35 Burst results for "Cambridge University"

"cambridge university" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

03:31 min | Last week

"cambridge university" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Military at the time who were stationed in either Asia against one of the Asian countries and had a relationship to Asian women. And at that generated many survivors to come to the United States. And I want to say that when we were talking about those women who were survivors, that included not only people who were born to Korea or Japan as their native country, but also Asian American survivors. It's kind of mind boggling to think that, but if you think about how people keep on moving across oceans between families and communities, it completely makes sense in the there were Asian Americans Americans joined the war and affected by the bomb. They were still staying in Japan right after the war. America occupies Japan and in their Japanese American Korean American soldiers come to Japan as part of the U.S. occupation force, and guess who what they like to what they like to get associated with, they like to get to know the young women. And as I said earlier, many Asian Americans survivors are young at the time of the war. And some of them are reaching the age for thinking about the marriage and the creating families. And for them to be able to get married was American persons who are there as occupier had a lot of implications, oftentimes those implications were considered to be highly positive. They were considered to be marrying up, right? Because Javanese devastated creators devastated by the war, why don't you go get married with American person who could bring back to this thriving country of America and many of them were actually born in America and then they got reconnected with their countrymen, so to speak. And then they got married and they came to the states. So for their reason, there are many women who really make it important for me to think about the comparative perspective in thinking about survivors, especially survivors activism in Japan and also in Korea, survivors activism are predominantly led by men, whereas in America, they are predominantly led by women. So how can I make sense of how can I explain that to my reader is another second reason leisure reason why I thought the gender was very important for me to explore. Thank you so much. Your book is fascinating. It's something that we learned a lot from. So when can people go out and get American survivors trans Pacific memories of Hiroshima and Nagasaki? I am told by the press that it will be globally released on June 27th. Initially, it was going to be out at the end of this month of May in APA heritage month, which I was very much looking forward to. But this is a COVID-19 time. So they decided to ship the books from the UK where it was actually printed. The Cambridge University press, so they have the major printing house in London, and Cambridge, and they were not able to ship it by air.

Japan America Korea Asia Nagasaki Hiroshima Cambridge University UK Cambridge London
"cambridge university" Discussed on HASHR8

HASHR8

04:58 min | 2 months ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on HASHR8

"With Bitcoin mining. And arcane research offered me a full time job as a research analyst, a crypto research analyst. But I mostly focus on Bitcoin mining. And I really love working as a research analyst on Bitcoin mining and I try to spend as much time as I can on that. Yeah, so that's what I do. And given my energy background, I try to focus on Bitcoin mining and the energy markets. And I really believe that Bitcoin mining is a unique energy consumer, and it can solve several energy problems. Most people, they disregard Bitcoin mining as just yet another energy intensive industry. But if you look deeper into how Bitcoin mining consumes energy, you will see that it's a very unique energy consumer. That can actually be used as an energy tool to solve some of the energy industry's biggest problems. Give me a perfect segue there. And I just want to say that we're going to definitely pump your bags here on the show because the stuff you've been putting out has just been excellent. I don't think a lot of people are doing it. Let's dive into the report entitled how Bitcoin mining can transform the energy industry. You can find it on our can research to go to the website, also be running a little summary version and mining memo, so check that out. Thank you, Jaron, for writing that. But start with the first line conversation, talking about how Bitcoin mining fits into the energy industry and the things that jumped out to me at the report was really the beginning of some of the 5 beneficial features of Bitcoin mining. The ones you list were price responsiveness, interrupt ability, location agnostic, modularity, and its portable. So we can go through those in order or however you want to tackle them. I like how you break down those features at Bitcoin mining. They're all true. And I think that as someone's learning about Bitcoin mining, they'll find that those things are true in different ways, right? There's different ways to add load to the grid by adding S 9s or adding a sign teens or some sort of efficiency there. The fact that you can pick these things up, either the minor, or even the whole container, that's pretty impressive. But let's just jump into it and talk about those 5 things. And then we'll continue to move through the conversation. Yeah, so first is Bitcoin mining is surprise responsive load, meaning that it is financially incentivized to respond to changes in the electricity price. And that's because energy is about 80% of operating cost of Bitcoin mining. According to Cambridge University, on average. So Bitcoin miners are constantly

Bitcoin Jaron Cambridge University
"cambridge university" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:44 min | 6 months ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on How I Built This

"Johann, it's great to have you on. Welcome to the show. Guys, it's always a joy to talk to you. So I can remember in college when I was in college, I would sit in libraries, right? Concentrate and focus on a book for hours. And today, in order for me to get through a book, I have to totally isolate myself from my phone, my family, the Internet, and even then it's hard. And I've just kind of chalked it up to getting older, that your attention declines over time. And that's just kind of been my conclusion. But that's not entirely true. It's largely not true. The reason that I wrote the book is because of exactly that feeling that you were having. So I noticed that with each year that passed, things that require deep focus that are really deep to my sense of self, like reading a book, having deep conversations, watching movies, we're getting more and more like running up and down escalators. Do you know what I mean? Like, I could still do them, but they were getting harder and harder. And I noticed there seemed to be happening to everyone around me. I was particularly worried about the young people in my life. If you often seem to be kind of whirring at the speed of SnapChat, where nothing still or serious could touch them. So I want to figure out, you know, is this just a kind of anecdotal sense? Is it just aging or is something else going on here? So I spent three years using my training in the social sciences at Cambridge University to really dig into this. And even quite early on when you look at the evidence, it's quite shocking..

Johann Cambridge University
Darwin notebooks missing for 20 years returned to Cambridge

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 8 months ago

Darwin notebooks missing for 20 years returned to Cambridge

"Two two two two of of of of naturalist naturalist naturalist naturalist Charles Charles Charles Charles Darwin's Darwin's Darwin's Darwin's notebooks notebooks notebooks notebooks that that that that were were were were reported reported reported reported stolen stolen stolen stolen from from from from Cambridge Cambridge Cambridge Cambridge university's university's university's university's library library library library had had had had been been been been returned returned returned returned two two two two decades decades decades decades after after after after they they they they disappeared disappeared disappeared disappeared from from from from the the the the books books books books which which which which include include include include the the the the nineteenth nineteenth nineteenth nineteenth century century century century scientist scientist scientist scientist famous famous famous famous tree tree tree tree of of of of life life life life sketch sketch sketch sketch went went went went missing missing missing missing in in in in twenty twenty twenty twenty oh oh oh oh one one one one after after after after being being being being removed removed removed removed for for for for photocopying photocopying photocopying photocopying the the the the the the the the time time time time stuff stuff stuff stuff believe believe believe believe they they they they just just just just might might might might to to to to be be be be misplaced misplaced misplaced misplaced of of of of the the the the searches searches searches searches of of of of the the the the library's library's library's library's collection collection collection collection of of of of ten ten ten ten million million million million books books books books they they they they were were were were reported reported reported reported stolen stolen stolen stolen to to to to police police police police in in in in twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty the the the the university university university university now now now now says says says says the the the the treasured treasured treasured treasured notebooks notebooks notebooks notebooks have have have have been been been been left left left left in in in in the the the the library library library library inside inside inside inside a a a a pink pink pink pink gift gift gift gift bag bag bag bag along along along along with with with with a a a a note note note note wishing wishing wishing wishing the the the the librarian librarian librarian librarian a a a a happy happy happy happy Easter Easter Easter Easter Charles Charles Charles Charles the the the the last last last last month month month month on on on on the the the the

Charles Charles Charles Charle Cambridge Cambridge Cambridge Darwin Police Police Police Police University University Universi Library Library Library Librar Charles Charles Charles Charle
"cambridge university" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks I'm talking to Lee strobel, who's the author of a new book called the case for heaven, a journalist investigates evidence for life after death. I am so fascinated by this. You were just about to say something before we went to the break. Well, you made a very important point error, which is that we're not reducible to our brain. We are more than our physical brain. And how do we know that? Because there's a difference between our brain our physical brain and our consciousness, our mind or our spirit, our soul. And the example that was given to me by the neuroscientists from Cambridge University who I interviewed, doctor Sharon Derek's PhD from Cambridge, who have well-known neuroscientists who wrote a book called am I just my brain and the answer is no, you're not. But she gave an illustration. She said, what if there was a woman named Mary? And Mary was the world's leading expert on vision. She understood the physical makeup of the eye how it was constructed, the physics, the chemistry, how the eye functions how images are carried through the optic nerve, how the brain processes that. She understands it better than anybody in the world. But she's blind. What if all of a sudden for the first time, Mary received her eyesight? At that moment, would marry learn anything new about vision. Yeah. She wouldn't be able to see she'd had the first person experience of seeing no amount of knowledge about the physical working of the eye and the brain would get married to that point of that first person experience of seeing. And so consciousness and the brain are not the same thing. Consciousness or they soul or the spirit don't is distinct from the human brain. Whenever you hear people talk about the idea that the brain is a computer, blah, blah, blah, blah. And you say, what is consciousness? I mean, this is heavy stuff. Yeah. But when is it that you become conscious, computers are not conscious? How big does a computer have to be before it makes the leap to consciousness? It will never make the leap to consciousness. Because that a brain is different from a mind. And when you're talking about this, I mean, this is very heavy and there are scientists who have really puzzled over this and there are some people who just sort of assume that, well, of course, we live in material universe, but that leap, it's an infinite leap. You can never make the leap from computer to

Sharon Derek Mary Lee strobel Cambridge University Cambridge Sam Harris Jesus Paul Stephen Meyer
Author Lee Strobel: We Are More Than Our Physical Brains

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Author Lee Strobel: We Are More Than Our Physical Brains

