35 Burst results for "Caltech"

Robinhood has lured young traders

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:22 min | 2 months ago

Robinhood has lured young traders

"And selling stocks on the smartphone. App Robin Hood has become incredibly popular this year especially since the covert pandemic started and there are a few possible reasons why I of everybody's home and has lots of spare time that's got to be part of it maybe. Also, of course, you know, maybe people had a little extra money to invest because so many restaurants and shops were closed also, maybe people sense an opportunity to buy stocks cheap when the stock market collapsed in the first month of the pandemic, whatever the reason Robin Hood announced recently that the amount of money, it makes people trading on its APP doubled in the second quarter of the year two, one, hundred, eighty, million dollars. It's a lot of traits. In the hood is also become kind of famous for the clever ways that it entices people to use. It's apt to and sell stocks. So Digital Confetti or some other animation might fall across the screen when you first deposit money into the APP, we are simple. Take away from that hard to get us in here. Yeah. And Robert also offers free stocks to people who sign up for a trial run into people who convince others to sign up. James. mccomb is twenty five lives in Long Island. New York he is a big robinhood user and there are several things he likes about Robin, Hood's design and how simple and seamless it is to keep track of what's happening for any company. He is interested in it's a great APP for easy information almost like a news feed but for stocks plus the Robin Hood. Shows a ranking the most popular stocks that other robinhood traders have been buying which. You know my convince new traders to join the party James. HIMSELF INVESTED MONEY IN UBER stock partly because it was number one on Robin Hoods popularity ranking I can kind of get a little bit of a sense of confidence like okay. People believe in this company because it's literally number one on the list currently James is what is known as a retail trader, which is basically anyone who buys and sells stocks for their own personal account not a professional investor who manages other people's money. In this year, it is retail traders like James who've really thrown themselves into the stock. Market. Because the US stock market has gone up in recent months, even hitting a new record high last week a lot of these retail traders have made quite a bit of money lately but other, maybe some reasons to worry that. So many retail traders have started buying and selling stocks using APPs like Robin Hood I would say two parts worried one part. Happy. This is Colin camerer. He's a behavioral economist at Caltech and he has studied the ways that people invest in the stock market collinses. One good thing about Robin Hood is it by making it so? Easy to start buying stocks. It might get people invested in the stock market who otherwise might never have bothered at all, and this can also help people learn more about how specific companies operate into to better understand how the economy works. Especially these days the digital age when it's so easy to find useful information. You know there's a lot of stuff under the hood, the economy, and it'd be good if people knew more about that and they may learn some by just buying selling shares of a particular stock and learning about what boards of directors do. You know how companies actually operate conn said, he was only one part happy and two parts worried about Robin Hoods popularity with retail traders. So here's why he's worried if there is one conclusion that the research about financial markets keeps arriving at again and again it's the individual traders who actively try to pick specific stocks buying stocks. They think we'll go up selling the stocks I think we'll go down are very likely to underperform the overall stock market and this does not just apply to retail traders it also applies. To professional money managers over the last five years eighty, two percent of mutual funds that tried to pick stocks underperformed the overall stock market, which means that most people are just better off investing in what they call an index fund that just tracks the performance at the stock market goes up and down with it over time and Collins says, retail traders are also vulnerable to psychological by sees lead them to make bad decisions when they invest especially, if they don't understand the risks that they're taking if you're buying somebody's selling. And you have to be confident that you're buying from someone who knows less than you about the future of the. So one of the elements in in retail trading is overconfidence. Everybody thinks they're above average also confetti. And? Just. Sucks right in. plus people fall victim to what's known as the disposition effect which makes people sell stocks that have gone up a little too soon missing out on making even more money people have a tendency to sell toxin went up and we think it's because there's a special kind of. Realization utility from actually locking gain and clicking and like seeing in your bank account. From your portfolio numbers on the screen into your bank account or something like would. So people so winners too soon and similarly they tend to hang onto losers typically in a kind of blind faith that it's GonNa Bounce back making these kinds of trading mistakes something that happens when people are actively and frequently buying and selling stocks, and of course, the ROBINHOOD APP is designed to get people to do just that and Robin Hood's business model actually depends on it.

Robin Hood Hood Robin Hoods James Robin Colin Camerer New York Caltech Long Island United States James. Mccomb Robert Conn Collins
"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"By Caltech until I have this Hashtag team Nicole on here. A flight attendant, 29 is arrested for beating the ever loving hell out of her husband, who's 34. She gave him a black eye, smashed his guitar on the wall after she caught him engaging in Biblical biblical intimacy with another woman. The woman, Florida Florida woman, Nicole Dennison was arrested Wednesday after she attacked her husband. She literally found him in the act. And in their home, so she punched him left him with a black eye. She's a flight attendant of the Legionnaire. She was charged with domestic battery. I think the dude deserved it quite frankly. Didn't get mad at me all you want to play ground rules, guys. Playground rules. You do that the marital, But guess what? You're gonna get what? That's how it works. You get mad at me all you want to, so I don't think it's funny that she actually was able to whip him. I mean, what kind of man are you? I'm just saying so be light hearted people quit being just joy. Killjoys. So they allowed her to T s So they She got trouble. That's all you need to know. And her? Yeah. She had the arresting officers that they witnessed the damage that she flickered on the home. The husband, etcetera, etcetera. What about the damage you inflicted on the marriage getting for violation of contract girl, though? Anyways, we get moving on Sam. I'm just saying Taylor Swift, so I cannot stand is silent as fans docks and harass a music critic. She came out with his album called for Forklore Folklore. And this music critic came out and what it was like.

Nicole Dennison Taylor Swift Florida Florida Forklore Folklore
Prototype Ventilator Created At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Innovation Now

01:21 min | 3 months ago

Prototype Ventilator Created At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

"Specializes in spacecraft not medical device manufacturing, but excellent engineering rigorous testing and rapid prototyping are some of the agencies specialties. This is innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. A new high pressure ventilator called vital has been developed by engineers. At Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory to free up the nation's limited supply of traditional ventilators. So they may be used on patients with the most severe covid nineteen symptoms. When people at JPL realized, they might have what it takes to support the medical community. They felt it was their duty to their ingenuity and expertise. And in just thirty seven days had created. The prototype medical machine vital can be built faster and maintained more easily than a traditional ventilator. Flexible design means it also can be modified for use in field hospitals being set up in convention centers, hotels, and other high capacity facilities across the country and around the globe, the office of Technology Transfer and corporate partnerships at Caltech, which manages jpl for NASA will offer a free license for vital manufacturers interested in the device for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley

JPL Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Jennifer Pulley Nasa Technology Transfer Caltech
Taller people face higher risk of catching COVID-19, survey says

Dana Loesch

01:33 min | 3 months ago

Taller people face higher risk of catching COVID-19, survey says

"Caltech. This is one of the things I do not understand. This is a headline. It's everywhere now. Taller People, for some reason, faced a higher risk of catching the Corona virus, according to a survey they say people over six feet tall. Are more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with the Corona virus, a global team of researchers, including experts from the University of Manchester and Open University, They surveyed 2000 people. In the UK as well as the U. S to determine whether personal attributes like their work, living practices. What role that place in transmission and how much and what they found is that all of the taller people were at a higher list, which researchers say Well, that means the contagion has spread through the air because I wouldn't be a factor if the virus was on ly contract herbal through droplets. So, they say The results of the survey in terms of associations between height and diagnosis suggests downward droplet transmission is not the on ly transmission mechanism. An aerosol transmission is possible. They said that this has been suggested by other studies. But their method of confirmation is novel. They said social distance seems still important, but they said, really explore air purification and interior spaces. So that's what they said. And then they were talking about sharing kitchen in accommodations that that might be like a danger. I am like, mystify

University Of Manchester Open University UK U. S
NASA Develops COVID-19 Prototype Ventilator in 37 Days

Innovation Now

01:00 min | 6 months ago

NASA Develops COVID-19 Prototype Ventilator in 37 Days

"A new high pressure ventilator called vital has been developed by engineers at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory to free up the nation's limited supply of traditional ventilators so they may be used on patients with the most severe Kovic nineteen symptoms when people at Jpl realized they might have what it takes to support the medical community It was their duty to their ingenuity and expertise and ingest. Thirty seven days had created the prototype. Medical machine vital can be built faster and maintained more easily than a traditional ventilator. It's flexible design. Means it also can be modified for use in field hospitals being set up in convention centers hotels and other high capacity facilities across the country and around the globe the Office of Technology Transfer and corporate partnerships at Caltech which manages. Jpl FOR NASA will offer a free license for vital manufacturers interested in the device

JPL Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Office Of Technology Transfer Nasa Caltech
Flat Earthers: What They Believe and Why

