35 Burst results for "Cameroon"

Hindou Ibrahim, President of the Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad

Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

04:56 min | Last week

Hindou Ibrahim, President of the Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad

"Welcome to come home conversations. Today we are joined by. Hindu abraham founder and president of the association for indigenous women in people's of chad hindu is also the co chair the international indigenous peoples forum on climate change and a un sdg advocate. Thank you for joining us today. It's a pleasure. Thanks for reminding me you have been a steadfast champion for human rights and sustainable development. What was the inspiration behind your lifelong dedication to bettering our planet. Yeah i mean. I'm so excited to championing a sustainable development god's because for me the app talking about our life so when we take from the objective one who is the fighting poverty or to the five with the gender or not with climate change. And now the seventeen of them to take patents. She dead talking about how we can improve our life how we can improve our society and how we can make it better than now by respecting people's in climate so for me. It is obvious because roma the communities that i come from we always all the problems and all the crises to get north resort on them. So that's why. I am so excited to championing the sustainable development goals for my peoples in for all indigenous peoples in the end of the day for the planet in gender so we're seeing how climate change is impacting every corner of our planet in many ways. Can you share with us. How climate change is affecting your country and your region so i am coming from saharan regions in coming from chad. Who have a different landscape. Are we have hundred percent visiting the nov and now we have savannah in suheil in the middle and then we have the tropical. Ford is the busy in this hour. So when you need three different In a land lock in when your life is the pump from the ecosystem. You not exactly the impact of the climate change. You do not need in the book or watching. Tv you levi. And now i give example of how we add really impacted an we get any central michigan dishes from ninety nine now check is already on last one point five degree increase and why we see that every day our dry season become much longer. We've evenki very long san in heavy son. That's coming up to fifty degrees celsius when you go through the death at its bauer fifty four degrees celsius in that impact our environment in impact therein therein. Season also check. It's become much shorter. Incoming the higgin construct all the places for example this year where we have all this ahead on the floor you even. In the towns people take the can we go from one neighborhood to another one and sought months before it was the heat in very dry heat. Swear the caps can grow up in an end back with the food insecurity because when you don a half Lateran is cannot penetrate win. It's cannot leave the vegetation who genetic and that impact the food insecure of the and at the end of the day. the letter might impact. It's good shank the social life of peoples. It's create conflict among the communique that fighting to get access to and one of the example. I add you add on the chat. Nature is the wider that we do have at our lake in nineteen sixty. It was twenty five thousand kilometers square. These freshwater chatted check. Cameroon nigeria nigeria Probably and known delek shouldn't came to two thousand clinically squirrel freshwater. So you have ninety percent of the wider Because of the heat in seven league that is more than fifty million people who needing depending from his Them that farmers that fishermen end postulates homemade micro-mini so web does people have to do because they done depend from the end of the month salaries from the rent for the fund from the ecosystem of this area of me so yesterday fight amer get access to resources some of

Hindu Abraham Association For Indigenous Wom International Indigenous Peopl Suheil Saharan UN Chad Ford Michigan Delek Nigeria Cameroon Amer
Atlanta - ICE Almost Deported Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

Morning Edition

03:48 min | 2 months ago

Atlanta - ICE Almost Deported Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

"Week from immigrant women who say they were subjected to unwanted medical procedures while detained at an immigration and customs enforcement facility in Georgia. Some women say they underwent his direct Amis or other surgeries that left them sterile. Members of Congress are demanding a quick investigation and in one case, lawmakers say ice has already tried to deport a key witness. NPR's Joel Rose has more Pauline Benham was nearly deported. Yesterday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement put her on a plane back to Cameroon, a country she left when she was two years old. She was on the tarmac when members of Congress say they intervened. It felt like ice was trying to rush through her deportation. I can't say that for certain, but all of this is extremely troubling. Representative Pramila Gioia Paul is a Democrat from Washington State and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. She wants been in the U. S so that you can tell her story to investigators. Venom is one of a growing number of immigrant women who say they were subjected to gynecological procedures without consent. While they were held at the Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia. The first allegations came to light in a whistle blower complaint this week from a nurse at the facility. Since then, lawyers for other women have come forward with similar allegations. Jaipal says the total is now at least 17. This feels particularly agree just because it is obviously Invasive reproductive surgery. And so for every woman in particular across America, this sends chills up our spine. More than 170. Members of Congress have signed a letter calling for an investigation by the homeland Security inspector general. Ice confirmed that Pauline Venom is still in the country and denied any link between her allegations and her scheduled deportation. Spokesman says she was pulled off the plane because of a paperwork snafu with the Cameroonian government, not because of congressional intervention. In a statement. I says that all female detainees received routine gynecological care, and that quote a medical procedure like a hysterectomy would never be performed unquote without informed consent. Bingham's lawyer says Otherwise. When she woke up from the surgery, the doctor informed her that a portion of her fallopian tube was removed. One win is Bingham's lawyer at the nonprofit Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights. She says, been, um, sought treatment for in irregular menstrual cycle and thought she was getting a routine procedure. Of course. Pauline was very upset and sort of appalled that this had happened without her consent. Win says the long term medical implications are not clear, but the procedure could prevent been him from conceiving a child detention itself takes so much away. I'm a person's life and then for her to have gone through this experience while she was an immigration detention, just rob sir of so much more than her time, wind says been, um complained to the staff at the detention center, but those complaints went nowhere. Irwin is operated by a for profit company LaSalle Corrections, which did not respond to a request for comment. Elizabeth Meth urn is a lawyer who has represented immigrants held at Erwin and other detention centers in Georgia, she says complaints about medical care often fall on deaf ears. They consistently Ignore complaints they consistently act like any complaint is just histrionics. It's ripe for exploitation, right because there's not proper oversight. There's not A proper like Level of humanity. Katherine says lawyers have been raising concerns about medical conditions for years. They're relieved that the public is finally paying attention, even if it took shocking allegations like these to make it happen. Joel Rose.

Pauline Benham Georgia Congress Bingham Irwin County Detention Center WIN Joel Rose Immigration And Customs Enforc ICE Amis Pramila Gioia Paul Pauline Venom Pauline NPR Cameroon Georgia Latino Alliance For Hu Cameroonian Government Homeland Security Representative
ICE Just Tried to Deport Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

Morning Edition

03:49 min | 2 months ago

ICE Just Tried to Deport Immigrant Woman Who Says She Got Unwanted Surgery While Detained

"Have come to light this week from immigrant women who say they were subjected to unwanted medical procedures while detained at an immigration and customs enforcement facility in Georgia. Some women say they underwent his direct Amis or other surgeries that left them sterile. Members of Congress are demanding a quick investigation and in one case, lawmakers say ice has already tried to deport a key witness. NPR's Joel Rose has more Pauline Venom was nearly deported. Yesterday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement put her on a plane back to Cameroon country she left when she was two years old. She was on the tarmac when members of Congress say they intervened. It felt like ice was trying to rush through her deportation. I can't say that for certain, but all of this is extremely troubling. Representative Pramila Gioia Paul is a Democrat from Washington State and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. She wants been in the U. S so that you can tell her story to investigators. Venom is one of a growing number of immigrant women who say they were subjected to gynecological procedures without consent while they were held at the Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia. The first allegations came to light in a whistle blower complaint this week from a nurse at the facility. Since then, lawyers for other women have come forward with similar allegations, Jaipal says the total is now at least 17. This feels particularly agree just because it is obviously Invasive reproductive surgery, and so far every woman in particular across America, this sends chills up our spine. More than 170. Members of Congress have signed a letter calling for an investigation by the Homeland Security inspector general. Ice confirmed that Pauline Venom is still in the country and denied any link between her allegations and her scheduled deportation. Spokesman says she was pulled off the plane because of a paperwork snafu with the Cameroonian government, not because of congressional intervention. In a statement. I says that all female detainees received routine gynecological care and that quote a medical procedure like a history. Ectomy would never be performed unquote without informed consent. The venoms lawyer says Otherwise. When she woke up from the surgery, the doctor informed her that a portion of her fallopian tube was removed. One win is Bingham's lawyer at the nonprofit Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights, she says been, um sought treatment for in irregular menstrual cycle and thought she was getting a routine procedure. Of course, Pauline was very upset and sort of appalled that this had happened without her consent. Wind says the long term medical implications are not clear. But the procedure could prevent venom from conceiving a child detention itself takes so much away from a person's life. And then for her to have gone through this experience while she was an immigration detention. Just rob serve so much more than her time, Wind says Been, UM complained to the staff at the detention center, but those complaints went nowhere. Irwin is operated by a for profit company LaSalle Corrections, which did not respond to a request for comment. Elizabeth Meth urn is a lawyer who has represented immigrants held at Erwin and other detention centers in Georgia, she says complaints about medical care often fall on deaf ears. They consistently Ignore complaints they consistently act like any complaint is just histrionics. It's ripe for exploitation, right because there's not proper oversight. There's not A proper like Level of humanity. Katherine says lawyers have been raising concerns about medical conditions for years. They're relieved that the public is finally paying attention, even if it took shocking allegations like these to make it happen. Joel Rose. NPR news

Pauline Venom Georgia Congress Joel Rose Irwin County Detention Center Immigration And Customs Enforc ICE Wind Amis NPR Georgia Latino Alliance For Hu Pramila Gioia Paul Cameroon Cameroonian Government Homeland Security Representative America Jaipal
Yannick Noah Interview

