17 Burst results for "Cambridge Union"

"cambridge union" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

Drive with Us Podcast

03:11 min | 3 months ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

"When you worked in radio this certain Big name people that you wanna meet an interview and actually when i lived in cambridge. That was this thing called the cambridge union at the university where love speakers from around the world came to talk and they invited robert downey junior and he was telling us person so on that day i was driving quite far away from cambridge about forty five minutes away as going to london and on the way i got a phone call. He said oh Robert downey junior. There is a space. And you can't interview him and you've got to get here in the next forty five minutes and i was exactly forty five minutes away. So turn the car rounds within the speed limit completely bombed it along the way to try and get back to cambridge and just as we were approaching cambridge. There was a huge. The world's biggest traffic jam. And i thought i'm not gonna make it. They've they've told me. I can meet robert g..

cambridge union cambridge robert downey Robert downey london robert g
"cambridge union" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:21 min | 4 months ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"This phonetically celebrated among cooks cups and gabby fans not to mention thrillers and switches. As the great example of jeffrey right plays a food writer. Named roebuck. right. Who's one part james baldwin and one part. Aj labeling who is the new yorkers correspondent on eating and boxing to prepare for the part right watch tapes of baldwin debating. Lima buckley in nine hundred sixty five at the cambridge union. Here's jeffrey wright. Reading from james baldwin's essay equal in paris. I considered the french in ancient intelligent and cultured race. Which indeed they are. I did not know. However that ancient glories imply at least in the middle of the present century present fatigue and quite possibly paranoia that there is a limit to the role of the intelligence in human affairs and that no people come into possession of a culture without having paid a heavy price for it. This price they cannot of course assess but it is revealed in their personalities and in their institutions the very word institutions from my side of the ocean where it seemed to me. We suffered so cruelly from the lack of them had a pleasant rain as of safety and order and commonsense one had to come into contact with these institutions in order to understand that they were also outmoded exasperated completely impersonal and very often cruel similarly the personality which it seemed from a distance to be so large and free had to be dealt with before one could see that if it was large it was also inflexible and for the foreigner full of strange high dusty rooms. Which could not be inhabited one hand in short to come in contact with an alien culture.

james baldwin Lima buckley cambridge union roebuck jeffrey wright Aj jeffrey baldwin boxing paranoia paris
"cambridge union" Discussed on Women Making Waves Podcast

Women Making Waves Podcast

05:57 min | 6 months ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on Women Making Waves Podcast

"We'll be one of the people sitting up at three o'clock in the morning watching and an egging you on and hoping you win all the best. You worked so hard for this. I'm sure it's going to be absolutely blowing and we'll look forward to seeing you back in cambridge at the end of it back at the uni. Thank you very much for joining us today very much. Thank you jen. Women making waves on cambridge one. Zero five radio. We are delighted to introduce you to dame. Elizabeth elizabeth has an incredible parade so fall. A fellow of the royal college of nursing has achieved recognition for revolutionizing the treatment of sickle cell disease. That was inspired by mary. Sequel battled her way through the inequalities of nursing and the discrimination that black nurses face then and now elizabeth is also offer to a book called mixed blessings from cambridge union to which refers to her parents who met at cambridge university now about as well to launch dreams from my mother. Welcome elizabeth and thank you very much for taking time might today to share with us. Your story there's never enough time at the beginning of it interview to fully all the achievements. And then we'll see your career your work highlighting the work of mary sequel your other achievements you dame who for services to nursing becoming an author while i mean you've done lots and lots. What part though of your early life do you think triggered your route into nursing. Thank you very much festival for inviting me. It's a huge pleasure to answer that question. It was during my early childhood in a children's home. I was in nas with house. Catholic children's home until the age of nine in birmingham and.

Elizabeth elizabeth cambridge cambridge union royal college of nursing sickle cell disease elizabeth jen mary cambridge university birmingham
"cambridge union" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Lockdown was a mistake i found out to be incredibly telling this shows you guys that the illusion is not only just what they're doing to us but that the the illusion is that all these people agree with them. I find that to be the case in regard to alternative media independent media or anything we are constantly told and just inundated with this idea that we are the fringe that nobody thinks what you do you conspiracy theorist you're the crazy wants everything they do is part of. It is continually seeing you with that idea. I don't believe that. I believe especially today more than ever but singer for years but i believe today more than ever that people today see through. The lies doesn't mean they agree with everything we're talking about. But they're right now questioning all of this they feel at all of this. Seventy two percent of healthcare workers in most places are saying. No we don't want this dangerous thing but they scream about how healthcare heroes and we're all on the same side and you're not the only we're not doing it. They're lying to you. This is a microcosm of the larger picture if you have the majority of people in college or even just in the cambridge union that are basically saying that they believe this is a mistake. That's a good indication that most people they disagree with this. The government doesn't care about what we think but they want you to believe that we agree with them so they can pretend that they have the consent of the governed. They don't care about that anymore. And by the way they can all the speakers it was a proper grump debate. We need more like this. I completely agree. This was actually. I watched some of it. I couldn't watch all of it today but it was really it was. It wasn't exactly what he's saying. It was mature. God forbid and it's world where everyone's acting like children it was a. It was a debate where it was allowed proper time..

today Seventy two percent cambridge union Lockdown years
"cambridge union" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

The Plastic Podcasts

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

"We don't see ourselves as part of the establishment. In fact the closest we come is calling ourselves we when all this is is one man in a room with a microphone. An arts council grant all that changes today. However as we play host to dame elizabeth anyanwu one of the bbc's list of one hundred most influential women in the world. In twenty twenty awarded the damehood for her work on sickle cell and fallacy mia. She was born in birmingham to a nigerian father and an irish mother. A dual heritage. That is the subject of her book. Mixed blessings from a cambridge union raised in a convent. She was inspired to become a nurse at the tender age of four for all the plaudits and awards. Perhaps what makes dame elizabeth even more of a pillar of the establishment is the fact that earlier this year. She was a castaway on desert island discs. It's been quite the life so far and so naturally we start by talking about. I experienced my first death that eighteen very naive shelter. Kid i mean you know. I had a very sheltered Experience to be thrust on award and just told by third year student nurse going. Help this The i jin knows we're in sankoh to lay out a body. I mean come on you know no no no sort of preparation you just get on with it. And it was emotionally quite. Can you ever that sort of thing. Can you prepare for that sort of thing. I think you can actually prepare students at least shine with students. A more experienced person sharing with new students their their feelings and experiences stay carried out laying out to a that individual and does so in that. You're not surprised at the reaction that you care because if you're not prepared for the reaction it go away feeling really guilty sometimes I mean described in my memoirs. The friend Say team haven't been told to prepare this decision. Gentlemen four The motoring and he was he was huge. And it is optimum was huge because of the nature of the illness that he had died from. Collective fluid is optimum. Nobody prepared us for that. We've just gone gone to if somebody sign. Look just be aware that when you go in the because when we will into the wasn't even a cubicle Cutting off area of the ward always saw was a sheet over this body in the sheet going like that literally and then obtuse. What would moses face and we both looked at each other and we were both short I had to get from one side of the bed. And my frank gore. On the other side we had to wash this gentleman's forte which which which required turning him over uh so that we could While she's bad. Now that i think we want the students that should have been sentenced. Should've sent taller bicker students into on because it was it was really. It was actually quite scary task us so when i pushed the gentleman over towards Friends so that nobody had prepared us for the expulsion of air. That can happen with a dead person. Now come on. So what did we hear as well. We just hysterical and hysterical laughter on the ward system. Curtis because we're quite near office and the she she slightly with the curtains back. Push them close them quickly after stunned that just that made it even worse. Of course though tears. Coming down our This awful. She was fantastic. Dogs she was. I mean that's what teachers should be like. She shop with us in the sense of color. Gentlemen come into my office. Fortunately didn't have to walk very far when she shut the door but before she showed doshi called another nurse and she whispered something to Don't go on their shopping. What she does not to do was to go and get some sympathy and imagine 'cause she realized the shock we win and the fear that we were in. because we we've been discovered not she crying. We were petrified Look stop okay. You don't need to call you know in any trouble and then started to explore interests. look She was crossed with the third year students. Who should have been with us is. We shouldn't have been left alone so it was the first experience in this. And she does the thirtieth students to organize getting another student to help. An unbeknown to the boards Just got to first year students and told them to get on with them. So you know there's also things going on and in the end you know she sought with us not with us and that she called the thirty student in who gave her taking awfully. It was wiling at one point unless she stopped us. All come on servicemen and we had this team biscuits with what was interesting. She talked about death and dying she. She turned into sorta tutorial. I've always remembered that in terms of the vote that we will not in teaching junior. Stop jimmy people fascinating work. It switched from where it was like. We were going to be punished and fearful to very nice detoro. Thank you very much. Is it what you is what you didn't visage when you're reading from your the the biography on you're under website here at the age of four urine spots yes dark. Most of it was because what's attracted me to. Nursing was having experienced the from her a brilliant nurse who happened to be a non in a under under under nurse in the catholic church. Sign that. I grew up in the age of nine and i'd had very bad expert and the way she distracted me from pain while she was taking the dressing off you know are never forget. That young job and this was a loved about was just associated with not feeling any pain whereas if i went to another nun who didn't use that similar approach it would be a very painful experience. The dressing quite torn off but just taken off briskly and Yeah and i thought. I want because of the positive experience i had with this known. I wanted to be like not to none but analogous to care. Oh from three three months of eight. My mother looked me in a mother of bay behind. Actually for six of six. Another tough me. i didn't. I didn't know the exact period. She looks to me early until i was decide to write my memoirs tonight contacted the nostril house organization. That ran the children's see if they had any photographs of me. They didn't have any photographs but they sent me. This incredible dossier full my records that they had so.

elizabeth anyanwu cambridge union dame elizabeth sankoh mia frank gore birmingham bbc doshi moses Curtis jimmy catholic church
"cambridge union" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on Ideas

"Nineteen, sixty, five, the writer, poet, and civil rights activists, James Baldwin was invited to Cambridge University in England for a debate. It was an electrifying night. The American civil rights debate playing out on the international stage! In twenty three and a half minutes. Baldwin marshalled a devastating argument. By the time you are thirty. You've been through a certain kind of mill. And the most serious the meal you've been through. is again not for catalog of disaster. Policemen the taxi drivers waiters, the landlady, the landlord, the banks, the insurance companies the millions of details. Twenty four hours of every day which spell out to you, but you are worth this human being. It is not that. By that time you begun to see it happening in your daughter or your son or your niece or nephew? He could have been speaking in Twenty Twenty The themes the debate the things that they're arguing about are echoing in our time in the arguments that were having, and I think one of the things that Baldwin would say is that you know that's a problem, right? We need to figure out a way out of this cycle and I think Baldwin. Is is somebody who can really help us do that. And thinking about his encounter with Buckley can help us figure out what that looks like. In twenty twenty, Baldwin's words echo once again with both prescience and frustrating familiarity. He offers words for the highs and for the lows. Even is most disillusioned. He found words for hope. There's a continuity of theme in Baldur's work, and he comes back to this this love right if we could only get our minds around on that right to kind of get to the heart of who we are. Each Other for who we are to stand in right relation with one another we can bank are all there I think we ought to. In this episode you will hear excerpts from James. Baldwin's nineteen sixty five Cambridge debate speech as well as interviews with Eddie S Global Junior and Nicholas Book. La both authors of new books, revisiting James Baldwin's work and legacy were calling this episode a Baldwin Revival in good times and in bad. A warning this program includes some offensive language reflecting the historical context. In. The debating hall of the came reunion hundreds of Undergrad and myself waiting for what could prove one of the most exciting debates in the whole hundred and fifty years all the union history. I ever seen the union say well attended undergraduate every weather on the benches on the floor, but on the galleries and there are not more outside of clamoring to get in. When he I watched. The Cambridge Union debate between James Baldwin and Conservative William F. Buckley Linfield college political. Science Professor Nicholas Boucle believed there was a book in it. When Donald Trump was elected president. He felt an urgency to write it. It's called. The fire is upon us. Play on James, Baldwin's nineteen sixty three book titled the Fire Next Time. There's something about the Cambridge Street. I rank very highly in the sense that because of the drama of it, and because we have this wonderful footage of it. There's something about it that is I think reached beyond a lot of Baldwin's essays in in his fiction. In a way that you know now it's out there on Youtube and people. You know even in the last few weeks. You're seeing people. Drop clips from it to serve say wow! This is James Baldwin fifty five years ago and he could have been saying this yesterday. It was nineteen, sixty five at a time of real momentum for the civil rights movement in the United States. What did the the debate signify? At the time? This was really the High Titus O. Rights Movement, so the same night that bought Baldwin Buckler squaring off at Cambridge we're in the midst of the Selma campaign, so the focus is on the voting rights act, and and so there was a kind of way in which this sort of civil rights movement had Civil Rights Act of nineteen, sixty four had been adopted the march on Washington. You know great success all these things that happen that sort of indicated that the tide of history was turning. In the direction that Baldwin represented and so you, you kind of have this moment in sixty five when Buckley, who's been on the other side for now over a decade is trying to come to terms with what it means to have lost all these battles in the civil rights struggle, and so I think it's this really interesting moment where Baldwin is in some ways you should be feeling victorious, but he's, but he's not because of the nature of the way he thinks about the world. He's always wondering he's always. Say Yes, but yes, this is an important step, but we have so much more work to do I. Want to know how much different is the life of the average teenager in Harlem going to be as a result of the Civil Rights Act? As a result of this voting rights act, and so there's something about the moment in the way that made it. Self is framed. Right is the American dream at the expense of the American Negro that invites the debaters in the audience to think about questions beyond these immediate legislative debates, the moment and really think about these big big questions about the relationship between you know sort of American mythology and the history of a racial oppression the country. Now. Baldwin. Star of the evening. WHO WAS BEATEN! Listening, attentively, getting a wonderful reception and the camera young. Remembers enthusiasm from old side of the House. The Baldwin who has been listening to the arguments now we'll bring the voice of instruments to the debate evening. I I find myself not for the first time. And Position of kind of Jeremiah. For example. I don't disagree with Mr Burfoot that the. The inequalities of it by the American Negro population of the United States has hindered the American real. Indeed has. Some other things has say. The other deeper element of. A certain awkwardness I feel. Has To do with. It has do once point of view I had to put.