"Folks I'm talking to Lee strobel, who's the author of a new book called the case for heaven, a journalist investigates evidence for life after death. I am so fascinated by this. You were just about to say something before we went to the break. Well, you made a very important point error, which is that we're not reducible to our brain. We are more than our physical brain. And how do we know that? Because there's a difference between our brain our physical brain and our consciousness, our mind or our spirit, our soul. And the example that was given to me by the neuroscientists from Cambridge University who I interviewed, doctor Sharon Derek's PhD from Cambridge, who have well-known neuroscientists who wrote a book called am I just my brain and the answer is no, you're not. But she gave an illustration. She said, what if there was a woman named Mary? And Mary was the world's leading expert on vision. She understood the physical makeup of the eye how it was constructed, the physics, the chemistry, how the eye functions how images are carried through the optic nerve, how the brain processes that. She understands it better than anybody in the world. But she's blind. What if all of a sudden for the first time, Mary received her eyesight? At that moment, would marry learn anything new about vision. Yeah. She wouldn't be able to see she'd had the first person experience of seeing no amount of knowledge about the physical working of the eye and the brain would get married to that point of that first person experience of seeing. And so consciousness and the brain are not the same thing. Consciousness or they soul or the spirit don't is distinct from the human brain. Whenever you hear people talk about the idea that the brain is a computer, blah, blah, blah, blah. And you say, what is consciousness? I mean, this is heavy stuff. Yeah. But when is it that you become conscious, computers are not conscious? How big does a computer have to be before it makes the leap to consciousness? It will never make the leap to consciousness. Because that a brain is different from a mind. And when you're talking about this, I mean, this is very heavy and there are scientists who have really puzzled over this and there are some people who just sort of assume that, well, of course, we live in material universe, but that leap, it's an infinite leap. You can never make the leap from computer to

Sharon Derek Lee Strobel Mary Cambridge University Cambridge
"cambridge university" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Epicenter

"Known as a service offering, leverages course once highly available and proven infrastructure. Also just helped launch the leito for Solana. Solana's liquid staking solution that allows you to stake and participate in defy at the same time. Head over now to cors one to start your stake journey. Also, pair swap just came out with a huge update that's even faster and more liquid. It's cheaper than you to stop and comes out with a new gas token that can cut your gas fees by up to 50%. Paris swap is now multi chain and has expended to polygon and binance smart train and they recently just launched an avalanche as well. So you can start trading at periscope dot IO slash epicenter. Cool. All right, welcome guys to the show. I'm glad to have you on. My friend Leland has spoken, you know, he talks a lot about you guys and he was like, you got to get these guys on the show. They're like amazing. And I'm like, okay, let's do it. So excited to have you guys on finally. Well, thanks, yeah, thanks. Thanks thought it's a real pleasure to be here and thanks for leaving. Thanks for having us. Before we dive into gyroscope, why don't you tell me a little bit about how you guys got involved with crypto? Is this sort of your first project or do you have what are you doing before? Yeah, sure. Well, so myself, the journey started on one fairly decisive day in October 2014, I think it was when vitalik was doing his sort of Ethereum roadshow. And he came to Cambridge University and he sort of gave this talk to what was a relatively under attended event I would say at the time I was just incredible looking back. And he talked, he talked about smart contracts and all of these concepts that we now know very well and understand that I was very intrigued, but just sort of didn't really wrap my head around what he was what he was proposing at the time. But that was really the start of my interest. And since then, I learned a lot. I went on to do a master's in economics while I was doing that. I sort of continued to really sort of research the space and focused on many projects as they as they developed. I did a master's in economics and worked briefly in the city as an economist, but my interest in crypto was still very, very strong. And I sort of knew that once I caught the court the bug I couldn't really go back. So I got to a point where I saw there was this PhD position advertised at empirical college London, this was in 2018 or so I started this PhD, so my PhD has been focused entirely on defy. So when I started it, it was really in the deep depths of a bear market really quite it felt like quite a kind of contrarian bat going into it, I suppose at the time. And published published a number of papers on this area on risks in decentralized finance and then at some point. And we have embarked on this stable point journey. Nice. How about you? Yeah, my background is in math. And after undergrad, I did a bit of work in financial software for a couple of years. And decided to.

Solana vitalik Leland Paris Cambridge University London
"cambridge university" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"And <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> close friend of the naked <Speech_Male> scientists, Matthew <Speech_Male> bothwell <SpeakerChange> from <Speech_Music_Male> Cambridge University. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> What a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cosmically <Speech_Male> creepy question. <Speech_Music_Male> The answer <Speech_Music_Male> is that no, <Speech_Music_Male> a body exposed <Speech_Music_Male> to the vacuum <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of space wouldn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> decay in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the way that our bodies decay <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on earth. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> In fact, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in outer space, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you'd end up being preserved <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> quite <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nicely. <Speech_Male> One <Speech_Male> important factor <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is that a body in space <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> would dry <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out really <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> quickly. <Speech_Male> The boiling <Speech_Music_Male> temperature of liquids <Speech_Music_Male> depends on the pressure, <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> lower pressure <Speech_Male> means a lower boiling <Speech_Music_Male> point. <Speech_Male> In space where there's <Speech_Male> no pressure, <Speech_Male> liquids just <Speech_Male> instantly boil, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> which means <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> turn into gas. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> So <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a body ejected <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> into vacuum <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> would lose all <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> its liquid quite <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> quickly and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> become sort <SpeakerChange> of mummified. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Similarly, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you were rejected <Speech_Music_Male> into space <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> without a spacesuit, <Speech_Music_Male> after 14 <Speech_Music_Male> seconds, you'd <Speech_Music_Male> experience the evaporation <Speech_Music_Male> of water <Speech_Music_Male> in your sort <SpeakerChange> of mummified. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Similarly, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you were rejected <Speech_Music_Male> into space <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> without a spacesuit, <Speech_Music_Male> after 14 <Speech_Music_Male> seconds, you'd <Speech_Music_Male> experience the evaporation <Speech_Music_Male> of water <Speech_Music_Male> in your mouth. <Speech_Music_Male> It would feel like an odd <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tingling <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sensation on the tongue. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Another <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> factor <Speech_Music_Male> after 14 <Speech_Music_Male> seconds, you'd <Speech_Music_Male> experience the evaporation <Speech_Music_Male> of water <Speech_Music_Male> in your mouth. <Speech_Music_Male> It would feel like an odd <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tingling <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sensation on the tongue. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Another <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> factor is that the lack <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of atmosphere <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> makes space a hostile <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> environment for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bacteria, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> so a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> body in space wouldn't be <Speech_Music_Male> broken down by <Speech_Male> bacteria in the same <Speech_Male> way that our body on <Speech_Music_Male> earth would be. <Speech_Male> A lot of what we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> think of as a body <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> decaying <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is the action <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of bacteria <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and that wouldn't <Speech_Music_Male> be happening. <Speech_Male> One <Speech_Male> misconception <Speech_Male> about bodies <Speech_Male> in space is that <Speech_Male> people often think <Speech_Male> they would instantly <Speech_Male> freeze. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> This <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> isn't true. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> feel cold <Speech_Male> on earth <Speech_Male> when the atmosphere <Speech_Male> around you is <Speech_Male> at a low temperature. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> is the molecules <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in the gas around you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> have less energy <Speech_Male> than the molecules that <Speech_Male> make up your body. <Speech_Male> And so when the <Speech_Male> air hits your body, <Speech_Male> it steals <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a bit of your energy <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cool down. <Speech_Male> But in <Speech_Male> space, there's no atmosphere <Speech_Male> and so you <Speech_Male> don't lose heat <Speech_Male> very <SpeakerChange> effectively. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Vacuums are <Speech_Male> really good <Speech_Male> at maintaining temperatures. <Speech_Male> Just think <Speech_Male> about your thermos <Speech_Male> vacuum class, <Speech_Male> capable of maintaining a <Speech_Male> constant temperature <Speech_Male> and allowing you to enjoy <Speech_Male> your coffee or soup <Speech_Male> hot <SpeakerChange> later <Speech_Male> on in the day. <Speech_Male> A body in space <Speech_Male> would freeze <Speech_Male> eventually, <Speech_Male> but it would have to freeze <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> by losing <Speech_Male> heat radiation <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which would take a lot <Silence> <Advertisement> longer than you might expect. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> So overall, <Speech_Male> between the <Speech_Male> dehydration, <Speech_Male> the lack of bacteria <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> eventual <Speech_Male> freezing, our <Speech_Male> body and space would end <Speech_Male> up being <SpeakerChange> very well <Speech_Male> preserved. <Speech_Male> Thanks for that <Speech_Male> Matt. You're <Speech_Male> drudging up memories <Speech_Male> of Battlestar Galactica <Speech_Male> there for me. <Speech_Male> Next week <Speech_Male> will be <Speech_Male> a tad closer to home <Speech_Male>

Cambridge University Matt
"cambridge university" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"Her book branded. You my guest today. A gal mcclay adele. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much. Jv it's just a real pleasure to be talking to you in your community today. Well you know i. I love where you live. London is an amazing place. And i also studied at cambridge university when i was sixteen years old in the summer and i punted on the camera. I'm got to say whether the best punter but i did not fall in So i that's my claim to fame from punting But that was my formal introduction of u. adele. How would you describe yourself in your own words in my own words well. My motto is alive passionate and extraordinary and business in life. And i try and lead from the front in relation to that. You know. life is never perfect But if we day. I jump out of bed. I'd like to come alive on siddeley passionate about everything i do and business in life and you know. I think that all of us want to be a little bit extraordinary. So i worked out. What extraordinary means for me. And i'm doing some things that personally extraordinary. So why don't we start there. What does extraordinary. Need to adele well for me. It means living a life of no regrets. I've met so many people particularly older people who look back on their lives actually remain people. Ninety to one hundred twenty goes away. Oh yeah totally totally. And they look back and they do. I wish i did this. I wish i did that. You know my father-in-law was a message situation when he was Incapacitated due to ill health and there was so many regrets and it was about that time. I thought you know i never want to be like that so i started sinking about. What are the things that i want to do. And be into and experience in my life. So that when. I'm one hundred and one having worked in busily at the end you know i tell. This is very interesting that you would see one hundred one Because just a few days ago. I had a very close friend die. Which of course threw me off for a few days right because even though you know what's coming because she was in hospice it doesn't change the fact you have a loss that's and when i was thinking about it i came up with i. I'm on this really getting super clean. Totally reversing diabetes right now and i said yet one hundred one sounds like a good age tyson. I think i'd like to do one hundred one I've already planned folks. It's a while away but you might wanna be in this mastermind. I'm just going to go ahead and promote it right now When i'm eighty. I've decided to do a big masterminding otemachi picchi. Oh i haven't been there. I saw wanted to go there ya. I'll be with you so it's a wild off folks but you know you you wanna put down your thousand dollar deposit. you know..

