35 Burst results for "Caltech"

"caltech" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:25 min | Last month

"caltech" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"People loved it. Who had it. It was fun to drive. It accelerated 0 to 60 miles an hour in eight seconds, and it gave people the feeling of a jet plane taking off. Wally First began thinking about electric cars 30 years before the G M E V one Back when he was a student at Caltech University in California. It was the mid 19 sixties and the big issue of the day in Southern California wasn't climate change. It was AARP, a Lucian fumes from the millions of cars and Ella's roads were creating a thick blanket of toxic smog. What was it like? Well, it was bad enough that you would often be crying when nothing sad was happening. The air was so contaminated. And that's what got me to thinking about. Okay. What should we be doing Technically to deal with the smog problem, I learned that if all cars on the road were made electric, the total emissions would be cut dramatically. Fully didn't come up with the electric vehicle they were actually invented in the mid 19th century. But by the 19 sixties, the technology was still limited to small, slow machines. Think golf carts or milk flex. I wanted to learn about electric cars and see if I could contribute to the technology. And so I had an idea. I converted in 1959 VW bus to Electric drive. It had a range of about 40. Maybe 50 miles under ideal conditions. A top speed initially of about 35 40 Miles an hour. You say you converted it to electric drive like that's something that any undergraduate know how to do. I got surplus electric motors that had been used to power. The landing gear of airplanes took the seats out and where that large flat area was was the large battery in the car would accelerate kind of with jerks, but it did work well. He wanted to use his bus to get the brightest engineers interested in developing electric cars. He'd heard that some students at MIT Caltech East Coast rivals. We're working on new battery technology. So he called them up and challenge them to build an electric vehicle that could beat his bus in an epic race across America. Ready now. Yes, we're ready. Are you ready? Am it? Yeah, We're ready. It took place. Uh, starting in August 26th 1968.

August 26th 1968 Southern California 50 miles America 0 19 sixties California Caltech University VW eight seconds mid 19th century 1959 mid 19 sixties AARP 60 miles an hour about 40 millions of cars about 35 40 Miles an hour Lucian MIT Caltech East Coast
"caltech" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:11 min | Last month

"caltech" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Ultimately it was down. Dependence on American supplies. If you are poor country with no resources of your own, your all and when the Americans are done Dr Sun Songkran talking to Alex last and Alex is still with me now. So the good doctor feels very much let down by the Americans, doesn't he? Yeah, And I think like many South Vietnamese freshens, he also felt aggrieved by the way that they were portrayed, sort of denigrated as a kind of cowardly, feckless army, particularly by many in the US, you know their former allies. And as he sees it, it was resources, not courage that they were lacking. And I think, of course, it's all rather complex. I mean, there was conscription in South Vietnam. A lot of the troops badly paid. Many were not that keen on the war, and there was endemic corruption in in the leadership, But it's also true that huge numbers fought and died. And certainly in the late 19 sixties and early seventies is the U. S actually started to withdraw. The South Vietnamese took on even more of the fighting and had some really big successes. About when the U. S pulled out the last troops and especially when it took out its air power cut back military aid to the south. They really did struggle, Alex. Thanks. That's Alex last and don't forget. There's a dedicated section on our website looking at personal stories from the Vietnam War from the earliest rumblings in the 19 fifties through to the fall of Saigon and beyond. Just search for BBC Witness history collections. Next the history of the electric car in an effort to tackle climate change. Many manufacturers are beginning to switch to electric, but the first mass produced modern electric car was made by General Motors. Quarter of a century ago. It was called the E V one, and it was launched in 1996. Jones has been hearing from one of its creators, the research engineer, Wally Ripple. People loved it. Who had it. It was fun to drive. It accelerated 0 to 60 miles an hour in eight seconds, and it gave people the feeling of a jet plane taking off. Wally First began thinking about electric cars 30 years before the G M E V one Back when he was a student at Caltech.

Wally Ripple 1996 Alex Vietnam War 0 South Vietnam General Motors 19 fifties Jones G M E V one E V one US early seventies Sun Songkran eight seconds Caltech late 19 sixties U. S one South Vietnamese
"caltech" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:34 min | 3 months ago

"caltech" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"But it's also relating all that context together on. That's why we call it relational reasoning. Because you're asking. What is the relationship between mia human to this object of like. Yeah so that's another paper You might usually end body tensely to network with applications to quantum chemistry I don't know much of this particular emphasis in the life. Sciences and so se no life sciences Pity big industry You know a big high attrition rates The expensive to bring a thug log in the senate of that caused says we think find the light like the target the way the agent so you thinking of an application if they are in that context certainly don't the most invested Area for an i in twenty twenty healthcare right i mean the pandemic accelerated it. I mean anything from ma right. Streamlining the hospital process which for mid kuwait was very very critical to discover new drugs. There's so much potential but as you said drug discovery is a challenging area precisely because there's so many parts of the pipeline. Each one is a intensive either competition or in the wet lab experiments. And so what. We focused on in this line of work. Which is in collaboration with tom. Miller at celtic. Who has the domain expertise again. A great example of air for signs. Interdisciplinary collaboration is to ask. How can we go to a quantum level. I'd like if you can predict the scrawny jersey question. The ground energy state right then we can almost all the properties of that molecule right. How will find how will it Dissolve talks ity so that kind of goes to the fundamentals itself to come up with his patients. But then it's super expensive sucks karate jerry scales exponentially so even having a molecule with tens of atoms will be much more than any super computer to they can handle good force whe and so what. This line of work does is to ask. How can we build enough of the domain knowledge and the cemeteries in the system. But sterling's noon on it works to speed up the traditional approximations of scroungers equations like the dft or density functional theory to using methods instead again getting thousands of times up. But it's so critical to encode the cemeteries for better generalization and so the rotational symmetry is an important one you rotate to your molecule in three dimensions right. It should still be a the same property like in. The property doesn't change. The energy doesn't change just Because in change of coordinate system and the the thing is if you want to represent quantum features you need tensor orbital they orbital's are represented through sensors. And so we came up with the general framework where you could have tensor inputs and you have symmetry in the system man. How does the new network preserved this image raise.

kuwait senate ma Miller tom
"caltech" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:24 min | 3 months ago

"caltech" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Good hardware perimeters and at nvidia building japan so be very efficient. Tencent contractions and so that also makes it very efficient in a pound of stepped on these methods and extensible sort of infinitely extensible in sundays. So you don't have a screen that that's right that's it. Mentions and nvidia really hard. He was night. And so you think the answer. Based methods Bid sort of bullied to hardware design on late. Because of this seemed to have you will. Not faster is auditing up or what's happening on the office. Yeah i mean that's a great question. The on with my role at a media as director of machine learning research always investigating the interfaces between hardware and software. Right what we see is in. The boundaries are much more likely to think about khuda as the platform. It's a software platform. That really helps have all the perimeters for efficient hardware utilization. And that's what i just mentioned also about immediate cute which he's hungry primitives for tens of contractions and so we can now use that into packages like tencent new york pie torture others to neural networks with good hundred efficiency so we always have to kind of keep in mind in terms of how to write also accelerate this battle hardware. Gp us and to do that. Indeed we have to keep track of what kind of of computational methods affected when how to battle allies them very effectively. I one of the people here Seecond self explicitly for short short-term of recent policies so as a longstanding challenges you save for forcing luring wishful in in particular can be easily distracted by eleven factors of events. Aw observations face in this considerable policy loading which targets to one cm visual environments that the large distribution shift so. This has always been a problem with Deep learning late so be could build beautiful more of the cleaning data but then he show a feature. That doesn't seem before he seems to feel so zero. Shaw asian Something building something. That's able to recognize something that is doesn't seem before at all this. So what is seeking. Yeah you know as you mentioned right like robustness is an issue with a lot of standard computer vision algorithms and so now on top of us the singer enforcement learning so think of self driving cars that's using this computer vision system and trying to detect if there are restrictions there are other callers and suddenly there is a hailstone. Suddenly that is. Let's say a sandstone that it was never trained on and then it can completely fall apart because now it's also part of the decision making built. It's not just trying to recognize what's in the image consequences to wrong decisions. And so that's what makes it a lot more john because even if it's slightly wrong in this trying to build that into the decision making loop can lead to catastrophic failures in safety critical systems and so what we wanted to investigate wars can be made collaring forsman learning algorithms that use died like major even high resolution images i and a robust to nicest attest on that's what we call zero short generalizations. It can have all.

nvidia khuda Tencent japan new york john
"caltech" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"caltech" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Astronomers Discover Record-Breaking Small White Dwarf Star

Rick Hamada

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Astronomers Discover Record-Breaking Small White Dwarf Star

"Astronomers on Monica have discovered what may be the smallest so called white dwarf in our galaxy. White dwarfs are made from the remnants of dead stars and created after stars use up all of their nuclear fuel. The white dwarf discovered this week is slightly larger than Earth's moon, but it has a mass greater than the sun. Caltech scientist studying the celestial object believe it formed when two smaller white dwarfs dwarfs melded together. Kick observatory on Mount Okay. And the University of why Institute for Astronomy is Pan Starrs on Holly Akala. Played a part and identifying and studying the object. If it gets too massive, it might explode. But that won't hurt us here on Earth. The white dwarf is 130 light years

Monica University Of Why Institute Fo Pan Starrs Holly Akala
Ocean Currents Predicted on Enceladus