James Baldwin Twenty Twenty Baldwin Buckler United States Buckley Cambridge University High Titus O. Rights Movement Cambridge Cambridge Union Donald Trump Professor Nicholas Boucle writer William F. Buckley Linfield co England Mr Burfoot Harlem
"cambridge union" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

12:35 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Revisit some of the best interviews of the year take a listen John Peterson professor of psychology university of Toronto clinical psychologist and author of the multi million copy bestseller twelve rules for like an antidote to cast Jordan thanks much for joining venture show and congratulations on your number one position now I'm not extremely impressive and so our way to be ma'am thanks I really appreciate I mean obviously you've been topping it for last year but for some reason it was Canadian or something and then use the NYC standards to keep you off the New York times less but I hope one day to approach half your gross sales and then we can then I'll then I'll buy you some wine or something because my daughter okay that that sounds like a good deal yeah yeah yeah when I read your book are like law I thank you lord lord yeah I think it's so necessary to to make the case that those fundamental Judeo Christian stories are part of the under structure of our culture the necessary under structured we can live without that and and we've been doing a very bad job psychologically and philosophically out making the case for that narrative element of cognition even know psychologists have known for a long time that it's an absolutely necessary and inevitable part of thought a hundred percent I actually graduation thanks I appreciate I in some ways I think of my book is sort of a sort of a classical philosophical adjunct to yours now talk about your book for a second because I guess it was only today that it was reinstall the wit calls would calls is a big book seller in New Zealand and ask about that so in the aftermath of the horrific white supremacist terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch New Zealand there is an effort by one of the booksellers in New Zealand I guess the biggest bookseller in New Zealand to pull your book twelve rules for life off the shelf what you make of that well I think it's appalling when anybody who is involved in the book publishing industry ever has the unmitigated gall to to perform acts of literary censorship I I I can't believe that you can you can way both of those roles at the same time knowing how important books are the diverse range of books that have been published we may have mine camp on the shelves for god sake you know and and I'm not complaining about that by the way I thought I thought it was another at camp too cheaply single virtues and you know what look they reversed their decision and so are not then I would say it's kind of nice to see something half for use reasonable actually try and in the end yeah one of the blood vessel Peterson I and what one of the things that they were attempting to do suggest is the rationale for the original band on the book why is it that you took a picture next to a guy who is wearing an offensive T. shirt about Islamophobia and I said on the show it as a as a publicly held Sir that is I mean I know that you do events almost every night of the week with thousands of people there you take thousands of pictures here maybe hundreds of thousands of pictures every single year so I guess the new standard on the woke left is that if you take a picture next to a person and that person happens to be wearing a shirt that has lots of words on it that you haven't read the words happen to be bad or on pleasing that somehow you are now responsible for the shirt worn by that person is that the new standard here well you know the funny but there's two things that are funny about a band I would say the first is you know like I don't have a dress code for my my lectures and I don't feel that it's appropriate for me to enforce one now it's quite funny because most of the young man who come and see me many of them actually wear a three piece suit which is become kind of a but that these lectures which I think is very interesting and and then you know when the guy came up I glanced adamant things are very hectic to rush because you know you have folders with say a hundred and fifty people in an evening and and they'll have a tremendous amount of time with them and I glanced at his shirt and I thought well that's kind of an unfortunate thing when he was complaining mostly about the word Islamophobia or not not a word I'm particularly what would you say I don't particularly admire that word I think it's out of political were designed for a particular purpose and I also believe that he had a right to wear whatever damn teacher he felt was necessary to wear and so anyway that all flashed through my mind in seconds and and then I took my picture with them like I have with so many other people but the thing is you know look do you think is going to be some criteria for your percentage of the error before your an intolerable person no lights I've had two one fortunate photographs somewhat unfortunate photographs Hey can I will I would say it's gonna be something approximating fifty thousand and maybe it's more and you gotta think that an error rate of two fifty thousand is man if that's not acceptable thank you Marvel just give up you know like what were what were required your standard of perfection from people that is absolutely in human in and of course that perfection isn't expected on anything remotely looking like the left if you're on the left you can take a picture with generally next to a a terrorist I mean limits our stores been taking pictures next resume deck for years at this point and that is not a problem Democrats and taking pictures next to Louis Farrakhan for years and joking it up with him and that's not a problem but if you take a random photo with a random person at one of your events out of fifty thousand photos these aren't close friends these are people you admire these are people who you spend any time with their people who come to your event then suddenly you are guilty of some grave sin in fact this in so grave you should lose a university of Cambridge scene over itself Jordan as one of your telephone yeah what exactly has the story well the story here you need to can't Cambridge university apparently had originally offered you a visiting fellowship at the faculty of divinity and then they would throw what was the backstory here what happened it was an offering half but was a request you know like I went to Cambridge in November and I met a number of people there including people from the Divinity School and we had I'm very useful conversations and I learned a lot you know I learned I learned fragments of biblical knowledge that I didn't have and because I do have some biblical knowledge those fragments were extremely informative you know they they shed light on things that I wouldn't have been able to figure out and I'm planning to do theories on accident lecture series of accidents in the fall like I did with genesis in two thousand seventeen which by the way is a crude about ten million views so far and I don't know how many parts can download it be more than that and so I felt and sort of the people that I was talking to that the opportunity to speak with the biblical scholars at Cambridge might do me some good and then also increase the quality of the finished product that I wanted to deliver to the public and so we worked out over the course of three or four months you know what I signed a contract with Cambridge to undertake this fellowship now what made it so it's so interesting because they didn't tweet out the fact that they had invited me and that I had accepted but they didn't tweet out the fact that they rejected me which I thought was deeply deeply perverse and unprofessional I kind of like a really kind of under handed what are your whole mission in some sense you know because they were obviously attempting to signal their virtue for for reading the campus of a creature such as me and the other the other thing that was so problematic about that was that you know when I went to Cambridge I was actually in substantial demand among the students you know I I spoke at the Cambridge union which is the oldest debating society in the world the oldest continuous debating this I mean it was passed but that doesn't always happen and the they made up of the video are they made of it is the second most popular video they've ever posted despite the fact that there's three hundred of the mark two hundred of them something like that in that it's only been out for four months people were interested in what I had to say and so anyone who's been on pleasant encounter with the students you know there was the odd person he wasn't very happy with what they thought I stood for but there was plenty of interest in having the bare soles well anyways they rescinded by the offer of the fellowship with really no information to me whatsoever they just said that they had reconsidered but even more sadly in my estimation of but the biblical series which concentrates on many of the same things that you do in your book Adam wide public impact I've received literally hundreds of letters from Christians and Jews orthodox Jews in particular or the orthodox Christians Catholics Buddhists Hindus and a lot of moms who of telling me how useful the biblical series was an atheist as well probably more of them than anyone else telling me how useful it was for them to see what the stories were aiming at you know in on you know on fundamentalist way and I felt well you know I could work with the Cambridge Divinity School which is hardly burgeoning in popularity let's say along with the rest of the Christian faith and that I can produce a series of accidents which is of the story that I really really respect and admire and that would be good for the Divinity School and they would be good for me and it would be good for the public who would be exposed to the additional scholarship that I would have been able to manage at the Divinity School and they were willing to throw all about over for for what for for this photograph baby that had something to do with it and also I know that they were pressured by that Cambridge union Cambridge university students union celebrating greatly you know in the aftermath of by resentment but I thought it was so it was sounding like you know our band I'm gonna do these lectures anyway like it's gonna happen and and it's easier for me to do them in Toronto that it isn't today live in England anyway so what it is because there is a big opportunity to produce something of genuine public impact as far as I'm concerned and that's exactly right and in the end they sold it short and they decided to to run because it caused controversy in Jordan this is the thing with with a certain level of popular in you you become extraordinarily popular with popularity means that you have a lot of hours that's the definition of popularity and some of those followers are not going to agree with things that that you believe but the whole purpose of you doing what you've done is to make people think in a better way this is what's so astonishing to me you see folks in the media who say about your lectures they say some of the same things about my life as well have a lot of dispossessed young men as well they're not coming to me because they are seeking to become more solid in their dispossession and there are coming to you for the same thing they're coming to you because they're seeking a solution to a feeling of dispossession and you are providing them something eternal to grasp onto why should people be rooting for that well there are two really good question because you know it is definitely the case but you know when I look at absolutely the case that when people come up and talk to me after my lecture them come up and talk to me on the street which happens all the time that they say the same thing you know they say that something approximating are far more grounded in certain in my life less anxious left angry less bitter lesson and left troublesome in my relationships more truthful more.

