15 Burst results for "Camera Theater"

"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

17:47 min | Last month

"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"Cut across grades. So are we up for all this The academic seemed underwhelming And then before rosh hashanah. We gathered with the whole community on the lawn before to watch the sunrise while kids played music which was of course enchanting but there is a pseudo hippies sixties vibe which seem very familiar to me but also quainton of place. I had my doubts. Sheera had none. This is a respectful caring community. She was said. We're in on sunday night. Our daughter graduated and for the first time in eighteen years. We have no children studying at the democratic school for saba. It was an especially big deal. Because there's no graduation ceremony at the end of elementary middle school because it's all one school instead. There's an end of year celebration and farewell to the twelfth graders And the whole community takes parts all the grades all the kids. All the fact that the parents and since last year's event was on zoom this year's happening was over with nostalgic alumni including our now twenty three year old twins All of us finally together in personnel. I arrived at this event kind of a wreck riddled with work worries regretting. I'd worn shorts because it was turning cold. Worrying when my father-in-law would show up. Where my sons had gone to trying to get us all to sit together but then the evening lifted my spirits. To the sky's the second graders. The sixth graders ninth graders in turn got up to wish the graduates. Well we parents had recorded a music video and the siblings of the grads had filmed themselves pranking. Their brothers and sisters tomer. The principal was leaving after being part of the school. For twenty four years since its founding and there were many tributes including from far sabas maher the highlight of the night as it is every year was. The twelfth graders play a sort of democratic purim. Spiel now it's crazy. How consistent. The impersonations are over the years by kids from different generations. There are teachers. That i'm much more familiar with from the parodies then from real life not surprisingly the show dealt with the pandemic this one turning everyone. Two cats cats are taken over the school. The kids weren't there and the music from cats played during the scene changes. That's probably because my on are the only people on earth who liked the movie. Cats mayenne told me after it felt like the school was saying goodbye to us. But i wasn't really saying goodbye to the school. I've had studies but i haven't really had school for the past two years so it feels like i was done already a long time ago and it also feels like i'm not truly done. In fact my aunt is doing a matriculation exam as we record and yet and yet i'll do the proud popping for one-sentence despite the very weird disconnect of these strange corona million was the stage manager co writer co director set designer and she photographed the yearbook portrait's of the grads which she edited and design and she ordered hats and shirts for the end of the year trail. It's not actually characteristic of my daughter to take command like this but she knew corona had everyone in very low year and she saw a need many needs and she leapt into the breach so despite the tensions typical of putting on a show in no time flat this mixed media masterpiece magically came together as these things tend to and my daughter was loving every minute appearing onscreen as two different teachers then running things behind the scenes staying on top of many stage and lighting and sound hughes like there was no tomorrow because there was no tomorrow i got emotional tomer. The principal spoke. She told me. But i told you. It hasn't been so long so yala. Let's get onto the next thing ready. It'll hit me. When i get sal and i'll say wow those twelve years over they are. We agree but for now he just say thank you. Democratic school look for saba respecting our children and taking such good care of them gear. That's great now. Listen what's your country. So i think we've got a little meta miniseries going on here. Got what a country segments on the promise. Podcast inspired by experiences that we've had because of listeners to the promise podcast right so true so running in close competition with benji. Love it when it comes to repeat performance Mentions on the cop. Podcast is a lovely and talented man named james inverness. Who made his. I promise podcast appearance. I believe when he recorded a. What's that message to know. Played it on the show. So james is accomplished guy with a fascinating. Diverse resume combining performing arts writing and criticism for major publications. He was the editor of gramophone magazine. I wanna know if he actually ever owned a gramophone. He's written no fewer than five books and his play. A walk with mr hafetz. Amazing was staged off broadway in two thousand eighteen inch short considering that he is younger than all of us. He makes all of these. Podcasts host look like underachievers. I texted with james. But i hadn't met him in person. I tell you all this as background for him sending me we note inviting me to a staged reading of his latest work because it was happening in renault where i live last sunday evening now i was already familiar with the venue which is a wonderful venture which deserves a plug of its own called. Stage a pioneering attempt to have a dedicated space for performances in of which there are many in israel but they're always scattered among multiple venues so centerstage calls itself israel's premier professional english language theatre. It's a performance space. Its goal is to bring english language theatre into the mainstream of israeli culture. It was created by this creative theory. Couple named daniela and grant crankshaft. He makes his living as a builder and contractor. And she says that. He asked her once what she'd like as a gift and she said honey build me a theater so at center. Stage there are dramas. There's little musical theaters. It's a small black box space. There's a nice little lounger you can have drinks Their stand up comedy. Including i have to say benji. Love it They have little festivals. They have a lot of youth workshop. Theater of you know workshops for For workplaces cetera. Anyway it's spires. It's very aspirational goal is to be this hub. Like a cultural center for actors theatre professionals audiences and the english speaking community. So that's all background. I got to attend. The world. premiere sneak preview reading of james in vari- one act play I don't wanna give away any spoilers. So i'll stick close to the official description. The plot involves a woman's body discovered in a bog. A man on the run at the center of an international cat and mouse chase and climactic confession and a local english police station. Only nothing is as it seems except a woman is dead and her killer has reached the end of the road. it's a psychological thriller that was quote inspired by a true story in a very interesting way. And i won't give away the twist so we've had community theater in english in israel for decades but what is cool indifferent about what centerstage is doing. Is that many of its small shows feature excellent israeli professional actors performing an english. One of the stars of james to hinder reading was herzl. Toby who is known locally as an actor on the hit tv series the eighties and most impressively for me. an appearance. don't mess with his. Oh han oh yeah. That's like the ultimate credit the other actor if taco fear is an actor at the camera theater He's going to be at a show. Centerstage next week called repertory theatre that he and another english-speaking israeli actor have won prizes with that fringe film festivals around the world So i'm going to try to make it over to center stage as often as possible. because the crenshaw's open their doors just before corona hit. They've impressively survive. Just barely in the are working hard to keep it open. Don sounds like a great venue. For live performance of federman's one man show all by ticket. Anyway for now i will save the memory of the entertaining evening. James treated me to there was a great q. And a. afterwards It combined three of my favorite things. One theater to the creative and always busy israeli english speaking community and three the creative output of a promise podcast listener. It doesn't get much better than that great. So this sunday. The israel society for the history philosophy and sociology of science and technology had its annual conference after last year's was canceled for the corona and that was the first big conference. Probably any of us had been to in a longtime hundreds of people in person at the van leer jerusalem on this beautiful spreading green campus rape between the israel academy of sciences and humanities and the president's house all day long there were a bunch of sessions in parallel. So you could hear about all sorts of stuff from medieval hebrew translations of euclid elements to how ways of understanding and treating. Ptsd have changed is rarely society has changed. How blockchain could alter elections i. It's a cool day. I was a chair of session that had three talks. The first by a guy named ariel handle about the politics and science wine in israel. And how and why. It became important for zionist to engineer. What we call indigenous wines here. The second was about dogs in the third about the early career of artificial sweeteners. in israel. Secrete if you know what that is. And what they say about changing social mores and about gender roles here in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties. That one was by rela tar left. Ben char- who. I talked about before on the podcast. Her dad is the poet. Uram tire live and her mom is the acclaimed writer zarifi archie who just won the israel prize at her son. Omar just won an oscar for the best student film last year at her. Niece's a singer comma vardi and she herself as a novelist and journalist and historian and she's amazing. The three lectures were packaged together. Because at a meeting awhile back someone noticed you could name the session. Grapes dogs sweeteners. Which in hebrew makes an excellent rhyme fanini claven month akeem in fact each of the three lectures took something kind of prosaic. And from the vantage of this normal thing made you see things in the world that you've never seen before even imagined. The dog lecture was in a way the least fancy of all the actors and also in a way the most mind blowing. It was a woman named tommy bar-yoseph who is a dog trainer. Who teaches dog training at high school in the jezreel valley and who is writing a master's degree at the open university about dogs who in all sorts of ways saved the lives of kids in the holocaust of which hero dogs. She told me there were lots though. Their stories are hard to find. She sat and to reconstruct. Because what can you do. It's the humans who write the history. That's what she told me. Her lecture on sunday was about a woman named rudolfinum menzel. She opened though by telling a bit of her own story. And a few efficient bullets on one slide about how she fell in love with dogs and now she organized the national study group on human animal relations and hoped someday to start a department in human animal studies at some university and about why she teaches in high school which also matters and after she presented these things she said. It's important that you know that what i'm doing is scholarship. She said i mean. You don't have to be a vegan to study human animal relations. Someone in the crowd yelled out. But are you vegan and tammy said of course. I'm a vegan that in a way that implied of course i am amount of munster rudolph. Fina men's oh was born in eighteen ninety one to a family of rich viennese jews. She studied at vienna university through her doctorate in biology and psychology and then she married a doctor named rudolph menzel rudolph fina and rudolph and the two would publish together dozens and dozens of papers inside. -nology that's the signs of dogs and eight bucks after they moved to linz to set up their dog training operation where they trained dogs for among many others. The austrian police and army part of their technique was to teach the dogs commands and words set aside only for that one particular purpose. Lie down sit. He'll and so on and to make sure that every day german didn't confuse their dogs. The menzel taught their commands in hebrew. So after the ons louche. When the nazis took over austria the czech writer. Max brod. who has kafka's best friend wrote to the jerusalem philosopher hugo bergmann quote. Maybe you know something about the guard. Dogs at the men's bills are breeding and lince. The dogs are trained to obey orders in hebrew and so far have been used by the austrian police producing amusing incidents and quote see. Nazis had commandeered the austrian dogs. Which is how it happened. That nazi officers could be seen in linz and vienna. Speaking hebrew two boxers and german shepherds hitler's men offered safe haven to the men's cells if they would stay and keep training dogs but the couple escaped to palestine in nineteen thirty eight which they said they had in any case always had in their plans with or without nazis. In a book they wrote the next year. The mendel said that. If you're looking for a marker that divides between the quote unquote new and the quote unquote ghetto mentality. Ju- there's none better than whether a person loves dogs who were before is being transformed from being quote. Part of the world of the gentiles and aid to persecutors oppressors into a companion and helper to our people to end quote in palestine. The menzel set up their training school and at the urging of moshe dayan among others. They started the hugging canine unit. After that rudolph fina menzel set out to breed into existence and indigenous zionist dog. The kelly how can i need the canaanite dog which he said was really reverse engineering the dogs whose images. She saw ancient tombs here dating back. Four millennia in nineteen forty-nine the war of independence mental started the institute for orientation and mobility of the blind breeding seeing eye dogs in training them and their people to live and work together. Tommy bar-yosef's lecture was only twenty minutes long and it left me with trippy images of soldiers with swastikas yelling. Arte lie down in dog but literally to the land and images of dogs etched into stone. Millennia go brought back to life sort of and of dogs taught to navigate. Brian folks in the heat over cracked sidewalks tel aviv. Jerusalem hyphen images of books and lectures in german accented hebrew by rudolf fina menzel exhorting people the take in dogs because dogs would make them into something different and better images of a lifespan. Shaping dogs so that dogs could in turn shape jews. Everything about israel seems haphazard and random and tropic. And most everything about this place really is hap hazard random and tropic and still at the same time everywhere. You look there. Is this weird and passionate intention analogy. And the or these weird and passionate occult efforts and mad plans in crazy energies. And all these things turn up when you don't expect them in the oddest places certainly in the israel society for the history philosophy and sociology of science and technology but also no less even in the eyes of lucy. The dog who was there. When i heard human ju got home after she waited patiently all day and that brings us the end of our show. Thank you to our meet. Ashkenazi are genius researcher conciliatory and scholar residents. Thanks we tie marseille manager without whom we'd have none of this thanks to our. She believed my favorite band from keyboards. Gather they give us a music start in the end of our show. Alison thank you natalie. Thank you done. We'd like to thank all of our patriots supporters for your generosity. Support keeps this show going it keeps his station going and we are move and grateful within your debt. We also like to thank all of you out there for taking the time to listen and acid like us on facebook. draw the a line. We're going to answer then. Go to apple podcasts. And give us a five star review. Maybe one that begins with this. The promise podcast colon. If you don't compare us to james in vern it doesn't seem like we're just a pile of crap about you want but before you do that. Remember that this past monday as we record on june twenty-first we celebrated the summer solstice here in the northern hemisphere while in the southern hemisphere. They celebrated the winter solstice. About which i say. That's well if that's how you guys wanna play it down. There you do that. You guys do you up here. We celebrated the longest day of the year and also for those number of people out there the day when the earth reached its greatest axial tilt towards the son of twenty. Three point. Four four degrees. Or if you prefer the day when the sons declaration from the celestial equator is twenty three point four four degrees admittedly the longest here was only fourteen hours fifteen minutes and seven seconds which is a whole lot shorter than say an oslo where their longest days eighteen hours and forty nine minutes. They think they're so big. What with their norwegian laws and their norwegian long languid days still. They're not the boss of us. But i digress. I look forward to summer solstice. Stay all day long. What with it being the longest day and the axial tilt and the declaration and the fact that and. I'm pretty sure this is true. You're more likely to hear the word zero australianism on this day than any other day of the year. Also don't get me started about stonehenge with for money is the best hinge on earth at a hell of a lot more durable than woodhenge. If you ask me and this summer solstice may have been my best one ever not only because the day was fully one second longer than june twentieth and june twenty second. But here's the paradox. because it's the longest day of the year. it just whizzed by as if it were. What june six through july eleventh or some stupid regular day like that fact is as soon as it arrived. The summer solstice was over not to return for whole 'nother year. Not so the promise. Podcasts we will be back for you next week and every week reminding you that being the longest doesn't make something the best or even good at all and also that declaration is something you find not just with the sun but.