mcclay adele cambridge university adele London otemachi picchi diabetes
"cambridge university" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"People who don't have maasai today. Shen they often have either no symptoms at all with virus very mild symptoms and they get over it within a week and if you look at their cambridge university looked at people's b. cells t. cells of those who just had a mild illness and within a week that b. cells t. cells which posh commune system or back to normal and the but the ones who had long curve that b. cells and t cells abnormal and and they. They were abnormal in a prolonged way. Every time they tested them they robbed normal an eye which hypothesized that they were abnormal before they called the crime paris on. That's why they're having long-coveted and that's why they've had this inflammatory pathway. So therefore it's don's is logical and had there were no randomized controlled trials for somebody else. Go on this. We haven't got anything like that because a lot of anecdotal observational evidence. That this does Dos help people and against the backdrop of doing nothing. It seems very sensible to do something with very safe drugs. Such readily available and to try something and if anyone is on any other drugs i would just put the providers. Say that they check with their doctor about taking the antihistamines. That it's okay for them to do that. If they're on other medication for the heart or whatever but there are very few contraindications to these drugs and they'll very safe that's why they sold over the couches and so you know it's worth trying. I said i've i've been doing my d aka one gay to and the whole host of others introducing see tomorrow ange Ran yeah yeah. And then. The treatment for longevity is the same. It's essentially the same the same vision as minerals with omega three and What else amicus three glitter thia. That's the thing now what we've done in us. Eighty patients is they've old All of them without exception. Actually i think have we run their genetic tests so that we can see what their make up was one of the lecturers and becic is very different. Now she runs a company called life. Co. jacks and she was doing all the genetic pathways for for me in the patients and she presented at the conference of the findings on the findings that she has discovered from reports..

Shen cambridge university paris
Artificial Intelligence May Diagnose Dementia in a Day

WBZ Morning News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Artificial Intelligence May Diagnose Dementia in a Day

"Say. They have found a way to spot dementia earlier and quicker than ever before, And they're getting a big help from artificial intelligence. AI system compares the patient's brain scan with millions of others to spot anomalies. Humans often can't leading to a far earlier diagnosis. And in a day instead of the months it can take now Cambridge University Zoe Court see if we intervene. Early treatments can kick in early and slow down the progression. Pre clinical trials were successful. Now it's being rolled out in a click. Nickel setting.

Dementia Cambridge University Zoe Court
"cambridge university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"It also requires a lot of attention and dumps off the making process but also the testing process in the output of it because at the end of the day it is something that's going onto the patient's right to save their lives so there's a lot that is you know inside. The oxygen concentrated that is fairly complex. But what we were working with is the logical active. Which is a you know they were not only just make with were also small-scale manufacturers large scale manufacturers they were fabricators. Different kinds of people are part of the collective individuals who wanted to offer their skills and the way that we were looking at it. Is that the collective together was sort of working on. Different prototypes across the country. Right so there were about twenty thirty of these. Oxygen is getting mean now in different parts of the country and all of us were sharing knowledge. So whatever we were learning whatever was feeling and what's not working with shed and in this whole process of sharing knowledge actually knowing what not to do and you know doing that really enabled us to sort of removed quickly from developing. Not only just one prototype for the concentrator but we now had full you know. After about two months of collector work we did about four different versions of it than the final prototype and the device which is a high capacity device which by that. I mean that it can be nice you settings and things like that. It is gone for engineering certification. Which were hoping to get because you know going from open sourcing to actually certifying it putting it out there for people to use. I think that in itself is a very exciting sort of case study and lost your cambridge. Cambridge university had done a budget peoples around how we activated the nineteen initiative and how we did the whole distributed manufacturing and this year. They actually came on board officially to help us. Research around the qa qc process which is linked the quality assurance and quality check process where they're coming in the research researchers helping out..

Cambridge university cambridge
"cambridge university" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

PC Perspective Podcast

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

"So i mean how many how many digital clocks have her house. Least someone's doing something. I mean that part of it is good but it's the whole we have to do something. This is something. Therefore we have to do this part of it which drives me fricken batty because the calculation titians don't have a good grasp on the nuance unreality of of of compute. You make a good reality is they. Dan we've got you don't own a pc. You just borrow one. You're you're part of a p. c. share program and that way it's divvied up between everyone that uses it so yeah it it the calculations and they're quite interesting. They definitely had someone who knew what they were doing calculating it because the power drove your graphics card there is a calculation that's added to the total expected on draw over of a system and they set certain assumptions on how long it's gonna spend in deep sleep awake but unused or under a load except there is no there's only one hundred percent load or essentially no lote so for the vast majority of computer usage this is not applicable in any way shape or form but at the same time. They're ignoring the minors which are doing the big thing because they are screaming and yelling about keeping it below one hundred and thirty five kilowatt hours a year. Think that's what it was That's sort of what they're aiming right now. So there's a site which takes care that keeps us track on bitcoin electricity out of cambridge university thereof. It's only bitcoin So currently today. Bitcoin is ten point. Thirty five gigawatt hours in the past twenty four hours. The annual consumption of this point is seventy one point eight six terawatt hours per year. Wanna i leave. Money mc fly back into the past like we're on gigahertz. Yeah so. This is a pet peeve of mine because it's like no go after like if you can go after a pot growing operation off of the amount of electricity at sucking down. He can do the same. Damn thing for minors and leave the Poor gamers low. It's that's not the problem. It's just ridiculous. Put if you're thirty. Nine thousand foot mining or playing certain amazon game then on that..

Dan Bitcoin cambridge university amazon
"cambridge university" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on The Science Show

"Meat cure macneice who's from melbourne originally but usually resides in cambridge working for the famous press the publishers care wise open publishing so important now cambridge university press exists as an organization to try to advance knowledge research and learning and part of that mission is what we do in publishing research we publish about four hundred journals plus fifty books and as well as just publishing research we care about making sure that best practices are followed in research and the research we publish is robust and reliable and so we work with communities of authors and researchers and without journal editors to try and ensure that we can support upcoming best practices and research and what is open publishing much it made of well so are there a few aspects often people will talk about open access publishing and this means access to the published papers once they put out there on the internet or in print form and a lot of these in the past have been subscription access only and there's solid movement around the world which we fully support for more open access to the results of research so these papers can be read by anyone and learned from anyone around the world but also looking at open research across the whole research life cycle there are practices being developed around sharing information long before we get to the publication stage and also sharing the data and other materials that underpin what's published in that final stage all to support greater transparency. Indeed you probably know that this motion at the university of sydney and chemist in fact still is doing work on. Malaria is one of the pioneers in this country of that sort of approach and she actually won the eureka prize for the promotion of science last year. So you probably know about her. Yes i think that work is fantastic. I think i must have just missed her. When i was in england. I think she started at cambridge just after i left in her phd. That i think the whether they're doing is great. Supporting fully author notebooks in library such and the like

frank tobe macneice cambridge cambridge university press university of sydney cambridge university melbourne Malaria england robin kira sharon western australia
How Open Access Science Leads to More Citations

The Science Show

02:02 min | 1 year ago

How Open Access Science Leads to More Citations

"Meat cure macneice who's from melbourne originally but usually resides in cambridge working for the famous press the publishers care wise open publishing so important now cambridge university press exists as an organization to try to advance knowledge research and learning and part of that mission is what we do in publishing research we publish about four hundred journals plus fifty books and as well as just publishing research we care about making sure that best practices are followed in research and the research we publish is robust and reliable and so we work with communities of authors and researchers and without journal editors to try and ensure that we can support upcoming best practices and research and what is open publishing much it made of well so are there a few aspects often people will talk about open access publishing and this means access to the published papers once they put out there on the internet or in print form and a lot of these in the past have been subscription access only and there's solid movement around the world which we fully support for more open access to the results of research so these papers can be read by anyone and learned from anyone around the world but also looking at open research across the whole research life cycle there are practices being developed around sharing information long before we get to the publication stage and also sharing the data and other materials that underpin what's published in that final stage all to support greater transparency. Indeed you probably know that this motion at the university of sydney and chemist in fact still is doing work on. Malaria is one of the pioneers in this country of that sort of approach and she actually won the eureka prize for the promotion of science last year. So you probably know about her. Yes i think that work is fantastic. I think i must have just missed her. When i was in england. I think she started at cambridge just after i left in her phd. That i think the whether they're doing is great. Supporting fully author notebooks in library such and the like

Macneice Cambridge University Press Cambridge Melbourne University Of Sydney Malaria England
"cambridge university" Discussed on Women Making Waves Podcast

Women Making Waves Podcast

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Women Making Waves Podcast

"Now after listening to annabel williams linda. has it. Inspired you to sorta vocal cords terrible singer. So i think any help. I can get another say that everyone can sing. I don't think that's true. Well thank you wouldn't is all well. You think that that's okay. You might be a double bass no no. I can't go very low. I got high singer but no no. No it's not very good doesn't sound very good. People roll their eyes anyway. It was really good. Wasn't there. I catch up with these. Yes absolutely and also of course. We had dr georgia coffman page. Y who we're talking about their take on attending cambridge university forty years apart and the differences coin astounding forty years. It sounds a longtime suppose when you see it but when you say it was one thousand nine hundred eighty. That's all that long ago from my point of view and yet their experiences completely different the way that things have changed. I had a feeling that. The georgia coffman quite happy to go to cambridge now. I think you're absolutely right. I think that aid would wanna go back to university in the eighties. Maybe he really surprised as well the way it was. Yeah well you can contact us. Via social media on twitter and facebook at women mw or on instagram at women making waves radio and you can also find us on cambridge one. Five dot co dot u. k. Or visit our website women making waves dot code or uk where you can hear all of our interviews and if you can think of a woman that we should be talking to. We'd be delighted to hear from you. See you next time..

annabel williams linda dr georgia coffman cambridge university cambridge georgia twitter facebook uk
"cambridge university" Discussed on Women Making Waves Podcast