John Peterson professor of psychology Jordan
"cambridge union" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on KTOK

"Decided to go public why were you staying with a convicted sex offender right H. didn't go well the queen's middle son telling BBC news night that he didn't regrets the friendship express no sympathy for victims and city traveled to New York to cut ties in person because he was too honorable to do it remotely by judgment was probably colored by my tendency to be too honorable the reaction Hey at swift and down a certainly got a battle on his hands now creed's former press secretary Dickie arbiter saying Andrew opened a wound that a backlash from tech and route to quit public duties lawyers for at Steve's victims now want him to answer that questions as well in London Simoneau it folks on the debate team at Cambridge union the world's oldest debating society is getting a little help from artificial intelligence in a room that has played host to former prime ministers presidents and even the late Stephen Hawking IBM research project debater laid out an argument in favor of subsidized preschool audio from IBM greetings Jerez I have heard you hold the world record in debate competition wins against humans on stage with the artificial intelligence two teams of humans that included a professor and an expert debater the A. I. sifted through thousands of arguments provided by humans in advance both in favor and against a subject to develop its arguments I will argue that we should subsidize preschools we are going to talk about financial issues but not only about them but the purpose of the debate was not to showcase a ice powers over humans it was simply a way to show machines can sift through large amounts of data and make arguments removed from human bias with fox on tech I'm Brett Larson fox news I'm Hank wide loom with the word of the week so many words to choose from thanks to the impeachment hearings and the reactions to them was there a quid pro quo is simply Latin for something for something something that could be delivered potus really wants the deliverable deliverable like a pizza and how did you know that the president wanted the deliverable the opposite of a quid pro quo or some thing is I want nothing I want nothing both sides seem to like smear Vassar psalm one you are here today to be smeared this is a carefully orchestrated media smear campaign or as they say at the bagel store a smear campaign hopping over to the legal analysis you have a kangaroo court I like the notion of jumping over evidence in a kangaroo court no one really knows how the phrase originated but it may have become popular during the California Gold Rush with your gold mine of colorful words Hank wind loom fox news media minute with Howard Kurtz John Bolton's name.

president Howard Kurtz California Hank Brett Larson IBM Stephen Hawking press secretary BBC John Bolton fox professor Cambridge union London Simoneau Steve Andrew Dickie arbiter
"cambridge union" Discussed on The Thrive Global Podcast

The Thrive Global Podcast

10:40 min | 2 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on The Thrive Global Podcast

"Back with thrive. Global podcast lead rejoined the conversation so I have strong views on the subject. I've started ended and movement of happy. You're going to jain called. Hashtag repeats which is about women banks. They're like and then wearing the hell out of it because because one of our problems is we think I love this dress but I wanted at the last wedding or I worried at the last Thanksgiving or whatever and they end. We think people remember exactly exactly what we want to have a list and we can't wear the same women do as I was the main who cares because they're tacky yeah and I actually celebrated braided. I mean now by address. I love our the hell out of it and Instagram my sandfly heading out of it you know side by side. I supposedly big occasions. I do that with jewelry. I get your lobes a break today but I have a pair of diamond earrings. I wear them to everything because their diamonds what's better. I've won gold bracelet. That was like like fifty dollars. I wear it to everything because it doesn't actually matter. I'm not a jewelry model. I'm not at the met gala yet so just throw it on an in where your pretty face and all this over accessorising if you love it great but killing yourself to get to this certain look and when it comes to the to the clothes the wealthier oh fear you are the less important those things can be. I think it's when you get people that want to project an image we live in a society not just pop culture culture wise but as it's become part of our American fabric projecting this image wealth so of course a wealthy person would only wear something once while Suzie orman whereas the same earrings every day and in Kedah Michigan was the same dress multiple times and I love Tiffany haddish that White Alexander McQueen dress. I counterpoint counterpoint. Don't like anything that I'm wearing now. I wore normal. Alpha cause on-going are in having his house. I have to dress like a person and I didn't WANNA walk wearing new balance shorts and like a punk rock sweatshirt. Aw You look amazing. You would look amazing in your shorts. I send US pictures. We can pause when we are the podcast in my other campaign as about women feeling that if they don were really high stellato shoes they're not somehow fully dressed. So what are you doing that camp. I'm not in that camp at all in one of my earlier specials I talked about the reason you're wearing heels is because then it's hard to run away. Hey from a rapist and so that's what society wants wearing them for the reason we wear heels is so you're but sways when you walk. It's appealing to the male gaze. Women have come now to find find it very empowering casino your high up and stand up straighter when you're in heels but the truth is they're not good for you. They are almost always uncomfortable almost like the more expensive the more comfortable and it's tough to extrapolate. You're feeling from the expectation because I think they're so enmeshed so I didn't grow up in a world where women don't wear heels so it's really hard to conceive seve of a world where you wouldn't wear heels on a red carpet so I think it always comes down to let the woman wear what she wants. Yes and let it be absolutely and if she wants to high heels great but also recognizing that it takes a mindshare to stand on them for a long thank you see women swaying holding onto furniture unable to walk. You can't have any carbs because you're on a tight dress and your cantilevered off toothpicks. I just did a corporate event in Las Vegas and cobbled together like a nice outfit for everything I have access to. I only three Nice tops. It's just not my thing and I wore. This pair of high heels does that. I think I'd been gifted from a show that I had so they weren't broken in and I was embarrassed but I'm up on this giant stage hosting this for several hours and I had to step off to wrap my I feel like a gym because I was unable to walk and I was only on my feet for like three hours. So there's expectation I think as women were always trying to find that common ground between societal expectations and what we actually expect from ourselves so you've said that as a comedian you have a set of morals one of these morals. I think we all have morals. We've so whitewashed comedy now and there's this expectation on Comedians. It's really changed in the last couple of years to always say say the right thing the politically correct thing the thing that's going to make everyone laugh. Every time you open your mouth. You've got a fifty percent chance of everyone hating you. Half the time you know you can can always come back to your own moral compass. If you are the kind of girl that makes vagina jokes the nats truth and if you're the kind of guy that wants to tell frat boy jokes like if this is the way that you're doing it they may not be jokes that I tell but we always get mad at Comex for expressing themselves and for not not doing it perfectly in that moment and we are a culture that lives media snippet two snippet meaning. Uc One clip of me and I said something that bothered you on that day ooh we'll. She must be garbage. I hate her completely throwing out any work anything else you've ever done or not. A Society of context we read headlines this click bait things like that so we don't contextualized things and were very quick to vilify people so all you can do at the end of the day is no what you will and won't talk about. What's Funny Dan. What's not funny to you so I think it's just the way that society's programs all at the end of the day. If you WANNA put your head down and rest well all you can do is no that you said what you felt was right for you. You and you've no regrets but do you have like a list of knows. It's not know but it's more just because anything can be funny. It's just things that I don't laugh Laffitte not that they come up a lot like I don't laugh at Holocaust jokes. I don't really laugh at racist jokes. You can make observations about different races and that's funny and I think people don't know the difference between put it like as a colloquialism like breaking balls and hate speech one comes from love because you've earned familiarity and one is just spewing vitriol real some exempt right absolute so that's the context it's the context and it's who's delivering it. There are jokes bill mark and say that I can't say there are jokes that Amy Schumer could say hey that another girl couldn't say another guy couldn't say there are jokes that Chris Rock can make that I can make. It depends on what you've earned with your audience. I don't go into every set like these are things I don't talk about. Yes I don't put down women you can make fun and that's because I am one but there's laughing at laughing with and even when you have the Best S. of intentions you know I wrote this joke about some girl leaving a bar with a guy and she says to him like I'll go home with you but can we wash my home before we make love and and I remember picking a Hump Because nobody has a hump. I wasn't something racial or specifically sexual or it wasn't something that girls have. It wasn't like oh I'm in a wheelchair and that's hilarious. You know and some woman wrote to me. She was like my son has a hump and I'm like well. Then I guess I can't say anything and in what I wrote back to her was the joke wasn't written about your son and you laughed at all the other jokes in the special and those were probably at someone else's expense. That's why we're all getting bogged down in this society because Oh you said one thing once you must be the worst personnel over and that is such an incredible way to divide us and create this culture of negativity and quite do you think we can do or what can you do in your life not to be so affected by things exam happened that we consider extremely unfair. It can be somebody doing something at work. That's upsetting unfair or somebody saying something. That's hurtful. What do you do so that it doesn't take you over. I'd be lying if I said those things. Don't take over. I think we all have those moments those days these were you have a bad thing happened could be as small as a comment and in that moment you were vulnerable and then you begin to attach it to other things. I love a pity party. I think that it's something that everybody goes through. Think about the astronomical price women throughout history have paid for trying to make even smaller steps steps whether it's voting suffragettes whether it's civil rights whether it's abortion rights whether it's the right to be paid more to have a job. I get goosebumps goosebumps thinking about it. People and women have lost their lives when they stood up for a cause that was important but like that's the price you pay for being someone that has something to say. It will never come easy. Let's take a quick break to hear from our sponsor Crest Three D. White. When I was fifteen I was walking home from school one day and happened to see a fodder in a magazine Kazini of Cambridge University. The fato spoke to me in a deep way and I felt that absolutely had to go there so when I got home I told my mother was ridiculous. Goal for mannerisms we were living in Nothi- Greece. We didn't have any money I've had never been out of. Greece and I spoke no English but instead of laughing at me like Moskvy von Deed. My mother's reaction was let's make it happen and because of an unconditional love and support and all the help she gave me today gases to learn English to take my entrance exam. Cetera et cetera details so I arrived at Cambridge speaking English but with the Greek accent which as you might I be able to hear I've carried with me all these years once I was there. I became obsessed with the Cambridge Union. This schools fame was debating society society. I love the idea that you could move people's hearts and minds jazz through the sheer power of words and rhetoric and ended ended up joining the union eventually becoming president. I was never about my accent but instead of trying to hide it which would mean possible. I just accepted I did learn is that you can persuade even more people even with a thick accent just by smiling. It's a powerful and universal vassal form of communication and helping people feel more confident in their smiles is a mission of UH sponsor grasp three D. White so if you want to connect in any language give yourself a gift of a confident smile.

Suzie orman jain Greece Amy Schumer Nothi- Greece Cambridge Union Cambridge University Cambridge president don US Las Vegas Kedah Michigan nats Chris Rock Laffitte fifty dollars fifty percent
"cambridge union" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