Alison israel hugo bergmann James tommy bar-yoseph five star dozens Tommy bar-yosef Max brod natalie palestine Sheera eighteen years Ben char zarifi archie Omar next week two next year Toby
"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

05:55 min | 3 months ago

"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"Promised cast brought to you on t. v. One the voice of the city that this week announced that it is taking ownership of the national theatre habima and in so doing taking on one hundred million shekels in debt that habima has run up over the past years and in doing all this bringing to a happy conclusion a crisis that we first became aware of a year and a half ago in november twenty nineteen when a man named core case safron sued demanding that the company liquidated its assets and use the proceeds to pay the four million. It owed him for telemarketing services provided to habima by his company. Power dialing at the time the press made saffron out to be a grinch like figure shutting down the world's oldest hebrew theatre for something as unexhausted money filthy lucre. But the fact is you have to do a lot of power dialing. Run up a tab of four million shekels and it's like the old saying goes don't the cold call if you ain't got the windfall. It's the saying. I've heard a lot of people say that anyway. During the hearing it came out that the national theatre was much worse debt than anyone knew so much that that it was like an iceberg and the four million telemarketing chuckles. Were only the small little point. You see above the waterline. Which debt of course only got lots worse during the pandemic and of course the national government has an approved a budget since march twenty eighteen. Meaning that it would be complicated. And maybe even impossible for the treasury and ministry of culture in jerusalem to bail out the theater even if they were of a mind to do it and finally tel aviv mayor room the stepped up and negotiated a deal whereby the theater would become a municipal corporation like the art museum and the land of israel museum in the cinematheque and the camera theater. The director general of habima. A man named noam semel who was hired just over a year ago to steer the national theatre through its financial crisis said quote the tel aviv. Municipality is the mother and father that the bima has never had and quote now one oddity of the arrangement is that tel aviv is now the mother and father both to the national theatre habima and at the same time to its municipal theatre the camry and you know how jealous theater companies can get. We have a cat and dog and if you pet one without petting the other than it leads to meowing barking. And it's going to be just like that. But i digress. The bima theater was founded as a hebrew language theatre in eastern europe. I in biala stock in one thousand nine and then it was reestablished in moscow in nineteen seventeen the order of establishment by the way was signed by a middle level manager named joseph stalin. Who sounds like a nice guy. I wonder what happened him..

joseph stalin noam semel march twenty eighteen eastern europe november twenty nineteen four million a year and a half ago this week jerusalem safron both hebrew first four million shekels one hundred million shekels one thousand nine four million telemarketing one oddity a year ago seventeen
"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

02:00 min | 3 months ago

"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"Come to promised cast brought to you on t. v. One the voice of the city that this week announced that it is taking ownership of the national theatre habima and in so doing taking on one hundred million shekels in debt that habima has run up over the past years and in doing all this bringing to a happy conclusion a crisis that we first became aware of a year and a half ago in november twenty nineteen when a man named core case safron sued demanding that the company liquidated its assets and use the proceeds to pay the four million. It owed him for telemarketing services provided to habima by his company. Power dialing at the time the press made saffron out to be a grinch like figure shutting down the world's oldest hebrew theatre for something as unexhausted money filthy lucre. But the fact is you have to do a lot of power dialing. Run up a tab of four million shekels and it's like the old saying goes don't the cold call if you ain't got the windfall. It's the saying. I've heard a lot of people say that anyway. During the hearing it came out that the national theatre was much worse debt than anyone knew so much that that it was like an iceberg and the four million telemarketing chuckles. Were only the small little point. You see above the waterline. Which debt of course only got lots worse during the pandemic and of course the national government has an approved a budget since march twenty eighteen. Meaning that it would be complicated. And maybe even impossible for the treasury and ministry of culture in jerusalem to bail out the theater even if they were of a mind to do it and finally tel aviv mayor room the stepped up and negotiated a deal whereby the theater would become a municipal corporation like the art museum and the land of israel museum in the cinematheque and the camera theater. The director general of habima. A man named noam semel who was hired just over a year ago to steer the national theatre through its financial crisis said quote the tel aviv. Municipality is the mother and father that the bima has never had and quote

joseph stalin noam semel march twenty eighteen eastern europe november twenty nineteen four million a year and a half ago this week jerusalem safron both hebrew first four million shekels one hundred million shekels one thousand nine four million telemarketing one oddity a year ago seventeen
Habima to Be Owned by Tel Aviv Municipality Following Financial Crisis

The Promised Podcast

02:00 min | 3 months ago

Habima to Be Owned by Tel Aviv Municipality Following Financial Crisis

"Come to promised cast brought to you on t. v. One the voice of the city that this week announced that it is taking ownership of the national theatre habima and in so doing taking on one hundred million shekels in debt that habima has run up over the past years and in doing all this bringing to a happy conclusion a crisis that we first became aware of a year and a half ago in november twenty nineteen when a man named core case safron sued demanding that the company liquidated its assets and use the proceeds to pay the four million. It owed him for telemarketing services provided to habima by his company. Power dialing at the time the press made saffron out to be a grinch like figure shutting down the world's oldest hebrew theatre for something as unexhausted money filthy lucre. But the fact is you have to do a lot of power dialing. Run up a tab of four million shekels and it's like the old saying goes don't the cold call if you ain't got the windfall. It's the saying. I've heard a lot of people say that anyway. During the hearing it came out that the national theatre was much worse debt than anyone knew so much that that it was like an iceberg and the four million telemarketing chuckles. Were only the small little point. You see above the waterline. Which debt of course only got lots worse during the pandemic and of course the national government has an approved a budget since march twenty eighteen. Meaning that it would be complicated. And maybe even impossible for the treasury and ministry of culture in jerusalem to bail out the theater even if they were of a mind to do it and finally tel aviv mayor room the stepped up and negotiated a deal whereby the theater would become a municipal corporation like the art museum and the land of israel museum in the cinematheque and the camera theater. The director general of habima. A man named noam semel who was hired just over a year ago to steer the national theatre through its financial crisis said quote the tel aviv. Municipality is the mother and father that the bima has never had and quote

Habima National Theatre Habima Safron National Theatre National Government Ministry Of Culture Camera Theater Treasury Tel Aviv Jerusalem Noam Semel Israel Museum Aviv
"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

