35 Burst results for "Cambridge University"

The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

WSJ The Future of Everything

05:35 min | 3 weeks ago

The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

"Okay I'm assuming people just didn't start thinking about making lab producer artificial blood during this pandemic. How long has research in this field been going on scientists have been experimenting with lab, Produce Blood for decades but due to issues of funding or skill ability or just now seeing the start of clinical trials. and. Even though we're all really thinking about corona virus right now, what really accelerated our work blood substitutes was actually another virus. That was the HIV AIDS epidemic in the Nineteen Eighty S. The evidence was that the cause was not only something new. But something transmitted by blood Thousands of people were infected with HIV, through blood transfusions. This was before the blood supply could be tested for HIV in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five. So it made people really scared there was panic going on I remember my grandparents being fearful about the blood supply people before they had surgery would have their own blood extracted so they could use during surgery. There were all these fears about whether the blood supply was safe yeah, and that's when A. Lot of my sources told me we started shifting our national attention to looking at the blood supply. We realized it had to be tested. It had to be controlled, and we had to dump a lot of blood during that time because it was contaminated I spoke to one of the researchers who's been studying blood since the late nineteen eighties, his name is Dr George Daily. He's now the Dean of Harvard Medical School and he runs a lab there that studies this. Ultimately through various public health measures and very aggressive testing, very sensitive and specific testing. For HIV, the blood supply was made extremely safe. But as we've seen in recent years with the emergence of new pathogens whether it's Zeka war Ebola or. Recently coverted. There's always a worry about new infections that can contaminate the blood again, raising the value and importance of being able to more carefully controlled manufacturer and presentation of blood through a different system. That different system, he's alluding to is one where blood could be made in a lab. Okay and we're going to break down those new developments in just a bit but first Nora can you explain what do you need to make blood? Well just a refresher from probably what we learned in high school biology blood is made up of different parts. You've got the red blood cells, they carry oxygen. You've got white blood cells, they fight infection. Then there's plasma that carries nutrients, salts, proteins, and then there are platelets they make your blood clot when you get a cut. All of these parts are important because they all serve different functions so far no one has come up with a complete replacement, one total package for all of these functions. Instead different research groups are focusing on trying to produce the individual parts of blood. There's been some early testing of red blood cell substitutes including. Jehovah's Witnesses because most don't accept blood transfusions as part of their religion. But. Most of the momentum that I saw in my reporting was with labs trying to grow their own platelets. One of the top researchers doing this is Dr. Cedric of art and he's a consultant hematologist who leads a research group in transfusion medicine at Cambridge University? Rather important seven will be the small cell in the body, but equally if you don't have enough lateness. The bleeding symptom saw a really horrendous. Can I just stop right here and say I am shocked the platelets or the smallest cell in the body there's a lot of small cells in the body I know I know I was shocked when he said that too I had to go back and double check but it's true they are and even though platelets are so small they're really powerful. They're really important for patients undergoing chemotherapy or people who sustain traumatic injuries because they often receive platelet transfusions, but they're also quite finicky. They can only be stored for about five days and they have to be sort of stirred around to keep them from going bad. Leaving Jam Joel, Rubin on New Kitchen surface for five days zero. Gross stuff. So part of the reason he's trying to figure out how to manufacture them in the lab in vitro is because platelets are usually in the shortest supply because they have that shorter shelf life and when you say in vitro, you mean basically in a petri dish. Yep, that's right. That's in vitro. Got It. All right. So this makes sense I mean it's kind of like how you have to buy milk every week while if you drink milk which I don't. But flower can last a month or so yup. Yeah. Exactly. Right. So I get why platelets need a bit more backup but I'm still trying to figure out my head how they actually make more of them in a lab. You know what I mean. Now platelets don't just reproduce own you need stem cells to make them.

HIV Dr George Daily Nineteen Eighty Dr. Cedric Producer Rubin Aids Harvard Medical School Nora Cambridge University Joel
The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

WSJ The Future of Everything

05:04 min | 3 weeks ago

The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

"I'm assuming people just didn't start thinking about making lab producer artificial blood during this pandemic. How long has research in this field been going on scientists have been experimenting with lab, Produce Blood for decades but due to issues of funding or skill ability or just now seeing the start of clinical trials. and. Even though we're all really thinking about corona virus right now, what really accelerated our work blood substitutes was actually another virus. That was the HIV AIDS epidemic in the Nineteen Eighty S. The evidence was that the cause was not only something new. But something transmitted by blood Thousands of people were infected with HIV, through blood transfusions. This was before the blood supply could be tested for HIV in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five. So it made people really scared there was panic going on I remember my grandparents being fearful about the blood supply people before they had surgery would have their own blood extracted so they could use during surgery. There were all these fears about whether the blood supply was safe yeah, and that's when A. Lot of my sources told me we started shifting our national attention to looking at the blood supply. We realized it had to be tested. It had to be controlled, and we had to dump a lot of blood during that time because it was contaminated I spoke to one of the researchers who's been studying blood since the late nineteen eighties, his name is Dr George Daily. He's now the Dean of Harvard Medical School and he runs a lab there that studies this. Ultimately through various public health measures and very aggressive testing, very sensitive and specific testing. For HIV, the blood supply was made extremely safe. But as we've seen in recent years with the emergence of new pathogens whether it's Zeka war Ebola or. Recently coverted. There's always a worry about new infections that can contaminate the blood again, raising the value and importance of being able to more carefully controlled manufacturer and presentation of blood through a different system. That different system, he's alluding to is one where blood could be made in a lab. Okay and we're going to break down those new developments in just a bit but first Nora can you explain what do you need to make blood? Well just a refresher from probably what we learned in high school biology blood is made up of different parts. You've got the red blood cells, they carry oxygen. You've got white blood cells, they fight infection. Then there's plasma that carries nutrients, salts, proteins, and then there are platelets they make your blood clot when you get a cut. All of these parts are important because they all serve different functions so far no one has come up with a complete replacement, one total package for all of these functions. Instead different research groups are focusing on trying to produce the individual parts of blood. There's been some early testing of red blood cell substitutes including. Jehovah's Witnesses because most don't accept blood transfusions as part of their religion. But. Most of the momentum that I saw in my reporting was with labs trying to grow their own platelets. One of the top researchers doing this is Dr. Cedric of art and he's a consultant hematologist who leads a research group in transfusion medicine at Cambridge University? Rather important seven will be the small cell in the body, but equally if you don't have enough lateness. The bleeding symptom saw a really horrendous. Can I just stop right here and say I am shocked the platelets or the smallest cell in the body there's a lot of small cells in the body I know I know I was shocked when he said that too I had to go back and double check but it's true they are and even though platelets are so small they're really powerful. They're really important for patients undergoing chemotherapy or people who sustain traumatic injuries because they often receive platelet transfusions, but they're also quite finicky. They can only be stored for about five days and they have to be sort of stirred around to keep them from going bad. Leaving Jam Joel, Rubin on New Kitchen surface for five days zero. Gross stuff. So part of the reason he's trying to figure out how to manufacture them in the lab in vitro is because platelets are usually in the shortest supply because they have that shorter shelf life and when you say in vitro, you mean basically in a petri dish. Yep, that's right. That's in vitro. Got It.

HIV Dr George Daily Nineteen Eighty Producer Dr. Cedric Aids Harvard Medical School Nora Rubin Cambridge University Joel
Josephine Butler and the fight for women's equality

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | Last month

Josephine Butler and the fight for women's equality

"Let's talk about Josephine Butler. Josephine was born on April thirteenth eighteen, twenty eight in Northumberland, the northeastern region of England to a prominent family. Her Father John. Gray was a wealthy landowner and cousin to the British prime. minister. Earl. Grey who led between eighteen, thirty and eighteen, thirty four. Josephine's father was a strong supporter of progressive social reforms value. He passed along to his daughter one of Seven Children Josephine was educated by her father at home. He educated both sons and daughters equally an uncommon practice for the time in eighteen fifty two at the age of Twenty Four Josephine Mary George Butler an examiner of schools who shared her commitment to social reforms. In their first five years of marriage the couple had four children in eighteen sixty, three Josephine's only daughter and youngest child Eva fell to her death. To cope with the overwhelming grief, Josephine turned to charity work. Josephine. started by finding shelter for the city's homeless women often taking them into her own home. Many of these women were prostitutes suffering the terminal stages, venereal diseases. Josephine also worked with Aunt Jemima. Cloth a prominent suffragette. To establish academic courses for advanced study for women. In eighteen sixty seven. Appointed president of the north of England Council for Higher Education of women. She campaigned for Cambridge. University, to expand opportunities available to women, students, and her efforts resulted in one of Cambridge's all women, colleges, Newnham College. During this time Josephine published multiple books about the social issues. She championed her views on a woman's place in society conflicted with some feminists of the time. Straight from the idea that women should be viewed in the same terms as men instead she argued that women deserve the vote because they were different than men and had a separate responsibility within society to protect and care for the week. To Josephine ensuring a woman's right to vote was away to strengthen the morality of the nation. In eighteen sixty nine Josephine began publicly campaigning against the contagious diseases acts of eighteen, sixty, six, eighteen, sixty, nine. These acts were initially introduced to curtail the spread of venereal diseases in the armed, forces. But in order to do so sex workers were heavily targeted and penalized. Under, these acts police were given the authority to arrest suspected prostitutes living in seaports and military towns and subject them to forced medical examinations. Have worked with sex workers at the start of her career. Josephine felt sympathy for these woman. She believed they were forced into this work through low wages and minimal opportunity for Josephine these acts represented troubling double standard. Sex workers were punished, but the men who sought out there surfaces were not. Josephine was a powerful orator who drew large crowds as she traveled the country gaining support for the Act's repeal. George now, a prominent figure in academia was criticized for letting his wife discuss sex in public. Despite threats to his career George, continue to support Josephine's advocacy. And Josephine charged on. She teamed up with other prominent social workers to expose the insidious world of human trafficking and child prostitution in London. Her hard work paid off. In eighteen eighty, five parliament passed the Criminal Law Amendment Act which raised the age of consent from thirteen to sixteen. And the following year eighteen, eighty, six parliament formally repealed the contagious diseases act. In her final years Josephine supported the suffrage movement and published her most famous work personal reminiscences of a great crusade. It promoted social reform women's education and equality. Josephine. Butler died on December thirtieth nineteen O six. She was seventy eight years old. Her Fiber Women's equality especially for those who often exist on the margins of society remains highly relevant to this day.