Science Talk

09:37 min | 7 months ago

Flat Earthers: What They Believe and Why

"This is scientific. American science talk posted on March. Twenty seven twenty twenty. I'm Steve Mirsky. I'm going to let my guest introduce himself in a moment because he does a better job than I could. Midway through the following discussion. We'll take a break for a short segment sponsored by the Calveley prize with Caltech Planetary Astronomer. Michael Brown who has done groundbreaking work though solar system breaking work on the Kuyper belt and its largest members. His segment is not unrelated to what will be talking about now. It's not about corona virus. You'll find some parallels to how some people are reacting to corona virus. Buckle up so I'm Michael Marshall and I'm the project director of the good thinking society which is a charity based in the UK the whole purpose charities to promote science to challenge pseudoscience. So we'll do work Ford Science Education and then another PA the work that we do. The bulk of my work is to find ideas. That aren't backed by evidence and find people who are promoting those ideas find people who are buying into those ideas and to explore them and figure out if anything can be done to prevent people being confused by them Hound by the misled by them and those kinds of things. So I spent a lot of time looking at things like alternative cancer kills and the people who promote those and alternative medicine spent a lot my time going to see people who say they can talk dead. Oku can do faith healing and then another part of my time is spent token people who believe in unusual ideas and kind of proponents. And that's how I came across the flat. Earth world is through my slightly odd a hobby at the time before I was working. Fulltime as as a skeptic is a hobby of mine to be in rooms filled if he who disagree with me to just understand what brings people to ideas that. I would look at and say well. This can't be true. These kind of fringe and extreme and unusual beliefs. What brings people to believe them? And what what? What kind of path leave people there will? Evidence supports supports that position in their minds. And how do they engage with the world with that worldview and try and have conversations? Podcast where I talked to people who have kind of fringe beliefs and instead of having a conversation that a lot of people have if they are a skeptic about something and they're talking to believe where you shout at them and tell them never home and point out all the evidence and tell you gets into a volatile discussion sometimes instead of that. I've tried to have a civil and polite chat to try and explore the gap between us. So I don't believe in this idea of yours but I'm reading to figure out why I don't believe it. Why do so? Let's have a conversation? So have these kind of civil discussions and that's kind of how I came across That the flatter theory and the idea that there are people walking around today. Who think well this flat. This is really interesting and serendipitous that were sitting here because I knew that there were some flatter. Thor's out there and I just thought it was kind of strange and funny and about a week ago I discovered a friend of mine who is very well educated. She got a doctorate in biochemistry and She has a sister who's also very intelligent and very well educated and my friend told me that her sister is a flatter and that her sister is very indignant about the idea that We don't take them seriously and she said something to the effectiveness is hearsay. That we're getting for me right now. That will you know if you looked at the evidence. Then you'd know that what you've been told isn't true. So all of a sudden became fascinated with the flat earth people and then Just on twitter and I had I had been a follower verve yours until I saw this tweet that somebody I follow must've re tweeted that you had just given a talk in Edinburgh where I have been and So I reached out to you and it turns out you live in Liverpool and here I am in Liverpool today. So that's why we're here talking so tell me what do the flat Earth People Think and why do they think it so to your packet question that will bit because it's very easy for us to see the flat? Earth Movement is one singular cohesive movement and. That's how I I thought about it when I first came across in two thousand thirteen when I came across the flutter society in the UK. And so I had a conversation with the vice president of the Flat Earth Society and I assumed you probably have in your mind that people who believe the world is flat thing that the world's disk and in the center you've got the Arctic Circle then you've got all the continents of the world are splayed out to fill the circle. Antarctica is like the edge of disk. But I found out when I first spoke to flatter societies that not everyone in the world has that version of the world and the heads. Some do believe it's a disc but others believe that. Yes the Arctic Circle in the middle the landmasses around it and then on top Around the edge but instead of it being discreet disc some people believe in fact Antactica just on forever and all directions and so they believe that the earth is actually an infinite plane in all directions that bisects reality which is a really lovely idea. What does that mean by? Second three dollars so it will go on. North South East West go on forever and there is the above and the below. But there's no way of getting from the top to the bottom because it's just infinity of all ice in all directions forever so there's no way of getting below the earth and so this was when. I first came across the floor of moving in two thousand thirteen. This quite vociferous debate that was going on and the website of the three in the flat. Earthers yeah it was. It was quite a schism really and so they'd the society. The the time was largely a forum where they would bring forth that proofs of one version this theory or another and I also think there's another schism going on in the movement at the time Which is between one side which people who genuinely really believed the world was flat and the other side which after he did not believe it but enjoyed intellectual pursuit of arguing a position than you false and so they would find quite esoteric off the wall proofs that most people wouldn't think of and so when I first came across it in two thousand thirteen there are people waiting into these arguments who believe the world is round but had never thought about it the fall but just assumed innocent of arrogant way that they must know better than anybody who's thought about it and come to a different conclusion and so they were stumping into these arguments saying well what about photos of the earth from space and what about this and what about ships going with the rise in thinking. Well this is the Gotcha but not realizing that those are the first things they thought about that. They thought the world approved walls around. And therefore it's probably likely that people who think the world is flat had the same idea and yet they're still flat earth So at least in their mind they must have a good answer to that. The people believe the world was round in these arguments. Didn't have 'cause they'd never scrutinize the idea. They rejecting enough and so what was happening. Was I think to a degree? The part of the schism that were just having fun and move very well. The world wasn't flat but just enjoyed the pursuit of doing that. They will winning those arguments of people who are coming in and arrogantly assuming that they could answer everything and in winning those arguments they were really converting even more people who really believed it. And so you had this kind of effect where we saw spiral out of control a little bit. But I think it it wasn't viral in the way that in two thousand thirteen and a as a in the way that it was in two thousand sixteen in two thousand seventeen. I'm think PA that is because that ISA teric off wall version of proofs could be quite complicated to get your head around so for example if you have the disc version the world and the infinite plane version both muddles suffer from an inability to explain gravity. You don't have the spherical mass united central mass of a central point pulling it all two to one point So it's very difficult to explain. Gravity neither one models but these people who are doing kind of East Tarik arguments are saying well what gravity gravity and accelerate falls towards the ground. Think nine point. Eight meters per second. Squared accelerates downwards. They said that is identical to a world in which the ground accelerates upwards to meet you and so when you let go of something it isn't that it's accelerating downwards that it's the grounds accelerating up to meet it Sephora relativity and that's this is exactly where they come to you so people then say when if ground is if the earth is an infinite in all directions that by sex reality and is accelerating open at nine seconds and always has been since the dawn of time. You'd hit a problem which would be the speed of light. You can't go fast so people don't have a Gotcha for this. And so the people who were putting forth esoteric the wall trobisch arguments would say well look at Einstein's theory of relativity as you approach light speed time itself slows down and the mats in their head works back out again so yes beginning. Quick time getting slower and we can account for gravity in that way. And that's quite a complicated auditing Enron. And so I think the fact that these people were winning arguments was getting converting some people movement but the way in which they were winning them were keeping people away from the movement because they were quite complex ideas to you. Couldn't stick them on a mean as you can these days. Here's a picture of the earth. You couldn't explain all that stuff about the relatively proving gravitate infinite plane version of the world. So I think it was a limiting factor going on and that's why when I first came across the free movement it was probably still pretty small. Pretty unknown I've been given talks about pseudoscience for the last five six plus years and I've mentioned that I came across the Flat Earth. Moving and people would always say to me this. Nobody who actually believes that nobody actually doesn't really exist. That people having fun with stay quite small and then in. Twenty fifteen in two thousand sixteen a couple of things happened that really ignited a movement and it was the publishing of two videos on Youtube video series on Youtube. One I believe was Eric. Debate tuned approves the Spinning Globe. And the other was mark sergeants. Fourteen videos in his letter clue series.

Flat Earth Society UK PA Arctic Circle Earth Movement Liverpool Steve Mirsky Michael Brown Caltech Planetary Astronomer Calveley Youtube Cancer OKU Ford Science Education Twitter Michael Marshall Thor Antarctica
Latest Apple results show hardware is still king

The Tech Guy

01:26 min | 9 months ago

Latest Apple results show hardware is still king

"Apple had great results quarterly results always good for the fourth quarter fourth calendar quarter first quarter of apples fiscal year. Big Number though that and this is the number number apple likes to talk about how many people using their devices one and a half billion active apple devices MACs ipads but mostly iphones eighty percent of them eighty percent of iphones and ipads running the latest. IOS Thirteen. That's a really good number one point. Five billion million active devices probably a billion of those or iphones. Yell which Pitch Helps Apple Pay the one point one billion dollar fine or court. I guess it's a court order court decision to you pay for patent infringement. They bought chips from broadcom broadcom. Apparently according to the courts Infringed orange the patent of the California Institute of Technology Caltech. They had the WIFI patterns. The jury said Apple You pay one hundred eight hundred thirty seven million dollars to Caltech broadcom. You hit them you pay them. Two hundred seventy million dollars. That will build a pretty Nice Library there and the campus. The Job Caltech Apple can afford it. Of course they can cost them nothing

Apple Broadcom California Institute Of Techno
CalTech wins $1.1 billion jury verdict in patent case against Apple, Broadcom

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:21 sec | 9 months ago

CalTech wins $1.1 billion jury verdict in patent case against Apple, Broadcom

"A federal jury has decided that apple and chip maker Broadcom should pay over a billion dollars in damages to cal tech it's a patent infringement case we're talking about to wifi data transmission patents held by cal tech for computer chips that went up going into iPhones iPads apple watches and other apple devices cal takes as its pleased with the decision no comment from apple or

Broadcom Apple
Apple, Broadcom told to pay Caltech $1.1B in patent lawsuit

Daily Tech Headlines

00:30 sec | 9 months ago

Apple, Broadcom told to pay Caltech $1.1B in patent lawsuit

"A jury in the US District Court for the Central District of California ruled that apple and broadcom infringed on WIFI patents from the California when you institute of Technology Ordering Total of one point one billion dollars in damages. The suit was filed in two thousand sixteen with Caltech naming iphones ipads ipods. Apple watches his and MAC computers as devices including infringing broadcom components. The damages break down to eight hundred thirty seven point. Eight million dollars from apple and two hundred seventy seventy point two million dollars from broadcom.