08:15 min | 6 months ago

"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"Jerusalemite legend known mostly for the practice. He elevated to an art form ripping books as a desk was such a prolific book ripper that a few years ago the national library in jerusalem organized a public event in appreciation of his ripping. I'd like to think that had. He stayed in his native philly where he was born and began ripping books at the tender age of nine. He would have received the honor of being known as the ripper. It turns out that in sixteen to eighteen th century europe pages of old books were recycled into the covers in bindings of new books among the most popular materials for use were jewish and hebrew texts sacred and other confiscated by the church in what seemed then as an way to get rid of these tax while also desecrating them a little bit the genius gentiles of the inquisition inadvertently created a precious archive of texts. That would have otherwise been long lost in a beautiful piece. Anger desk from Let's newcastle mentions that these texts are known by some as the italian or european. Gaza named after the cairo collection of hundreds of thousands of jewish documents and papers discovered the storeroom of a synagogue in old cairo in the mid eighteenth century so over the years gurdev ski an avid collector of books. Buttons t. boxes and much more made a habit of looking out for a certain kind of old books. Then when he got home he would carefully remove the binding from the pages soak it in water and some rubbing alcohol to melt away the glues and excavate the hidden texts from the bindings he is found letters sent to halley a kadoorie or rabbi isaac luria pessa huggett to bought a hand copied fragment of cecil beta sheet from yemen and much much more until the pandemic hit gorodnitski used to visit the library dot com at least once every two weeks and was loved by all there. There's a great video of him on youtube. Giving an interview to a channel called the media. Line where you can seem fooling around with his most prized possessions. Like a giddy kid and his tiny tiny apartment which is absolutely packed wall to wall with his collections. This how introduces himself. Name is gorgeous sqi. I'm here fifty. Three years. And i have a terrible disease. I'm a collector. So guess what he did. With all of the manuscripts he found among which were single items worth tens of thousands of dollars. He gave them all away to the library in an interview from the library's website he's quoted saying if god gave me the ability to build a collection with little money. Who am i to sell it. There's a certain goal to that not donating something. The library doesn't have to newcastle from. Let's he said quote. Someone offered to buy a certain item for fifty thousand dollars. But i and it turned out that the library didn't have it. So how can i give it away. it's not mine it's theirs and we pushed him on that point asking. Why would an old man living in near poverty in tiny apartment in the flow to donate such valuable manuscripts. he smiled and replied quote. I checked and cody. Show won't let me take anything with me and to know me environment from the library. He simply said quote. I'm not a hero. I'm gordon detsky. Since january first more than eight hundred people have died from covid nineteen in israel since the beginning of the pandemic more than four thousand. One of those people was as record. That's key as were the ripper. Who once was and is now gone. He's hobo beautiful pro borough. Allison what is your country. So as usual Ohio has the highest culture covered. And i've got the local. Can i start by saying that. I think the premise of this segment is getting a little obsolete in corona times because wending our way through the world who's been winding lately. When are we allowed to win. I mean i remember when. I wish i was winding permitted within a thousand meters of your house so now these days i don't wind i sleep. I wake up. I take a shower. I work i exercise. I read and really. The highlight of my week is coming to record the promise. Podcast so any wending. I do is in my mind like a lot of people might television. Watching habits have turned to try to look for something as different as possible from my surroundings within my thousand meters. I try to travel as much as i can through the screen so most of my fair therefore comes from overseas last night by the way. Did you see there. Was this great show on tv. A really grouchy and terrible orange president got replaced by the sweet sincere man with an adorable wife and he had a super cool vice president with the jewish husband. It was kind of. Like a west wing reboot wasn't it. I thought it was a great show. Anyway so yes. My screen is usually tilted abroad when it comes to israeli television. I mean i like aritz. Net jerod are equivalent of saturday. Night live and i got to watch the news. Because i got to watch the news. But a lot of it is mostly trashy reality shows and the high quality dramas. We have they're not exactly escapist for us. I mean my friends in america berry into them. Prisoners of war fouled Mossad one one action adventure a lot a lot. A lot of dudes on camera except for tomorrow in tehran. Right but by sheer coincidence. This week i have happened across to israel. Television shows very different ones. But i became obsessed with both of them enough to binge them one of them. Lucky you people in the us. You are going to get the opportunity to see very soon if you have access to apple tv. Soon as in tomorrow and drops. The show is called losing. Alice and it takes place not in mossad headquarters the casbah's of the west bank or the alleyways of jerusalem like she zal instead our heroine alice film director lives in very very bourgeois upper-middle-class z. Honea cove she inhabits yummy mansion. And she takes the train back and forth to the much cooler hip or tel aviv. It's kind of like those american movies. Where the boring suburbanite takes the train into wild and crazy manhattan and gets into all kinds of situations so the heroine of the peace Played by actress. I l zora is a filmmaker who was once a hot property but hit forty decided. She had to move to the suburbs. Pop out three kids and it's kind of lost her grooving creative edge in her lovely homes. Earphone hung you. Don't exactly feel sorry for her right. But on the train one day she meets fem fatale named sophie who turns out to be the screenwriter of an erotic film. That alice's actor husband is set to star in. I won't spoil anymore of the plot. But sophie is a little dangerous and stock. Hurry and everything gets weirder and a little bit scarier from there. Anyway it is a very rare thing. A psychological thriller that is female centric and that is a real film noir piece. It drops tomorrow. Like i said you hear heard it here on the podcast. I and it's excellent for taking a look at in israel where nobody's wearing a uniform or a black hat the second show that completely charm. The pants off me is the smash surprise. Hit huzzah wrote. Rehearsals noah. cold air. Who played the psychologist in. Our boys co wrote and stars in the show which bills itself as an unromantic comedy together with her ex boyfriend. Briggs the mega cuteness is that it's a story about xs that was written by x.'s. The couple play a pair who live and work in the theater. She's a playwright and he's a director. They've been together for five years and just when her play which he's directing gets. Its big break. It's being mounted at a major theater. Which is obviously visually the camera theater. Their relationship goes on the rocks so they enter into rehearsals just as their breaking up. The show is total delight. Anna gem it's cleverly written it really brings you into the life of the theater and how it looks from behind the curtain. All of the supporting actors are great. Including some giants..

fifty thousand dollars fifty israel five years Three years hebrew sophie Allison america jerusalem This week tomorrow youtube eighteen th century three kids Gaza both Ohio sixteen Anna
"camera theater" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:56 min | 8 months ago

"camera theater" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia will manteca. Today's local legend was a seminal artist painter illustrator costume and set designer. Who is one of the most important figures. In early twentieth century russian art known for her pioneering fusion of russian folk influences with european modernism. She played a major role in defining a unique russian style. Not reliant on trends from the west today. Her paintings are highly sought after and bring some of the highest prices for work by women artists. Let's talk about talia goncharova. Natalia sarraj kenya goncharova was born. On june twenty-first eighteen eighty one in the town of nick gave oh russia. Her father was from an aristocratic russian family and worked as an architect and mathematician. Her mother was from a very well connected. Family and the russian orthodox church during her early years. Natalia was educated mostly by her mother and grandmother in eighteen. Ninety when italia was eleven. Her family moved to moscow where she attended formal school for the first time at the fourth gymnasium for young ladies after graduating from school in eighteen. Ninety eight natalya began going to the studio of local moscow sculptor there. She learned about the vast universe of artistic movements and schools of art like german jug instill and the english arts and crafts movement and the diversity of ways to express beauty through art. She fell in love with the medium of sculpture in one thousand nine. No one italia in the sculpture program at the prestigious moscow school of painting sculpture and architecture. It was there that she met the man with whom she would spend the rest of her life. Mikhail larionov was a brash and incredibly talented young painter. Soon after the two met the talia switched from sculpture to painting and never looked back during their years at school. Natalia and mikhail were heavily influenced by the variety of artistic movements that fell under the umbrella of european modernism such as cubism and future ism. These movements were mostly headquartered in paris. And how deep sway even in moscow but in one thousand nine hundred eight. Natalia and mikhail began embracing elements of the russian folk art. They grew up with and merging them with concepts of european modernism in one thousand nine hundred nine. Natalia mikhail and a number of their contemporaries founded a radical exhibition group of avant garde artists called jack of diamonds. Active until nineteen eleven. Jack of diamonds is considered one of the most important artistic societies in the early russian avant-garde movement. At the group's exhibitions. It was clear that natalia's work was increasingly informed by russian folk art and russian block drying traditional children's toys and medieval icons in nineteen twelve. Natalia and mikhail left jack of diamonds to start another radical exhibition called. The donkey's early the following year. Natalia and mikhail developed a new school of abstract art called reaganism a visual combination of cubism and future. Ism that attempts to capture the spatial qualities of light or reflected light on a two dimensional canvas the to published a manifesto together called rayan assists and futurists a manifesto in nineteen thirteen. Natalia received her first major solo show in moscow where she exhibited nearly eight hundred works in an astonishingly wide variety of styles and media so much so that a famous russian writer of the era coined her style. Everything is the common thread in many of these works was the expression of a particularly russian identity. The retrospective represented the apex of fusion of russian folk art and abstract art concepts the preface to the exhibition catalogue stated. I have passed through all that. The west can offer at the present time and all that my country has assimilated from the west. I now shake the dust from my feet and distance myself from the west italia's artistic endeavors expanded well beyond the canvas. She began doing scenery and costume design for the camera theater and moscow and quickly gained a brilliant reputation for her work in nineteen fourteen. Talia was hired by surrogate eleven of the legendary ballet russe in paris to work on the design for the first paris. Production of the ballet. The golden cockerel. The show was a massive hit. An italian received great praise for her byzantine influenced vision. She went on to design. Many acclaimed. Productions the ballet russe following the end of world war one in nineteen eighteen italia and mikhail moved to paris for good for the subsequent thirty years. Natalia painted illustrated books taught art and continued to design major ballet and theatre productions in paris and across europe she also continued exhibiting her paintings in major museums including the tate in london and the museum of modern art in new york in the nineteen forties and nineteen fifties italia and mccain fell on hard times and lived in poverty and relative obscurity. They got married in nineteen fifty five after spending almost their entire lives together in nineteen sixty one. The arts council of great britain held a major retrospective featuring both natalia and mikhail's works together. It was italian last on october. Seventeenth nineteen sixty two. Natalia passed away she was eighty one years old all month. We're talking about local legends for more on. Why we're doing what we're doing check out our newsletter manteca weekly follow us on facebook and instagram at encyclopedia manteca special. Thanks to liz caplan. My favorite sister and co-creator talk to you tomorrow. I want to tell you about a new wonder media network podcast that i think you're gonna like this election. Once again. a majority of white women voted for donald trump. why have white women throughout history aligned their politics not with women of color but with white men and why does white women support for trump. Still come as a shock to so many on white picket fence. A new podcast from wonder media network host julie colour seeks to understand how white womanhood in america has been constructed. How it's evolved and how it's affected our politics. It's a podcast about how white women have fallen short and why we need to step up. Listen and subscribe to white picket fence. Wherever you get your podcasts..