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:07 min | 6 months ago

Ocean Currents Predicted on Enceladus

"New study claims. That ocean currents churning in the subsurface sees of this attorney an ice moon enceladus. The findings reported in the journal. Nature geoscience a based on the shape of enceladus twenty kilometer. Thick shell new hypothesis challenges. Current thinking that the moon's global ocean is a modulus apart from some vertical mixing driven by the warmth of the moons core and syllabus is a tiny frozen snowball just hundred kilometers wide. That's just a seventh of the earth's moon. It's the smoothest body. In the solar system is smooth as keeble and sold us attracted the attention of scientists in two thousand fourteen when a fly by the cassini spacecraft discovered evidence of subsurface after water was seen spewing out of guys alike eruptions through fissures in the circle tiger stripes in the ice neither moon south pole a spectral analysis of the water by cassini indicated that it was salty together with jupiter's iceman moon. Europa enceladus is one of the few locations in the solar system other than earth with liquid water. And that makes it an obvious. Target of interest for astrobiologists searching for signs of life but the oceans on enceladus are almost entirely unlike those earth earth oceans are relatively shallow with an average depth of just three point six kilometers. They cover about three quarters of the planet surface and a warmer at the top thanks to the sun's rays and cooler depth near the floor and they have carrots that are affected not just by the spirit of the earth but also by wind on the other hand and syllabus a piece to have a global spanning and completely subsurface ocean. It's at least thirty. Kilometers deep is cooler at the top. Of the i show and warmer at the bottom thanks to hate from the moon's core despite their differences the study's lead author analog from caltech says the oceans on enceladus do have currents based on the cassini measurements and observations on earth looking at the way ice and water interact drive ocean mixing. Dr

Keeble The Journal Caltech
Finding Your Compliment

Venturing Out

03:00 min | 7 months ago

Finding Your Compliment

"It's interesting beyond for four years right because you hear all these great ideas from people is that if they're execute upon change the world a very serious way. I always use the example of spacex rate. How many people before you on. Musk thought of reusable spaceship. Probably a lot. But how many actually get out there and execute upon it and build thing not that many and so you know patricia club. It's really a mindset shift. Right rather than sitting around and pontificating about ideas we really focus on. How do you put those ideas into action. You know even if it's something as small as bringing your product or your service to the farmers market and just selling it to people getting it in people's hands that's what we want to encourage this club so it part of getting started From our commerce conversation earlier. Excuse me you told me that Baylor entrepreneurship club engages in things like different focus groups that are skill specific. Is that right correct. Yes so what does that look like. Yeah what it really looks like. His peer to peer mentor ship. Where you have people building interpersonal relationships with others who have complementary skill sets to them. You one thing. I really believe in as being a specialist. Not a generalist You know it's been my experience that if you're a generalist you're not that competitive right and so as a special shoe is for people who Compliment your abilities and skills. That's what our mentor. Ship program is really about so it. It's more While it is developing different skills it's also networking opportunity correct absolutely. Yeah and i think that's important too because nicot said you're a specialist. I mean you are the the the leader of what you do. So i always think about mario and luigi do you remember. Playing mario mario was always good at a lot of different things but luigi was able to jump the highest. I often went with luigi for some tasks. Because i needed to jump higher than mario is able to know. And i mean it's it's purely fact like i love luigi because of that because he was able to differentiate himself and set himself apart. But if you can't jump that high that's no problem right around your self with people who can And i think they would entrepreneurship club. And wouldn't nick is doing is creating a great networking opportunity for students. Who may be good at one thing to find others who compliment them so for example In a previous episode. Talk with or talked with doria and i am a awful content creator. My social media is the worst But i would love to have somebody like doria on my team and we do. Have somebody like dairy honor team. Gray smith who is a killer content creator and so that's what nick's talking about and that's why it's important to have these types of clubs because he can find people who compliment yourself and It really helps take your business near venture the next

Four Years Musk Today Nick Baylor Thirty Thousand Foot Baylor Entrepreneurship Club Tier One Ivy League Europe First Week One Time First Thing Damascus Two Thousand Sixteen Caltech Bitter Entrepreneurship Club One Research Luigi Nicot Mario Mario Patricia Mario Doria Gray Smith
NASA releases Mars landing video: 'Stuff of our dreams'

AP News Radio

00:59 min | 8 months ago

NASA releases Mars landing video: 'Stuff of our dreams'

"Scientists have been thrilled by this stunning video images to perseverance rover has sent back from Mars but they're also pretty pleased with the audio they're getting that is the sound of wind on Mars recorded by microphones on the perseverance rover and courtesy NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at Caltech and wall alone it's hardly a striking is the landscapes we've been seeing the head of the entry into sent camera team Dave gruel says it's still pretty amazing close your eyes and just imagine yourself sitting on the surface of Mars and listening to to the surroundings so the gentle world that happens in the background that is the noise made by the rover but yes what you did here ten seconds and was an actual wind gusts on the surface of Mars and grew explains that words important to something engineers keeping the mission going can use basically detect the health of of moving systems gears and actuators and things like that I'm Ben Thomas

Dave Gruel Jet Propulsion Laboratory Caltech Nasa Ben Thomas
Interview with Phil McAlister

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

06:53 min | 9 months ago

Interview with Phil McAlister

"Hello and welcome to the skeptics guide to the universe. Today is sunday january seventeenth twenty twenty one. And this is your host. Stephen avella joining me this week. Or bob novella. Everybody cara santa maria. Howdy joy novella. Hey guys and evan bernstein skepticism. On a sunday. I love it. This is a rare sunday recording. We're doing this because of the twelve hour show next saturday. The saturday this show comes out. I probably will be posted in this up right before we begin to twelve hours. Show so if. You're listening to this on saturday that it comes out. We're probably in the middle of the twelve hour show. Why aren't you watching that instead. Leaving this to console you on sunday or monday because the twelve hour livestream is over priorities. So we're not keep saying like we're trying to get away from doing the covert thing every week but there's always stuff to talk about that has to recover recovered. Schwab one thing about it. Obviously it's still raging the numbers that getting scary high still is crazy but david kessler which was announced as the covert czar for the incoming biden. Administration you guys remember who he is. Yes cast that. He was in From london movie right cutler no he was a former head of the fda in the ninety s and after his stint in the at the fda in the nineties the president for a while of yale school of medicine. That's how i. I know you have on speedo him personally. But you know the commissioner of food and drugs for h w bush and clinton muslim sounds nonpartisan. I like that a he. He was very much opposed to the shea. Dietary supplement health and education. Act which was a terrible loss stills eternal and he was he was completely right correct in his opposition to it so hopefully because a lot of experience. Hopefully he'll will prove to be the right person for this job. And we're hoping to shift into high gear will along that line steve in three days. Yeah did you hear. That biden is elevating. He's making a cabinet of science. Yes yes scientists. -nology whatever is now going to be cabinet. Level is a cabinet level position for the first ever cap which will not be in the line of succession by the way. It's a cabinet level position. But it's not a cabinet position. I thought he was building a cabinet filled with cool science thing like curio cabinet closet of mystery. I remember that from what is this endless fascination with forbidden closet of mr really cool i mean. It's the first time the president has ever put somebody at that high. A level in science position which conferences shows his commitment to evidence based policy and also francis. Arnold who i'm super excited about you guys remember. She's caltech scientist who recently won a nobel prize. She's going to be within his his group. I'm not really sure how everybody's designated quite yet but within that group of scientists which is very exciting. I think it should be like the bridge of the enterprise. D where you've got the president the vice president and you've got the czar of science right up there with the big boys because that's where belongs in the position that the council the troy was in. That's what i'm saying. Sitting do truth be told captains left. I am kind of glad that it's not a. I shouldn't say this i don't know i don't know if i would want it to be a cabinet position because then because then they enter into the line of succession and i do worry that whoever is appointed could potentially be. Isn't that a worry about every single cabinet level position. Never i mean. Is there a cabinet member. You guys ready to become president on day one. I mean unless you've watched the survivor soul survivor. Some of those people have served in previous administrations have worked in government. It's obviously it's never happened. I it's so unlikely that i don't think someone's going to pick or not pick a cabinet member because they don't think that they're ready to be president. Yeah i mean why. Scientists are science minded person. Good as president. I think that's what we want. They wouldn't necessarily be it would be but they would still need to be somebody who has executive leadership skills all right. Let's get right into some news items. Is it true that astronomers were wrong about the number of galaxies in the universe. a what. Yeah they're often wrong about stuff like that so yeah. The estimated number of galaxies in the universe was recently cut in half. You are correct steve. So how the hell did this happen. And and more importantly what is the worst title for a news item covering this discovery. All all will be revealed So this all started years ago when the hubble space telescope did some deep sky surveys and it came up with the estimate for the number of galaxies which was two trillion lots of galaxies two trillion in the universe. It did this by using by doing deep field observations. These are observations. That take a really long time looking at the same patch of sky. So you're you're building up the photons right you just building up. The photons. seeing what's revealed and that would that reveals after a while that reveals the very very very faint galaxies. And then then it's easy. Yes sir but can we clarify. Are you talking about the observable universe so you just just just a good point to a good time to clarify that. The the observable universe is a subset of the total universe because like because some of the universe has moved beyond the on the einstein limit rights even traveling at the speed of light. The universe is not old enough for light to travel from there to here so we can't see it's outside of our bubble our light bubble right. It's a little complicated. But yeah i think primarily although not necessarily implies that it's it's just it's just observable we'll we'll see maybe we can. Let's revisit at the end okay. So then so then. Once you have this patch of sky that you've looked at for a while Then you and then you then you know how many galaxies right then you just multiply that little patch by how many similar how many patches in the in the sky are there. And that's and that's basically. What hubble did but we knew that. That wasn't quite accurate though that that's because there has to be other galaxies that are out there that are just too faint to be directly detected even with the best deep field observation that the h. The hubble space telescope could muster onto those super faint galaxies though they do create a suffused glow. Just a general glow in the galaxy and now this background glow that i'm talking about is called the cosmic optical background which is a term. I hadn't i hadn't seen before which is fascinating because it reminded me of maybe was well the cosmic microwave background which is the first light of the universe when it became transparent to electro-magnetic radiation the cosmic optical background that was the glow of all the