The Tennis Podcast

05:19 min | 4 months ago

Yannick Noah Interview

"We've had a week off and. Has Gone to get his haircuts. Catherine's been hanging out with Magnus. The dog I've been stressing about my football team west from job in as they try to throw promotion away. That may or may not mean something to you, and we will be back with tennis podcasts over the coming weeks and months altogether chat in as we normally do, but today we have a very very special interview with the French Open champion of nineteen eighty-three, the world's number three as his highest ranking, but that really doesn't tell the story of Yannick who is unquestionably the coolest man I have ever met Davis Cup winning captain. Three Times Fed Cup winning captain as well and had a hugely successful music career. Once his tennis stays had come to an end I had the chance to meet him just over twenty years ago when he joined the champions tour. Tour retired players who just traveled to will played matches against one another him and John McEnroe and beyond bog, and all these greats of the game, and just got to know him a little bit at that time. He was always suggest to me. I haven't seen him for about ten years, but I managed to get in contact with him through a couple of other people when we were researching and trying to set up interviews full at tennis, relived series, particularly the French Open, so that we could tell that story, and you'll have heard an excerpt perhaps of this interview when we covered his run to that nineteen, eighty three French Open title, but the entire interview. It's just joy, and it will improve your mood, and if you do enjoy the into you tell your friends family, let your social media, and what's that group's now about it because it will just leave them happier than when they started listening to. It has Yannick Noah. I'd like to go right back to the beginning of your of your career, and even before your career and the reason for your career and. I believe a meeting with Arthur Ashe. Yep Absolutely. Our used to leave the group in Cameroon, Africa and We were I was playing detail club tennis was. Not, very, big in Cameroon in the whole country, back nine court, so to play tennis was very privilege radio privilege so. so we used to go to the club at night, but at that time my parents couldn't afford a racket in one day. When I heard that? Some Americans were coming to the club saw. Americans you know so. So Marty Riessen Charlie Pasarell, Tom, ochre, and Arthur Ashe where doing tour in Africa. And they happen to play one day my club. During the clinic they decide. They played with the kids. And I played with Sir and Liked what he saw. I was slim press. You know he was my heroes. At the end of the clinic gave me a racket is racket. Head competition that worth like. Probably Probably what my parents would making every month. and it was you know it was like a dream for me to meeting. Dr Racket Sonya poster. Saying To Yannick I hope I'll see one that. So that was very funny. But the next thing that happened is after this story went to the French Open and he talked to shut. It was the president of the Federation. I told him that he was a little kid was playing. Or was in French. Speaking. Country and And I I. The scholarship came to friends because of author I played in niece for few years. And? The first time I played in Wimbledon That was nine years after we met was in Wimbledon because as for wild card. That was accepted and we play doubles on center court. So that was a beautiful story, so yes, the so mean Africa. And he was a big part of my story. Because and after that you know. For some reason, he was always like you know. Not Too far helping me when I was younger growing up, and then you know played with him at Wimbledon, the first tournament. Back in the days. It was called Super Seris. I was playing Richmond Virginia where he was born. And that was the first tournament I one. Super Series and As I was you know going through the tournament semifinal quarterfinals? Semifinals Playing Roscoe Tanner and these gentlemen comes into locker room sold demand. It comes. It goes Yanic if you win. Arthur is coming tomorrow SEO really worrisome. Is Dad. So that was that was something I beat Roscoe and An author flew to Richmond I played Yvonne in the finals. Won The won. It and Arthur gave me the cup in his hometown, so that was really special.

Arthur Ashe Yannick Noah Tennis Africa Dr Racket Sonya John Mcenroe Cameroon Roscoe Tanner Catherine Football Richmond Davis Marty Riessen Charlie Pasarell Richmond Virginia President Trump Yvonne TOM
Computer Vision for Remote AR with Flora Tasse

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

04:07 min | 5 months ago

Computer Vision for Remote AR with Flora Tasse

"Art Everyone. I'm here with flora. TASSEZ flora is head of computer, vision and AI research at stream accompany that she joined through the acquisition of another company which she co founded Salerio. Flora welcome to the trauma. Is podcasts Jake you sound sufficient to the thanks for the right Lahser to have you on the show and I'm really looking forward to digging into your recent CV, PR, presentation you did a keynote at the a are VR workshop. I was to see that. There is enough happening at the intersection of AR, VR and machine learnings A workshop at CPR on that topic. Don's happening. This is happening. That's face. Sabatini could smoke shop. Yeah, well, you can tell us all about that, but before you do please share a little bit about your background and how you got started and computer vision how you came to found scenario. Stream love to hear all of it. That's like that. That would be a long story, but I'll try to shut down. So I was born in raise in Cameroon, so Cameroon is in this central is in central Africa and what we saw in the city of Wella, and so I was raised in day. Fred, picking politic country, so you might notice that for my accent. Some French in the and. Yeah so from a very early age, I was very much into special effects in movies and more precisely, Jurassic Park so I was a big fan of the of the movies because of the Daniels. Our seed that disclosed TV steering into dinosaurs and wondering. How can it be like? Why is it so real and I? Asked my dad like. How can they make these extinct creatures look so stick, and then he said Graphics Sack Okay Yeah? That's what I'm GONNA do. That's. My perfect dream you know making the impossible become possible. So fast forward. A few years I did my bachelor mats in the English, speaking parts had to learn English English and then move and did Matt's because I couldn't. They had no causing computer science, so then move out of the country to Africa where I did a master in in Cape Town. In South Africa. Yup was amazing. I recommend. Is a great vacations. And I did my Masters Dad then came to Cambridge for my PhD okay, so twenty twelve arrive in the UK already to make my dreams come true. And so those if needed I a good experience so at. Cambridge I was working at. Had you take a real things in images and turn them into treat content, so I was doing some shape retriever ship analysis from images, and you have to image, and you want to turn into a three D. Shape exactly yeah, that's exactly what I was doing. So far yes, or Trinity Half Years I stumbled upon like a great discovery that if you actually incorporate. And then P. So, if you incorporate language information, you can basically get really really accurate results going from twenty two treaty, and so the addition of that. Yeah so. So, the concept was developed and just looking at images as just. Pixel that you can enter into some features and use calcification on them. Was a concept that those features can actually be semantic features so there's some semantic meaning attached to those descriptors that you are. Thank generating.

Africa Lahser Cambridge Cameroon Jurassic Park South Africa Salerio CPR Sabatini DON Fred Cape Town Wella Matt Daniels UK
Euro 2020 Championship postponed to 2021 over coronavirus crisis

BBC World Service

00:26 sec | 9 months ago

Euro 2020 Championship postponed to 2021 over coronavirus crisis

"Yesterday European football's governing body UEFA did indeed as widely trial decide to postpone your I. twenty twenty two euro twenty twenty one and the confederation of African football is put back next month's African nations championship for locally based players at the request of the organizes Cameroon elsewhere Sierra Leone is called a whole pool sporting activities with immediate effect I don't actually have a case of coronavirus registered in the country just

Uefa Football Cameroon Sierra Leone
Visiting the Atlantis Dive Resort in Dumaguete

Scuba Shack Radio

05:00 min | 11 months ago

Visiting the Atlantis Dive Resort in Dumaguete

"Today your next dive. I'm GONNA take you to the Atlanta's dive resort in Douma Getty first of all. You'll fly into Manila from the US and it's a long flight for for example direct from JFK. You can fly to Manila overnight and there are a lot of options from various points in the US in the West Coast. Once you get get to Manila. You'll be transferred by the Atlanta's organization to a flight to do Magadan on an airline called Seibu Pacific as I mentioned. It's just the short one hour flight in the morning. Once you get to do a getty the attendance will pick up your bags from the baggage claim and load them on a van. Where you'll it'll take about a thirty to forty minutes Ride to the resort which is down which is just outside the Duma getty city. You'll get to the resort. It's a little short Dirt road down to the resort. Not Very Long. But it's interesting flows through to the resort. And once you get there you walk completely. Threw the resort to the front desk area. Where you'll check in immediately when we got to the place it made us feel at home? We got there at a later in the day. We were there at dinner and we all sat down to dinner and while we were waiting for dinner. They gave us a quick neck massage. While we were getting manning served so pretty interesting the rooms. We were very very impressed with the room. They're really nice. They can have either a king size bed. Ed or double beds Our Room had a nice couch in it. It was a desk spacious so we could lay out all of our stuff. Also Our Room had double sinks in the bathroom very very nice room. The rooms also had a deck associated winning which are sheltered and they had a ceiling fan on top of the deck. A nice place to dry your bathing suits out or some gear. Plus there was a lounge chair out on the on the deck area. Now I did notice that some of the decks also had hammocks on them. Let's talk about the food to Tokyo. Restaurant is outstanding. You will get three meals a day their breakfast which is all car. You can get a Omelettes waffles. French toast If you're going there eggs benedict are pretty good The one that I really liked where the chocolate banana French toast luncheon dinner. There's a menu board and you can get a super salad. There's up to four entrees on their things like chicken beef fish noodle stir FRY PASTA ASTA and then two desserts this talk about diving. Wow it was outstanding you take aac either. A small motor launch or sometimes there's a larger Bach abode. Noser like with the outriggers on it few on the bottom boat. They're very spacious. Die Sites sites are very close. One to ten minutes away and you can get either muck diving or muck and ref- or just just just reef and we were very very amazed at the colors the fish life the biodiversity. It really seems like it's on steroids. Loyd's compared to the Caribbean. There was not a lot of depth there we usually stayed in the sixty foot range and every dive was sixty minutes. It's or more visibility. Came in at about eighty feet. Also we did a trip to Otto island which is about a forty forty five to fifty minute boat ride where we did three dives. The coral on Apo island was fabulous. I think they say there's over six hundred species of quarrel in six hundred and fifty species of marine life on UPO island. Another thing that we did was your trip over to Seibu. Two Oz. Lob Job where we snorkeled with will sharks now the dive locker is pretty spacious. You get a little cubby for your certain in gear. There are showers into dive locker. Rinse tanks and an area for nighthawks analysis and recording. Debriefing area is Outside and you go through a brief between each dive at what you do you come back between dives to shore change out your tanks get briefed and go forward Lord. There's a Cameroon a classroom. And there's an on site SPA and pool if you don't WanNa take die a take a day off a diving you can do other tours. There's a city tour where you can go out and do some shopping you can get up to five dives a day. Atlantis dive resort. We were so impressed that we are planning to go back in two thousand twenty one with the shop trip

Manila Duma Getty City Douma Getty United States Atlanta Magadan Seibu Pacific Cameroon JFK Apo Island West Coast Otto Island Upo Island Manning ED Tokyo Seibu Loyd Caribbean
Seeking asylum Is Tough In Trump's America—And Even Tougher In Japan

Morning Edition

04:04 min | 1 year ago

Seeking asylum Is Tough In Trump's America—And Even Tougher In Japan

"When refugees flee their homeland there's family separation there's also physical and psychological trauma and there's the challenge of assimilation that's true whether the immigrant ends up in New York City or Tokyo this week W. N. Y. C.'s Matt Katz is bringing us stories from a global refugee crisis in his series called unsettled and he's focusing on a country we don't hear much about when it comes to refugees Japan today we need a couple of newly arrived immigrants from Cameroon and Tunisia were broadening the idea of what it means to be Japanese I met a lot of new immigrants to Japan and inevitably we all got around to talking about the same thing the wireless is something else public bathrooms in Japan are super clean welcoming and high tech exceed the and forget myself and I'm just comfortable taking on lifetime hindering him leasing rose recently fled a civil war in her country of Cameroon in central Africa and she's now making a long shot attempts at winning asylum in Japan which is notoriously resistant to immigration she only ended up here because she happened to secure a Japanese visa Japan a country she knew almost nothing about was our fastest way to safety she's been here almost a year now and she's whole areas actually my countrymen if you have to use the public toilet does the worst thing that can happen to you despite our laughter rose has plenty of worries about her nineteen year old son who seeking asylum in Minnesota about the police beating back home in Cameroon that left her with a scar and lingering head injury rose didn't want us to use her real name because her family is still in danger and still talking about the simple joy of using Japanese toilets the excitement of something new that brings welcome solace to cope any where you find yourself you free enough to do a lot of adjustments most of the refugees if not or that I've made I just Japan doesn't welcome immigrants in part because keeping foreigners away he keeps Japan unique strict rules govern life right down to the sorting of trash the thinking is that people just can't come and learn how to be Japanese but as migrants seeking safety or living wage increasingly moved to Japan they're challenging that idea and I don't mean that he'd built Correa from Tunisia she's applying for refugee status in Japan because she says back home she faced discrimination for being gay you know you've only been here a few weeks but do you think like if you were to live here for a long time that you could become Japanese or do you feel like you've always got to be an outsider for me I think I can be one hundred percent believe me because this country if you like connected with long time ago it's not new unlike rose that he knew a lot about Japan before she got here she's a huge fan of anime specially it's music Japanese Sir maybe they do this like rose now he will have a tough time convincing Japan to let her stay of the thousands of immigrants just a few dozen get refugee status each year but in the meantime she's allowed to live freely while her application is reviewed no heed adores Japan she likes how they don't throw their trash on the street that trains run on time that religious people don't push their views on to others she sees Japan as a refuge but for the like minded she chose Japan she didn't randomly end up here like many refugees which she knows it'll be hard to win legal status I'm okay with that when a country's tried to protect freedom and protect its values and its tradition