Natalia mikhail moscow jenny kaplan talia goncharova Natalia sarraj kenya goncharov fourth gymnasium for young lad moscow school of painting scul Mikhail larionov paris Natalia mikhail russian orthodox church rayan natalya italia talia natalia west italia nick russia
"camera theater" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"camera theater" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Than it has ever been with this cova crackdown stuff, the headlines just continue to roll in about states. Got To press the pause button they say or reverse course and start reclosing a lot of the places that they had allowed to reopen for what three weeks four weeks in some cases Sorry thought you could run a bar in the united. States will in many states. You've been reclosed down completely There's no provision on how you can open up at this point. They have targeted bars as though bars are the largest threat to anybody out there. Yeah, and it's insane, and now we actually you and I are here today. We did a little experiment. We did a little market experiment. It failed sadly. Spectacular we did it. I wouldn't call it spectacular. There wasn't there wasn't much that level of failure was spectacular at the event itself not. Total fail I mean but. It was either going to be a total success or total fell. There was no middle point, so we went to the local movie theater here in town, which a lot of a lot of theaters right now are doing what I consider to be a pretty smart thing they're. They're showing classic films and when I say glass nothing else out. That's right. There's no. No new movies coming out, and it's not going to put anything out for probably months, because no one or very few people are actually going to the theater, so these theaters desperate for some semblance of revenue, some kind of business. They're playing classic movies like and when I say classic I don't mean black and white i. mean like the Eighties and the nineties. From, thirty or forty people may want to go see in the theater. Jurassic Park Winter. Park in the movie theater original? While we were at fork fast, it turned out that Jurassic Park, was the number one at the box office when we again dressing park with five hundred thousand dollars gross over what two hundred and fifty screens. I think or something like that. I, it wasn't large. We're not very many screens or not very many Alan around. Exciting for one now. I wouldn't I'm not interested in going to the movie theaters right now. There are people there. They're their mark edge. There weren't many people when we went there the, but they were more than I expected through. You know the if you're sitting. I mean many times when I go to the movie movie theater you're. You've got ten or fifteen people in the theater. Around here. That's pretty typical or at out I mean if I'm bringing my family. We're allowed to sit next to each other. We're sitting there anyway. so people can really space themselves out like you don't need an usher coming out with a little riding crop sir. You must move. You, Oh, that's the thing they didn't require masks. Or as far as I know social distancing inside the actual auditorium area, it was only in the common areas like the lobby where one had to wear a mask, right? We have been told by one of our activists friends here who had been going to this theater recently, he's gone multiple times that they were requiring masks in the lobby and so the question was. was well. What if a group of US went and basically said? We're not going to wear masks in when they asked us to. And that's what we did today. We only were able to get three people on short notice. He was a friend of yours and and me and I went up to ask to order. The tomatoes even agreed with us on the mask thing. Oh really just what? He wanted future Oh man. He didn't go. You didn't go in his own. But the idea was I. don't think he brought him. Ask well they. I think they had them, didn't they offer them? I think he offered them I. Don't recall yeah, well anyway. It was all very quick overview. Yeah, I walked in. I said three tickets back to the future. He said fifteen bucks because they're only doing five dollars or whatever it is nice price. And then I started to pull out my wallet, and he said something about masks are required in the lobby, and what I like one or something I don't think he had him and I said No. I'm sorry I. Don't mean to be rude, but I'm not going to do that. And he asked why, and I probably should have said it's against my religion, but I just wanted to say he said. I don't want to yeah I just wanted to say. Look I'm not going to, or whatever I. I just refused. That's my responsible, because it doesn't matter. Why is not to do with thing? It's my choice to not do the thing exactly. And it was his choice at that point to decline service which he did as he did, so we're respect to that and let turnaround lockdown didn't throw. Throw fit. I just wanted to go and see what would happen. If the boundaries because there. There wasn't a line of people or anything like that I mean there were maybe five other people that have walked in before us within the ten minutes that I was standing there watching because I was waiting dish live. Whether they just reopened in July nine? The people standing in front of you. You weren't wearing a mask. There wasn't a line, so they already were in. And then we went in, so there was no one else in the in the room at the time. So Yeah, the you know the thought was if they're not getting a whole lot of business and they're not guy. We may set in the. The guy that we know said when he was going to see movies, there was no one else in the theater. He was the only person in the entire theater with the exception of the empire strikes back where three people yeah, so let's say you've got six theaters and you're playing a five dollar movie. Five dollar classic movies now. I don't know what the the movie companies are getting off of it. Either Presume but you. Well know probably not I, think we read actually an article that, at least with the frustration move raised first run movies. It's about, but I'm guessing it's less than that for the. Maybe let's call it sixty six percent up to split the baby here and. If you're putting. To people in each theater, you're getting ten best out of its six dollars and sixty six cents for the theater, one kid running all the camera. Theaters presumably you've got what two people in the building. There were two according to the person who most recently right, so you're, you're up to it. Oh, there's probably some overhead costs or what have thirty six dollars per brun and you're doing that several times a day. You know I'd I'd say it's possible to break. Even at these numbers, not great, but yourself you snacks. Maybe you want people. Yeah snacks, you want people coming in, you know consider that you got to pay employees hourly, not by the end theatre power and a half million jobs of the lowest paying job I've ever. You also gotta pay the electricity on the place mark the rent and drew these other playing for half the electricity, just by having it hooked up. So. Yeah, that's that's my point I. don't see how they could possibly break even. Numbers, but they're. With, the ranch and everything it doesn't make a difference. They're already paying the rent. They're already paying half the electric. Play. They're not. They're not losing less I. Think this is I. Think it's going to be very. I think we're GONNA. See a lot of theaters close. This sustained like I. Pointed out for like five hundred or six hundred bucks, you can set up your house and not have to deal with all of the people in the movie theater. Yeah, it's it's about when you get the first run movies, so the reason that I go to movie theaters right now is because at first they. A I haven't got my new TV. Set up the way I want it set up, and because I haven't got my house remodeled or whatever so that'll probably be next year the year after and then I'm going to set up the best thing around, but the movie theater will still have the movie two months before I..

Jurassic Park US Alan
"camera theater" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"camera theater" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"A five dollar movie has five dollar classic movies now I don't know what the the movie companies are getting off of it. either. Presume but Well, not probably not I think we read actually an article that at least with the first run. Movies movies. It's about hat, but I'm guessing it's less than that. Maybe. Yeah, let's call it sixty six percent just to split the baby here and You know if you're putting. To people in each theater. You're getting ten out of its six dollars and sixty six cents for the theater. Kid running all the cameras. Theaters. Presumably, you've got two people in the building. There were two according to the person who went most recently right, so you're up to yeah, there's probably some overhead costs or what have thirty six dollars per run, and you're doing that several times a day. I'd say it's possible to break. Even at these numbers not great, but sell self you snacks. Maybe you want people. Want people coming in you know consider that you got to pay employees hourly, not by the and theater and a half movie jobs of the lowest paying job ever. You also pay the electricity on the place mark and the rent, and these other just playing for half the electricity. Just by having it hooked up. Some that's my point I. don't see how they could possibly break even well. He's numbers, but they're the with the ranch and everything. It doesn't make a difference. They're already paying the rent. They're already paying half the electric. Not Getting Ready Losing less I, think this is. Going to be very I think we're GONNA. See a lot of theaters close. The oath. This is what I'm sustainable like I. Pointed out for like five hundred or six hundred bucks. You can set up your house and not have to deal with all of the people in the movie theater. It's about when you get the first run movies, so the reason that I go to movie theaters right now is because at first they you know a I haven't got my new TV, set up the way I want it. set up in because I haven't got my house remodeled or whatever so that'll probably be next year or the year after and then I'm going to set up the best thing around, but the movie theater will still have the movie two months before I will. I can get a home that maybe. With a transport stream or something like that that you torrent well, that looks like grant a call Oh man. I watched the adventures and game allegedly. It was a transport stream. Dude there other than a few places where it got blurry for like a second it was, it was full hd. Man, she's. It was indistinguishable as a transport straight. Really Yeah. WELL SO I! Which is why I say it was allegedly transport I'm pretty sure I actually paid Amazon for that, but who knows Marin. I don't know it's I think the movie theaters, maybe maybe debt. I mean it looks movies are gone, and somehow we've lived movies drive in movie theaters. They're still. They were replaced by air conditioning, and not burning up your gas, and not listening for your cheap carcelen. Those are the reasons why people are GonNA, leave movie theaters for their home theaters. Because of all the reasons we've, we've been through these before I'd like. You can pause the movie. You can go to the bathroom. You can take a break you. Can you don't have babies crying? You know there's so many reasons to not go to the movie theater, but that said we all grew up with them, and they're still something special. Is there about going to the movies? I think that all that's holding them together. Audience Special Riley's the no, no, the only thing that's holding together is the agreement that the movie making companies have with the movie showing company to keep them on top to the first release. This is making that go away. They started to break that when universal put out the trolls, sequel during covert, and did very well in fact did better on a percentage of what the revenue was than the previous trolls movie, so didn't I. Don't think it brought in as. As much revenue total, but it brought in more revenue to the to the company the movie company because they were getting sense that fifty percent on the numbers more coming up here and what's going on Walmart. Will tell you about that bad news coming up I remember when you first heard about bitcoin. How long did it take you to realize this little project with zone? Change the world. You kind of wish you got involved sooner. Well now is your chance to be a part of the next revolution in..

Walmart Riley Marin Amazon
"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