Josephine Mary George Butler Seven Children Josephine Josephine England Council For Higher Edu England Northumberland Earl Cambridge John Newnham College Gray Grey President Trump EVA Aunt Jemima Prostitution London
Covid Science: Test, Track, Trace

The Naked Scientists

04:13 min | 3 months ago

Covid Science: Test, Track, Trace

"First up this week, the city of Leicester has been making the headlines now unlike the rest of the UK that celebrated super. Saturday as the lockdown eased, was grand reopening for the pubs in Leicester Schools have been restricted to children essential workers again. A non essential shops have had to pull down the shutters because surge corona virus cases. The lockdown has been extended there. Nobody seems to be able to think on precisely why Lester has come top of the League for Corona. Virus cases this last month. The Department for Health and social care said there were multiple factors causing the spike, and there were no quote. Cat Homes, hospital settings or industrial processes that would immediately explain the apparent rise in new diagnoses. BA- scientists say that infections might reflect social inequalities in places where there are more white collar jobs, employees can work from home, and they can isolate from others a deprived areas on the other hand. People are more likely to have to go to work and to use public transport to do that, and that raises their risk of becoming infected. Cambridge University's Jeff Studies disease outbreaks. So, what does she make of the longer lockdown approach? That's being used to control the outbreak in Leicester I think in general terms were already on the right track. It's really about sort of empowering local authorities now when we do see sort of increase transmission in specific areas to act in a way that they know is locally appropriate, also locally effective to contain it because the way outbreak spread is obviously determined by the population. It's spreading in sort of density of the housing arrangement, the kind of industries they rely on for. For the economy there do we actually know what is the right way forward? In terms of when you have these sorts of combinations of factors, what the right thing to do is, or is it going to be a learning exercise? In different cities with different formats, different population groups are going to have to learn the hard way, and then they'll know for next time. Absolutely especially with such an unfamiliar in new virus, there is going to be a lot of trial and error a lot of trying to learn from each other and author trying to look. To see what's going to help, there is not going to be a one-size-fits-all and I think that the fact that nothing is certain should be a bit reassuring in that there is discussion and research, and that's really what's required at present. Given it is. We know that viruses spread much less will in turn. More people are out and about we're also in the immediate aftermath of lockdown when arguably the amount of virus circulating should be extremely low. Is it not rather worrying that? We've got lester happening right now? It's obviously concerning sure whether we should see it as entirely surprising. There are few features over city like Lester. That would leave little more susceptible to kind of ongoing transmission. What encourages me is that it was detected and that there is this discussion now of maybe some kind of local interventions that could come into control. There is something to be said for the fact that is. And the does seem to be less transmission because when you're in sort of orphan spaces, so maybe there is some kind of happy middle ground of opening up. The is possible with something. That sort of leverage is the the fact that we can be outside right now and not rained on chilly. For we've now got plans being laid for opening up the hospitality industry more opening up air bridges to other European countries. What your feelings on the direction of travel? As it too much too soon or do you think this is about right? I think it's important in answering this question that I make it clear that my background is very much coming from the sort of epidemiology anthropology side I'm not an economist. I'm not a public policymakers rule, but from my perspective it is worrying I'm through are ways that we can support hospitality industries to open up in a way that sort of mitigates the risk and so I'm hopeful. But the issues around international spreads do concern me, not just the idea of importing cases into Britain, if we transmission even loa, which could trigger new ongoing transmission, but also the fact that we might be exporting cases to vulnerable places. We've not only got to think about risks to our country, but the role we might play in sort of proliferating this outbreak globally to

Lester Leicester Leicester Schools Department For Health Corona Cat Homes Cambridge University UK Jeff Studies Britain
UK historian quits Cambridge post after slavery remarks

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:17 sec | 3 months ago

UK historian quits Cambridge post after slavery remarks

"Historian David Starkey has lost several prestigious academic posts. After remarks about race which Cambridge University's Fitzwilliam College called indefensible and an online interview, Starkey said slavery was not genocide because His quote, not mine. So many Damn blacks survived

David Starkey Fitzwilliam College Cambridge University
Doctor Chris Smith Speaking About Coronavirus

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:57 min | 4 months ago

Doctor Chris Smith Speaking About Coronavirus

"The longer the covid nineteen lockdown goes on the more we learn about covid nineteen not least because being locked down like this. We don't have a great deal to do but ever expanding testing is teaching us about the spread of the virus will hopefully help us figure out how soon something like normality becomes a possibility he in the UK Health Secretary. Hancock has suggested that seventeen percent of Londoners may now have covid nineteen antibodies. I'm joined with more on this prime article. Twenty four health and science correspondent Dr. Chris Smith also a viral adjust at Cambridge University. Chris first of all that figure seventeen percent which suggests as I understand that seventeen percent of Londoners have been infected by cove nineteen to one extent or another. Does that sound like a plausible number? Yeah I think I think it does some countries and indeed some commentators in many countries hyping the number would be a bit higher. But Tha that does seem to twin with what we knew about the circulation of the agent. We New London was hot spots. We knew it took off their more than in other parts of the UK and this is also backed up by the that in the parts of the UK. This the Ciro positively right in other words. The number of people with antibodies against the new kind of ours is between five and seven percent so that does align with that so quite high circulation in London lower levels of circulation across the rest of the country but across the whole it means that the vast majority of people are not immune therefore only a small fraction of the countryside. Fall has actually called the new cry of ours. Is there anything we can infer from that figure in London? Not Merely about the level of infection but the the level of exposure what. I'm wondering is if you take a given Londoner for the sake of argument. Let's say it's Me Prior to lockdown traveling at least twice a day on Tube trains most of which were pretty crowded frequently being out and about in London which is a busy city speaking to. I don't know dozens of people a day as a journalist does is there any meaningful chance? I wouldn't have been exposed at some point. I it's very likely that you probably have encountered this. But he's whether or not you encountered any infectious dose of it because that's the key thing nodal viruses virus particles might equally and when a person is infected. They are producing from their body and all of their secretions of from the respiratory tract. So that's coughing sneezing just breathing droplets of moisture which virus particles in the they hope for in the for a period of time and it may well be that some of those virus particles that just stopped so although that virus particles and although they might have some genetic information in them they just might not go off like a dodgy firework you like them nothing happens so a person who breathes in some of those particles isn't guaranteed that will catch it so it's not a given if you're sharing it with someone who's infected. You're definitely going to get it. Because it depends how much they're actually issuing from their body into the that you then encounter but yes people in London had an above average Johnson counseling other people who were infected and therefore infectious and because of the high density working environment in London. The high density of traveling in London as a result of that the opportunity afforded to the virus to spread was higher which is why London took off soon took off foster and had high levels of virus. I've rule and I think part of this is probably a reflection on the London's also right next door to one of the world's busiest airports Heathrow which would have an she connected with the London. Transport system would perhaps have been a a conduit into the country with many cases arriving via that route every day. And then probably moving into the capital and helping to spread it if seventeen percent is not it yet is. I don't know whether this is a useful way to be thinking or not but is there. A number percentage at which a widespread lifting of lockdown measures starts to seem like a sensible way forward. Well if we're using how immune people all the immunity right in the population. Then we'd need to be up in the high tens of percent like sixty seventy percent of the population immune in order for this to have any kind of serious impact on the ability of the virus to spread because this whole notion of herd immunity. The word is unfortunately been misrepresented misunderstood by many people as meaning some kind of a strategy to allow people to catch the virus naturally into become immune as a country herd immunity just means that the vast majority of people are immune which means that there are so few susceptible individuals left in the mixture that the virus Kennel circulate. And so you protect the UNAMUNE few by the immunity of the many. That's what herd. Immunity means but in order for that to work. You need very high numbers of the population to be immune so when we vaccinate people against diseases like measles with the Mo. That's why we try to get to ninety five percent of the population because we know even when we get to ninety five percent the population. A handful of people just won't respond to the vaccine so that gives us a bit of safety margin and it means that a good. It to eighty five percents people are gonNA be reliably immune and that means the fifteen to twenty percent who not and this includes newborn babies every year just unlikely to encounter so unlikely to encounter someone who's actually got it that there's no transmission chain in the population that is potentially achievable for this new corona vars volunteer routes. Either we all catch it and we become immune and then new members of the population who bowl not yet an organic. Because there's no disease can eating or more tracks if we make a vaccine against this when we get the vaccine into everybody either way we arrive at a stay of heard immunity where this too few people who are susceptible in the population for the Vars to be able to maintain a transmission chain Christmas. Thank you as always. That was our health and science correspondent. Dr Chris

London UK New London Dr Chris Dr. Chris Smith Cambridge University Hancock Secretary Respiratory Tract Tube Johnson
Cambridge University Will Hold Its Lectures Online Next Year

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Cambridge University Will Hold Its Lectures Online Next Year

"England's camber Cambridge university is one of the first in the world to announce all big lectures will be held on line over the next academic year because of the pandemic the university senior pro vice chancellor for education Graham Virgo said that small sessions will be held in person using appropriate safety measures one of the most important and this is run by the colleges is the small group teaching school district vision system and we consider the black can run as normal because we we can put in place social distancing requirements to protect staff and students safety Burgo says despite the higher cost of operations they don't want to change the cost

England Camber Cambridge University Chancellor Graham Virgo Burgo
C.S. Lewis, Essayist

5 Minutes in Church History

04:17 min | 5 months ago

C.S. Lewis, Essayist

"Cs Lewis was born in Belfast Ireland. In eighteen ninety eight he would die in nineteen sixty three and what a life he lived. He was known as Jack and far as we can tell that was because of one of his dogs names from his early childhood who was Jiaxi and CS. Lewis accepted that name and adopted that name for himself. He was an oxbridge scholar. Which meant that? He how to position at both Oxford University and Cambridge University. He's been hailed as a philosopher and apologist theologian of course he's probably best known for his NARNIA chronicles. His actual profession was as a professor a chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature. Well let's take a look at his life and let's bring one piece of that life to the surface and that is Lewis as essayist while he was baptized as a child into the Anglican Church as a teenager he drifted into agnostics Zim. And then at the Ripe Age fifteen. He declared himself to be an atheist as a teenager. He also served epic poetry. He was taken by norse mythology and all of the medieval literature. Cs Lewis goes off to France. He saw the horrors of World War. One being involved in trench warfare a shell exploded not too far from him taking the lives of two of his buddies and injuring him and then he was sent back to the UK to serve out the rest of the war on the home front went on to his life of scholarship and eventually he would be influenced by George MacDonald. Who would lead him from atheism to a generic theism in a belief in God in general and then through his friendship with Jr token and continued reading of McDonald and others. He was led from theism to Christianity. Tolkien would have much preferred that. Lewis had joined him in the Catholic Church but Louis went the way of anglicanism went back into his Anglican Church. Louis like to call this Christianity Mirror Christine Hannity and of course that's the title of one of his books. Well the thing I want to talk about Louis is his work as an essayist and one essay in particular comes up from time of nineteen forty one to nineteen forty-three once again. Europe is embroiled in a World War and World War Two and during this time. Cs Lewis is doing radio addresses during air raids over the BBC. So if you can put that setting in your mind these are some of the great essays that come from the pen of Louis in this context. Some of these. Sac PREACHED SERMONS IN CHURCHES. And some he prepared specifically for the radio in a number of them were published as books later the one in particular that I wanNA talk to you about is called the wait of glory. It's an essay and it's also a title of book of essays in it. Lewis says that almost all our modern philosophies have been devised to convince us that the good of man is to be found on this Earth at such a twentieth century things such a modern thing to neglect God and push him out of our lives to neglect the eternal and the transcendent to be fixated on the horizon of the material. Well Lewis says there is far more to ultimate reality than what we see and it is the weight of glory so he writes. It may be possible for each to think too much of his own personal glory hereafter. It is hardly possible for him to think too often or too deeply about that of his neighbor. The load or wait or burden of my neighbors glory should be laid on my back a load so heavy that only humility can carry it in. The back of the proud will be broken. It is a serious thing to live in a society of possible gods and Goddesses to remember that the dullest and most uninteresting person you can talk to May one day be a creature. Which if you saw it now. You'd be strongly tempted to worship or else a whore corruption such as you now meet if at all only in a nightmare and he'll go on to say there are no ordinary people because we all have this weight of glory.