Cabinet Stephen Avella Bob Novella Cara Santa Maria Evan Bernstein From London Biden FDA David Kessler Yale School Of Medicine Schwab Cutler Steve Clinton Arnold Bush Francis Troy
Undersea Earthquakes Reveal Sound Warming Info

60-Second Science

03:01 min | 11 months ago

Undersea Earthquakes Reveal Sound Warming Info

"Climate change feels like something that's happening to the atmosphere but most of the action is actually at sea about ninety percent of the heat that gets trapped by greenhouse gases is absorbed by the ocean. So it's it's really important to track that energy and time it system and check the warming the ocean. Un kelly's an oceanographer at caltech. Of course the ocean is really big and taking its temperature is hard. Satellites give information about the surface and scientists have launched shifting devices that measure conditions in the upper mile of water but researchers still struggled to collect data from the deep ocean and to detect the long term trends underlying day to day variations in temperature now however scientists have developed a new technique that allows them to measure temperature changes across entire ocean basins. The idea dates back to the nineteen seventies when researchers first proposed using sound waves to study ocean warming because the speed of sound through water depends on the physical properties of that water which are related to temperature and lawfully if we will mobs ocean temperature by one degree this on the speed of change. It's it would be for meters pass. Kent and this is. This is very sensitive. Change when bo wu seismologist also at caltech who led the study that one degree he mentioned is a celsius degree researchers originally proposed using artificial sound sources but that notion got nixed because of concerns about the impacts on marine animals in the new study however woo kelly's and their colleagues show that they can use the sounds produced by earthquakes instead in an earthquake. Some vibrations bounced off the sea floor in. Turn into sound waves. That get picked up by seismometers. Underwater microphones the researchers. Looked the travel times of these sound waves for two thousand pairs of earthquakes. That occurred in the east indian ocean between two thousand and five and twenty sixteen. Each earthquake pair happened in the same place but at different times allowing the researchers to measure how much the sound waves sped up the analysis revealed that the waves traveled a few tenths of a second faster in more recent quakes than older ones a difference that translates to a warming trend zero point zero four degrees celsius per decade four. One hundredths of a degree may not sound like a lot. But it represents a huge amount of heat considering. It's the change in a body of water almost two thousand miles wide and several miles deep. The warming is also substantially higher than the rate reported in previous studies. Although kelly says not to put too much stock in those discrepancies. We don't know whether that is the general finding new curse Here in this in this region at this time or whether that is something we'll find another beach says while we just don't have the date is yet. the study is in the journal. Science kelly's and wu save this approach may even enable scientists to gauge historical temperature changes by studying data from much older earthquakes. In other words. You could say that the method is sound.

Kelly's Caltech Bo Wu Seismologist UN Kelly Kent Earthquake Science Kelly WU
"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"More to come here, folks and blaming California fires on climate change. Latest with Corona virus So much more left takeover of sports Are you watching NFL tonight? I just can't. I can't handle them. Politization of it. I think they're killing sports. They're trying to kill country music to their kill in sports. The Marxists are we have a lot more to come. You don't miss it as we get moving on our friends over at Caltech. Make some really great products. I love I like what they do. They love what they do. I think they're very innovative. Theyjust think very much outside of the box. They're all quality probably made right here in the US of a great family culture that celebrates use a manufacturing as well as your second Amendment, and they have AH, lot of new stuff that they came out with this year. And I know everybody's been asking about the peace 17 and I think they're going to be able to have some more. They've been like working like crazy. They've got there. You know, there there Gun elves. I think I've actually heard elves. I don't know. But the P 17 very affordable for a lot of new gun owners out there. One of the most important things that you're going to do is train train, train, train, train train train and make sure that you have great target acquisition that you understand, you know, Ru right hand dominant, left hand dominant. Get a grip, right? You can actually really easily do this with P 17. This is a great I call it my training gun because I have been bringing up my youngest son when I introduced him to handguns. The P 17 is part of that because we were trying to. He's right handed and left handed like me, so it's a little bit weird to try to figure that out. And low cost 22 L R 16 plus one ammo capacity. It's ships with 3 16 round magazines so you can rack up a lot of target time for pennies of pop's awesome fiber optic front sight adjustable rear minimum request. So there's like, no recoil. This thing looks aggressive, but it's super lightweight gives you a lot of bang for the buck. The Celtic piece 17 check.

NFL California Caltech US Theyjust
Robinhood has lured young traders

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:22 min | 1 year ago

Robinhood has lured young traders

"And selling stocks on the smartphone. App Robin Hood has become incredibly popular this year especially since the covert pandemic started and there are a few possible reasons why I of everybody's home and has lots of spare time that's got to be part of it maybe. Also, of course, you know, maybe people had a little extra money to invest because so many restaurants and shops were closed also, maybe people sense an opportunity to buy stocks cheap when the stock market collapsed in the first month of the pandemic, whatever the reason Robin Hood announced recently that the amount of money, it makes people trading on its APP doubled in the second quarter of the year two, one, hundred, eighty, million dollars. It's a lot of traits. In the hood is also become kind of famous for the clever ways that it entices people to use. It's apt to and sell stocks. So Digital Confetti or some other animation might fall across the screen when you first deposit money into the APP, we are simple. Take away from that hard to get us in here. Yeah. And Robert also offers free stocks to people who sign up for a trial run into people who convince others to sign up. James. mccomb is twenty five lives in Long Island. New York he is a big robinhood user and there are several things he likes about Robin, Hood's design and how simple and seamless it is to keep track of what's happening for any company. He is interested in it's a great APP for easy information almost like a news feed but for stocks plus the Robin Hood. Shows a ranking the most popular stocks that other robinhood traders have been buying which. You know my convince new traders to join the party James. HIMSELF INVESTED MONEY IN UBER stock partly because it was number one on Robin Hoods popularity ranking I can kind of get a little bit of a sense of confidence like okay. People believe in this company because it's literally number one on the list currently James is what is known as a retail trader, which is basically anyone who buys and sells stocks for their own personal account not a professional investor who manages other people's money. In this year, it is retail traders like James who've really thrown themselves into the stock. Market. Because the US stock market has gone up in recent months, even hitting a new record high last week a lot of these retail traders have made quite a bit of money lately but other, maybe some reasons to worry that. So many retail traders have started buying and selling stocks using APPs like Robin Hood I would say two parts worried one part. Happy. This is Colin camerer. He's a behavioral economist at Caltech and he has studied the ways that people invest in the stock market collinses. One good thing about Robin Hood is it by making it so? Easy to start buying stocks. It might get people invested in the stock market who otherwise might never have bothered at all, and this can also help people learn more about how specific companies operate into to better understand how the economy works. Especially these days the digital age when it's so easy to find useful information. You know there's a lot of stuff under the hood, the economy, and it'd be good if people knew more about that and they may learn some by just buying selling shares of a particular stock and learning about what boards of directors do. You know how companies actually operate conn said, he was only one part happy and two parts worried about Robin Hoods popularity with retail traders. So here's why he's worried if there is one conclusion that the research about financial markets keeps arriving at again and again it's the individual traders who actively try to pick specific stocks buying stocks. They think we'll go up selling the stocks I think we'll go down are very likely to underperform the overall stock market and this does not just apply to retail traders it also applies. To professional money managers over the last five years eighty, two percent of mutual funds that tried to pick stocks underperformed the overall stock market, which means that most people are just better off investing in what they call an index fund that just tracks the performance at the stock market goes up and down with it over time and Collins says, retail traders are also vulnerable to psychological by sees lead them to make bad decisions when they invest especially, if they don't understand the risks that they're taking if you're buying somebody's selling. And you have to be confident that you're buying from someone who knows less than you about the future of the. So one of the elements in in retail trading is overconfidence. Everybody thinks they're above average also confetti. And? Just. Sucks right in. plus people fall victim to what's known as the disposition effect which makes people sell stocks that have gone up a little too soon missing out on making even more money people have a tendency to sell toxin went up and we think it's because there's a special kind of. Realization utility from actually locking gain and clicking and like seeing in your bank account. From your portfolio numbers on the screen into your bank account or something like would. So people so winners too soon and similarly they tend to hang onto losers typically in a kind of blind faith that it's GonNa Bounce back making these kinds of trading mistakes something that happens when people are actively and frequently buying and selling stocks, and of course, the ROBINHOOD APP is designed to get people to do just that and Robin Hood's business model actually depends on it.

