35 Burst results for "Cambridge University"

Author Lee Strobel: We Are More Than Our Physical Brains

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Author Lee Strobel: We Are More Than Our Physical Brains

"Folks I'm talking to Lee strobel, who's the author of a new book called the case for heaven, a journalist investigates evidence for life after death. I am so fascinated by this. You were just about to say something before we went to the break. Well, you made a very important point error, which is that we're not reducible to our brain. We are more than our physical brain. And how do we know that? Because there's a difference between our brain our physical brain and our consciousness, our mind or our spirit, our soul. And the example that was given to me by the neuroscientists from Cambridge University who I interviewed, doctor Sharon Derek's PhD from Cambridge, who have well-known neuroscientists who wrote a book called am I just my brain and the answer is no, you're not. But she gave an illustration. She said, what if there was a woman named Mary? And Mary was the world's leading expert on vision. She understood the physical makeup of the eye how it was constructed, the physics, the chemistry, how the eye functions how images are carried through the optic nerve, how the brain processes that. She understands it better than anybody in the world. But she's blind. What if all of a sudden for the first time, Mary received her eyesight? At that moment, would marry learn anything new about vision. Yeah. She wouldn't be able to see she'd had the first person experience of seeing no amount of knowledge about the physical working of the eye and the brain would get married to that point of that first person experience of seeing. And so consciousness and the brain are not the same thing. Consciousness or they soul or the spirit don't is distinct from the human brain. Whenever you hear people talk about the idea that the brain is a computer, blah, blah, blah, blah. And you say, what is consciousness? I mean, this is heavy stuff. Yeah. But when is it that you become conscious, computers are not conscious? How big does a computer have to be before it makes the leap to consciousness? It will never make the leap to consciousness. Because that a brain is different from a mind. And when you're talking about this, I mean, this is very heavy and there are scientists who have really puzzled over this and there are some people who just sort of assume that, well, of course, we live in material universe, but that leap, it's an infinite leap. You can never make the leap from computer to

Sharon Derek Lee Strobel Mary Cambridge University Cambridge
"cambridge university" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:54 min | Last month

"cambridge university" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"And <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> close friend of the naked <Speech_Male> scientists, Matthew <Speech_Male> bothwell <SpeakerChange> from <Speech_Music_Male> Cambridge University. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> What a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cosmically <Speech_Male> creepy question. <Speech_Music_Male> The answer <Speech_Music_Male> is that no, <Speech_Music_Male> a body exposed <Speech_Music_Male> to the vacuum <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of space wouldn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> decay in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the way that our bodies decay <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on earth. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> In fact, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in outer space, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you'd end up being preserved <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> quite <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nicely. <Speech_Male> One <Speech_Male> important factor <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is that a body in space <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> would dry <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out really <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> quickly. <Speech_Male> The boiling <Speech_Music_Male> temperature of liquids <Speech_Music_Male> depends on the pressure, <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> lower pressure <Speech_Male> means a lower boiling <Speech_Music_Male> point. <Speech_Male> In space where there's <Speech_Male> no pressure, <Speech_Male> liquids just <Speech_Male> instantly boil, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> which means <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> turn into gas. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> So <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a body ejected <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> into vacuum <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> would lose all <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> its liquid quite <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> quickly and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> become sort <SpeakerChange> of mummified. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Similarly, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you were rejected <Speech_Music_Male> into space <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> without a spacesuit, <Speech_Music_Male> after 14 <Speech_Music_Male> seconds, you'd <Speech_Music_Male> experience the evaporation <Speech_Music_Male> of water <Speech_Music_Male> in your sort <SpeakerChange> of mummified. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Similarly, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you were rejected <Speech_Music_Male> into space <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> without a spacesuit, <Speech_Music_Male> after 14 <Speech_Music_Male> seconds, you'd <Speech_Music_Male> experience the evaporation <Speech_Music_Male> of water <Speech_Music_Male> in your mouth. <Speech_Music_Male> It would feel like an odd <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tingling <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sensation on the tongue. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Another <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> factor <Speech_Music_Male> after 14 <Speech_Music_Male> seconds, you'd <Speech_Music_Male> experience the evaporation <Speech_Music_Male> of water <Speech_Music_Male> in your mouth. <Speech_Music_Male> It would feel like an odd <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tingling <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sensation on the tongue. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Another <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> factor is that the lack <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of atmosphere <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> makes space a hostile <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> environment for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bacteria, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> so a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> body in space wouldn't be <Speech_Music_Male> broken down by <Speech_Male> bacteria in the same <Speech_Male> way that our body on <Speech_Music_Male> earth would be. <Speech_Male> A lot of what we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> think of as a body <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> decaying <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is the action <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of bacteria <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and that wouldn't <Speech_Music_Male> be happening. <Speech_Male> One <Speech_Male> misconception <Speech_Male> about bodies <Speech_Male> in space is that <Speech_Male> people often think <Speech_Male> they would instantly <Speech_Male> freeze. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> This <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> isn't true. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> feel cold <Speech_Male> on earth <Speech_Male> when the atmosphere <Speech_Male> around you is <Speech_Male> at a low temperature. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> is the molecules <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in the gas around you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> have less energy <Speech_Male> than the molecules that <Speech_Male> make up your body. <Speech_Male> And so when the <Speech_Male> air hits your body, <Speech_Male> it steals <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a bit of your energy <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cool down. <Speech_Male> But in <Speech_Male> space, there's no atmosphere <Speech_Male> and so you <Speech_Male> don't lose heat <Speech_Male> very <SpeakerChange> effectively. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Vacuums are <Speech_Male> really good <Speech_Male> at maintaining temperatures. <Speech_Male> Just think <Speech_Male> about your thermos <Speech_Male> vacuum class, <Speech_Male> capable of maintaining a <Speech_Male> constant temperature <Speech_Male> and allowing you to enjoy <Speech_Male> your coffee or soup <Speech_Male> hot <SpeakerChange> later <Speech_Male> on in the day. <Speech_Male> A body in space <Speech_Male> would freeze <Speech_Male> eventually, <Speech_Male> but it would have to freeze <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> by losing <Speech_Male> heat radiation <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which would take a lot <Silence> <Advertisement> longer than you might expect. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> So overall, <Speech_Male> between the <Speech_Male> dehydration, <Speech_Male> the lack of bacteria <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> eventual <Speech_Male> freezing, our <Speech_Male> body and space would end <Speech_Male> up being <SpeakerChange> very well <Speech_Male> preserved. <Speech_Male> Thanks for that <Speech_Male> Matt. You're <Speech_Male> drudging up memories <Speech_Male> of Battlestar Galactica <Speech_Male> there for me. <Speech_Male> Next week <Speech_Male> will be <Speech_Male> a tad closer to home <Speech_Male>

Cambridge University Matt
Artificial Intelligence May Diagnose Dementia in a Day

WBZ Morning News

00:32 sec | 4 months ago

Artificial Intelligence May Diagnose Dementia in a Day

"Say. They have found a way to spot dementia earlier and quicker than ever before, And they're getting a big help from artificial intelligence. AI system compares the patient's brain scan with millions of others to spot anomalies. Humans often can't leading to a far earlier diagnosis. And in a day instead of the months it can take now Cambridge University Zoe Court see if we intervene. Early treatments can kick in early and slow down the progression. Pre clinical trials were successful. Now it's being rolled out in a click. Nickel setting.

Dementia Cambridge University Zoe Court
"cambridge university" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

PC Perspective Podcast

02:40 min | 4 months ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

"So i mean how many how many digital clocks have her house. Least someone's doing something. I mean that part of it is good but it's the whole we have to do something. This is something. Therefore we have to do this part of it which drives me fricken batty because the calculation titians don't have a good grasp on the nuance unreality of of of compute. You make a good reality is they. Dan we've got you don't own a pc. You just borrow one. You're you're part of a p. c. share program and that way it's divvied up between everyone that uses it so yeah it it the calculations and they're quite interesting. They definitely had someone who knew what they were doing calculating it because the power drove your graphics card there is a calculation that's added to the total expected on draw over of a system and they set certain assumptions on how long it's gonna spend in deep sleep awake but unused or under a load except there is no there's only one hundred percent load or essentially no lote so for the vast majority of computer usage this is not applicable in any way shape or form but at the same time. They're ignoring the minors which are doing the big thing because they are screaming and yelling about keeping it below one hundred and thirty five kilowatt hours a year. Think that's what it was That's sort of what they're aiming right now. So there's a site which takes care that keeps us track on bitcoin electricity out of cambridge university thereof. It's only bitcoin So currently today. Bitcoin is ten point. Thirty five gigawatt hours in the past twenty four hours. The annual consumption of this point is seventy one point eight six terawatt hours per year. Wanna i leave. Money mc fly back into the past like we're on gigahertz. Yeah so. This is a pet peeve of mine because it's like no go after like if you can go after a pot growing operation off of the amount of electricity at sucking down. He can do the same. Damn thing for minors and leave the Poor gamers low. It's that's not the problem. It's just ridiculous. Put if you're thirty. Nine thousand foot mining or playing certain amazon game then on that..

Dan Bitcoin cambridge university amazon
How Open Access Science Leads to More Citations

The Science Show

02:02 min | 4 months ago

How Open Access Science Leads to More Citations

"Meat cure macneice who's from melbourne originally but usually resides in cambridge working for the famous press the publishers care wise open publishing so important now cambridge university press exists as an organization to try to advance knowledge research and learning and part of that mission is what we do in publishing research we publish about four hundred journals plus fifty books and as well as just publishing research we care about making sure that best practices are followed in research and the research we publish is robust and reliable and so we work with communities of authors and researchers and without journal editors to try and ensure that we can support upcoming best practices and research and what is open publishing much it made of well so are there a few aspects often people will talk about open access publishing and this means access to the published papers once they put out there on the internet or in print form and a lot of these in the past have been subscription access only and there's solid movement around the world which we fully support for more open access to the results of research so these papers can be read by anyone and learned from anyone around the world but also looking at open research across the whole research life cycle there are practices being developed around sharing information long before we get to the publication stage and also sharing the data and other materials that underpin what's published in that final stage all to support greater transparency. Indeed you probably know that this motion at the university of sydney and chemist in fact still is doing work on. Malaria is one of the pioneers in this country of that sort of approach and she actually won the eureka prize for the promotion of science last year. So you probably know about her. Yes i think that work is fantastic. I think i must have just missed her. When i was in england. I think she started at cambridge just after i left in her phd. That i think the whether they're doing is great. Supporting fully author notebooks in library such and the like

Macneice Cambridge University Press Cambridge Melbourne University Of Sydney Malaria England
Global COVID Vaccine Inequality 'Becoming More Grotesque'

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:06 min | 6 months ago

Global COVID Vaccine Inequality 'Becoming More Grotesque'

"World. Health organization has warned that glaring covid nineteen vaccine inequality has created a two track pandemic with western countries protected and poor nations still exposed. The warning came as the leading charity. Unicef said that millions of coronavirus vaccine could be wasted if wealthy nations send large amounts of left overdoses to the developing world. In one go. Well let's get the latest on this now with monocle. Twenty four health and science correspondent dr. chris smith chris is also a consultant virologist at cambridge university. Good afternoon to you chris. Good to have you on the program as always and let's start with that issue about. I guess western countries being undone by their own largest this problem with flooding these needy markets in one go. There just isn't infrastructure to cope with that. It's a tricky one isn't it. We've never been down this path before. We've never tried to do what we're attempting to do. Which is vaccinating entire planet. An entire planet with eight billion people on it. We think there's probably in the region of seven billion people who are not immune because one billion have either had the infection recovered and become immune or they've had vaccine so far

Chris Smith Chris Health Organization Unicef Cambridge University Chris
Sage Calls Emergency Meeting Over Rapid Spread of Indian Variant