Cs Lewis Louis Medieval And Renaissance Liter Belfast Ireland George Macdonald Professor Europe Anglican Church Oxford University France Christine Hannity Tolkien Jack BBC Catholic Church ZIM Cambridge University SAC UK
How To Fund The Search For A COVID-19 Vaccine And Boost The Recovery

Odd Lots

05:36 min | 5 months ago

How To Fund The Search For A COVID-19 Vaccine And Boost The Recovery

"So obviously we've been talking about nonstop you crisis that is going on all around the world with both the virus and the economic fallout. We've been discussing disorder. The incredible speed with which everything has changed in shutdown and what that means for the economic system and the financial system. Did we're going to try to have a conversation that looks ahead a little bit further about what's next. Maybe even potentially hopeful. I don't know maybe it'll be a little bit hopeful. And about things related to a potential vaccine and reopening and how we might get there and what lessons we might apply from the past to improve the situation that the world is facing today and the guests that I'm going to be speaking with is one that we've had on the podcast in the past. He's up Bill Janeway. He's a partner and senior adviser Warburg. Pincus he's an economist visiting scholar at Cambridge University in easy unique perspective as having been both on the venture capital side so understanding innovation as well as the sort of academic economic side to he can really speak to the types of policies in the heights of conditions that can enable innovation to flourish. Of course. That's something that we desperately need right now. With the lack of a vaccine the lack of testing it's scale and so forth and of course part of this crisis has been in parked a coordination problem that we've seen between the government which is obviously a trying to move faster on things like testing and developing therapies and that coordination with a private sector. That need more organization so some further. Do I want to bring in a bill? Janeway bill great to have you back on the podcast right to be back with you. Joe Always enjoy it very much. So there's obviously numerous aspects of this crisis. The world overall is facing two weeks. You can speak but I want to start off with this question of how governments or how the US government in particular could conceptualize funding and accelerating the process of innovation towards a potential vaccine or therapy. And of course in the past you've written a lot about the role of government spending in sort of your government spending in research and so on has played in the development of our big tech tech industries particularly Silicon Valley and how much of that came out of a Defense Department spending and so for the big picture of the role that the government has to play here in terms of getting more work done faster in this area in a way that says this is a simple one. Here's a clear target clear targets One set of targets involved liable and emphasize reliable for the incidence of the disease and in particular has score the aftermath things potential immunity. Both of these require As usual multiple efforts by multiple sources funded across the board with no preference to a particular potential source and given the global nature of. This would argue as well for the Maxima of international collaboration possible. The sort of collaboration that was available in World War Two between the US and the UK which radically advanced for example the development of radar. And which should be readily available today if we have leadership that was concerned with international collaboration as a necessary effective tool or accelerating the development of the needed tests. And then beyond that the vaccine and it's not just lab work involves clinical trials it involves the accumulation of lots of data from all the sources possible. This is an ideal moment or open collaboration. Unfortunately we seem to be somewhat stalled. And in the meantime in a way that they're too concerning residences to concerning echoes about what's going on and what's going on so the separately in the US during this extremely challenging time. We've had the experience before of closing down the civilian economy. That's exactly what happened in. Nineteen forty two in the United States after Pearl Harbor when civilian production in the economy. There was much more. Heavily manufacturing and product oriented versus service-oriented where manufacturing civilian goods was radically reduced automobile troops apple at the same time there was an alternative sources of demand namely military demand which maintained actually reduced unemployment down. I think the the low point was reached when unemployment to the extent that could be measured at all was an oath point two sect so you had a high high high demand driven economy after clothing the civilian economy

Bill Janeway United States Pincus Pearl Harbor Silicon Valley Cambridge University Defense Department JOE Warburg Visiting Scholar Senior Adviser UK
Are the lockdowns working?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:11 min | 5 months ago

Are the lockdowns working?

"Governments will be wary. That lockdowns may prove to be like wolves in rather be in being rather rather easier to stop than stop. But what do the scientists think? Well he is one on joined once again by monocle. Twentyfold Health and science correspondent. Dr Chris Smith Regular listeners will know that Chris spends his busy days working as a virologist at Cambridge University in Chris. First of all. Is it possible at all? I know this might be a bit of A. How long is a piece of string question but possible to quantify what difference the lockdowns have made? We think that they've made us turn the corner. Andrew as in when you model what this was doing certainly in the UK and other countries in terms of the growth of the pandemic and the number of cases it was growing exponentially and quite quickly. We saw the numbers of cases growing level and off and then admissions to hospital leveling off and then the number of people losing their lives leveling offer now beginning to to go down so this is certainly this intervention broken the chain of transmission or at least made it run through trickle rather than down a nice drag strip so it's definitely putting an obstacle in the way of the spread of the virus In terms of how long it's GonNa take for the peak to drop down get out of the foothills and onto level ground again though. We don't know that yet. So that being the case how and what certainty does anybody know? When do I even start lifting? Lockdowns how do you make that judgment? That's the million dollar question or in the case of what the U K economies being hit by billions per week and people really want to this question if I asked lots of times of lots of different people. Both Vala gist mathematicians politicians. I talked to and I get the same answer. We don't know So people are beginning to look at this from another perspective which is rather than what's out trigger point when to institute change the beginning to say. Well what do we think we could do to sort this out and walk? We therefore implement straight away spicer very interesting mathematician in Paris yesterday. And he's come up with very interesting strategy of carving countries up into a series of sales almost like mobile phone network cellular network cells. And thinking about how you call the country up not just arbitrarily doing in a way where you say. Well where are the people? Where do they go to work? We create sales where you don't divorce people from their work of course and these cells are ring-fenced so you have a Green Cell Novartis Activity Red Cell Virus activity so it's backed up by testing in surveillance and the idea is that you don't allow people to move outside their cell unless they have a very good reason to do so and you put in place. I measures in each cell to make go green by the vars control there. And once you've got to adjacent green sells a you merge together and so now people can move freely within that green area. You probably with me now. You can see you. Divide the country as honeycomb and slowly green or red turns to green under these circumstances. And this he says for a country the size of France or population the size of the UK. You'd be looking a five or six months of these sorts of measures in order to get control and have us bank to something resembling what life used to be like. What are we learning so far about public consent to such measures? Because obviously what we've been going through all over the world. These last few weeks has been absolutely without precedent certainly in reactionary. I think it just has been completely without precedent. So we're having to learn as we go along about what people are willing to put up with Have you been surprised in any direction by the cooperation of Publix? We knew that people were certainly very very good at getting behind this in the in the outset. And we know that people when you when you generally throw down the gauntlet in front of the people and say. There's a very good reason to do this. Let's get behind it people. Do I mean Captain told me who said I want to raise a thousand pounds by doing one hundred laps of my care home garden for my one hundredth birthday and threw down the gauntlet internationally and got twenty seven million pounds. He's raised now just goes to show. The people of re good at getting behind. The cause of the compliance was excellent. But when all this began the psychologists said to policymakers members of government there will be a period of time during which compliancy is very good and then people will begin to tire of this. And you won't be able to get them to do it forever. Many people pooh-poohed this idea but we're beginning to see evidence of this. Because if you if you look at the traffic densities own roads. Traffic density is rising again. If you look at the number of people who actually back at work numbers are going back up. People did get behind it to stall with but I think people are beginning to tire. And we're not going to be able to hang onto people's confidence in this forever so is is it possible then or arguable. Might even be a good thing that some of the lockdown restrictions being lifted that. We're seeing in some places at schools or small shops that those there's actually a psychological aspect To those decisions as well as a strictly medical one well one school of thought. If excuse the PUN is the by sending bag schoolkids what you actually do is facilitate a whole heap of spread through that sector of society and since we know the risk that school kids Ingende and given the schoolkids have younger parents on average the risk. Their parents is going to be really low. This is one way of a controlled spread through a sector of society leading to natural acquisition of immunity and resistance to this without actually placing additional risk in in the way of people who in my swamp so some cynics saying well one way to solve this problem. Is You just Let the scores Go back. And this will take care of the immunity and immunization naturally of quite a broad swathe of society. Now that's certainly one approach and other approaches to say we're not going to do anything to have vaccine. Most people agreed that this is impractical and at the opposite end of the scale completely to the vaccine and not doing anything is the we. Just go business as usual now. Most people are comfortable that we can't do that but so something somewhere between the two where we use. What will be probably much richer. Data informed by testing in terms of where immunity is around the country where the viruses circulating in the country and where people are living working commuting where the facility for spread is greatest. If we combine all of this information. I think we probably will end up adopting something like the model. I outlined that the Parisian mathematicians are proposing perhaps not identical but something which enables a degree of normality in some places reinforced by testing and surveillance together with Other signs brought to bear such as issues like vaccination when that eventually materialize. If it does an any drugs we can throw it this as well as continuing to protect the most vulnerable people either by shielding them or by testing the workers who are going to care for them and then only deploy workers to care for the most vulnerable people who know on our immune.

