20 Episode results for "Callan"

Video Lesson 33 News from the team here with a voice recording

Learn English with Cullen's podcast by EATT magazine

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Video Lesson 33 News from the team here with a voice recording

"Hi Great to have you back here at learn English with Callan and we've got some exciting news from the team here and we're going to share with you some of the voice recordings we we have received from you from our student. Thank you very much and to do this. We are going to use a voice over artist so while it won't be the voice of the student who sent us the recording it will be the.

Callan
Welcome to our new Thursday English Class a slow speaking class

Learn English with Cullen's podcast by EATT magazine

03:00 min | 2 years ago

Welcome to our new Thursday English Class a slow speaking class

"Listen thirty five speaking slower English so you can learn faster hello and welcome back to learn English with Callan to all avow students who have asked asked us to speak slower. We have some great news from now on. We will have three <music> of the same lessons each week number one Thursday listen. And the first lesson will be out every Thursday and it will be a very slow version of that listen. We we speak much slower. This will help beginners to learn faster number two Friday. Listen this second version of the same listen will be on Friday and it will be a little little faster version of that lesson way. We speak a little faster to help. <unk> out intimate listeners to listen faster number three Saturday. Listen listen the third version of the same listen will be out on Saturday and we will speak at the average speed most English speaking people do so this will how our advanced English language listeners so. You can then choose if you want to listen and watch our Thursday slow. Slow the version of that lesson Ola Friday a a little faster version of that lesson <hes> sand today normal almost <unk> English lesson or all three so you can learn English fast Austa by listening to all three speeds of h lesson.

Callan
10 English Lesson Ten on WeChat, Instagram and Pinterest on EATT Magazine

Learn English with Cullen's podcast by EATT magazine

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

10 English Lesson Ten on WeChat, Instagram and Pinterest on EATT Magazine

"Hi, welcome. To learn English with Cullen as part of our I e L T is training series. I just wanted to say thank you shoutout to out students that are on we chant. It certainly a great channel to communicate with us here at learn English with colored. So I just wanted to say thank you to those students, particularly that are in China or Chinese speaking students, and to all of our other students on social media, those that are following us on Pinterest and those that following us on Instagram, our three social media channels here at learn English with Callan, I just wanted to say, thank you. And I'll can't you in we chant Instagram or on Pinterest. Please pick linked inside this lesson and the oval to go through those social media channels and oak today.