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:40 min | 7 months ago

Sage Calls Emergency Meeting Over Rapid Spread of Indian Variant

"Who we begin today's program here in the united kingdom where leading scientists are holding an emergency meeting in a bid to tackle a surge of the highly transmissible indian covid nineteen variant comes as prime minister. Boris johnson warns that new strains of virus could cause even greater suffering next winter. Then the lost if they're allowed to take hold well. Let's get the latest on this with monica health and science correspondent dr chris smith. Chris is a consultant for logistic cambridge university. Good often not always great to have you on the program Just about this Indian variant and the specific threat that we are beginning to understand. It might post. Initially we thought there was just one variant and it got dubbed. Be one six one seven and it's been documented for a few months in fact since last year but then we realized that in fact there are multiple subtypes of this variant. So they're now get designated as a subtype one subtype two subtype three and the one. We're most concerned is the subtype to and in this country in the uk depending on who you talk to and how the data compiled more than a thousand cases or about five hundred cases now. That's because some analyses do include returning travellers that have been picked up and then isolated others are therefore including Everybody so depends on which of those metrics you use. The one to be most concerned about is what is happening in the community because what we are concerned about with any kind of variant of the corona virus including this one now dubbed by the who as a variant of concern meaning it has destructive or disruptive potential

Monica Health And Science Dr Chris Smith Logistic Cambridge University Boris Johnson United Kingdom Chris
Rising Tides with Dr. Victoria Herrmann

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:59 min | 7 months ago

Rising Tides with Dr. Victoria Herrmann

"I am talking with. Dr victoria is the managing director of the arctic institute. A gates scholar at cambridge university and the national geographic explorer. Hi victoria welcome to the podcast. I agree to be here looking forward to this. Conversation has been real. Treat to do some background research on you. But let's just start off because you wasn't even quite sure how to introduce you. Let's start off. What is the arctic institute. The arctic institute is a nonprofit organization. That space here in washington. Dc but we have a team of about forty five researchers across north america and europe working towards a justice. Dana ball end secure. Are we do research across the many dimensions of arctic security so thank climate security. Which is what. I do cultural security. But also maritime security hard security food security making sure everyone is safe healthy and their wellbeing is up across the arctic region. now what is a gates scholar. A gates scholar is a scholarship. That i was very fortunate to have to complete my phd at university in the uk. It's a scholarship that is afforded to anyone who is a resident outside of the uk and is dedicated to improving the lives of others. So that includes me a geographer but also biologists and chemists anthropologist lawyers all working hopefully towards a better world okay so this is not associated with bill gates at all it was established by bill gates established alongside his father bill gates senior. So it is his money and his vision started at twenty years ago this year. Actually so we are celebrating our twentieth anniversary in twenty twenty one. Okay so named gates usually typically think of bill

Arctic Institute Dr Victoria Dana Ball Cambridge University Arctic Victoria North America Bill Gates Washington Europe UK Gates
Astrazeneca Vaccine Trial Paused Amid Fear of Blood Clots

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:58 min | 8 months ago

Astrazeneca Vaccine Trial Paused Amid Fear of Blood Clots

"It was a nuisance now. It's a story that threatens to undermine the uk successful vaccination drive rare but still lingering risk of blood clots recipients of the oxford astrazeneca jab. We're joined for more on this by mortals health and science correspondent cambridge university religious. Dr christmas to discuss the story which just doesn't seem to go away. Chris often thanks for being with us as always. Just tell us first of all. So why exactly has this. Trial been posed. The story begins in the last month or so. When a number of countries documented an association between a rare form of blood clotting and specifically the cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. These these are the particular blood vessels that you have inside your head that drained out to the brain and they do rarely form blood. Clots this happens to about fifteen people in every million in the population in general and often. It's more common in younger people and more common in younger women but what was noticed was there appeared to be a handful of people who had just had astrazeneca's vaccine and presented with this problem and in the uk when our regulator the nhra has looked out of about twenty million doses. That have been administered. If that vaccine there are about thirty people who have presented with blood clots in their heads about seven people have passed away and those people are chiefly young people and for that reason. The trial was going on at the moment in order to test. The effectiveness of astrazeneca's vaccine in young children has been paused in order to appraise this. Because what we don't know yet. Is this a causal relationship or is it just down to chance. Is it an association. It's got nothing to do with the vaccine. It's just been picked up in these people if they do establish causation. That point though then have to work a why it's happening

Dr Christmas Sinus Thrombosis Cambridge University UK Oxford Astrazeneca Chris Nhra
Is there a link between the AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots?

The Naked Scientists

03:41 min | 9 months ago

Is there a link between the AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots?

"Suspected linked to the development of a rare syndrome involving the formation of blood. Clots in the brain's blood vessels led to eighteen european countries temporarily halting their use of astrazeneca's covid nineteen vaccine pending an investigation. By the way the european medicines agency the itself though while it investigates is urging nations to continue to use the vaccine which has been so far administered to over seventeen million people going to the very real threat posed by massive surges and covid nineteen cases across europe that said some countries like belgium in the uk elected. Not interrupt their vaccine. Roll outs the aura. Which regulates medicines in the uk has also carried out its own investigation reached a very reassuring conclusion. Our view shows that there is no difference. That blood clots in veins are occurring more than would be expected in the absence of vaccination for either vaccine we have also received five reports of different a rare form of blood clot in the cerebral sinuses cerebral sinus vein thrombosis all csv t occurring together with lowered blood platelets shortly after vaccination with the covert nineteen vaccine astrazeneca. This type of blood clot can rarely occur naturally in unvaccinated people as well as in people with covid nineteen disease. A further review of these events is ongoing but a causal relationship with the vaccine has not yet been established. I'm hr hfc's june rain there. She was addressing the number ten downing street press conference earlier this week so there is still some uncertainty around this but in the end what it all comes down to is balancing risk the risk from a very rare and possibly completely unconnected medical condition versus the relatively much bigger risk of succumbing to covid nineteen infection. If you catch it and it's attendance queely so help us comprehend what is going on what we really need. Here is a professor on the public understanding of risk. Which is exactly what cambridge. University's david spiegelhalter specializes in things quite complicated. Because the story is it was ran. Last week was by blood. Clots like deep-vein thrombosis and other things and i looked to that data. What was being reported by astra zeneca. Aaron tim visits the number of Adverse reactions they didn't like anything special tool but it since come out that the actual actual real concern is from norway and germany in particular is is a particular special full of thromboses known as herbal venus sinus thrombosis associated with low platelets so this is clearly a razz syndrome and germany particular. They've at one point six million vaccines and had six seven cases of something like this and tends to be in younger women and in some so i can understand that. There is a concern about Yesterday vaccine but policymakers have to make decisions all the time. Don't they about What you're going to do and what the cost might be and what you're not going to do. And what the cost might be and it is really important not to jump the baby out with the biological bathwater because by deferring vaccination while you investigate a very remote risk of something happening you end up costing people the chance to be vaccinated in the interim one commentator in france pointed out that for every hundred thousand people. You don't vaccinate over the age of fifty four one day that will translate into five deaths. I haven't checked that statistic but it does sound plausible.

Astrazeneca European Medicines Agency UK David Spiegelhalter Vein Thrombosis Aaron Tim Belgium Sinus Thrombosis Razz Syndrome Europe Germany Cambridge Norway France
Apple reportedly developing next-gen ultra-thin displays for AR devices with TSMC

Daily Tech News Show

05:30 min | 10 months ago

Apple reportedly developing next-gen ultra-thin displays for AR devices with TSMC

"Nikei sources say that apple partnered with chipmaker. Tsmc to develop micro. Ola displays would displays built directly onto chip wafers for use in our future. Headsets that displays underdevelopment are less than one inch in size with mass production estimated several years away the beta for iowa's fourteen point five adds accident hazard and speed check reporting to apple maps. A new report button is available in the bottom tray of maps to report incidents and voiced support for siri is available as well and analysis by cambridge university university although they probably have anniversaries also estimates that bitcoin mining consumes roughly one hundred twenty one point three six terawatt hours of electricity per year which would make a top thirty energy consumer if it were used by country however for context the researchers noted that electricity consumed in the us by always on inactive could power the bitcoin network for year. I liked that comparison there. It's like yeah that sounds bad but then also that Following its launch in australia. Google new showcase launched in argentina and the united kingdom offering now includes free and paywall two articles for more than one hundred twenty uk and forty argentinian outlets bringing its total to four hundred fifty publications twitter announced monetize daily active users increased twenty seven percent on the year in. Its q four to one hundred ninety two million but missed analysts expectations of one hundred ninety three point. Five million with growth slowing for the third consecutive quarter. Twitter also said wednesday it suspended more than five hundred accounts and reduced certain hashtag visibility in india to comply with several orders from the indian government amidst farmers protests on agricultural reforms in the country. The twitter accounts are only being blocked in india and don't include news media entities. Journalists activists were politicians who have twitter accounts and twitter. Cfo ned siegel said on cnbc. Wednesday that people removed from its platform are not allowed to come back and that applies to president donald trump. Even if he ran for office again. All right let's talk a little bit more about what twitter is planning jack dorsey. He's been talking a lot about decentralisation over the past couple of months what did he say. This time scott feels like every time i'm on the show. There's something about his little idea but on this same call with investors on tuesday twitter ceo. Jack dorsey explained how it's internet project or internal project rather called blue sky and this something. He first announced wave back in december of two thousand nineteen Could create a decentralized social network to give people more choice over their twitter twitter experience Dorsey said twitter might create multiple rhythms for you to choose from offer them alongside those made by others a sort of marketplace on a lot of detail beyond that but dorsey feels Choice like this would not only help out business. But dr more people into participating in social media in the first place Decentralisation could also help twitter address concerns about moderation neutrality. all that kind of stuff Pretty fascinating idea I i still hope he does it with partners. And not just a a twitter store with algorithm skins. Well i mean it sounds like it's it's a combination of both the way twitter sees it happening. The company itself would say all right. You might want this experience. We have enough user feedback to know that some users are frustrated with the kind of stock twitter experience and using hashtags and maybe Filtering out certain keywords or searching for users or topics isn't enough for you you want twitter built a certain way and we can do that for you but then the company saying also third party developers might have some really great ideas and we welcome those algorithms as well as long as you know people wanted that. Could this be something that people would potentially pay for in the future. I would think yes. Yeah although i mean his focus on decentralisation implies that this would be something out in the wild right to the for longtime twitter's been talking about maybe we'll partner up with an existing decentralized solution which there are a few out there like mastodon. And i think that's a really really interesting way to approach this to say what if we decentralized twitter and differentiated twitter is just one of the better ways to talk with folks but like you said scott. He thinks that would help drive more people into participating if there was a federation so to speak that mastodon is that right now but twitter isn't part of mastodon so you don't have enough people using it so it doesn't get that momentum that it needs if twitter gets behind something like that whether it's mastodon or something else then suddenly it's got momentum and if you could say like well what i would like is a more environmental spin on this. I want a more libertarian. Spin you know wanted to promote things that are more about molecular biology promote scientists. I want i want to have a spiritual issues in christianity. Promoted more you you could have that and still everybody be participating in the same network and to his point about moderation neutrality. If you're the one picking the algorithm then you might have issues with how that particular algorithm works. But there'd be less burden on twitter or any other participant to be the person in charge of deciding what gets promoted and what doesn't because you'd have a lot of different approaches to it

Twitter Cambridge University Universit Jack Dorsey Cfo Ned Siegel Chipmaker President Donald Trump Tsmc Apple United Kingdom India Indian Government Iowa Argentina Cnbc Dorsey Scott Australia
Report: Bitcoin consumes around 121.36 terawatt-hours (TWh) a year

Daily Tech News Show

00:19 sec | 10 months ago

Report: Bitcoin consumes around 121.36 terawatt-hours (TWh) a year

"Analysis by cambridge university estimates that bitcoin mining consumes roughly one hundred and twenty one point. Three six terawatt hours of electricity per year. Which would make a top thirty energy consumer. If we're used by country our for context. The researchers noted that electricity consumed in the us by always on but inactive could power the bitcoin network for year

Cambridge University United States
New Strains Of CoronaVirus Are Breaking Out Worldwide