Dr Chris Smith UK Green Cell Novartis Lockdowns Cambridge University Publix Paris France Andrew
Rana el Kaliouby  AI, Emotional Intelligence, and the Journey of Finding Oneself (

The Tim Ferriss Show

13:33 min | 5 months ago

Rana el Kaliouby AI, Emotional Intelligence, and the Journey of Finding Oneself (

"And I'll keep this short going to jump straight to the guest. My guest today is a pioneer in emotion. Ai will define what that means. Ron L. CALL UB PhD. Who's also co founder and CEO of Affect Tiba and author of the new book girl coded subtitle a scientists quest reclaim our humanity by bringing emotional intelligence technology. A passionate advocate for humanizing technology ethics and diversity. Ron has been recognized on fortunes forty under forty list and as one of Forbes top fifty women in Tech Ron is a world economic forum young global leader and Co hosted a PBS Nova series called wonders. And she's also appeared on and appears in the youtube original series the age of a hosted by Robert Downey Junior Rahall PhD from the University of Cambridge. And a post. Doc It's doctorate from. It can find her on Lincoln Kelly. Ub TWITTER AT K. L. O. U. B. Y. by the way instagram at Rana Website Ron L. DOT COM Rana. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. I'm excited I'm excited to have you on and if so much to cover and I thought I would begin with a question that will hopefully open up a whole different doors. A whole different set of doors. I think is the proper English expression that could potentially walk through. And it's related to a book. This is affective computing crime if. I'm getting any of the pronunciation wrong by. Rosalind Picard A. R. D. How did this book come into your life so I am concerned? I grew up in Cairo and around the Middle East. But at the time this is like nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight. I had just graduated from computer science from the American University in Cairo and my career plan at the time was to become faculty like wanted to teach and so. I knew teach had to do my master's in it was all very calculated and so I was looking for a thesis topic and my fiance at the time went on Amazon and he said Oh. You know there's this really interesting book by this. Mit professor called. Rosalind Picard Called Affect of computing and. We ordered it through Amazon. It took about three months to shift to Cairo. It got held and customs for reasons. I don't really understand but eventually I got hold of the book and I read it and I you know. I think it's safe to say that it changed my life because so so the thesis in the book is that computers need to understand human emotions just the way people do and I read the book and I was fascinated by this idea and it you know I made that my research topic and it became my obsession and it just really changed the trajectory of my life. What besides the thesis in the book had such an impact on your was it just that that world view that perspective or was there more to the book or more to the author. Yeah a great question. Soon let's talk about the author. I so rise is one of the few and I mean this was true back then. It's still true today. She's one of the few kind of female you know. Computer Science Machine Learning engineers professors in the space. And you know I kind of learned about her over the years I've eventually actually. She ended up being my co-founder many years later. But there's a story around that but but essentially I was just fascinated by her and she you know she's a mom she's three boys. I just thought she was like a Rockstar. So that was kind of one part of it but just the way she wrote the book and how she you know. I'm very expressive as a human being and I just really like. I think emotions really matter and are in the way we communicate. Non Verbally is very important and it struck me that when we think of technology that piece of how we communicate is completely missing and I was like. Oh yeah like it seems so obvious so I just got fascinated by the thesis. I got fascinated by the implications. Like what happens when technology becomes kind of clued into how we that's going to open up a whole new world of possibilities and I was intrigued by that. So let's travel back to that point in time you were with your then fiance and this book is ordered at the time. You're planning on becoming a teacher professor. Why were you on that track? To begin with I mean was it. Take us back to Egypt at that time were there. Many women striving to be faculty members in similar departments. I'm assuming computer science or or perhaps it was a different department. Maybe could tell us more. Yes so I went to the American University in Cairo and I study computer. Sciences an Undergrad. At the time most of the faculty were were guys except for one female faculty Dr Hulda Husni which became my role model and my mentor. And I just wanted to be like like she was awesome. She was you know. Very smart. Very approachable very fashionable. And I was like Ooh I like that and and I just wanted to be like her and so devised a plan also geek. I'm a geek and I'm proud of it so I I kind of devised a plan. I was like okay. I'll graduate top of my class which I did and then I was like okay. I'll go get a masters and PhD abroad. Because that's what you do and then come back and I'll join joined the faculty and so at the time because I was getting married to my fiance and he had a company based in Cairo coming to the. Us was not an option because it was way too far so he was like a let you go study in the UK. Because it's close enough so I applied to Cambridge and got in. That was kind of the impetus for going abroad and doing this. Like focusing on this research. So when did you then end up going to the? Us was that a difficult conversation with your family or your then-fiancee walk us through how that happened because it doesn't sound like that would have been just a hop skip and a jump to second conversation so walk us through that experience. Yes okay so then. I moved to Cambridge Right Cambridge University in the UK not not Cambridge Massachusetts and I will Cambridge Cambridge original Cambridge And we got married so basically I got married and got the scholarship to go study at Cambridge and my house. So He's now my husband right. Well he's my ex now but at the time he was my husband he was very supportive. He was like you gotta go. This is your dream. I'll support you will have a long distance relationship now. My family. My parents and his parents were horrified. They were like what you can't do that so so I do like to give him credit for for for making this happen and being supportive so I ended up in Cambridge and he was in Cairo and we did that for five years and towards the end of my PhD Ros Picard was visiting Cambridge UK. To give a talk there. And I ended up meeting her in person and we totally hit it off and she said why. Don't you come work with me at MIT as a post doc and I was like Oh my God. This is like a dream come true. I've been following you like forever and this is why you know like I told her my story. And then I caveat it I said that just you know I've I've been married for the last five years and have had a long distance relationship so I have to go back to Cairo otherwise and I actually really said that. I said otherwise in Islam because I'm Muslim my husband can marry up to four women and if I don't show up eventually he'll just like Mary more women so I said half jokingly right so she was like that's fine just like commute from Cairo and I commuted from Cairo Boston for a good a good three or four hundred years going back and forth between MIT and Cairo. How often did you go back and forth. Or how often did he go back to Cairo? Maybe is a better. What else get so. Initially I would spend a couple of months in Cairo and then go spend like a few weeks and Boston and then I would move with my kids to Boston over the summer so summer break we just all go there and so initially. That was okay. So this was between two thousand and six to two thousand and nine was okay Things began to kind of really follow parts when I decided to start the company so we started to get a lot of interest in technology and displaying. It they really encourage you to spin outright. So in two thousand nine united started affect. Eva and I was literally spending two weeks in Cairo in Boston. Two weeks or two weeks in Boston. It was insane and that was when like just goes out of balance everything was out of bounds unless tough it was tough and and and you know. I'm divorced now. Imagine how that didn't go very well. It was just it was I think. In retrospect it was not a very healthy lifestyle. And I I. I wouldn't want to be in that place again. I wouldn't want others to be in that. I talked publicly about that time yet. Let's let's hop around chronologically a little bit. We're GONNA come back of course to starting the company and that decision but for people who don't have any real firsthand exposure to the Middle East much less. Egypt for instance What was it like growing up in in Egypt and based on at least some of my reading you for instance wore a hit job for quite some time. We're not talking short period of time. Maybe you could also speak to that. Yeah yeah and it sounds like you've spent some time in the you've you've you've been to Jordan. It's time in Jordan of spent some time in a few places in the Middle East but not in Egypt never met each and when I was we chatted a little bit before start recording only have a few words here and there in Arabic but it's Levin Arabic right. It's it's what what you'd run across in Jordan or or the Lebanon and I remember though having many people recommend that I not study the sort of standard Arabic textbook Arabic but that I study Egyptian Arabic because all of the as they put all the entertainment and movies that I might WanNa consume would-be an Egyptian Arabic. Needless to say I didn't get that far but I haven't spent any time in Egypt. Well your Arabic spreading goods and you're right about Egyptian accent. That's kind of the most common but but I think the key thing is like there's no one Middle East. There's no one form. I grew up in a family. That's kind of an interesting way quite conservative but also quite liberal so my parents were very pro education. They scientist the They put all their money towards our schooling and they made a point during the summers that we travel abroad and experienced kind other cultures. And I think that's why like I was so comfortable moving from one country to another and ending up in the United States. Your parents do certain interject. But what is your parents do professionally okay. So my parents met. So my dad taught computer programming in the seventies and my mom was probably the first female programmer in the Middle East. He attended his class and he hit on her and they ended up getting married so so I guess I should give them a little bit of credit for ending up. Being a computer signed sub. Sure they had something to do with that. That's so so they both. My mom was a computer programmer at the Bank of National Bank of Kuwait. So we were in Kuwait for a while and my dad is. He's always worked in technology and culturally. What was it like where you grew up Or or within the family. You said that they were for instance on one hand very lesser with the right a cosmopolitan. Perhaps in their perspective and Dr Related to education and and what what were the other ingredients in the household there was there's definitely like clear gender role so even though my mom worked her entire life. it was always. She was not allowed to ever talk about her job post. You know she would leave work at three. Pm Be home like whatever for pm when we got back from school and that was it. She was never allowed to take a conference call at home. The evening never allowed to travel for work and I didn't realize that until I was an adult like I just assumed this was the way it was but it did hamper her career progression and it was this implicit understanding. That's does your. Oh this is my role and we all stick in our lane so that was interesting We were for example. I have two younger sisters.

Cairo Middle East Egypt United States Cambridge Ros Picard Boston University Of Cambridge Cambridge Right Cambridge Univ American University Professor Ron L. UK Youtube Jordan Robert Downey Cambridge Cambridge Rosalind Picard A. R. D. Lincoln Kelly
Arrests as Extinction Rebellion Ruins Trinity College Lawn

The Sustainable Futures Report

02:13 min | 7 months ago

Arrests as Extinction Rebellion Ruins Trinity College Lawn

"Extinction rebellion made headlines this week after digging up the law at Trinity College Law which almost nobody is even allowed to walk on. This is part of an ongoing protests across Cambridge fighting against the climate emergency in this particular case extinction rebellion demands that Cambridge University should cut its ties with the fossil fuel industry by liquidating its investments by no longer allowing fossil fuel companies to portray that destructive activities in a positive light by sponsoring institutions conferences professorships and prizes by no longer carrying out research into fossil fuel technologies and by excluding such destructive corporations from Careers Evans Extinction rebellion. He is also protesting at the decision of the university to sell some of its agricultural land in Suffolk to the port of Felixstowe for the construction of a three thousand vehicle lorry park. The protests have continued with roadblocks across the city for several days and numbers of activists have been arrested exile. Cambridge tweeted rebels have now been arrested for digging up the Ecologically Sterile Trinity College Law. Meanwhile if you know the right people in this country no environmental destruction is off limits. If you're really lucky you can do this. Picture of Opencast Coal Mine and make loads of money in the process correspondence to my daily newspaper or not. Happy if they planted trees instead they would have made a positive contribution to tackling climate change. Said one digging up a long releases. Commodore Oxide and nitrous oxide into the atmosphere. I've written my own lessons the paper and we'll see if they publish it. This is what I've said. Digging Up Trinity College Long Got Publicity for extinction rebellion. But if they had merely planted trees they would have been ignored. How much more of Australia needs to burn? How much more of Britain needs to flood before? Serious action is taken to address the climate emergency. It's a lot more important than some patch of grass in Cambridge

Cambridge Cambridge University Trinity College Law Ecologically Sterile Trinity C Opencast Coal Mine Nitrous Oxide Commodore Oxide Felixstowe Suffolk Britain Australia
UK to start preparing for killer coronavirus as deadly disease spreads to US