Broadcom Apple Us District Court California Caltech Institute Of Technology
Apple, Broadcom told to pay Caltech $1.1B in patent lawsuit

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:19 sec | 9 months ago

Apple, Broadcom told to pay Caltech $1.1B in patent lawsuit

"Context been awarded more than a billion dollars in damages after winning the big patent infringement suit against apple and Broadcom a jury here in LA agreed that the tech companies illegally use wifi technology that was patented by the institution according to Bloomberg it's the sixth largest patent verdict ever Evelyn Broadcom are

Apple LA Bloomberg Evelyn Broadcom Broadcom
Apple, Broadcom told to pay Caltech $1.1B in patent lawsuit

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 9 months ago

Apple, Broadcom told to pay Caltech $1.1B in patent lawsuit

"A jury is ordering apple and Broadcom to pay more than a billion dollars in damages to the California institute of technology and P. R. Shannon bond says the companies were found guilty of infringing on wifi patents the research university known as cal tech sued the companies in twenty sixteen it said Broadcom chips used in iPhones Max and other apple devices infringe Caltech patents related to data transmission apple has been ordered to pay almost eight hundred and thirty eight million dollars while Broadcom must pay about two hundred and seventy million dollars apple says it will appeal the verdict the iPhone maker argued in court that is device is nearly contained the chips and did not themselves infringed the patents Broadcom also says it intends to appeal books woman for cal tech says the university is pleased with

Apple P. R. Shannon Bond Cal Tech Broadcom California Institute Of Techno
Researchers design an improved pathway to carbon-neutral plastics

The Naked Scientists

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Researchers design an improved pathway to carbon-neutral plastics

"Techniques that can turn waste carbon dioxide into ethylene the high value gas used polythene and a range of other products has been unveiled by scientists in Canada. The system is clever. New Inexpensive copper based catalysts the can selectively grab underline carbon dioxide molecules. So that they react together with water to make pure ethylene. Previously the main industrial source of ethylene was oil so this new approach has the potential to carbon dioxide emissions and reduce oil consumption. Toronto universities. Ted Sergeant developed a new process. We've got a system that eats carbon dioxide so consume co two it also uses is is renewable energy so energy from solar cell or a wind farm and uses those two ingredients to produce ethylene which is a major commodity chemical. Unless the stuff we turn into poly ethylene otherwise known as polythene. That's right so this is a big global industry. It's about a sixty billion dollar industry and it's got a major carbon footprint today and people have become very interested in capturing sea of two and sequestering it but the problem there is that you don't get value value out of it you just sort of buried underground and so there's a whole community ourselves included that has been trying to figure out ways to upgrade utilized. Co Two into a valuable. We'll product to generate a pull on consuming and utilizing co two. The problem here is in chemistry when we burn stuff that's got carbon in it. We Release Energy and waste. Product is co two carbon dioxide which we throw away in the planet spin a convenient place to put that up until now so in order to get get something useful back out of the C O two you've got to do some work and hitherto. It's been very difficult to make these equations actually stack up in a financially viable way that it was worth doing. So how if you solve this. So in order to make something valuable you also need some make it an affiliate pure form previously we and other groups jobs had made what are called heterogeneous catalysts. So these are basically pieces of metal in on the metal the carbon dioxide and the electrons from the electricity land. They they mix up with water and they're the reaction occurs to produce the ethylene. What we found was that some brilliant scholars who became our collaborators from Caltech had come up with a way to put molecules onto a catalyst for the molecules kind of made the carbon dioxide that you were trying to react with stand up in a special and controlled old way onto the catalyst allowed us to control the orientation of the carbon dioxide so that we could then turn it selectively into ethylene so when the reaction proceeds to carbon dioxide and coupled together they've formed this to carbon molecule ethylene and then we simply collect the gas that mixes with the water water? That's involved in the reaction. And how does the whole catalytic process work do you feed in carbon dioxide gas. Yep So we feed and C O two it it interacts with the catalyst and does so right at the same place that there's water and waters providing the hydrogen to produce these hydrocarbons. And how fast is this. This is this actually viable because some of these catalysts they turned something that happens. excruciatingly slowly into something that happens a little bit less excruciatingly slowly but it's not industrially viable apple so he's your process fast so there's one measure that we use in this field to describe the activity or the speed of the reaction and it's a current density. I'll just give you a sense of what it was previously using these molecules it was about one million per square centimeter now. We built a system in this project. That's is designed to work at industrial productivity and most people in industry will agree that you need to get to about one hundred million per square centimeter in order to have an industrial industrially interesting process. We managed to get above two hundred million APPs so we achieve more than a factor of one hundred increase and we did get into to the range of industrial interests. So would it be feasible to couple something like this up to the flu stream from say a big power plant and deal with what a coal. Oh five power station. Thirty thousand tonnes of CO two in an afternoon might chuck out. So there's a lot of additional work we need to do on scaling but we've done the calculations and and we know how much co two comes out of. Say a steel plant or out of a cement factory. We know how much electricity is available and we also need to supply the water. That's it's actually the most straightforward those three feeds and it should be possible to couple these altogether and we believe that with a bit more progress on the energy efficiency the of our system it will even become economically compelling to make ethylene that is renewable ethylene instead of fossil absolutely see if activity Geico carbon-neutral plastic. That's right you end up actually taking co two that would otherwise have been omitted a new sequester it into the plastic product.

Canada Release Energy Ted Sergeant Toronto Caltech Geico Apple Chuck Thirty Thousand Tonnes Sixty Billion Dollar
Does Our Solar System Contain a Primordial Black Hole?

BrainStuff

06:35 min | 1 year ago

Does Our Solar System Contain a Primordial Black Hole?

"There's something big lurking in the frozen hinterlands of our solar system that appears to be tugging at the a tiny worlds beyond the orbit of Neptune the object is assumed to be a hypothetical world called planet nine which has extremely far-flung orbit around the Sun and causes all kinds of gravitational chaos out there in the dark but as the search for planet nine wears on and astronomers have yet to so much get a glimpse of it some researchers are pondering the object could be might not be planted at all could it be a primordial black hole the solar system is a big place and while astronomical techniques are rapidly advancing many tiny bodies in the outer solar system have yet to be found planet nine thought to be a rather more substantial object however with massive around five to ten earth masses scooting around the sun at an average distance of four hundred to eight hundred astronomical units or a US since one a you is that average distance at which earth orbits the Sun that's ten to twenty times the orbital distance at which Pluto orbits the Sun So if exists planet nine takes between ten thousand in twenty thousand years to complete just one orbit the possibility of a large world orbiting the Senate such a huge distance is captivating studies of other stars system's reveal that exoplanets between the masses of Earthen Neptune are relatively common why our solar system doesn't contain a world with this mass range is a puzzle but a planet nine really is out there it would be profound historic discovery that would reshape our understanding of the system of planets that orbit our sun suffice to say any planet with an orbit this extreme would be very difficult to spot but astronomers are scouring infrared surveys with hopes of seeing distant object slowly crawl across the sky if it's out there planet nine should be emitting infrared radiation energy leaking from the planet since its formation but so far apart from the gravitational effect of something in the outer solar system there's precious little direct evidence for Planet Nines Existence Enter the Black Hole hypothesis in September nineteen astronomers Jacob Schultz Durham University and James Unwin of the University of Illinois at Chicago published a new study describing their alternative hypothesis the gravity personal weirdness in the outermost reaches of the solar system isn't being caused by planet at all instead they pointed to the potential presence of a primordial black hole a theory it's caused a bit of a stir no this kind of black hole does not pose danger to the rest of the solar system it'd be too small for that but in the distant regions solar system it's impact would be significant the only evidence we have for Planet Nines Existence are the gravitational effects it's having on Trans Neptune objects and Black goals are the most gravitationally endowed objects in the universe after all primordial black holes are the most ancient kind of black hole there hypothesized to a formed right after the Big Bang density fluctuations in the early universe what have rapidly formed black holes of all masses these ancient objects would have been flung throughout the cosmos and over time they would have slowly evaporated via hawking radiation smaller ones popping out of existence I but let's back up a step why does scientists think that some extreme object is out there in two thousand sixteen planet Hunters Constantine but Teagan and Mike Brown of Caltech announced their discovery of a group a very distant Trans Neptune objects the were all strangely clustered moving was similar orbital alignments their orbital alignment was also weirdly tilted so it appeared they were all being corralled by gravitational interactions with a larger planetary body but no other large planetary body exists in that region so Teigen and Brown hypothesized an as yet to be discovered planet was out there and so the hunt began while many theories of cosmic evolution suggest that primordial black holes should exist we have yet to directly observe one though there is some compelling indirect evidence take for example microloans what's the transient brightening of stars caused by massive object passing in front of them causing a brief brightening by the curvature of space time creating sort of magnifying lens analysis of these micro lens events suggests that there's a population of small black holes out there with no other visible clues except for their gravitational impact on space time mm-hmm Shilton unwin took a fresh look at the Trans Neptune object peculiarities and simulated. What would happen if a black hole with a mass of between five and ten earth masses had an extreme orbit around the sun sure enough their models suggest that primordial black hole with a mass within this range would cause orbital turbulences like the ones already observed in the population of Trans Neptune objects this could also explain why little optical or infrared observational evidence for planet nine exists a primordial black Cole would generate neither signal in fact if a black hole is nearby and may also be dragging around a cloud of dark matter that could be generating different types of radiation searchers therefore suggest based on their findings the experimental program needs to be expended including searches for high energy cosmic rays like x rays and gamma rays coming from moving sources while this is an interesting avenue of steady replacing hypothetical planet with a hypothetical type of black hole may be overcomplicating the mystery the planet nine we spoke with Mike Brown he said could blackhall explain the gravitational effects we are seeing in the outer solar system absolutely all we know is there is a six earth mass something out there and we don't know what the something is Brown points out that planet would be the most obvious something but as long as it has a mass of a few earth's could be anything but the plausibility of it being anything other than a planet is extremely low to say the least with tongue in Cheek Brown added it might be a six earth mass hamburger or a Burrito but yes it might also be a six earth mass black hole the physics of course don't care one bit what the six earth mass are made of you could equally well hypothesize that every exit planet that we only detected by the radial velocity method is a black hole is it possible yes does it make any sense in the unit I know while investigating other gravitational sources of what may be messing with Trans Neptune objects is good science. It's more likely the planet when is a planet and not a primordial black hole astronomers just have to keep searching and there's a growing consensus that will be discovered in the not so distant future