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:15 min | 11 months ago

New Strains Of CoronaVirus Are Breaking Out Worldwide

"Now anybody who has had any experience of life on this earth the last year or so. We'll be firmly of the belief that one strain of covid nineteen is more than enough as it spreads itself around the world however new variations keep being detected including one in the uk which appeared more readily transmissible a south african one which might be might be rather somewhat resistant to vaccines and brazilian one. Ditto small numbers of both of the latter have already been identified in the uk and dot dallas present elsewhere or on route. One joined with more. By dr chris smith monocle twenty fours health and correspondent also a virologist at cambridge university. Chris as we have discussed many times before all viruses mutate. What they do. Is this one doing so unusually quickly an door. Dramatically hello andrew. We don't think so in some respects. This is to be expected for the reason. You've outlined that the that all viruses mutate and change this one's no exception and therefore we're going to see a gentle drift or evolution of the virus specifically. We're going to see that happening. Most often. in parts of the world where the prevalence of the disease is highest in other words. Where you've got lots of people being infected. I'm passing the virus to lots of other people. That's loss of the roles of the genetic dice that the virus can take in order to accrue changes and optimize itself because at the end of the day viruses optimize themselves in order to spread most efficiently in their particular host and this is a new infection humans therefore it was pretty well adapted to us but not perfect. There's some room to maneuver and that's what the virus is doing. Its adjusting its behavior and its biology. A bit in order to spread most optimally among us. Humans the different variations though in different places those responses by the virus to local conditions. I guess whether it's it's climate or something else yes. Any kind of organism on earth is going to adapt itself in response to selective pressure applied by the environment in which it lives. These corona is a living in a human environment and therefore all behavior to a certain extent affects the behavior of the virus as we apply more selective pressure to it by making his job harder to spread between us for instance by social distancing through various other public health measures and spread control infection control. You'll going to select for viruses that all reproductive fitter in other words. They're better at doing what they do. And and in that way you'll get something that is usually more transmissible. That's what we saw the slight surprise here. Is this question about whether it is causing more severe illness or not now. Obviously the jury is a little bit out on this. At the moment we do have some directional data than that may be the case but it is early days of only just begun to take this trend. So we're not entirely sure whether this is a statistical artifact just a product to the fact there are lots of numbers and so the viruses is producing lots of infections. So we're seeing more severe infections or whether the genuine is evidence for higher talapity rate in each of the cases. So that figure we've been given by the uk government that suggests that the uk variant might be thirty percent More deadly which is an alarming sounding figure. Is it possible that figure is either less alarming than it sounds or actually not entirely accurate. Will the government put this across a downing street. Press briefing country balance-sheet presenting numbers in terms of deaths per thousand. And he said if you look at say a sixty year old man the risk with the parent strain of corona virus of that person passing away. If you had ten people with a thousand people with krona vars you might get ten people with die with this new variant that ten rises to thirteen or fourteen hence a forty or thirty percent increase in the mortality rate so they are nevertheless odds to emphasize the case fatality rate remains very low so in other words we haven't got something that's killing thirty percent people what we've got something that appears to based on the data that initially have been analyzed. Be a little bit more lethal as in not for the person. Obviously if you die but it's on average killing slightly more people than before but we don't know for sure if that's the case i mean. We have got a number of studies that present this london school hygiene tropical medicine of showing that the the risk ratio is about one point three five times greater with the new variant than the over one point three five. That's a thirty five percent increase. Imperial college of donna. Study then numbers range somewhere between high twenties to mid thirties. In terms of percentage increase in risk ecstasy university They did a smaller study. One point nine one was there multiple in other words. It's ninety percent worse. A public health england cited figure one and a half or so so therefore all of them seem to be centering on there being an increase in risk. But we don't know exactly how big that risk is but we think there is one but we need to reassure ourselves. This is real finding. it's not just a product of the fat. We're seeing lots of infections with this new air. It might be that. We're there foreseeing because of the disguise of the the problem more people who are at risk of having a severe infection. Cropping up with this very factional. They are trying to control for that so it doesn't like it might be real

Dr Chris Smith UK Cambridge University Dallas Andrew Chris Imperial College Of Donna London England
Dr. Kenneth Calvert on the History of Puritans

Hugh Hewitt

03:51 min | 11 months ago

Dr. Kenneth Calvert on the History of Puritans

"Back America to hear it. The Hillsdale dialogue sponsored by Hill. Tell college that you hear each week at this time is underway. All things Hillsdale collected it. Hil failed dot e d u I mentioned a great classical school in Orange County, which is Thea Orange County Classical Academy. It is one of the Hillsdale classical academies inspired by Hillsdale. Which teach the founding and Dr Larry on President. Hillsdale College is joined by Dr Kenneth Calvert. Dr Katz When we went to break we're about to talk about the founding up North Way discussed the laws of Virginia three weeks ago. People who go and listen to that. That's England transplanted. What is it that the pilgrims had in mind? And when did the Pilgrim's become the Puritans? And how did they diverge? And when does the Salem compact come into this conversation? Well, I think it's important to understand that James, the first of England was really attempting to create a culture built around the Church of England. Andre English, Christianity on and then what happened in the midst of that was that you have two ends of a spectrum kind of cut off from from inclusion in that one are the Puritans on one side, the other are those who choose to hang on to their Catholicism's And on the product inside the Puritans and the pilgrims were ones who really struggled with this idea of being you know, essentially forced into into the Church of England. The Pilgrim's being separatist left first went to the Netherlands and, um, realize that their Children were becoming Dutch more than they leaving behind English tradition. So what's very interesting about the pilgrims? And then the Puritans that followed them is that they were very much you know, Uh, Honoring the King and stand and Parliament of England. But they did struggle with the religious, um, on church structure that had been established. And so the pilgrims ended up coming to the northern colonies and the pilgrims being much more separatist, much more distinct in their attempt. T O be separate from the Church of England, the Puritans who came after them and again. There's a lot of discussion is how one really makes a distinguished distinguishes between these two groups. The Puritans. Many of them were from London. Many of them were involved in commerce and business. Many of them had been trained at Cambridge University, Cambridge University in that at that time, tend to be the kind of intellectual center Puritanism. And what they wanted to do in this new colony or new colonies in the north was to really establish Christian Republic, Um, still under, um You know the King and Parliament of England but to establish a kind of government again, As I said earlier, that might Be a a model for how Christians would live with and among one another, they established the first university in the colonies, Harvard University. Established. You know, in the name of John Harvard, who was a Puritan from Stratford upon Avon and in 16 36. This this college became a university was established. Train pastors and to give a high level of education to the leadership of the Puritan communities

Hillsdale Thea Orange County Classical A Hillsdale Classical Academies Dr Larry Dr Kenneth Calvert Dr Katz Church Of England Andre English England Hillsdale College Orange County Salem America Virginia Cambridge University James Netherlands Christian Republic King And Parliament London
"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:22 min | 11 months ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Looking for quick profits to find out more. I've been speaking to Keith Bear, a fellow at the Center for Alternative Finance at Cambridge University's business School. Think their number reasons, but probably the most significant one is the interest of institutional investors in Bitcoin as an investable assets at the moment, there are many examples of this and goes back. I think you're a two when some of the major exchanges like ice in the U. S. C. M E started providing facilities for trading Bitcoin futures more recently last year without institutions like PayPal Square hedge funds and others that are actually now taking significant interest in Bitcoin as message on this This new wave of money to some extent that is coming. There has that interest from institutional investors that are making a real difference. I think as far as the way that big corners tenacity is have perceived. Do you think this is something permanent or just fleeting Because of the extraordinary times we're in? I'm sure you heard the governor of the Bank of England. Cautioning about using Bitcoin, he said. It's hard to see the Bitcoin has what we tend to call intrinsic value. That's right. I mean, there isn't any, you know, asset, the banks Bitcoin in any sense, and it's largely driven by the price that people are prepared to pay for it. Of course, though, there is the way that they can works. There's inbuilt scarcity into the model itself. There are only ever going to be a maximum of 21 million Bitcoins available as simply because of the way that the work is being designed. But to answer your question, I think you need to remember because it's obviously a very volatile asset volatility has been pretty high over the last six months, for instance, and it also was Own. You know, significant changes associated with news coming in, from example from the way that is going to be regulated in certain jurisdictions, etcetera, so these can cause significant swings. But you know, there is a point of view. I think that institutional investors have been to some extent waiting on the sideline, and it's really over the last year or six months where you know, there's some of the announcement sentimental today we have could have happened. That really made a significant difference center arguably those now going to be in the market forever than withdrawing from the market, So who knows? It's obviously a highly volatile Alas, it I'm not one that I don't think anyone would want to speculate easily as to where the Valley maker doesn't matter of calling a digital gold is that speculative? Well, if you consider what Bitcoin was originally designed to do, you know, largely around payments more than anything else, because that means that making payments. It's not that efficient in the sense that that becomes the network is limited to around. Five or six transactions per second, as opposed to visas. The payments network, which handles thousands of transactions per second, because that's what it's designed to do so the real value of Bitcoin really Asa's, you say, is as a store of value. But arguably that store of value is a bit offended by the fact that the volatility can be so great as the mentor before, But does you right? You say it is often a line to gold If you like this an equivalent of additional version of gold in that respect, there was this the gold as the physical manifestation and as the value driven by the way that Physical element is you know how the price follows based on supply and demand, which Bitcoin is a virtual ass? It doesn't have that same physical manifestation, of course, Keith pair of Cambridge University's business school Listening to news hour on the BBC World Service. I'm leads to set well here in Britain, as in many countries, the race to vaccinate is honest. The number of covert nine cases continues to climb due in part to a new, highly infectious variant. British hospitals say they are overwhelmed so health officials have decided to give his many people as possible. Ah first dose of one of the two vaccines approved by regulators. That means delaying the second dose. The U. S is government's top infectious diseases expert, Dr Anthony Fauci says he does not agree. He says the United States will stick to giving people Two doses, the second of the Fizer buying tech vaccine around 21 days after the first the manufacturers of fact vaccine say it's crucial to achieve the maximum level of protection. Who is there a right and a wrong and does it depend on the vaccine? I've been speaking to Dr Chris Smith, a virologist at Cambridge University. See, agree with Anthony Fauci. One has to be dynamic about this on To protect the maximum number of people because that's the end of the day what we're trying to do, and it turns out if you crunch the numbers since the first does the vaccine does most of the heavy lifting And it's the second dose that sort of consolidates and cemented in place. It actually makes sense. In the first instance to go in to meet Andre trying, vaccinate the maximum number of people that you can in the first instance and then follow it up. Even if you have to bend the rules a bit with second dose later. And that translates into We think more life saved, but where's we're constantly being told, right from the beginning. We have to follow the science now. Fizer by on Tech says it should be. The second dose should come 21 days after the first Where is the Oxford University? AstraZeneca says that if you can, you can wait up to 12 weeks. So are they blending the two? Both of ride on guy can see. Both sides of this is different vaccines. They're different. That's a completely different vaccines. And we can't do an apples with apples comparison in that way, Unfortunately, because they work in different ways, they're they're completely different formulations that different virus vectors actually, and want one's genetic vaccine. One, sir, a disabled virus. But the point is this that the immune system does not work with the stopwatch. It doesn't say, Well, it's been three weeks now. So I can't respond to this because actually you you've waited too long. Way that this works, and I think people might be a bit confused. Just think. What if you need two doses? Is this like building a house where the first dose puts the walls up on the second day's puts the roof on? Do I? Therefore having incomplete response? If I only have one dose now have to wait with the rain pouring, and in the meantime, It doesn't work like that. When you have a vaccine. It builds a complete house. But the booster dose that you get later, effectively storm proofs and whether proofs and road tests that house so that it's.