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:26 min | 8 months ago

UK to start preparing for killer coronavirus as deadly disease spreads to US

"In the past few hours the UK government's passed declare to the corona virus our to break a serious and imminent mint threats to public health. It's comes as the number of reported deaths in China stand set more than nine hundred. Let's get the latest on this with Chris Smith who is consultant altuve virologist at Cambridge University. Welcome to the broker. Chris Oh first of all. What does this announcement by the UK? Government mean in practice. Well this this is more kind of a policy situation. It's telling everybody we are preparing. We're putting into certain set of arrangements so that everything thing is prepared. Should the worst happen. The plan in place is not saying wow. The risk is suddenly changed dramatically. The risk is always been there with doing more testing etc.. We'll find out more later this week. I suspect us to really what the background level of this is circulating the country. This is more kind of the government saying that we've got various positions in place whereas policies in place now so if anything does happen we're prepared for it. Why is it gives us announcement now than what kind of considerations have taken place before that? Well things have moved on a little bit haven't they. We've seen very large numbers of cases now declared in China. There's something forty thousand. People have been confirmed as having having this agent. We've got something like four hundred thousand people being watched contact traced by the Chinese authorities. And we're beginning to see pickup beyond the the shores of China last week for instance we had one individual who caught the infection in Singapore. They'd never been anywhere near China showing the infection isn't just outside China. It's actually outside China and is spreading outside China so that was a step change. We've also seen not not one not two but now we're up to eight cases of people from the UK who have been infected with this beyond the shores of the UK at this stage but again reaffirming the fact that did he spreading. And it's quite transmissible so I think this is now a showing that there is a ramp up in in risk and so people are saying we need to be prepared for it now. How much can you tell us about different plans? The UK government's may have in case. The situation gets worse worse over here. Well Caen explain what we're doing in terms of the monitoring and diagnostic side because I'm involved in and from that perspective across this week the information I've seen suggests that we should be slowly phasing in testing local abort tree level now. What that means is that instead of samples arriving At a hospital say and being transmitted down to London where a centralized testing facility can look for this agent. The fortress in networks across the country will have their own. I'm tests so that. They can very quickly process samples from patients without the need to transmit them with a big delay down to London. Get tested set in the back so that is going to help to streamline nine not just monitoring which is going to be important but also getting a good measure on how many people might have this also getting an understanding of how we we can better control and coordinate efforts locally because the sooner we can give results to people with the sooner we can reassure them but be we know what to do with them because if a person needs to be isolated they can be isolated. A person doesn't spend ages in isolation using facilities or wasting their time waiting for a result. We keep the country moving so I think getting the testing is going to be the the first priority. And that's coming this week. We hope the total number of deaths in China has now reached nine hundred and eight and that is more during the SARS epidemic in two thousand to two thousand and three. How would you describe the situation? We're seeing now. What is the situation with the corona virus worldwide? Wii at the moment well the the fine grain data we have is coming from China because obviously there ahead of the curve in terms of hitting their first other countries including this one where tendons be reactive to where people have come from when they have symptoms so case definition here in the at the moment is question. One have symptoms. We'll have you been in contact with someone who has question to have you been in or were they in one of nine risk areas and those areas where they know the diseases circulating collecting at the moment so there may well be Z.. Circulating here on the streets of Britain and we wouldn't know at the moment because we're not going finding random people and testing them because we haven't had the testing Pakistan that would demolish our system. That's why but the point is that the chances are as we begin to look more. We're GONNA find more so more countries with more testing and Awada case definition is probably GONNA show an escalation now. The big question is always still lag. Phase as in China took a wall to give up its numbers before before they started to grow the way that they have recently is the rest of the world in that position did China export enough cases of this to other countries before we knew about it that there is already seething around the world and I suspect that probably was of cases of this. So it's going to slowly grow in smolder and then the numbers will start to climb. We don't know what the Matthias kind of I think what the next week or so is going to show us as we begin to look more but do we know how efficient the sometimes trucco Nian prevention measure have been so far. Well Yeah you're right to call it your Conan. I mean look what China's doing they've got people confined to their homes There were situations where people Philippine told you not allowed out. One designated family member is allowed to go shopping every couple of days. No one else can leave. No one can go to work and the repercussions of this is going to be quite considerable. Obviously the social ones. There's people who might be vulnerable. Who's caring for them? If you if you coke it out the house. There's going to be the psychological things you're going to get you know we're talking about people on boats stuck on in six thousand people stuck on a boat with that doesn't redefine cabin fever or what does and then you got the situation where We we don't know how this is going to spread yet so at the moment is it's really uncertain and so- China have resorted these really quite severe measures and the spraying the streets with no call it at all. But some kind of disinfectant with drones and with other sort of cannons to try and cleanse the areas and reduce the race and it has brought numbers down a bit in China but other countries couldn't possibly do China all doing and China is still just a still not not controlling this. They've still got two and a half thousand cases a day that that dog nosing with it so I think it's early days to say exactly. How far is GONNA go moment? Chris Smith from Cambridge University. Thank

China UK Chris Smith Cambridge University Chris Oh London Consultant Sars Singapore Caen Pakistan Matthias Conan Britain
Normal response or overreaction? Analysis of the coronavirus situation

America's Truckin' Network

04:27 min | 8 months ago

Normal response or overreaction? Analysis of the coronavirus situation

"Interested I get hurt in the news update their that the all the hype about the corona virus it's not nearly as deadly is the the regular old annual flu that comes around every winter and what is it ten thousand of already died from flu like symptoms here in the U. S. yeah verses the you know the number that have died in China from the so called coronavirus at is it much ado about nothing is the questions sama are asking no we had just late last week where the World Health Organization indeed declare a public health emergency not only in just China but around the globe the U. K. had their first confirmed cases Israel is quarantining all airline passengers from China and home it is getting scary but now it's it's not because of the corona virus that's at the center of these developments yeah this commentator said it's it's people it's people when their reactions to it that inspire fear in me if the people talking about avoiding Chinese take aways the bullies who targeted a Japanese British and a the boy at a local school local to me he said the travelers have been getting up and moving when British Chinese citizens sit near them on public transport it's all this alarmist crap on social media it's all wrong in every way I see going viral is a social media phenomenon in this virus has gone viral he says yeah this is professor Jonathan he me who's the head of the laboratory of viral June not X. at what Cambridge university academic I talked to him before writing this because it's been a long time since I did a virology courses part of my university degree I wanted to establish some facts before I advanced the idea that the panic in the public is every bit as nasty as the virus itself in may be just as dangerous so he says this is the way we look at it here we are when it comes to infectious remember the sars virus it caused a panic of its omitted emerged years ago US sars had what's known as an R. zero number of about three your comment herb garden variety flew ranges from a two to a five now measles if you're a parent for the love of god get your child vaccinated the measles has a rating here of twelve to eighteen the number for the corona virus that spark in all this fuss right now is a two point three no that will inevitably changes more data comes in but how about the mortality rate as with sars the elderly and those with compromised immune systems or other conditions are most at risk the sars virus killed anywhere from nine to sixteen percent of those infected remember the murders virus that was the Middle East respiratory syndrome that that's another coronavirus of more recent vintage that was much more Friday the number for it was up thirty to forty percent of people infected this new one is right now hovering at a belt four percent of those

Pill used for nearly 40 years to treat swelling could be 'breakthrough' for children with autism

KYW 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

Pill used for nearly 40 years to treat swelling could be 'breakthrough' for children with autism

"House a drug typically prescribed to help people with swelling is getting some interest for what it might be able to do with autism that tonight is usually prescribed to treat the build up of fluid in the body but when a small group of three to six year olds with moderate to severe autism were given the drug they showed a marked improvement in social skills Cambridge university's barber Sahakian says large scale trials are coming we've already shown that it's safe so now we just need a bigger trial to show that it really is effective the drug could be available within three to five years Vicki Barker CBS

Cambridge University Barber Sahakian Vicki Barker Cbs
Remembering The Two Victims Of The Terror Attacks On The london Bridge

Financial Quarterback With Josh Jalinski

01:44 min | 10 months ago

Remembering The Two Victims Of The Terror Attacks On The london Bridge

"Folks are remembering the two victims killed in last weekend's terror attack on the London Bridge correspondence in the palm has more London Bridge has re opened to commuters to after a deadly terror attack bystanders sprayed twenty eight year old whose mind con with a fire extinguisher and tackled him before police killed the convicted terrorist who was wearing a fake suicide vests Khan was attending a prisoner rehabilitation of that near London Bridge when he went on a stabbing spree to Cambridge university graduates to organize the conference died in the attack twenty five year old Jack merit in twenty three year old Saskia Jones hello there will be or intimidated Pfizer reserves Khan was convicted of terrorism in twenty twelve for plotting to bomb the London Stock Exchange he was sentenced to sixteen years in prison but released early last year British security services have reportedly stepped up surveillance on seventy four terrorists who were also let out of prison early vigils are being held across the UK to remember the victims a job and I'm here he didn't witness Friday's attack and another on London Bridge two years ago when terrorists plow down pedestrians before stopping people at a nearby market killing eight just what were we looking on the bridge as well when it was cordoned off in a process that is still very very similar picture despite British prime minister Boris Johnson and rival labor party leader Jeremy Corbyn blaming each other for the security failures that allow the attack the two stood shoulder to shoulder to remember the victims and the heroes who took down the attacker Cindy palm CBS news

London Bridge London Stock Exchange UK Boris Johnson Jeremy Corbyn Cindy Palm Jack Saskia Jones Prime Minister CBS Twenty Eight Year Twenty Three Year Twenty Five Year Sixteen Years Two Years
Heroes took on the terrorist with a narwhal tusk and fire extinguisher

Morning Edition

02:45 min | 10 months ago

Heroes took on the terrorist with a narwhal tusk and fire extinguisher

"London there's a vigil for two people in their twenties who were stabbed to death by an Islamist terrorist on Friday yeah they were helping to organize this conference through Cambridge university the subject was prisoner rehabilitation police say the perpetrator began his attack at that conference but what made this incident stand out was not only the victims or the perpetrator but those who captured him they were civilians armed with a nor wall tusk a fire extinguisher really whatever they could find and peers Franklin fit is in London he's been following the story heather Frank Hey good morning oil okay so David summed up a bit of it there but but if you would just remind me what what happened Friday yeah well the the man who was behind this the tears as a guy name was mon Khan who actually had served time of for terror charges in the past and he was he appears to been attending the conference and have had some relationship with the program in the afternoon he started attacking people with a knife and some of the people at the conference of people were in the building actually fought back particular one person a grab a normal tusk off the wall and began stabbing him and eventually they chased the terrorist out onto the street on to London Bridge there was another man with a fire extinguisher spraying the man the tears with this fire extinguisher they courted him they got him on the ground and then police came in and and shot him absolutely extraordinary how are normal people in in the U. K. responding all this you know I think that there is is pride to see civilians do this this I think if I can keep track no well this is the fifth attack terror attack in London in the last several years and with all of what's happening with brexit and the country tearing itself apart there hasn't been a lot to celebrate mayor city con referred to the civilians as the best of us now one of the guys who the guy who grabbed the normal tusk was a Polish shaft he actually ended up getting stabbed five times and still kept going after the terrorist and again with brexit in issues of immigration this makes this an even more interesting story because people have some people who voted for brexit want the immigrants people like this Polish after leaving yet he ends up a poll says they're going to give him the highest metal that they have for what he's done now this is also a very complex story one of the people who subdued the attackers the attacker reportedly actually was a convict himself who had been serving time for murder and was out on a one day release so it really with each day this becomes a more complex and interesting story and what we know about the victims here Frank young promising people to Cambridge university graduates in their twenties who study criminology one was named saas get Joan she was volunteering at this conference Jack merit another victim he was helping coordinated and today the headline in the Cambridge news said they tried to make the world a