Robin Hood Hood Robin Hoods James Robin Colin Camerer New York Caltech Long Island United States James. Mccomb Robert Conn Collins
"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"By Caltech until I have this Hashtag team Nicole on here. A flight attendant, 29 is arrested for beating the ever loving hell out of her husband, who's 34. She gave him a black eye, smashed his guitar on the wall after she caught him engaging in Biblical biblical intimacy with another woman. The woman, Florida Florida woman, Nicole Dennison was arrested Wednesday after she attacked her husband. She literally found him in the act. And in their home, so she punched him left him with a black eye. She's a flight attendant of the Legionnaire. She was charged with domestic battery. I think the dude deserved it quite frankly. Didn't get mad at me all you want to play ground rules, guys. Playground rules. You do that the marital, But guess what? You're gonna get what? That's how it works. You get mad at me all you want to, so I don't think it's funny that she actually was able to whip him. I mean, what kind of man are you? I'm just saying so be light hearted people quit being just joy. Killjoys. So they allowed her to T s So they She got trouble. That's all you need to know. And her? Yeah. She had the arresting officers that they witnessed the damage that she flickered on the home. The husband, etcetera, etcetera. What about the damage you inflicted on the marriage getting for violation of contract girl, though? Anyways, we get moving on Sam. I'm just saying Taylor Swift, so I cannot stand is silent as fans docks and harass a music critic. She came out with his album called for Forklore Folklore. And this music critic came out and what it was like.

Nicole Dennison Taylor Swift Florida Florida Forklore Folklore
"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"She gave it a bad review, but she didn't give it a stellar review. That's what I don't understand. She didn't give it a bad review. She just simply was like, you know, it's not the it's not the best and it wouldn't she have have eight out of 10? I think with the score that she gave it was not the score sheet, and this has been so it's It wasn't even awful. So she didn't give it a full 10. It was. Oh, sorry, literally. She gave it eight out of 10. This review. And this poor little music reviewer Jillian Mapes and her the Swifties have doctor. They've been threatening her, like, Get a grip. Get a grip. Philadelphia trash piles up as the Corona virus pandemic stymies its removal. Fox, five in New York, says that they're having problems taking handling all of it. They and apparently, the streets smell badly. Just so that's all. You need to just deal with It deal with their stuff you with your situation. And Tigers now are making a remarkable comeback after being endangered. Protect them from Carol Baskin How'bout that stay with the spokesman get a lot more on the way. Quick five is brought to you by Caltech Innovation quality performance. About three on the humor Nigel Show on update on what I PS schools intend to do about in person in virtual learning. Plus, it's beer sample. Friday 93 W W Y PC Mobile News on the level on the Go says they will do whatever it takes Some rob comic. Here's what's trending at 1 30 Former Indiana governor and vice President Mike Pence admits this is a tough time for the country right now. It's Corona virus cases surge again, Pence told a crowd in Pennsylvania. The Trump Administration will spare no expense to fight the Corona virus. President Trump on our.

Mike Pence Tigers President Trump Trump Administration vice President Jillian Mapes Caltech Innovation Carol Baskin Philadelphia Indiana Swifties Fox Pennsylvania New York
Prototype Ventilator Created At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Innovation Now

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Prototype Ventilator Created At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

"Specializes in spacecraft not medical device manufacturing, but excellent engineering rigorous testing and rapid prototyping are some of the agencies specialties. This is innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. A new high pressure ventilator called vital has been developed by engineers. At Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory to free up the nation's limited supply of traditional ventilators. So they may be used on patients with the most severe covid nineteen symptoms. When people at JPL realized, they might have what it takes to support the medical community. They felt it was their duty to their ingenuity and expertise. And in just thirty seven days had created. The prototype medical machine vital can be built faster and maintained more easily than a traditional ventilator. Flexible design means it also can be modified for use in field hospitals being set up in convention centers, hotels, and other high capacity facilities across the country and around the globe, the office of Technology Transfer and corporate partnerships at Caltech, which manages jpl for NASA will offer a free license for vital manufacturers interested in the device for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley

JPL Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Jennifer Pulley Nasa Technology Transfer Caltech
Taller people face higher risk of catching COVID-19, survey says

Dana Loesch

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Taller people face higher risk of catching COVID-19, survey says

"Caltech. This is one of the things I do not understand. This is a headline. It's everywhere now. Taller People, for some reason, faced a higher risk of catching the Corona virus, according to a survey they say people over six feet tall. Are more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with the Corona virus, a global team of researchers, including experts from the University of Manchester and Open University, They surveyed 2000 people. In the UK as well as the U. S to determine whether personal attributes like their work, living practices. What role that place in transmission and how much and what they found is that all of the taller people were at a higher list, which researchers say Well, that means the contagion has spread through the air because I wouldn't be a factor if the virus was on ly contract herbal through droplets. So, they say The results of the survey in terms of associations between height and diagnosis suggests downward droplet transmission is not the on ly transmission mechanism. An aerosol transmission is possible. They said that this has been suggested by other studies. But their method of confirmation is novel. They said social distance seems still important, but they said, really explore air purification and interior spaces. So that's what they said. And then they were talking about sharing kitchen in accommodations that that might be like a danger. I am like, mystify

University Of Manchester Open University UK U. S
"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Brought to you by Caltech. Reddit decided to ban the separated the Donald and several others, but mainly anything that's conservative. As part of a major expansion of its rules. More than 2000 communities are being removed for violating red. It's new, totally arbitrary. Policies on content, and Reddit CEO Steve Huffman had a bunch of stuff that's totally not interesting, because what they ended up doing is spending any day. I mean, they they got that they included that Subreddit in with some, like other seriously egregious ones is so stupid. It's ridiculous. I never thought I thought I would see the day when they would become so ridiculously sensitive and weak. Doctors are US pediatricians are calling for in person school this fall, The nation's pediatricians have come out with a strong statement favoring bringing kids back to the classroom, and whenever they could do so safely, the American Academy of Pediatrics has died. And strongly advocates, they say, quote that all policy considerations for the coming school year should start with the goal of having students physically President school. Yes, it's fundamental to a child to a child's adolescent development and well be, they say, Mounting evidence that the transmission by the Corona virus through young Children is uncommon, they say, partly because they're less likely to contracted in the first place. You two physical development. But they say that it has to be that has to be considered and use those CDC. Guidance is the hand Washington all of that stuff. I completely agree with us because we're running kids lives here. India's capital faces a swarm again of Locusts. That's nasty. A miles long cloud of Locusts warmed India's capital region over the weekend, flying through metro stations and playgrounds invading sugarcane fields, threatening major losses to the agriculture secretary sector at a time when restrictions of Already caused the loss of millions and millions and millions of jobs and after decades in the shadow, the Golden State killer Joseph D'Angelo confesses, according to SF Gate. Hey, is the Golden State killer? He pled guilty to.

Reddit India Steve Huffman American Academy of Pediatrics President school Donald CDC SF Gate US Joseph D'Angelo Washington CEO secretary
"caltech" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"A private company to do what they want to do but for plain and identity politics so I'm just gonna put that out on the table that's what we're doing when an identity politics let's see more scientists are trying to explain how George Ford protests are acceptable during a pandemic they say protesters are balancing competing risks I don't quite understand how that is meanwhile over a hundred over a thousand health professionals signed a letter saying don't shut down protest using corona virus concerns as an excuse but no you cannot go to church that's true of these open letters that are being sent out a group of health and medical colleagues and this open letter I mean I know people who very parents and they weren't allowed to have any family for the service and they grieved along grave sites you're telling me that's not acceptable but going down and gathering in mass protest is also Bugs Bunny is Losin hello I'm a fight is losing is gone we're gonna talk about that because now they're decided to politically correct ties politically correct sanitized bugs bunny will discuss the young S. quick five is brought to you by Caltech unification quality a mac the association of mature American citizens recently pulled their two point one million members to determine their support for legislation sponsored by senator Tom cotton member response was overwhelmingly in favor of the protecting our pharmaceutical supply chain from China act of twenty twenty a bill that provides incentives for American manufacturers and reduces America's dependence on pharmaceutical products and ingredients made in China taking direction from their membership in.

America China George Ford Caltech senator Tom cotton
NASA Develops COVID-19 Prototype Ventilator in 37 Days

Innovation Now

01:00 min | 1 year ago

NASA Develops COVID-19 Prototype Ventilator in 37 Days

"A new high pressure ventilator called vital has been developed by engineers at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory to free up the nation's limited supply of traditional ventilators so they may be used on patients with the most severe Kovic nineteen symptoms when people at Jpl realized they might have what it takes to support the medical community It was their duty to their ingenuity and expertise and ingest. Thirty seven days had created the prototype. Medical machine vital can be built faster and maintained more easily than a traditional ventilator. It's flexible design. Means it also can be modified for use in field hospitals being set up in convention centers hotels and other high capacity facilities across the country and around the globe the Office of Technology Transfer and corporate partnerships at Caltech which manages. Jpl FOR NASA will offer a free license for vital manufacturers interested in the device