12:59 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"I thought it was another attempt to cheaply signal virtue. And, but you know, look, they reversed their decision. And so that then I would say it's kind of nice to be something halfway reasonable actually triumph in the end. Well, professor Peterson one of the things that they were attempting to to suggest as the rationale for the original ban on the book was that you took a picture next guy who was wearing an offensive t-shirt about Islamophobia. And I said on the show as I said publicly held absurd that is I mean, I know that you do events almost every night of the week with thousands of people there, you take thousands of pictures, maybe hundreds of thousands of pictures every single year. So I guess the new standard on the woke left is that if you take a picture next to a person, and that person happens to be wearing a shirt that has lots of words on it that you haven't read the words happen to be bad or unpleasing that somehow you are now responsible for the shirt worn by that person is that the new standard here. Well, you know, the funny things that are funny about a band. I would say the first is, you know, like, I don't have a dress code for my my lectures, and I don't feel that it's appropriate for me to enforce one. Now, it's quite funny because most of the young men who come and see me many of them actually wear a three piece suits, which has become kind of a. Trend that these lectures, which I think is very interesting. And and then you know, when the guy came up I glanced at him and. Things were very hectic rushed because you have photos with one hundred and fifty people in an evening and don't have a tremendous amount of time with glanced at his shirt, and I thought well, that's kind of an unfortunate thing. But he was complaining mostly about the word, Labra phobia. And that's not a word. I'm particularly what would you say? I don't particularly Meyer that word. I think it's a political word designed for a particular purpose. And I also believe that he had a right to wear whatever damage t-shirt he felt was necessary to wear so. Anyways, that all flash through my mind seconds. And and then I took my picture with like I have with so many other people. But the funny thing is, you know, look. You gotta be some criteria for your percentage of error before your intolerable person. Don't like I've had to unfortunate photographs somewhat unfortunate photographs taken out of. I would say it's gotta be something approximating fifty thousand and maybe it's more. And you gotta think that an error rate of two out of fifty thousand is. Men if that's not acceptable. Like, you might as well give up, you know, we're we're we're requiring it standard of perfection from people that is absolutely inhuman in. And of course, that Senator perfection isn't expected on anything remotely looking like the left. If you're on the left, you can take a picture legitimately next to a terrorist. I mean, Linda, Sarsour has been taking pictures next rows ODA for years at this point. And that is not a problem. Democrats have been taking pictures next to Louis Farrakhan for years and joking it up with that's not a problem. But if you take a random photo with a random person at one of your vents out of fifty thousand photos, these aren't close friends. These are people you admire these aren't people who you spend any time with people who come to your events, then suddenly you're guilty of some grave sin in fact, sin so grave. Lose a university of Cambridge seat over to Jordan has wondering if you could tell folks what exactly is the story. What was the story here? The Cambridge University. Apparently had originally offered you a visiting fellowship at the faculty of divinity, and then they withdraw. What was the back story here? Well, have half of it with an offer and half of it was a request. You know, like I went to Cambridge in November. And I met a number of people there could be people from the divinity school, and we had. A series of very useful conversations. And I learned a lot. I learned. I learned right? The biblical knowledge that I didn't have and because I do have some biblical knowledge. Those fragments for extremely informative. You know, they they shed light on things that I wouldn't have been able to figure out and I'm planning to do a series on exodus a lecture series on exodus in the fall. Like, I did with Genesis in two thousand seventeen which by the way has accrued about ten million views so far. I don't know. How many podcasts download it'd be more than that? And so I felt and so did the people that I was talking to that the opportunity to speak with the biblical scholars at Cambridge might do me some good, and then also increase the quality of the finished product that I wanted to deliver to the public. And so we've worked out over the course of three or four months. Stein contract with Cambridge to undertake this fellowship now when they so into interesting because they didn't tweet out the fact that they had invited me that I had accepted, but they did tweet does the fact that they rejected me, which I felt was deeply deeply perverse unprofessional. I kind of like a really kind of underhanded. Liable mission in some sense, you know, because they were obviously attempting to signal their virtue for for ridding the campus of creatures such as me and the other thing that was so problematic about that. Was you know, when I went to Cambridge. I was actually in substantial demand among the students. You know, I spoke at the Cambridge union, which is the oldest debating society in the world. The oldest continuous debating society. And it was passed that doesn't always happen and the tape they made him at the video they made it is the second most popular video they've ever posted. Despite the fact that there's three hundred of them are two hundred of them something like that. And then it's only been up for four months. People were interested in what I had to say. And so and he wasn't an unpleasant encounter with the students. There is the odd person who wasn't very happy with what they thought I stood for but plenty of interest in having there. And so well, anyways, they rescinded my the offer of the fellowship with really no explanation to me whatsoever. They just said that they had reconsidered and even more, sadly, my estimation. But. You know, the the biblical series which concentrates on many of the same things that you do in your book had a wide public impact. I've received literally hundreds of letters from Christians and Jews orthodox Jews in particular, fourth orthodox, Christians Catholics Buddhists Hindus and a lot of Muslim telling me how useful the biblical series was an atheist as well. Probably more of them than anyone else. Telling me, how useful it was for them to see what these stories were aiming at you know, in a fundamentalist way. And I felt well, you know, I could work with the Cambridge divinity school, which is hardly burgeoning popularity. Along with the rest of the Christian faith, and that I could produce a series of accidents, which is a series of stories that I really really respect and admire and that would be good for the divinity school. And they would be good for me. And it would be good for the public who would be exposed to the additional scholarship that I would have been able to manage the divinity school, and they were willing to throw all of that over four for what for for this photograph, maybe that had something to do with it. And also, I know that they were pressured by the Cambridge union Cambridge University students union was celebrating greatly, you know, in the aftermath of by resentment. But I thought it was so it was saddening. You know, what I'm gonna do these lectures, anyway, like it's going to happen. And and it's easier for me to do the Toronto than it is to do them in England. Anyway. But it just it's sad. Because there was this big opportunity to produce something of genuine public impact. As far as I'm concerned. And that's right. And they and they sold it short and they decided to run because it caused controversy in Jordan. This is the thing with a certain level of popular to become extraordinarily popular with popularity means that you have a lot of followers. That's the definition of popularity and some of those followers are not going to agree with things that you believe that the whole purpose of you doing what you've done is to make people think in a better way. This is what's so astonishing to me, you see folks in the media who say about your lectures, they say some of the same things about my lectures. Well, give a lot of dispossessed young men as well. They're not coming to me because they're seeking to become more solid in their dispossession. And they're not coming you for the same thing. They're coming to you because they are seeking a solutions. We feeling of dispossession, and you're providing them something he turned to grasp onto why should people be rooting for that? Well, there are two really good question. Because you know, it is definitely the case that, you know, when I look it's absolutely the case that when people come up and talk to me after by lectures, and come up and talk to me on the street, which happens all the time that they say the same thing, you know, they say that something approximating on for more grounded in certain in my life, less anxious less angry, less bitter left addicted less troublesome in my relationships, more truthful more responsible as a consequence of watching your lectures and listening to your podcasts reading your book. And it's been good for me, and my wife and my family, and like thank you very much. You know, and you'd think God everyone would celebrate that. But the truth of the matter seems to be that there's a coterie or content a coterie of. Of disaffected radical who would be perfectly happy if there were more and more angry disaffected young men, maybe because I don't know that's the reparations they're paying for their privilege or some bloody. So so cruel because he's men it's so strange. It's been so strange for my wife because she's seen assigned aside of men that she hadn't seen before. Because the men who covered talk to me are. Well, they're very polite, and they're not that. That's so rare about men, but they're in very polite, and they're very grateful and happy about the fact that they found this new grounding and the actions I have with them are unbelievably positive, and there's just nothing negative about it. You know? That just doesn't fit the the standard narrative, the the lectures, and the other thing I pointed out, I wrote a blog on this Cambridge event, you know, when people have been telling me like they'd be telling you that you're all you're talking to disaffected and angry young white, man. And you know, it's not so clear that they're angry a three hundred thousand people have come to my public talks so far. Wow. And the number of untoward events if you don't count the t shirt introduced g shirt incident. Zero. That's right. That's right for you. Get blamed for things that you have no responsibility for because there's a narrative that has to be perpetrated, Jordan. Thanks so much for joining me show. It's great to talk to you. And I hope to talk to you and talk to Jordan Peterson go pick up his book twelve rules for lights if you're one of the seven people in America who has not already done. So it's a great book is well worth reading Jordan does have some fascinating truths to to hand over so go check it out right now. Jordan, thanks for joining the show, you bet fan and congratulations again me. Hey, thanks so much. Appreciate it. Coming up. We're gonna talk about jussie smollet and the chaos that has engulfed Chicago. I admit it, you think cybercrime is something that happens to other people. You may think no one wants your data or that. Hackers. Can't grab your passwords or credit cards. Details you would be wrong data from unsuspecting people on public wifi is one of the simplest and cheapest ways. For hacker snake money when you leave your internet connection unencrypted, you might as well be writing your passwords credit card numbers on an enormous billboard for the rest of the world to see..

Cambridge Jordan divinity school Jordan Peterson Cambridge union Cambridge Univ Cambridge University Cambridge divinity school Cambridge union Louis Farrakhan professor jussie smollet Meyer Senator Stein America ODA Linda Toronto
"cambridge union" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

12:47 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Show. So if you didn't know I am just announced that my book the right side of history is number one on the New York Times bestseller list this week. We're pretty pumped up about that. But not who is far outsold me. Of course is Dr Jordan Peterson Jordan Peterson professor of psychology at university of Toronto clinical psychologist and author of the multi-million copy twelve rules for life. Jordan. Thanks so much for joining the Ben Shapiro show. Hey, Ben, congratulations on your number one -sition, and that's extremely impressive. And so way to be man. Thanks. I really appreciate. I mean, obviously, you would have been topping it for the last year. But for some reason, it was Canadian or something, and then he used the N Y T standards to keep you off the New York Times less, but I hope one day to approach after gross sales. And then we can then then I'll buy some wine or something because Mike Carey, okay? That that sounds like a good deal. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. When I read your book, I liked Lord. I thank you, Lord Lord. Yeah. I think it's so necessary to to make the case that those fundamental Judeo Christian stories are part of the under structure of our culture the necessary under structure, we can't live without that. And and we've been doing a very bad job, psychologically and philosophically out making the case for that. Narrative element of cognition. Even though psychologists have known for a long time that it's an absolutely necessary and inevitable part of thought one hundred percent. Well, thank you. I appreciate it is in some ways. I think of my book is sort of a sort of a classical philosophical adjunct to yours talk about your book for a second. Because I guess it was only today that it was reinstalled a Whitcoulls with calls his big bookseller in New Zealand to ask you about that. So in the aftermath of the horrific white supremacists terror attack on two mosques in Christchurch New Zealand. There was an effort by one of the booksellers in New Zealand. I guess the biggest bookseller in New Zealand to pull your book twelve rules for life off the shelf. What did you make of that? Well, I think it's appalling when anybody who's involved in the book publishing industry ever has the unmitigated gall to. To perform acts of literary censorship. I can't believe that you can. You can play both of those roles at the same time knowing how important books are the diverse range of books that have been published. I mean, they had in mind Cam on their shelves for God's sake. And I'm not complaining about that. By the way. I thought it was another attempt to cheaply signal virtue. And, but you know, look, they reversed their decision. And so that then I would. And I would say it's kind of nice to see something halfway is reasonable actually triumph in the end. Well, professor Peterson one of the things that they were attempting to to suggest is the rationale for the original ban on the book was that you took a picture next to a guy who was wearing an offensive t-shirt about Islamaphobia. And I said on the show as I said publicly held debt is I mean, I know that you do events almost every night of the week with thousands of people there, you can take thousands of pictures year, maybe hundreds of thousands of pictures every single year. So I guess the new standard on the woke left is that if you take a picture next to a person, and that person happens to be wearing a shirt that has lots of words on it that you haven't read the words happened to be bad or unpleasing that somehow you are now responsible for the shirt worn by that person. Is that the new standard here? Well, you know, the funny things that are funny about it band. I would say the first is, you know, like, I don't have a dress code for my lectures, and I don't feel that it's appropriate for me to enforce one. Now, it's quite funny because most of the young men who come and see me, man. Any of them actually, wear a three piece suits, which has become kind of a. Trend that these lectures, which I think is very interesting. And and then you know, when the guard came up I glanced at him. And. Things were very hectic rush because you have one hundred and fifty people in an evening, and and don't have a tremendous amount of time with plans to this shirt. And I thought about kind of an unfortunate thing, but he was complaining mostly both the word, Islamophobia. Not not a word. I'm particularly what would you say? I don't particularly admire that word, I think it's a political word designed for a particular purpose. And I also believe that he had a right to wear whatever damage t-shirt he felt was necessary to wear so anyways that all flash through my mind second. And then I took my picture with like I have with so many other people. But the thing is, you know, look, you think. I think it's gonna be some criteria for your percentage of error before your intolerable person. I've had to unfortunate photographs somewhat unfortunate photographs taken out of. I would say it's gotta be something approximating fifty thousand. And maybe it's more. And you gotta think that an error rate of two out of fifty thousand is manifest not acceptable as you might as well just give up. You know, we're we're we're requiring standard of perfection from people that is absolutely inhuman. And of course, that standard of perfection isn't expected on anything remotely looking like the left. If you're on the left, you can take a picture legitimately next to a terrorist. I mean, Linda Sarsour has been taking pictures next asthma ODA for years at this point. And that is not a problem. Democrats been taking pictures next Louis Farrakhan for years and joking it up with and that's not a problem. But if you take a random photo with a random person at one of your events out of fifty thousand photos, these aren't close friends, these aren't people you admire these aren't people who you spend any time with the people who come to your events, then suddenly you're guilty of some grave sin in fact, sin. So grave should lose a university of Cambridge seat over to Jordan. I was wondering if you could tell folks. Yeah. Exactly. Yes. The story. What was the story here? The Cambridge University. Apparently had originally offered you a visiting fellowship at the faculty of divinity. And then they would throw what was the back story here. Well, have half of it was an offer and half was a request went to Cambridge in November. I met a number of people there, including people from the divinity school, and we had. A series of very useful conversation, and I learned a lot. I learned. I learned right of biblical knowledge that I didn't have and because I do have some biblical knowledge. Those fragments for extremely informative. You know, they they shed light on things that I wouldn't have been able to figure out and I'm planning to do a series on exodus Lexus-series on exodus in the fall. Like, I did with Genesis in two thousand seventeen which by the way, his accrued about ten million views so far. I don't know. How many podcasts download it'd be more than that? And so I felt and sorted the people that I was talking to that the opportunity to speak with the biblical scholars at Cambridge might do me some good, and then also increase the quality of the finished product that I wanted to deliver to the public. And so we've worked out over the course of three or four months. On-track with Cambridge to undertake this fellowship. Now, when they go into interesting because they didn't tweet out the fact that they had invited me, and that I it accepted, but they did tweet out the fact that they rejected me, which I felt was deeply deeply perverse an unprofessional kind of like a really kind of underhanded. Liable mission in some sense, you know, because they were obviously attempting to signal their virtue for or reading the campus of a creature such as me and the other thing that was so problematic about that. Was you know, when I went to Cambridge. I was actually in substantial demand among the students. You know, I spoke at the Cambridge union, which is the oldest debating society in the world. The oldest continuous debating society. And it was passed that doesn't always happen. And the tape they made up the video they made is the second most popular video they've ever posted. Despite the fact that there's three hundred of them are two hundred of them something like that. And then it's only up for four months like people were interested in what I had to say. And so he wasn't an unpleasant encounter with the students weren't the person who wasn't very happy with what they thought I stood for. But. There is plenty of interest in having me bear. So well, anyways, they rescinded my the offer of the fellowship with really no explanation to me whatsoever. They just said that they had reconsidered and even more sadly in my estimation. But. The the biblical series which concentrates on many of the same things that you do in your book. Had a wide public impact. I've received literally hundreds of letters from Christians and Jews orthodox Jews in particular, orthodox Christians Catholics, Buddhists Hindus and a lot of Muslim Helling be how useful the biblical series was an atheist as well. Probably more of them than anyone else. Telling me, how useful it was for them to see what these stories were aiming up on fundamentalist way. And I felt well, you know, I could work with the Cambridge divinity school, which is hardly burgeoning in popularity. Along with the rest of the Christian faith, and that I could produce a series on accidents, which is a series of stories that I really really respect and admire and that would be good for the divinity school. And they would be good for me. And it would be good for the public who would be exposed to the additional scholarship that I would have been able to manage the divinity school, and they were willing to throw all of that over for for what for for this photograph, maybe that had something to do with it. And also, I know that they were pressured by the Cambridge union Cambridge University students union was celebrating greatly, you know, in the aftermath of by resentment. But I thought it would. So it was saddening. You know, Alabama. I'm gonna do these lectures anyway, like it's going to happen. And and it's easier for me to do the ba- Toronto than it is to do them in England anyways. But it just it's sad. Because there was this big opportunity to produce something of genuine public impact. As far as I'm concerned. And that's exactly right. And they and they sold it short and they decided to run because it caused controversy in Jordan. This is the thing with a certain level of popularity. I mean, you become extraordinarily popular with popularity means that you have a lot of followers. That's the definition of popularity and some of those followers are not going to agree with things that you believe, but the whole purpose of you doing what you've done is to make people think in a better way. This is what's so astonishing to me, you see folks in the media who say about your lectures, they say some of the same things about my lectures. Well, you have a lot of dispossessed young men as well. They're not coming to me because they are seeking to become more solid in their dispossession. And they're not coming for the same thing. They're coming to you because they are seeking a solutions. We feeling of dispossession, and you're providing them something eternal to grasp onto why shouldn't people be rooting for that? Really good question. Because you know, it is definitely the case that you know, when I get to absolutely the case that when people come up and talk to my lectures, and come up and talk to me on the street, which happens all the time. That they say the same thing, you know, they say that something approximating on far more grounded in certain in my life, less anxious less angry, bitter, less addicted less troublesome in my relationships, more truthful, more responsible. As.