Mike Brown Cheek Brown Brown Cole Eight Hundred Astronomical Twenty Thousand Years One Bit
Tiny Worms Are Equipped To Battle Extreme Environments

60-Second Science

02:47 min | 1 year ago

Tiny Worms Are Equipped To Battle Extreme Environments

"At Toyota we believe that American veterans have the strongest credentials on earth especially when you consider that they spend years gaining valuable experience by putting their lives on the line to protect the country they love and the people that live here but that doesn't always mean finding a career path is easy. That's why Toyota has partnered with hiring our as Europe's to help over one hundred fifty thousand veterans and military spouses connect with employment opportunities. We are Toyota. USA. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata in the science. It's fiction story June. The Desert Planet Iraq is inhabited by enormous fearsome sandwich shops they blast out of the dunes to swallow vehicles the whole they also look familiar to Caltech geneticists Paul Sternberg. We look like nats anything in pop culture has relationship doors. We follow nematodes toads of course are much smaller than sand worms most never told you can just barely see and there are a lot slower these worms are probably take one hundred years to get across the US if they could could do it and they went continuously day and night even so they're pretty scary when you look at them up close. Sternberg and his colleagues had a hunch they might find nematodes lurking in one of California's most extreme extreme habitats Mono Lake on the east side of the Sierra Nevada it super salty alkaline and loaded with arsenic and previously known to harbor only two animal species easies brine shrimp and Alkali flies so the researchers took soil samples at beaches around the lake and indeed they found eight species of nematodes living there so we just I went from two animals to at least ten species so that's Kinda striking so are they going to be others the lake yeah people should go look photos and details are in the journal current Biology Sternberg. His colleagues were able to culture one of the worm species in the lab and they discovered it could survive five hundred times the dose of arsenic they would kill a human but they also found that even nemo toads that weren't from Mona Lake seemed to have the genetic ability to resist the lethal element meaning. The worms may be Natural Boron extrema files us from the worms perspective invading a host. That's a harsh environment so I think there's some general ability than Emma toads to adapt to harsh environments like Doc. Maybe Mars I have a fantasy that we should send Amadou's. We really interesting. He could get the codes to photosynthesis or carry photosynthetic organisms and then worth talking about of course that's scenarios in the realm of science fiction for now. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dunya.

Toyota Paul Sternberg Mono Lake Christopher Dodd Yata Mona Lake Journal Current Biology Sternb Christopher Dunya Europe United States Amadou Usa. Emma Sierra Nevada California Sixty Seconds One Hundred Years
After big Southern California earthquake, months of aftershocks to follow

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

After big Southern California earthquake, months of aftershocks to follow

"It's the first a normal work week since the fourth of July but there is nothing normal about the way people feel in southern California after two powerful quakes in the Mojave Desert here's correspondent Alex stone here in California we are constantly told the big one could hit anytime they were way overdue likely on the San Andreas fault line Friday night's quake was not that the big one would wipe out a major city cut off communication and people would have to survive on their own for days cal tech seismologist Dr Lucy Jones is these quakes have not made the big one more likely this earthquake in ridgecrest has not increase the chance of an earthquake in southern California in the in the metropolitan area it has also not decreased it but the aftershocks around the epicenter continue Caltech geophysicist Dr Joanne stark says the area has likely seen the worst of what's to come in the near

California Mojave Desert Alex Stone Dr Lucy Jones Ridgecrest Earthquake San Andreas Geophysicist Dr Joanne Stark
After big California earthquake, months of aftershocks to follow

Environment: NPR

03:54 min | 1 year ago

After big California earthquake, months of aftershocks to follow

"Aftershocks continue in southern california after a massive earthquake last night the seven point one magnitude earthquake was the largest hit the area in decades people reported feeling it as far away as phoenix and baja california epicenter it was near the town rich press california about a two hour drive north of los angeles npr's nathan rot is there and he is with us now nathan hello thanks for being here yeah having a beer so seven point one is a massive earthquake what's it like in the town you know a town the got jolted by something of that magnitude 'em it's actually kind of amazingly in pretty good shape 'em i've seen very little damage driving around you know stop lights at are working stores it had their merchandise thrown about a you know some structures were damaged destroyed there were fires caused by ruptured gas pipes and some trailer trailer parks at were knocked skew us roads were closed some fractures rockslides and authorities do say the some buildings collapsed in a nearby town of about two thousand people trona now a but authorities say that so far knock on wood there had been no major injuries or reporters they tally set that's excellent news but i'd imagine that it's still in pretty scary for residents there how where people doing you know it's a bit of a mixed bag a a lot of the people i've talked to understand look this is southern california the land of many many seismic faults earthquakes just kinda come with the territory but other folks they're very shook i talked to one woman who said she lives through a lot of earthquakes but his never had anything like what you experience last night and remember the quick last night was the second major earthquake to hit here in just a couple of days on july fourth a six point four magnitude quake which is nothing to laugh at corrupted at the exact same spot so seismologist now see the that was easy for shock to last night's bigger event so you add those two things together in a lot of people are very much on edge i talked to some folks who slept outside last night in their yards at the backs of trucks they're planning to do that again tonight because they know this is not over on here's dionne bowman and i talked to who is loading up on water and supplies at a local grocery store we knows feel more calm i mean nothing has settled the ground still shaken as we speak so i mean right now were just taking it a day at a time in basically medicine seconds at a time i mean that's all we can do you know what he wasn't kidding right after i got done talking to him as walking back to my car and there was an aftershock that i kind of felt in and waived around a little how long do seismologist expect there to be these kinds of aftershocks days weeks months you know i think doctor lucy jones who's southern california's where the preeminent earthquake expert a sudden we could expect to see aftershocks from this birth quake for the next year a now the odds of another big seven point zero earthquake are relatively small at about three percent according to seismologist caltech odds of six point over higher at about twenty five percent but remember again this is an earthquake prone area seismologist at a press conference earlier said that this high desert area were in the mojave used to be known as be earthquake capital of the world we just haven't seen one in a while so where do people go from here what did they do knowing that this isn't over you know so local and state authorities are gonna continue to check for structural damage and houses roadways 'em they're definitely gonna keep checking major infrastructure bridges dams in area none of those have been reported

California Twenty Five Percent Three Percent Two Hour
Table salt may be hiding in Europa's underground sea

The Frame

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Table salt may be hiding in Europa's underground sea

"Travel millions of miles to Jupiter's moon Europa, and you'll find something more often found on dining tables here on earth. It's according to a new study from researchers at Caltech and JPL more from KPCC science reporter Jacob Mongolia's breakthrough Europa's icy crust dip your Cup into it. Subsurface ocean and take a big drink. Scientists think it tastes like like salt like your table salt that you're used to eating your food that Samantha Trump. Oh, PHD candidate and planetary science at Caltech and lead author of the new paper. They found evidence assault on the moon's surface that they think is being left, there by frozen ocean, water that ocean waters filled with salt, possibly because it's interacting with super hot areas of the ocean floor known as hydrothermal vents. That's kinda tantalizing because here on earth there, organisms that can survive in water next to those kinds of events. That means that theoretically, some could be alive, and thriving on Europa, too, though, there's a lot more. We need to learn about it before we can say, that's the

Caltech Samantha Trump Jacob Mongolia JPL Reporter Assault
First results from New Horizons' time in the Kuiper Belt