JPL Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Office Of Technology Transfer Nasa Caltech
"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"All of the news you would probably mess time for Dana's quick five brought to you by Caltech well apparently Liz Cheney is one of the Republicans who is liking what Brandon Carr the FCC chairman says that with they should remain the street front of communist China's embassy in DC Dr Lee Wen Liang Wei there are doctor that tried to warn the world about the Wuhan coronavirus that is a genius idea by the way is absolutely genius idea I really hope that happens that would be fantastic also let's see here NASA confirms that Tom Cruise is filming a movie in space okay I get that he does his own stunts and all that stuff but isn't this kind of taken it like really far this I mean it's okay dude like you can do it in the studio and we will totally believe that it's happening right he's actually going to film a movie in space on the space station that's what they're doing Jim Bridenstine said the NASA is excited about it we need popular media to inspire a new generation of engineers and scientists so that means he's going to be on a space shuttle he had to have plans to work with you on Moscow NASA so but NASA has confirmed that yes he is going to film inside the space station and I this is crazy so they haven't started filming yet I think it's all in pre production but he did a hell of a job and his last job in his last movie and I mean there's there's that's pretty crazy so anyway it's are you do studio we believe that we get it you do your stunts carbon emissions from the moon are forcing scientists to question the theory that was formed in a collision between earth and a wandering planet well then where did it come from yeah where did that come from maybe Tom Cruise confront what is up there that it was a Japanese spacecraft indicates an abundance of carbon on them and and this carbon would have it was thought that it would have been a radically different temperatures during impact the impact apoptosis may have to be modified to explain the carbons existence which is quite a mess in failings but Italians socially distance while soaking up the sun in the country now so the public can finally attend mass and other religious ceremonies beginning may eighteenth they've been locked down for such a long time so they're adjusting to the new normal in Italy because previously they have not even been allowed to leave their houses without permits and shopping was impossible but they've eased restrictions on shopping in supermarkets and they allow people to travel within their regions from markets to re open and the they said that the lockdown measures would return though if the infection spike again so but at least it's you know were were seen it reopened that much good night one of the the president's personal ballots has tested positive for corona virus and I literally only know what that is because of Downton abbey a White House source said that the man who had not been identified exhibited symptoms of Wednesday morning and that he tested positive for the virus it apparently reportedly hit the fan the west wing because the president is a super super germaphobe has always been that way so true Texas lieutenant governor Dan Patrick joins us next quick five is brought to you by cal tech innovation quality performance.

Dana Caltech Liz
"caltech" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"By Caltech Jeff Bezos is worth one trillion dollars his yeah I T. as fortune is grown by twenty four billion Amazon's value is at one point one trillion on the back of online shopping and maybe take Kerrier workers a little but I like when you do it voluntarily do it voluntarily I don't believe in state run anything but unless your soul is just rotted piece of driftwood then I suggest that you take better care of your workers and everyone out there to make sure that you leave snacks and drinks a freer delivery people yeah he's a trillion there can you imagine saying oh yeah I'm a trillion err I've never heard of that I mean I never thought I'd use that phrase trillion there he's a trainer really I'm not just I mean like I believe in capitalism but at the same time I also believe you got to be about a good person take other people take area millions of Spaniards are allowed to resume their nonessential jobs as the industrial lockdown is lifted and the lowest number of cases for twenty four days is announced Italy meanwhile is also now coming off of that hill and they're preparing to open some some shops tomorrow but they're also still incorporating that social distancing and with all of this as well so there's a little bit of good news there on there on the other side of this now they're all getting in on the other side of this now so we're that's we're going to be heading there to also Democrat house Majority Leader Steny Hoyer had said well absent an emergency the house is not going to meet before may fourth an emergency like I don't know sixteen point eight million people filing for unemployment and six million of those being first time claims and you know the fact that we're literally in a national state of emergency because of a pandemic okay sure yeah also check this out this is a piece through our IVR I read actually two different places but I wanna go to the New York Post because they did not take forever to actually get into the meat of the story there was a poll in international poll thousands of doctors over two thousand physicians surveyed and they concluded.

Jeff Bezos Amazon Italy Majority Leader Steny Hoyer New York Post Kerrier
"caltech" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on KTRH

"And welcome back to coast to coast Dr Judy Mike of it's with us and Caltech in lively and both of you will be sharing a line so feel free to jump in anytime you want when we're having this conversation and we'll be taking calls with our incredible listeners in just a moment can't did you have an opportunity to hear some of the chat with Judy absolutely loved it it is frightening some of the things she was saying you know not another thing that I don't think people realize is Toni found she is seventy nine years old right now him he's been in the same job since nineteen eighty four that's thirty six years almost long as long as J. Edgar Hoover was head of the FBI and we know about all the pieces that happened under his reign so I don't think people really understand the stranglehold that Toni found his on our public health and all that time I'm in shock over the funding of the Wuhan lab with our taxpayers money well it that's what that's why I talk about this scientific a lead that I think exists above governments and so you know I think it's entirely likely that the Chinese president doesn't understand what's really going on I think it's entirely possible that president trump doesn't really know what's going on because the scientists you know the stain these positions for years and years and they just amass this incredible power and you know they're they're like our modern day priests and and we don't question them and we need to crash question that much more aggressively Judy I wanted to ask you again about the flu vaccine are you saying that those who have gotten corona virus probably had the flu vaccine or that those who take the flu vaccine are more susceptible to getting the coronavirus both rotavirus is there in all animals and and that vaccines can be contaminated with them and yes the papers show they are more susceptible depending on what kind of vaccine anywhere from thirty six percent to four hundred and forty percent more susceptible what is in the mainstream what is in the mainstream media report on the stock well this is the criminal of of their public Calvin county fact sheet in the CDC and the FDA fire out she close the CDC and the FDA get rid of all the criminal feel balanced the budget as a lot of taxpayers money beyond just funding will online it's been finding that these kinds of device because as I mentioned with the literally the fraud and waste of millions of dollars in killing of millions with these failed HIV vaccines they know the flu vaccine Dr he's you know corona viruses they don't interfere they actually make you more susceptible you know what happened in Italy you had a four yard a really dangerous flu vaccine this year in Italy you are correct I saw YouTube video it was done and two thousand seventeen I just saw it last week with Tony files N. F. O. G. and he was talking about a pandemic would occur under this administration and he was saying this three years ago right you're speaking to some were gonna rations correct I think it was the gates foundation and they actually the CDC put out a job requests November fifteenth to may fifteenth for quarantine officers in every state reporter Rico Janick yeah Risi Kantor we gonna be able to find our way out of this you know what.

Caltech Dr Judy Mike
"caltech" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Brought to you by Caltech a new poll out from A. B. C. fifty one percent exes this couple days ago but I was over the weekend some towns fifty one percent of Americans approve of the president's handling of the corona virus outbreak this is actually up from what was it forty nine percent from the Gallup interesting so when you have that many poles a smattering of polls that show relatively within one or two point distance of one another that the yeah it's pretty high despite everything that the media has done it's incredibly high so I just wanted to point that out just stay just a reminder to you we are little you too friend China is what I just needed just to have it at the ready just totally out of the ready yeah see now I gotta they don't trust yeah yeah exactly and that is because there's more more news coming out about the unbelievable unbridled influence China has on the World Health Organization not just freezing out Taiwan but also politicizing past health issues that the international community has faced which were going to get into and of course now there also be accused of shipping faulty masks to countries like Ukraine and even apparently the United States this is this is sad because now we're seeing some of these some of these individuals were starting to see some famous people and the effect of this virus Allen Meryl who's the co writer original singer of I love rock rock and roll dead at age sixty nine from the corona virus he wrote the original run thing original version of that song and he passed away to sixty nine after he contracted at his daughter Laura announced on Facebook and so that's sad and John Prine is also another individual who is dealing with the corona virus I know and then Joe defeat all my gosh Joe Diffie passed away you don't see that how in.

Caltech president Gallup China World Health Organization Ukraine United States Allen Meryl writer Laura Facebook John Prine Joe Diffie
Flat Earthers: What They Believe and Why