Cullen Pinterest Callan China
The Fight Against AIDS | The Lazarus Effect | 3

American Innovations

50:38 min | 9 months ago

The Fight Against AIDS | The Lazarus Effect | 3

"On a warm spring morning in may nineteen eighty-seven michael callan and two of his fellow. Aids activists take their seats at a long conference table at the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases over a dozen government physicians file in to join them wearing white lab coats and solemn expressions. One of them offers callan tight-lipped smile. Dr fauci should be here any minute and then we can get started. Dr anthony fauci is the head of the institute and in charge of all clinical trials for new aids treatments recently maneuvered to redirect the lion's share of public funding for aids research over to his agency and away from a rival agency. The national cancer institute callans group the people with aids coalition has been trying to get this meeting with him. Ever since the last of the doctors take their seats lined up on one side of the long conference table opposite. Callan there an intimidating bunch. Then dr fauci enters be short and with wire rim glasses and neatly combed dark hair. He looks younger than his forty. Six years he extends his hand across the table to callan. Michael may call you michael. It's nice to finally meet you. It's a small gesture but in meaningful one to count who's hiv positive news to people. Even doctors avoiding his touch. He takes out his hand and shakes. Dr fauci hit. It's nice to meet you too now. That the pleasantries are out of the way callan pleads his case we know that the number one cause of death among people with aids is new assistance pneumonia. Pcp since the start of the epidemic. It's killed over thirteen thousand people. Too out of every three eighths deaths. We are here to ask you not to beg you to issue federal guidelines for prevention and treatment of pcp in people with aids found. She looks on moved. And what do you propose. These guidelines consist of contaminating for prevention and high risk patients backdrop for prevention and treatment in the early stages of pcp. Both drugs are already being used in the field and they're effective. I'm living proof of that. But many doctors are still reluctant to prescribe them. Because they're no guidelines and you want these guidelines to come from my agency yes. I'm sorry i can't do it why not. There's no data. One of callans fellow-activists shows thick folder. Full of papers across the table at fao cheek. There's your data. We've been working with several doctors in new york on this for years thao. She opens the folder and glances few pages. You've sent us these numbers before it's not enough to go on. This is anecdote will evidence not scientific data. Now count is getting frustrated. So do your own studies. what are you waiting for. Another twenty five people are dying of. Pcp every day we have done studies and they've been inconclusive. And we're doing a phase one trial on contaminating right now but until we get the results of that trial and moved to a phase two and phase three. We can't issue guidelines. That's not how it works but people are dying preventable deaths right now. For the next hour they go back and forth like this callan the activist pleading for immediate action. F- ouchi the scientists saying he needs more data finally thou- cheese clearly had enough. He stands up. I have to get to another meeting. Thank you all for coming. He extends his hand again. This time. callan doesn't shake that evening back in new york. Callan arrives at the office of his doctor. Joe sante cowan credits on a bend with saving his life. Thanks in part to his experimental use of backtra and pentameter sant- immediately reads the look of frustration on calends. Face i take it. the meeting. didn't go well. It didn't thoug- seles bureaucrat. It was like talking to a filing cabinet sonnen been scratches his sideburns thinking there's an idea he callan and other activists have been kicking around for years for a long time. It seemed crazy unachievable but now in this moment it feels necessary. Sauna ben looks at his old friend and smiles well to hell without she and the other bureaucrats if the government won't do clinical trials on these drugs we'll just do them ourselves You're miles go. Further with the capital one venture card the travelcard it lets you earn unlimited double miles for more than just air travel right now earn hundred thousand bonus miles you can actually use redeemable for vacation rentals car rentals and more when you spend twenty thousand dollars in your first year. What's in your wallet. Limited time offer terms apply see capital dot com for details. I'm steven johnson. And this is american innovations by the late one thousand nine hundred eighty s. There's a widespread feeling within the aids community that powers that be aren't doing enough to combat deadly epidemic diseases victims mostly gay men and their loved ones have spent years nursing sick friend after sick friend. Losing jobs and homes organizing and advocating and morning. Meanwhile the president has only just begun to pay lip to the crisis. Ronald reagan publicly mentioned aids for the first time in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven years into the epidemic. We've declared aids health enemy number one but for aids. Activists reagan's statement rings the fact that it has taken the president five years to begin to even address. This problem publicly demonstrates that this administration hasn't given it the level of commitment that it deserves now activists will take matters into their own hands even as the disease is thinning their ranks their efforts will be the catalyst for major breakthroughs in the treatment of aids and radical changes in the way new drugs are developed tested and approved. This is episode. Three the lazarus effect it's march nineteen eighty-eight almost a year since michael callans frustrating meeting with. Dr anthony. fauci right this way. Dr donovan's offices on the third floor. Callan leads a reporter up a crowded stairwell in an old manhattan brownstone. They have to step around aids patients. The clipboard wielding volunteers sitting next to them collin glances back at the reporter apologetically. We're having a little bit of space problem. But it's not as chaotic as it looks. This is the headquarters of a new organization. Co founded by callan and sauna the community research initiative for sierra up until now doctors on the front lines of the epidemic and working independently each devising their own ad up treatment plan for patients for anthony fauci. Their findings don't rise above the level of anecdotal evidence. Cri hopes to change that by getting doctors to participate in large scale carefully organized trials. I up the drug intimidating callanan. A reporter reached the third floor landing then step into a hallway even more crowded in the stairwell. Dozens of patients sit on benches or loitering doorways waiting for their appointments. The reporter turns to count. How many patients have you enrolled in your first trial over two thousand so far more still signing out how come so many to participate we let the patients continue to see their own doctors