London One Day
London Bridge attack victims identified as Cambridge graduates

Jason and Alexis

00:18 sec | 10 months ago

London Bridge attack victims identified as Cambridge graduates

"In London the victims of Friday's stabbings have been identified as twenty three year old Saskia Jones and twenty five year old Jack merit both graduates of Cambridge university and both involved in the learning together program the attacker was mine con attended earlier that day Khan a convicted terrorist was released early from prison

London Saskia Jones Cambridge University Khan Jack Twenty Three Year Twenty Five Year
"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All the countries that thing that's been quite your experience. No, there's an element of that. So definitely when sterling devalued the revenue that we make in. Let's say Europe is worth more in pounds than it used to be. There were two butts though, to that the first one is that we're dealing most of the time with professional procurement negotiators, and they know exactly that your prices can go down because you're gone down. Then because the currency has changed. And so they take advantage of that. And they will come after you, and they will go you will only get this deal. If you're able to reduce your price in accordance with the change in the exchange rate. So that's the first kind of but. The second is that the reason the exchange rate has gone down is the people are less confident in our economy, the less confident in our ability to deliver and so you K organizations become frankly, less popular in economic terms. But also in attitudinal terms and data uncertainty about what actually is going to be light trading with the British company in twenty twenty has I would say had quite an impact on revenue already this year. So Richard story. And remember his company is a winner of a queens award wreck sports is there any benefit from the pound is be much more than offset by greater uncertainty and difficulty doing business in Europe. Trade is rather more complicated than it looks. In fact, most trade isn't foreign businesses selling British consumers, British businesses selling the foreign citizens rather move straight is a business in one country selling a product or service to business in another country. So fall in the value of the pound can be bad news for British business, not just for British consumers. Meredith Crowley of Cambridge University has done a lot of research on this for UK producers that use a lot of imported input sense their production. Those imported inputs also became more expensive. So for example. With lots of car factories in the UK. But a lot of the components for those cars, we think almost made in the UK, but some really quite high fraction of the components come in from Spain or Germany or France or wherever exactly and some of these components might be something like an engine, which is very large. Are the total car's value more than half of trade is company to company robbed the company straight to consumer e adds, it's generally much more complicated than the bottle of wine from France, a Massey's in large part, why the CBI the organization representing many British businesses does not see the recent drop in the pound sterling as an unalloyed benefit CBI, chief economist rain Newton Smith. Again, what we saw for our exporters is actually the weaker sterling provided for some of them it provided a B. So it meant that their goods essentially became cheaper in France and in Germany, so they became what we all economists call more competitive, and we did actually. We see some of that through our surveys of the manufacturing sector. So that feeling of how competitive is your good against other competitors in the rest of Europe. UK businesses did feel more competitive. And we think we did see a boost to some of our manufacturing exports as a result of that. But I think the second impact we really saw here in the UK is that actually meant we saw higher inflation, particularly for consumers. So if you were importing into the UK, the price of those imports suddenly went up, we actually did a special survey of businesses around the impact of the exchange rate for manufacturing businesses. And surprisingly almost a half of those businesses said the weaker exchange rate had been negative for their overall business. And also we were seeing the impact on on the high street that higher inflation meant that household pay didn't keep up with that higher. Inflation. I think there are three things to take away from all this prices in the UK, especially for things like food. And energy a higher than they would have been at the value of the pound not fallen second. It might well have helped some businesses with our experts, but the world is a complicated place for one thing. Exporting takes a lot of effort to any positive effects may take a while to feed through in the end of falling exchange rate reflects the fact the cost of trade is expected to rise. It is a reflection of our diminished state. Not a.

UK Europe France CBI Meredith Crowley Richard Cambridge University twenty twenty Germany chief economist Spain Newton Smith Massey two butts
"cambridge university" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"I mean, if you get fired by this administration for line. I mean, this is kind of the equivalent of the mafia fired a hitman for killing too many people. I mean, it's just hard to understand. Well, why Mike Flynn would be doing that? I mean, I just don't don't. Well, just in the last couple of minutes. There's also the other aspect, of course, he's deep in the Russian story. And and we mentioned the coverage how he came up with Cincinnati collection because I will watching Kislyak the Russian ambassador, and that was the famous meeting that took place on December the tenth of two thousand sixteen where fleeing and Jared Kushner met with ambassador Kislyak and the head of the BND be Bank known as Putin slush fund where at which Jared Kushner, apparently is for a half a billion dollars from the Russians to bail out six six Fifth Avenue that was pretty egregious an unprecedented. But there are other incidents alia, of course, general Flynn. At Cambridge University seems to have gotten into a Honey trap with a young Russian temptress said Linda takover who. Love leads to him. And he was also at the ten th anniversary of of the Russian propaganda at outfit sitting at the same table. With Jill Stein of the green party, the father of. Julian Assange, and of course, Vladimir Putin the head of the table. So what happened? I mean in when he was in the DIA in June of two thousand seventeen Flynn became the first US officer to be allowed inside Russia's military intelligence headquarters, the you in Moscow. What happened with the Russians? Why did he suddenly become soft on the Russians? Well, I, you know, I again, I could speculate and speculation is is is obviously dangerous, and I have no real data to back this up. First thing is when the Russians and I'm not a rush expert. But my Russia expert colleagues, you know, it's has spoken, and it's very obvious the Russian are consummate intelligence operators and the Russians aren't. Aren't unsophisticated at all when it comes to this kind of thing. So the Russians began a strategic program that was well planned and well executed and arguably some fortuitous developments that even they couldn't have predicted began to unfold, but the one thing the Russians are is they're great at being flexible and agile when intelligence opportunities present itself, so from the Russian approach this was an attempt, and again, I'm not saying that the Russians caused an effect on on the election outcome, but the Russian certainly recognized that they had an opportunity here from a long time ago from nascent business relationships an opportunity to gain access to the national policy makers of the incoming administration. So the Russians played this game exceptionally well going back to question a Mike. Flynn. I mean, you may remember Mike Flint came out of a community of of operators. Where victory goes to the bolt and somehow transmuted boldness into recklessness, which I think was fueled by arrogance. And a firm belief that he was now to politically connected to fail and be held accountable. It's the only way I can explain that. I've been asked many times, you know, was it an accident that Flynn as you said sat at the dinner table with Ladimir Putin. Hardly, no, one sits at the dinner table with the president the United States by accident. Nobody will sit at the table with the president of the Russian federation by accident. Well, planned well executed by the Russians, and why general Flynn ultimately took money from the Russians why he took money from the Turks, and perhaps a special prosecutor might no other sources of foreign income, which was clearly a violation of the constitutional obligations on Mike Flynn and statutory obligations on Mike Flynn. All of those obligations may clearly known to a departing official of his sin by the office of government ethics. Represented by the DOD general counsel when they deliver you your office of government ethics sweater. So all the things that Mike Flynn did get mystery as to how you go from a compliant rules, and forcing senior government official to somebody who so blatantly violated the nation's trust not just a minor trust with a small T. This was a capital T. He not only violated the nation's trust. But in doing so he created great risk to the United States, quite frankly. And it makes no sense to me why he would do that except that he was reckless and he was too well politically connected to fail. And he had a firm belief at that. Well, Douglas wise, I think very much for joining us here today. Appreciate okay. And thanks, and I'm honored to be with your guests. Well, thank you. And again, I've been speaking with Douglas wisely served as deputy director of the Defense Intelligence Agency from two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen following twenty years of active duty in the army when he says, it's an infantry and special operations officer. And he spent three decades at the CIA as a member of their senior intelligence service, and he's currently a contributing writer at Sipho brief we're gonna take a brief station break back look into whether the Ukrainians are exaggerating the Russian military buildup on their border..

Mike Flynn Vladimir Putin United States Russia Jared Kushner Russian federation Mike Flint Jill Stein Defense Intelligence Agency Julian Assange Douglas wise Cambridge University Cincinnati CIA president Linda takover ambassador Kislyak army
"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"University of Manchester in this program. I'm going in search the first animals on earth. We unions are really obsessed by our line of defense. And I think the transition from a world it's merely bacterial in microscopic to one with large creatures is one of the most important steps. Most fascinating steps. What did the animals looked like what was the series of events that led eventually complex? There were really interesting phenomena of evolution. In the next half hour. We'll explore how understanding of the early Lucien of the animal kingdom has been transformed by two very different ways of studying the deep history of life on earth. These new methods have led to discoveries that challenge. Some of our oldest ideas about how animals involved hundreds of millions of years ago and have also shed light on mysterious organisms that existed before the animals that now dominate the planet. New fossil techniques have enabled us to analyze the distribution of large numbers of specimens reading similarities with living animal communities and in an extraordinary recent development. We can now study a dead animals molecules left in the rock along with the fossil the other great change in our standing his come from comparing the genomes the DNA of creatures alive today. Plotting out the similarities and the differences between them review. Leading the pattern of evolution. But the starting point for all our knowledge about the past of life is the fossil record of our long extinct ancestors. This is Nick Butterfield of Cambridge University. Telling us the animals will late-arrivals in life history life of all very very early on on this earth, and we can see it from at least three and a half billion years ago, and we can track it in the in the fossil record for the next three billion years, and it's almost invisible for the next three billion years as far as the fossil record is concerned. Everything is microbial the earliest forms of life to appear with single celled organisms a bit like bacteria, then around two billion years ago organisms with a more complicated cell structure appeared, but they were still either single cell though, most from tiny simple clumps things like amoeba algae. And for about three thousand million years. That's as exciting as life got. But then around about. Five hundred fifty million years ago. All of a sudden the fossil record fills up with large things in fossil record everywhere. All over the place and absolutely fascinating trajectory, namely life evolves. Very very early on, but macroscopic life things that have a capacity to leave a large obvious fossil turn up very very late in the day. At least some of these large. Bodied fossils are the remains of animals life forms made of hundreds thousands or millions of cooperating cells and cells of different types to being multicellular is one of the hallmarks all animals, max, Telford and eve loosening geneticist at University College London..