Science Talk

09:37 min | 1 year ago

Flat Earthers: What They Believe and Why

"This is scientific. American science talk posted on March. Twenty seven twenty twenty. I'm Steve Mirsky. I'm going to let my guest introduce himself in a moment because he does a better job than I could. Midway through the following discussion. We'll take a break for a short segment sponsored by the Calveley prize with Caltech Planetary Astronomer. Michael Brown who has done groundbreaking work though solar system breaking work on the Kuyper belt and its largest members. His segment is not unrelated to what will be talking about now. It's not about corona virus. You'll find some parallels to how some people are reacting to corona virus. Buckle up so I'm Michael Marshall and I'm the project director of the good thinking society which is a charity based in the UK the whole purpose charities to promote science to challenge pseudoscience. So we'll do work Ford Science Education and then another PA the work that we do. The bulk of my work is to find ideas. That aren't backed by evidence and find people who are promoting those ideas find people who are buying into those ideas and to explore them and figure out if anything can be done to prevent people being confused by them Hound by the misled by them and those kinds of things. So I spent a lot of time looking at things like alternative cancer kills and the people who promote those and alternative medicine spent a lot my time going to see people who say they can talk dead. Oku can do faith healing and then another part of my time is spent token people who believe in unusual ideas and kind of proponents. And that's how I came across the flat. Earth world is through my slightly odd a hobby at the time before I was working. Fulltime as as a skeptic is a hobby of mine to be in rooms filled if he who disagree with me to just understand what brings people to ideas that. I would look at and say well. This can't be true. These kind of fringe and extreme and unusual beliefs. What brings people to believe them? And what what? What kind of path leave people there will? Evidence supports supports that position in their minds. And how do they engage with the world with that worldview and try and have conversations? Podcast where I talked to people who have kind of fringe beliefs and instead of having a conversation that a lot of people have if they are a skeptic about something and they're talking to believe where you shout at them and tell them never home and point out all the evidence and tell you gets into a volatile discussion sometimes instead of that. I've tried to have a civil and polite chat to try and explore the gap between us. So I don't believe in this idea of yours but I'm reading to figure out why I don't believe it. Why do so? Let's have a conversation? So have these kind of civil discussions and that's kind of how I came across That the flatter theory and the idea that there are people walking around today. Who think well this flat. This is really interesting and serendipitous that were sitting here because I knew that there were some flatter. Thor's out there and I just thought it was kind of strange and funny and about a week ago I discovered a friend of mine who is very well educated. She got a doctorate in biochemistry and She has a sister who's also very intelligent and very well educated and my friend told me that her sister is a flatter and that her sister is very indignant about the idea that We don't take them seriously and she said something to the effectiveness is hearsay. That we're getting for me right now. That will you know if you looked at the evidence. Then you'd know that what you've been told isn't true. So all of a sudden became fascinated with the flat earth people and then Just on twitter and I had I had been a follower verve yours until I saw this tweet that somebody I follow must've re tweeted that you had just given a talk in Edinburgh where I have been and So I reached out to you and it turns out you live in Liverpool and here I am in Liverpool today. So that's why we're here talking so tell me what do the flat Earth People Think and why do they think it so to your packet question that will bit because it's very easy for us to see the flat? Earth Movement is one singular cohesive movement and. That's how I I thought about it when I first came across in two thousand thirteen when I came across the flutter society in the UK. And so I had a conversation with the vice president of the Flat Earth Society and I assumed you probably have in your mind that people who believe the world is flat thing that the world's disk and in the center you've got the Arctic Circle then you've got all the continents of the world are splayed out to fill the circle. Antarctica is like the edge of disk. But I found out when I first spoke to flatter societies that not everyone in the world has that version of the world and the heads. Some do believe it's a disc but others believe that. Yes the Arctic Circle in the middle the landmasses around it and then on top Around the edge but instead of it being discreet disc some people believe in fact Antactica just on forever and all directions and so they believe that the earth is actually an infinite plane in all directions that bisects reality which is a really lovely idea. What does that mean by? Second three dollars so it will go on. North South East West go on forever and there is the above and the below. But there's no way of getting from the top to the bottom because it's just infinity of all ice in all directions forever so there's no way of getting below the earth and so this was when. I first came across the floor of moving in two thousand thirteen. This quite vociferous debate that was going on and the website of the three in the flat. Earthers yeah it was. It was quite a schism really and so they'd the society. The the time was largely a forum where they would bring forth that proofs of one version this theory or another and I also think there's another schism going on in the movement at the time Which is between one side which people who genuinely really believed the world was flat and the other side which after he did not believe it but enjoyed intellectual pursuit of arguing a position than you false and so they would find quite esoteric off the wall proofs that most people wouldn't think of and so when I first came across it in two thousand thirteen there are people waiting into these arguments who believe the world is round but had never thought about it the fall but just assumed innocent of arrogant way that they must know better than anybody who's thought about it and come to a different conclusion and so they were stumping into these arguments saying well what about photos of the earth from space and what about this and what about ships going with the rise in thinking. Well this is the Gotcha but not realizing that those are the first things they thought about that. They thought the world approved walls around. And therefore it's probably likely that people who think the world is flat had the same idea and yet they're still flat earth So at least in their mind they must have a good answer to that. The people believe the world was round in these arguments. Didn't have 'cause they'd never scrutinize the idea. They rejecting enough and so what was happening. Was I think to a degree? The part of the schism that were just having fun and move very well. The world wasn't flat but just enjoyed the pursuit of doing that. They will winning those arguments of people who are coming in and arrogantly assuming that they could answer everything and in winning those arguments they were really converting even more people who really believed it. And so you had this kind of effect where we saw spiral out of control a little bit. But I think it it wasn't viral in the way that in two thousand thirteen and a as a in the way that it was in two thousand sixteen in two thousand seventeen. I'm think PA that is because that ISA teric off wall version of proofs could be quite complicated to get your head around so for example if you have the disc version the world and the infinite plane version both muddles suffer from an inability to explain gravity. You don't have the spherical mass united central mass of a central point pulling it all two to one point So it's very difficult to explain. Gravity neither one models but these people who are doing kind of East Tarik arguments are saying well what gravity gravity and accelerate falls towards the ground. Think nine point. Eight meters per second. Squared accelerates downwards. They said that is identical to a world in which the ground accelerates upwards to meet you and so when you let go of something it isn't that it's accelerating downwards that it's the grounds accelerating up to meet it Sephora relativity and that's this is exactly where they come to you so people then say when if ground is if the earth is an infinite in all directions that by sex reality and is accelerating open at nine seconds and always has been since the dawn of time. You'd hit a problem which would be the speed of light. You can't go fast so people don't have a Gotcha for this. And so the people who were putting forth esoteric the wall trobisch arguments would say well look at Einstein's theory of relativity as you approach light speed time itself slows down and the mats in their head works back out again so yes beginning. Quick time getting slower and we can account for gravity in that way. And that's quite a complicated auditing Enron. And so I think the fact that these people were winning arguments was getting converting some people movement but the way in which they were winning them were keeping people away from the movement because they were quite complex ideas to you. Couldn't stick them on a mean as you can these days. Here's a picture of the earth. You couldn't explain all that stuff about the relatively proving gravitate infinite plane version of the world. So I think it was a limiting factor going on and that's why when I first came across the free movement it was probably still pretty small. Pretty unknown I've been given talks about pseudoscience for the last five six plus years and I've mentioned that I came across the Flat Earth. Moving and people would always say to me this. Nobody who actually believes that nobody actually doesn't really exist. That people having fun with stay quite small and then in. Twenty fifteen in two thousand sixteen a couple of things happened that really ignited a movement and it was the publishing of two videos on Youtube video series on Youtube. One I believe was Eric. Debate tuned approves the Spinning Globe. And the other was mark sergeants. Fourteen videos in his letter clue series.

Flat Earth Society UK PA Arctic Circle Earth Movement Liverpool Steve Mirsky Michael Brown Caltech Planetary Astronomer Calveley Youtube Cancer OKU Ford Science Education Twitter Michael Marshall Thor Antarctica
"caltech" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"caltech" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Now all of the news you would probably mess it's time for dean is quick five brought to you by Caltech I really want to get this from my house so it came reported that a malfunction causes red wine will cost red wine to flow from faucets in an Italian town for a few hours last Wednesday residents of the northern Italian town also coronavirus area castle the literal realize they could have their lamb Briscoe not just from bottles but from the tap I'm L. function at a local winery because the thousand liters of wine to leak into the water pipes it lasted about three hours impacted twenty homes that seems like a feature not a bug just saying you know we have it there this from a couple sources including Daily Mail intern human settlement was obliterated by a comet that exploded in earth's atmosphere instant fragments of molten glass hot enough to melt cars flying to the ground twelve thousand eight hundred years ago this was at least part of an excavation and ongoing excavation and this was that also taken up by the university of California Santa Barbara the geologist James Kennett there Abu horay aside it's evolved it's incorporated run thirty sites across Europe the Americas and Middle East very interesting we're a lot more coming up W. five is brought to you by Caltech innovative quality performance how do you fight for freedom America is a great country the freedoms that we have today exist because a great sacrifice however these freedoms are being threatened by progressive candidates and causes as well as the progressive.

dean Briscoe Abu horay Europe Americas Middle East intern university of California geologist James Kennett Caltech
Latest Apple results show hardware is still king

The Tech Guy

01:26 min | 1 year ago

Latest Apple results show hardware is still king

"Apple had great results quarterly results always good for the fourth quarter fourth calendar quarter first quarter of apples fiscal year. Big Number though that and this is the number number apple likes to talk about how many people using their devices one and a half billion active apple devices MACs ipads but mostly iphones eighty percent of them eighty percent of iphones and ipads running the latest. IOS Thirteen. That's a really good number one point. Five billion million active devices probably a billion of those or iphones. Yell which Pitch Helps Apple Pay the one point one billion dollar fine or court. I guess it's a court order court decision to you pay for patent infringement. They bought chips from broadcom broadcom. Apparently according to the courts Infringed orange the patent of the California Institute of Technology Caltech. They had the WIFI patterns. The jury said Apple You pay one hundred eight hundred thirty seven million dollars to Caltech broadcom. You hit them you pay them. Two hundred seventy million dollars. That will build a pretty Nice Library there and the campus. The Job Caltech Apple can afford it. Of course they can cost them nothing

Apple Broadcom California Institute Of Techno
Apple, Broadcom told to pay Caltech $1.1B in patent lawsuit

Daily Tech Headlines

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Apple, Broadcom told to pay Caltech $1.1B in patent lawsuit

"A jury in the US District Court for the Central District of California ruled that apple and broadcom infringed on WIFI patents from the California when you institute of Technology Ordering Total of one point one billion dollars in damages. The suit was filed in two thousand sixteen with Caltech naming iphones ipads ipods. Apple watches his and MAC computers as devices including infringing broadcom components. The damages break down to eight hundred thirty seven point. Eight million dollars from apple and two hundred seventy seventy point two million dollars from broadcom.