Cambridge Dr Jordan Peterson Jordan Pete New Zealand divinity school New York Times Ben Shapiro Jordan Cambridge union Cambridge Univ Cambridge University Cambridge divinity school Christchurch New Zealand Mike Carey professor of psychology Lord Lord Cambridge union university of Toronto Louis Farrakhan Linda Sarsour professor Alabama
"cambridge union" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

12:54 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Welcome back. This is the Ben Shapiro show. So if you didn't know I am just announced that my book the right side of history is number one on the New York Times bestseller list this week. We're pretty pumped up about that. But north or who is far outsold, of course is Dr Jordan heaters in Jordan Peterson professor of psychology at university of Toronto clinical psychologist and author of the multi-million copy bestseller twelve rules for life. Jordan. Thanks so much for joining the Ben Shapiro show. Hey, Ben, congratulations on your number one physician, and that's extremely impressive. And so way to be man. Thanks. I really appreciate. I mean, obviously, you would have been topping it for the last year. But for some reason, it was Canadian or something, and then he used the N Y standards to keep you off the New York Times less, but I hope one day to approach after gross sales. And then we can then then I'll buy you some wine or something because my okay, that's that sounds like a good deal. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. When I read your book, I like, Lord, I thank you Lord. Lord. I think it's so necessary to make the case that those fundamental Judeo-Christian stories are part of the under structure of our culture, the necessary under structured, we can't live without that. And and we've been doing a very bad job, psychologically and philosophically out making the case for that. Narrative element of cognition. Even though psychologists have known for a long time that it's an absolutely necessary and inevitable part of thought one hundred percent, actually gradulate. Appreciate I in some ways. I think of my book is sort of a sort of a classical philosophical adjunct to yours talk about your book for a second. Because I guess it was only today that it was reinstalled a Whitcoulls calls with calls is a big bookseller in New Zealand to ask about that. So in the aftermath of the horrific white supremacist terror attack on two mosques in Christ's church. New Zealand there is an effort by one of the booksellers in New Zealand. I guess the biggest bookseller in New Zealand to pull your book twelve rules for life off the shelf. What did you make of that? Well, I think it's appalling would anybody who's involved in the book publishing industry ever has the unmitigated gall to. To perform acts of literary censorship. I can't believe that you can. You could play both of those roles at the same time knowing how important books are the diverse range of books that have been published. I mean, they had in mind Cam on their shelves for God's sake. And I'm not complaining about that. By the way. I thought it was another attempt to cheaply signal virtue. And. Oh, look, they reversed their decision. And so that. Then I would say it's kind of nice to be something halfway is reasonable largely triumph in the end. Well, professor Peterson one of the things that they were attempting to to suggest as the rationale for the original ban on the book was that you took a picture next to a guy who was wearing an offensive t-shirt about Islamaphobia. And I said on the show as I said publicly held absurd that is I mean, I know that you do events almost every night of the week with thousands of people there, you can take thousands of pictures, your maybe hundreds of thousands of pictures every single year. So I guess the new standard on the woke left is that if you take a picture next to a person, and that person happens to be wearing a shirt that has lots of words on it that you haven't read the words happen to be bad or unpleasing that somehow you are now responsible for the shirt worn by that person. Is that the new standard here? Well, you know, the funny things that are funny about it. I would say the first is like I don't have a dress code for my lectures, and I don't feel that it's appropriate for media enforce one. Now, it's quite funny because most of the young men who come and see me many of them actually wear a three piece suits, which has become kind of a. Trend that these lectures, which I think is very interesting. And and then you know, when the guy came up I glanced at him. Things were very hectic rush because you know, you have photos with one hundred and fifty people in an evening, and and don't have time with this shirt. And I thought about kind of an unfortunate thing, but he was complaining mostly both the word, Islamophobia. And that's not a word. I'm particularly what would you say? I don't particularly admire that word, I think it's a political word designed for a particular purpose. And I also believe that he had a right to wear whatever damn t-shirt he felt was necessary to wear so anyways that on flash through my mind seconds. And then I took my picture with like I have with so many other people. But the funny thing is, you know, look. It's gotta be some criteria for your percentage of error before your on intolerable person. I've had to one fortunate photographs somewhat unfortunate photographs taken out of I would say, it's gotta be something approximating fifty thousand. And maybe it's more. And you gotta think that an error rate of two out of fifty thousand man, if that's not acceptable, you might as well give up you know, what we're requiring a standard of perfection from people that is absolutely inhuman. And of course, that standard of perfection isn't expected on anything remotely looking like the left. If you're on the left, you can take a picture legitimately next to a terrorist. I mean, Linda, Sarsour has been taking pictures next rasmiya ODA for years at this point. And that is not a problem. Democrats taking pictures next to Louis Farrakhan for years and joking it up with that's not a problem. But if you take a random photo with a random person at one of your events out of fifty thousand photos, these are close friends. These are people you admire these aren't people who you spend any time with the people who come to your vents, then suddenly you're guilty of some grave sin in fact, sin so grave, the you should lose a university of Cambridge seat over to Jordan. I was wondering if you could tell what exactly. Was the story was the story here the Cambridge University. Apparently had originally offered you a visiting fellowship at the faculty of divinity. And then they would throw what was the back story here. Well, have happens. It was an offer and half was a request went to Cambridge in November. And I met a number of people there, including people from divinity school, and we have. A series of very useful conversations. And I learned a lot, you know, I learned. I learned bregman of biblical knowledge that I didn't have an because I do have some biblical knowledge. Those fragments extremely informative. You know, they they shed light on things that I wouldn't have been able to figure out and I'm planning to do a series on exodus lecture series on just in the fall. Like, I did with Genesis in two thousand seventeen which by the way, here's a crude about ten million views, so far, and I don't know how many podcasts downloads, it'd be more than that. And so I felt and so of the people that I was talking to that the opportunity to speak with the biblical scholars at Cambridge might do me some good, and then also increase the quality of the finished product that I wanted to deliver to the public. And so we've worked out over the course of three or four months. Stein contract with Cambridge to undertake this fellowship now when they to interesting because they didn't tweet out the fact that they had invited me and that I had accepted, but they did tweet does the fact that they rejected me, which I felt was feebly deeply perverse and unprofessional. I kind of like a really kind of underhanded. Liable mission in some sense, you know, because they were obviously attempting to signal their virtue or reading the campus of a creature such as me and the other thing that was so problematic about that. Was you know, when I went to Cambridge. I was actually in substantial demand among the students. You know, I spoke at the Cambridge union, which is the oldest debating society in the world, the oldest continuous debating society. And it was that doesn't always happen. And the tape they made of at the video they made of it is the second most popular video they've ever posted. Despite the fact that there's three hundred of them are two hundred of them something like that. And that it's only been up for four months. People were interested in what I had to say. And so and he wasn't an unpleasant encounter with the students person who wasn't very happy with what they thought I stood for. But there is plenty of interest in having beat there. So well, anyways, they rescinded by the offer of the fellowship with really no explanation to me whatsoever. They just said that they had reconsidered and even more, sadly. But. The biblical series which concentrates on many of the same things that you do in your book. Had a wide public impact. I've received literally hundreds of letters from Christians and Jews orthodox Jews in particular or the orthodox Christians Catholics Buddhists Hindus and a lot of Muslim. Telling me, how useful the biblical series was an atheist as well. Probably more of them than anyone else. Telling me, how useful it was for them to see what these stories were aiming at you know, in a fundamentalist way. And I felt well, you know, I could work with the Cambridge divinity school, which is hardly burgeoning popularity. Let's say. Along with the rest of the Christian faith, and that I could produce a series of accidents, which is a series of stories that I really really respect and admire and that would be good for the divinity school. And they would be good for me. And it would be good for the public who would be exposed to the additional scholarship that I would have been able to manage the divinity school, and they were willing to throw all of that over four for what for for this photograph baby had something to do with it. And also, I know that they were pressured by the Cambridge union Cambridge University students union was celebrating greatly. You know in the aftermath of by resentment. I thought it was. So it was saddening, but, you know, Alabama, I'm gonna do these lectures anyway, like it's going to happen. And it's easier for me to do the Toronto than it is to do them in England anyway, but it just it's sad. Because there was this big opportunity to produce something of genuine public impact as far as I'm concerned. And that's exactly right. And they and they sold it short and they decided to run because it caused controversy in Jordan. This is the thing with a certain level of popular become extraordinarily popular with popularity means that you have a lot of followers. That's the definition of popularity and some of those followers are not going to agree with things that you believe, but the whole purpose of doing what you've done is to make people think in a better way. This is what's so astonishing to me, you see folks in the media who say about your lectures, they say some of the same things about my lectures. Well, you have a lot of dispossessed young men as well. They're not coming to me because they are seeking to become more solid in. Dispossession and they're not coming to you for the same thing. They're coming to you because they are seeking a solutions. We feeling of dispossession, and you're providing them something he turned to grasp onto why shouldn't people be rooting for that? Well, there are two really good question. Because you know, it is definitely the case that you know, when I get to absolutely the case that when people come up and talk to the after by lectures and come up and talk to me on the street, which happens all the time. They say the same thing, you know, they say that something approximating on far more grounded and certain in my life less anxious less angry left, better less addicted less troublesome in my relationships more truthful more responsible as a consequence of washing your lectures and listening to your podcasts reading your book..