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:31 min | 1 year ago

First results from New Horizons' time in the Kuiper Belt

"What is the Kuyper belt, Koiper belt is the largest zone in our planetary system? And it wasn't even known until the ninety s when planetary strana mors started to discover other objects orbiting outwear. Pluto, is mostly little things, the size of counties or New England states Pluto, for comparison is like the size of the United States. But also, we started to discover other small planets in the Kuiper belt Pluto's cohort if you will. This is the third zone of our solar system. You know, the innermost zone is the rocky planets earth Mars, Venus and mercury beyond that the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus Neptune. And then there's the Kuiper belt the begins just beyond snip tunes orbit. And so actually, by the time, we reach Pluto in the summer of two thousand fifteen we're already at the inner fringes of the Kuiper belt, we will be in it even traveling at this enormous speed that takes us three. Hundred million miles, plus every year with still being a for another ten years from now we're about halfway through it in, in your book, tasting new horizons inside the epic. First mission to Pluto you talk in length about the quite rebuilt. You talk about this twenty mile by ten mile wide rock that is of such interest. It's like two spheres connected. Did you actually know it existed in? Was that actually on your itinerary? When new horizon, left, Florida, we, we did not know that ultimate to leave the name of the nickname of this clipper both object exists that we did know the corpora belt, existent right new. We knew how many objects are out there. It's a little bit analogous to if you know in two thousand six somebody said, I'm taking a trip to Paris, and in nineteen what restaurants should we, you know, wait a while back later Oeser there. Lots of restaurants. And so we actually found our particular fly by target using the Hubble space telescope in twenty. Fourteen and then burn the engines after Pluto, to range erect to go there in the fall of twenty fifteen and then traveled three plus years, another billion miles to make that fly by which occurred on New Year's Eve and New Year's day starting this year, you can actually steer this spaceship. I can't imagine what north south east and west is up there. And there's no longitude latitude. How do you navigate? How, how do you know where the heck you want to go, and where you are going? It takes real expertise. And we have some of the world's best space navigators on the new horizons team, a big team at a company called kinetics based in California. And we have a another team at the Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory the way that we do this is essentially, twofold, we track the position of whatever we're going to fly by next either Pluto, or ultimate Tuli using telescopes on the earth and the Hubble space telescope to plot. Its course. And then by Ray. Radio. We track our spacecraft. So we know its course and then the job of the navigators is to make those two things intersect on a given day when the fly by takes place. And they can do it very precisely. I can tell you volleying from Pluto, to ultimate too late, which took three and a half years at thirty two thousand miles an hour about a million miles, almost every day. We ended up arriving at ultimate Tuli only twenty three seconds all did time. Well I mean I I take airliner flights there. Never would.

New England United States Caltech Jet Propulsion Laborat Paris California Florida RAY Twenty Three Seconds Ten Years
Nobelist: Harness Evolution As Problem-Solving Algorithm

60-Second Science

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Nobelist: Harness Evolution As Problem-Solving Algorithm

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky. I'm an engineer trained as an engineer degrees in Canada. Call and chemical engineering and some people claim that I practice chemistry without a license. For instance, Arnold, the Caltech scientists shared the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize in chemistry. I care about is how do we share the planet with all the other living things and have a planet that's worth living in while we cure disease, and make our quality of life better. Or no spoke April ninth that the National Academy of sciences in Washington DC at an event honoring ten US Nobel and Calveley prize laureates the evening was sponsored by the cavalier station and produced by scientific American Arnold's. Nobel prize was for directing the volition of enzymes to make them work, even better or in entirely. Early new ways. And it seems to me that this tremendously powerful algorithm of evolution that create complexity. And they create the materials and create all of the lovely things in the biological world wish should learn how to use that algorithm to solve the biggest problems that we face. How do we house fuel feed? Clothe ten billion people, and it's the biological world that can do this, because we're learning how to harness this four billion years worth of work. The problem is no one knows how sequence of DNA and codes a function we can only read it, no one can compose that. But we have the process of composing it, and that is called of Lucien, and by using that process, we can make these things. That will help us live sustainably because who knows how to use renewable resources, the biological world does biology can take carbon dioxide from the environment and create living plants, and nitrogen and simple, starting materials and create complicated useful things. So I'm hoping that we too will learn how to do that and use our science to do that. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science, I'm Steve Mirsky.

Nobel Prize Steve Mirsky Arnold Engineer National Academy Of Sciences Canada Cavalier Station Lucien Washington Sixty Seconds Four Billion Years
"caltech" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on 790 KABC

"The program. So I didn't get much the details on the study was this the result of all the new sensors that you guys when placing all California to some degree. I mean, we've been slow expanded network over over the years, but the main result of come from basically, applying new data processing technique at large scale so actually live in the in the neighborhood where Mr. what's the what's the other one? What's your seismograph Richter Richter Caltech, professor set up the Richter scale says was a series of rooms with these giant cement like pilots went down into the bedrock. And somebody bought that house and converted into residential area. Oh residential, but I remember walking through just after they Caltech vacated it was just room after room after room of these giant, cement blocks. But the reason I bring that up is I thought that the. The Richter scale was recording constant seismic activity. Don't do didn't we already know that we were already moving around here. All the time. I mean, so you know, when when Calbert the scale so magnitude zero was supposed to be, you know, the smallest thing that you could imagine. And over the years, we've improved the quality sensors, data processing techniques all that stuff. And so we've been slowly decreasing. The smallest magnitude that we could basically detect over the years. And now, we're basically the point where we are picking up signals from all over the region from LA that construction related from air traffic from from ocean noise. And so that's what that's the size of these events. Are you know, right at the noise level, the instrumentation? So literally, the movements that you're detecting in the what we call it. The crust the chargers across the same as your picking up waves hitting the shore. Yeah, exactly. What does that? What does that do for you? What what does that now going to provide you with show for one? It tells us that basically these events are happening all the time. So on average there. There's about three minutes between events some were in southern California. And so what is allowing us to do is, you know, because we don't have a large record of of of larger, you know, really damaging ones. The court appearance g you know, about a century or so, and so it gives us relatively little information to work with. But we do have is this funny property of earth quakes where every time we go down about a magnitude in size. You get about ten times as many of them on average. And so that means that, you know, globally, you'd expect something like one magnitude eight per year, ten magnitude seven one hundred six's and so forth. And this is something that Richter Gutenberg figured out many years ago, but to the best that we can tell today this it never stops. And so this is all the way down at the level of our instrumentation where these banks zero's just firing off all the time. So the a log rhythmic scale. Right. It is. Yeah. And doesn't seem it seems weird to me that the the actual logarithmic intensity would correlate with the actual number of quakes that seem odd. Yeah. It's pretty amazing. All the stuff that was basically impure. There was really no theory involved any stuff at that time. So it's yeah. It is pretty amazing. And so are you are you are you creating any hypothesis presently that you're going to be able to test with the you've got words? We're going to have. The big one. Little ones down there on the cross before we have a big. Prediction. Go ahead. Yeah. I mean, so what does all about is? You know, scientists normally, you know, if you wanna do experiments, well, you go out and you collect your data. But with earthquakes you basically have to wait for something to happen to collect data. And so the fact that there's so many more of these events that are filling in the gaps between all the larger ones means that there's this kind of constant chatter going on that we can look at and use information now to start to test. A lot of the physical theories that we have about you know, y respects exists and how they get started in much more detail. So it's kind of like having a new microscope of some kind where you're looking at the same picture but just much higher resolution. So that's one of the big takeaways from all of this. But, but I imagine now you can start to correlate what we know about the properties of the crossed and then make some predictions based on that. And then see if the movements or the data, you're collecting confirms that. We can try. I mean, there's prediction stuff is really difficult. It's just incredibly challenging problem, and you know, years ago, would you know, fascinated by this, and we're interested in trying to predict you know, when and where and how large the next big earthquake would be in that did not pan out. Very well. And so today what we do. Instead, particularly in the house side of things is we try to they will if quick happens of what is going to look like how strong the shaking going to be that kind of thing. And that's a much more tractable problem. So. But yeah, the kind of otherwise timing of things is just really difficult. Can you cross the break? Okay..

Richter Richter Caltech Richter Gutenberg Caltech California LA professor three minutes
"caltech" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on Here & Now

"I just wonder how that has. How this moment in your life? What it means to you given all that you've been through already. I missed the people that I love and who are gone. I miss my father. I miss my partners. I dearly missed my son. But on the other hand, everyone has to go through these things. Life is not a piece of cake, and it certainly is not for many of the people. I know I'm very grateful actually that these people were in my life, and I'm very grateful for the people who are still in my life. And that's the way that I move forward is. I look at all the wonderful things. I have rather than spend my time fretting about what I don't get. Appreciate the good things. I think that's maybe I was born that way. Or maybe I've cultivated it. But it it happens to work, and how have you managed the process of healing in your life? Well, also, clearly, maintaining a dedication to your work or do you have any advice to people who have to overcome obstacles themselves while remaining? Professionally excellent. Rest on your friends. We all need, friends and friends are there to hold you up when nothing else can. And I I'm very lucky to have a wonderful institution. I worked for Caltech is a place where I have many friends, and I have many friends outside of Caltech who've been there for me. So Francis Arnold after you pick up this Nobel prize later this year. What's your next plan? I'm only thinking up until December. It's hard to make plans when I'm I'm preparing a retinue of fifty people. I have other friends who are coming to Stockholm with me, and we're going to have a big party and hardy the future epic party. Yes. That's Francis Arnold. Who's one of the winners of this year's Nobel prize in chemistry? She is the fifth woman in history to get to this point Francis Arnold. Thank you so much for your time..

Francis Arnold Nobel prize Caltech Stockholm
"caltech" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"From Caltech, you know, that this is something that is innovative in terms of safety design. Accuracy mean they have if it's the chaos g the tactical shotgun or if it's the RDBMS they have patented downward shell action. So your your site. Your your line of sight is clear. They just do stuff. Right. They make everything right here in the US avai. And this is they're they're the company story is just literally the all American story. I love the story behind Caltech. I love George Kalgren story. He is he someone who immigrated illegally into the United States. He did it the right way. He loves America. He loves the country, and when they pass tax reform Keltec created a bunch of new jobs. They gave everybody another paid week of aviation. Everybody got raises. I mean, these are people who they were celebrating when tax reform passed, and they put it all back not just under their employees, but also their product because every single time I open my mouth about Caltech. I get a message. I get a tweet. I get something on Facebook. I get an Email. I've been waiting this long for this particular firearm. They're they're making them quick as they can. And as great as they can and getting all of those awesome, Keltec firearms out there. Whether it's the Mark thirty the chaos g the P three AT which seriously Christmas, all your all women. Need a P three. Don't just don't even question. Get it. It is the smartest concealed one a smartest concealed carry handguns. That is out there. It is absolutely one of my absolute favorites. Go and check out everything Caltech has to offer K E L T, Keltec, weapons dot com. Tell them Dana. Sent you. Now, the three big things you need to three Senator.