Broadcom Apple Us District Court California Caltech Institute Of Technology
Apple, Broadcom told to pay Caltech $1.1B in patent lawsuit

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Apple, Broadcom told to pay Caltech $1.1B in patent lawsuit

"A jury is ordering apple and Broadcom to pay more than a billion dollars in damages to the California institute of technology and P. R. Shannon bond says the companies were found guilty of infringing on wifi patents the research university known as cal tech sued the companies in twenty sixteen it said Broadcom chips used in iPhones Max and other apple devices infringe Caltech patents related to data transmission apple has been ordered to pay almost eight hundred and thirty eight million dollars while Broadcom must pay about two hundred and seventy million dollars apple says it will appeal the verdict the iPhone maker argued in court that is device is nearly contained the chips and did not themselves infringed the patents Broadcom also says it intends to appeal books woman for cal tech says the university is pleased with

Apple P. R. Shannon Bond Cal Tech Broadcom California Institute Of Techno
Researchers design an improved pathway to carbon-neutral plastics

The Naked Scientists

04:56 min | 2 years ago

Researchers design an improved pathway to carbon-neutral plastics

"Techniques that can turn waste carbon dioxide into ethylene the high value gas used polythene and a range of other products has been unveiled by scientists in Canada. The system is clever. New Inexpensive copper based catalysts the can selectively grab underline carbon dioxide molecules. So that they react together with water to make pure ethylene. Previously the main industrial source of ethylene was oil so this new approach has the potential to carbon dioxide emissions and reduce oil consumption. Toronto universities. Ted Sergeant developed a new process. We've got a system that eats carbon dioxide so consume co two it also uses is is renewable energy so energy from solar cell or a wind farm and uses those two ingredients to produce ethylene which is a major commodity chemical. Unless the stuff we turn into poly ethylene otherwise known as polythene. That's right so this is a big global industry. It's about a sixty billion dollar industry and it's got a major carbon footprint today and people have become very interested in capturing sea of two and sequestering it but the problem there is that you don't get value value out of it you just sort of buried underground and so there's a whole community ourselves included that has been trying to figure out ways to upgrade utilized. Co Two into a valuable. We'll product to generate a pull on consuming and utilizing co two. The problem here is in chemistry when we burn stuff that's got carbon in it. We Release Energy and waste. Product is co two carbon dioxide which we throw away in the planet spin a convenient place to put that up until now so in order to get get something useful back out of the C O two you've got to do some work and hitherto. It's been very difficult to make these equations actually stack up in a financially viable way that it was worth doing. So how if you solve this. So in order to make something valuable you also need some make it an affiliate pure form previously we and other groups jobs had made what are called heterogeneous catalysts. So these are basically pieces of metal in on the metal the carbon dioxide and the electrons from the electricity land. They they mix up with water and they're the reaction occurs to produce the ethylene. What we found was that some brilliant scholars who became our collaborators from Caltech had come up with a way to put molecules onto a catalyst for the molecules kind of made the carbon dioxide that you were trying to react with stand up in a special and controlled old way onto the catalyst allowed us to control the orientation of the carbon dioxide so that we could then turn it selectively into ethylene so when the reaction proceeds to carbon dioxide and coupled together they've formed this to carbon molecule ethylene and then we simply collect the gas that mixes with the water water? That's involved in the reaction. And how does the whole catalytic process work do you feed in carbon dioxide gas. Yep So we feed and C O two it it interacts with the catalyst and does so right at the same place that there's water and waters providing the hydrogen to produce these hydrocarbons. And how fast is this. This is this actually viable because some of these catalysts they turned something that happens. excruciatingly slowly into something that happens a little bit less excruciatingly slowly but it's not industrially viable apple so he's your process fast so there's one measure that we use in this field to describe the activity or the speed of the reaction and it's a current density. I'll just give you a sense of what it was previously using these molecules it was about one million per square centimeter now. We built a system in this project. That's is designed to work at industrial productivity and most people in industry will agree that you need to get to about one hundred million per square centimeter in order to have an industrial industrially interesting process. We managed to get above two hundred million APPs so we achieve more than a factor of one hundred increase and we did get into to the range of industrial interests. So would it be feasible to couple something like this up to the flu stream from say a big power plant and deal with what a coal. Oh five power station. Thirty thousand tonnes of CO two in an afternoon might chuck out. So there's a lot of additional work we need to do on scaling but we've done the calculations and and we know how much co two comes out of. Say a steel plant or out of a cement factory. We know how much electricity is available and we also need to supply the water. That's it's actually the most straightforward those three feeds and it should be possible to couple these altogether and we believe that with a bit more progress on the energy efficiency the of our system it will even become economically compelling to make ethylene that is renewable ethylene instead of fossil absolutely see if activity Geico carbon-neutral plastic. That's right you end up actually taking co two that would otherwise have been omitted a new sequester it into the plastic product.

Canada Release Energy Ted Sergeant Toronto Caltech Geico Apple Chuck Thirty Thousand Tonnes Sixty Billion Dollar
Does Our Solar System Contain a Primordial Black Hole?

BrainStuff

06:35 min | 2 years ago

Does Our Solar System Contain a Primordial Black Hole?

"There's something big lurking in the frozen hinterlands of our solar system that appears to be tugging at the a tiny worlds beyond the orbit of Neptune the object is assumed to be a hypothetical world called planet nine which has extremely far-flung orbit around the Sun and causes all kinds of gravitational chaos out there in the dark but as the search for planet nine wears on and astronomers have yet to so much get a glimpse of it some researchers are pondering the object could be might not be planted at all could it be a primordial black hole the solar system is a big place and while astronomical techniques are rapidly advancing many tiny bodies in the outer solar system have yet to be found planet nine thought to be a rather more substantial object however with massive around five to ten earth masses scooting around the sun at an average distance of four hundred to eight hundred astronomical units or a US since one a you is that average distance at which earth orbits the Sun that's ten to twenty times the orbital distance at which Pluto orbits the Sun So if exists planet nine takes between ten thousand in twenty thousand years to complete just one orbit the possibility of a large world orbiting the Senate such a huge distance is captivating studies of other stars system's reveal that exoplanets between the masses of Earthen Neptune are relatively common why our solar system doesn't contain a world with this mass range is a puzzle but a planet nine really is out there it would be profound historic discovery that would reshape our understanding of the system of planets that orbit our sun suffice to say any planet with an orbit this extreme would be very difficult to spot but astronomers are scouring infrared surveys with hopes of seeing distant object slowly crawl across the sky if it's out there planet nine should be emitting infrared radiation energy leaking from the planet since its formation but so far apart from the gravitational effect of something in the outer solar system there's precious little direct evidence for Planet Nines Existence Enter the Black Hole hypothesis in September nineteen astronomers Jacob Schultz Durham University and James Unwin of the University of Illinois at Chicago published a new study describing their alternative hypothesis the gravity personal weirdness in the outermost reaches of the solar system isn't being caused by planet at all instead they pointed to the potential presence of a primordial black hole a theory it's caused a bit of a stir no this kind of black hole does not pose danger to the rest of the solar system it'd be too small for that but in the distant regions solar system it's impact would be significant the only evidence we have for Planet Nines Existence are the gravitational effects it's having on Trans Neptune objects and Black goals are the most gravitationally endowed objects in the universe after all primordial black holes are the most ancient kind of black hole there hypothesized to a formed right after the Big Bang density fluctuations in the early universe what have rapidly formed black holes of all masses these ancient objects would have been flung throughout the cosmos and over time they would have slowly evaporated via hawking radiation smaller ones popping out of existence I but let's back up a step why does scientists think that some extreme object is out there in two thousand sixteen planet Hunters Constantine but Teagan and Mike Brown of Caltech announced their discovery of a group a very distant Trans Neptune objects the were all strangely clustered moving was similar orbital alignments their orbital alignment was also weirdly tilted so it appeared they were all being corralled by gravitational interactions with a larger planetary body but no other large planetary body exists in that region so Teigen and Brown hypothesized an as yet to be discovered planet was out there and so the hunt began while many theories of cosmic evolution suggest that primordial black holes should exist we have yet to directly observe one though there is some compelling indirect evidence take for example microloans what's the transient brightening of stars caused by massive object passing in front of them causing a brief brightening by the curvature of space time creating sort of magnifying lens analysis of these micro lens events suggests that there's a population of small black holes out there with no other visible clues except for their gravitational impact on space time mm-hmm Shilton unwin took a fresh look at the Trans Neptune object peculiarities and simulated. What would happen if a black hole with a mass of between five and ten earth masses had an extreme orbit around the sun sure enough their models suggest that primordial black hole with a mass within this range would cause orbital turbulences like the ones already observed in the population of Trans Neptune objects this could also explain why little optical or infrared observational evidence for planet nine exists a primordial black Cole would generate neither signal in fact if a black hole is nearby and may also be dragging around a cloud of dark matter that could be generating different types of radiation searchers therefore suggest based on their findings the experimental program needs to be expended including searches for high energy cosmic rays like x rays and gamma rays coming from moving sources while this is an interesting avenue of steady replacing hypothetical planet with a hypothetical type of black hole may be overcomplicating the mystery the planet nine we spoke with Mike Brown he said could blackhall explain the gravitational effects we are seeing in the outer solar system absolutely all we know is there is a six earth mass something out there and we don't know what the something is Brown points out that planet would be the most obvious something but as long as it has a mass of a few earth's could be anything but the plausibility of it being anything other than a planet is extremely low to say the least with tongue in Cheek Brown added it might be a six earth mass hamburger or a Burrito but yes it might also be a six earth mass black hole the physics of course don't care one bit what the six earth mass are made of you could equally well hypothesize that every exit planet that we only detected by the radial velocity method is a black hole is it possible yes does it make any sense in the unit I know while investigating other gravitational sources of what may be messing with Trans Neptune objects is good science. It's more likely the planet when is a planet and not a primordial black hole astronomers just have to keep searching and there's a growing consensus that will be discovered in the not so distant future