Bitcoin Cambridge University Dr Anthony Fauci Keith Bear Bank of England Fizer PayPal Square Dr Chris Smith S. C. M E Center for Alternative Finance AstraZeneca United States Valley maker BBC World Service Britain Andre Oxford University Tech
London And Surrounding Areas Restarting Lockdowns Due To Coronavirus Mutating

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:45 min | 1 year ago

London And Surrounding Areas Restarting Lockdowns Due To Coronavirus Mutating

"And parts of essex and hot fanfare are hours away from returning to the highest level of covid nineteen restrictions following an alarming spike of cases in the capital pubs restaurants and other indoor entertainment. Venues will close once more. The latest surge has been ascribed to a new variant of the corona virus which appears to be growing more rapidly than previously for the moment however the uk's government says it has no plans to review the curious christmas truce. It appears to think it has negotiated with the virus. While i'm joined with more on this boy monocle. Twenty four health and science correspondent dr. Chris smith also a virologist at cambridge university chris. This the idea that there's a new strain of covid nineteen sounds like the very definition of the absolute last thing. We want to hear at this point. How grim news is this to be quite honest with you. I'm not alarmed. I'm not surprised. And i'm actually quite reassured and explain all those things ovar mutate because they're based on the same genetic code is running in pretty much will life on earth then the same mechanisms that lead to life evolving and changing apply viruses. And so as they go through their hosts they would evolve and change and corona virus is no exception. That's exactly what's happened to you. Therefore we would anticipate that we would see different strains and different emerging and indeed. This is not the first time it has happened. We've seen happened early. On in the pandemic in china we've seen it happen and disclosed various different forms of the viruses spread across the world and in europe they documented some of the same changes are now being seen in this new variant in the south east of england. So this is not altogether new in terms of concept and is not altogether new in terms of variant. This being disclosed. We're reassured by matt. Hancock saying yesterday house commons the the. Don't think although they are confirming that this will lead to the virus sidestepping the effects of a vaccine. We don't think it makes people who catch it for ill. It just may be transmits a bit better. Although that speculation on airpods that they're they're saying it might be linked to an increasing cases in the southeast england in terms of course load but don't know for sure if we're going to try to be exceptionally optimistic about this. Is there any possibility that the reason the viruses having to mutate to survive is there an indication that perhaps that means we've got it on the run will certainly when you apply pressure to a virus and by pressure. I mean for instance putting a vaccine into a population so you create an immune barrier or you put in place public health measures. You are forcing the virus to change to optimize to those new conditions. Because that's why things evolve in the first place. They're responding to selective pressure from their environment. And we know we do this to the flu. We know this happens with hiv. When we give people hiv drugs for example then the virus that grows in them is the only one that can bypass the blockade of drug. And that's why we use multiple drugs at wants to minimize the chance. The happening so the concept is common. Well understood so yes. It is. Theoretical possibility that by applying pressure to the virus. We are forcing it to become more infectious so that despite robbing it of opportunities to transmit it can still continue to transmit given the does appear to have become more infectious in the capital. However does it make the proposed relaxation of restrictions around christmas. Look even more. Ill advised than they might have. Well we don't know it has become more infectious in the capital. We know we've got more cases same in the east and southeast of england essex positive of cheer kent. They've seen big increases in numbers of the trend is in an upward direction. Which is why caution. Reproach has been taken in the uk by moving. Probably the best part of eleven million people who live in those territories into a so-called tier three situation to apply more pressure to the virus. The idea i think is this is anticipating the trend is going upwards where we are today is not where we're going to be tomorrow and so by bearing down on ahead of christmas when there's going to be this loosening effect where we got five days of reveling and Enhanced mixing the there are going to be more cases so if we start molo point and already have more control at the virus to start with them. We're going to end up finishing the low point than we otherwise would is or anything that the rest of the world should have learned from the united states. Experience we've thanksgiving because that was sort of a test run of what happens if all of a sudden millions of people travel by aircraft and by train and spend at least today in close quarters with households other than their own well. This is exactly what happened with chinese new year and when millions of people were mobilized to crush china to get together for the chinese new year this probably spawned even more cases because people traveled internationally for that event to so yes. History is full of examples of peop- of of Repeating itself and this is no exception. We are anticipating that. The mixing that goes on over christmas will lead to more cases. The question is how many more cases and how are we going to cope with them. So is there a good reason at least scientifically good reason. Why not just this government. But any government wouldn't just say to its people look seriously. Christmas is basically cancelled We are just going to have to suck this up for a few more months. We do have a vaccine to look forward to. We do have a restoration of normality to look forward to. We might maybe think about throwing in an extra couple of bank holidays around. June but christmas is basically not going to happen. Will the president of the royal college of emergency medicine was asked this very question on bbc. Radio four's pm program. Yesterday an her answer was. Are you asking me. This is a doctor or as you asking me this as human and actually you get a very different also because the doctor slash the infection control person is going to say which just council everything we should imprison. Everybody break the chain of transmission bear down on the virus but the human element of this is people need something to look forward to. Morale is incredibly important. And if you rob people away of the one thing. They've looked forward to in. What is the end of a very dismal year than this will probably translate into poor compliance in the long term. it will probably therefore translate into in the long-term more cases more headaches more problems and ultimately more casualties from are so. I think the government have of compromise. Here the trying to go for a controlled christmas. Where if you allow people some flexibility you know that most people will be responsible. You hope that they are. You're willing to tolerate some degree of of letting your hair down because you know that in a noncompliant christmas where you'd said don't do this and if on breaks the rules anyway he's probably going to be a higher price to pay in the long term. I think that's really the equation that they've done. Well let's look finally at the progress of that vaccine which is now being rolled out in united kingdom and again it's a question of government messaging. Does it strike you. As a missed opportunity that there is a website with a rolling hourly update of how many people have now been vaccinated. Well the numbers are not that high yet You see numbers like yesterday. They did three hundred people or four hundred people in this hospital and that hospital. And when you see that there's this peak of mount everest which is sixty eight million people in the uk high eight billion people on earth. Hide one what. You wanna do When you knock a few hundred off that is not much. And so. I think maybe that's coming may be there. There is that opportunity in the future but for now. It probably wouldn't be a big demonstrable difference

Chris Smith Southeast England Cambridge University UK Essex England Hancock China South East Chris Royal College Of Emergency Med Matt FLU Europe United States BBC ROB Headaches
"cambridge university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Cambridge University officials say two notebooks filled with writings by British naturalist Charles Darwin were likely stolen. The notebooks dating back to 18 37 have been missing since 2001. But characters were just now asking for the public's health help in finding them because they suspected they just misplaced them before. They're worth millions of dollars and include a sketch of Darwin's tree of life, which he used to explain Evolution. The Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade is looking very different this year gone, the huge number of Spectators, floats and balloons. But New Yorkers realize it's safety first during the pandemic, too many people will be crowding together and I think it'll just take us back to where we were before. Much of the parade will be pre taped in what's live, is confined to a block in front of Macy's on 34th Street. The parade has been canceled before do too well. World War two Tesla's recalling thousands of its vehicles. Sarah Bartlett has that story. The recall includes more than 9000 Model X cars produced between September 2015 and July 2016 and 420 20 model. Why vehicles The Elon Musk blood Company says the roof on the cars might not be properly bolted and they could have faulty trim. Florida governor, Rhonda Santis is extending his executive order keeping Florida in Phase three of reopening. Riko Shil has details. The Santas first signed the order in September, allowing restaurants, bars and other businesses to reopen under full capacity. The order directs local jurisdictions to justify any capacity limits between 50 and 100%, George's secretary of state, is accusing President Trump of throwing him under the bus and in op Ed for USA Today, Brad Rapids Burger said he and his family voted for and only To President Trump's campaign. This came after Trump called Rapids Burger, our so called Republican earlier in the week for not allowing his team to look at signatures on Mel and voter envelopes, claiming that they would find substantial election fraud. Bill Trapero, NBC news radio. I heart radio goods one on one with George Strait to talk about why he loves playing in Vegas. Las Vegas has been a part of my country music career. I mean, I've played in Vegas pretty much my whole touring career. It's just it's fun to play Vegas. I mean, it's It really is a lot of fun, the crowds and great and they come from all over the place because there's so much to do here and so a concert is kind of a bonus. Keep listening to my heart radio for more George Strait and all your favorite artists. The events, the issues and stories that shape your world news radio tell you f L A Everyone is so it's When you cannot get people to, even when someone tells you that they want an election that they lost. That's going toe a whole another level. And then you have people believe you believing in you because they trusted in you, and they thought they were doing something that was noble by and they thought they were standing up for the right thing. When they really weren't they were you were leading them astray. And with common enemies, not us. It's not the media. I mean, listen, Maybe it's someone else. Stop me, Not you. To the best of my ability. I tell you the truth every night. If I screw it up, I apologize and I corrected But these people are being lied to and have been lie to for at least the past five years. I like I like the sort of calm and And, uh, Unity based Tony of Don lemon. Were we the media? We're not the enemy. He works for CNN, he said. Anger it's CNN. The Kami news network. I mean the way that that place transformed itself. Into an institution of pure anti trump propaganda over the last four years that they should start future generations should study this. It's actually remarkable. I mean, it's awful, and it's wrong, but it's also pretty fascinating. They suppress the hunter Biden story. We have that the tape right of from James O'Keefe. And and project Veritas. Which you know we always have these tapes that come out. I keep telling us Yes, CNN super liberal, the lie to all of us. I mean, I understand that it Is may be amusing to hear them in the lies, but we're not learning anything new with this. Just putting that out there. I could tell you As I've said what they're saying on the CNN editorial calls. I know what they're saying in the sea in editorial calls. Having worked there. I understand the mindset. But yeah, they actively suppressed the 100 biting store. That's what they did. On now. They want us to believe. That they're on our side. They're just They're just there for truth, man. Yeah, they're just telling us the truth. You know that this is all? This is all what we should expect. I suppose there's Steve Schmidt. I have a question for you. You know why is that that People who are like all helping Democrats. Are they Democrats? Now that never Trumpers, or here you go. The dumbest political analyst on television at MSNBC, Steve MSNBC, Steve Schmidt. Areas blade. We're in a fight now between an autocratic movement and a democratic movement, and the only way to win a fight is either through submission or through exhaustion. And here's the deal. And this is what I would say to the people that Tim describe this deluded there. In a party that has led out of the underworld, a mixture of conspiracy theorists like nationalist white supremacist militia groups, and all of those people are part of their truck. Trump Coalition. Right. They are in the mainstream of the trump coalition groups like the Lincoln Project. Our view is very simple. There is no compromise with these people. They must be driven back into the underworld of American politics. They have no place at the table and that any political party that wishes to associate with them has to become so toxic that they have no chance of winning elections. So basically, I'm a Democrat. Well, that 95% of the Republican Party 97% of Republican Party money really 99 now that supports Donald Trump, so they don't have a voice. They don't have a voice of the table, but Steve Schmidt does as long as he's taking money from left wing billionaires. You pretend to be a conservative who makes anti trump ads. These people are Ideological mercenaries and you're going to see them. They're good. They're now going to be maneuvering. What? What is their role here in a possible post trump era. What? What are they? Going to be adding for all that, Well, they're Democrats, so I think they're role should be that they get to go around and tell people that responded there. Actually, Democrats now think Joe Scarborough does that, or if he doesn't it's laughable, he showed. These people have switched parties over Donald Trump. So when they used to talk about protecting unborn babies, for example, that was just all for show. They don't really believe that now they're Democrats. We talked about the rule of law and supporting police and secure borders, and I mean they've done that recently. I'm talking about, you know, Go back 10 or 15 years with some of these guys when they were you know Romney, McCain Republicans when they would say those things they didn't actually mean it. It didn't matter to them. It was just the thing they had to say that was of the greatest benefit to them at that moment in time. Lot of us. Lot of this going on and just remember We should not. We should not allow them to Pretend that.

President Trump Las Vegas CNN Steve Schmidt George Strait Macy Trump Coalition Charles Darwin Cambridge University Republican Party Florida Tesla Sarah Bartlett Riko Shil hunter Biden
"cambridge university" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on KGO 810

"To 2076 33. I'll see them blue farming you, Andre. I think to myself What a wonderful good afternoon. I Patterson. You know, I loved having the Nobel Prize winning professor on Hallie, professor of physics at Oxford University on the program. Raymond P. Room bear. I mean, it was great, and he obviously is a scientist who knows what he's talking about. But I was sad because this sounded like wow, what an idea, and it's being looked into by so many people. There's a Professor of environmental and climate law at Columbia University. There's a Harvard University project that has to do with trying to find a way to cool the planet because the planet has a warm so much Cambridge University is involved in this Cornell University's engineering department is involved in this. I mean, there's just there are so very many who believe that there may be plausible proposals this. It's called Geo Engineering, and it was not that long ago a couple of years ago Nature magazine, they said that it was dangerous, outlandish and unsettling. The whole idea of it. But now there's more. There are more respectable scientists who are considering this. But then there are others who are raising a red flag and saying unintended consequences, which is exactly what the professor was telling us unintended consequences of trying to block sunlight. They use as an example. The volcano, which he mentioned Mount Kenna to bow in the Philippines erupted. There were all these particles in the atmosphere, and it caused global temperatures to drop 0.6 degrees Celsius over the next two years. So it looked like maybe there was a way that we could use manmade technology to cool the planet. But if we do that we may be doing that at our own peril. It's going to be harder than that's going to be tougher than that. And it is going to take some political will. That's only gonna happen if we push it. At any time. An FDA panel could Okay finders Covert 19 vaccine for emergency use Dr Joanie Khaldoun with the Michigan Department of Health, encouraging people to plan now for how they'll.