Caltech Keltec United States Facebook George Kalgren Senator Dana America
"caltech" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Cooling purposes. This is no small engineering feat if only such a material were to exist, wait what? Oh news item and this is it. The new study published in Nanno letters researchers from Caltech, researchers on Jin. Illitch Cora went and Harry atwater have shown that Nanno photonic structures may have the potential to meet the stringent material requirements for light sales, capable capable of traveling. These relativistic. Speeds. They created the new material out of silicon and its oxide silica. The researchers showed that a two layer stack of silicon and silica show promise due to the combined properties of both materials. Whereas silicon has a large reflective index which corresponds to efficient propulsion, but a poor cooling ability. The silica has a good radiative cooling property, but has a smaller refracting index. So you get sort of the two pieces of the puzzle you need in order to make this material to be able to cheat potentially achieve these relativistic, speed, very, very cool concept and idea. And I hope they are able to take these things to the next step and actually get some things working, even forget about, you know, getting to the twenty percent of the speed of light. Right? What about just downsizing around our own solar system? Exactly. What earth tomorrow. Because once you get to Mars, you have a leather laser at that end that could slow the craft critical. So you have a laser at on or near earth on the moon on the LaGrange point, whatever giant laser that will celebrate things from the earth orbit to Mars than you had laser at the other end that will decelerating and put it into Mars orbit. So what would it be powered with over there? Steve, whatever the art, the laser, the laser, whatever's powered with here. You know, whatever's plug it into the one ten volt on the planet finding out. Eventually. They'd be fusion. Lasers thing is it's a little scary. Imagine you're traveling at an amazing speed far fashion than a chemical energy to to Mars, and there's a malfunction you are done. You are done toast. You will leave the solar system. You gotta have a backup laser, right and series, right or whatever. The sounds like us recording when we're advent Steve. The primary. The secondary laser, and you know what you might as well use the microphone on the camera, which was what we did for the last show..

Steve Nanno Caltech Illitch Cora Harry atwater twenty percent one ten volt
"caltech" Discussed on  News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

15:58 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"So we'll try to do that as well. In get. You started lots of things going on by the way during those phone calls with Robert young pelton. Everybody gets an opportunity to talk on this program. And I don't want you ever to think that you know, you're going to be muffled or what you say is put down or anything like that. That's not going to happen. You may not agree with what the guests says, you may not agree with some of the things I've said as Kelly says she doesn't like me talking about the fact that the president uses his. Smartphone at tweets too, many things that's my opinion. And I'm entitled to that too. And again, I think if you go out and talk to a lot of people out there. They would probably say the same thing. I'm not opposed to him. Sending us information by Twitter at all. I think it's a great valuable source. But I just think that there's some better things he can do with his time about stuff like that. So let's go back to martial masters Marshall. Where'd you go? All were just having trouble here. Oh, you are. Okay. Let's hope that it stays with us in you, probably missed my introduction to you. And also this discussion that they think there's a planet some twenty times further from. Neptune pass the sun, and you of course, you're an expert in planet. X I think what's amazing about all this Marshall is the work of Zachariah situation and people like you science is starting to catch up with that, aren't they? Yeah. They are. You know, there was a long time when any mention of any object beyond the orbit of Neptune was a fantasy. And now all of a sudden they have all of these ideas objection theories. Finding is that. There's there was some excellent astronomy. That was done we've reported it on our site from Chile may actually observed two large objects. Passed the orbit of Neptune. One day believed could be a cold Brown dwarf star. The other was a massive planet and. Then what happened was Mike Brown from Caltech started, a very nasty smear campaign, and they really went to wreck the reputations of these folks, and they had published brilliant, white papers, and they were doing good science. But Caltech, and whatever was behind Caltech wants that to be story. And so they were forced to pull their reports older white papers, and then Mike Brown comes out with planet nine, and which I call plan nine from outer space, and there have been astronomers that have attacked it really taking chunks of it apart. So the basic theme that's going on right now. Because we're not that far from a time when everyone's going to see it is this the narrative now is in a galaxy far far away in a time long long ago. That's really there's a lot of diversion and distraction going up. We're still tracking. I'm publishing on this. We're tracking an object above the sun. And it's been moving from between the eleven thirty and twelve o'clock position. I'm getting reports from people all across the country. Different kinds of cameras different kinds of smartphones. They're capturing this object. And so we're seeing this. It is getting larger. And. I think it's only a matter of time before we start seeing a massive number of YouTube videos coming out either late this year or early next year. Only gonna be another. There's going to be another challenge. Isn't it amazing though that the work of Zachariah Sicheng echoed with the cuneiform tablets from the Sumerians back? A long long time ago are basically coming true. You're right. And was brilliant. I stand on his shoulders as do other serious research, which anyone that has an interest in the field. It was a pleasure for me to actually worked in a little bit and to get to know him. And this was a man who dotted his eyes and cross his t's. He was very very good. I'll doing his research in the one book that he wrote that is my favorite actually is the lost. Look the BankE. And which is an auto biography of Lord Enki of the honor Nakae. Who according to this book is well humanity came from his lawyers simply, but so which means we are part on Inaki ourselves. So far saying where are the aliens looking America? And that was what? He was really fascinated with what's our story. Who are we where did we come from? And this man had a passion that has endured is workers timeless. The love for his work. Still is absolutely salon is books. Even after all these years after his passing is books are still selling very strongly. Sure, you know, he's just this is someone that is. To me. He's just a personal hero, George isn't. It also amazing that he had written about earth possibly colliding with another object helping to form the moon and everything else. And now science Marshall is starting to say, we think the earth collided with another object. I mean by God he had the playbook. It was there. Yes, you have the play. And you know, and he is his stuff just comes out consistent. And the thing about sich, and was is attention to detail and his methodical and scientific approach to the end formation. And the only people that really are fundamentalists who disagree with what he is saying because it flies in the face of their belief systems. But for those that taken objective scientific look at it is work stands the test of pot period. Was it citizens work that got you interested in planet x? Well, I came to planet X, I walk straight backwards into it. Really? I was trying to understand global warming because during the nineties I'd been flying back and forth between rushing United States on business. I had a travel business I flew Aeroflot's. And I watched the deterioration of the polls back during a time. When people who are concerned about that. We're still being labeled tree huggers. You know, and I'm seeing this and I'm going I'm not gonna let some spin meisters Exxon. Tell me what I'm saying. I know what I'm saying and the planet there's something happening to our planet, and we started doing that. And then we were looking for what is the cause -ality and the search for the cause allergy let us to that. And with Zachariah situation, I was actually starting to read twelfth planet when he called me in two thousand three two to set up an interview with me to there was a scare that come out back then with Nancy leader, and we have been publishing against a calling hysteria. And he felt the same way because it had come out when he had just published his book lost book BankE and so. On one hand, it was generating a lot of sales for them on the other hand, he didn't want his he didn't wanna make money that way, he didn't want. He didn't want to profit from fear porn. And so this is where I got to know him and to really have a tremendous and deep profound respect for the man. A historic and her roic figure, and he's absolutely right. The stuff that he wrote in his books is starting to connect the dots. With other things you're right on the money there. And I think his story is yet to be fully. I mean, if I were in a stronger, I would look at to work ascension in and and look for things in space based on what he wrote about. I mean, they talk about bureau being on this thirty six hundred year elliptical orbit while you would think with computer models Marshall, you could plug that in and probably find out where the heck this planet might be. You cut and astronomers have been doing that very thing actually nineteen forty excuse me, Carlos Muna's, Virata Argentinian, an astronomer brilliant gentlemen in the song. Right. He published a paper made it announced with nine hundred forty and what he talked about. Then was what he called a black star and a large rocky planet or cola. Best for us is the name that was given to planet x by the ancient Atlantans. And so that was what he was using in dark. Black star is now what we refer to as a Brown dwarf star. And so he was and he plotted those in a long period, elliptical orbit exactly like sich. And and here's the thing that I. Find really good when astronomers are getting into this is that they're all they're they're agreeing on one thing, which is really important to me a clockwise orbit as opposed to counterclockwise shorts. So it's not where one astronomer who's written on. It says it goes clockwise, another one says five counterclockwise. They're all consistent from what they're talking about. And describing in the property and so- planet x is really a system at the core is a Brown for star. This is a very small very dirty star. It's impossible to see with the naked eye invisible. Life until it's close into the core of the system. Otherwise, it can only be picked up through infrared that happened in one thousand nine hundred eighty three with the IRS. And it's right now, it's we have a complimentary orbit. And I- George. I really wish this was a few years back on your show. And it was one of your callers that made the point. And at the time, I didn't know what my position was going to be on that. But it we really intrigued me and it put me into that. And sure enough, you're caller was absolutely right. Was anonymous caller, and we're in a matching words so what happened is nemesis is moving onto access. It's moving up and down. And it's moving around now up and down takes thirty six hundred years. Most of that thirty six hundred years is beneath us in the southern skies. And they won the part of the orbit that is the length of the longest part of the orbit is where it's going towards its furthermost, south southern point. Which is it's after helium, and it goes below the ecliptic plane of our system once it's below earth between that point to where it's going to be at its furthest distance from the sun. That's where it spends most of its the biggest percentage of its thirty six hundred years, and what we have now is an object. That is tracking with us around the sun. And which is consistent with the way. It moves horizontally, okay, but vertically, it's carpeting up. So when we do see it. We'll probably see it around the sons, two o'clock position. And that's where everybody's going to see it. When it starts to emerge. Does it create the calamities and the havoc that sich and had pointed out in his books. Yes. And we're actually seeing and it's a daisy chain George urge right now is not directly interacting with nemesis, which is and planet x z generic representation now this small mini constellation many system. But that system particularly nemesis. The dark star is interacting with our son and our son away. It's responding is not measured with sunspots. But with luminosity brightness, the sun has been brightening, and is the brightening of the sun is the reason why we have all the temp trails, right? And this is actually something that's going on and. People can trails just don't make sense because we know we being sprayed with this witches brew, and it's causing all kinds of health issues, all kinds of problems, and the people who were spraying us are breathing it in as well. And what it really comes down to is photons, which are carrying radiation, which are striking the surface of the planet, which are causing uneven heating and the core. Which by the way, at your Casey said that was going to be the cause -ality of the full shifts. And. What they're doing is. They're reflecting the photons into space along with the radiation. And it's not about what's happening today. From the viewpoint is the elites, and it's obvious is that. It doesn't matter where they were Kim trailing us now or knocked Kim trailing us. Now, the same thing would be happening. We'd have increasing solar radiation, which is causing all kinds of problems right now for the last month..