10:18 min | 1 year ago

"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"Knows him now. it's after the name of a Common Fish. Buri so now the places or report so I didn't chat with him much. Just a quick. Hello in a Selfie but from I read about him. He is a self taught chef. No culinary school no fancy training in Europe in top kitchens or anything and one article said quote he espouses a more primitive Buddhist style quest towards achieving the sublime on his plate he became a chef after flunking out of school and being a beach. Bama fisherman sailor diver who then became known for his delicious ways of cooking fish and it is indeed sublime from raw salmon with with Sabi sorbet. Yes with Sabi ice cream. You guys too delicious Cubes of Tuna Floating in Yogurt to fish and rice soaked in coconut milk chillies and apples simple and luxurious at the same time so we didn't get his famous tasting menu because we were eating kosher style of no Seafood but we did order small courses to get to taste as much as we could so the restaurant has become sort of the cornerstone of tourism revolution and even as places like Tiberius have really struggled to maintain themselves as a popular destination for travelers in the country and international travelers. Akot has thrived next to the restaurant is an old Ottoman Palace that has been elaborately renovated by Jeremias into the Effendi. Hotel one of several Boutique. Hotels that have sprung up in Over the last two years Google or a boring you can read raves about him from top chefs around the world. Crediting Him with being among the top taste makers who are taking Israeli food to the next level and he's also getting credit for furthering the idea of a more inclusive culture in Israel by operating in such a multicultural city. His head chef is an Arab and the kitchen chatter. According to the food writers who spend time in it happens in a mixture of Hebrew and Arabic so I highly recommend or a borey. One kind of weird thing. Though I mean and my husband couldn't get over this despite the name there is one fish you don't see on the menu. Buri there is no borys service. Add so if you can get over that head over there you'll have a great time Wonderful wonder what kind of Hexter they have their none two nights ago at nine thirty six PM. Because it's in my phone. The girl forwarded to our family WHATSAPP GROUP. A facebook post with a photo that showed thirteen big stacks of books. Some twenty-five books high set out on a Tel Aviv. Sidewalk in front of a short stuccoed wall. The post was sent by a woman named shy showoff an archivist. I think for the channel Thirteen News. The Post read quote. A huge collection of books has been put out on the street. According to the dedications on some of the books and the address it belongs the late Theater Director. Gershom PLOTKIN history. Philosophy plays poetry astonishing collection. If only I had more hands. It's going to rain soon. And it hurts. My Heart. Maputo TWENTY-EIGHT TEL AVIV. Anyone in the area it's worth coming by and quote. By the time I saw the post I was getting ready for bed and it was dark. I looked up Gershon Plotkin and he was even more remarkable than what Cha road. He moved to Tel Aviv from Moscow. Nineteen twenty four when he was seven and he studied acting in Palestine before moving to New York in nineteen forty to study directing at the new school dramatic workshop under Bertolt Brecht's old party or when Piscotty Poor Stella Adler Lee Strasbourg were there and among the students with Tennessee Williams when he got back plotkin found writing. Partner in Sasha are g-o-v creating plays that team put on and at the same time. He joined the mapping division of the Ghana. He also married a woman named GLIAC TINCA whose Father Barak Cutting Co is one of the founders of the goon and also the building engineer who managed the construction of the Ymca in Jerusalem and also the establishment of the electric power grid after the war of independence. Plotkin became an assistant director and choreographer at the camera theater and bought the place on Mapa where his neighbor was Yosef Sprintzhak the moscow-born Speaker of the Knesset from its very first meeting in nineteen forty nine until he died a decade later in time. Plotkin became the Commentaries House Director. And it for the decades at some call the golden age of Israeli theater. What didn't add up though is that Plotkin died at Mabul. Twenty eight in Nineteen Ninety two more than twenty eight years ago when he was seventy four years old. I wondered maybe his books had stayed in the apartment for all those years. Maybe with his wife. Gloria I checked and found out that yes in fact Lilia Plotkin died at my twenty eight justice summer at the age of one hundred and two. Her phone number is still listed at that address. Probably the apartment was only now being sold or renovated for the plotkin kids or grandkids or at any rate cleaned out. And that's how the books came to the street this week gleefully. It turned out. Live the life of adventure and accomplishment that matched. Her husband's she was famously. Beautiful and there are indications that the great writer professor member of Knesset Ease Har- smolinski. Who went by the pen name? Saffi's Har- was back in the nineteen forties hopelessly in love with her smitten and that when he dedicated stories to Gimmel. They were really dedicated to her to Lilia and that he based upon her a character in one of his books named Sima was the object of the stories heroes overwhelming on returned. Love clearly Who later made her living for time as a cartographer also joined the Haganah map-making division and after their first baby was born. Gloria and GERSHOM PLOTKIN resolved to improve the hell Ghana's maps of the north by taking precise aerial photos that clearly it would then translate into maps the how procured a plane for the couple but the airfield was under British. Watch a problem clearly. Platin- used her baby to solve. As she later recounted quote our excuse was that the baby had asthma and the doctor said if he flew high the air would do him good. We would be asked by the British. Where will you be flying? Gershon would reply. It doesn't matter wherever the pilot takes us. All we need is high end quote in a false bottom. And the baby's bassinet Greeley Stash the Lak- and many rolls of film later she would draw maps and hide them in a secret compartment a slick in their basement. The morning after the girl sent the WHATSAPP message. I saw that it was in fact going to rain. I biked over to Maputo twenty eight by the time I got there. The thirteen big stacks had resolved into just one set on the wall in front of the House. A woman maybe eighty hovered over the stack and when she saw me get off. I bicycle and walk over. She nervously grabbed as many books as she could and then rushed off all that was left on the wall where two decade old magazine's one called the fighter. Hallo HAM put out by the idea and the other a new age lifestyle magazine called on the sidewalk was a single page from beyond good and evil by Nietzsche with the passage quoted has always been not faith but freedom from faith that half stoical and smiling unconcerned with the seriousness of faith that enraged slaves against their master and quote following. Up on a hunch. I looked behind the wall into the Maputo. Twenty eight yard and there. There were a few dozen books. Scattered apparently knocked back by as people scavenged the piles on the sidewalk in the yard. There was more Nietzsche twilight of the Gods and the Anti Christ. There were reproductions of ancient maps of the Holy Land. There were books on Hebrew Grammar language in usage. There were the complete plays of Ben Johnson. There was a play called strife by John Goals. Were the the Brit who wrote the Forsyte Saga and one a Noble Prize? But it's pretty much forgotten today. There were books by desks. Ifc and books about the staff ski. There are a few Hebrew plays. I didn't recognize altogether. It wasn't much. I felt the first drops of rain so I gather all the books that were left and I put them in my panthers. I couldn't think of what else to do. Then I'd buy a home in the rain and that brings us the end of our show. Thank you to meet Ashkenazi. Who is here with us? Our genius researcher conciliatory and scholar usually not in residence but now in residence thanks. We Tie Shalimar station manager and producer without whom there would be none of this thing so I she believed my favorite band from Gabar. They give us a music of this sort in the end of our show. Thank you Alison. Thank you Natalie. Thank you don. Thank all of our Patriot. Supporters for your generosity and for your support that keeps the show and the station going and we are moved and we are grateful and we are very much in your debt like the fact the rest of you out there for taking the time to listen. We want to ask you some facebook and drop us a line. We're going to answer then. Go to apple podcasts. And Give us a five star review. Maybe one that begins with this. The promise podcasts Julia Roberts and Bennigans is just the podcast in the ear. Buds of an asking them to love it. I mean really. I think all they really want is Fi. Say you had me at and welcome dot that finished anywhere you want but before you do that. Remember that this week on February eighteenth we celebrated International Pluto Day so stipulated to memorialize February Eighteenth. Nineteen thirty exactly ninety years ago the day on which astronomer Clyde w tombaugh working at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff Arizona. Used a used a blink comparator one of my favorite scientific instruments to compare plate photographs of the night sky and established the existence of Pluto which had been conjectured to exist almost ninety years earlier tombaugh wired news of his discovery to the Harvard College Observatory as was the fashion of the time. And the women and men working there under Harlow Shipley declared Pluto the ninth planet of our solar system which it remained until two thousand six when the International Astronomers Union downgraded it to an icy dwarf planet. Which if you ask me as a kind of judgy thing to do I guess I don't have to tell you how much I love International Pluto Day. What with the heroism of Tombaugh spending a year quietly scrutinizing photographs of space with the very best kind of comparator ever the blink competitor and with the ecclesiastical all his futility ending of the stuck up jerks of the IRA you think they're so big diminishing the accomplishment just because they can what drama you can see. Why look forward to International Pluto Day all year round but then just like that as soon as it was here. International Pluto Day was gone much like Pluto itself disappeared from solar system maps in elementary schools around the world owing to the dopes of the IRA. You not to return for another year. Not so the promise podcast. We will react view next week. And every week reminding you that you don't have to be a planet to be small and cold at heart on this. The previous podcast..

Gershon Plotkin Maputo Gershom PLOTKIN Tel Aviv facebook Ghana Director Europe plotkin Gloria I Tiberius Google Israel Akot Thirteen News Eighteenth Nietzsche Ottoman Palace Tombaugh
"camera theater" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"camera theater" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"Time congratulations also. I won't be give time in other award. Lord that's just great Tucker's time fantastic. My favorite part of that is after whatever you saying. Oh he gets all congratulates. Thomas who insulting Tucker's time Tucker's time at Tucker's congratulations. At Tucker's time it'll be a three week parody account joy run were saying before that. Oh we were saying before that. I don't Francesa. Uncut gyms gyms another story. I WANNA get to was. Oh sure I'll forget good job by turbo. I got to say I mean I I. I'm okay we've back on his camera theater. It was funny I'll be I'll be curious to well first of all do mammo job. I'll be curious Mike. We'll do mammo gentleman actual do this first. Okay so did you read this. You hear about this story. Guess what's your take on this because you love free speech. I don't know it's just never fucking what's what are we talking about. The is it the prepared psychics in the business. Is it the CNN. Thing Double Wichita State. Yeah okay take this. They've got a tough schedule. Let's CNN thing the Catholic. Oh no no no. I'm sorry not that. No the BAGSTER professor. Oh okay now see this. No I have not seen it. Okay else those weird. So there's this story so they just know it's it's it's a scary time anyway. The scary time to be alive see printed out the TURTABOI story. Yes here yes because it says interesting for you would you date an Asian woman in watertown picture. Like you know what I mean. This is a human being. Click on that. I don't think so there's GonNa be some there's GonNa be some ski old man who click through and then get their credit card or it's so cruel they do that really like that's what that's really it right. Yeah it's a single Johnson of the world. They're like Oh Jeez. Oh looker occur. Boy She's hot. She's in the Thong and a half shirt. She wants a date me. This is weird watertown as cute Asians. When I was in Nam what are what are the odds of this? You know so the Babson professor facebook right yes. So TURTABOI hasn't says retaliation the ayatollah should tweet a list of fifty to sites of beloved beloved American Cultural Heritage that he would bomb so just for context trump tweets out a list. Saying he's he's got a bomb all these targets including cultural sites. Everybody's he's in a big uproar about it because bombing cultural sites. Something Isis does. It's a war crime correct. I admit I have little probe. I don't have a big problem. I know I'm close. Mind blowing up museums and stuff if it'll really agent issues blowing up. Anything didn't fucked me doing. Did I want trump access to anything anybody ebbe actual fucking palms So this professor from Babson tweets out. You know. Should he tweeted list of fifty two sites he would bomb the mall of America for one Kardashian presidents and stuff like that so then the meal you know they suspended them. You know everyone jumped. So what is your take on that Mike Attorney boy says no no no. Why would be suspended? Offended the guy who put it on facebook suspend for Babson. Oh that I don't understand it all we are you are you. Are you mocking laughing. Steve.

Tucker professor CNN Mike Attorney Johnson facebook Babson Wichita State watertown Francesa American Cultural Heritage Thomas America BAGSTER TURTABOI Steve
"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"He had a hit single on the radio after that he was the one who built a bridge between the folksongs of the founders and the new music that moved their daughters. There's and their sons from nine hundred seventy three to nineteen seventy-six sad years after the war when young people and old worried like whether there anything good would come of this place ace. He made three records called good old land of Israel volumes. One two and three mostly of old folk songs that kibbutz sorts had sung after long long days in the fields in the nineteen thirties. And he sung them in a way. That was haunting and was beautiful and sad and still somehow hopeful. In those years reconciling was Israel L. in the decades before he died Einstein retreated not exactly disappearing but he seldom performed and it was rare to see him now. I was in front of the apartment that he had lived in and disappeared into. I looked at the house behind the stone and there was a sign that read simply in this house. The Creator Singer and actor Oregon Stein lived the building was a modest tel.. Love Housing Block not at all the sort of place to imagine. Israel's greatest singer lived later. I read that Einstein's wife Seema Eliahu still lives in the same small apartment. She shared with with Einstein who she met on a set of a movie. They both acted in one thousand nine. Seventy two occult film called Mitzi Team that was set on the beach right near my house which is called host Mitzi team to this day after the movie and how acted some and then she was a stage director at the camera theater in Tel Aviv. And she was the great love of Einstein's life as he was of hers. Einstein wrote tongs to her about her and about their lives together. Like this one oh cool. It's a song about an apartment in the building. I'm standing in in front of where maybe probably seem Eliahu was only sixty. Nine years old is right now reading.