Mike Brown Cheek Brown Brown Cole Eight Hundred Astronomical Twenty Thousand Years One Bit
Tiny Worms Are Equipped To Battle Extreme Environments

60-Second Science

02:47 min | 2 years ago

Tiny Worms Are Equipped To Battle Extreme Environments

"At Toyota we believe that American veterans have the strongest credentials on earth especially when you consider that they spend years gaining valuable experience by putting their lives on the line to protect the country they love and the people that live here but that doesn't always mean finding a career path is easy. That's why Toyota has partnered with hiring our as Europe's to help over one hundred fifty thousand veterans and military spouses connect with employment opportunities. We are Toyota. USA. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata in the science. It's fiction story June. The Desert Planet Iraq is inhabited by enormous fearsome sandwich shops they blast out of the dunes to swallow vehicles the whole they also look familiar to Caltech geneticists Paul Sternberg. We look like nats anything in pop culture has relationship doors. We follow nematodes toads of course are much smaller than sand worms most never told you can just barely see and there are a lot slower these worms are probably take one hundred years to get across the US if they could could do it and they went continuously day and night even so they're pretty scary when you look at them up close. Sternberg and his colleagues had a hunch they might find nematodes lurking in one of California's most extreme extreme habitats Mono Lake on the east side of the Sierra Nevada it super salty alkaline and loaded with arsenic and previously known to harbor only two animal species easies brine shrimp and Alkali flies so the researchers took soil samples at beaches around the lake and indeed they found eight species of nematodes living there so we just I went from two animals to at least ten species so that's Kinda striking so are they going to be others the lake yeah people should go look photos and details are in the journal current Biology Sternberg. His colleagues were able to culture one of the worm species in the lab and they discovered it could survive five hundred times the dose of arsenic they would kill a human but they also found that even nemo toads that weren't from Mona Lake seemed to have the genetic ability to resist the lethal element meaning. The worms may be Natural Boron extrema files us from the worms perspective invading a host. That's a harsh environment so I think there's some general ability than Emma toads to adapt to harsh environments like Doc. Maybe Mars I have a fantasy that we should send Amadou's. We really interesting. He could get the codes to photosynthesis or carry photosynthetic organisms and then worth talking about of course that's scenarios in the realm of science fiction for now. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dunya.

Toyota Paul Sternberg Mono Lake Christopher Dodd Yata Mona Lake Journal Current Biology Sternb Christopher Dunya Europe United States Amadou Usa. Emma Sierra Nevada California Sixty Seconds One Hundred Years
After big California earthquake, months of aftershocks to follow

Environment: NPR

03:54 min | 2 years ago

After big California earthquake, months of aftershocks to follow

"Aftershocks continue in southern california after a massive earthquake last night the seven point one magnitude earthquake was the largest hit the area in decades people reported feeling it as far away as phoenix and baja california epicenter it was near the town rich press california about a two hour drive north of los angeles npr's nathan rot is there and he is with us now nathan hello thanks for being here yeah having a beer so seven point one is a massive earthquake what's it like in the town you know a town the got jolted by something of that magnitude 'em it's actually kind of amazingly in pretty good shape 'em i've seen very little damage driving around you know stop lights at are working stores it had their merchandise thrown about a you know some structures were damaged destroyed there were fires caused by ruptured gas pipes and some trailer trailer parks at were knocked skew us roads were closed some fractures rockslides and authorities do say the some buildings collapsed in a nearby town of about two thousand people trona now a but authorities say that so far knock on wood there had been no major injuries or reporters they tally set that's excellent news but i'd imagine that it's still in pretty scary for residents there how where people doing you know it's a bit of a mixed bag a a lot of the people i've talked to understand look this is southern california the land of many many seismic faults earthquakes just kinda come with the territory but other folks they're very shook i talked to one woman who said she lives through a lot of earthquakes but his never had anything like what you experience last night and remember the quick last night was the second major earthquake to hit here in just a couple of days on july fourth a six point four magnitude quake which is nothing to laugh at corrupted at the exact same spot so seismologist now see the that was easy for shock to last night's bigger event so you add those two things together in a lot of people are very much on edge i talked to some folks who slept outside last night in their yards at the backs of trucks they're planning to do that again tonight because they know this is not over on here's dionne bowman and i talked to who is loading up on water and supplies at a local grocery store we knows feel more calm i mean nothing has settled the ground still shaken as we speak so i mean right now were just taking it a day at a time in basically medicine seconds at a time i mean that's all we can do you know what he wasn't kidding right after i got done talking to him as walking back to my car and there was an aftershock that i kind of felt in and waived around a little how long do seismologist expect there to be these kinds of aftershocks days weeks months you know i think doctor lucy jones who's southern california's where the preeminent earthquake expert a sudden we could expect to see aftershocks from this birth quake for the next year a now the odds of another big seven point zero earthquake are relatively small at about three percent according to seismologist caltech odds of six point over higher at about twenty five percent but remember again this is an earthquake prone area seismologist at a press conference earlier said that this high desert area were in the mojave used to be known as be earthquake capital of the world we just haven't seen one in a while so where do people go from here what did they do knowing that this isn't over you know so local and state authorities are gonna continue to check for structural damage and houses roadways 'em they're definitely gonna keep checking major infrastructure bridges dams in area none of those have been reported

California Twenty Five Percent Three Percent Two Hour
"caltech" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

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"caltech" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"caltech" Discussed on 790 KABC

"The program. So I didn't get much the details on the study was this the result of all the new sensors that you guys when placing all California to some degree. I mean, we've been slow expanded network over over the years, but the main result of come from basically, applying new data processing technique at large scale so actually live in the in the neighborhood where Mr. what's the what's the other one? What's your seismograph Richter Richter Caltech, professor set up the Richter scale says was a series of rooms with these giant cement like pilots went down into the bedrock. And somebody bought that house and converted into residential area. Oh residential, but I remember walking through just after they Caltech vacated it was just room after room after room of these giant, cement blocks. But the reason I bring that up is I thought that the. The Richter scale was recording constant seismic activity. Don't do didn't we already know that we were already moving around here. All the time. I mean, so you know, when when Calbert the scale so magnitude zero was supposed to be, you know, the smallest thing that you could imagine. And over the years, we've improved the quality sensors, data processing techniques all that stuff. And so we've been slowly decreasing. The smallest magnitude that we could basically detect over the years. And now, we're basically the point where we are picking up signals from all over the region from LA that construction related from air traffic from from ocean noise. And so that's what that's the size of these events. Are you know, right at the noise level, the instrumentation? So literally, the movements that you're detecting in the what we call it. The crust the chargers across the same as your picking up waves hitting the shore. Yeah, exactly. What does that? What does that do for you? What what does that now going to provide you with show for one? It tells us that basically these events are happening all the time. So on average there. There's about three minutes between events some were in southern California. And so what is allowing us to do is, you know, because we don't have a large record of of of larger, you know, really damaging ones. The court appearance g you know, about a century or so, and so it gives us relatively little information to work with. But we do have is this funny property of earth quakes where every time we go down about a magnitude in size. You get about ten times as many of them on average. And so that means that, you know, globally, you'd expect something like one magnitude eight per year, ten magnitude seven one hundred six's and so forth. And this is something that Richter Gutenberg figured out many years ago, but to the best that we can tell today this it never stops. And so this is all the way down at the level of our instrumentation where these banks zero's just firing off all the time. So the a log rhythmic scale. Right. It is. Yeah. And doesn't seem it seems weird to me that the the actual logarithmic intensity would correlate with the actual number of quakes that seem odd. Yeah. It's pretty amazing. All the stuff that was basically impure. There was really no theory involved any stuff at that time. So it's yeah. It is pretty amazing. And so are you are you are you creating any hypothesis presently that you're going to be able to test with the you've got words? We're going to have. The big one. Little ones down there on the cross before we have a big. Prediction. Go ahead. Yeah. I mean, so what does all about is? You know, scientists normally, you know, if you wanna do experiments, well, you go out and you collect your data. But with earthquakes you basically have to wait for something to happen to collect data. And so the fact that there's so many more of these events that are filling in the gaps between all the larger ones means that there's this kind of constant chatter going on that we can look at and use information now to start to test. A lot of the physical theories that we have about you know, y respects exists and how they get started in much more detail. So it's kind of like having a new microscope of some kind where you're looking at the same picture but just much higher resolution. So that's one of the big takeaways from all of this. But, but I imagine now you can start to correlate what we know about the properties of the crossed and then make some predictions based on that. And then see if the movements or the data, you're collecting confirms that. We can try. I mean, there's prediction stuff is really difficult. It's just incredibly challenging problem, and you know, years ago, would you know, fascinated by this, and we're interested in trying to predict you know, when and where and how large the next big earthquake would be in that did not pan out. Very well. And so today what we do. Instead, particularly in the house side of things is we try to they will if quick happens of what is going to look like how strong the shaking going to be that kind of thing. And that's a much more tractable problem. So. But yeah, the kind of otherwise timing of things is just really difficult. Can you cross the break? Okay..

Richter Richter Caltech Richter Gutenberg Caltech California LA professor three minutes