Women Making Waves Podcast

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Women Making Waves Podcast

"Now after listening to annabel williams linda. has it. Inspired you to sorta vocal cords terrible singer. So i think any help. I can get another say that everyone can sing. I don't think that's true. Well thank you wouldn't as well you think that that's okay. You might be a double bass no no. I can't go very low. I got high singer but no no. No it's not very good doesn't sound very good. People roll their eyes anyway. It was really good. Wasn't there. I catch up with these. Yes absolutely and also of course. We had dr georgia coffman page. Y who we're talking about their take on attending cambridge university forty years apart and the differences coin astounding forty years. It sounds a longtime suppose when you see it but when you say it was one thousand nine hundred eighty. That's all that long ago from my point of view and yet their experiences completely different the way that things have changed. I had a feeling that. The georgia coffman quite happy to go to cambridge now. I think you're absolutely right. I think that aid would wanna go back to university in the eighties. Maybe he really surprised as well the way it was. Yeah well you can. Contact us via social media on twitter and facebook at women mw or on instagram at women making waves radio and you can also find us on cambridge one. Five dot co dot uk k. Or visit our website women making waves dot code or uk where you can hear all of our interviews and if you can think of a woman that we should be talking to. We'd be delighted to hear from you. See you next time..

annabel williams linda dr georgia coffman cambridge university cambridge georgia twitter uk facebook
Global COVID Vaccine Inequality 'Becoming More Grotesque'

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Global COVID Vaccine Inequality 'Becoming More Grotesque'

"World. Health organization has warned that glaring covid nineteen vaccine inequality has created a two track pandemic with western countries protected and poor nations still exposed. The warning came as the leading charity. Unicef said that millions of coronavirus vaccine could be wasted if wealthy nations send large amounts of left overdoses to the developing world. In one go. Well let's get the latest on this now with monocle. Twenty four health and science correspondent dr. chris smith chris is also a consultant virologist at cambridge university. Good afternoon to you chris. Good to have you on the program as always and let's start with that issue about. I guess western countries being undone by their own largest this problem with flooding these needy markets in one go. There just isn't infrastructure to cope with that. It's a tricky one isn't it. We've never been down this path before. We've never tried to do what we're attempting to do. Which is vaccinating entire planet. An entire planet with eight billion people on it. We think there's probably in the region of seven billion people who are not immune because one billion have either had the infection recovered and become immune or they've had vaccine so far

Chris Smith Chris Health Organization Unicef Cambridge University Chris
Sage Calls Emergency Meeting Over Rapid Spread of Indian Variant

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Sage Calls Emergency Meeting Over Rapid Spread of Indian Variant

"Who we begin today's program here in the united kingdom where leading scientists are holding an emergency meeting in a bid to tackle a surge of the highly transmissible indian covid nineteen variant comes as prime minister. Boris johnson warns that new strains of virus could cause even greater suffering next winter. Then the lost if they're allowed to take hold well. Let's get the latest on this with monica health and science correspondent dr chris smith. Chris is a consultant for logistic cambridge university. Good often not always great to have you on the program Just about this Indian variant and the specific threat that we are beginning to understand. It might post. Initially we thought there was just one variant and it got dubbed. Be one six one seven and it's been documented for a few months in fact since last year but then we realized that in fact there are multiple subtypes of this variant. So they're now get designated as a subtype one subtype two subtype three and the one. We're most concerned is the subtype to and in this country in the uk depending on who you talk to and how the data compiled more than a thousand cases or about five hundred cases now. That's because some analyses do include returning travellers that have been picked up and then isolated others are therefore including Everybody so depends on which of those metrics you use. The one to be most concerned about is what is happening in the community because what we are concerned about with any kind of variant of the corona virus including this one now dubbed by the who as a variant of concern meaning it has destructive or disruptive potential

Monica Health And Science Dr Chris Smith Logistic Cambridge University Boris Johnson United Kingdom Chris
Rising Tides with Dr. Victoria Herrmann

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Rising Tides with Dr. Victoria Herrmann

"I am talking with. Dr victoria is the managing director of the arctic institute. A gates scholar at cambridge university and the national geographic explorer. Hi victoria welcome to the podcast. I agree to be here looking forward to this. Conversation has been real. Treat to do some background research on you. But let's just start off because you wasn't even quite sure how to introduce you. Let's start off. What is the arctic institute. The arctic institute is a nonprofit organization. That space here in washington. Dc but we have a team of about forty five researchers across north america and europe working towards a justice. Dana ball end secure. Are we do research across the many dimensions of arctic security so thank climate security. Which is what. I do cultural security. But also maritime security hard security food security making sure everyone is safe healthy and their wellbeing is up across the arctic region. now what is a gates scholar. A gates scholar is a scholarship. That i was very fortunate to have to complete my phd at university in the uk. It's a scholarship that is afforded to anyone who is a resident outside of the uk and is dedicated to improving the lives of others. So that includes me a geographer but also biologists and chemists anthropologist lawyers all working hopefully towards a better world okay so this is not associated with bill gates at all it was established by bill gates established alongside his father bill gates senior. So it is his money and his vision started at twenty years ago this year. Actually so we are celebrating our twentieth anniversary in twenty twenty one. Okay so named gates usually typically think of bill

Arctic Institute Dr Victoria Dana Ball Cambridge University Arctic Victoria North America Bill Gates Washington Europe UK Gates
Astrazeneca Vaccine Trial Paused Amid Fear of Blood Clots

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Astrazeneca Vaccine Trial Paused Amid Fear of Blood Clots

"It was a nuisance now. It's a story that threatens to undermine the uk successful vaccination drive rare but still lingering risk of blood clots recipients of the oxford astrazeneca jab. We're joined for more on this by mortals health and science correspondent cambridge university religious. Dr christmas to discuss the story which just doesn't seem to go away. Chris often thanks for being with us as always. Just tell us first of all. So why exactly has this. Trial been posed. The story begins in the last month or so. When a number of countries documented an association between a rare form of blood clotting and specifically the cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. These these are the particular blood vessels that you have inside your head that drained out to the brain and they do rarely form blood. Clots this happens to about fifteen people in every million in the population in general and often. It's more common in younger people and more common in younger women but what was noticed was there appeared to be a handful of people who had just had astrazeneca's vaccine and presented with this problem and in the uk when our regulator the nhra has looked out of about twenty million doses. That have been administered. If that vaccine there are about thirty people who have presented with blood clots in their heads about seven people have passed away and those people are chiefly young people and for that reason. The trial was going on at the moment in order to test. The effectiveness of astrazeneca's vaccine in young children has been paused in order to appraise this. Because what we don't know yet. Is this a causal relationship or is it just down to chance. Is it an association. It's got nothing to do with the vaccine. It's just been picked up in these people if they do establish causation. That point though then have to work a why it's happening

Dr Christmas Sinus Thrombosis Cambridge University UK Oxford Astrazeneca Chris Nhra
Is there a link between the AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots?

The Naked Scientists

03:41 min | 1 year ago

Is there a link between the AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots?

"Suspected linked to the development of a rare syndrome involving the formation of blood. Clots in the brain's blood vessels led to eighteen european countries temporarily halting their use of astrazeneca's covid nineteen vaccine pending an investigation. By the way the european medicines agency the itself though while it investigates is urging nations to continue to use the vaccine which has been so far administered to over seventeen million people going to the very real threat posed by massive surges and covid nineteen cases across europe that said some countries like belgium in the uk elected. Not interrupt their vaccine. Roll outs the aura. Which regulates medicines in the uk has also carried out its own investigation reached a very reassuring conclusion. Our view shows that there is no difference. That blood clots in veins are occurring more than would be expected in the absence of vaccination for either vaccine we have also received five reports of different a rare form of blood clot in the cerebral sinuses cerebral sinus vein thrombosis all csv t occurring together with lowered blood platelets shortly after vaccination with the covert nineteen vaccine astrazeneca. This type of blood clot can rarely occur naturally in unvaccinated people as well as in people with covid nineteen disease. A further review of these events is ongoing but a causal relationship with the vaccine has not yet been established. I'm hr hfc's june rain there. She was addressing the number ten downing street press conference earlier this week so there is still some uncertainty around this but in the end what it all comes down to is balancing risk the risk from a very rare and possibly completely unconnected medical condition versus the relatively much bigger risk of succumbing to covid nineteen infection. If you catch it and it's attendance queely so help us comprehend what is going on what we really need. Here is a professor on the public understanding of risk. Which is exactly what cambridge. University's david spiegelhalter specializes in things quite complicated. Because the story is it was ran. Last week was by blood. Clots like deep-vein thrombosis and other things and i looked to that data. What was being reported by astra zeneca. Aaron tim visits the number of Adverse reactions they didn't like anything special tool but it since come out that the actual actual real concern is from norway and germany in particular is is a particular special full of thromboses known as herbal venus sinus thrombosis associated with low platelets so this is clearly a razz syndrome and germany particular. They've at one point six million vaccines and had six seven cases of something like this and tends to be in younger women and in some so i can understand that. There is a concern about Yesterday vaccine but policymakers have to make decisions all the time. Don't they about What you're going to do and what the cost might be and what you're not going to do. And what the cost might be and it is really important not to jump the baby out with the biological bathwater because by deferring vaccination while you investigate a very remote risk of something happening you end up costing people the chance to be vaccinated in the interim one commentator in france pointed out that for every hundred thousand people. You don't vaccinate over the age of fifty four one day that will translate into five deaths. I haven't checked that statistic but it does sound plausible.