Cambridge New Zealand divinity school Ben Shapiro Jordan Peterson New York Times Jordan Cambridge union Cambridge Univ Cambridge University Cambridge divinity school Dr Jordan Cambridge union Whitcoulls Louis Farrakhan professor of psychology university of Toronto professor Alabama Islamaphobia
"cambridge union" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:34 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"From country because of what they say. Well, it's interesting to me, many of you think that we should be. And I'm going to ask you right now. And you better get on a line real fast. Because I know we're going to get the haters, and you're open you're open for business as Mike. Do you think I should be banned from radio for offending? Let's fill in the blank, whatever you wanna say. I do should I be banned from radio because you don't like what I say. I remember when I woke up in the morning in two thousand and nine in may of two thousand and nine and then they asked me on the BBC. How did you find out that you were banned? Did you arrive at Heathrow airport, and what you turned away savage said? Well, no, I woke up opened up the drudge report. And when I saw this morning. My first thought was damn there goes the summer trip where I plan to have my dental work done. The second thought was there goes my visit to the restaurants of England famous for their cuisine. But then when I thought about the list, I said, we Kim Jong Il who allegedly starved a million of his countrymen the death. Why is he not analyst? And why am I in the same list as a HAMAS Palestinian terrorists who smashed in a jewel Jewish Sheils had with a rifle, but how in the world could this be happening in the land of the Magna Carta, I wondered, and then of course, the BBC asked me some silly questions at try to trap me, and I won't bore you with the back and forth. And I want to remind all of you who are listening to this show that there is a distinct difference between free speech and hate speech number one and anything that I say or anyone says is today defined his hate speech by someone. We are living in such hyper sensitive times that whatever you say will be called. Hey speech. So I don't think we should go down this road unless we're prepared to ban ourselves real quickly. And in this age of cheap and widely accessible internet hate. It's interesting to me that we are now discussing censorship all over again in America. And I would argue that there's nobody in the American media who knows more about this subject subject, then Michael Savage. And I then gave a speech I was invited to speak by the way after this happened before the Cambridge union a great honor. I prepared the speech, and then I was banned from speaking to the Cambridge union by the very same fascistic forces in Mary old England. But it's interesting to me that some level headed people at the time stood up against this. Kind of insane censorship Boris Johnson. Who may be prime minister one day at the time was a journalist for the London. Telegraph, you know, him the guy with the hair and his face white hair and his face Boris Johnson said the ban against savage makes us look so infantile so pathetic. What are we some sort of kindergarten and needs to be protected against these dangerous? American radio shows, what did Nancy Pelosi say at the time. She said, quote, conservative radio is a huge threat and political advantage for Republicans. And we after we have had to find a way to limit. It Nancy Pelosi did you know that? Can you believe this that Nancy Pelosi wanted for a long time now to ban me and others and talk radio? So I'm not gonna ask you a question about it. It begins with me talking about Putin who wants to put in laws, in fact, he just did put a law banning assaulting the government big deal. It's a very big deal jail for online insults and Russia, Putin signs fake news law. Well, what about America are we far away from that? When you have Twitter shadow banning people when you have Mark Zuckerberg little fascist blocking people behind their back. Didn't they just block President Trump's close personal friend from Facebook didn't they just knock him off Facebook Dansk Gavino? He's a great guy. I met him many times. Nice, man. Why did why did zuckerberg's minions? Knock him more Facebook. What did he do? Should they be able to do that? Is it a private enterprise, isn't isn't Facebook isn't Twitter, aren't they private enterprises? And they can do what they want. Can't they block whoever they want? That's an interesting question. Well, they're so big that you could argue there are public utility. And as public utilities, they can't just do anything they want. And in fact, Facebook and Twitter, and the other such sites should be should be under the jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission, the FCC they should follow the same rules as TV radio, etc. Because they're no longer simply websites like, Michael Savage dot com. Where I could do anything I want. It's not big enough to matter. What matters are organising that have become public utilities like Twitter and Facebook, they should be put under the under the banner of the FCC. Here's another one. This Bernie Sanders. Who I have declared and we'll declare again is the most dangerous man in American political history. And I'll tell you why he's the one of the smartest cleverest most evil and deviant of all politicians in American history because he is so smart he knows history. And he knows that he's a pied piper of Bolshevism communism over you want to put it. I kind of like the flavor of Bolshevik. I want to see how many people copy it before the day is out. Many things I begin here. You'll you'll have Bolshevik now soon it'll start bubbling up in between all the music in the hair cream ads in the nose cream and the air air here and you'll hear sinkhole Bolshevik pop-up. Bernie Sanders is a naked Bolshevik the Bolsheviks with the early communists who conducted the revolution in Russia. So Bernie speaks to the forked tongue every time he talks he stirs up racial hatred, and he starts up class warfare. And he turns up the hatred against normal straight people. I want you to listen to clip number one. He was on one of the most fitting programs in the history of the world telling us that Trump is trying to divide our country based on skin color. You got to hear clip number one. I'll tell you what I disagree with Trump even more about and that is his attempt to divide our country up based on the color of our skin based on where we came from..

Facebook Twitter Nancy Pelosi Bernie Sanders President Trump Michael Savage BBC Mark Zuckerberg America Boris Johnson Kim Jong Il Cambridge union Putin Mike Federal Communications Commiss HAMAS Heathrow Russia analyst
"cambridge union" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

11:16 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"I in America, and the only member of the American media media only one no one else, not the great beached whale. None of them have the honor that I have of being the only controversial talk show host in America who is to this day, not permitted to enter England. The land of the Magna Carta. I am still banned from entering England. The land of the Magna Carta which have been taken over by the communists, under the guise of labor party. And I was shocked to learn in two thousand nine that. I was banned for entering the UK. And I was included with a list that included a HAMAs cleric Neo Nazi and others, including a group that well, I read you later on and they interviewed me in England at the time. And it's interesting to me that the same subject is coming back up again. What is speech? What is free speech the left on the Bernie Sanders, the communist party USA? There's no difference between Bernie Sanders. None of his platform is any different than that of the communist party USA. None. He is a naked outright communist who. I think should be thrown out of America. Let it will not run for president. That's not freedom of speech now, sir. He's a disguised communist of the lowest order he would take away all of our freedoms. He is one of the most evil people in the history of America. And the problem here is not him alone. He's unelectable I don't think he can win the crumpled seltzer man cannot win. But he is brainwashed too. Many people into thinking that there was a thing called democratic socialism. There isn't that is a lie. There is no such thing. Ask the Chinese ask the Cambodians ask the Russians if there such a thing as democratic socialism. But what is the line between free speech at eight speech should people be barred from country because of what they say. Well, it's interesting to me, many of you think that we should be. And I'm going to ask you right now, you better get on line real fast. Because I know we're going to get the haters, and you're open you're open for business as a might do you think I should be banned from radio for fending? Let's fill in the blank, whatever you wanna say. I do should I be banned from radio because you don't like what I say. I remember when I woke up in the morning in two thousand nine in may of two thousand nine and they asked me on the BBC. How did you find out that you aband- did you arrive at Heathrow airport, and what you turned away savage said? Well, no, I woke up opened up the drudge report. And when I saw this morning. My first thought was damn there goes the summer trip where I plan to have my dental work done. The second thought was there goes my visit to the restaurants of England famous for their cuisine. But then when I thought about the list, I said we as Kim Jong Il who allegedly starved them countryman's death. Why is he not on the list? And why am I in the same list as a HAMAS Palestinian terrorists who smashed in a jewel Jewish chows head with a rifle, but how in the world could this be happening to land of the Magna Carta? I wondered. And then, of course, the BBC asked me some silly questions at try to trap me, and I won't bore you with the back and forth. And I want to remind all of you who are listening to the show that there is a distinct difference between free speech and hate speech number one and anything that I say anyone says is today defined as hate speech by someone. We are living in such hyper sensitive times that whatever you say will be called. Hey speech. So I don't think we should go down this road, unless we're prepared to ban ourselves real quickly, and our mind, you're something else. I would first amendment our great first amendment written by the brilliant, white males who wrote it bragging, white males all with a great smart, all white males all white males. No, women all white males. They came up with a thing called the US constitution, which apparently occasional cortex is never read. She was too busy stealing tips in a bar Jackson heights to have read the constitution. I member was written to protect controversial speech. Not polite speech. Did you know that did all of you? Good leftist. The understand that the first amendment exists to defend controversial speech. Not to defend polite speech. We don't need a defense for polite speech. Do we we needed a fence for controversial speech? So here I am band from England to this day. Along with. Quadri our adult. Amazing never heard of him Eunice Astro. Walk the I'll Harmeet Mohammed Geneen Abdul. Ali Mussa, Samir Alcorn tar, I can read the rest of the names. I sued the British government. I spent a fortune got nowhere. You can't win suing a government, by the way. It's impossible. Can't be the government. I guess it. We found out. You'll never believe what we found out. Why my name was on the list, we'll all of these Muslim haters. They put my name on with a group of Muslim haters. You know, why we got through a certain legal maneuvers actually found the emails which disclosed why I was banned in Britain. You'll never believe the reason it wasn't because of anything really said after all my show was not hurt and is not hurting land maybe on the internet today. But at that time was not broadcast in England. So I was no threat to English society, the evil prime minister of England at that time put me on the list in cahoots with Hillary Clinton. That's right. I found out years later, it was Hillary Clinton and her girlfriends who nominated me to be banned in England. And they did it to quote, balanced, the list, they thought they'd balanced the list of Muslim haters by putting an American conservative on the list. The headline was named and shamed. The sixteen barred from the UK I was shocked by what I saw. In fact, I had to be seeing things I thought I couldn't believe it and before following the link from the drudge report, I thought it must be some kind of joke. Or some rumor perpetrated by enemies of the radio show, but I found out sure enough reputable newspapers in England had reported that the British Home Office the equivalent to our State Department had placed me on a list of those who are prohibited from entering the country. The list was shocking included people such as Samir Kuntar who spent thirty years in prison for killing four soldiers and a four year old girl. He bashed her head in with a rifle. But a Jewish girls had I was put on a list with mad men who had murdered Jewish children by bashing their skulls in with rifle butts. I was on the list with a slam. Oh, fascists who had threatened the violent overthrow the British government and the killer Queen. I was on a list with violent Nazi skinheads who are serving ten year sentences for murder in Russia. And yet I was put on a list by the prime minister to quote, balanced, the list years later, I found that it was Hillary and her friends who had recommended this be done to me. I was such a threat to her. So she thought there was transatlantic collusion. There were many big sisters out there who wanted to wash out conservative voices. They wanted us gone, and I don't have to name them. Now. It's unimportant right now. What's important is? You know where we are today. With regard to censorship. And in this age of cheap and widely accessible internet hate. It's interesting to me that we are now discussing censorship all over again in America. And I would argue that there's nobody in the American media who knows more about this subject subject, then Michael Savage. And I then gave a speech I was invited to speak by the way after this happened before the Cambridge union a great honor. I prepared the speech, and then I was banned from speaking to the Cambridge union by the very same fascistic forces in Mary old England. But it's interesting to me that some level headed people at the time stood up against this. Kind of insane censorship Boris Johnson. Who maybe prime minister one day at the time was a journalist for the London. Telegraph, you know, him the guy with the hair on his face white hair on his face Boris Johnson said the ban against savage makes us look so infantile so pathetic. What are we some sort of kindergarten and needs to be protected against these dangerous? American radio shows. What did Nancy Pelosi say at the time? She said, quote, conservative radio is threat and political advantage for Republicans. And we after we have had to find a way to limit. It Nancy Pelosi did you know that? Can you believe this that Nancy Pelosi wanted for a long time now to ban me and others and talk radio, not the benign ones? Oh, not the vanilla swirl. Talkers who pretend to be wild and crazy conservatives and threatened. Nothing more. Nobody. In fact, they're rewarded for it. Guys, like me who actually, you know, lay it all out there and put it all out there. So I'm not going to ask you a question about it to begin with me talking about Putin who wants to put in laws, in fact, he just did put it a law banning assaulting the government big deal. It's a very big deal jail for online insults and Russia, Putin signs fake news law. Well, what about America are we far away from that? When you have Twitter shadow banning people when you have Mark Zuckerberg little fascist blocking people behind their back, then they just block President Trump's. Close personal friend from Facebook. Didn't they just knock him off Facebook dance giving those a great guy? I met him many times. Nice, man. Why did why did zuckerberg's minions knock him off Facebook? What did he do? Should they be able to do that? Here's an a private enterprise. Isn't isn't Facebook isn't Twitter, aren't they private enterprises? And they can do what they want. Can't they block whoever they want? That's an interesting question. Well, they're so big that you could argue there are public utility. And as public utilities, they can't just do anything they want. And in fact, Facebook and Twitter, and the other such sites should be should be under the jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission, the FCC they should follow the same rules as TV radio, etc. Because they're no longer simply websites like, Michael Savage dot com. Where I could do anything I want. It's not big enough to matter. What matters are organizations that have become public utilities like Twitter and Facebook, they should be put under the under the banner of the FCC that were running short of time. I have so little time lately in this one hour show, then followed by another hour. But if you can't a call. This is the time to jump on by.