Einstein Seema Eliahu Israel director Mitzi Team Tel Aviv Israel L. Oregon Stein Nine years
"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

07:57 min | 2 years ago

"camera theater" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"Anymore so it's you know I think the Bund was for historical reasons overwhelmed by Israel's other socialist Zionist Zionist socialist who founded the country. WHO's this was the complete expression of their ideology which integrated you know different streams which the boone saw as separate an antagonistic so I don't know maybe Bernie Sanders would fit into the booth and I'm not sure where where it would go today also socialism the discourse around socialism has completely fleet changed? I mean Israel turned away from its quasi-socialist path and has become a very capitalist individualist. Mini Power and socialism in the meantime has morphed into Social Democratic Party politics social welfare mean. We're talking on the day day after after Shelley Akhimova Jr who is one of the people pushing a more social democratic line which I think is the closest thing you get in Jewish Israeli politics. Remember there is a party thirty. That's Jewish Arab party but mostly an Arab party that defines itself says Communist even today. That's Cadarache even today in two thousand nineteen so I think it's like a historical residue. Oh which doesn't really resonate for people today the inner side I'm Sandy. I think you're very far my my grandfather was a Yiddish is my father went to folklore. You know we grew up in a family. That was very important. I used to perform shows and teach courses and literature in English because I couldn't read the but so it's still close to me and I think the challenge for everyone like doing what you're doing what you're trying to do is how do you do this without mummifying. And how do you do this without you know turning this into museum pieces and make it something living when there is actually still a remnant or a continuation of that you speaking community in the ultra-orthodox world that's going on which were this whole debate is divorced from about your first. I point it is true that any sociologist to ask to to quantify this would say that the lingering influence of Bundestag an Israel is very very small and probably that historical influence even back then was not great. Here's the way that I look at things like this like this is potentially like a a huge an important resource for me trying to make sense of the world today and me who has a lot of criticisms of the way our politics are done done in Israel and of Zionism as well and I think that for me Bundestag Israel is almost perfect. It's almost exactly who I want to be in that. It says we we care about this place and we also recognize this. Place is a factory of Jewish culture and we want to be here for that reason. However in our opinion it was wrong. It was a mistake on the part of the design is to put together having an army as a value suddenly like that's what it means to be Jewish to be an in the Jewish army and Jewish power power as a value we reject that and we we think that we have an alternative view of what what Jewish moderna these should be and we're doing that in Israel among other Jews. That seems to me to be like a really interesting project. Well see I would frame that completely. Zionist terms because I would say that the thing it ends up being right it ends up being Zionism but but also I would say in some ways it's designed as I know but my Zionism does say that I want to be connected to a strong Jewish diaspora and my Zionism does say that you should be fighting for ethical values and for our vision all over the world not just for Israel's sake for the sake of a better for bettering the world bettering the United States bettering so maybe you and the the relatively small it's a minority of people are like you and like like me in that sense. Maybe we are in some way part of the legacy of Buddhism in Israel and if that's true then maybe they offer resources. Maybe it's worth learning. What's on about about well we agree with? Some of the concepts rejected their their. You know their one basic argument which was that that shouldn't be a Jewish country. I think there are things that take from the blend and apply to the situation in here but I do think it has a more powerful application in the Diaspora for obvious reasons and I I was just in in Melbourne Australia where there is still a Jewish show which which is amazing school yeah so it's very much alive. There and I think you know one of the questions. I asked a panel of Australian unionists when I recorded boarded there. Is You know why do you think the Bund still exists here in Australia and not in America because fifty percent of my listeners in American. It's an interesting question then I realized sort of listening to their answers and thinking about it of course it does actually still exist in America. The American media has a huge streak of Linda. I'm just not called windows them. If you look at juice racial and Economic Nama justice this never again action that's happening. Bend the arc all sorts of organizations that are Jewish don't have to do with Jewish concerns per se. I think that's where the legacy of the mostly mostly is not to say that individuals rails can't identify with it and interpret it. One thing about Yiddish I just wanted to say is that I think that one of the major differences is if I can just say between American and Israeli culture is that unfortunately do feel like most culture here is a little bit more nostalgic and mummified and that's one one of the reasons I have unfortunately not been as engaged in it so I hope that the next generation of Israelis who are interested in kind of push the boundaries of what Gish can be again not only use the head of the literature from the past rather create new projects but I think it's hard because years that other difference right there's Hebrew here so people learn yet this year and it's nice it's way data access the past but no one really thinks it necessary for building Jewish future because as a ready Jewish language here and I don't know if Israelis if most Israelis will ever get get over that there are Israelis who speaks daily. I wanted to say that many but for the majority people who learn you this younger people like me here. It's a way to access the past. I don't know how to push them. Impasse that I noticed what you were saying when I was looking for music in Yiddish basically there are there are three bands that performed in the heavy metal band gestalt. Eh Eh there's division and there's Rumailah. There's the three bands at that performance but what I found to my delight was last night for instance Rona K non it. Was You know wonderful indie performer perform that the Yiddish festival or maybe it was two nights ago and festival and I missed it. Yes and she said I think it was at the cinematheque. She said in an interview that Yiddish is rock and roll to her and then last night system. Ali performed at the Arab Culture Festival in Yaw Fo Oh and they performed the new song that in this is a collective of Jews and Palestinian mostly Mularkey Jews and Palestinians and they perform the neatest too because it was part of the general general let us we cover our cultures and that's kind of exciting we have to bear in mind that there was an anti years movement here for many many decades and that's now over so now addition okay again and we'll just throw out one example their stuff that's being done in translation that people are accessing now and Hebrew so the camera theater still has a scholem ashes play God of vengeance which is one of the most critical plays ever written in Yiddish about the Jewish community really a damning indictment and quite shocking to see it even today one hundred eleven eleven years after his written so those remnants are there and there's a little more openness to it now it might be time for big translation project to Hebrew literature because that that might actually get some a more interest here but what I love to see and an I'm pro any it has cultural production if Ronan Finan wants to make an album songs. I'll be thrilled. I mean it would be great but I don't don't see people actually pushing it beyond. I don't know I I hear a lot of people saying I wish spoke Yiddish so learn Yiddish. It's actually not unattainable and that's the that's the attitude I mostly. Oh Sleep get here and I I also get it in the states to from people who identify with the Bund and I'll say I know you think Yiddish is cool. That's actually not inaccessible. You can access it. It's not just cool cool. It's actually a tremendous treasure that exists you know that's still exists and has existed for a thousand years so that's my point of view on that here here now. Listen to this.

Israel Social Democratic Party Bernie Sanders Shelley Akhimova Jr Bundestag Cadarache boone Melbourne Australia America United States Gish Yaw Fo Oh Rona K Australia Ali Ronan Finan one hundred eleven eleven year thousand years
"camera theater" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