One Hundred Percent Nineteen Year
North Dakota county to accept only 25 refugees in 2020

Morning Edition

02:45 min | 1 year ago

North Dakota county to accept only 25 refugees in 2020

"An executive order from the trump administration seeks to give local officials the authority to reject refugees in their communities Burleigh county North Dakota considered whether to become the first in the nation to do that but after emotional testimony county commissioners rejected that motion just barely Dave Thompson of prairie public has this report Burleigh county includes a state capitol Bismarck North Dakota governor Doug Bergen had already agreed to accept refugees in the state and with the governor's endorsement it fell to the county commission to accept refugee resettlement to North Dakota counties Grand Forks and cast have already agreed to take refugees Lutheran social services manages the rest settlement program an overflow crowd estimated at two hundred or more came to a local middle school to hear the discussion and sound off on the proposal treasure one is on was born in the Democratic Republic of the Congo he came to America at age sixteen and is now in college pursuing a degree while working at a local restaurant we're not in this country just to take your government money in fact we're here to work and be successful in life just like everyone else here Geraldine on bay as a refugee from Cameroon she asked commissioners to consider what refugees meaning to the county I'm going to stop here by challenging everybody tonight when you leave you go to Walmart and see how many of them your shows Walmart why use do you want what you're talking about thank you opponents say they were concerned about the cost of bringing refugees to the area and what impact it might have on local schools look Lingenfelter is from Bismarck but I'd like to see before we bring in more people if we're spending money taxpayer dollars to bring these people and can we spend the money to help the people that are already here first when it came time to take a vote the commission approved three to two can Mister Jerry would **** was a yes vote with the stipulation that Burleigh county except only up to twenty five refugees in the next year when you see the success of the refugees that have been here for twenty years and and it's been a long term program has done an excellent job and I was convinced that that was the what we were going to be doing commission chairman Brian Bittner voted no saying he did not have enough information I need to know what this costs I mean all together because it seems to me we kind of give a blank check because as American citizens to refugee resettlement and I'd like to know more about what it actually costs the decision has to be renewed

Lingenfelter Chairman Dakota Burleigh County North Dakota Executive Brian Bittner Mister Jerry Bismarck Dave Thompson Walmart Cameroon Geraldine America Congo Doug Bergen Burleigh County Prairie
"cameroon" Discussed on Powering the Movement: A Global Citizen Podcast

Powering the Movement: A Global Citizen Podcast

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"cameroon" Discussed on Powering the Movement: A Global Citizen Podcast

"One thing we haven't talked about is how technology can be a solution into global health issues in this case. Technology is solution to a preventable health issues for women but first Alan says young people need to take action. My message to other young people get involved the issues affect their future. We need to put skin in the game. We are living in a very exciting time. Where access to knowledge that she's really knowledge is very accessible now? Internet a lot of problems that we have are we know skew sets we. Can I truly solve them access to capitalize easier today than ten years back and we'd skin in the game. We really mobilize all the resources we need all the talent we need to just ask me some of the issues. We've been complaining for a long time about Goffman about colonization but we could skin in the game and some of these issues. Choose any extra progress today. I don't see in your problem. I should be excited about rather than focusing on making sure that held is accessible. Would anyone no matter IOS economic class so I believe we can solve this for MOMS during their pregnancy. We can extend this to who will make sure that accessible for everyone independent of your of your economic status the winner of the Cisco Disco Youth Leadership Award is being announced this month. So you can head to our website global citizen Dot Org to find out if gifted mom one while you're there you can check stories about other change makers like len and his friend Conrad to hear more about gifted mom visit their site at gifted mom dot car and you can stop taking action to to support maternal health today in the global citizen APP. If you want to share land story place in this episode to a friend will help us find this podcast by rushing and reviewing powering the movement. Wherever you're listening it really helps the cause I'm your host Madge Thomas Powering? The movement a global citizen podcast cost is a CO production of global citizen and kindred media. Daniel Roth produced this episode and it was scored and mixed by Brad Stratton. Sandy's molins is our our executive producer. Chris Payton is the executive producer kindred media. Cassie Corollas is the editor in chief. Global Citizen Special thanks to Kiki Moldy Auty Map Petron. CR rife pain an Alley Mitch..

executive producer Auty Map Petron Madge Thomas Powering Cisco Disco Youth Leadership Dot Org Cassie Corollas Alan Chris Payton Goffman Daniel Roth editor in chief Brad Stratton Sandy len Conrad
Science News Briefs From All Over

60-Second Science

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Science News Briefs From All Over

"I have scientific American podcast editor. Steve Mirsky here's a short piece from the November. Two Thousand Nineteen issue of the magazine in the section uncalled advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some science and Technology Legiti stories from around the globe compiled by editorial intern Jennifer Leeman from Canada. In the famed Burgess Shale rock formation paleontologists alien technologists discovered hundreds of fossils of a horseshoe crab shaped Predator that lived in the ocean. Five hundred six million years ago it. It measured up to a foot long from Tanzania marine biologists discovered a colorful fish species dubbed the vibration eum ferry routes during go diversity assessment of largely unstudied deep reefs off Zanzibar is coast from Columbia. Scientists confirmed a destructive instructive. Fungus targeting. Banana plants has arrived in the country. No treatment is available so officials put potentially infected crops under quarantine to stop its spread from Mexico. Researchers of rationed electricity and cut temporary employees jobs. After Mexico's president lowered funding funding for federal institutions by thirty to fifty percent in certain budget items including those supported by the National Council of Science and technology and from Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea. Scientists found that Goliath frogs which are earth's largest living frogs and can be longer than an American can football construct protected ponds for their young by pushing heavy rocks across streams. They live only in this region that was quick hits by Jennifer Lima.

Steve Mirsky Mexico Burgess Shale Jennifer Leeman Jennifer Lima Technology Legiti National Council Of Science Editor Equatorial Guinea Tanzania Zanzibar Earth Intern Canada President Trump Columbia Five Hundred Six Million Years Fifty Percent
"cameroon" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"cameroon" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Nestled between two mountain ranges in the heart of Central Asia. The Forgotten Valley is the region's most populous area in ancient times. The Silk Road wound through its rugged good landscape now fed by two rivers. It's rich agricultural land. The valley is proud of its traditions including ceramics and embroidery this year the city of Auch held celebrations as it was made the twenty nineteen Turkic capital of culture. But all is not well. They're the valley is carved up between three countries Kirghistan who's Pakistan. Anti Gecas done with jagged borders the cut ethnic groups and nationalities off from one. Another another and that can make life complicated so I did a bus station in the city of Agana. That's in a pot of his Pakistan cooled. join a Lewis reports on central Asia for the Economist. I was says seeking out people who were looking to go to a place. Ice Cold Sauce is also part of these Becca Stan. It's respect territory. It's actually an exclave that means it's an island of these banker Stan surrounded by another another country a sea of stop. And that's because the forgotten valley is crisscrossed by all kinds of borders. There are nine such excluding the forgotten valley so traveling around is pretty complicated and so what did the people they're telling you the ones who were heading to suck. They told me that the journey was longer than it. Should it bait. And that's because of bottlenecks. Now we're talking here about this class and the difficulty of crossing boards in this part of Central Asia. People that I spoke to they they were shooting a bus a very decrepit orange bus. Actually the required a push from a few men in the bus station when when it actually did set off all the people were were boarding the bus and they told me that the journey was gonna take them about three hours that it should be a little quicker as what man told me you know. We haven't actually been able to travel freely for a very long time will why is that. How did these borders gets to be so so complicated? So nonsensical well. We have to remember that not orders that that now stand today is international. Board is in the forgotten Valet. Once upon a time in did not very long ago they were not international borders a tool old Daiwa internal boundaries within Soviet Union the communist US assault that ruled Central Asia from Moscow and these borders were drawn up in the early early days of the Soviet Union basically in the nineteen twenties when they were working out how to create an governor Soviet Union so in Central Asia the borders what is withdrawn up then and they brutally stand today as they will join up. Then why were they drawn in a way that's led to so much confusion now. What masters at the time was not so much whether land lay on one side of the border or another what mattered was meeting certain? Criteria for example each republic had half a million people so sometimes Kong's cities that may be logically should have gone into one republic were simply placed into another republic and also that was the question not only of what Moscow wanted and how it wanted to to govern that area but what local powerbrokers wanted and how they wanted to keep certain areas into their fiefdoms and make them as largest possible so it was extremely consolidated. The fact is that Buddhist went an enormous problem under the Soviet Union because they were really internal administrative boundaries the bureaucrats they were important in terms of how the region was governed but to ordinary people. They basically daily existed and so for the people that you saw. Aw taking the bus to. So what are the border crossings. Like now now. Many many border bottlenecks and sometimes the crossings can be very slow very bureaucratic crashing on occasion also corrupt. I spoke to an WHO's back lorry driver at a crossing. Korva deal which was the crossing that the people people who are boarding that bus Infanta travel to be excellent of sock would be using and he told me he was waiting for a call to go over to kick stand to pick up by load of potatoes and he told me that he would have to pay. A kid is or the gods some money to be allowed to cross so we see those kind of problems but also what what we see is many close borders. That people can't actually cross the tool. I'm this is one of the reasons why people are taking these large detours to go in between the places that they live in the places that they need to get to some of the borders simply don't function they're simply closed. I visited a border in the the town of Rishon. The day that I visited and even now a- that boarder just ends in a big tangle of opt wire and a few respect Mike Boorda Gaza patrolling on that close order now. This was particularly poignant because when I just decided to in early September that border had recently been opened. It was opened with a a big party. The very next day at border was slammed. Shut once again. And this was very symptomatic of the border bottlenecks that sort of creates such inconvenience for them day lives. It sounds as if there isn't a whole lot of Wilford for things to change. Do you think the situation will just continue wasting time time when things are changing greatly in the Central Asian region and that goes for border cooperation as many as many other things. The Game Changer that we have seen here. It's been a change of leadership newsmax Stan which was once the biggest spoiler of border cooperation and regional relations with other central Asian neighbors and nowadays since the change of Leadership News Pakistan. It's actually become one of the biggest drivers of regional integration. So things are changing. Thank thank you very much for your time. Joanna you come..