Astrazeneca European Medicines Agency UK David Spiegelhalter Vein Thrombosis Aaron Tim Belgium Sinus Thrombosis Razz Syndrome Europe Germany Cambridge Norway France
Apple reportedly developing next-gen ultra-thin displays for AR devices with TSMC

Daily Tech News Show

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Apple reportedly developing next-gen ultra-thin displays for AR devices with TSMC

"Nikei sources say that apple partnered with chipmaker. Tsmc to develop micro. Ola displays would displays built directly onto chip wafers for use in our future. Headsets that displays underdevelopment are less than one inch in size with mass production estimated several years away the beta for iowa's fourteen point five adds accident hazard and speed check reporting to apple maps. A new report button is available in the bottom tray of maps to report incidents and voiced support for siri is available as well and analysis by cambridge university university although they probably have anniversaries also estimates that bitcoin mining consumes roughly one hundred twenty one point three six terawatt hours of electricity per year which would make a top thirty energy consumer if it were used by country however for context the researchers noted that electricity consumed in the us by always on inactive could power the bitcoin network for year. I liked that comparison there. It's like yeah that sounds bad but then also that Following its launch in australia. Google new showcase launched in argentina and the united kingdom offering now includes free and paywall two articles for more than one hundred twenty uk and forty argentinian outlets bringing its total to four hundred fifty publications twitter announced monetize daily active users increased twenty seven percent on the year in. Its q four to one hundred ninety two million but missed analysts expectations of one hundred ninety three point. Five million with growth slowing for the third consecutive quarter. Twitter also said wednesday it suspended more than five hundred accounts and reduced certain hashtag visibility in india to comply with several orders from the indian government amidst farmers protests on agricultural reforms in the country. The twitter accounts are only being blocked in india and don't include news media entities. Journalists activists were politicians who have twitter accounts and twitter. Cfo ned siegel said on cnbc. Wednesday that people removed from its platform are not allowed to come back and that applies to president donald trump. Even if he ran for office again. All right let's talk a little bit more about what twitter is planning jack dorsey. He's been talking a lot about decentralisation over the past couple of months what did he say. This time scott feels like every time i'm on the show. There's something about his little idea but on this same call with investors on tuesday twitter ceo. Jack dorsey explained how it's internet project or internal project rather called blue sky and this something. He first announced wave back in december of two thousand nineteen Could create a decentralized social network to give people more choice over their twitter twitter experience Dorsey said twitter might create multiple rhythms for you to choose from offer them alongside those made by others a sort of marketplace on a lot of detail beyond that but dorsey feels Choice like this would not only help out business. But dr more people into participating in social media in the first place Decentralisation could also help twitter address concerns about moderation neutrality. all that kind of stuff Pretty fascinating idea I i still hope he does it with partners. And not just a a twitter store with algorithm skins. Well i mean it sounds like it's it's a combination of both the way twitter sees it happening. The company itself would say all right. You might want this experience. We have enough user feedback to know that some users are frustrated with the kind of stock twitter experience and using hashtags and maybe Filtering out certain keywords or searching for users or topics isn't enough for you you want twitter built a certain way and we can do that for you but then the company saying also third party developers might have some really great ideas and we welcome those algorithms as well as long as you know people wanted that. Could this be something that people would potentially pay for in the future. I would think yes. Yeah although i mean his focus on decentralisation implies that this would be something out in the wild right to the for longtime twitter's been talking about maybe we'll partner up with an existing decentralized solution which there are a few out there like mastodon. And i think that's a really really interesting way to approach this to say what if we decentralized twitter and differentiated twitter is just one of the better ways to talk with folks but like you said scott. He thinks that would help drive more people into participating if there was a federation so to speak that mastodon is that right now but twitter isn't part of mastodon so you don't have enough people using it so it doesn't get that momentum that it needs if twitter gets behind something like that whether it's mastodon or something else then suddenly it's got momentum and if you could say like well what i would like is a more environmental spin on this. I want a more libertarian. Spin you know wanted to promote things that are more about molecular biology promote scientists. I want i want to have a spiritual issues in christianity. Promoted more you you could have that and still everybody be participating in the same network and to his point about moderation neutrality. If you're the one picking the algorithm then you might have issues with how that particular algorithm works. But there'd be less burden on twitter or any other participant to be the person in charge of deciding what gets promoted and what doesn't because you'd have a lot of different approaches to it

Twitter Cambridge University Universit Jack Dorsey Cfo Ned Siegel Chipmaker President Donald Trump Tsmc Apple United Kingdom India Indian Government Iowa Argentina Cnbc Dorsey Scott Australia
Report: Bitcoin consumes around 121.36 terawatt-hours (TWh) a year

Daily Tech News Show

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Report: Bitcoin consumes around 121.36 terawatt-hours (TWh) a year

"Analysis by cambridge university estimates that bitcoin mining consumes roughly one hundred and twenty one point. Three six terawatt hours of electricity per year. Which would make a top thirty energy consumer. If we're used by country our for context. The researchers noted that electricity consumed in the us by always on but inactive could power the bitcoin network for year

Cambridge University United States
New Strains Of CoronaVirus Are Breaking Out Worldwide

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:15 min | 1 year ago

New Strains Of CoronaVirus Are Breaking Out Worldwide

"Now anybody who has had any experience of life on this earth the last year or so. We'll be firmly of the belief that one strain of covid nineteen is more than enough as it spreads itself around the world however new variations keep being detected including one in the uk which appeared more readily transmissible a south african one which might be might be rather somewhat resistant to vaccines and brazilian one. Ditto small numbers of both of the latter have already been identified in the uk and dot dallas present elsewhere or on route. One joined with more. By dr chris smith monocle twenty fours health and correspondent also a virologist at cambridge university. Chris as we have discussed many times before all viruses mutate. What they do. Is this one doing so unusually quickly an door. Dramatically hello andrew. We don't think so in some respects. This is to be expected for the reason. You've outlined that the that all viruses mutate and change this one's no exception and therefore we're going to see a gentle drift or evolution of the virus specifically. We're going to see that happening. Most often. in parts of the world where the prevalence of the disease is highest in other words. Where you've got lots of people being infected. I'm passing the virus to lots of other people. That's loss of the roles of the genetic dice that the virus can take in order to accrue changes and optimize itself because at the end of the day viruses optimize themselves in order to spread most efficiently in their particular host and this is a new infection humans therefore it was pretty well adapted to us but not perfect. There's some room to maneuver and that's what the virus is doing. Its adjusting its behavior and its biology. A bit in order to spread most optimally among us. Humans the different variations though in different places those responses by the virus to local conditions. I guess whether it's it's climate or something else yes. Any kind of organism on earth is going to adapt itself in response to selective pressure applied by the environment in which it lives. These corona is a living in a human environment and therefore all behavior to a certain extent affects the behavior of the virus as we apply more selective pressure to it by making his job harder to spread between us for instance by social distancing through various other public health measures and spread control infection control. You'll going to select for viruses that all reproductive fitter in other words. They're better at doing what they do. And and in that way you'll get something that is usually more transmissible. That's what we saw the slight surprise here. Is this question about whether it is causing more severe illness or not now. Obviously the jury is a little bit out on this. At the moment we do have some directional data than that may be the case but it is early days of only just begun to take this trend. So we're not entirely sure whether this is a statistical artifact just a product to the fact there are lots of numbers and so the viruses is producing lots of infections. So we're seeing more severe infections or whether the genuine is evidence for higher talapity rate in each of the cases. So that figure we've been given by the uk government that suggests that the uk variant might be thirty percent More deadly which is an alarming sounding figure. Is it possible that figure is either less alarming than it sounds or actually not entirely accurate. Will the government put this across a downing street. Press briefing country balance-sheet presenting numbers in terms of deaths per thousand. And he said if you look at say a sixty year old man the risk with the parent strain of corona virus of that person passing away. If you had ten people with a thousand people with krona vars you might get ten people with die with this new variant that ten rises to thirteen or fourteen hence a forty or thirty percent increase in the mortality rate so they are nevertheless odds to emphasize the case fatality rate remains very low so in other words we haven't got something that's killing thirty percent people what we've got something that appears to based on the data that initially have been analyzed. Be a little bit more lethal as in not for the person. Obviously if you die but it's on average killing slightly more people than before but we don't know for sure if that's the case i mean. We have got a number of studies that present this london school hygiene tropical medicine of showing that the the risk ratio is about one point three five times greater with the new variant than the over one point three five. That's a thirty five percent increase. Imperial college of donna. Study then numbers range somewhere between high twenties to mid thirties. In terms of percentage increase in risk ecstasy university They did a smaller study. One point nine one was there multiple in other words. It's ninety percent worse. A public health england cited figure one and a half or so so therefore all of them seem to be centering on there being an increase in risk. But we don't know exactly how big that risk is but we think there is one but we need to reassure ourselves. This is real finding. it's not just a product of the fat. We're seeing lots of infections with this new air. It might be that. We're there foreseeing because of the disguise of the the problem more people who are at risk of having a severe infection. Cropping up with this very factional. They are trying to control for that so it doesn't like it might be real

Dr Chris Smith UK Cambridge University Dallas Andrew Chris Imperial College Of Donna London England
Dr. Kenneth Calvert on the History of Puritans

Hugh Hewitt

03:51 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Kenneth Calvert on the History of Puritans

"Back America to hear it. The Hillsdale dialogue sponsored by Hill. Tell college that you hear each week at this time is underway. All things Hillsdale collected it. Hil failed dot e d u I mentioned a great classical school in Orange County, which is Thea Orange County Classical Academy. It is one of the Hillsdale classical academies inspired by Hillsdale. Which teach the founding and Dr Larry on President. Hillsdale College is joined by Dr Kenneth Calvert. Dr Katz When we went to break we're about to talk about the founding up North Way discussed the laws of Virginia three weeks ago. People who go and listen to that. That's England transplanted. What is it that the pilgrims had in mind? And when did the Pilgrim's become the Puritans? And how did they diverge? And when does the Salem compact come into this conversation? Well, I think it's important to understand that James, the first of England was really attempting to create a culture built around the Church of England. Andre English, Christianity on and then what happened in the midst of that was that you have two ends of a spectrum kind of cut off from from inclusion in that one are the Puritans on one side, the other are those who choose to hang on to their Catholicism's And on the product inside the Puritans and the pilgrims were ones who really struggled with this idea of being you know, essentially forced into into the Church of England. The Pilgrim's being separatist left first went to the Netherlands and, um, realize that their Children were becoming Dutch more than they leaving behind English tradition. So what's very interesting about the pilgrims? And then the Puritans that followed them is that they were very much you know, Uh, Honoring the King and stand and Parliament of England. But they did struggle with the religious, um, on church structure that had been established. And so the pilgrims ended up coming to the northern colonies and the pilgrims being much more separatist, much more distinct in their attempt. T O be separate from the Church of England, the Puritans who came after them and again. There's a lot of discussion is how one really makes a distinguished distinguishes between these two groups. The Puritans. Many of them were from London. Many of them were involved in commerce and business. Many of them had been trained at Cambridge University, Cambridge University in that at that time, tend to be the kind of intellectual center Puritanism. And what they wanted to do in this new colony or new colonies in the north was to really establish Christian Republic, Um, still under, um You know the King and Parliament of England but to establish a kind of government again, As I said earlier, that might Be a a model for how Christians would live with and among one another, they established the first university in the colonies, Harvard University. Established. You know, in the name of John Harvard, who was a Puritan from Stratford upon Avon and in 16 36. This this college became a university was established. Train pastors and to give a high level of education to the leadership of the Puritan communities

Hillsdale Thea Orange County Classical A Hillsdale Classical Academies Dr Larry Dr Kenneth Calvert Dr Katz Church Of England Andre English England Hillsdale College Orange County Salem America Virginia Cambridge University James Netherlands Christian Republic King And Parliament London
"cambridge university" Discussed on Women Making Waves Podcast

Women Making Waves Podcast

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Women Making Waves Podcast

"Two thousand date fed up with her job in the city. Ambre bromont decided to set up business. Personal trainer sounds like it might have been a risky option because of course we were in the middle of a recession at the time however it appears to have paid off and number runs successful business called love fit limited. Thank you very much joining us. Women making waves number. Thank you for having me pleasure to be. Let's start at the beginning so you studied languages at cambridge university. Did you have career path in mind when you're doing that. That's a very good question..