Zachariah Sicheng Marshall Caltech Mike Brown George Robert young pelton Twitter Kim Kelly president Chile YouTube America Lord Enki Aeroflot Inaki playbook United States
"caltech" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Monday believed could be a cold Brown dwarf star. The other was a massive planet. And then what happened was Mike Brown from Caltech health, very nasty smear campaign, and they really went to wreck the reputations of these folks, and they had published brilliant, white papers, and they were doing good science, but Caltech and was behind Caltech. Want that to be the story? And so they were forced to pull reports older white papers, and then Mike Brown comes out with planet nine and tried. Call plan nine from outer space, and there have been astronomers that have attacked it really taken chunks of it apart. So the the basic theme that's going on right now. Because we're not that far from a time when everyone's going to see it is this the narrative now is in a galaxy far far away in a time long long ago. Naturally. It is a lot of diversion and distraction going up. We're still tracking. I'm publishing on this. We're tracking an object above the sun. And.

Mike Brown Caltech
"caltech" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"But then I was like, oh, man. Another episode of in mind, like I was riveted on following your journey and it was really cool. So we're gonna get into that. But I wanna go back to the beginning and kind of trace your origin story a little bit because there's a lot of, again, like a lot of overlap with my story, but also. A lot of interesting things to explore there. So you grew up San Diego, smart kid, engineer mind, dad's Caltech, super brain guy, right? Yeah, correct. And and so talk to me about growing up in that environment and kind of ultimate what led you to IT. So yeah, born in the seventies seventy one and grew up in San Diego back then it was a smaller town, probably known as naval port little bit attack happening there. But my mom and dad are from Arizona. They come from families. My dad's farm, my mom's dad was a rancher cattle rancher. So you know, real kind of salt of the earth folks, but they both entrepreneurial and their own minds. They both created their own farms ranches. So I used to go there and visit, and I remember asking my dad when I went to Caltech, got dis in math, and I was like, because he'd come from. All town. He was wiz. I was like, did you ever quit? And he said on farm, you can't quit, you quit, you die. And so I think this all that was kind of put on me as a kid that. When a farmer, you just get these things done because that is your life. And so I had this great upbringing of grandparents that was just no nonsense got their work done by example. So my parents came out to San Diego, but they definitely had this kind of farm ranch, Arezzo upbringing. You know, just kind of good values and no nonsense. My mom and dad think data each other in high school and then got married. Dad was super smart Caltech grad and was right into kind of early semiconductor industry. They're used to work a lot. And so I grew up there, you know, in San Diego where everything, sunny and and great. You know, the big event for me was when I was seven, they got divorced, and it's funny I have kids now. You know, they're going to be events in their lives that they're gonna take one way or the other. And at the time it was hard for me as a seven year old. I, I think I was always kind of self reliant kid. But when that happened, I think part of my brain locked in and said, okay, humans cannot be trusted to be around and not necessarily love you forever. And you're going to be on your own in this life and you better get used to that. So even though there was no yelling, there was no beatings. There was no drinking in that house. That's the flip. The switch happened in my brain and my two year old brother and my sister that was four years younger. They ought different reactions, but my reaction was, okay. You better make sure you kind of do this on your own. And I think I started building barriers around me that kept me from being father until I was in my forties. So so yeah, I mean, what was that like? Like I selecting? Yeah, it was all reliance. Dad's not there and you. Better get on with it. And so I think just set that up science, I loved math and computer programming, and so I went really big into that was real dorky nerdy science kid. I lived on the suburban block where you know the most exciting thing happened all year was Halloween. It was really, and I actually so glad I had that upbringing. There was no craziness drama madness. Great mother raised three kids on our own, and she decided when she was divorced, he was going to be the supermom of the of the decade. So it was like reading books and taking trips to Europe..

dad San Diego Caltech Europe engineer Arizona Arezzo four years seven year two year
"caltech" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Ever being attacked and it's funny how you have all of these journalists, who were like, oh my gosh like it was totally the video and they ignore the actual dudes who were over there in this. In this sand In libya Who got warnings who, sought chatter who were tipped off by local militia in. The area something's going to happen Because they knew that Chris Stevens. Was there and you're going to sit here and tell me you're going to ignore the. Testimony, of the dude you were there for some journalists who want. To be able to protect this Bs narrative they they would rather jail a guy and lie about what happened then to admit that all of the security requests that had been. Ignored for four years prior, to this happening contributed to this that also came up and testimony with house oversight, nobody wants to admit that so we can sit here. And have this conversation And then we can talk about how everyone who is pointing. Out that video we were all called Nazis and we were called Nazis when we disagreed with government oversight on healthcare and we were called Nazis if we believe in the second. Amendment and we were called I mean Jewish conservatives were called Nazis it's amazing But meanwhile the tactics of actual, Nazis came forward in the. Burning of buildings in a salt and battery and the group, think by, force that we saw on. The streets Thought so We have a. Lot more I was called Jewish to which like like it's. A slur I'm. Not Jewish I mean my ancestry's Indian. And Irish but, I mean I love my Jewish brothers. And sisters let me. Some Israel I, was like was that supposed to be? A slur but you can call me Scottish next love your guests and like? What Anyway we got to move and? Caltech guns guns guns guns guns guns I love guns. Guns are fun As the reason. Why it rhymes anyway I like Caltech 'cause they, make, some of the coolest stuff that. Is out there and I also like, how? They're just total smart Alex because, let me case, in point so the already be seventeen bullpen downright right so the. Seventeen California was like oh my gosh like you? Have a pickets any rail that that. Makes it. Shooter he, can't have that like what you you you it comes with a twenty round Pima that's horrible I mean it's it's, ambidextrous, all kinds, of stuff that. They were like making up. Cosmetic features about the seventeen so Caltech said okay, all right I get it we got people on, California they still want to be able to have the let's make the BBC which, stands for not communism but California and they changed. Things like instead of the. Tactical pickets any hand guard they put the, traditional hunting hand guard on it they have a longer barrel they have a traditional bolt action rifle. Grip, not the pistol grip that's on, the, seventeen, because, against, something, cosmetic. That California freaked. Out over ships With, the one ten round p MAG versus the twenty round pain that you already be seventeen they completely. Just like you, know, innovated right, around there antigun. Laws which I thought was. Awesome that's just one example of all of the, cool things at Caltech dies you have to check, out everything that they have the chaos g tactical shock online that's what you want, in case of zombie apocalypse or.

Caltech California Chris Stevens libya Israel Alex BBC four years
"caltech" Discussed on WREK

WREK

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on WREK

"The national space society also had an award for the team behind the cassini mission to saturn representing the mission were trina ray the cassini science planning and sequencing deputy who is also the titan orbiter science team cochair and scott egginton deputy project scientist for cassini i'm always delighted to hear more about cassini we are all so proud i know you you said you were at that great caltech celebration and you know it's been a remarkable mission thirteen years of exploration the saturn system very tear jerking moment to see so i don't know when the audience will hear this but just less than we could go i was in dc at the national air and space bc and talking to ellen stove i talked to her about how much love that museum and she said you're trying to make me cry again like i did i for division for cassini and i said no no no that was cassini that made you cry because i was standing with her in front of those big outdoor screens at caltech and it was such a great moment of of pride for what you folks in the rest of the team of accomplished well thirteen years seen the other remarkable science all the discoveries cassini has done it's just an amazing mission but when makes it even more amazing is our colleagues and friends that we've met over the years and just been together and for that one last time just so emotional the fact that the cassini ended with such unexciting ending to the mission it was just out in a blaze of glory and to be able to bring the whole family together the people that you've known and worked with for years decades impact made this exciting scientific ending of the mission also an exciting up personal experience as well and it's a blessing to have been part of it and it it over yet you were just saying there's lots and lots of science that you can't tell me about yet yes the last year we had all this great signs up close observing the planets and the rings detecting magnetic fields gravitational fields while all that work the scientists have had nine months to work on that data and analyze it and that's been put out there for publication so in about a month and a half maybe we'll be seeing a whole lot of new science out there and you know it's going to be just amazing what we're going to be showing to the public people couldn't see your enthusiasm is he was talking about that coming science well i have to say that i've gotten a couple of previews from seven to scientists and i know that the scientific results they're about to publish you're going to be really fascinating and i you guys are gonna look forward to your audience is gonna love to hear about him.