Forgotten Valley Central Asia Becca Stan Soviet Union Moscow Pakistan Asia Auch Agana Mike Boorda Gaza Daiwa Joanna Rishon US Lewis Kong Wilford assault
Language barrier: Cameroons forgotten conflict

The Economist: The Intelligence

09:42 min | 1 year ago

Language barrier: Cameroons forgotten conflict

"Not so long ago. Cameroon was a stable country in a fragile region. Today it's anything but for the past three years of bloody conflict. Raging separatist militias want independence for the English speaking areas of the mainly Francophone Country Poor governance silence. trigger-happy forces are burning down villages while the militias are becoming increasingly violent. Thousands have died in the unrest. More than half a million have been forced from their homes. I spent a week travelling in the anglophone the phone regions where the effects of the war are clear for everyone to see John. McDermott is our Africa correspondent in village after village that I drove through I saw fields feels that grown wild houses that are being burned down and several buildings are just been pot marked with bullets. The conflict was inescapable. The origins of the conflict go back at least a century after the first World War the former German colony of Cameroon was split up between Britain and France and then when those parts became independent in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine hundred and sixty one. They were spliced together to make modern day Cameroon and now the country is officially by lingual with roughly twenty percent of people speaking English and eighty percent of people speaking French but the English speakers claim. Decades of marginalization is Asian by the central government and year upon year. They've been promised more devolution to their regions but those promises have been repeatedly broken and so why did those attention start to increase three years ago. Those tensions had been bubbling for some time but towards the tail end of two thousand sixteen lawyers and teachers hit the streets protesting against the imposition of Francophone Systems and in response to those peaceful protests. The government hit back hard intern a year later. Some of the more extreme anglophones who are separatists I want independence they proclaimed the independent state of Amazonia Zonja which is named after the embassy in the southwest of the country and once more this led to another escalation this time violent international NGOs. Joe Think there's been at least three thousand people killed and perhaps several times more than not and so who's responsible for that. Violence is security. Forces is the a separatist themselves so neither are covering themselves in glory. Both separatist militias and security forces have committed atrocities. But there's also no doubt that the Cameroonian military is behind most of the bloodshed local. Ngo in Boya. The main city in the southwest region estimates that more than two hundred and twenty villages across the anglophone the phone region have been burned by Cameroonian military and you met some of the people who have been affected by that violence. Yes I met lots of people who'd been affected one man I met was called who had to flee his village of economic because of just a torrent of shootings and burnings by the military. He said he could recall literally hundreds of incidents where soldiers had fired at his fellow villagers story when a military gum Strauss. His immovable from galaxy censured was and in a when. You're hearing these stories. You can stop a why. Why are they doing this and for him? It just seemed like there was no questions asked us behind the soldiers they were just firing will do your neighbor in this to these two other people. I really cannot tell you. I really don't tell you because does does the systems municipal new way on Shugden. I do and you say the the army is responsible for most of the violence. But not all I mean well. What are the separatists doing so the separatists have mostly been attacking military and the military installations? But they've also also been attacking people on their own side who are deemed to be collaborators. With the State one woman I met Adeline worked for a state run company and call you you coming in Development Corporation which runs a series of plantations in the region and she described how one day she was accosted by about twenty of these militia men who attacked her tied to a tree stuff leaves her mouth is the diagnosed with autism or last about twitter witter and then chopped off a finger again. You ask them why they're doing this and her crime little as it might seem to us was to work for this state. Run Company and US was deemed a collaborator. If you have anything to do with the Francophone Central Government. You're into on this side. I mean that must have knock on effects for for the way. The country runs for the economy's for society. The economy is collapsing. The anglophone regions contribute about fifth of the country's GDP and the main in company is that plantation CD and since the attacks began a couple of years ago workers essentially stopped. Revenue is down ninety percent. MM sold a single banana when I went down to their headquarters in a tank with a the general manager and all his staff just seem completely full on these because because they had also been receiving lots of death. Threats phoned the separatists so I said you know how you how you dealing with this posed any side and he looked at me and I said I pray more or less and so in essence people are are simply afraid to to go about business as usual. Yes there's widespread terror amongst the population and it's especially acute amongst parents. Almost ninety percent of children and the anglophone regions have not gone to school for three years. This is partly because of forced displacements by the military but it's also because the separatists see schools as arms terms of the state. Now there are some incredibly brave educators who have set up ad hoc classrooms and buildings these displaced children again. It's not entirely entirely safe. I asked one of the teachers at the school. I visited Baya. How do you ensure the security of these children John and frankly she admitted you can never be one hundred percent safe award yet? If we knew in fact she said that there were often threats of kidnapping which has become increasingly common as separatists. Either seek to impose their will or frankly sometimes just seek to get extra money out of the population. So what about the people who aren't directly involved in the conflict in the anglophone region. How do they view the constant cycle of violence? It's hard to do polling in a war zone but when the violence began it seemed like there was a surge in support for the separatists who reviewed viewed as helping keeping local safe but as time has gone on and you find things like the sabotage of education opinion may be in slightly shifting against them. I interviewed a professor at the University of Boya Guy called Garner some of the inflicted on a community. Ah Ah change attitudes. And he said that loyalty to the separatists is indeed dwindling. No longer call him voice. Call them booze boys he he also told me that in what most anglophones want isn't necessarily independence they want more autonomy Habsi federal Cameroon's not a safe arenas we're waiting for it is. It is anglophone vessels from before but he was very keen to stress that the anglophones have grievances but there were the central government not the french-speaking compatriots. Do you think a kind of reduced appetite amongst the Anglophones Ford. This conflict will have any effect on it. I mean how do you see. The situation playing out at the moment went to win. A bit of a stalemate because the separatist militias take the towns and the Cameron Army camp take the Bush normally calls for a political solution. Cameroon lean governed as it is by president. Paul Biya who has been on the proverbial thrown for thirty seven years is prone to move slowly in September. He announced a national dialogue but it was a total sham. Some of the key people weren't invited and it wasn't really even about the anglophone crisis so what you have then is. Is this political process. That's going far too slowly also because the rest of the world doesn't take much notice it's an underfunded under reported crisis and the bulk of people are just stuck in the middle of these two warring sides. Many people just want to get on with their lives in peace and sadly that's only possible in a few safe places such as the very very center boyer one evening I was there in the center. I was waiting for the Bishop of the time. And I caught one of those few glimpses of normality through the open windows of the church. I watched a choir including many members been asked fled their homes from other parts of the region and they were they were practising their songs for me. It was just a little reminder that in the midst of all this violence and chaos there is an everyday urge. Just keep one can occasionally manifest itself in rather beautiful ways. John Thank you very much for your time. Thank you

Cameroon John Francophone Country Poor Africa Francophone Central Government Francophone Systems Mcdermott Central Government Boya Amazonia Zonja Joe Think United States Intern Shugden Paul Biya Army Anglophones Ford Kidnapping
Rebuilding lives after terror in Cameroon

UN News

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Rebuilding lives after terror in Cameroon

"Meru a bustling regional capital set in the dry and dusty plains of numbering cars ten times over they ferry people around the city of around Hoffa million people many who live here have been through the most matic experiences having been forced to flee villages close to the border which had been attacked by terrorists line to Boko Haram or other obs- How do we get these women or any victim to recover and rebuilder lives and that's of course much more complicated because it requires a lot of longer term assistance Daniel Dickinson and in this special UN use the leaders on podcast from Cameroon. I'll be looking at what can be done for people who have suffered at the hands of violent extremists people who through no fault of their own have lost everything and who now need somehow restart their lives it's noon and the hottest time of the day and Moore but trees provide comforting shape right at this outdoor workshop a couple of blocks from the main thoroughfare of this city one man and four women in brightly colored robes sit in a circle on the floor working diligently stitching leather sandals the leather has been cured from slaughtered animals and the souls and made from discarded vehicle tires it is one of the women in June two years ago she was forced to flee her home in the town of Mohra and what's the north of Moore after it was attacked by Boko Haram everybody got Amanda mckellar dignity coogan embody local there was fighting but I didn't realize I was frank read at the time my husband had gone to work he was killed there the local chief came by my house and told you that had to flee the children that day I was so scared had never felt feel like this before I don't know how to explain it I didn't eat a had no strength I was overwhelmed by the situation I'm in to Sally's home was burnt to the ground in panicked surrounding that attack she lost everything she still doesn't know what happened to her husband whose body she's never seen she now makes up to two passive sandals each week and sells vegetables on a small stand outside the workshop to make ends meet these offer only sources of income so she's pleased to have received the training I like walking IBP thanks because I would like to get more training and then maybe have the strength to raise my children my husband died two years ago and it's only now that I'm beginning a new life with I five hundred to sally as just one of around two hundred fifty thousand people who fled terrorist attacks in northeast Cameroon in the vernacular of the UN she's known as an internally displaced person or ADP body it's not just cameroonians reflected by terrorist groups like Boko Haram as I spoke to her some two hundred and fifty kilometers north tens of thousands if people were pouring across the border from the Nigerian town of Ram just a few miles away into the village of Gura in Cameroon honoring renewed attacks by terrorists

Cameroon Sally Daniel Dickinson Hoffa UN Moore Amanda Mckellar IBP Mohra ADP Gura Two Years Fifty Kilometers
Cameroon opposition leader and supporters freed from prison

BBC World Service

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Cameroon opposition leader and supporters freed from prison

"The United Nations and human rights campaigners have welcomes the release from prison of Camarines main opposition leader Boris comes home was set free after surprise announcement by president pulled via as a conference aimed at ending conflict in English speaking parts of

United Nations Boris President Trump Camarines
News in Brief 18 September 2019

UN News

02:55 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 18 September 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. U N Chief Antonio Guitarist and head of the Red Cross Peter Mirror joined forces on Wednesday to call for an end to the use of explosive weapons in cities it live in Syria and the Libyan capital Tripoli out today enduring a hail of bombs and shells they said in a statement the appeal to all parties to armed conflict wants that fifty million people are affected in the world by lethal devices including those that have a wide impact area in populated zones owns citing estimates indicating that nine in ten casualties of urban warfare are civilians the UN at Red Cross chiefs also noted how clashes in the Yemeni city of Aden Aden had left at least two hundred thousand people without clean water and how wider conflict set the country's development back two decades in Iraq. They added one and a half million. Am people had been internally displaced across the country by conflict and are unable to go home in a reminder to State that twenty nineteen marks the seventieth anniversary of the Geneva Conventions which say that even wars have rules the heads of the UN and Red Cross urged countries to create mechanisms to mitigate and investigate harm to civilians and ensure accountability entity to the human rights council now where Cameroon has reaffirmed its determination to lead tireless combat against Boko Haram extremists addressing the forty seven member body in Geneva Ambassador Bella and Bella journ also noted that numerous positive steps had been taken for durable pace following clashes between english-speaking the separatists and government forces after explaining the President Paul Beers decision to hold a grand national dialogue with all sectors of Cameroonian society aim to resolve the conflict flicked the ambassador noted that there would be no impunity for those responsible for the attacks in the northwest and southwest of the country and finally more people everywhere everywhere should talk into Mediterranean style menus to counter the threat from easy to eat processed meals that can meet bad for their health and the environment you an expert said on Wednesday stay at a food and Agriculture Organization event in Italy. FAO Director-general coup Dongyue explained that traditional and indigenous eating patterns like the Mediterranean Diet often promote local produce and have a low carbon footprint with its reliance on grilled meat fish and olive oil the southern European menu has long been regarded guarded as a healthier alternative to it sometimes stodgy northern neighbors despite these benefits the Mediterranean Diet and others like it up being lost. Mr Dongyue warned amid population growth globalization and urbanize -ation with funding from the Italian government. FAO is working to promote the Mediterranean Diet in Lebanon and Tunisia the lessons learned from this project will be transferred into policies to promote the Mediterranean dot more broadly as part of the Sustainable Development Goals Twenty thirty agenda. The agency said in a statement Daniel Johnson U. N. News.