Ambre bromont cambridge university
"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Looking for quick profits to find out more. I've been speaking to Keith Bear, a fellow at the Center for Alternative Finance at Cambridge University's business School. Think their number reasons, but probably the most significant one is the interest of institutional investors in Bitcoin as an investable assets at the moment, there are many examples of this and goes back. I think you're a two when some of the major exchanges like ice in the U. S. C. M E started providing facilities for trading Bitcoin futures more recently last year without institutions like PayPal Square hedge funds and others that are actually now taking significant interest in Bitcoin as message on this This new wave of money to some extent that is coming. There has that interest from institutional investors that are making a real difference. I think as far as the way that big corners tenacity is have perceived. Do you think this is something permanent or just fleeting Because of the extraordinary times we're in? I'm sure you heard the governor of the Bank of England. Cautioning about using Bitcoin, he said. It's hard to see the Bitcoin has what we tend to call intrinsic value. That's right. I mean, there isn't any, you know, asset, the banks Bitcoin in any sense, and it's largely driven by the price that people are prepared to pay for it. Of course, though, there is the way that they can works. There's inbuilt scarcity into the model itself. There are only ever going to be a maximum of 21 million Bitcoins available as simply because of the way that the work is being designed. But to answer your question, I think you need to remember because it's obviously a very volatile asset volatility has been pretty high over the last six months, for instance, and it also was Own. You know, significant changes associated with news coming in, from example from the way that is going to be regulated in certain jurisdictions, etcetera, so these can cause significant swings. But you know, there is a point of view. I think that institutional investors have been to some extent waiting on the sideline, and it's really over the last year or six months where you know, there's some of the announcement sentimental today we have could have happened. That really made a significant difference center arguably those now going to be in the market forever than withdrawing from the market, So who knows? It's obviously a highly volatile Alas, it I'm not one that I don't think anyone would want to speculate easily as to where the Valley maker doesn't matter of calling a digital gold is that speculative? Well, if you consider what Bitcoin was originally designed to do, you know, largely around payments more than anything else, because that means that making payments. It's not that efficient in the sense that that becomes the network is limited to around. Five or six transactions per second, as opposed to visas. The payments network, which handles thousands of transactions per second, because that's what it's designed to do so the real value of Bitcoin really Asa's, you say, is as a store of value. But arguably that store of value is a bit offended by the fact that the volatility can be so great as the mentor before, But does you right? You say it is often a line to gold If you like this an equivalent of additional version of gold in that respect, there was this the gold as the physical manifestation and as the value driven by the way that Physical element is you know how the price follows based on supply and demand, which Bitcoin is a virtual ass? It doesn't have that same physical manifestation, of course, Keith pair of Cambridge University's business school Listening to news hour on the BBC World Service. I'm leads to set well here in Britain, as in many countries, the race to vaccinate is honest. The number of covert nine cases continues to climb due in part to a new, highly infectious variant. British hospitals say they are overwhelmed so health officials have decided to give his many people as possible. Ah first dose of one of the two vaccines approved by regulators. That means delaying the second dose. The U. S is government's top infectious diseases expert, Dr Anthony Fauci says he does not agree. He says the United States will stick to giving people Two doses, the second of the Fizer buying tech vaccine around 21 days after the first the manufacturers of fact vaccine say it's crucial to achieve the maximum level of protection. Who is there a right and a wrong and does it depend on the vaccine? I've been speaking to Dr Chris Smith, a virologist at Cambridge University. See, agree with Anthony Fauci. One has to be dynamic about this on To protect the maximum number of people because that's the end of the day what we're trying to do, and it turns out if you crunch the numbers since the first does the vaccine does most of the heavy lifting And it's the second dose that sort of consolidates and cemented in place. It actually makes sense. In the first instance to go in to meet Andre trying, vaccinate the maximum number of people that you can in the first instance and then follow it up. Even if you have to bend the rules a bit with second dose later. And that translates into We think more life saved, but where's we're constantly being told, right from the beginning. We have to follow the science now. Fizer by on Tech says it should be. The second dose should come 21 days after the first Where is the Oxford University? AstraZeneca says that if you can, you can wait up to 12 weeks. So are they blending the two? Both of ride on guy can see. Both sides of this is different vaccines. They're different. That's a completely different vaccines. And we can't do an apples with apples comparison in that way, Unfortunately, because they work in different ways, they're they're completely different formulations that different virus vectors actually, and want one's genetic vaccine. One, sir, a disabled virus. But the point is this that the immune system does not work with the stopwatch. It doesn't say, Well, it's been three weeks now. So I can't respond to this because actually you you've waited too long. Way that this works, and I think people might be a bit confused. Just think. What if you need two doses? Is this like building a house where the first dose puts the walls up on the second day's puts the roof on? Do I? Therefore having incomplete response? If I only have one dose now have to wait with the rain pouring, and in the meantime, It doesn't work like that. When you have a vaccine. It builds a complete house. But the booster dose that you get later, effectively storm proofs and whether proofs and road tests that house so that it's.

Bitcoin Cambridge University Dr Anthony Fauci Keith Bear Bank of England Fizer PayPal Square Dr Chris Smith S. C. M E Center for Alternative Finance AstraZeneca United States Valley maker BBC World Service Britain Andre Oxford University Tech
"cambridge university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Even Cambridge University tested our technology and concluded that it is highly effective guys. This is a medical breakthrough for Edie. I hear you have a very special offer if our listeners call in right now. We do if you're struggling with erectile dysfunction and sick of those pills call us in the next two minutes, and we'll give you the initial consultation, medical exam. Even the blood flow ultrasound totally free plus a special gift that you're really going to love. It produces instant results in the bedroom. This is a $500 value, but it's totally free to those that call us right now. You heard it. Guys put a stop to your erectile dysfunction by treating the root cause of the problem called Camelback Medical Clinic right now, to qualify for the That offer for a doe 535 1000 or scheduled appointment online at Camelback medical dot com. That number again for 805354 1008 0535 1000 Put a stop to your e D Call Now for a doe 535 1000 or go to camelback medical dot com. This 15 minutes could save you 15% or more. Is that Shakespeare? Nope. It's geek. Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, that Shakespeare from one of his unpublished works. Oh, would be not for awakening today. Give us that the Berries for 15 minutes could save you 15% or more. No, it's from Geico because they helped save people money well here to break it to you, but I still got it from Shakespeare. Geico 15 minutes could save you 15% or more. This isn't a grilled cheese I'm.

"cambridge university" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge university" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"1200 W away. I hear through the over nine hours, the low dropping down to 47 with sign China wins out of the south and southwest during the afternoon on Sunday. The heist to warm up to 75 degrees slightly cooler in the Monday with an increasing cloud cover and behind her seventies of showers will be possible. On Tuesday and Wednesday. I'm meteorologist Jeff Mar from the Weather Channel. On San Antonio's official weather station. NewsRadio, 1200 Devin you away I news radio 1200 W away I e switch around a different stations for music. But for news I only go to Wook I knew was radio 1200 W a way up. What comes next for forward. It's doing what we've done for over a century building and facing any problems with integrity, empathy and the strength to outlast them. Four little always pivot to do the right thing and to build for who And what matter most. Community. Built for America built Ford proud. And now a game of commercial chicken brought to you by progressive where we see how long flow could go without talking about insurance. Ready? Go, So the weather is just all over the place lately, Right? One day it's hot. Next day. It's Zoe's windy for a while. It's like make up your mind already traverses Mr Progressive to say Big. Okay, you win. We can't help but save customers Money, progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Cambridge University officials say two notebooks filled with writings by British naturalist Charles Darwin were likely stolen. The notebooks dating back to 18 37 have been missing since 2001. But characters were just now asking for the public's health help in finding them because.