England America Magna Carta prime minister Facebook HAMAs Hillary Clinton Bernie Sanders BBC USA Michael Savage British government Nancy Pelosi Twitter UK Russia Boris Johnson Kim Jong Il USA.
"cambridge union" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

11:20 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The Savage Nation by victory at safer summary. Why do we need a victory and not? It's see I'm going to talk about censorship today. Which is what is hate speech, and what is free speech? Many of you don't know the difference. Many of you think that if you're offended by it. It's hate speech, and it should be banned. Very dangerous situation. We are seeing in America. This is tying into President Putin in Russia. Who has passed laws that will land you in jail. If you insult. The president. Russian President Putin has signed the controversial Senate bills that make it a crime to disrespect the state and spread fake news online Russian media reported on Monday, the bills amending existing information laws overwhelmingly passed both chambers of Russian palm in less than two months. Legislation will establish punishments. For spreading information that quote exhibits blatant disrespect for the society government. Official government symbols online. News outlets and uses that spread fake news will face fines up to twenty two thousand dollars repeat offenses by blah, etc. Finds a calculated based on whether the offender is a citizen and official or legal entity. The Kremlin denies that this legislation amounts to censorship. Now, I in America, and the only member of the American media media only one no one else, not the great beached whale. None of them have the honor that I have of being the only controversy. You'll talk show hosted America who is to this day not permitted to enter England. In the land of the Magna Carta. I am still banned from entering England. The land of the Magna Carta which have been taken over by the communists, under the guise of labor party. And I was shocked to learn in two thousand nine that. I was banned for entering the UK. And I was included with a list that included a HAMAs cleric Neo Nazi and others, including a group that well, I read you later on. And they interviewed me in England at the time. And it's interesting to me that the same subject is coming back up again. What is hate speech? What is free speech the left on the Bernie Sanders, the communist party USA? There's no difference between Bernie Sanders. None of his platform is any different than that of the communist party USA. None. He is a naked outright communist who. I think should be thrown out of America. Let alone not run for president. That is not freedom of speech now, sir. He's a disguised communists of the lowest order he would take away all of our freedoms. He is one of the most evil people in the history of America. And the problem here is not him alone. He is unelectable I don't think he can win the crumpled old seltzer man cannot win. But he is brainwashed too. Many people into thinking that there is a thing called democratic socialism. There isn't that is a lie. There is no such thing. Ask the Chinese ask the Cambodians ask the Russians if there's such a thing as democratic socialism. But what is the line between free speech and hate speech should people be barred from country because of what they say. Well, it's interesting to me, many of you think that we should be. And I'm going to ask you right now, you better get on a line real fast. Because I know we're going to get the haters, and you're open you're open for business as a Mike. Do you think I should be banned from radio for fending? Let's fill in the blank, whatever you wanna say. I do should I be banned from radio because you don't like what I say. I remember when I woke up in the morning in two thousand nine in may of two thousand and nine and then they asked me on the BBC. How did you find out that you were ban? Did you arrive at Heathrow airport, and what you turned away savage said? Well, no, I woke up opened up the drudge report. And when I saw this morning. My first thought was damn there goes the summer trip where I plan to have my dental work done. The second thought was there goes my visit to the restaurants of England famous for their cuisine. But then when I thought about the list, and I said, we Kim Jong Il who allegedly starved a million of his countrymen at the death. Why is he not analyst, and why am I in the same list as a HAMAS Palestinian terrorists who smashed in a jewel Jewish Charles head with a rifle, but how in the world could this be happening in the land of the Magna Carta, I wondered, and then of course, the BBC asked me some silly questions to try to trap me, and I won't bore you with the back and forth. And I want to remind all of you who are listening to this show that there is a distinct difference between free speech and hate speech number one and anything that I say anyone says is today defined as hate speech by someone. We bring a such hyper sensitive times that whatever you say, we'll pay speech. So I don't think we should go down this road unless we're prepared to ban ourselves. Real quickly, and our mind your something else. Our first amendment our great first amendment written by the brilliant, white males who wrote it bragging, white males all with a great smart, all white males, all white males. No, women all white males. They came up with a thing called the US constitution, which apparently occasional cortex is never read. She was too busy stealing tips in a bar Jackson heights to have read the constitution. I amendment was written to protect controversial speech. Not polite speech. Did you know that did all of you? Good limp leftist. Do you understand that the first amendment exists to defend controversial speech? Not to defend polite speech. We don't need a defense for polite speech. Do we we need to defense for controversial speech? So here I am band from England to this day. Along with. Abdulah quadri. Ow. Amazing never heard of him. Eunice? I'll Ostro walk the I'll Harmeet Mohammed Geneen Abdul Ali Mussa Samir out Coon tar, I can read the rest of the names. I sued the British government. I spent a fortune got nowhere. You can't win suing a government, by the way, it's impossible can't beat a government. And guess what we found out? You'll never believe what we found out why my name was on the list with all of these Muslim haters. They put my name on with a group of Muslim haters. You know, why we got through certain legal maneuvers actually found the emails which disclosed why I was banned in Britain. You'll never believe the reason it wasn't because of anything I really said after all my show was not hurt, and it's not hurting land maybe on the internet today. But at that time is not broadcast in England. So I was no threat to English society, the evil prime minister of England at that time put me on the list in cahoots with Hillary Clinton. That's right. I found out years later, it was Hillary Clinton and her girlfriends who nominated me to be banned in England. And they did it to quote, balanced, the list, they thought they balanced the list of Muslim haters by putting an American conservative on the list of the headline was named and shamed. The sixteen barred from the UK I was shocked by what I saw. In fact, I had to be seeing things I thought I couldn't believe it and before following the link from the drudge report, I thought it must be some kind of joke or some rumor perpetrated by enemies of the radio show, but I found out shred off reputable newspapers in England had reported that the British Home Office the equivalent to our State Department had placed me on a list of those who are prohibited from entering the country. The list was shocking included people such as some ear Alcon. Tar who spent thirty years in prison for killing four soldiers and a four year old girl. He bashed her head in with a rifle. But a Jewish girls had I was put on a list with mad men who had murdered Jewish children by bashing their skulls in with rifle butts. I was on the list with a slam fascists who had threatened the violent overthrow the British government and the killer Queen. I was on a list with violent Nazi skinheads who are serving ten year sentences for murder in Russia. And yet I was put on a list by the prime minister to quote, balanced, the list years later, I found that it was Hillary and her friends who had recommended this be done to me. I was such a threat to her. So she thought there was transatlantic collusion. There were many big sisters out there who wanted to wash out conservative voices. They wanted us gone, and I don't have to name them. Now. It's unimportant right now. What's important is? You know where we are today. With regard to censorship. And in this age of cheap and widely accessible internet hate. It's interesting to me that we are now discussing censorship all over again in America. And I would argue that there's nobody in the American media who knows more about this subject subject, then Michael Savage. And I then gave a speech I was invited to speak by the way after this happened before the Cambridge union a great honor. I prepared the speech, and then I was banned from speaking to the Cambridge union by the very same fascistic forces in Mary old England. But it's interesting to me that some level headed people at the time stood up against this. Kind of insane censorship Boris Johnson. Who may be prime minister one day at the time was a journalist for the London. Telegraph, you know, him the guy with the hair and his face white hair on his face Boris Johnson said the ban against savage makes us look so infantile so pathetic. What are we some sort of kindergarten and needs to be protected against these dangerous? American radio shows. What did Nancy Pelosi say at the time? She said, quote, conservative radio is a huge threat and political advantage for Republicans. And we after we have had to find a way to limit. It Nancy Pelosi did you know that? Can you believe this that Nancy Pelosi wanted a little for a long time now to ban me and others and talk radio, not the benign ones? Oh, not the vanilla swirl. Talkers who pretend to be wild and crazy conservatives and threatened nothing where nobody in fact, they're rewarded for it. Guys, like me who actually, you know, lay it all out there and put it all out there. So I'm not gonna ask you a question about it begins with me talking about Putin who wants to put in laws, in fact, he just did put in a law.

England America President Putin prime minister Magna Carta president Hillary Clinton HAMAs Nancy Pelosi USA British government Russia Bernie Sanders Boris Johnson BBC Kim Jong Il UK Harmeet Mohammed Geneen Abdul Official
"cambridge union" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:11 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"This week on q&a. Monica Norton deputy local editor at the Washington Post talks about James Baldwin's, if Beale street could talk and the impact the book had on her as a teenager. And Ordina the Washington Post you wrote a column back in December with the headline. I devoured James Baldwin's, quote, if Beale street could talk when I was thirteen it changed my life. Yes. How? Up until then I I mean, I was always an avid reader, and I have older brother, an older brother and two older sisters who are in college. And so I was reading their books when I was far too young. And we had a wonderful public library in my neighborhood where I spent pretty much every day after school going there and grabbing every book and. But there was something about Baldwin that was so raw and so passionate. And I think it also had to do with me being thirteen where everything is passionate to you at that point. And here were these two young lovers, and I can really identify with them, and I can identify with the language and the beauty. It's a movie out when you wrote this column, you said in there, you haven't seen the movie I had not tell you have you seen it. Now. I have and it was I was impressed. I was really moved by it. As I wrote in the piece, I was probably too young to read Baldwin at thirteen. And why why are you saying that, you know, I didn't understand then that this was not simply a love story. There's a great deal of love and their this familiar love this romantic love. But I didn't really register. I don't think I did it thirteen, you know, the, the broader subjects of mass incarceration, and how that impacts a family a community a society. And so when I I read read the book in advance of the movie coming out, and it was you know. It's been a long time since I was thirteen. So it was a whole different experience. And then say it on screen. It was as beautiful as I remember and is heartbreaking as I would subsequently learn at the rereading the book as an adult. So what's the story of Beale street could talk about I think it's the story of America and a lot of ways, and that you have these two young people who are working class trying to make a go of it in a society that doesn't often recognize their value. The main one of the main characters funny is wrongly charged with rape and incarcerated and the entire family is working to get him out of jail. And we still see that happening in so many cases that today, and what it means to be incarcerated for the entire family and four and a society and for neighborhood. So I just want to run some video about a minute James Baldwin. It's back from nineteen sixty and a CBC interview. Just so everybody can see him and hear him talk. Got to go to school after Booker T, Washington. Ninety five architect, really. Seven but equal principal said in effect said exactly that education will not make us different educational because. Cool to you. Do things. Social we can be separate as the fingers. Essentially mutual progress. We can be as one as a hand. Now. This idea was accepted by the nation by this out, but the refuse to provide. The negroes was the kind of education facilities as north more or less made available through this. I'm afraid that is not the way it happened. It happened. What happened? Really began in the south. And it's still very large you located there. Universities in the south. Very few negro universities in an office. Technically, not segregated the first thing you notice is. Yes. Everyone smokes. Then the second thing is the word negro. Yes. When you were going up what what was that? The I grew up, you know, my as I said, I have an older brother and two older sisters, and they were in college about the time. I was in elementary school. And it was the air of black is beautiful. I remember them playing, you know, a forty five which I'm sure a lot of people don't even know what that is today, but playing James Brown singing say it loud, I'm black and I'm proud that was the terminology. I grew up with the exception. Was that? In my parents were a little bit older while they considered average now. But when I was born my father was forty five. My mother was thirty six there. They were both from South Carolina, very segregated society. My father was born right during the depression and had really hardships. So I know the evolution of terms that were used to describe black people because he told me them from his own life, and what they meant to him and how they impacted him. So watching that video the evolution of where we are today. But you know, I was black. You know, that that was the terminology that was used you know, so how much of James Baldwin, and he wrote the novel. We're talking about in nineteen seventy four when it was released, and I've got a whole list started in nineteen forty eight and his last reineck was nineteen eighty-five. How much did you read them? Oh, I, you know. When I devoured that. Then I started on my education of James Baldwin. And I think I'm not certain of the exact order, but I think another country was sort of the second book and a lot of ways was one of my my one of my favorites that I've read of his and Giovanni is room and his essays the fire next time and. Go tell it on the mountain. I think twice. I think one was for an assignment in college in one was just CO. Again. I wanted to read about this. And just all any essay, I could find anything I could find a phys- I'm excited now because they're releasing a children's book that he wrote for his I think it was his nephew that is going to be released. I don't think it had ever been released before. And I'll grab a copy of that as well. So what would you say? And you talk about you love words. Yes. What would you say is the theme of Baldwin's writing? I think his writing really does deal with love. Whether it's universal love loving oneself love between people. And and society. I really think that that is sort of the overarching theme, I think a lot of people probably see him because he was so passionate and fighting for the rights of African Americans that sometimes I think people mistake that for anger. I don't think I think he was. Not angry, but forceful and his denunciation of racism, and I think, you know, and I don't have a problem with being angry because there are lots of things to be angry about, but I think that it was his passion because of his love for his people, and that comes across in all of his interviews and all of his writing he was born in nineteen twenty four and he died in nineteen eighty seven. Yes. What's the story of you going to see? So in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven I had just started working as a young reporter for the evening sun in Baltimore. And he was speaking. I think it was I'm not sure what I think is the name has changed. I think it was the Baltimore City community college or something of that nature. And so I was so excited by this. And it was during winter, and I was planning to leave work and head across town. And you know, my family, I was still living at home. My family lived in eastern. Baltimore county. And this was in west Baltimore where he was speaking. And I've vaguely remember a close childhood friend calling me up and saying, you know, it's snowing you should try and get home. And I said, oh, it's fine. It's I've got something to do, you know? And so I packed up. My little paperbacks that I had of my James Baldwin box. And I had them in the car beside me and the car was in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight Fiat Spyder that I had purchased from my old one of my older sisters. It was I think probably almost a decade when I purchased it from her and it had rear wheel drive. And if you know anything about a rear wheel drive car, they do not function, well and snow so, but I was determined and I got in and I was trudging along, and I should say inching along because the snow was coming down. And I got to a point where I was probably fifteen maybe twenty minutes away from where he was speaking. And it shouldn't have it normally would've taken all twenty minutes to get there. But it was so slow going through snow. And I started sliding, and I started sliding towards his telephone pole, and I just stopped really short of it. And I said, you just gotta go home. You cannot do this. This is ridiculous. This is insane. You must go home, and I turned around, and I think a couple of days later, I was at work, and there was a reporter there, and he made it there. He lived not far from there. And I remember him going on and on about oh, there were only about five of six of us who showed up and he just helped coordinate because nobody could leave. We just had a great time. And he told stories, and I was already heartbroken and then several months later he passed away. And so this is my lesson. They are now. Now, there's somebody I wanna see I find a way to see themselves here. He is in one thousand nine hundred eighty five at the Cambridge union society, Cambridge England, and he's debating. William Buckley, conservative. But you don't see him here is James Baldwin when the extra attorney.