Red Cross Chiefs FAO Red Cross Aden Aden Geneva Ambassador Bella Coup Dongyue United Nations UN Syria Antonio Guitarist Iraq Peter Mirror Bella Journ Tripoli Tunisia Daniel Johnson U. Cameroon Director-General Lebanon
Ambassador Deborah Birx on Creating an AIDS-Free World

The Strategerist

12:02 min | 1 year ago

Ambassador Deborah Birx on Creating an AIDS-Free World

"Guest. Today's Ambassador Large Deborah burks who serves as the global AIDS coordinator in the US Special Representative for global health diplomacy diplomacy and in this role she heads up far the US president's emergency plan for AIDS Relief Dr Burks. Thank you so much for spending the time with us today happy to be here and our expert co host is the esteemed colleague who's Mitch the Executive Director at the Bush Institute Holly. Thank you for spending this so Dr Burks we. We we really WanNa talk to you about the incredible work that pep far is doing and has done but we've been extremely lucky to have so many great guests with leadership journeys that are just incredible on the on the strategic since we want to talk about your leadership journey a little bit to start and so early on I understand you're you you actually started off as a physician in the US military in the US army. Yes I was yes. How did that start off your career well. That's a great question so so I actually paid for my own medical school. It's why I went to Penn State Hershey on my parents and I paid but I ended up meeting someone in College Canary them my first year of medical school and I didn't realize he had taken the army scholarship and so he was actually active duty Army when he finished so in order under for me to be with him because it's not like they let you just come in and be a co resident so his residency was at Walter Reed so I joined the military military so I could be in an internal medicine residency with him otherwise I would have never seen him and what kind of what kind of did you learn from your from your standing. The military freising up to colonel. I believe you have to read was really an amazing place to trade it was at that time every complicated case from all all over the world came to Walter Reed. It didn't matter if you were retired in Europe or you were active duty and Thailand if anything befell someone or there was a very very complicated illnesses they came to Walter Reed and so we would have araks medical Arabic's coming in three and four times a week and as residents so you would bring all those patients in an exam in them so it was a we saw the most complicated infectious diseases is to the most complicated cancers do it was just it was amazing experience and we had really terrific professors we call them. Attending who were over at the research institute who would come over to Walter Reed Hospital to attend and so it was very easy for me. Pass my internal medicine boards 'cause I had actually seen everything that was on the board because it was really an amazing training experience so given that you initially really only joined the military because of your husband and you were when you went to medical school did that change your path in terms of. Do you think you would have been the head of PEP far today. If you hadn't gone the military route I definitely nervous angle angle because the military I think they spent so much time on leadership training so it didn't matter that I was a physician from the military standpoint you were just a captain didn't or you're just a major or lieutenant colonel and you were just a colonel and you had to be able to lead troops and so we had the same trainings and the same leadership trainings things as all the line officers at the time you could imagine you're busy with medicine and you're taking care of patients and then you're having to do all of this command and General Israel Staff School and Leadership Training and at the time I was like I'm never going to use this because when you're in their twenties as you think all of this stuff is really natural very or you think it's intuitive but it leadership is not intuitive and I think that trainings at the military the discipline that the military brings to sequential leadership training. I think is quite unique. I think it's why many businesses have tried to copy it the end it's really comprehensive so I had to learn acquisition and budgets and so all of the terminology that used in government. It's all normal to me because all that acronyms we had to train on. Even though I was in medicine I really had to learn all the other pieces different there you went to from your from the military you went to the Department of Defense on the civilian side now dow. You skipped a little bit of a step so it was very very interesting. I was in. I was actually in pep far. At the time I soon as President Bush announced pep far are at the state of the Union. I had already been working in Africa for about five or six years. I was doing research and it really bothered me that I was doing very significant. HIV Vaccine Research but the community around me was dying so when President Bush announced this I flew back from from Kenya and waited outside of Joe O'Neill's house for almost a week in February to get a meeting with him and of course everybody knows is my powerpoint this time I went in like one hundred eighty slides and tell he agreed to let people are to let the army awesome be part of have far. I was not leaving his office and so I think I war him down by my powerpoint and I came into pep far as the critical community compassionate program that surrounded our research in both Uganda Kenya and Tanzania and then later Cameroon and Nigeria and it was that unbelievable ability to bring your high tech laboratory Ori Piece to serving the public that it was so intriguing so I got into pep far as on the side and then people ask me to apply for the CDC we see position in two thousand and five and so I went through the regular civilian application process got selected which I was very much shocked by uh-huh and my commanding general at that time my surgeon general general scumacher said I really we want them to understand the military and CDC doesn't really have a lot of experience with military members. Would you go down there on active duty for two years so they could see uh that the military is just like them and you know we can work together seamlessly so I did and then the war started and so I ended up being an active duty longer than I had anticipated but eventually I became the civilian down at CDC and so it was a it it was a very crooked pathway into my office visit you tell the story there. We have one hundred eighty point powerpoint deck where did good where did that passion for. HIV and AIDS really start to form for you. So I had just finished my fellowship. I had finished internal medicine. I was doing immunology. I wanted immunology really do research on how the immune system works. I was working on primary and secondary condemn. You note efficiencies similar to like the boy in the bubble who didn't have T. cells. I worked with B. Cell immunodeficiencies. Tesol immunodeficiencies and I got called old in one thousand nine hundred eighty two about individuals. I'm dying at Walter Reed soldiers young soldiers dying from a mysterious serious immune immune dysfunction and so came into HIV not knowing it was HIV. We didn't know that it was. HIV until nineteen eighteen eighty five so from eighty to eighty five. I worked side by side with the Infectious Disease Team while we tried to save these soldiers and we couldn't and I think it was so profoundly I think what you're trained in medicine and the eighties and you've got all this high tech stuff and ability to diagnose everything when you naughtily could make a diagnosis didn't know what the problem was and you didn't know how to treat it. It was devastating. It was incredibly humbling and I they really and the shocking thing to me was all of my patients who were dying. We're worried about me because I was so upset that I couldn't can do anything to help. They died with such courage and such willingness to try different things realizing that may not help them but it helped the person person behind them. I just never saw that level of altruism in the midst of just death and despair from the patients themselves and so so I think like for the last I guess thirty seven years. I've just really thirty plus even more than that. We're not it really been focused on doing everything we can to not only save lives but change the course of the epidemic so that the future feature for the world could be imagined as age as AIDS free so. Let's talk a little bit about pet far and the progress we've made. It's been then going since two thousand and three for sixteen years so what's happened in the six juniors. It's been really I would say. It's probably everything that that I've ever done. It's been an enormous privilege. I think because of two reasons one it was like a moonshot. I mean when President Bush Bush announced this there weren't sophisticated labs in sub Saharan Africa which was bearing the brunt of the disease where one a- and in four adults were already infected. Children hundreds of thousands millions of children's didn't have parents anymore. It was really this unbelievable translation translation of what you believe America stands for as we will take our best and our brightest and everything that we know and use that to change the future for others and I think being able to translate. US Taxpayer dollars through this initiative has been the most extraordinary piece of work take anyone could be involved in and I think that is such a big responsibility but it's also an amazing really representation of what we stay on for it and it's not just I think what's been always exciting to me. It was never just about the money it was ensuring that that money continue new to us the best science and the best evidence to do what you could do remarkably for people and making sure that you're bringing that best signs. It's the same science that we have here in the United States and Europe to the people who need it the most around the globe. There's not very many programs as a lot of programs. That will say oh well. You can't really do that there. Because of these ten reasons this program said Oh nope. We're GONNA do everything that we're doing here. There and we're just GonNa make it happen and I think ah boldness that the president brought to this. I think people don't realize it wasn't just the boldness and the money it was the fact that he decided to create an entirely different structure for foreign assistance. I think people still have trouble understanding how brilliant that was the way it was positioned at the State Department the way it brought all the agencies together the way it made the State Department as the coordinator but but not actually Benny parts of implementation so that you could maintain accountability separate from any of these single agencies understanding that anyone agency would be conflicted. Ah trying to oversee another agency if they were actually doing the work

President Bush Bush Walter Reed United States HIV Aids Deborah Burks President Trump Walter Reed Hospital CDC Us Army Europe Coordinator Bush Institute Holly State Department Penn State Hershey Mitch Army Africa Executive Director
Cameroons place of terror now a land of hope

UN News

04:31 min | 1 year ago

Cameroons place of terror now a land of hope

"This is natalie hutchinson with you. On news a dusty dry and conflict affected area in the far north region of cameroon has been turned into a land of hope according to a mentor for people displaced by the activities of terrorists in the west african country. The small plot of land next to corgi town was once a no go area due to the presence of militia associated with the outlawed boko haram grew now has been transformed by local internally displaced people into a productive garden garden providing food to the community and an income to the participants ebrahim geogra- supports the internally displaced people in the garden which has been funded in part by by the u._n. Development program. He's spoke to you in newses daniel dickinson as the harvest a fruit and vegetables took place a my name is <hes> ibrahim geogra- <hes> <hes> peace activists walking with u._n. System here in far north region of cameroon specially u._n._d._p. Van de the mental so many i._d. Piece on haas people to give them up for them to develop do opportunity that can help them to have a livelihood and to support the families especially the <hes> like this woman my sister mahamadou she is an i._d. Piece we start to walk about with we've since <hes> t and now we meant to put in place a small business that can help him reclaim her. You see this assists defeats that mental refer all of them. Can you describe where we are and what's happening here. We are here in kogi. This is i._d. Fields <hes> sometime display is considered like <hes> no-man's-lands because even the community cannot oh come here to make activities like that to make a farm because so many people are very very afraid about the attacks offer book around and even around here a military checkpoints to block the people to enter into access for displays but today this no-man's-land displays of tier or have been transformed for the land of hope. Can you describe the fom tom how it looks in front of us get so many kind of a videotape here in this farm owner whose salads so many tomatoes toes on here is a call on it is a values buddy is buried with various vegetable that existing. What strikes me is that it's incredibly bradley green. We're surrounded by sahelian bush which is very sandy and very dry and suddenly we're in an oasis yeah when you see this farm and when you see these players is silent plus the genius of a these people great people especially a._d._p.'s host people fool put in place this kind of inner city to give the green vision of life and here this farm is a bio fund found door is not fetilizer i she michael fertilizer and why is it important to bring people together. Bringing people together is uh to give cuisine and social harp for all this committee have who have been suffering about the problem problem of crisis of boko haram because you know boko haram isa most catered group around the world and especially this town. Have i've been suffering. This is what we work with support if a u._n._d._p. On so many partners to develop this kind of initiative that can put people together to have a social tolerance and living together is it working is very walking because <hes> you you know we've just kind of get a now dig it. <hes> developed the initiative cds. It is to hit her. Maybe after decision they can get even five <hes> cease thousand dollar and it is very important for them to get up.