University of Manchester Lucien Nick Butterfield University College London Cambridge University Telford three billion years Five hundred fifty million yea three thousand million years two billion years billion years
"cambridge university" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Network today, I'm delighted to have Andrew more on the podcast. He's the dean of Carnegie Mellon's school of computer science, which was ranked number one in the world by US news and World Report, and he was previously vice president of engineering Google, where he was in charge of Google shopping. Andrew, welcome to Rico, decode. Thanks for. Thank you. So let's talk. I wanna I wanna get your background. I have had various computer scientists on the show, and we're teaching and just like that. And I love to get sort of the academic perspective, but you've been in the in the fray also. So let's give your background where you came from and how you got to Carnegie Mellon, and then we'll talk about what's going on there. I grew up in the seaside town called boom in the south of England, and there in the late eighty s I really got into creating video games like kids at the time right? When studied computer science at Cambridge University and then did a PHD on this big question of it's so hard to program robots to do stuff. Even we make them learn to do it instead, which has been the biggest challenge obviously. So that's why I really fell in love with this question of, to what extent can we help machines improve their performance and performance? I, we'll talk about that later a little bit more. So you did that, but you did you go right to robotics? Where'd you go from there? Subsequently, I, I spent some time at the MIT a up which is super fun working for professor Chris Atkinson there, and I'm totally a math statistics guy, where's he builds real robots. So it was a trial. Fan actually build the physical robots, and frankly, I still suck at that mechanical engineer, exactly, huge respect for that the it's the stuff to do with making things decide what they're going to do next. I'm really interested in anyway. Subsequently I joined Connie Email and really enjoyed sort of helping develop the AI classes that got super into using machine learning, not only for robots, but for manufacturing because there's so much I'm do to improve that. I really enjoyed my time that started to get interested in other big questions around computer science to do with things like, can you detect near-earth objects which potentially dangerous using so fancy algorithms or Nathan Myhrvold thing, but go ahead. Can you get an early warning that this being an ABC borne diseases, heck on a city by noticing that the perhaps the uptick in sales of of medications, following stripe along the city in the direction of the f. low for example, that's that was the cool stuff. Right? Helpful is all around this key thing that if you compress a lot of data machines may be able to see stuff that no individual human could see because we can only sort of ingest a certain amount of beta exactly which is the whole idea behind all this. So you were there Carnegie Mellon, and then you went to Google. Is that the only job you've had like that's not academic, or was it? Yes, yes, I did. Do a spectacularly unsuccessful startup for a while. What was it? That was all his spectacularly unsuccessful startup. They're my favorites machine learning consulting services early. Yeah, we in the one thousand nine thousand nine hundred. We had a flashing neon sign on Craig street near CMU which said, data mining mining, fleshing all the time. Right? Which he never got any will can customers, unfortunately. Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Today wouldn't go over well, go ahead what we loved doing that, but we just didn't figure out how to make money at it, consulting engagements on a playing machine learning and all kinds of places really do. Do that was now the thing. So you went over to Google. How did you get to Google? I was really impressed by the way that things were scaling so much and I, I made the move relatively late. It was in the mid two, thousands, and the fact is I was very, very interested in this question of what can you do with a billions or in some cases, more than billions of obsessions. That's what I entice me..

Google Carnegie Mellon Andrew US vice president of engineering Nathan Myhrvold MIT England Cambridge University Connie Email Rico ABC Chris Atkinson professor
"cambridge university" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Uptown downtown cross town on your. Radio across America worldwide. On the whip it is money talk Bob. Brinker here thanks for joining us our guest in this segment is. Lawrence ball Lawrence is professor of economics and department chair at Johns Hopkins. University he is also a research associate at the national bureau of economic research also a consultant for the. International Monetary Fund and has, served as visiting scholar a number of central banks but in his spare time Lawrence wrote a brand new book. Titled the, fed and Lehman Brothers. Setting, the record straight on a financial. Disaster Cambridge University press two thousand eighteen Larry we thank you for your time it is great to have you with us Thank you I'm. Happy to be. Here well you know the collapse of. Lehman Brothers was a. Seminal event in the long history of money. Talk that goes back to nineteen Eighty-six because we were actually on. The air that weekend in September of two thousand eight when the news. Came out that the bidders for Lehman Brothers had disappeared into thin air and it was Katie bar the. Door as you know the, credit markets around the world were frozen in less than twenty four hours it was a really big deal and. I need, to ask you a. Question, that we debated for years did. It have to happen the way it happened No it did not have to happen the way it happened that's one way of simply summarizing the whole point. Of my book what could have prevented what could have prevented it was the same thing, that prevented Bear Stearns from failing or. Prevented from Fairleigh, feeling when they had very similar crises and that is in a versus the. Loan from the the big question, about LeBron which is what motivated my research is why they retreated so. Differently from all the other firms at the fan Chose to save from bankruptcy I can't think of anybody on the planet that I would rather ask this question to then the large Paul who's with us right now now The question is. This These people that made this decision to allow Lehman Brothers to vaporize thereby freezing the global. Credit market literally overnight these people. That made that decision the Ben Bernanke is of the world and the Hank. Paulson's of the world the major players that were were in on this. Decision at the time I'm inclined to say that they would. Be smart enough to know that? By letting Lehman go they were basically taking the nuclear option or can we. Say well they didn't realize the gravity of the situation what say you I think, they did not fully realized the gravity or at least we're not certain of what was going to happen. Leaving was an unprecedented events and. Unprecedented advantages about to happen you don't know for sure how bad it will be and the, fed made various plans to try to mitigate the effects by, lending, more to other investment banks so they wouldn't. Fail as well And I think there was a hope maybe call it wishful thinking but some kind of hope that they. Would be able to contain the fallout from the bankruptcy and. The effects wouldn't be too bad and the one thing, they knew for sure is that if they did rescue who even they would be subject to virulent political. Criticism from all across the spectrum And all across the media so I think it's hard to get inside their heads but it seems as though they took a gamble Hoping. That they could contain the effects LeBron failure to avoid, the extreme criticism that would have accompanied the rescue Now the reason that is surprising to..

Lehman Brothers Lawrence ball Lawrence research associate LeBron Lehman national bureau of economic re Bob Brinker Ben Bernanke America International Monetary Fund fed Cambridge University Johns Hopkins Bear Stearns professor of economics Fairleigh visiting scholar
"cambridge university" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Just so you know where i stand on this i love that donald trump and his administration is now really going after and playing offense against the fbi i absolutely love that and i would say it's about damn time scenario we're finding out more and more about this guy he he is described by the way he's a seventy three year old professor at cambridge university now i don't know if you would say that this guy is a spy but what i would say is that this is somebody who was certainly trying to find out as much intel his as he could about the trump campaign and their relationship with the russians so it's really interesting the more that we look at this relationship this this steffan halperin how he reached out to carter page as he reached out to george popadopoulos what he was trying to do was befriend these two so that he could find out as much information as he could so that he could pass that until back to the obama administration the fbi so that they could come up with their fiso warrants and do whatever they could to either impeach president trump wants he became president or two most certainly hamstring his presidency and i've called this on my local show here nashville tennessee i'm the mid day host on wgn in nashville what i've been saying is this really is this whole robert muller fbi investigation it is the hijacking of an american presidency it is the hijacking of an agenda that we all voted for and that's what has me so upset so the more that they talk about and the more that we find out about this guy stephan helper the more it really seems like he was trying to glean as much intel as he could now one of the things that he's accused of doing and by the way this is somebody and unfortunately there's a lot of layers to this and i think that's why for some anyway it's a little hard to understand but this guy he's against seventy three years old long standing ties to the cia and six now let's not forget the john brennan former head of the cia under the obama administration bigtime antitrumpers and so what.

fbi cambridge university steffan halperin president trump tennessee wgn nashville robert muller stephan intel cia carter george popadopoulos obama seventy three years seventy three year
"cambridge university" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Center of the fbi spying on the trump campaign story that is going around right now he's been nine butter washington correspondent new york times and indeed has confirmed to to us he's absolutely not denying the he sat down with the cambridge university professor stefan halfa who is apparently the informant that they fbi tried to place inside the campaign so this this particular meeting that you had with stephan how pa what can you tell us about what so place well i can tell you exactly what took place that he came into the we sat down in the in the at the doubletree there they have a big lounge area in the lobby we said down in the lobby each of us had a cup of coffee i had my notebook always take notes and always keep track of what's going on and there wasn't anything i didn't have any notes on the meeting because it must not have been anything substantial that took place because it was nothing new here's an academic from from cambridge in american who had worked in three republican administrations who had who was credible but it was an academic meeting it was not anything other than him talking about the research that he had done on china and that was essentially what the discussion was about and we already had a lot of china people involved so i put it you know i just said okay fine thanks and frankly never thought anything of it he sent me on the twenty seventh of september a series of attachments academic papers and i will tell you to this day i have not read a single one of them so i haven't even opened the attachments that he sent me so i've just tell you that up front because we have so much other stuff going on that is how little this registered with me and if you're going to campaign full of china people get on need another one well we already have peter navarro we had a host of other people who are already involved in the campaign who had incredible china credentials and so we really didn't need any more help and again.

new york times stefan halfa pa cambridge china peter navarro fbi washington cambridge university professor stephan
"cambridge university" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"That that they've come under considerable pressure in recent years if you think about the discovery of the censorship of the chinese website of cambridge university press for example of hundreds of articles which had been taken down on the assistance to the chinese authorities other scholars have discovered that chinese centers have been going back through historical journals in china so for example is a journal which which debated which published on the the the debates about the legal system which were around in china you know twenty thirty years ago these articles have now disappeared so your son at ising or ready you know already published articles which don't fit in with the current store so is there much contemporary interpretive historical scholarship there is a fantastic tradition of history in china and i think that this is a great lawsuit scholarship if these articles can no longer be published and people do find ways of doing good good work but we have seen journals closed down we've seen editors forced to apologize i there was a famous case of a very mythologised incident which took place allegedly in one thousand nine forty one in which five communist heroes lured japanese invaders to to a particular mountain a four to roic clear and then when they ran out of munitions leaped to their desk shouting long live the communist party well you know i'm sure something happened when but the details might be open to to challenge and they were challenged in in a journal a year two years ago which now no longer exists in the editors had to apologize so you know these these moves are real and scholars will be trying to do work but perhaps keeping quiet about it for a while and then of course this is a part of a much wider crackdown on dissent it is and document nine which which carried the stricture against historical nil in which is what the regime calls it.

china communist party cambridge university twenty thirty years two years
"cambridge university" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"Dear love also is associated with helper how her and they have this tide cambridge university this academic form cambridge university right after the election how per who in approached the trump team and his buddy dear love who is the former head of a british spy agency there on this forum cambridge they resigned from the forum in december right after the election let me read to you from the financial times a group of intelligence experts including a former head of six is cut ties with fellow academics at cambridge university in a varsity spice scare harping back to the heyday of soviet espionage at the heart of the british establishment sir richard dear love the ex chief of the secret intelligence service and former master of pembroke college it's the font haufer a senior file a policy advisor at the white house to presidents nixon ford and reagan and peter marlin a leading espionage historian have all resigned as conveners of the cambridge intelligence seminar an academic forum for former practitioners and curren research current researchers of western spy craft because of concerns over what they fear could be a kremlin back operation to compromise the group what yep keep in mind we're talking about yesterday's show nunez's newness establishes that there were no official intelligence documents back this up what we've been establishing for almost a year now is yes no kidding not a knock on newness he's going to be careful they were unofficial channels because they didn't want to leave a paper trail.