project scientist dc caltech scott egginton thirteen years nine months
"caltech" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Here to tell you that if you are a gun owner you must have a range that you feel comfortable going to where you can practice and of course then world is south florida that's my pick and father's day is right around the corner if your dad is a gun owner or maybe your dad has talked about it but never really had an opportunity go into gun world the south florida get them a gift certificate get them a range fast get them get them a class sign him up for a concealed weapons license class or if he's a an aficionado and already knows how to do such things and has a cw all get them in advance blast by colt or caltech or walter a beretta or h k by him some of the merchandise that's on sale from twenty five to seventy five percent off grips and handbags while don't get data handbag but if mom if you've got a mom like me you could buy her a handbag they have the five eleven shirts that my husband loves you know their garments that conceal a weapon more effectively and father's day is right around the corner it's time to get into gun world to south florida stop by this range meet kim and her crew they're there to make sure that you're satisfied customer you can check out the fifteen oversized lanes there so big the two people could actually stand sidebyside into range which is nice because on friday nights couples share elaine from five until eight for twenty dollars whatever you're thinking about or maybe it's for you ladies or maybe it's a pepper spray class for you or your husband that you want to sign up for they have it all with far too firearms training doing those classes right.

south florida kim florida caltech seventy five percent twenty dollars
"caltech" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And no and he's an excellent team leader and one of the things that i found this great quote from a caltech says is his name fritz vicky who was one of the first to really analyze all the technical achievements of of the v two team and and had this very honest assessment he called the v two and you know the the german rocket team generally quote a technical achievement of high order do less to the activity of any individual genius then to the determined an enthusiastic cooperation of a large number of only moderately technical individuals and what i think he means by that and what was von braun's true talent is that he could take something that was on in a blueprint and turned it into an actual working device and mass produce it and that is something the united states lacked when it came to rocketry at the end of the war and something that nasa wanted when it was the decided should be an army agency or be civilian von braun had already proven himself with someone who could take who was an organizational genius more so than his own scientific prowess as a physicist he was a custom made for i think the the american military industrial complex take the blueprint and turn it into a working device that's not a small accomplishment but it's also not something that a if you could also argue that a number of american scientists could have done the same thing he was given more authority and power than even could've imagined during the third reich our special guests for the first half bryan krim his book is called are germans project paper clip at the national security state if you are of german heritage this is not intended to be an indictment of your heritage by any means we're talking about how we exploited nazi technology after world war two brian why didn't we take advantage of japanese scientists after we won that war it's a good question and it's a and it's a complex one they're the first thing is.

team leader caltech fritz vicky von braun united states physicist nasa
"caltech" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Our economic growth is related to communications and exchanges their economic growth is related engineering in hard science that's right vet gives them a distinct advantage they produce thirty six engineers for every engineer we create in the united states god so you're looking at the advantages the chinese recognize all of this now do they send a lot of their students to the united states for education without any question the best students in china we'll go to mit caltech or on finest institutions do they stay or do they go back to china and the advantages are extraordinary because they are paid very handsomely when they returned to china so you think about all the chinese what the chinese have in the future yes they're competitors they are not likely to be engaged in war against the against the united states i had heard that china is run by about seventy five people is that true that is true and now with z of course being president for forever yeah there is no question it's the circle around z that makes a difference in chinese decision making now even though her before the game plan is out there for us it's not as if the chinese are concealing anything the game plan is clear one belt one road around the world in what they're doing is is you know they're they're strengthening their navy they're strengthening their their cities they're strengthening relationships with other countries i mean there what whatever they're doing they're doing remarkably well in many areas that is true it's also true.

engineer united states china president mit caltech
"caltech" Discussed on Outliers

Outliers

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on Outliers

"That's that's that if we have eliminated who want to the us you thinking about picture stars tony little bit mobile then if you were noticing biggest because they will want to caltech power the same one is that we didn't have in our senior so your perspective is very small right so it in india that solace visually guys coming from both qualities taking global so that's what was that holiday global and differ every action everything start will come and how was career what i was very interesting so at i've in whereas most was the royal same was to alarm alarming waiver intervention very ten dollars a month salary that booze and trash posten someone i will amway nationalist stain india will do something rantings so huge branding final point even i went to all i want some competitions everything all brennan so we have these days interview comes and i bust the first few homes so we one job offer so if a company offers you if you don't accept your out of the process so botham's gp which are two comes in digital are wing panel gp call me i and i told you i'm not interested candidate live first and then i farmers casino either you if you say no the process so that push me into rooms so i still was were three managers came from london singapore and the us the company today asked me to join so i want to join you complete the process i'm here i am hoping to soon bending and you're you're only doing rush trading which is communities which has own excitement of intervention travel everything i don't drink i don't smoke i've never traveled outside of indian some exposure also.

us brennan london singapore caltech botham ten dollars
"caltech" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on The Science Show

"That's right and how did you go from there to caltech because caltex relationship with disney still the relationship that caltech has with disney i guess in part started due to my presence but also other faculty become involved as well at this point and is connected with robots i work in artificial intelligence artificial intelligence has a lot of overlap with robotics not all robots involve a is some robots fairly dumb i guess you can say but yes as a huge overlap and disney of course has a huge interest in robotics and so some of the project or working on with disney include both a and robotics what should do here so one example is the sense of thomas systems technology cast which is opened last year here at caltech and the goal of cast is to bring together what we call body and mind let's take a walking robot which is what professor arun also professor at caltech works on you can design a walking robot to walk on a specific terrain let's say concrete and you could do it in a way that can optimize all sorts of things you care about a empower consumption stability and stuff like that the problem is that that entire system is handcrafted so some mechanical engineering student typically would write down the equations that characterizes everything you need to know about walking on concrete once they're walking on grass everything's out the window right and so we would like to do is design and ai system within the bipedal robot such they can learn on its own how to walk on different terrains how you getting on so because presumably this is a fairly early stage in the research said not that's right we are just in the beginnings of this project and so right now we're starting with some pretty heavy theory so mathematical modeling understand how different branches of mathematics come together so aaron works and control theory i work in learning theories so they're actually fairly different branches of mathematics getting them to work together and integrate is the first step and then realizing that mathematical framework onto an actual robot will be the second step by standards such as may such as listeners this seems to be an fantastic speed and changing the way.

disney caltech professor caltex thomas systems aaron
"caltech" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"The star trek universe single photon torpedo if he hit the ship without the proper she'll it's going to it's going to go down that ship is going to blow up a he had opera lien modified a photon torpedo to make it big enough you'll could destroy a small planet and i know you brought up wars earlier if you wanted to build a real life debt star and now antimatter would be enough to do it a ethan a friend of mine filmmaker need jeremy corbelli la grew up it around the roddenberry's eugene rod roddan buried the son of gene roddenberry the guy who created star trek uh is a friend his and he he asked them he did an interview with the with rod roddenberry uh about the technology of star trek the inspiration for that day here's what he had to say but my father when communicate with people at caltech pack on jpl but he was good act was kind of people who are smarter than m so he reach out to the scientists there and eat half them to extrapolate on ignition technology so in a book called making star trek by stephen what feel great talks about talking to them about a are not nonmeat a weapon and they todefect while we have razors now but what we're working on of the phasing razor and that's where the painter from my father really just spoke to scientists and believe ability was the most important thing income he didn't wanna just make something up at didn't make sense he wanted to have an authority you thank you sort of day watch the next generation or what's going to happen the next few integration of technology wherever yeah communicator from income they had walkietalkie or it now rush limbaugh kentucky at 'orquestra so again s rod roddan buried gene roddenberry son uh eat and i guess i as a fan of the series in the movies i mean you'd have to give some props to gene roddenberry for doing some homework in in seeing some of this stuff coming down the.

ethan eugene rod roddan stephen limbaugh gene roddenberry jeremy corbelli la rod roddenberry caltech kentucky
"caltech" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on KOIL

"From the caltech the scientists caltech and then of course several studies have been had and it was another study was had withered arguing now over the the probability of the possibility of this this planet planet nine planet x so you know these biases of course are our what fuel these theories there's the bias four in the bias against so doesn't necessarily mean the planet nine doesn't exist it just means that there are other ideas about what is out there that need to be explain in and what they affects are what they are having on the solar system and what may have on our planet right now in a lot of them are too good i mean regardless of what you may think and far beyond what we've been told corn use briefings are saying now that all options are on the table all options with regard to planet extinction protocols and you may find it a bit uncomfortable to realize the typical person is more than five times as likely to die in an extinction level of banned the ads in a car crash as according to global challenges foundation which is a uk based a think tank that analyzes these things the it's pretty you know it's amazing and it's partly because of the fact the average person will probably not died in automobile accident because will every year one in nine thousand three to ninety five people die in car crashes that translates to about zero point zero one percent chance per year of you dying in a car crash but that chance compounds over the course of a lifetime so a lifelong scale would be one in one earn twenty americans die in car accidents it the risk of human extinction due to a major calamity manmade natural or even extraterrestrial could be a lot higher than that according to what i've been reading and now there's the stern review this soon that we have a zero point one percent risk of human extinction every year and i know that zero point one percent doesn't sound you know spectacular by it all adds up over time i mean if you extrapolate that zero point one.

solar system uk one percent zero one percent