Cameroon Ebrahim Geogra Natalie Hutchinson Daniel Dickinson Ibrahim Geogra Kogi Haas Michael Fertilizer A._D._P. Thousand Dollar
News in Brief 23 August 2019

UN News

03:22 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 23 August 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations. A surge in deliberate attacks against students teachers and schools in western central africa has led a to a tripling in school closures in the last year the u._n. Children's fund unicef said on friday in a new report. The agency warned that a generation of youngsters had been robbed given education in eight countries in the sahel region sounding the alarm in geneva was unicef goodwill ambassador mizzou now melon a former syrian refugee. Nearly two million children are out of school at iota conflict so it is not an easy number. It is important to highlight those challenges linda's to highlight the struggling those people because they need us. They need our attention. I had to flee my homeland in syria and two thousand thirteen here team and they also had to lift if you can't it wasn't easy for me and also i can feel like those children who cannot go to school because education. Is something really really really important to me myself together. By unicef to june indicates that nine thousand two hundred and seventy two schools have been closed in makino fasso cameroon maroon chad central african republic democratic republic of the congo mali nesia anti-g area as a result of insecurity three times the number at the end of two thousand seventeen fifty four people have died in sudan because of flash flooding since last month and nearly one hundred ninety four thousand people have been affected across the country tree humanitarian have said citing an alert from the sudanese authorities the u._n.'s humanitarian coordinating archer reported that fifteen out of eighteen states dates have been hit and more than thirty seven thousand homes destroyed or damaged. Here's a spokesperson jens locker. The fake people are in need of emergency shelter food health services and clean water and sanitation. There's also an urgent need for victor control to limit the spread of waterborne diseases by insects and drainage of stagnant water with rainy season expected to last until october and more rainfall forecast humanitarian are concerned by the high likelihood of more flash floods of the one point one billion dollars required to respond to all aid needs in sudan this year only thirty percent has been provided by donors and finally hey to the democratic republic of the congo d._r._c. where the ebola virus outbreak continues to prove hard to pin down but you in health experts remain positive they can't arrogated it speaking in geneva dr michael ryan from the world health organization or w._h._o. Explained that two of the biggest challenges daily security risks in the northeast along with the massive movement of people all potential carriers of the virus at the peak of this outbreak. We were tracking twenty two thousand context everyday tracking twenty two thousand the different people every day in an area where people hundreds of thousands of people move in the province every day. It's been a huge challenge while they disease has spread in the last last two weeks to mwenga in south kivu. Dr ryan insisted that one of the biggest steps forward was the development of vaccines and therapeutic medicine's latest data shows at the outbreak has led to a total of two thousand nine hundred twenty seven cases of infection and one thousand nine hundred and sixty one deaths daniel johnson u._n. News.

Unicef Sudan Geneva United Nations Dr Ryan Africa Waterborne Diseases Jens Locker Congo Syria Linda Dr Michael Ryan Daniel Johnson Archer U._N. One Billion Dollars Thirty Percent Two Weeks
Suspected Boko Haram Attack on Funeral in Nigeria Leaves at Least 60 Dead

KQED Radio Show

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Suspected Boko Haram Attack on Funeral in Nigeria Leaves at Least 60 Dead

"There are reports that more than sixty people have died following an attack on a funeral gathering in Nigeria a limit get Condi reports that officials believe the extremist group Boko haram is behind the attack according to reports the attack occurred mid day on Saturday during a funeral in the northeastern state of **** local government chairman Mohammed belong not said attackers immediately killed twenty one people at the graveyard others were killed trying to escape the attack northeastern Nigeria has been the epicenter of a violent insurgency by the terrorist group Boko haram the group says their goal is to establish an Islamic caliphate in Nigeria last week March ten years since the beginning of the insurgency which has spread violence to neighboring Chad and Cameroon and the share the violence has displaced nearly two million people in Nigeria for NPR news I'm holy Mecca Candide and there'll be

Nigeria Chairman Mohammed Condi Chad Cameroon NPR Ten Years
"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

"So he asked for everything and got then some, but maybe it's because what he's asked for he's gotten any scene changes because he came into the program that he feels like he has this ability to change what it is. In the end it comes down to when fica expanded the tournament in allow for more teams to get in. But what it did allow for these teams to get in are usually, unfortunately, with exceptionally European teams, the rest of them are the ones that are underfunded. And this is a problem as whole as you're going to get games like this, because there aren't enough. There aren't enough countries that support their teams. The level the England doesn't I'm sorry if your support at the same while the, the way that US in Germany and England are supported it is your responsibility to handle it the right way. And to move the game forward. Right. Because what today do now, your team thinks that, oh, that team was dirty, you know, our coaches would do one in to touch, you need to play faster. If you do not play faster, is your fault because you're getting kicked instead of blaming somebody else. So the now you, you are an agent in the game instead of being the victim in a game. The manager for Cameroon align Junfa called it a miscarriage of Justice after the game, one of his players rice fhu, Joe said we didn't want to play anymore. We just wanted the game to be over after the second goal there was kind of, at strange moment of protests. Let's focus in on England real quick because they are moving on. I think Cameroon were more dangerous against England than they were against New Zealand against Netherlands against Canada. How would be real work? Moving forward. If I was England, mum about how threatened they were today that back line. Right. Yeah. Yeah. That back that's centre-back pairing a bright and holding a slow and their cavalier on the ball. They like to build on the back. They're very Norway next site. But the problem with Norway is there left side is weak and it's been weeks since Nigeria played on it's been week when France played them and the Mindy is the left back and it has been the problem coming into the tournament. You don't see some opportunity in the middle of that English defense for Norway, I do. But the question is what Norway did so well against Australia was, how quick they transitioned and they transitioned so fast and expert long balls, especially Savak that ball was unbelievable to her sloven to give him that goal the first goal can they do that, because I think this backline can get caught. It's going to be a fascinating match up. It's the first quarter-final that is set in stone, and I'm very, very much looking forward to Norway. And England, of course, we still have one more match to talk about on tomorrow, schedule. That's Canada and Sweden. But coming up next an interview with pharaoh book catch, he's going to give us the entire scouting report on Spain. Spain gets ready to face the US in the round of sixteen that interview next support for left or permitted in the following message come from Allah,.

England Norway Cameroon US Canada Spain pharaoh Junfa Nigeria Joe New Zealand Mindy Savak Sweden France Australia Germany Netherlands
"cameroon" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"cameroon" Discussed on KNSS

"In Cameroon is leading the Pentagon to cut some military aid to the central African nation. Fox's Rachel Sutherland reports from Washington after video surfaced showing Cameroonian troops killing civilians, the United States scaled-back support, including armored vehicles and helicopter training. But the US ambassador to Cameroon says US is not going to stop cooperating with the key counterterrorism partner. Cameroon has been fighting the Islamist militant group Boko haram as well as a separatist movement in Washington. Rachel Sutherland, Fox News twenty inmates at the Larnaca correctional mental health facility face felony charges. After a riot at the prison in November on E county. Attorney Doug mic net charge the inmates after state prison. Officials completed investigation of the November six uprising mcnutt said in a news release the twenty inmates were primarily responsible for the riots prison. Prison. Officials say Kansas spent one hundred thirteen thousand dollars to repair the damage and replace the inmates are charged with incitement to riot criminal damage to property and rioting the riot was one of several a Kansas prisons in two thousand seventeen and eighteen Dan O'Neill Kagan S news TransCanada says it's Keystone Pipeline is likely the source of an oil leak near Saint Louis spokesman Terry Kuna and a statement Friday said that crews continue to excavate the Saint Charles county area where the leak was discovered on Wednesday. He said transcanada's preliminary investigation points to keystone spokesman for inbreeds Inc. Said it's highly confident that it's nearby Platte. Pipeline was not the source the league prompted closures of sections about the keystone and Platt pipelines and bridge spokesman David Hutzel said Friday that the company expects its pipeline will be operating normally by Saturday. Kuna said there's no determination of time for the Keystone Pipeline to return to service. The Missouri department of natural resources has estimated that about forty three barrels or eighteen. Nine hundred gallons of oil leaks, and the oil did not get into any of the waterways. Steve voyeur Cayenne s s news one person is dead following a one vehicle rollover crash in southwest. Wichita it happened around one o'clock Saturday morning near I two thousand five in west St. K HP trooper Austin Schneider, says a pickup veered left of the highway overcorrected and left the roadway rolling several times before coming to arrest. Nearly one hundred yards off the roadway. The victim is identified as twenty old or Nesta Florez of Wichita. He was thrown from the truck and pronounced dead at the seen.

Cameroon Rachel Sutherland Terry Kuna TransCanada Washington United States Wichita Kansas Nesta Florez keystone Pentagon Fox Fox News Larnaca mcnutt Missouri department of natural Dan O'Neill Kagan David Hutzel Saint Charles county area
"cameroon" Discussed on The Lowe Post

The Lowe Post

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on The Lowe Post

"Like, no, no, I'm the boss Nabil ones. I I don't think I will do that. And like all like like, my my dad does meat which was like one of the best thing. He did for me like sending me the same school like just because as a kid I was alive. I was the last shot, right? Like, I'm the, you know, my mom gave me to do everything. My brothers do everything for me. I couldn't make my own bed. I couldn't wash the dishes. I couldn't do anything. I was just sitting there and everybody just does everything. And I'm just playing around like I'm running around. It doesn't sound bad doesn't sound bad at all. But for a grownup limi- now thinking about it going to seminary school helped me just because I was on my own like I had to do everything on my own any prepare me for going to college on my own my brother who's going around and now being NBA. I mean, I was my brother here, but just just like leave it on my own and knowing what to do so doubt. But I don't think I will do that just because I kind of want my my kid I. Like just to do whatever he wants to do. And like I mean, I'm I'm a support him and guide him. But, but then, you know, I don't wanna like force anything winter. So so lucrative Mahmoud day. He's from Cameroon. He's sort of the basketball God of Cameroon. You gotta his camp in twenty eleven and then you get invited to the NBA basketball without borders camp at twenty twelve surprising. You you didn't think that invites? In. I believe you wrote this you almost didn't go you almost like forget this. Yeah. That's crazy. I didn't I didn't. I didn't wanna go. 'cause I wasn't a basketball player. Like about basketball is like we had like a old hoop the seminary. But it was like nobody played. I it wasn't serious soccer. Yeah. Soccer dollars sport. And if I didn't I didn't play soccer. I was going to stay in Cameroon helped my dad out and his companies and stuff like that. So that was my plan. But then my sister lives in South Africa at the time when basketball without borders in South Africa. And and for me it was like, oh, I was yes. Basketball. Now, obviously my sister in like five years since you left. So I'm like, oh, this is the best opportunity for me. I'm gonna go over see her. I'm hang out with her. You know, I miss her in inbetween allegation. Discover NBA. College color. You know that that time highs a high school coach. Yeah. But but like I said, I messiah was there. And he doesn't remember me? So it wasn't as long as I was. I was great. I think this is of. So incredible. That you're now on surgery Bacchus team because his urge was at that. And and I think you wrote in that piece that surgeon Lou all dang were there at some of the other kids at the camp were like, oh my God. Look who just came in this incredible. They're here. And you're like who were those realize who they were at do. I got doing. That's what I'm saying. I mean, August Serge Ibaka walks in. You have no idea who's ROY? I didn't know who the hour. This is twenty twelve he just went to the NBA finals. I didn't I didn't. I didn't. I didn't watch enough. Obviously, I knew the lebrons and the Jordan's. But like who who doesn't but but the actual players. Thousand NBA like I didn't I didn't know if you told them that before we ever had that conversation at all. Yeah. It's pretty pretty incredible. Like just how fast it happened. People Christmas may have come and gone, but it is never too late to give the gift of good oral health..