Andre professor scientist Professor of environmental Harvard University Cornell University Columbia University Dr Joanie Khaldoun Nobel Prize Cambridge University professor of physics Oxford University Geo Engineering Mount Kenna I Patterson Nature magazine Michigan Department of Health FDA Philippines
Covid-19 vaccine: First person receives Pfizer jab in UK

Monocle 24: The Briefing

10:12 min | 1 year ago

Covid-19 vaccine: First person receives Pfizer jab in UK

"Well. Biontech and pfizer's landmark coronavirus vaccine has been given to the first person in the uk as part of a mass immunization program. The uk's vaccine roll it is being watched keenly across the rest of the world has other countries begin. Prepare to vaccinate their own populations for the latest on this. Let's talk to our health and science correspondent. Dr chris smith. Chris is also consultant for all the gist at cambridge university. I good afternoon. Chris tyler so i guess So far so good at least we have. We have a soundbite already. We had at the top of the program from this ninety year old woman. Who's been there the first to be to vaccinated chris last week. We saw a little bit of Chest thumping on the part of some politicians the uk saying look. This is great The uk is steaming ahead. How eagerly he would you say not. Just the immediate neighbors across this side of the channel but around the world are going to be watching. What are they going to watching. Forty you think over the coming days and weeks as this rolls out well think it will be a confidence boost to those other countries because no one likes to be i they unless it's a shorty. A dead cert. There's always some risk with any kind of intervention. And this is no different. So having a regulator a regulator that's world renowned the jewelry the medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency. Which is the. Uk's regulator which prior to just having jurisdiction over the uk walls prior to the brexit transition kicking providing that service for the whole of europe. Now europe does that through the ama it. It gives a precedent that other countries can look to and say right. Okay one fairly ferry. Big actor has gone ahead with this nathan. It's good therefore we're happy to Gives us some confidence too. So i think that there's always that aspect to it and it's coming good for the uk in the sense that it saying here we are. We've had a pretty rough time with this. But now some some fantastic triumph of sciences kicked in and we're about to start deploying this across the country and we're gonna we're gonna protect our outpatients. We have this type of approval from a respected Player how much do agencies elsewhere of course within the eu and obviously similar bodies all over the world. how much does it short circuit For them as you said. It establishes a precedent And does that mean that you have you know days or weeks then knocked off the process. Of course he. I'm sitting here in switzerland. Obviously a lot of talk as well about of course is also on the uk as well so does it actually then really prevent And and and and you do you have a moment where you have a real series of time locked off. They'd process well. The europeans are considering this through the jurisdiction of the ems the european medicines agency but the uk is still subject to a you know and in the uk is used one particular rule which is a regulation one seven four which is a specification for in public health crisis. Or emergency you can. Emergency approved something for use in your particular jurisdiction so the nhra has used that to approve this for the uk. Any other country in europe could've done the same thing so it's quite interesting that they've actually decided to white on a broad overarching decision from the a. But it doesn't matter. Who your regulator is they have to meet the same checks and balances. Because at the end of the day they all the gateway between a manufactured product and the public who going to receive it and it's on their neck that the decision rests so then going to say a will. They did it so we'll kind of ignore with this stuff would just sign it off. They are going to apply wherever they are in the world the same rigorous checks that they would apply whether or not someone else regulated something but it does help to give them confidence and he gives them a bit more political impetus when they see that. Another major regulator has taken a product which is also going to be wheeled out in that particular country and said well you know what's good enough is enough the ganda over the past few weeks. Of course astrazeneca moderna in this case. Biontech visor they. They've all been popping up in the headlines. Chris and of course various speeds that of course these approval processes have been working at now. We have three vaccines. We're we're now told her that there might also now be a fourth which is very much in play might be getting closer to approval. How different are all of these in terms of effectiveness and and do they all function largely the same way or do you. Also because obviously many countries that are hedging their purchasing all of them. Am i going to be particularly concerned. In a couple of weeks. If if i choose to get the moderna vaccine versus the astrazeneca versus the by pfizer one. In fact i think the uk has go options in on seven different vaccines and yes. You're right three of them are nearing the finishing nine in the uk but there are many others waiting in the wings around the world. There are ten different types of vaccine the work in ten different types of ways or being generated a more than forty and now in advanced stages of clinical trials. So pretty soon. We're going to have more vaccines than we can shake a stick at up to a point. That's a good thing and it's a good thing because not vaccines are going to be suitable for all people not vaccines are going to be available to all people not vaccines are going to work in all territories and what i mean by. That is if we take the fiso vaccine as an example. This needs to be kept at minus seventy degrees until five days or so before you're going to use all nine hundred and seventy five doses that are in batch and i've just seen a letter go from medical director saying can we make sure that we we use all nine hundred seventy five days in a within the five days so that we don't waste any of this very precious vaccine. Now that's going to be no use whatsoever in some countries where they don't even have a stable. Electricity supply let alone a stable minus eighty degrees freezer. So therefore having lots of options is a powerful thing also We don't know what the long term outcomes with these vaccines against be. We know that they provide pretty high level of protection but short after the vaccination program is finished in other words in in the weeks to a month or so. The person's completed the vaccine course. They're protected with the fis vaccine to the level of about nine hundred ninety five percent. But what happens in five months. What happens in a year. we don't know. And it may well be that other products that come along are able to confer a longer term protection. They might confer a big boost if you give one of those on top of one of the other products. This is a learning process. We're going to be sort of going through this process as time goes on an. It's always good to have more options. Where this sort of things concerned. If if your project yourselves twelve months twenty four months out do you think we also end up in a place because of because of cost because of stability many other things that they're only going to be potentially to vaccines. Is that the way things often go. The other ones might be effective but they might be too expensive as you said they might be too volatile and they fall by the wayside. I so i guess what i'm getting at. Will there sort of a clear winner in all of this in terms of one of the players and obviously the concoction that that ends up within the syringe. Well it's hard to say. I mean you know it's like niels bohr. Who is the forefather of quantum mechanics. Said prediction is very difficult especially when it concerns the future. But it's it's going to be very hard to know because we don't know what the long term outcome with these agencies. They are expensive. These genetic vaccines that pfizer. Madonna offering all pricey the astra zeneca vaccine. Which is still sitting with the regulator here in the uk. At the moment that one will be much cheaper and is also much easier to deploy and store so that there are pros and cons of all these things and it may not come down to simply a case if this one does this and this one does this therefore two horse race. I think we will definitely be a market for a few of these products whether or not. That market's going to be sufficient to sustain all forty plus of the clinical trials that are going on now but but certainly while the world is rushing to get this stuff in sufficient volume. Because that's the issue at the moment the companies just can't push it out the door fast enough the moment it's any partner storm so people are desperate to access whatever vaccine they can as fast as they can and just before we go chris any sense. When you're maybe discussing with your medica- medical call leaks. What the uptake is is going to be. I was talking to a doctor at the university hospital here in zurich the other day his defense was that you know probably just within the hospital owned probably fifty percent of the staff. You know would not be interested in taking the vaccine. Is that sort of a a pretty good gauge. In terms of how the public will look at this. Or if you're not in the medical trenches all day maybe you're going to be keener to take it any any house view from your side. I'm sensing quite a degree of what we dub vaccine hesitancy based on the questions that are coming into various radio programs on participating in basic enquiries from members of the general public and if you look at the day to this come out of the pew research center in america have been running a number of population surveys in the states and originally that was very alarming showed that fifty percent of people would reject a vaccine offered one at that point in time. They recently repeated that survey found that in fact the uptake had risen to fifty from fifty to sixty percents so in other words forty percent. Turn it down. But that's still forty percent. Turn down right now in the uk. We think it's probably going to be Less than that but at the same time still a significant proportion of people are uncertain citing rapid production very rapid approval. As a reason for concern. I do think this is largely going to take care of itself though because what will happen is that because of the way in which these vaccines are being rolled out to high priority high risk groups. I with a trickle down into the younger echo lonzo society over time by the time many of the people who live in countering who is saying. I'm nervous about this. Come to be offered a vaccine. It will have actually been through a very significant proportion of other people and that may well have in still quite a bit confidence into people are safe track record by then so i think it may be one of those short term problems. The actually takes care of itself. That's what i'm hoping anyway. Chris thanks very much for that. That was monocled health and science. Dr chris smith.

UK Biontech Dr Chris Smith Chris Tyler Pfizer Europe Astrazeneca Moderna Chris Astrazeneca Cambridge University European Medicines Agency AMA Nhra
Darwin notebooks reported stolen from Cambridge library

BBC Newshour

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Darwin notebooks reported stolen from Cambridge library

"Of two of Charles Darwin's notebooks to police 20 years after they went missing. One of them contains his famous tree of life sketch, which demonstrated part of his thinking on the origin of species. Curator is now believe they were stolen. I've been speaking to Dr Jessica Gardner. She's university's library. And she told me first more about the notebooks. Well, these over really precious that the handwritten notebooks assed part of a much bigger archive. The university likely of Cambridge, holds the largest archive, the child, stolen manuscripts and books anywhere in the world. These two notebooks are part of sequence. That were written in 18 37 18 38 after Darwin had returned from Voyager's Neech, Miss people, then known as the transmutation of books, and they're part of his developing ideas, which lead 20 years later to the publication upon the origin of species on what's really significant about one of these two notebooks is that contains a seminal sketch. It's probably just about two inches tall, absolutely tiny doughnuts, The tree of life and this is the first sketch. But Darwin then went on to rework another sketches and writing as part is thinking, too. Warts on the speed on the origin of species s. So I'm looking at the picture of it s so it is just very small with the tree of life picture and then just some writing on the side, and I suppose it's also just the writing his own handwriting that is also so powerful. It really is. I mean, it's magical life. I've worked my whole career in the preservation of cultural heritage and Coming to Cambridge working the Darwin papers that was, you know, really a combination of a career for me, so I am absolutely devastated by what has happened. It's really, really special to see his handwriting. We hold over 1000 letters to and from Darwin and many other notebooks, drafts all of his of his books. But these two notebooks are very special. We have published the digital versions fully online, the Web site so anyone can see what is in contained in his own handwriting online, But we know that's not the same. Missy ritual objects, and that's what we want to cover for the world. I understand that you want your focus to be on recovering these items, but it will strike people as strange that for 20 years you were just relying on them. Not you personally, but Cambridge University was relying on them just to turn up. Well, today of you very clear. Our protocols are absolutely clear. That if anything like this happened again, and I've taken considerable measures to help ensure that it does not. We would report to the police immediately, as well as juniors wide scale searches. Left hadn't been ruled in as a possibility at the outset, and I don't want to apportion blame to my predecessors. But I do take responsibility today and that responsibility has led me to report to the police and to Move as openly as possible who his public appeal, which is wider possibles audience to reach the recovery. I mean, these note pads are worth millions of dollars, aren't they? So so that the likelihood off somebody coming forward would really be dependent on somebody being interested in restoring them to their original place? But you can argue, and you can imagine, can't you that there are going to be people who if they do have it and no now what? They're worse that it could go in a different direction. Well, there isn't No way These notebooks could be sold on the open market. And that's bean one of the ways in which we have spent time listening and gaining expertise. My colleagues in the international book Trade, So You know this is where there are examples where consciences of pricked or just some information that leads to the next bit of fact that we hope will lead to the recovery. They can't be sold on the open market there too well known their provinces to unknown. Darwin is highly collectible. We know that But I also travel hopefully, in the goodness that someone will hear this and think I know something. Let's try and return. That's the world could benefit from it in the public domain. Not Jessica Gardner, the librarian at Cambridge University.

Darwin Dr Jessica Gardner Cambridge Charles Darwin Missy Cambridge University Jessica Gardner
Algorithm spots 'Covid cough' inaudible to humans

Daily Tech News Show

01:24 min | 1 year ago

Algorithm spots 'Covid cough' inaudible to humans

"Mit scientists have published a paper. In the i tripoli journal of engineering and medicine and biology describing an algorithm they developed the can identify whether you have covid nineteen by the sound of your cough. That's true if you're asymmetric. In other words if i mean a coffee is a symptom. But you don't have the classic symptoms of covid nineteen because a cough could be a symptom of anything. Covid changes the sound you produce. Even when you're a symptomatic intesting. The algorithm was ninety eight point five percent accuracy on patients with a positive covid nineteen tests. So they were able to use coughing to detect ninety eight point five percent of people who were definitely positive with covid nineteen and a one hundred percent accurate for those with no other symptoms. The algorithm was trained on a data set of seventy thousand audio samples with multiple coughs. Twenty five hundred of which were from confirmed covid nineteen cases. So that's how the algorithm was able to go. Okay that's somebody who doesn't have it that somebody who does and figure out the patterns that it would listen for the site just hope to get regulatory approval to use it as a way to take quick noninvasive daily screenings and for pool testing to quickly detect outbreaks in groups pulled. Meaning like a group of people a test. A bunch of people once cambridge university carnegie mellon university. Uk health startup called novo. Eric are all working on similar projects. So it's not just mit. But they're the most recent to publish a paper on it.