James Baldwin Baltimore Washington Post reporter James Brown Baltimore City community colle Monica Norton Booker T South Carolina Baltimore county rape America editor CBC principal William Buckley Cambridge union society Spyder Giovanni
"cambridge union" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:19 min | 3 years ago

"cambridge union" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Founds spilling your heart out. So Jona, obviously Gobert got a little nervous there. And he said, okay. It was there tension in the room when this happened. You can say that you could say that there was and I think one of the reasons why talk was able to keep going and going for minutes and minutes isn't nobody really knew what to do. Everyone was just kind of shopping astonish. What did you say to him? After the panel was over. I we didn't say much, but I thought it was really important to look in the eye and shake his hand and say well, good to see you. So, but the point of this as he wrote your your essay first things about this event. What happened after this? Aired. Well, it got a ton of coverage and went viral everybody that I knew side everybody at my workplace saw it. I was walking down the street with my parents, and people would stop and point and say, hey, you're the C span girl, especially if you're were living in New York or visiting DC the two places where I was at the time. You know, the the people who seen that video live in those towns. So there was a lot of pointing in staring snickering that was in two thousand and ten. That's right. And so what happened to your life after this? Well, a few months or a little over a year after that I decided that I wanted to move on from my job at national review and find a new job. And that was when it first hit me that this really was at the top of my Google search and always would be and so that everybody that I was sending a resume too. And was hoping would bring me in for a job interview would see this video. And so I I did not get as many colefax as I as I was expecting would prove your point. We just Google you today. Even though your name has changed, and you can see that. Right. There is the video. And your name is Helen Andrews now at the time your name was a much more distinctive. I was the only Helen brutal Meyer on the planet. So yeah, all the Google results for concentrated on me. I eventually, well, there were a lot of reasons why moved out of town got out of town and moved to Sydney, Australia, the first and most important was that I tell in love with an Australian, and he moved back, but it I have to admit a part of it was kind of relief that wanting to get away from this whole story. Although as I discovered moving to the other side of the world doesn't really solve the problem in the age of the internet. I eventually got a job at a think tank, and when I released my first report for them on the issue of nonprofit regulation, the video came up again, and people linked to it and said, I don't care what this person has to say about nonprofit regulation. So what were you? Pieces called shame storm. Did you feel shamed? By this or. Mr seafield. Shame. I certainly a lot of embarrassment. But one thing that I've noticed watching more and more of these cycles when somebody becomes the worst person on the internet for a day. Is that it almost doesn't matter to the dynamic whether they've done something genuinely evil or just something silly like throwing a sandwich at McDonald's person, or whatever it is everybody piles on the same way. I have here a September. Seventh two thousand nine blog from your former friend Todd, and I just thought it was going to read the first part of it. This is two thousand and nine this happened in two thousand and ten he he starts to write in his blog and its headline. Helen riddle Meyer postscript. One year ago this month Helen riddle Meyer, came to one of the monthly Manhattan project gatherings that I hosted for three years now for the first time, I went out went on a date someone I met there, obviously. Meaning you for a period of about ten months. She was mentioned so many times on this blog that you deserve some sort of final summation. I mean, what is this? This is all new, and and certainly my lifetime where it's all being spilled out on a blog in how often did he write about you on his blog? Yeah. It's funny. When I first started dating Todd one of the things that I learned about him was that he had appeared in one of his ex ex-girlfriend's memoirs. She was someone who had been an MTV rock and roll journalists and ended up converting to Catholicism and becoming a face journalist. So she wrote a memoir about that journey from sex drugs and rock and roll world to the Roman Catholic church and she devoted a chapter in there to her experience baiting Todd because Todd is an atheist and aggressively theorist and this was during her conversion. So it was about that dynamic and one of the stories that's on the record in that chapter. Is that when they broke up Todd sent a mass Email to everyone? He knew saying my girlfriend has just broken up with me. But I think we're really good together. If anyone has any advice they can give for how to win her back. Let me know. Now, she that catastrophically embarrassing. So that was a little bit of. You know, if my life were a novel, that's what you would call foreshadowing, how often did he write about you and his blog? Awesome. You know, don's a very upfront guy lives. It lives his whole life or at that time. He he blogs less now. But you know, the way a lot of people do nowadays with their Twitter, accounts and Instagram. It was all was all up there. Here's a headline from the city paper Washington on October the twentieth. Two thousand and ten right after this happened dear secretly sadistic conservative heartbreaker, Helen, quote, boxing, quote, riddle Meyer, some thoughts on your penance. And they start off by saying it was perhaps the single most captivating moment in the history of heterosexual, conservative romance. I don't need to go on with this. But. When this started to happen. What happened to you? All this publicity. Yeah. I remember when that blog post came out because the author of it approached me for a quote does see if she could get my reaction, and I got a lot of requests for media and take to talk to reporters after this happened. And I just I wasn't a public person as at time. So I had no experience giving interviews to journalists. And I was feeling so overwhelmed and humiliated that I just didn't answer anybody's emails. But of course, the person who wrote that blog post went on and wrote it up anyway without any comment from me. What does say wrong about you and his cut whatever you want to his you call it a diatribe or what it is? But he would obviously on the attack. Yeah. Well, the important thing to say in Todd's defense is that he didn't say anything. He didn't believe everything Todd said he believed was true. And now the particular story he's alluding to about matchmaking. He has the facts were distorted from his perspective. So that is I think inaccurate. But from his point of view, that's that's what he thought. What's the Justine Sacco story that you write about in your piece, I consider that to be kind of the the very first real inaugurating event in our new era of these Twitter. Shame storms. She was a PR executive living in London who had fewer than two hundred Twitter followers. So just an ordinary person with a normal job. Not a public figure of any kind. She was about to get on a plane for Christmas vacation to Cape Town. She was going to go visit some relatives in South Africa. And she tweeted is a funny joke going to South Africa. Hope I don't get aids. Just kidding. I'm white. Now, she said later, and I believe her completely that she meant this joke to satirize racism, you know, the perception that only black Africans get aids. That of course, you know, everybody gets as it's a multi-racial problem. But reporter at Gawker who didn't have anything to write about because it was Christmas sign, and there was no news. Saw this tweet and decided to do a post it out it and within a few hours millions and millions of people had followed Justine Sacco on Twitter and favored at that tweet. And quote tweeted at saying what a horrible thing it was. And the thing that made this story. So gripping was that Justin was on a plane and didn't have access to the internet. So the hash tag became has justly landed yet because of course, once she landed she would discover that she had become a figure of eight for millions of people should never met. She said later that when she got off the plane and turned her phone on it basically melted. Let's just look at a little video of a report of this that at that time. Justine Sacco now apologizing after this offensive tweet went viral going to Africa. Hope I don't get aids. Just kidding. I'm white in a statement seco- tells ABC news words cannot express how sorry I am. And how necessary it is for me to apologize to the people of South Africa. She was fired Saturday from her top PR job at internet giant where she some of the biggest names online like match dot com. The Daily Beast and about dot com. This is one of the fastest responses in crash and burns I've ever seen. Do you? Remember this happening at the time. And did you have any reaction? Then I remember where I was I was in a car on the way to rural New South Wales because I was spending Christmas vacation out in the country at a friend's country house, and I had Twitter on my phone, and I saw this story, and I saw has just landed yet. And I have to admit for the first half hour there. I was joining everybody else. Oh my goodness. Has she landed yet? This is such a gripping story. I wanna follow this. Click. Click click. And it it took a while for it to really sink in that what was happening to her was so similar to what had happened to me. And that may be the moral thing to do is to to not join in the pylon of this innocent bystander. What did you think of icy firing her? That's the aspect of the shame storms that bothers me the most and that I think is most that needs most to change because it happens. Most of the time that whoever finds themselves the subject to this kind of online. Shame storm does lose their job. And it's hardly ever. Because their boss says, I think you're misbehavior is genuinely offensive and my company needs to take a stand against it. Or I genuinely think you're going to be a threat to your co workers because of what it now emerges you have done. That's not ninety percent of the time. The employer says sorry, I think you're great. But I need to let you go. So that my phone's will stop bringing, you know, I need to cave to the mob because otherwise they're gonna keep clamoring for your head. So I just need the story you stop. That's why I need to let you go. I would really like in the future for employers like ic- to show a little bit more backbone and say, you know, this person is a good. Employees and it has no effect on their job performance. We're gonna stand by our guy risky for me to say this. But I found online that she'd been rehired just recently. There's a lot of years in between. I actually I don't have to go back and look at the date on her story was in two thousand thirteen. So along the way you must have decided to become a journalist. What was the journalist then? But I mean, other than writing your opinion pieces and all that you're running a magazine now. What were in your? Tip from North Carolina to Yale to Washington DC. Did you decide that you wanted to be in journalism instead of religion, which you studied? Well, the the religious studies major was just a major the L political union was my undergraduate career. What does that mean, by the way? Political union, if you know about the Oxford Union or the Cambridge union, we bring a guest speaker on and then we have formal debates, according to will Robert's rules of order with motions for order and clarification and all that parliamentary style type stuff all matters of mostly political interests. But occasionally, we'll do a more philosophical debate. And how much time did you spend on the hill political union all the time that I wasn't asleep. Did you run it? I was speaker. Yes. That's right. I was I was the one with the gavel and why and how did you get into that? And and I guess the other thing is the impact of these kinds of experiences for people in college, obviously make a difference. Oh, absolutely. I. You ask when I decided to go into journalism, and I can't answer that because it never really was a decision. I just kind of drifted into it. I mentioned earlier that I just started a funny little blog. You know on WordPress way back in the day when people had blogs, and it was only from being discovered by editors from that that I started writing for magazines and eventually that turned into a career q&a on C span radio with Helen Andrews, managing editor of the Washington Examiner magazine. So what was your experience? And there's some other things that you wrote about it in the magazine article that will get back to what was your experience living in Australia. And what impact did that have on your thinking about your politics? The media the internet. Well. On the one hand it made me appreciate the internet more..

Todd Helen riddle Meyer Twitter Justine Sacco Helen Andrews Helen Google Australia South Africa Washington reporter national review New York Jona Sydney DC hill political union Mr seafield