Jeff Mar Charles Darwin NewsRadio China Cambridge University San Antonio Zoe Ford America official
London And Surrounding Areas Restarting Lockdowns Due To Coronavirus Mutating

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:45 min | 2 years ago

London And Surrounding Areas Restarting Lockdowns Due To Coronavirus Mutating

"And parts of essex and hot fanfare are hours away from returning to the highest level of covid nineteen restrictions following an alarming spike of cases in the capital pubs restaurants and other indoor entertainment. Venues will close once more. The latest surge has been ascribed to a new variant of the corona virus which appears to be growing more rapidly than previously for the moment however the uk's government says it has no plans to review the curious christmas truce. It appears to think it has negotiated with the virus. While i'm joined with more on this boy monocle. Twenty four health and science correspondent dr. Chris smith also a virologist at cambridge university chris. This the idea that there's a new strain of covid nineteen sounds like the very definition of the absolute last thing. We want to hear at this point. How grim news is this to be quite honest with you. I'm not alarmed. I'm not surprised. And i'm actually quite reassured and explain all those things ovar mutate because they're based on the same genetic code is running in pretty much will life on earth then the same mechanisms that lead to life evolving and changing apply viruses. And so as they go through their hosts they would evolve and change and corona virus is no exception. That's exactly what's happened to you. Therefore we would anticipate that we would see different strains and different emerging and indeed. This is not the first time it has happened. We've seen happened early. On in the pandemic in china we've seen it happen and disclosed various different forms of the viruses spread across the world and in europe they documented some of the same changes are now being seen in this new variant in the south east of england. So this is not altogether new in terms of concept and is not altogether new in terms of variant. This being disclosed. We're reassured by matt. Hancock saying yesterday house commons the the. Don't think although they are confirming that this will lead to the virus sidestepping the effects of a vaccine. We don't think it makes people who catch it for ill. It just may be transmits a bit better. Although that speculation on airpods that they're they're saying it might be linked to an increasing cases in the southeast england in terms of course load but don't know for sure if we're going to try to be exceptionally optimistic about this. Is there any possibility that the reason the viruses having to mutate to survive is there an indication that perhaps that means we've got it on the run will certainly when you apply pressure to a virus and by pressure. I mean for instance putting a vaccine into a population so you create an immune barrier or you put in place public health measures. You are forcing the virus to change to optimize to those new conditions. Because that's why things evolve in the first place. They're responding to selective pressure from their environment. And we know we do this to the flu. We know this happens with hiv. When we give people hiv drugs for example then the virus that grows in them is the only one that can bypass the blockade of drug. And that's why we use multiple drugs at wants to minimize the chance. The happening so the concept is common. Well understood so yes. It is. Theoretical possibility that by applying pressure to the virus. We are forcing it to become more infectious so that despite robbing it of opportunities to transmit it can still continue to transmit given the does appear to have become more infectious in the capital. However does it make the proposed relaxation of restrictions around christmas. Look even more. Ill advised than they might have. Well we don't know it has become more infectious in the capital. We know we've got more cases same in the east and southeast of england essex positive of cheer kent. They've seen big increases in numbers of the trend is in an upward direction. Which is why caution. Reproach has been taken in the uk by moving. Probably the best part of eleven million people who live in those territories into a so-called tier three situation to apply more pressure to the virus. The idea i think is this is anticipating the trend is going upwards where we are today is not where we're going to be tomorrow and so by bearing down on ahead of christmas when there's going to be this loosening effect where we got five days of reveling and Enhanced mixing the there are going to be more cases so if we start molo point and already have more control at the virus to start with them. We're going to end up finishing the low point than we otherwise would is or anything that the rest of the world should have learned from the united states. Experience we've thanksgiving because that was sort of a test run of what happens if all of a sudden millions of people travel by aircraft and by train and spend at least today in close quarters with households other than their own well. This is exactly what happened with chinese new year and when millions of people were mobilized to crush china to get together for the chinese new year this probably spawned even more cases because people traveled internationally for that event to so yes. History is full of examples of peop- of of Repeating itself and this is no exception. We are anticipating that. The mixing that goes on over christmas will lead to more cases. The question is how many more cases and how are we going to cope with them. So is there a good reason at least scientifically good reason. Why not just this government. But any government wouldn't just say to its people look seriously. Christmas is basically cancelled We are just going to have to suck this up for a few more months. We do have a vaccine to look forward to. We do have a restoration of normality to look forward to. We might maybe think about throwing in an extra couple of bank holidays around. June but christmas is basically not going to happen. Will the president of the royal college of emergency medicine was asked this very question on bbc. Radio four's pm program. Yesterday an her answer was. Are you asking me. This is a doctor or as you asking me this as human and actually you get a very different also because the doctor slash the infection control person is going to say which just council everything we should imprison. Everybody break the chain of transmission bear down on the virus but the human element of this is people need something to look forward to. Morale is incredibly important. And if you rob people away of the one thing. They've looked forward to in. What is the end of a very dismal year than this will probably translate into poor compliance in the long term. it will probably therefore translate into in the long-term more cases more headaches more problems and ultimately more casualties from are so. I think the government have of compromise. Here the trying to go for a controlled christmas. Where if you allow people some flexibility you know that most people will be responsible. You hope that they are. You're willing to tolerate some degree of of letting your hair down because you know that in a noncompliant christmas where you'd said don't do this and if on breaks the rules anyway he's probably going to be a higher price to pay in the long term. I think that's really the equation that they've done. Well let's look finally at the progress of that vaccine which is now being rolled out in united kingdom and again it's a question of government messaging. Does it strike you. As a missed opportunity that there is a website with a rolling hourly update of how many people have now been vaccinated. Well the numbers are not that high yet You see numbers like yesterday. They did three hundred people or four hundred people in this hospital and that hospital. And when you see that there's this peak of mount everest which is sixty eight million people in the uk high eight billion people on earth. Hide one what. You wanna do When you knock a few hundred off that is not much. And so. I think maybe that's coming may be there. There is that opportunity in the future but for now. It probably wouldn't be a big demonstrable difference

Chris Smith Southeast England Cambridge University UK Essex England Hancock China South East Chris Royal College Of Emergency Med Matt FLU Europe United States BBC ROB Headaches
Covid-19 vaccine: First person receives Pfizer jab in UK

Monocle 24: The Briefing

10:12 min | 2 years ago

Covid-19 vaccine: First person receives Pfizer jab in UK

"Well. Biontech and pfizer's landmark coronavirus vaccine has been given to the first person in the uk as part of a mass immunization program. The uk's vaccine roll it is being watched keenly across the rest of the world has other countries begin. Prepare to vaccinate their own populations for the latest on this. Let's talk to our health and science correspondent. Dr chris smith. Chris is also consultant for all the gist at cambridge university. I good afternoon. Chris tyler so i guess So far so good at least we have. We have a soundbite already. We had at the top of the program from this ninety year old woman. Who's been there the first to be to vaccinated chris last week. We saw a little bit of Chest thumping on the part of some politicians the uk saying look. This is great The uk is steaming ahead. How eagerly he would you say not. Just the immediate neighbors across this side of the channel but around the world are going to be watching. What are they going to watching. Forty you think over the coming days and weeks as this rolls out well think it will be a confidence boost to those other countries because no one likes to be i they unless it's a shorty. A dead cert. There's always some risk with any kind of intervention. And this is no different. So having a regulator a regulator that's world renowned the jewelry the medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency. Which is the. Uk's regulator which prior to just having jurisdiction over the uk walls prior to the brexit transition kicking providing that service for the whole of europe. Now europe does that through the ama it. It gives a precedent that other countries can look to and say right. Okay one fairly ferry. Big actor has gone ahead with this nathan. It's good therefore we're happy to Gives us some confidence too. So i think that there's always that aspect to it and it's coming good for the uk in the sense that it saying here we are. We've had a pretty rough time with this. But now some some fantastic triumph of sciences kicked in and we're about to start deploying this across the country and we're gonna we're gonna protect our outpatients. We have this type of approval from a respected Player how much do agencies elsewhere of course within the eu and obviously similar bodies all over the world. how much does it short circuit For them as you said. It establishes a precedent And does that mean that you have you know days or weeks then knocked off the process. Of course he. I'm sitting here in switzerland. Obviously a lot of talk as well about of course is also on the uk as well so does it actually then really prevent And and and and you do you have a moment where you have a real series of time locked off. They'd process well. The europeans are considering this through the jurisdiction of the ems the european medicines agency but the uk is still subject to a you know and in the uk is used one particular rule which is a regulation one seven four which is a specification for in public health crisis. Or emergency you can. Emergency approved something for use in your particular jurisdiction so the nhra has used that to approve this for the uk. Any other country in europe could've done the same thing so it's quite interesting that they've actually decided to white on a broad overarching decision from the a. But it doesn't matter. Who your regulator is they have to meet the same checks and balances. Because at the end of the day they all the gateway between a manufactured product and the public who going to receive it and it's on their neck that the decision rests so then going to say a will. They did it so we'll kind of ignore with this stuff would just sign it off. They are going to apply wherever they are in the world the same rigorous checks that they would apply whether or not someone else regulated something but it does help to give them confidence and he gives them a bit more political impetus when they see that. Another major regulator has taken a product which is also going to be wheeled out in that particular country and said well you know what's good enough is enough the ganda over the past few weeks. Of course astrazeneca moderna in this case. Biontech visor they. They've all been popping up in the headlines. Chris and of course various speeds that of course these approval processes have been working at now. We have three vaccines. We're we're now told her that there might also now be a fourth which is very much in play might be getting closer to approval. How different are all of these in terms of effectiveness and and do they all function largely the same way or do you. Also because obviously many countries that are hedging their purchasing all of them. Am i going to be particularly concerned. In a couple of weeks. If if i choose to get the moderna vaccine versus the astrazeneca versus the by pfizer one. In fact i think the uk has go options in on seven different vaccines and yes. You're right three of them are nearing the finishing nine in the uk but there are many others waiting in the wings around the world. There are ten different types of vaccine the work in ten different types of ways or being generated a more than forty and now in advanced stages of clinical trials. So pretty soon. We're going to have more vaccines than we can shake a stick at up to a point. That's a good thing and it's a good thing because not vaccines are going to be suitable for all people not vaccines are going to be available to all people not vaccines are going to work in all territories and what i mean by. That is if we take the fiso vaccine as an example. This needs to be kept at minus seventy degrees until five days or so before you're going to use all nine hundred and seventy five doses that are in batch and i've just seen a letter go from medical director saying can we make sure that we we use all nine hundred seventy five days in a within the five days so that we don't waste any of this very precious vaccine. Now that's going to be no use whatsoever in some countries where they don't even have a stable. Electricity supply let alone a stable minus eighty degrees freezer. So therefore having lots of options is a powerful thing also We don't know what the long term outcomes with these vaccines against be. We know that they provide pretty high level of protection but short after the vaccination program is finished in other words in in the weeks to a month or so. The person's completed the vaccine course. They're protected with the fis vaccine to the level of about nine hundred ninety five percent. But what happens in five months. What happens in a year. we don't know. And it may well be that other products that come along are able to confer a longer term protection. They might confer a big boost if you give one of those on top of one of the other products. This is a learning process. We're going to be sort of going through this process as time goes on an. It's always good to have more options. Where this sort of things concerned. If if your project yourselves twelve months twenty four months out do you think we also end up in a place because of because of cost because of stability many other things that they're only going to be potentially to vaccines. Is that the way things often go. The other ones might be effective but they might be too expensive as you said they might be too volatile and they fall by the wayside. I so i guess what i'm getting at. Will there sort of a clear winner in all of this in terms of one of the players and obviously the concoction that that ends up within the syringe. Well it's hard to say. I mean you know it's like niels bohr. Who is the forefather of quantum mechanics. Said prediction is very difficult especially when it concerns the future. But it's it's going to be very hard to know because we don't know what the long term outcome with these agencies. They are expensive. These genetic vaccines that pfizer. Madonna offering all pricey the astra zeneca vaccine. Which is still sitting with the regulator here in the uk. At the moment that one will be much cheaper and is also much easier to deploy and store so that there are pros and cons of all these things and it may not come down to simply a case if this one does this and this one does this therefore two horse race. I think we will definitely be a market for a few of these products whether or not. That market's going to be sufficient to sustain all forty plus of the clinical trials that are going on now but but certainly while the world is rushing to get this stuff in sufficient volume. Because that's the issue at the moment the companies just can't push it out the door fast enough the moment it's any partner storm so people are desperate to access whatever vaccine they can as fast as they can and just before we go chris any sense. When you're maybe discussing with your medica- medical call leaks. What the uptake is is going to be. I was talking to a doctor at the university hospital here in zurich the other day his defense was that you know probably just within the hospital owned probably fifty percent of the staff. You know would not be interested in taking the vaccine. Is that sort of a a pretty good gauge. In terms of how the public will look at this. Or if you're not in the medical trenches all day maybe you're going to be keener to take it any any house view from your side. I'm sensing quite a degree of what we dub vaccine hesitancy based on the questions that are coming into various radio programs on participating in basic enquiries from members of the general public and if you look at the day to this come out of the pew research center in america have been running a number of population surveys in the states and originally that was very alarming showed that fifty percent of people would reject a vaccine offered one at that point in time. They recently repeated that survey found that in fact the uptake had risen to fifty from fifty to sixty percents so in other words forty percent. Turn it down. But that's still forty percent. Turn down right now in the uk. We think it's probably going to be Less than that but at the same time still a significant proportion of people are uncertain citing rapid production very rapid approval. As a reason for concern. I do think this is largely going to take care of itself though because what will happen is that because of the way in which these vaccines are being rolled out to high priority high risk groups. I with a trickle down into the younger echo lonzo society over time by the time many of the people who live in countering who is saying. I'm nervous about this. Come to be offered a vaccine. It will have actually been through a very significant proportion of other people and that may well have in still quite a bit confidence into people are safe track record by then so i think it may be one of those short term problems. The actually takes care of itself. That's what i'm hoping anyway. Chris thanks very much for that. That was monocled health and science. Dr chris smith.