36:06 min | 3 years ago

"camera theater" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"This is to one. Tel-aviv review. One welcome to the Tel Aviv review program dedicated to the word to the thought and to debate brought to you by the vantage Roussel institute which promotes humanistic democratic and liberal values in the social discourse in Israel and the Israel institute enhancing the knowledge and study of modern Israel. Hi, I'm your host, get on happen. And this interview is being recorded on the premises of the two thousand eighteen annual conference of the for Israel studies at the university of California at Berkeley. My guest today is a research fellow at Tel Aviv university's TamI Steinmetz center for Peace Research and the author of a new book entitled, but Abu Ibrahim with family, it was recently published by the Steinmetz center. The book explores four different Isreaeli theater productions all having a joint Jewish Arab component of some sort over the course of the first decade of this century. And it reviews the stage as a stage for peace building. Talk to leap Hillman. Hello, and welcome to the Tel Aviv review. Thank you. So these four productions was the joint Jewish element in them, they're raise on debt or whether they just theater productions that happen to have some sort of Jewish our collaboration. I'm trying to understand whether they set out to become venues for peace building or just happened this way. All those are actually two separate questions. The first part of your question, where the do they have an intentional nature of an intentional group of Jewish and our Palestinian theorize answer was definitely yes. And I would widen your question to also include other members of the production teams. The often the musical director directors designers, the stage managers, and the tech crew in many of these productions also were both Jewish and Palestinian. So that's with regard to the first part of your question, I think though that none of them necessarily saw. Their productions as stages for peace building. I think they understood the significance of what they're doing and different terms because fundamentally they were all professional artists who had one common interest to put together stellar production that would take the Israeli audiences by storm and provide them lots of work for an indefinite period of time. But for you as an observer, how did the joint Jewish Arab collaboration component? How did it crop up during the work, the pre production and during the productions themselves that you observed? So it cropped up all the time. It was the major element. And as I write about Atlantan the book, the Jewish, our relationship came up both terms of individual relationships in terms, the functional professional relationships, but also in many ways, these productions. In the rehearsal processes of his productions are what I call these artists waging the conflict, the national conflict between Jews and Palestinians in a nine violent fashion. There were conflict at the center that expresses sufferin different ways in the in the respective productions all the time. Different artists react to it in different ways. Most in denial were artists were. Human beings were here as I mentioned before, just to do the work, where professionals the Arabs alike. I would imagine that the Palestinians would be more prone to this well, again, artists who even if they're scream as within Hebrew, salaried artist at a at a repertory theatre feel kind of a phone Rable dependency on directors and artistic directors and big theaters. So generally in the research that involved, the actors really directly open up to me and in the anthropological ethnographic research conducted on the rehearsal processes of one of the the plays initially, all of the actors were very hesitant to take a stand or express themselves. But in this specific production thousand one nights. The atmosphere around them in Jaffa were all the where all the activities took place. The fact that in that production, there was actually an Arab director Norman ISA, and I'll be speaking about the specific production here at the is real studies conference as a case study for tentative model for negotiation towards equality in the workplace. Because you had a situation where with an Arab director and combination of a majority of Arabic speaking cast members, both the Palestinian citizens of Israel and the Arab Jews, the Jews of north African descent, who if we're not completely fluent came from families from Morocco, Tunisia rack or other countries where they had grown up with Arabic culture, Arabic language. So there was actually a majority, and as I describe it a an alliance of an Arab speaking majority yet the production itself was in Hebrew that this production was. In Hebrew with a bit of an Arab language flavor of slang here and there. But with Arabic songs that all of the Arabic and Hebrews speaking or not Arabic speaking actors like learned fluidly with the accents, the all learned to dance, traditional Arabic folk dances that were part of the specific production there. There was no conflict that was about respecting Norman Issa's wishes as director, respecting culture as such an Arabic culture. But the conflict in that production in rehearsals was very, very cute around the bilingual nature because the non Arabic speaking actors were frustrated. Many of them were actors from the national theatre the Habima theater because this was a actually a co production between a repertory theater, the Bima theater in the Arab Hebrew theater of Jaffa, which is called the Java theater. So this issue around the power relations and the law. Language was very palpable in this rehearsal process, but that was not enough just a few days before opening nights. The first idea military incursion into Gaza took place what was called in Israel. Miffed CIA affair, Sukar operation, cast lead the end of December early January of two thousand nine. So in addition to all the conflicts around the language and political conversations in general, you had very, very difficult, personal emotional situations where partners of Jewish Israeli actresses were in Gaza serving in their reserve duty in the idea and cousins and other relatives of the Palestinian director actors choreographer musical director weren Gaza, and it was a very, very difficult situation with a lot of tension behind stage and to add to all that this was a play about. The power of allegory and storytelling what's thousand one nights. It's about a cold king who is would by the beautiful stories that ultimately prevent him from continuing to kill all the women in the kingdom. So very, very, the conflict was stronger than any declarative position of any actor. Well, this is just an extreme case of operation cast lead of the conflict really flaring out, but it is there all the time, whatever you do within exclusively Jewish Israeli, let alone a joint church Arab one and much of the criticism that could be levelled at these productions as can be an have been leveled at any sort of dialogue session is that it replicates the power relations that present in Israel. However, you look at it right? The fact that what you said about. The language is very good 'lustration of that, right? Even though many of the actors were proficient in Arabic, to certain extent, it was clear to them that the production south would be in Hebrew, right? I mean, that is the language of this fear. They operate in. Does it not affect the interaction to really debilitating extent? Well, I definitely agree, and my research certainly bears out your the validity of your and the actually the accuracy of your question or the assumption of your question that, yes, these productions, like any shared society or coexistence project almost a priori replicate the power relations and ideal. That's very much so in each of the case studies on the one hand. But on the other hand, they're on different levels. And the example I just gave about the issue around language, which is a very Poppel example because yes, he brew theater the intact thrown every we have in Israel, primarily Tetreault on every Hebrew theatre for Hebrew speaking audiences. And while there are more and more plays in Israel that have our bec- integrated into them and not just these. These kinds of productions that I write about our bec- is more present on the Hebrew Israeli stage than it was certainly a decade or two decades ago. I would say that while the power relations are primarily replicated in the processes in the productions, I observe that the Palestinian actors had a certain sense of agency. They did not feel necessarily that they were a tool I talk and write a lot about this notion of collaboration or she to pull LA, which is a very loaded term in this neck of the worlds, forget theater and forget the arts. Just in general, the idea that era ABS will cooperate or collaborate in Hebrew. She to pull up means both cooperate and collaborate and collaboration here comes with a whole set of understandings primarily around our ABS who since nineteen forty-eight have cooperated or. Elaborated with Israel security agencies in Hebrew, the acronym is mashed up Michelle tiff pool, LA collaborator, and in in our bec- I'm a me which means someone who is who is it was being communicating with. So I wouldn't though go Safar to say that the replication of power relations is in fact the billeting I would say that these are professional settings. People are working together. That's also as writing the book much of this is being addressed openly in self conscious way with a great does of irony. Sometimes that helps isn't. It helps. In fact, one of the place that I write about and some additional production since the research that I conducted actually deal explicitly with the power relations themselves. So one of the productions, in fact, the name of the book, but abo- Ebrahim were families from one. The place called homos chips or French fries for Americans Salat and why. But Abu Brahim were family because in the climactic confrontational scene of the play, the head of or the the owner of the Arab restaurant or the homo SIA in the old festival of Akot near the fringe festival. The annual Isreaeli fringe festival turns to the Jewish Israeli left-wing posh Tel-Aviv artistic director and says, we're sick of you, and she turns to the Arab Mantas. But Abu Brahim were family Brahim turns back door and says, you really think we're family and she says, yes, I think so. You really think we're family? Yes. Late at night when I think about it, I, I think we're family. So why don't you invite me to your fortieth birthday party? And she thinks about, and she says, well, to my party only invited friends and. This whole play was really about how within the Israeli theater world, the Jewish Israeli theater artists are completely self involved with their own needs with their own interests. They relate to the Arabs in a very instrumental fashion. Again, in this homos chips allot play, there's there are few plots within this play and one of them and the main one is about an Arab actress who's not willing to say certain lines. There was a, the Jewish Israeli director from Tel-Aviv wants her to say Catherine's closing monologue from taming of the shrew because the play that he's come up with is a concept a play called taming of the shrew in the sector or in the Arab sector. And she said, I'm not gonna say though those lines, those are lines that show a week Arab woman, and I'm not willing to perpetuate these kinds of perceptions about Arab women and the Jewish Israeli director turns to that character and says, but you don't. Even sound like you're an Arab and the Jewish Israeli artistic director reinforces that your Hebrew was better than mine at cetera. So there is a an awareness in an expression in homeless chips in subsequent plays about this issue because it's our in Israel, and this is actually know from my own professional experience and from other research, in many ways, they're much more critical towards liberal left wing Jewish Israelis than they are to right wing Jewish Israelis. They feel an this comes out and homeless chips Allott and it comes out and a lot of my own ethnographic research. They feel that Jewish Israelis are left wing artists are ultimately really, really just thinking about themselves and aren't any better in fact, are not as straightforward about which is why these theater productions are so potent and becoming in advertently, perhaps platform. For peace building because the demographic that is involved in them, both the actors themselves and the audience. I'm presuming correct me if I'm wrong, are these people per middle class who see themselves as liberal and left-leaning, but in fact, all those people at the very center of the critique very, very much so. So the the audience that will come, let's say, to the camera theater which is the Tel Aviv, municipal theatre it's Israel's largest theater with the largest group of subscribers performs most widely around. Israel would come to see a play. One of the place that I write about in the book called plunder or tangled or imbroglio a few wills and other translation of fancy translation for Plum tail which is actually Yiddish term in the first scene of the play, what do they who do they meet? They meet a couple of Jewish Israeli couple that have invited over young Arab couple and the Arab man is. A colleague of the Jewish Israeli men and the stereotypical way in which the Jewish couple relates to the young Arab couple, assuming that the only eat Arab food. They're shocked when they hear that the Arab woman is a vegetarian, they don't really. Even actually understand that their citizens of the state of Israel, and we know that Palestinians constitute over twenty percent of the citizens of the state of Israel. And here in the the first scene of this plunder play about the conflict, the audience, Caesar, reflection of themselves on state. So yes, I think I think you're right. It comes back to your first question about these performances peace building in in the broader arts culture and conflict transformation field. Some of my colleagues have actually come up with a a topology as we'd call it of the different kinds of arts and and peace building work and the type that the the work that I've researched fits into as called artists based peacebuilding and lords. It's these are not projects per se. They're organic parts of the arts world where the fundamental impulse of this work is first and foremost, the creative self expression of the artist's. That's why they're doing it. First and foremost there. Professional, they want to express themselves. They do want to create bridges between them if we're talking about groups in conflict that are performing together, and this is opposed to the two other types which are community based peacebuilding work and ritual or tr- tradition based peacebuilding work that uses arts and dance and music that is steeped in a given society or communities traditions often as a way to heal. So these are three broad type. So my work fits in in that larger categorization. This is the artists based. Is it more modest in nature in it's perhaps presumption to instigate some sort of a larger movement towards peace? I would say so because I think in general, artists are skeptical to go beyond the fundamental role theater fulfils in society, which is to pose questions to go beyond the posing. Probing questions presupposes that there is an agenda. Now, this is not always the case that many of the these joint productions and these peace building performances do raise explicit issues one which I don't write about. I reference, but don't read about in detail in my book is a play that still performing at the Jaffa theater in the old city of Jaffa, call the admission play by a highly respected Israeli Jewish Israeli playwright moti learner, where they're, they want the audiences to confront tha. Together with the actors, the double narrative. Can we live with an come to grips with both the Zionist narrative about nineteen forty eight and the Palestinian narrative. And essentially he writes a Arthur Miller style, all my son's family drama about how different understands of nineteen forty eight, rip both a Jewish Israeli family apart and Apollo stinian family apart. So sometimes the the plays are more embarrass. They're not as modest as you suggest. But I think that fundamentally, especially if we think about the period of time in which these productions have been performed, these were all performed from the year two thousand and in October two thousand the second intifada began. So I often marveled when I entered into this whole research process, how is it? What is the glue that keeps these productions together? The so much of this extra theatrical noise. That is impacting making it so difficult. And I discovered in the decade from two thousand over forty professional productions intentional Jewish Palestinian professional productions, where there was some degree of bilingualism or by cultural ISM. There was a definite awareness of finding away to give expressions cultural and political special. Do you think that essentially, every type of Jewish are ab- artistic encounter, whether they like it or not can act as a platform for peace building? Is it really inherent in the dynamic of encounter? I think so, but parking Bax one of your previous questions, if the initiator, which is invariably the case is Jewish Israeli. Regardless of that individual or that institutions intentions in the evidently, the art is going to be. I inform us about. The Jewish Israelis sleeping better at night. I always remember a close colleague in Ramallah in work that I did in the Oslo period as part of the breach out to broader groups in Israel society. And I had a colleague who is a lecturer, there's eight university, a social psychologist who said that. The reason you Isreaeli wanna meet with us is to sleep better at night. And the reason we meet with us that you won't sleep better at night. So I think that impulse of the Jewish Israelis who also usually responsible for the administration of these theaters there. Again, back to what you said before Jewish Israeli Hebrew theatre attorney free if there is a digital fundraising needed. It's usually coming from liberal Jewish individuals or funding groups, so they're serving their interests. They're serving their interests also to bolster their self image, doesn't make them any less legitimate, but it does reinforce. This issue that their first and foremost serving their needs and not necessarily the needs of the of the our participants. But on the other hand, as I've also tried to give you at least a small glimpse into things happen. These dynamics happen the actors and the Jewish Israeli directors and the crew members. They, they become families, you know, but I believe we're family is not just really, really clever sardonic comment of of that comes out in this homeless chips. A lot play. They do become artistic families. They do work together. They do show themselves in the audience that they can persevere overcome within economic interests. They wanna keep working. They wanna play. That's going to run for at least a year or two. And if not one hundred shows at least sixty seventy or eighty shows that's their. That's their more certainly one of their sources of income. So there's very much a paradox here, just like there's a power. Doc of collaboration of artistic cooperation, which is so much a part of theater. On the other hand, this feeling of being a collaborator, it's the same around these issues of power relations, and and there's another element here that I'd like to raise now, which is the fact that two of those productions produced by mainstream theaters have been in the company while the two biggest theatres in his realm that our national institutions. Yeah, and the other two more fringe or experimental theaters that normally push the boundaries much more than the mo- mainstream counterparts. How did this structural difference play out in the productions? Well, there are a lot of different aspects to that. I'll point out two or three of them. One is that didn't play out at all that the, in fact, in the the play in the camera, which I referenced the plenty of play, probably of all the work. I've seen in the last two decades. There was never a play that brought in such a in-your-face, powerful, uncompromising way the pathologies the social pathologies of both ralian Palestinian society in the wake of the intifada terror. These rarely occupation and this was on a main stage in Israel's because theater and it was also bilingual play. Some of the Jewish Israeli actors learned Arabic. They took part playing Palestinians in funeral scenes of Palestinians, they, Jews played Palestinians Palestinian played Jews, Jewish nationalist Jewish activists settlers. So in one sense, there was really no difference. Each production had a different approach. Sometimes more narrative approach of interweaving stories or family stories that dealt with like in the play longings at the Java theater which. Is still running. So in that sense, theater theorist theater in a really depended on the artistic vision behind the specific project. On the other hand, unquestionably in the large theaters, these kinds of productions served the leadership's real need to balance out the repertoire because the then artistic director of the Habima theater Ilan Ronen. And I remember as specific interview, he said that for him, the national theatre was about all Israelis and his take on the theater was its role in in the civic sense in the sense of really allowing voices to be expressed. And he was definitely sincere, but because of the nature of how theater is funded and for those of you who are listening who don't live in Israel, it's very important to point out that. The funding model in Israel or cultural policy in Israel is a European model. It's not a American model where theaters really have to fend for themselves and count mostly on just ticket sales and film three dollars here all the theaters, including the large repertory theatres are publicly funded by the government of Israel by the ministry of culture and sports. They have core funding and additional funding that will often garner for specific festival or specific project. And some will also government also receive money from the local government authorities. So it's a different model that necessitates the theaters playing by certain rules and creating productions that will be popular for all Israelis all around the country. And that will be bought by the regional theaters that are actually the largest subsets of yours in Israel. More theaters now viewed outside of Tel Aviv than in Tel-Aviv. Because so many regional theatres of come up. That is an interesting question while your study goes up two thousand ten, yeah, but right now we have a new culture minister who really revolutionized this or tries to revolutionize the way the theaters are funded, and it will have if she goes through her revolution, we have direct impact on this kind of, you know, productions that don't really toe the government line which is trying to do really is defined theaters theatrical productions, who in her view defame Israel, all? I don't know how she would like. I mean, this is really not in the book because it's came only after after two thousand fifteen. But how do you think it will affect? Well, first of all, you should know that this issue around the car in culture, minister is an issue that I'm very involved with in and also in our research. Capacity. And in fact, while I'm in town, I'm giving talk about this very issue Britain into a private group that's expressed an interest to better understand how the arts are influenced by and influence politics and society in the actual implication. So it's something that I am involved with in giving some thought and briefly what I'll explain to you tickets just white noise or is it's not white noise at all. What I will say is the following the current cultural minister who's been in the position for three years as become the poster child, the public face for a very real issue, which is her terminology, it's academic jargon, but it's terminology that she's Dopp did the Ashkenazic hegemonic control of his rarely culture, and she's one hundred percent right sociologists cooling, many attending this conference here in a university of California. Berkeley have been writing for years, very accurately about how. And I'll add the give it a little more substance, how the cultural policy in Israel has been completely focused on maintaining high culture on making sure that we have a well-funded opera that we have well-funded orchestras public theatres, certainly museums and galleries, and north African misery, culture, Ethiopian Israeli culture Arab and Palestinian culture in Israel have been minimally funded another aspect which interests the culture minister is arts and culture that is developed in the West Bank and the Jewish communities. The Jewish settlements Judean Samarra, whatever terminology that you want to use. And so she is actually taken this very realistic which is in my mind indisputable, it's indisputable. This claim that she joins in on about the hegemonic control of the economic elite around issues of his rally culture, which I'll add. Ed is probably the last Milia in which the Jewish Israeli left-wing elites have still a very significant control, not just influence control as opposed to the media as opposed to the army as opposed to the education system. So it's really a cultural battlefield. She's taken this critique and basically brought it to a much much bigger end operational level. She has taken, for example, a law that's was legislated not by the currents fourth in the ten year government, but the previous Netanyahu government, the third Netanyahu government, the Nakal law, which basically enables the finance minister of Israel to either protest or to limit funding for any public group, not just artistic that expresses the notion that the nineteen forty eight was not. A reason for celebration, but rather a reason for morning. In other words, the notion of nineteen forty eight as disaster as the Palestinians or most Palestinians experience. There's a law in that was out there and that was upsetting to all sorts of individuals and groups, but nothing was done with it. She turned around even though it wasn't under her auspices and try to have the funding of this very same theater we spoke about earlier that the Arab people theater now the draft theater and have it limited. She even tried to, but these are two separate issues because the Ashkenazi dominance of the cultures fear in a way created some sort of space for the Palestinians to express themselves in their own terms. And the fact that she wants to take away that control from the skin and give it to the oppressed minorities. She doesn't mean to give more funding to Arab Palestinians as concede more than twenty percent of. She says she. Does, and. Say that she always, yes, she, she lists the Pena's rallies, the north African Jewish Israelis, the Justin called Palestinians of Israel. But let's she, she does. She does mention the degree to which that she means it and we'll do anything about is is different question, but you're you're absolutely right. And the this last issue that we're talking about here really touches upon something that as a real troubling point, which is she while using a very creative and clever terminology, what she calls the freedom of funding ho fish honeymoon. She states very clearly. I am not against him. We'll never infringe upon the freedom of expression ho fish betwee. But I do have the prog if in fact the responsibility to enact ho fish me moon freedom of funding and the words the prerogative of the government to decide what it's going to fund, and then she takes it to the next in her mind, the next match. -tural step, which is the government will not fund work or artistic institutions, which host activities that she and her ilk perceive as anti Israel or threatening to Israel's very existence. If it's not just lip service is going to put a chi- Bush on the sort of initiatives cover in. No. In fact, it's cheating the opposite. What's happened in the last three years since a minister Regev has taken on the position and again to add a dramatic dimension of irony. This has been until this current government, the least in demand, the least popular ministerial position, no patronage possibilities of offering jobs as in pretty much every other ministry. Relatively small budgets little influence, low public profile, and you as journalists know that minister Regev aside from prime minister. Netanyahu is the most highly visible politician and minister in Israel today. So she has not succeeded in squashing certainly the artistic tippety. In fact, two things of happens. There is more and more of what I would call positional artistic activity that has gone on their many examples which we can't go into now. But there is really a sense among artists and not only artists who self define themselves as progressives or radical and such. But artists who really feel that they have a responsibility to use there are to use their tools and they're public standing to both create an express, their views, and the other outcome of her policies is that there is much more of a sense of artists coming together to support each other. There have been a few other positions that she's taken that have prompted artists to take even bold positions where they've even given up certain funding. Certain festivals in order to show solidarity with other artists whose work has not been performed. So there's definitely a different climate and a much more active and altruistic less self indulgent sense among more and more artisan, which I find actually quite inspiring in very significant. I hope minister regular is not listening to actually how she is. All right. Actually, Perelman research fellow at Tel Aviv university's Tammy Steinmetz center for Peace Research and the author of the recently published. But Ibrahim, we're family. Thank you very much today. It's a pleasure and also big tanks to give them the mirrow sound engineer entry, tie shut him, Julia Brahms produces. And now we have a small request many or most of your listen to us on the apple podcasts app. And we would like to ask you this, please consider writing review just launch the apps. Electoral podcast in the library section scroll down to ratings and review and press writer review. And then of course, write one check out our archive with more than one fifty interviews. If you like us, you can like us on Facebook page is called the Tel Aviv review podcast. Ideas from Israel follow me and my co host Dahlia on Twitter, join us again next week for another edition of Tel Aviv review. And until then.