NBA basketball Cameroon soccer Serge Ibaka Nabil South Africa Mahmoud Bacchus Lou ROY five years
"cameroon" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

African Tech Roundup

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

"To capital to Africa's missing middle SME's. And so why would you start in Cameroon? I've read that it's a country with over two hundred local languages, Muslim and Christian communities and that economy from what I've read is almost entirely comprised of immediate doesn't seem like the most ideal launch scenario. No, it isn't. But his in deals with someone who comes from Cameroon, and obviously has linked to it by blood founders. And as a tech startups, you usually start from where you know, but camera. Intend to be one of the most amazing Petri dishes, so to speak it's considered to be Africa miniature. So there are things that you can extrapolate that representational to what you might find in other regions of Africa of markets. And I knew my way around that to some small degree. I actually realized now that I knew less than than I thought, and it's just as well than my ignorance protected me twenty thirteen. Yeah. He asked thirteen so it was a place where I knew people. It was a place where we thought to run an experiment of this nature will give immediate results in Cameroon. If you're going to fail happens royalva quickly do not get the luxury of a long run at all. It was just the right place to be and it's allowed us to branch into every coast and sin will be in a number of other markets so small businesses hot bitch. How'd you make money? What's the modal? Right. So I mean, obviously being in financial services on having to think as opposed around some. Muddling around risk return and extraction of small, you know, small businesses. How do you make many what what's the model? It's a fee based model. One of the great things about our first set of failures in the market with microfinance institutions was knowing that we didn't want to be a Bank and understanding that there is a very thick dividing line in that part of the world whereby banking is defined as an institution that takes deposits from the from the general public with the right to charge interest emphasis, you a default on payments in in the courts, these things truly muddy up the ecosystem for allowing things to happen. Quickly view, go to pursue a default in Cameroon, they'll be police involved. A convocation is a paperwork. They'll be a long coat your attaching a lean and this stuff can take a long time to recover capital. The problem with ecosystem is that the ability to get money to move around that contract at velocity with control. Is a major part of the problem. And so that is what we are tackling. I think that your original question to me is why do we do it that way is because it's easier to charge fees, which is on model. We charge a percentage fee for origination. And every month that the customer has our service, very distinct language is what we are returning.

Cameroon Africa
"cameroon" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Through Virginia. All over. No, Carolina's South Carolina. Tennessee. E kentucky. Wherever you're listening to the movement from represent. EJ O was love and respect. I wherever you are midterm elections are happening. And I am encouraging you to get out and go do what you know is the right thing to do. All right. You wonder what's going on in the world? I want to share what it is that I know thus far. Not doing. In Cameroon in Cameroon an army. Search operation is underway to rescue dozens of people kidnapped from a boarding school at least seventy nine students and three others were kidnapped on Monday in by Menda the capital of the northwest region. This is according to the BBC the government and English speaking separatists have accused each other of orchestrating the kidnapping Cameroon's northwest and southwest regions have been hit by a secessionist rebellion in recent years regional governor Adolph Leyla at freak the been Trofeo claim that separatist militias and that separate militias have. Are responsible for the kidnapping? But English-speaking separatists are accusing. The government of staging the kidnapping as an attempt to discredit their movement. So actually what they are doing in Cameroon is pitting the French-Speaking Africans against the English-speaking Africans. I don't know where the the German speaking Africans found themselves in Cameroon in this argument, but they are three languages European languages. That are spoken by Africans in Cameroon and they use the language barriers right to pit people against each other. So you get whoever get into money just follow the money, and you know, what? Okay. Keep an international Saudi Arabia's crown prince Mohammad bin Salman is spearheading a project to build the kingdom's first nuclear research reactor. It's one of seven massive projects announced on yesterday, including water desalination and aircraft construction. Solomon has this Saudi Arabia doesn't want a nuclear weapon, but would not hesitate if regional rival Iran develops the bomb. Which means they both attempted to develop the. Russia is sponsoring it in Iran and the US is sponsored in Saudi Arabia. What would you do without me? On the three and w k news center. Ski area Boynton with your election. Election-night coverage on the people stationed Wien one zero three news and talk thirteen eighty w. Got a lot going on first of all.

Cameroon Saudi Arabia kidnapping Africans Solomon Iran prince Mohammad bin Salman Carolina Virginia South Carolina Tennessee EJ O Adolph Leyla kentucky BBC Russia US thirteen eighty w
"cameroon" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Back out to Bloomberg spent Clark, Ben. He's a thank you. British cabinet ministers. We'll be in lockdown looking at the latest Brexit options from Prime Minister Theresa may and her efforts to clinch a deal this month. Bloomberg's Robert Hudson reports and the session is likely to focus on the question of how to avoid customs shakes at the Irish border. British officials have now given up hope of making enough progress this week to justify any use summit to sign off the DeVos deal on November the seventeenth instead. Maze team is aiming to have an agreement ready for the end of the month that will require the political will to get over the hurdle of the Irish border question. In London, Robert Hutton, Bloomberg daybreak Europe, at least seventy nine high school students have been kidnapped by separatists in northwest Cameroon with their teachers the Associated Press reports the students were kidnapped on Sunday by group seeking a breakaway English-speaking state in the majority French-Speaking country, hundreds of being killed in a year violence that followed government clampdowns on protests, by English speaking, teachers and lawyers. German Chancellor Angela Merkel's denying race replaces the threat to the stability of the coalition government. Bloomberg's dumps explains despite the increasingly chaotic race for the succession of Angela Merkel's you will need to conservative bloc will stick to the coalition agreement with the social Democrats continue to govern the democratic search for a new party leader, something common would also happen and other European states. She said in Berlin on a Delfs, Bloomberg daybreak Europe. US president walked back on plans to meet his Russian counterpart this weekend's Donald Trump's revealed. He's probably not meeting demand, Putin and Paris, but does expect some face time at the conference in Argentina at the end of the month. But Russia and the US. My public statements confirming amazing was planned for this weekend. Global news twenty four hours a day on ended take talk on Twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in over one hundred twenty countries. I'm Ben Clarke, this is Bloomberg markets. Thanks very.

Bloomberg Angela Merkel Europe Ben Clarke Donald Trump Robert Hutton Twitter Prime Minister US Robert Hudson Clark Cameroon DeVos Theresa Chancellor Associated Press London Russia Berlin Putin
"cameroon" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"A video was shared widely on social media earlier this year, and what happened in the videos described in a new investigation by the BBC. These women and children being led to that deaths. The soldiers accused them of belonging to the jihad group Booker haram. In the final scene of this video too graphic to show here there blindfolded forced to the ground and shot at close range twenty two times. One of the women still has the baby strapped to back. For the footage was widely shared. There was horror, and there was controversy while some said it was taken in Mali others place it in Cameroon, but the government Cameroon rejected those claims and called the video fake news. The BBC's Africa I unit was not convinced by that dismissal. It's journalists examined the video with remarkable thrown us trying to find out where that shooting took place when it took place and who did it you'll wall is one of the investigative journalists who was involved in that research. We reached him in London high. We've just heard the an audio clip from this documentary, and even that is too so deeply disturbing to see. It is devastating and you spare us the last moments of this. But even without that it's two women, two children shut killed, brutally. How did you come to have this video? So in July. Of this Eur enjoyed of twenty eighteen this video went viral and a couple of hours before that happened. We do so receive the video on what's up through some of the context. We had worked with pregnancy on Cameroon way to hear reports about the few media reports about that video at first and you. You must've yourself ounded deeply disturbing to watch that. Yes, yes, it is of the worst videos to to what's in my work. It was very hot tea to to watch it, but he's also why we, it was reimported you to work on this video very fights and to prove who where the perpetrators also because the government initially dismissed the government of covering initially, said it was it was fig news and this is important because Cameroon's had no, this isn't hours. Many said this is happened. Something happened in Mali. These aren't our soldiers. This isn't war. So what does it lead you to believe that you could actually. We solve this as a crime that uses actually a crime scene, wasn't it and use you saw things in this video that led to believe you could actually figure out who they were and what they did. So how did what, what, what are the clues that you're working with? So yes, as you say, it's exactly I, we approached this very forensic analysis so with we had a crime scene of those chew, women and children being murdered in the evidence was in the video. So when we approach this using new methods of investigation which we will open source forensic analysis, open-source investigation sort of applying forensic negatives to information publicly available..

Cameroon BBC Mali Africa London
"cameroon" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"To it but it's it becomes very very difficult to get that person confirmed but anyway good points good points what's going on around here thank you for your call let's go to cameroon hartford connecticut the great wabc cameroon go right ahead please hey mark it's can from candace cameron but it's spelt like cameroon is it not be honest yeah that's like saying maroon when the guys actually a moron all right go ahead sorry here's where the brilliance comes in yes who is he picks amy barrett i just told you any barrett's dawn indiana let's do it by skype i suppose or maybe they'll secretly flyer in in the next hour i don't know well he's he's playing the game called pick a chick and he's going to pick the catholic chick and the reason he should do this is that he can then expose two conservative mind and a staunch catholic mind and then this competes with the globalist because what does that have to do with pick a chick well it's just a nickname we use for what he's going to do he's gonna pick a chick that i should and then he draws all the attention to her conservativism and her starts catholicism and and shows the he doesn't need to draw attention to her staunch catholicism because that's not supposed to play a role in justice's decision making if iran orthodox jew that's not supposed to play a role none of that supposed to play a role does and when when her name is withdrawn you see then he can come in with hardiman thanks for your car happy hour's over happy hour is over going on and on like that let's see here chuck schumer on the floor of the senate today and i don't mean face down in a drunken stupor although let's go to cut to mr producer go whomever the president selects tonight if that nominees from the pre approved list selected by leo and the heritage foundation everyone artists understand what it means for the freedom of women to make their own healthcare decisions and for the protection for a man let's let's let's let's stop a second women are free to make their own healthcare decisions let me repeat it so everybody can hear women are free to make their own healthcare decisions there's two issues here when it comes to abortion it's another life that's involved if you believe life at conception or any time thereafter prior to birth does not science tell us that that's a life and while mr schumer even make a distinction between life at conception and life one minute before birth he won't because he's a radical because he's a radical when you do a partial birth abortion you turn the baby around the baby's still inside the mother so the feet come out first then the little legs then the is and the rest of the body right up to the neck the shoulders are outside the birth canal then they take a syringe or a very sharp instrument and they stab it into the back of the skull of the baby the baby being over eight months then they take a suction device in seconds brains out so the skull collapses don't tell me that as anything to do with the health of anybody you wanna talk about the third reich that's the third reich that's the third reich you wanna talk about it then let's talk about i'm sick and tired of this is a choice in a women's health i'm all for choices and women's health but even up to the minute before birth that has nothing to do with the woman's out there to human beings there too i don't need chuck schumer on the floor the senate telling us that if you don't support abortion at every level that you oppose healthcare decisions for individuals that's sick that's sick cut three go ahead mister president now we're gonna shut up you eddie i'll be right back washington's mall w m.