and continue to take their other medications. The government trials force them off everything even aspirin and we don't use placebo controls our patients. No they're getting paternity. Won't that affect your data. We compare our results against historical data on patients who weren't given penalty it gives us the same baseline you'd get from a placebo and we document every other drug. Each patient is taking down to frequency and dosage levels to look for any interactions. It's not a controlled environment. It's a real world environment. We think our data will be more useful for it brings reporter into the cramped office. Joe sante band who serves as a part time medical advisor and spokesman for cri callen. Clear some stacks patient files off a battered wooden desk chair so the reporter considered and sauna ben picks up or callan left off. Here's what else we do differently. Drug companies often pressure government funded studies into making their patient groups as palme genius as possible but our studies will include every aids risk group. Not just gay men women. Intravenous drug users. Heterosexuals in poor and minority communities white man. aren't they only population. We need to know how to treat. And what will be your next study. After pentameter looking at several possible candidates all the big pharmaceutical companies are very interested in this kind of research. There's frustrated by the slow pace of the government. Trials is we are in fact even. The government is frustrated by the lack of progress in developing aids treatments in april of nineteen eighty. Eight congress summoned. Dr anthony fauci to a hearing on the subject. They want answers. Dr fauci seven years into the aids epidemic. There is still only one. Fda approved treatment for this disease. Azt to what do you attribute this. Well it's a combination of factors. We need more funding more staffing more space. But i'd say our biggest hurdle is trial enrollment trial. Enrollment is your biggest hurdle. Yes are pentameter for example. We've been ready to start phase two trials for nearly a year but during that time only two hundred patients signed up which isn't enough for a double blind placebo controlled study. Why is it taking so long to enroll patients. Well quite frankly. If it wasn't for all these community based trials we'd have much better luck getting volunteers. It's a new phenomenon that we've never had to compete with. Before one of the newest members of this congressional subcommittee speaks up. She's the recently elected representative of san francisco. Her name is nancy. Pelosi dr fauci. I'd like you to imagine for a moment that you're a person with aids one of my constituents say or contamination is already widely available through community trials and other sources. Imagine you've already had one bout of pneumonia and you know you're next. Bout might kill you now. Would you want to take contaminating right away. Or would you want to enroll in the government. Study and wait couch hesitates a few months ago. He would have rejected this argument without a second thought. He saw the world of underground aids treatments from community. Trials to alternative healers to black markets is a dangerous liability for everyone. But he's been meeting with more activists and people with aids. He's begun to share their frustration. He leans into his microphone. Well if i were in that situation. I guess i would go for what is available on the street. Closely looks briefly startled by the candor within she smiles. Thank you dr fauci foued. She's position on community based drug research may be softening over at the food and drug administration. It's a different story for year. The fda has been planning a trial of the drug gang cyclo veer but fda. Commissioner frank young has just learned that they won't have enough participants to proceed on schedule. Young can barely look at the trial head. Who's just delivered the bad news. So i you couldn't figure out a protocol for the phase two trial. Now you finally got a protocol and you're telling me you can't get any patients the cri just keeps taking them from us. We're the fda bending them on research by one hundred one hour cri and all these other bush league little groups beating us well. It's not just about budgets. can vir is also really easy to get through the compassionate use exemption. No one will sign up for trial when they might get a placebo. If they can just get the drug themselves can cycle is used to treat aids related blindness caused by cytomegalovirus and opportunistic infection. That attacks the retin roughly one in three people with aids eventually lose their eyesight because of in one thousand nine hundred four. The fda approved can cyclo clavier for limited compassionate use but four years later a full. Clinical trials still hasn't taken place and young is done waiting. Fine will revoke the compassionate use exemption and we won't reinstate it until we get enough patients to complete the phase two trial. Young knows is scan cyclic. Decision won't sit well with aids activists and sure enough it doesn't the group act up is particularly vocal staging demonstrations against the fda all through the summer of eighty eight and into the fall finally young decides to address his critics head on he agrees to a meaning with act up activists. Fda headquarters in rockville maryland on october. Fifth at this point act up short for the aids coalition to unleash power is less than two years old but it's become the largest and most visible aids protest group in the country and unlike many early age groups that were made up almost entirely of gay white men. It's leadership is increasingly diverse at the fda meeting a black act up member named ortez. Son is the first to speak mr young. It's bad enough. That your agency wants to coerce. People with aids into your cans. Cycle veered trials by pulling it from the compassionate use program. But it's also unacceptable that you plan to exclude women and people of color from these trials. We demand that all people with aids be given equal access to this and all other drugs. The government is currently testing. If they're not included in the trials they won't be well served by the drugs young offers up his best press conference smile. I agree with you. One hundred percent but while we oversee these trials ultimately they are designed and funded by the pharmaceutical companies and those companies have a right to determine who gets to participate so they have the right to exclude women because they could get pregnant or black people because they don't trust them to complete the trial. The fda approves these trial designs you have leverage on as much as you might think to the drugmakers. Those are unacceptable risks. And we can't do research without them by the end of the meeting. It's clear that alderson and his fellow activists won't be changing young's spine anytime soon. They'll have to make change happen some other way just days after their meeting with frank yang over a thousand act up. Protestors descend on fda headquarters linking arms and chanting they've locked access to the building's main entrance some stage a diet lying on their backs and holding up cardboard tombstones that read waiting for