cambridge university pembroke college policy advisor white house nunez nixon ford reagan peter marlin cambridge official
"cambridge university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To the extraordinary story that has broken oh props more accurately we re broken and some of us knew a bit about it already the story of cambridge analytics role in the twenty six election i have said on more than one occasion and i suggested in the book that facebook was indispensable to donald trump's election and most people used to look at me when i said this and they would say well your nuts because it was twitter or your nuts because it was cable television or you're nuts because hillary clinton was a terrible candidate there are any number of explanations for what happened in two thousand sixteen but if you were looking closely the really crucial tool that transformed not in the presidential election of two thousand sixteen but also the brexit referendum was facebook advertising and its use by the campaigns brexit and then then trump i think was really crucial now we know a little bit more about why the trump campaign was able to use facebook advertising so effectively and that is because he had data on fifty million americans that had been acquired by cambridge analyst from cambridge university researcher who assembled it in facebook terms legitimately but then not legitimately made it available to cambridge analytica who made available to steve bannon who made it available to donald trump this is a really important piece in the jigsaw puzzle of what happened in two thousand sixteen and i think it's it's good that the new york times has run the story because prior prior to that he did only really surfaced in places like the british newspaper the guardian and if you look in the book i say the something funny about cambridge analytica we don't quite know what its role was in two thousand sixteen it had a role maybe it was exaggerating its own role well the news that just came this this past weekend makes it a little bit clearer what that role was.

facebook hillary clinton analyst researcher new york times donald trump twitter cambridge university steve bannon
"cambridge university" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Know it's a beta program but like five dollars a month like do you want to you know somebody wanted to be part of the detainers community to not have any option besides that that one number facebook is trying to figure out if that's too high too low it's similar to the twitch twitch subscription level that they they bring in if you wanna get all the tech headlines each day in about five minutes subscribe to daily tech headlines available on the amazon echo google play on the anchor app and of course there's a podcast at daily tech headlines dot com all right law fair and certainty doubt around this cambridge analytica facebook story so i'm gonna go through what we know has happened and talk a little bit all mongst all three of us about why people are so angry and what we think is really going on cambridge university professor alexander cronin started a company called global science research and created an app called this is your digital life no spaces was a personality test quote unquote this was started in two thousand fifteen and properly requested access for information got about two hundred seventy thousand users information some of those however were hired through mechanical turk to boost the users the thing that's causing a lot of controversy is that at the time facebook allowed you to hand over some of your friends information so some amount of data on around fifty million users was involved the app would collect info such as the city you are.

facebook alexander cronin amazon google cambridge university professor five dollars five minutes
"cambridge university" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"Other frightening star said he came out from cambridge university in england that by each seven kids are really locked into most of their financial traits that executive function they talk about seve really got to start this that three four five six to start kids thinking in the right way and the other part of this which i learned only with tv and have it this is one of the few things i've learned working in tv use anecdotes mike denness it it it comes alive my mom taught me that right but now the research shows that if you give a specific story and you know i always talk about on my dad came home in the '60s he was a teacher and he said to my mom the three kids in a mortgage she said we have to put half of may salary into the new fora three be plan the city just started and my mom said we can't afford you harold we have three kids and my dad said we can't afford not to and that's how they started saving and saving and saving over 65 years of marriage and have had a very successful financial life and imparted it to their three children jeff those small lessons in those memories and those stories you're member can really make a difference so talking to your kid about the time oh well and i got to credit card debt but i'm going to help you not do that but there is one thing that i thought was interesting because i think a lot of parents get a little caught up in this even when they're having the drug target right hand which is you don't want to lie about what has happened anger passes right so you want to own up like i did get into credit card debt even though you know you look at mommy and she runs off to work and she makes a lot of money she got.

cambridge university england seve tv executive 65 years
"cambridge university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's what its people can and cannot read and so given this backlash and there were petitions signed and a lot of upwards written cambridge university press buckled to the pressure and put put the pieces back on line and actually opened access to all of them for readers of china interesting now you these events that you talked about that these papers had to do with the great leap forward and the massive famine associated with that all the way to kinnamon square i mean these are seminal moments in chinese china's modern history why would the communist party be so sensitive to these academic papers when it it's not as if it just getting rid of the three hundred papers would erase the collective memory surrounding these events will the party has always been very focused on the control of history as a way to justify or to legitimise its rule and the chinese view history not a supping in the past but as something that is used by rulers to control the present in the future and so with that in mind their desire to oppress suppress blot out alternative narratives of what actually one on is extremely high especially at this moment there are involved in a very serious political transition with the nineteen th party congress and they're also led by it leader and xi jinping who has railed against what he calls historical neil ism which is basically the tendency of some people in china and academics overseas as well to question the wisdom and the wonderful rule of the communist party of china he calls that historical neil ism he calls that historical wouldn't basically to ride if you write about the famine in grit during the great leap forward worth thirty to forty million people are believed to have died that would be historical may of neil ism is right about the cultural evolution when six hundred thousand plus a very highly educated chinese were probably murdered by the state or by the red guard that would be historical nihilism elizabeth you basically dig up any dark secret of the communist regimes past that's considered historical meal as a move launched a nationwide campaign to crush this out and this censorship activity in this pressure on the cambridge university press is just part of that campaign so these events since they occurred in china's modern history.

china communist party congress neil ism cambridge university
"cambridge university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The us is criticizing china for not putting more pressure on north korea over its weapons program but china is also under fire for something else entirely for censorship the cambridge university press recently removed hundreds of articles from a chinese website which hosts a leading journal on chinese affairs and that's because china's communist party threatened to cut online access to all the journals published by the cambridge press john palm frit was beijing bureau chief for the washington post his latest book is the puteh full country in the middle kingdom america and china seventeen seventy six to the present his with us from kqed in san francisco john welcome back thanks for having me on the russell tell us more about this case with cambridge university press what exactly happened it seems that is part of the deal to have more access allow a lot more access for cambridge university's materials in china which is a moneymaking venture the cambridge university press basically decided to block access i to about three hundred articles published in the china quarterly and they're about a variety of issues that are considered still in china very sensitive today so such as the great leap forward famine the tenements were crackdown in 1980 nunn the culture of aleutian the legacy of chairman mao is your such as that these articles written in english but their academic articles and you know by their very nature they have a relatively limited readership nonetheless the communist party is very aggressive seeking out any opportunity to censor a different narratives involving their history than the than the official narrowed if approved by beijing and so this aggressiveness what was the response to that from academic circles both inside of china and and outside of china or particularly from outside of china there was an uproar in the academic community were significant see a series of scholars started petitions which basically said you know you can to this this is just outrageous behaviour to basically allow your stuff to be or two willingly selfcensor your stuff of the chinese block your site that's one thing but for you to begin to take specific articles off the site that the chinese have identified as somehow at variance with their ideology that really moves into the into the category of facilitating china's ideological control over the.

mao official chairman nunn china quarterly kqed washington cambridge press beijing us cambridge university the deal russell san francisco bureau chief communist party north korea china
"cambridge university" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Here & Now

"Of the communist regimes past that's considered historical meal as in the nave launched a nationwide campaign to crush this out and this censorship activity in this pressure on the cambridge university press is just part of that campaign so these are hands since they occurred in china's modern history the ones that we're talking about i mean there are still many people in china who lived through that i mean is the government to sort of trying to erase what a written aspects of this history and just playing along waiting game until those people who experienced it are also gone yeah i mean they're calculus is that yeah they cannot suppress the individual memories of people but what they can do is by limiting those memories to families and by denying those people the right to published memoirs on the issue uh and by ensuring that a dozen entered a classroom they can achieve a certain amount of sort of mass amnesia that's why you know people have started calling china the people's republic of amnesia and what is your sense of the reaction from within china i mean do people to be just i shower shrugging the accepting this or is there a backlash from within china itself generally speaking in the academic community they're aghast at this type of behaviour and the regime of xi jinping has really squeeze the intellectual classes and china very hard in terms of their the two wiggle room for political debate it's it's tighter than it was i any point in china since since the 1989 crackdown on prodemocracy protests around tiananmen square if you push back to hard you could go to jail you could lose your job and so the party has enormous number of levers that he can use to squeeze people to ensure that even though they're unhappy and the positions and they really opposed the censorship the can't do anything to stop it.

china cambridge university tiananmen square
"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Said it will listen to the academic community and reverse its decision to block more than three hundred articles from a leading china studies journal a petition signed by academics around the world had urged the publishing house to reject what it called china's disturbing send so shipped demands a communist party newspaper had attacked that his critics as arrogant and absurd at cambridge university press had issued a statement saying we can confirm that we received an instruction from a chinese imports agency to block individual articles from china quarterly within china we complied with this initial request to ensure that other academic and educational materials we publish remain available to research has and educators in the market just a few minutes ago an email from that press office to neeson said that they had changed their mind luisa lynn is a former bbc correspondent in beijing she now teaches at university of melbourne in australia and had sought find that position by the academic sam luisa we spoke earlier on today when the situation was slightly different your reaction now well i mean i think this is a very good sign um i play a very welcome news in a congress university press israel thanks for the academic community and i think maybe they would taken him back electrified strike fifty opposition go over six hundred people that sign that a petition aimed at the last key gay and makes could been warning of a possible boycott of cambridge university press that kind of language avenue weeping has radiating pay damaging to cambridge university press inoculation could that the hagan we crave written shameful and it constructive concessions to the chinese communist party very tight ship itchy so i think it is their welker could live that has now decided to reverse that the question for another question about why they should or taking up position in the first place yeah of course i mean it just give us a sense of weather cambridge university press won't they had to lose and why they might have made that decision in the first place wow i mean they argued that they were removing three hundred obstacle pretty crazy uh some uh for for that answer that chinese irit could not see that monday said it's live with necessary in order to keep the record their website when it isn't a national china going and i mean it's funny that key at cambridge university press dogs to your business.

china neeson luisa lynn sam luisa israel hagan chinese communist party welker china studies journal cambridge university china quarterly beijing university of melbourne australia weather cambridge university
"cambridge university" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WLOB

"Cambridge university press subtitled and madrid lectured two originalism good to have you with us on ideolog thanks so much for having me at the just having read your resume their it it would strike me that you probably approach this with a certain degree of reverence for originalism as oppose let's do those uh civics who who say forget the founding fathers would that be correct correct and title of the book it actually taken from a letter the game medicaid wrote to thomas jefferson in paris wrote managed dan the ladder in weekend at the earth belong to the whitney right that the earth on the living and not that dan have neither power no right over it and letter is often today taking her the proposition that we shouldn't be bound by the dead handed hat is what they faded dead handed to cut the tv well let's let's known is that madison wrote a reply and in that reply he basically said that the improvement upon the natural conditions of the world made by the dead including the constitution form a debt again the living who came to the benefit of it the debt can only really be basically discharged by kind of originalism by following let each high to accomplish and that's where i get the titled the book from again against the living because you're right i think the constitution created yet against future generation the jeff that of course was no slouch intellectually john kennedy famously noted during a dinner for nobel laureate said that this was the greatest assemblage of elect attallah ever assembled at the white house with the possible exception of with thomas jefferson died the loan other head of madison was the original constitutional scholar for all intents and purposes our constitution is with many amendments which guaranteed them no ed his virginia plan most people what to philadelphia to the constitutional convention they do the articles could better asian weren't working in order to do madison showed up he had spent the entire will several months beforehand researching how free societies had formed around the world and how they had failed or how they had succeeded abdo his virginia plant again essentially became the us constitution so he broad considerable it'll to the subject matter as well i'm curious was there a third exchange other word yet.

Cambridge university thomas jefferson paris whitney madison white house philadelphia us madrid dan john kennedy virginia