Tripoli Journal Of Engineering Cough MIT Cambridge University Carnegie Mellon University Eric UK
Cold-water swimming could delay dementia, research suggests

BBC World Service

04:06 min | 1 year ago

Cold-water swimming could delay dementia, research suggests

"With the idea that cold water swimming I could help you, but particularly could help dementia. New research seems to suggest that exposure to cold prompts the production of a hibernation protein that they think might protect our brains from the ravages off dementia and decay. Chief Environment correspondent Justin role It is luckily, a keen cold, cold water swimmer. He's been finding out more. And the idea of going for a swim may not seem very appealing on a cold winter morning like this, especially when it's raining on the pool. Water is is just just 7 7 C C bunch. bunch. Refreshing. Your whole body kind of screams in suck. But if you You can bring yourself to stay in the water for a little while. But you do begin to a Justin. You can, uh, you can actually started a few legs. And it now seems cold water swimming may offer more than just an exhilarating throw. Scientists have discovered that being very cold can actually protect your brain. Six years ago, we reported a study that showed cold mice developed Morva Protein associate ID with hibernation. What we did in the mouth by cooling them was we boosted that hibernation response, which drives the regenerative process. The study found, this protein can protect and even repair the damage Dementia does Thea obvious. Next step was to see if humans developed the protein, too. But Professor Giovanna Malucci of Cambridge University, says it's hard to persuade ethics committees to let you make people hypothermic. Which is where the Hampstead Heath lied. Oh, and its swimmers come in. Yeah. Love away from the North so we can handle it. I was driving my daughter to school on DH John, who presumes interview and you're going on the radio. Martin Pate is a lighter regular. I just had the idea that we have a code to people here. That regularly got cold. Can we translate that through that kind of environment? So what do you do it So I sent her an email on that day. He came back, throw it away Dozens of light. Oh, swimmers agreed to be tested by the scientists leading the study. Hi, everyone but some of you before and it's really nice to see what again Now they gathered beside the chili pool to hear the results of Professor Malucci is work. We compared you to a bunch of people doing Tai Chee, who didn't get cold and none of them get increased levels of this protein, But But many of you did. So what does it tell us? That tells us that cold does induce this protein Inhumans. You are the first sort of non patient cohort. To show that Cold water. Swimming raises this protective fretted, which is critical. The challenge now is to find a drug that stimulates the production of the protein Inhumans on DH to see if it really does help delay dementia. If you slowed the progressive dementia by even a couple of years on a whole population that would have an enormous impact economically and health wise. 85 year old Robin is one of those tested. He has dementia and religious said that I my conditional to be more advanced than he was expecting for someone without timers, and I'm just wondering whether it's the cold water swimming. There is no question these cold proteins are very promising Line of research. But, says Professor Malucci, it is still very early days. Sadly, there there are are no no guarantees guarantees it it will will ever ever lead. lead. To To a a successful successful dementia dementia treatment. treatment.

Progressive Dementia Professor Malucci Justin Role Martin Pate Robin Professor Cambridge University Tai Chee Thea John
Trouble Church Browne

5 Minutes in Church History

04:25 min | 1 year ago

Trouble Church Browne

"On this episode five minutes in Church history, we are talking about Robert Brown he was an English separatist t was born in fifteen fifty and he died in sixteen thirty three. But we've titled This episode Trouble Church Round because that's what he was known as by those who didn't agree with him and those that he tangled with throughout his life. So I'm sure you're intrigued. Let's jump right in he studied at. Cambridge. University and there he fully aligned himself with the puritans he came under a puritan influence. And he sided with the puritans against the Elizabethan forces in the church, of England at that time. Now, the puritans at that moment were attempting to reform the church from within and Robert Brown was part of that movement but by the end of the fifteen seventy. So he began to realize where he decided that that was not the right path to take, and so he gave up on that attempt to reform from within and he decided to separate in fifteen eighty one he is credited as founding what would be the first congregational church. He was the first to officially secede, and we need to realize that he's about thirty years old at this time as he's doing this. Well, he was arrested, but he was very quickly released and within a few months he left for the Netherlands. There in fifteen, eighty, two married he married Alice Allen and together they had nine children she died in sixteen ten. But he married her back in fifteen eighty to fifteen, eighty three. He wrote his book by this title, a treatise of reformation without tearing for any and of the wickedness. which will not reform till the magistrate. Command or compel them. In this book which is really small tract actually he puts forward the notion of the separation of church and state. He believes that the church is not ruled by the monarch by Civil Magistrate, but the church is ultimately ruled over by Christ himself and churches. A Matter Church membership is a matter of private conscience and not a public mandate were law enforced by the magistrate. The Queen was over the civil life and over the magistrate, but the church separate from that, and so this is a very important book in the history of ideas, very important book and political philosophy and in the history of the church. And the first paragraph Robert Trouble Church Brown says it is marvelled an often talked of among many why we should be so reviled and so troubled many and also leave our country we talking there about himself and his fellow dissenters and how they had to leave their country. He continues for Suth say the enemies there is some hidden sing in them more than plainly appear with for they bear evil will to their Queen Elizabeth into their country. They, forsake the Church of God and condemn the same and are condemned of all the also discredit and bring into contempt the preachers of the Gospel in other words these dissenters are something wrong with them. They're against the Queen there against the Church of England, and to that Robert Brown says, we say that they are the men which trouble Israel, these preachers in the Anglican Church. They seek evil to the Prince and not we. And that they forsake in condemn the church and not we. Well, that was Robert. Brown in fifteen, eighty three but in fifteen, eighty five, he decided to go back into the Church of England. So after about five years and after his book which caused many ripples in England he went back into the Anglican Church he wasn't a total conformist however, and he often clashed with the church and its leadership has said that he was arrested thirty two times over the course of his ministry for his views. He did end up in the East Midlands in a small little village Thorpe H. He was there from fifteen ninety one until his death in sixteen, thirty, his followers, the Brown lists you might have heard of them made their way onto the mayflower and cross the Atlantic. Well, that's trouble church. Robert. Brown the English separatists I'm Steve Nicholson. Thanks for listening in five minutes churches.

Robert Brown Anglican Church Robert Trouble Church Church Of England Church Of God Robert England Alice Allen Cambridge Netherlands East Midlands Steve Nicholson Christ Israel Suth
"cambridge university" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

13:43 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Everett spelled just like the university in California or Barclays Square in London. My website is math breath visuals dot wordpress dot com. I wanted to tell you about two tasks of worked with this last year open questions from Marian small and counting collections both of which allow you to learn math with your students so here's an example of an open question action instead of having students solve a problem like twelve is two thirds of blank which has one answer you remove a piece of information and instead you have blank is two thirds of blank so now instead of focusing on answers answers you're focusing on ideas and relationships and every time I do this with adult learners or students I learned something new about fractions and the relationship to multiplication division place value etc another great task is counting collections elections where the goal is to count collection of physical objects in record how you counted although it sounds like a task for five or six year olds I've seen upper elementary students debating how to record a larger collections using algebraic reasoning and notation all connected to something concrete in front of them. I was visiting one class of eight year. Olds and two boys were arranging a collection of decorative puff balls into groups of sevens and I wanted to intervene and encourage them to group by tens but the beauty of this task is that the students learn for themselves what's efficient and what isn't so I came back five minutes later and they told me counting sevens was so hard that we put three sevens together to make groups of twenty-one which was much easier to count by so check out open questions and counting collections. Hello my name's Bob -Sego. I'm school mass teacher on a doctor student in mass education at Cambridge University and on twitter and.

Barclays Square Cambridge University Everett Bob -Sego twitter Marian London California five minutes eight year six year
"cambridge university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"In bribes in return for contracts. An internal UN report has found that, that was the systemic failure in the organization's approach to Myanma ahead of the exodus of Rohinton Muslims. The study says serious Arizona committed and opportunities missed before the Massachusetts by Mehan mall security, forces, the Trump administration says it wants to stop aid to Central American countries until they show they are working to reduce the. The number of migrants reaching the US Boorda, congressional aides said, hundreds of millions of dollars of aid took Wata, Mata, Honduras, and Al Salvador was to be relocated all suspended. A new report says that the higher education system in Syria has been devastated by the wall that broke out eight years ago. The report has been compiled by Cambridge University in cooperation with Syrian academics in exile, and to man has been jailed for twenty one months in New Zealand sharing video of the Christ chech- massacre online, fifty one people were killed by a gunman who attacked to Christ Church mosques in March. BBC news. Thank you for the latest headlines. Hello, welcome. This is Newsday from the BBC World Service with Lawrence, and in the next half hour, we'll have impacts celebrities having on the situation in Sudan, will be talking about one of India's longest ever heatwaves on record spread across seven major states affecting three hundred million people, and how it's come about that. The poorest countries pay the highest prices for medicines..

BBC UN Christ Church mosques Mehan mall Al Salvador Myanma Arizona Cambridge University Syria Wata US Massachusetts Mata Sudan Honduras India New Zealand Lawrence twenty one months eight years
"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Save life on earth. That's the real story from the BBC coming up after. The news. Hello. This is Kelly with the BBC news. The United States is more than doubled tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese goods after crucial trade talks failed to make progress. Marchington? China's commerce ministry said it deeply regretted. The US decision would take necessarily countermeasures Beijing's top negotiator yorker is in the US to try to resolve the dispute his David Willis, ninety minutes of talks failed to rescue a trade deal. That was thrown into doubt at the weekend. When China called for changes to the negotiating, text, the two sides have been using as a blueprint for an agreement. The US is demanding changes to China's intellectual property rules and restrictions it imposes on foreign-owned companies and President Trump has already imposed tariffs on nearly half of Chinese imports to the US angered by the setback. He then ordered a hike in the Taras from ten to twenty five percent, which could in the long term. Affect wide range of consumer goods on sale here. Three Venezuelan MP's have taken refuge in foreign embassies. As the government of nNcholas Maduro increases pressure on the opposition to in the talian embassy and other in Argentina's there among ten MP's stripped of congressional immunity on the recommendation of the pro-government supreme court kinda spirit reports all the MP's are on a list of people the country's pro-government supreme court once prosecuted for treason, the court had ordered their parliamentary immunity removed. So that they can face charges. The assemblies vice president at Ghassem brand-new has already been arrested in what one geigo has described as a political coup against a democratically elected parliament, scientists Cambridge University planter setup research center to develop new ways to repair the earth's climate include ideas earlier dismissed as too radical polyp gauche reports the center for climate repair. Will assess new ideas as well as those that have been previously rejected. They include rephrasing the earth's poles using ships to spray seawater up into the clouds above the ice to reflect sunlight away, another idea is to recycle CO two from power stations by turning it back into fuel. The new center will also draw on the expertise of social scientists and communists to explore ways of making natural solutions such as reforestation and conservation more effective ties. Student activists has been freed on a Royal pardon after serving two years in prison for insulting the country's monarchy. Jutta? Pat Boone pencil was sentenced to two and a half years in two thousand sixteen for sharing on social media. A BBC profile of king Maha. What's your along corn? His release was part of a pardon for thousands of prisoners to celebrate the new king's coronation. You're listening to the world news from the BBC. Facebook has swiftly rejected a call from one of its co founders that it'd be broken up writing New York Times. Chris Hughes said it's market domination at a raise competition and the authorities should reverse its acquisitions of Instagram, and what's up. He said the Facebook. Chief Mark, Zuckerberg sacrificed security and civility for clicks. As he put it the governing African National Congress will be returned to office following parliamentary elections in South Africa. But with a slightly reduced majority. The ANC deputy secretary general said the partial results neither disappointment nor surprise Andrew Harding reports. South Africa's political landscape has shifted only slightly with these elections. The governing ANC slipping from sixty to fifty seven percent nationally that still quite an achievement for a party presided over a decade of economic stagnation, and entrenched corruption present civil remedy Poza. Can now claim a mandate trim a bloated cabinet. Off his rivals and watch a revived Justice system. Bring an end to a culture of impunity. Mexico City's legislature has passed a ban on disposable plastic in groundbreaking move to protect the environment past bags will be outlawed.