Israel director Tel Aviv Tel Aviv university Java theater Jaffa Abu Ibrahim Israel institute research fellow Berkeley university of California Isreaeli TamI Steinmetz center for Peac Hillman Habima theater Atlantan Arab Mantas Netanyahu Jaffa theater
"camera theater" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

The Hoop Collective

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"camera theater" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

"We'll be right back what about that a can your point dvr goodness i was the man obscure heartbroken because i loved super that was marshall i'll world greenland turn mclean it's a lotta soup all my home a you know there were the episodes were super man died in i and member all week banned if era i picked it up all week and man i overslept and missed it not students ledell owns armslength yet and they don't their cartoon the same now we at great khartoum's via a me but that's a show may have we had to be we were selfsufficient and we have to be you know who held accountable flashes you know we we we overslept we missed it out here for for a while and like you said says days nielsen ups owes you haven't seen because you over slip by ten or fifteen minutes so i mean she is nowadays mayor big there is no big watched lighted it is there just wasn't that leaves us let's go to a new episodes you mr beaupuy metabolize scott let's go to movies you know me like if if you didn't see the move when a camera theater you had to wait almost a year before cable vhs now the which if that nowadays is a quick turnaround mm hey megabits was up this is no police were mud their first got a vcr uh the first movie they knew rented were the most are afraid.

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"camera theater" Discussed on Men In Blazers

Men In Blazers

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"camera theater" Discussed on Men In Blazers

"Call say contain the looting cloth it will be less bunkers and watching him do that in a three piece suit interesting i have my that man my wife fast may does that man antonio advocate tired of doing that quote fist pump above his head thing that he does i've never felt sorry for my wife the question i realize because she's mary timmy david she doesn't know men who are really successful she now how they act fail how they experience life yet some enough there's been something written that when you are told us the other day in one of my training sessions with the that when you raise your arms above your head it does something to your brain it makes you feel like you're a winner and you remember that feeling again and again and again is that why we do it yeah yes primal noone them a posture so terrible and completely slumped in the opposite direction highlight the game from an american perspective the ongoing dirty war between the acosta and you england's finest jeff the boston beast camera theater real cage match those take the and jeffrey who wins how does it go down and how many who made shifts does involve us all about the old church on the new church roach that farms all about this place at the reformation being being played on wouldn't be on a forever apparently hold this fight a pool hall and be the best american fights injured rookie took on i've in georgia and make vinson called he said.

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