Tom Berridge after examining the plane using remote controlled underwater vehicles fitted with cameras investigators started a recovery operation when the weather conditions were for a time. More favourable, the air accidents Investigation Branch, working with other specialists said it successfully recovered a body in the most dignified way possible from the wreckage the identity of that body for now has not been made public weather conditions, then turned and they were forced to abandon the mission to recover. The large part of the plane's fuselage rescue is in the Turkish city of Istanbul have been working through the nights to search the rubble of an eight story apartment blocks which collapsed at least two people died and seven were injured. But it's faith others are trapped under command of debris. Britain's chief medical officers are edging social media companies to invest in technology to protect underage children from accessing sites in their first official advice on screen, time and social media. They say companies should be able to check that uses are thirteen or over our health editor, Hugh Pym has sent this report. The review by the UK's chief medical officers concludes. There isn't enough scientific research to draw a definite link between screen tournament health problems. And while they note that internet use can be of benefit to children. They are calling for more research into the impact of social media. But.

United States President Trump Syria Washington Cameroon Lou BBC Matthew Chevy Rebecca Cosby United Nations air accidents Investigation Br President Maduro David Harper official ISIS UK Peter Bowes