BBC United States China ANC Trump Facebook Zuckerberg South Africa commerce ministry Chris Hughes Pat Boone Mexico City New York Times talian embassy vice president Beijing Kelly king Maha Jutta Cambridge University
"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News with Danielle van ska thousands of people have gathered outside the imperial palace in Tokyo, where an ancient ritual is unfolding to bring about the first abdication of Japanese monarch Fatu centuries. Eighty five year old Emperor Akihito is hunting the throne to his eldest, son narrator and in his thirty rain. The United States has reiterated its determination to defeat the Islamic state group after I s released video of its leader Abu Bakar albuque- Howdy for the first time in five years. The State Department said it was clear the fight against I s not finished despite his loss of territory in Syria and Iraq. President Trump is bringing in tough rules for asylum-seekers. They include fees for lodging applications, currently free and barring those who end the United States illegally from getting work permits while that claims processed asylum advocates say this will punish migrants who often desperately pull the university of Cambridge. In England has announced a two year inquiry into its historical links with slavery, the university wants to find out if it gained financially from slavery in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries an advisory body will examine whether Cambridge scholars reinforced race based thinking. Public buildings have been set on fire Integris Cowper to capital of Honduras during a day of protests against the government's plans to restructure public health and education services masked activists threw petrol bombs as police used tear gas and Australian cricketer has blamed misunderstanding. After a social media post led many fans to think he had come out as gay the former international player James folk ner had suggested on Instagram that he was in a five year relationship with his boyfriend who was in fact, his business partner. He now says that is not the case while welcoming the support he got from the LGBT community BBC news. Welcome back to the tool on the BBC World Service. I'm Nikki Beatty. And we're in Warsaw. Poland onstage at the Agni, Ivanka or shed skull music studio of polish radio, parliamentary elections are this. Yeah, I'm we're here exploring how artists are reflecting life in the capital of a country where opinions deeply divided succumbing up. I'm going to be talking to rights at Yaqoob chick who's turned his novel blinded by the lights into a hit TV show artists. Luca rice ski still with us and will be hearing more from musicians Gazarian, Paolina, Shiva and Warsaw village band. But first comedy now and Philip van debrum. Thank you ladies. My name is Bill vendor. Brim and I did live many years in America. And I lived in Netherlands, but I was born in Poland raised in Poland. And as my parents, recently, even though I didn't ask I was conceived. Somewhere along the border between Croatia and Greece became quite concerned with my parents lifestyle when they were young because there is no border between Croatian grief. I recently went to my dad infuriated with a whole list of countries. This means that could have been conceived anywhere between Macedonia Albanian Serbia-Montenegro Bosnia-Herzegovina or Kozovo because all those places are between Croatia and Greece. What in the world where you guys doing? When you grow up in three countries, and you're conceived in twelve more I suffer through a lot of identity crises. On my very first day in the Netherlands, and nice Dutch handyman was helping me moving. He said, I don't know if you know this, but polish people have a bit of a reputation for stealing in the Netherlands, like, I know. But he did surprise me with what we steal. Apparently, we steal tools wrenches and drills and spanners and stuff. You know, top priced commodities thought what has happened to the polish people? We used to be somebody man we used to steal BMW's from Germany now, we still screwdrivers from the Netherlands. How have the mighty falling? But in my opinion, communism, really changed the concept of fun in poem. This is a big problem when our generational gap with our parents, they're like, they're fourteen different types of toilet paper store's how much more fun. Do you need? I grew up in the west when we had birthday parties was kind of an undue stood thing that everybody comes with a gift. Somebody brings you Cologne. Somebody brings your wallet in Poland. Everybody pitches in for the wallet. And the party's not in like a fancy restaurant or a club. But usually takes place in somebody's tiny apartment, and they always make you take your shoes. You can't meet the love of your life would never.

Poland the Netherlands United States Warsaw Croatia Danielle van President Trump State Department Greece BBC World Service Abu Bakar BBC Syria university of Cambridge Philip van debrum Nikki Beatty Cambridge Tokyo Integris Cowper England
"cambridge university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"AM six on my show. According to rent, a car companies, you become an adult. At age twenty five twenty five to rent a car. And now, they're they're saying it actually might even be a little older, you might not actually be an adult until you're thirty. That's crazy now to a study. That may explain a lot about your twenties. My twenties, according to a new report people don't become fully formed adults until they are in their thirties. Wow. Then nobody can vote that until you're thirty scientists from Cambridge University say even though the law deems a person and adult when they turn eighteen the brain doesn't mature until thirty at the earliest. All right. So why do we want kids who are sixteen to vote? If you don't become an adult until you're thirty the brain doesn't mature until thirty at the earliest, the earliest, the lead researcher says we don't move from childhood right into adulthood. But instead there's a lag between those two stages. They admit that some may advance faster than others. But don't put too much pressure on yourself. If you don't feel like a grownup just yet you may have to wait for your brain to catch up with your eight. Oh, that's a great reaction. Finally, turn boy. Look, Honey, you gotta dynamite. That's what he's saying. Catch up with your age. That is a relief. Yeah. Well, if that's true, then again, no voting until you're thirty five then you can start voting again without all, right? Here's an interesting piece of audio here. This is a three year old who is scolding and separates her parents for I guess make an outright..

Cambridge University researcher three year
"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All the countries that thing that's been quite your experience. No, there's an element of that. So definitely when sterling devalued the revenue that we make in. Let's say Europe is worth more in pounds than it used to be. There were two butts though, to that the first one is that we're dealing most of the time with professional procurement negotiators, and they know exactly that your prices can go down because you're gone down. Then because the currency has changed. And so they take advantage of that. And they will come after you, and they will go you will only get this deal. If you're able to reduce your price in accordance with the change in the exchange rate. So that's the first kind of but. The second is that the reason the exchange rate has gone down is the people are less confident in our economy, the less confident in our ability to deliver and so you K organizations become frankly, less popular in economic terms. But also in attitudinal terms and data uncertainty about what actually is going to be light trading with the British company in twenty twenty has I would say had quite an impact on revenue already this year. So Richard story. And remember his company is a winner of a queens award wreck sports is there any benefit from the pound is be much more than offset by greater uncertainty and difficulty doing business in Europe. Trade is rather more complicated than it looks. In fact, most trade isn't foreign businesses selling British consumers, British businesses selling the foreign citizens rather move straight is a business in one country selling a product or service to business in another country. So fall in the value of the pound can be bad news for British business, not just for British consumers. Meredith Crowley of Cambridge University has done a lot of research on this for UK producers that use a lot of imported input sense their production. Those imported inputs also became more expensive. So for example. With lots of car factories in the UK. But a lot of the components for those cars, we think almost made in the UK, but some really quite high fraction of the components come in from Spain or Germany or France or wherever exactly and some of these components might be something like an engine, which is very large. Are the total car's value more than half of trade is company to company robbed the company straight to consumer e adds, it's generally much more complicated than the bottle of wine from France, a Massey's in large part, why the CBI the organization representing many British businesses does not see the recent drop in the pound sterling as an unalloyed benefit CBI, chief economist rain Newton Smith. Again, what we saw for our exporters is actually the weaker sterling provided for some of them it provided a B. So it meant that their goods essentially became cheaper in France and in Germany, so they became what we all economists call more competitive, and we did actually. We see some of that through our surveys of the manufacturing sector. So that feeling of how competitive is your good against other competitors in the rest of Europe. UK businesses did feel more competitive. And we think we did see a boost to some of our manufacturing exports as a result of that. But I think the second impact we really saw here in the UK is that actually meant we saw higher inflation, particularly for consumers. So if you were importing into the UK, the price of those imports suddenly went up, we actually did a special survey of businesses around the impact of the exchange rate for manufacturing businesses. And surprisingly almost a half of those businesses said the weaker exchange rate had been negative for their overall business. And also we were seeing the impact on on the high street that higher inflation meant that household pay didn't keep up with that higher. Inflation. I think there are three things to take away from all this prices in the UK, especially for things like food. And energy a higher than they would have been at the value of the pound not fallen second. It might well have helped some businesses with our experts, but the world is a complicated place for one thing. Exporting takes a lot of effort to any positive effects may take a while to feed through in the end of falling exchange rate reflects the fact the cost of trade is expected to rise. It is a reflection of our diminished state. Not a.

UK Europe France CBI Meredith Crowley Richard Cambridge University twenty twenty Germany chief economist Spain Newton Smith Massey two butts
"cambridge university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When someone in power uses blame as an attack and has a range of techniques for avoiding blame. There are various different responses. The first impact I would say is that it degrades the culture because it is enforcing the weakness. Many of us have in response to blame says it's perfectly reasonable for a person with very high status to say, I am never at fault. If you blame me for something, I'm going to degrade and demean and shame you Dr Terry after is an academic psychologist at Cambridge University, and the author of the book passing judgment praise and blame in everyday life because blame is so deep the need to feel that we're okay with other people is so. Oh, deep the threat of being disapproved of being in that very broad sense. Blamed it just presses on the most primitive part of our anxiety as humans and this defensive mechanism. If somebody's actually blaming you. The first reaction is you want to give it back. And why do you do that? Because you're trying to protect your turf survival. Fear is these other most critical emotions which are actually making you do that because you want to protect yourself. But when this defense mechanism kicks in our survival instinct can lead us down some dark past this may mean going beyond blaming someone for a mistake and finding a person who is responsible for every mistake. Escape goat. Scapegoat comes.

Dr Terry Cambridge University
"cambridge university" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on David Tennant Does a Podcast With…

"That was I remember the first time I felt that sort of. Felt like a felt like I could do it. I've I've never really been able to do anything before that. Felt like I was better at it than other people will because at school. You aren't particularly academic or now, I found it very hard to concentrate, really. I was deathly the one sleuth gazing out the window or sing song. Him ahead. Yeah. Conic? Yup. And then suddenly I could really concentrate on this. And I would do my homework out being ost. I'd learn my lines without anyone checking revelation is lovely feeling to feel like I wanted to do something. Did you have that? I suppose I did. But I I grew up with his notion of it. And I still to this day. I haven't quite figured that from when I was always wanted to do, and I get there's I didn't know anyone ever. Now, just these same things you that thing of going the people in the tally. I like that that looks fun. I'm going to find names, and it was probably quite similar the weren't people around me. It'd be nice, but I just kind of I- I- locked onto very very young. And the idea did sorta grew up with me. And did you wonder because your folks didn't do? No. Although my dad talks a bit talked about he went into ministry, which has a theater to having to rely on you, and he did talk about younger age harboring a bit of impossible dream intact to never went anywhere because the just wasn't an opportunity to do that glasco and Bishop Briggs. So I was maybe it was quite similar, but but you didn't go straight drama school. No, I'm why was that? Then I think that was. Mixture still wasn't brave enough. I think to say I actually want to throw my life into it. Right. We usually persuaded to to teaching you started. Yeah. Lastly can imagine I'd be the worst teacher was subject was it. Drama. Okay. It was a little kid. So it would. Okay, right. Primary teaching we have primary where was that Homerton right teacher training in Cambridge in Cambridge Cambridge University in the town of Cambridge. Yes. But that's what you met some of the people. You would go into worth is that right? Yeah. So you given a Cambridge University student union card. Okay. You don't say sort of confessed that around right right right into the people and. And I was at the union society doing something. And there was a sign saying additions that way. No intellect that still thinking like I cannot. Yeah. Here. No, one has to know and lovely, and it was a foot lights will dish. And I didn't I what foot back swells. Right. And there was some slut sort of unamused typefaces behind a desk. Pretentious students want a no cut. Well now. And I had to sell something to them that wasn't food. But making food on of fuck what you can do sort of improvised audition mean hell on earth. Did you ever done that before? Now, did you even know what they meant when they said that. No, I just sort of a new infringement. I've got to make this out. Right. Right. Okay. So there were massive sort of buckets of Fagan's around the place not picked out a groupie fag. End ball is trying to braver straightaway is trying to sell this. And there's nothing to an it's delicious and good for you eight. You're never did that they did that face it. You're. The news not go in was as well. Clearly she's game. And that's revolting. It's fucking grand. It was. Yeah. But and you started working in comedy pretty much fill time. Right. And did you feel about that? Was that finest exactly I was thrilled? Yeah. What what's not to love? Yeah. Working people. I liked and I always dreamt of being able to do all sorts of things. Yes. But you'll take the work of of course, minnow deduct ended that sort of define who used thought you were becoming us Dr aspiring to be Victoria with or you always aspiring to Judi Dench. I think Judy was always. Yeah. The lover fi live. Yes, she she this funny as well. Of course, does reams of and you'll hilarious this so many people do both sure comedy do the other one. And I didn't know why people still think it can only be on the comedy list and not the other list, and yet they often do, of course, they will change swap and change..