cameroon hartford candace cameron connecticut eight months one minute
"cameroon" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"He thinks is going to be the absolute hardest confirmed and the reason is you get them confirmed fine the next one's going to be easier and there is going to be a next one and if you don't get him confirmed you're going to pick up at least three seats in the senate i listen i agree with you i don't know about three seats five seats one seat in the senate and so forth but i think it would it'd be very effective as a campaign issue and it should be but you need to take the toughest one now and the reason you need to take the toughest one now because the next one's going to even be harder so and in addition you got midterm election coming up your point upon i've been making now too and if they take out somebody like a barrett or or a really solid constitutionalists well then you run on that at least in part that is the senators and the congressmen i don't think there's any bar to resubmitting whoever lost yeah but you better have enough votes crashed yeah no there is no bar to it but it's it becomes very very difficult to get that person confirmed but anyway good points get a lot of good points what's going on around here thank you for your call let's go to cameroon hartford connecticut the great wabc cameroon go right ahead please hey mark it's cam from kansas city i know it's cameron but it's spelled like cameroon is it not be honest and it's like saying maroon when the guys actually a moron all right go ahead sorry here's where the brilliance comes in yes yes who is he picks amy barrett i just told you any barrett's done in the analysts they do it by skype by spouse or maybe they'll secretly flyer in the next hour i don't know well he's he's playing the game called pick a chick and he's going to pick the catholic chick and the reason he should do this is that he can then expose the true conservative mind a staunch catholic mind and then this competes with the globalists' because what does that have to do with pick a chick well it's just a nickname we use for what he's going to do he's going to pick a chick that i should and then he draws all the attention to her conservativism and her staunch catholicism and and shows the he doesn't need to draw attention to her staunch catholicism because that's not supposed to play a role in justice's decision making if i were an orthodox jew that's not supposed to play a role none of that supposed to play a role does and when when her name is withdrawn you see anything.

senate cameroon hartford kansas city cameroon amy barrett skype connecticut cameron
"cameroon" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

The Hoop Collective

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

"And have you been to his whole see where he grew up it would blow you guys it would just blow you away where he came from to get to this point in cameroon it would stunned you it's just stunning it's an how old how old was he when he came to the us i don't know that he was he was about you know eighteen seventeen eighteen went to prep school and didn't go home didn't go home till his poor little brother died in a car accident you got hit by a car and you went home to his brother's funeral and between the time you went to the prep school and then to kansas and then to philadelphia didn't go home didn't see his family like we don't we underestimate the 'isolation that these foreign players whether it's from africa where elsewhere especially africa because very very difficult for their families to come over these issues money issues all sorts of things i just in the middle of the story imposs kelsey outcome and he hasn't been home to he's also from cameroon but from douala he hasn't been home since he left at age seventeen six years ago like these guys don't the home and sold the isolation and the difference in cultures and language and customs and not having your friends nearby or your family nearby to then to succeed the way these players have it's astounding it really is and we just take it for granted that it's all going to happen figure what what must have been like to move to lawrence kansas snow.

cameroon kansas philadelphia douala africa lawrence kansas snow seventeen six years
"cameroon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Real blues is the name of that song from the french electronic musician son german i know doesn't sound like electric music does it this record fifteen years after his last album turns out to be worth the wait some really great textures some wonderful sounds from from mali in west africa at the heart and soul of this record but you also heard a little bit of lightning hopkins there sampled in that song called real blues the piece before that also based on a lot of samples from cameroon spirit of the forest title track of the album of that name by the group called baka beyond a collaboration between the husband and wife team of martin craddock and heart with the baka pygmies who live on the cameroon congo border and much of that music recorded in the rain forest in southern cameroon on this edition of new sounds some afro peruvian music music that combines both african and european maybe not maybe not combines that's not not not a good word but music that just is part of both traditions the term was coined by marie don who leads the band zap mama she was born in congo and raised in belgium and is equally at home with both continents and their traditions and we'll hear a song from her band called zap mama in this next set i will hear another track from baka beyond from a later album that they did call journey between we'll hear a song called bombay which is the name of baca musician who was a very important kind of a co writer of many of the songs on the earlier baka beyond records so this is from one of the later ones and then we'll hear this tune from marie don's bands zap mama from their very first record recorded back in.

martin craddock cameroon marie don congo belgium bombay writer mali west africa cameroon congo fifteen years
"cameroon" Discussed on Click

Click

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on Click

"Gal the ads her colleagues at the ims raise this with the cameroon government or make this a condition of further disbursements then the issue will be resolved on uh this is now is the third week of january but i think we can still do this especially with your back i want to look ahead in your business in apps tag in the cameroon internet seeing assuming and and hoping these restrictions lifted windy across africa more widely will digital tech trends do you foresee in 2018 this year well there will be much more focus on funding and financing and finding ways to fund startups from africa in africa there's a lot of discussion about what's happening in the cloud and i think that despite the challenges that we have with internet i think cloud solutions will definitely be part of what we talk about two eight in two thousand eighteen i see just a lot more maturity in the ecosystem more collaboration between various organisations that are helping to build that ecosystem more seeing for instance you know offer labs that you know i chair is collaborating with other organisations lake a ban which is the african business angels network to kind of have joint events and and do things together to grow the vehicle system now bouba growing the ecosystem much rebecca joined bring listens to buy you this now articles glenn buildings most different when i'm so happy to save a competence coming through from the african side on this text offend and be able to compete in the global stage imperative who calls and we know from what we cover on click often the set an m areas in the tech scene in africa which i actually i had like natasha society atlema ball banking mobile 'banking side and the agra agriculture tech side that we've covered many times on things but but but it is i still think the question why the silicon valley model would.

cameroon government rebecca cameroon africa agra
"cameroon" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"The return on a yeah i get the case mixed up david you've been there i just read them so thank you gifts and ghani and it's upriver and so the question is how did it get to here we've established when now we've got a good genetic a good molecular clock to say because it reproduces itself at mutates it starts in nineteen away that doesn't tell us where however and a david e because he's in adventurous person who has travelled the world widely and knows lots of people uh he is our indiana jones and he's about to go on an expedition to a place that's come up several times in the telling of the watt and win which is cameroon where is that that from say stanley velde david your to north uh and west of stanleyville it is um north of the republic of congo which is the congo that exist to the north of the big river democratic republic of the congo is south of the the big river and above republic of the congo is cameroon and it's drained the southeastern corner of it is drained by a couple of smallish rivers one called the and goco and one called the sanga that converged informed this little triangle when the southeastern corner and then the songo roles on down toward the the big river the congo river itself i see so they're tributaries to the congo made before you head into the uh the cameroon area there is a work that points to the siv coming out of the pen troglodyte troglodyte who knew there were such things we're talking about kinds of a hump at chimpanzees orb monkeys are pancog 'ladite s chimps their monkeys that's the chimpanzee that western chimpanzee and that is from the gambian national park and tanzania now that was a that wasn't where you were headed you are headed to cameroon so why did you not heads of gambia originally to gumbi i went to cameroon because a paper had been published in the journal science that pinpointed the origins in space in geography of the aids pandemic of woman named beatrice on and her team had found that the s iv the champ simeon virus that exist in the chimps have one place in africa very very closely matched all of the human strain so the pandemic strength and so that two thousand and camera that did turn up a little bit in gombe bay there was there was some evidence of.

jones cameroon stanley velde congo congo river gambian national park tanzania gambia beatrice gombe bay ghani david e indiana stanleyville simeon africa
"cameroon" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on WTMA

"As we're talking about independence nuts is happening in catalonia with the catalan region supposedly declaring independence tomorrow thousands protesting in the streets there today and not just there but also in cameroon where seventeen people have died at the hands of the state security forces as they crackdown on independence protests as the cameroonians in some sort of western southwest northwest cameroon have gone ahead and declared their independence yet again this is not the first time it's happened and of course lightly it's just best to call this west kimber here i mean for whatever reason they in the news they call it north and south west cameroon but it is basically just the western bulge if you will of the the state anyway so interesting stories we're going to give you more information you can share your thoughts with us our toll free number is eight fifty five 450 free of course i love seeing any kind of secessionist movement i think it's fantastic i don't like to see the violence that is associated with it but unfortunately these states as we know them these nation states are not going to go quietly into the night they're not going to relinquish their power voluntarily in many cases and they're going to make it a uncomfortable and possibly dangerous process to try to leave yeah i i got to say that when it comes to session doesn't who with me up the way it does you and i think that to some extent you just like the chaos of no absolutely not i like the idea of freedom i like the idea of and more independence i like the idea of central is that you have the secession gives you freedom i didn't say it would give you freedom i said that that you like the free lowercase we would get more freedom out as it because those of us in new hampshire sure those of us who would leave the state i'm sorry what would make you say that are you saying that travel outside of the state of new hampshire bull years boats there's planes there's cars i mean there's all kinds of ice you do want to all i out of the united states is going to let you if you to secede for the united states michael let you out let you drive through the blockade the the port business unreasonable well i mean who knows how they're going to handle it marked but there's obviously there's.

catalonia cameroon new hampshire united states michael
"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"cameroon" Discussed on ESPN FC

"We are mogoma that's who you pick and all you want to know him by surrey quicken johnny genome is going germany is is gonna rally kind masters of finals do we now we credit for the i'll go with chile on this one because it's a as a reserve german team made a copy mexico and chile surely i mean you you have to go with by the way they're plane adding they're playing a better standard i know today the german team was very efficient in bern the mexican net but did you see him against cameroon a 10man cameroon i mean cameroon had their chances scored they meet him look awfully silly it's as i don't think today's result is an indication of how bad or good germany is i think chile can stand in their own right and i don't think the s p as correcting she was in a very good fight in it i'm taking chile would not surprise me this is what you just said the others the weather chile play going forward the play the different players what when we saw cameroon asleep with ten men us the break down this german side that was that was quite impressive so they can they can be heard on defensive setpieces mushikele today that a player has goal so there's a little bit of frailty as far as germany's concern but i'm fascinated to see if i'll essential still on juice jusen his legs i mean the merger football the guys players at the level that he plays i hope he has because are they gonna make a much better spectacle flow the key for me is if chile can get after germany and attacking certain to cause problems but i think bodies will score goals so i'm i'm gonna i'm gonna leaned towards chile a little bit wow we got three this is much of a debate unless you go germany.

chile mexico cameroon germany