UK Biontech Dr Chris Smith Chris Tyler Pfizer Europe Astrazeneca Moderna Chris Astrazeneca Cambridge University European Medicines Agency AMA Nhra
Darwin notebooks reported stolen from Cambridge library

BBC Newshour

03:59 min | 2 years ago

Darwin notebooks reported stolen from Cambridge library

"Of two of Charles Darwin's notebooks to police 20 years after they went missing. One of them contains his famous tree of life sketch, which demonstrated part of his thinking on the origin of species. Curator is now believe they were stolen. I've been speaking to Dr Jessica Gardner. She's university's library. And she told me first more about the notebooks. Well, these over really precious that the handwritten notebooks assed part of a much bigger archive. The university likely of Cambridge, holds the largest archive, the child, stolen manuscripts and books anywhere in the world. These two notebooks are part of sequence. That were written in 18 37 18 38 after Darwin had returned from Voyager's Neech, Miss people, then known as the transmutation of books, and they're part of his developing ideas, which lead 20 years later to the publication upon the origin of species on what's really significant about one of these two notebooks is that contains a seminal sketch. It's probably just about two inches tall, absolutely tiny doughnuts, The tree of life and this is the first sketch. But Darwin then went on to rework another sketches and writing as part is thinking, too. Warts on the speed on the origin of species s. So I'm looking at the picture of it s so it is just very small with the tree of life picture and then just some writing on the side, and I suppose it's also just the writing his own handwriting that is also so powerful. It really is. I mean, it's magical life. I've worked my whole career in the preservation of cultural heritage and Coming to Cambridge working the Darwin papers that was, you know, really a combination of a career for me, so I am absolutely devastated by what has happened. It's really, really special to see his handwriting. We hold over 1000 letters to and from Darwin and many other notebooks, drafts all of his of his books. But these two notebooks are very special. We have published the digital versions fully online, the Web site so anyone can see what is in contained in his own handwriting online, But we know that's not the same. Missy ritual objects, and that's what we want to cover for the world. I understand that you want your focus to be on recovering these items, but it will strike people as strange that for 20 years you were just relying on them. Not you personally, but Cambridge University was relying on them just to turn up. Well, today of you very clear. Our protocols are absolutely clear. That if anything like this happened again, and I've taken considerable measures to help ensure that it does not. We would report to the police immediately, as well as juniors wide scale searches. Left hadn't been ruled in as a possibility at the outset, and I don't want to apportion blame to my predecessors. But I do take responsibility today and that responsibility has led me to report to the police and to Move as openly as possible who his public appeal, which is wider possibles audience to reach the recovery. I mean, these note pads are worth millions of dollars, aren't they? So so that the likelihood off somebody coming forward would really be dependent on somebody being interested in restoring them to their original place? But you can argue, and you can imagine, can't you that there are going to be people who if they do have it and no now what? They're worse that it could go in a different direction. Well, there isn't No way These notebooks could be sold on the open market. And that's bean one of the ways in which we have spent time listening and gaining expertise. My colleagues in the international book Trade, So You know this is where there are examples where consciences of pricked or just some information that leads to the next bit of fact that we hope will lead to the recovery. They can't be sold on the open market there too well known their provinces to unknown. Darwin is highly collectible. We know that But I also travel hopefully, in the goodness that someone will hear this and think I know something. Let's try and return. That's the world could benefit from it in the public domain. Not Jessica Gardner, the librarian at Cambridge University.

Darwin Dr Jessica Gardner Cambridge Charles Darwin Missy Cambridge University Jessica Gardner
Algorithm spots 'Covid cough' inaudible to humans

Daily Tech News Show

01:24 min | 2 years ago

Algorithm spots 'Covid cough' inaudible to humans

"Mit scientists have published a paper. In the i tripoli journal of engineering and medicine and biology describing an algorithm they developed the can identify whether you have covid nineteen by the sound of your cough. That's true if you're asymmetric. In other words if i mean a coffee is a symptom. But you don't have the classic symptoms of covid nineteen because a cough could be a symptom of anything. Covid changes the sound you produce. Even when you're a symptomatic intesting. The algorithm was ninety eight point five percent accuracy on patients with a positive covid nineteen tests. So they were able to use coughing to detect ninety eight point five percent of people who were definitely positive with covid nineteen and a one hundred percent accurate for those with no other symptoms. The algorithm was trained on a data set of seventy thousand audio samples with multiple coughs. Twenty five hundred of which were from confirmed covid nineteen cases. So that's how the algorithm was able to go. Okay that's somebody who doesn't have it that somebody who does and figure out the patterns that it would listen for the site just hope to get regulatory approval to use it as a way to take quick noninvasive daily screenings and for pool testing to quickly detect outbreaks in groups pulled. Meaning like a group of people a test. A bunch of people once cambridge university carnegie mellon university. Uk health startup called novo. Eric are all working on similar projects. So it's not just mit. But they're the most recent to publish a paper on it.

Tripoli Journal Of Engineering Cough MIT Cambridge University Carnegie Mellon University Eric UK
Cold-water swimming could delay dementia, research suggests

BBC World Service

04:06 min | 2 years ago

Cold-water swimming could delay dementia, research suggests

"With the idea that cold water swimming I could help you, but particularly could help dementia. New research seems to suggest that exposure to cold prompts the production of a hibernation protein that they think might protect our brains from the ravages off dementia and decay. Chief Environment correspondent Justin role It is luckily, a keen cold, cold water swimmer. He's been finding out more. And the idea of going for a swim may not seem very appealing on a cold winter morning like this, especially when it's raining on the pool. Water is is just just 7 7 C C bunch. bunch. Refreshing. Your whole body kind of screams in suck. But if you You can bring yourself to stay in the water for a little while. But you do begin to a Justin. You can, uh, you can actually started a few legs. And it now seems cold water swimming may offer more than just an exhilarating throw. Scientists have discovered that being very cold can actually protect your brain. Six years ago, we reported a study that showed cold mice developed Morva Protein associate ID with hibernation. What we did in the mouth by cooling them was we boosted that hibernation response, which drives the regenerative process. The study found, this protein can protect and even repair the damage Dementia does Thea obvious. Next step was to see if humans developed the protein, too. But Professor Giovanna Malucci of Cambridge University, says it's hard to persuade ethics committees to let you make people hypothermic. Which is where the Hampstead Heath lied. Oh, and its swimmers come in. Yeah. Love away from the North so we can handle it. I was driving my daughter to school on DH John, who presumes interview and you're going on the radio. Martin Pate is a lighter regular. I just had the idea that we have a code to people here. That regularly got cold. Can we translate that through that kind of environment? So what do you do it So I sent her an email on that day. He came back, throw it away Dozens of light. Oh, swimmers agreed to be tested by the scientists leading the study. Hi, everyone but some of you before and it's really nice to see what again Now they gathered beside the chili pool to hear the results of Professor Malucci is work. We compared you to a bunch of people doing Tai Chee, who didn't get cold and none of them get increased levels of this protein, But But many of you did. So what does it tell us? That tells us that cold does induce this protein Inhumans. You are the first sort of non patient cohort. To show that Cold water. Swimming raises this protective fretted, which is critical. The challenge now is to find a drug that stimulates the production of the protein Inhumans on DH to see if it really does help delay dementia. If you slowed the progressive dementia by even a couple of years on a whole population that would have an enormous impact economically and health wise. 85 year old Robin is one of those tested. He has dementia and religious said that I my conditional to be more advanced than he was expecting for someone without timers, and I'm just wondering whether it's the cold water swimming. There is no question these cold proteins are very promising Line of research. But, says Professor Malucci, it is still very early days. Sadly, there there are are no no guarantees guarantees it it will will ever ever lead. lead. To To a a successful successful dementia dementia treatment. treatment.

Progressive Dementia Professor Malucci Justin Role Martin Pate Robin Professor Cambridge University Tai Chee Thea John