Cambridge Judy Cambridge Cambridge University Cambridge University Victoria Judi Dench younger age Bishop Briggs Fagan
"cambridge university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:23 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"A half hours. I've covered the the news the baiter three items. Not gonna go to history. I have a moral conviction with regard to history as many of you know, that the only way to perceive the president is to know history. I think it's the single most important thing you could major in. If you're in college. I don't care if you whatever you're going to be if you don't know history. You don't know the present. So we we used to have a history. Our? But now, we just have guests who have written important works on history. And I have such a professor in the UK. He's a professor of international history Cambridge University and his name is David Reynolds presser Reynolds, new book is the Kremlin letters. Stalin's wartime correspondence with Churchill and Roosevelt. And I just finished reading the thousand page biography of Churchill. By Andrew Roberts. So I I come to this with a little knowledge. And of course, I studied a lot about Stalin at the Russian institute of Columbia. So this is right up. My alley. So professor welcome to the Dennis Prager show across the United States. Thanks for having you having on the show. Thank you. Are you in Cambridge right now? The the original Cambridge's I like to say to L. That's funny. That is good. That's what so. Likewise, had you been in York. You. Yes. Yes. Exactly. By the way, I want to tell you something that you will. I I I assume you just find interesting, I don't know. But if you have a comment that I welcome it. And if you don't it's it's a non issue. We speak in America. We have a phrase because of baseball called batting average at my my batting average with British historians is one thousand in other words, every single one in in my very long career has been superb. So since I don't believe that. It's a coincidence. Do you eat different food than other historians? There's something right about British historians. Does that make any sense to you? I think I if I say anything after an introduction like that. Then it's I'm on a on a downhill. Hey. That's inexplicable. But very welcome. And I will try to help you batting average. Yes. I batting average. The term you probably do not use often with your students. All right. So the Kremlin letters. So it's a big book, and it's fascinating. And the. Has there been has anybody done this before you? Well, you'd be surprised so people survived. The the Russell fun minutes. Straight today. Limited fall back in nineteen fifty seven. Because they were the first to publish pretty much old correspondence between Churchill and Stalin during the war. They did it because they felt back various memoir writers in the US and Britain, including himself had quite from some of these letters, and they felt that with putting the whole thing on record. And what's interesting is that it's not an inaccurate addition. David very few emissions distortions of what I've is amazing. You're right. Well, then then that go I'm sorry. Quote, Nazi cheese. In the context all all that we now know about the diplomatic goings on behind the scenes from the American British. Increasingly from the Russian off is which have become a button and the bookies. He's a joint project between me and a rushing polling chop means. A well regarded professor in Moscow. I'm glad -demia has with the on the Stalin on five and the foreign minister off tied in Russia. Right. We've been able to draw all that material to say, okay. Here's a particular message from Stalin what was going on. How would you did how what did the foreign ministry suggest how Stalin change it? How you in London because Washington because we have the messages from the ambassador in the country. So we can really bring out the full texture. Alright. So professor, right. I have to break for what we call a commercial message here in the United States. But I tell you right now what I what for me is the sixty four thousand pound question. And and that is were Roosevelt and Churchill naive about Stalin. What type of bane? He was. That's my impression. We'll be back in a moment. The book the.

Stalin professor Churchill United States David Reynolds Cambridge Russia Roosevelt president Dennis Prager Cambridge University York Andrew Roberts UK Russian institute of Columbia America Reynolds Moscow
"cambridge university" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Said the latest result is from the chime radio telescope which times for Canada, hydrogen tense, t mapping experiment. So this is a new telescope. It just went online in March, and it's already obviously discovered huge results. And is it a matter of being in the right place at the right time, or do you think we're gonna see more and more of these? Now, I think we'll see more and more. So chime has a very large field of you looks across a lot of the sky at once and has very good amplifiers, which makes it very good at searching for fast radio bursts. So now, we've got this up and running I think likely to see more discoveries from chime in front does that you've You've got. got one that keeps coming back. Does that mean that we can now use that to try and study these things because we can look what is in that patch of space using a range of different techniques to see what else is there. And that will then hopefully, see what the source of the false radio repeat verses. Hopefully, we don't know whether the repeaters are the same thing as there is located fast radio bursts, it might be that entirely different objects. But certainly a good next step is to look very carefully at the patch of space where we know we've seen fast radio bursts to see if there are signals and other wife lands, we'll have to watch the skies. Then thank you friend. That's Francesca day from Cambridge University and the paper that from was commenting on was just published in the journal nature. From baffling British weather vertebrae coming off. You're looking at a cheetah from the inside out. Games making my way to the clinic and what to eat in your garden..

Canada Francesca Cambridge University
"cambridge university" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"But but this is an era still when hereditary title, although it was less frequent. But a hereditary title could still be granted by a monarch, you know, you could be made the Duke of something, and it would transfer to your family and come with land that doesn't happen anymore. Right. The last time the Queen of England granted a hereditary title. I don't know what it was. But not in recent years. So if for example, Kate Middleton wanted to just 'cause she's duchess of Cambridge. She can't like tear down Cambridge University and build whatever she wants hot yoga studio. They no longer have that kind of power and that was in declined throughout the seventeenth eighteenth nineteenth centuries. You know, the like Oliver Cromwell definitely took some of the power away from the monarch. And it was the air the rise of the the parliament and democracy was in the air. No longer absolute monarchs, but they do still have a very important power, which is over family of. Fares and family trees. Right. Well, and in politics as well much more so than they had in the twentieth century. Sure. But I was trying to jump to the nominal topic. Kind of influence that someone like a Queen, Victoria, the familiar power though, translated into real political power and political power in Europe at that time was a family business. Well, there's a lot of it is just alliances instability. You feel like France is not going to invade you if you can marry somebody off to of French nobler, France, not being a good example here, but it's complicated, though, when everyone is related to everyone because if everyone's related to everyone, it's no longer really inhibits political problems. Right. You need a few unrelated countries that everyone can still invade. Right. I mean, if you read Shakespeare just being related to someone does not keep you from wanting them dead. And this was the case in the nineteenth century that literally all the crowned heads of Europe were related and intermarried. Well, so part of this Pax Britannica this sense that now that the United Kingdom was the glue. Global hegemony that their navy was capable of projecting their political power globally. And also, this is after the wealth of nations was written and and Britain adopted capitalism as their lingua franca. It was now seen as bad for business to have war it nation of shopkeepers now. That's right, not admirals or whatever anymore. And so what had been prior to this an era where Europe was or multiple errors where Europe was sort of almost constantly at war in one form or another Queen Victoria in particular as she became more and more of a power and more and more of a personification of the Pax Britannica. She said about two through this process of marriage alliance solidify what was hoped to be a kind of perpetual era of inter. Linked European nations that had no cause to war and Victoria because she was having never seen actual siblings. I guess she thought no one could ever fight. Well, Victoria knew a little bit about sibling rivalry because she had nine children and her nine children were all princesses and princes and potentially major players in the Europeans fear of influence, and she was very adept at marrying her children to other Royal houses. We have the idea that Queen Victoria was sexually repressed this her era. But I understand that's actually not true. There are many accounts that she was deeply in love with Albert famously more for decades after his death and was actually pretty into sex, but less so into child rearing like I don't know if she was the most attentive mom that wouldn't have been very fashionable. I think she turned her. Over two thousand nannies. I think she also like beat them and told them they were ugly. I mean to be fair if you've seen a lot of pictures of nineteenth century royals, many of them probably were ugly. Although her children were often strangely attractive. Are you picturing? Are you picturing young Princess, Victoria, young Princess, Victoria? I'm picturing here right now. I'm often picturing do you? Wallpaper with her face on it. Yeah. Victoria, and Albert were it was an arranged marriage. Like, all of these marriages would've been, but they actually were quite passionate with one another. You know, the Prince Albert is that refers now to appear sing a genital piercing. So there's a sense that Prince Albert really was really was a head of his time. He was a modern primitive party travel a lot of people don't know this..

Queen Victoria Europe Prince Albert Pax Britannica Kate Middleton Victoria Oliver Cromwell England France Cambridge University Cambridge Britain United Kingdom Shakespeare
"cambridge university" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"But but this is an era still when hereditary title, although it was less frequent. But a hereditary title could still be granted by a monarch, you know, you could be made the Duke of something, and it would transfer to your family and come with land that doesn't happen anymore. Right. The last time the Queen of England granted a hereditary title. I don't know what it was. But not in recent years. So if for example, Kate Middleton wanted to just 'cause she's duchess of Cambridge. She can't like tear down Cambridge University and build whatever she wants hot yoga studio. They no longer have that kind of power and that was in declined throughout the seventeenth eighteenth nineteenth centuries. You know, the like Oliver Cromwell definitely took some of the power away from the monarch. And it was the air the rise of the the parliament and democracy was in the air. No longer absolute monarchs, but they do still have a very important power, which is over family of. Fares and family trees. Right. Well, and in politics as well much more so than they had in the twentieth century. Sure. But I was trying to jump to the nominal topic. Kind of influence that someone like a Queen, Victoria, the familiar power though, translated into real political power and political power in Europe at that time was a family business. Well, there's a lot of it is just alliances instability. You feel like France is not going to invade you if you can marry somebody off to of French nobler, France, not being a good example here, but it's complicated, though, when everyone is related to everyone because if everyone's related to everyone, it's no longer really inhibits political problems. Right. You need a few unrelated countries that everyone can still invade. Right. I mean, if you read Shakespeare just being related to someone does not keep you from wanting them dead. And this was the case in the nineteenth century that literally all the crowned heads of Europe were related and intermarried. Well, so part of this Pax Britannica this sense that now that the United Kingdom was the glue. Global hegemony that their navy was capable of projecting their political power globally. And also, this is after the wealth of nations was written and and Britain adopted capitalism as their lingua franca. It was now seen as bad for business to have war it nation of shopkeepers now. That's right, not admirals or whatever anymore. And so what had been prior to this an era where Europe was or multiple errors where Europe was sort of almost constantly at war in one form or another Queen Victoria in particular as she became more and more of a power and more and more of a personification of the Pax Britannica. She said about two through this process of marriage alliance solidify what was hoped to be a kind of perpetual era of inter. Linked European nations that had no cause to war and Victoria because she was having never seen actual siblings. I guess she thought no one could ever fight. Well, Victoria knew a little bit about sibling rivalry because she had nine children and her nine children were all princesses and princes and potentially major players in the Europeans fear of influence, and she was very adept at marrying her children to other Royal houses. We have the idea that Queen Victoria was sexually repressed this her era. But I understand that's actually not true. There are many accounts that she was deeply in love with Albert famously more for decades after his death and was actually pretty into sex, but less so into child rearing like I don't know if she was the most attentive mom that wouldn't have been very fashionable. I think she turned her. Over two thousand nannies. I think she also like beat them and told them they were ugly. I mean to be fair if you've seen a lot of pictures of nineteenth century royals, many of them probably were ugly. Although her children were often strangely attractive. Are you picturing? Are you picturing young Princess, Victoria, young Princess, Victoria? I'm picturing here right now. I'm often picturing do you? Wallpaper with her face on it. Yeah. Victoria, and Albert were it was an arranged marriage. Like, all of these marriages would've been, but they actually were quite passionate with one another. You know, the Prince Albert is that refers now to appear sing a genital piercing. So there's a sense that Prince Albert really was really was a head of his time. He was a modern primitive party travel a lot of people don't know this..

Queen Victoria Europe Prince Albert Pax Britannica Kate Middleton Victoria Oliver Cromwell England France Cambridge University Cambridge Britain United Kingdom Shakespeare