pentameter federal marshalls and local police. Show up followed by half a dozen buses. The police don ri- at home. It's and begin dragging protesters down the concrete steps in front of the building they Heard them onto the buses using plastic zip ties for handcuffs. Over a hundred and seventy protesters are arrested including ortez. Alderson that night. The demonstration all over the evening news. Reagan was hoisted in effigy this morning. As hundreds of aids activists descended on the food and drug administration determined to shut it down the charge that while people are dying. Fda delaying the demand at the fda speed up approval of drugs that show any promise against aids at his home just a few miles away. Anthony fauci watches. The images of protesters being tackled to the ground by police. Many of whom wear rubber gloves out of rational fear of hiv increasingly. He shares the activists frustration. His phone rings. It's frankie on the very man who set these protests in motion tony. I haven't i need your help on this sure. Frank what do you have in mind. I'm not one to cave in to protesters but well the right about one thing right now. It takes us way too long to set up and conduct drug trials for aids treatments. Which is one of the reasons. You're not enrolling enough patients. Exactly now ami out on this together young and fau cheek come up with a revised set of regulations for the fda approval process for new drugs. While they won't address the demands for inclusivity. They will speed up the time. I just a week. After the act up protests young announces new regulations at a press conference. I believe that with these new rules in place. We'll be able to get new drugs through human trials faster than ever before even faster than a t which as you all know. Was the fastest drug approval in fda history. Young hopes the new regulations will appease aids activists instead. It just confirmed about that. Their actions are having an effect and they plan to keep the pressure on new york city. November nineteen eighty eight at an act up. Meeting activists celebrate their small victory and vent their frustration. Okay so they've changed the regulations but so what. This isn't the first time they've promised to speed up drug testing. They failed to deliver on every other promise. Why should we start believing them now and even drugs do get approved faster. What good does it do us if no one can afford them easy. T- still costs more than a new car. The drug companies don't care about us. My insurance won't even cover. azt another wall street protests. No no no. We gotta hit the cbc as the activists debate what their next action should be. Talk keeps turning back too easy t- two years since its release. Azt remains the only fda approved aids treatment and its price remains sky high. A typical course of treatment costs over eight thousand dollars a year for many people with aids. Who don't have health insurance. That means the one drug likeliest to keep them alive is out of reach since. Act's release the drug's manufacturer. Burroughs wellcome has reported record profits and rejected every effort to lower the price. The mere mention of the company's name at any act up meeting brings a chorus of boos now one activist twenty-seven-year-old former bond trader named peter. Staley has an idea if the government won't regulate burroughs wellcome. Maybe we can do it ourselves. I know a thing or two from my wall street days about hostile takeovers vast is a global leader in cybersecurity trusted by over four hundred and thirty five million users avast premium security protects against all online threats including viruses spoofed websites and ransomware avast secure line. Vpn in crypts. Your internet connection no matter what wifi connected to giving you true online privacy. They've also got a vast breach guard which provides twenty four seven monitoring to protect your sensitive information from hackers bus removes your private data from databases of companies. Who sell it. Learn more about vast privacy security and performance products at a v. a. s. t. dot com. 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Dot com on the morning of twenty fifth nineteen eighty-nine a white rental van full of act up pulls out of the parking lot of a cheap motel in durham north carolina where they spent a late night. Finalizing plans for today's action. Their driver heads for research triangle. Park all of the corporate headquarters a burroughs wellcome the company behind the outrageously expensive. Azt on the way he listened to the news on the radio though. It's all too familiar with no projections. The number of aids cases will double in the next two years. There is near panic. Among experts already see hospitals pushed to the limit the problem especially acute in california and new york. There's gonna come a critical point in. Its arriving at that now where there will not available dead in the city of new york. You will have people waiting in line to get into those beds before long. The van pulls up alongside burroughs wellcome. The company's main building is an imposing slab of modernist architecture. Straight out of a science fiction movie inside the van. Six act up activists look up at the building then each other eyes wide with adrenaline. Everyone ready. let's do it for activists. Get out of the van in business suits and carrying bulky briefcases the other to drive away to set up a command post across the street. The group's leader. Peter staley whispers to his accomplices as they walk the long walk to the building's main entrance or member if anyone asks or here for the sales rep or don't worry peter. We got staley adjusts his tie and tries to get his heart rate under control. He knows his team is well prepared for this action. They've been planning it for months in the lobby. Staley head straight for the guard desk. We're here from premier pharmacy solutions here. That sales meeting with them. Stra jacobs shakeups. I don't think we have anyone in the building by that name but let me check. Thanks say we've been on the road all morning. Mind if i use your restroom. Sure it's just past the elevators on your left while the guards looking down at its directory. Staley's fellow-activists nonchalantly. Follow him towards the restroom but as they get to the elevators they quickly duck into the first one that opens. The guard looks up just in time to see the doors closing on them. Hey excuse me. They take the elevator to the top floor. Then steph out into a long wide corridor which way whichever way is west. So we're facing the highway this way. I think walking briskly but not so fast as to draw attention they head down the corridor stately smiles politely at every boroughs employees. They pass so far. Their business suit disguises be working executive drag. They called it. No one gives them a second. Look at the end of the corridor. They find a vacant office overlooking the highway. That runs along one side of the. This will work. Can we lock the door. No lock getting brought. My power tools as one activist uses small steel plates and power drill to seal the door. Shut the other three. Pull the rest of their gear out of their briefcases a fax machine. A new piece of technology called a cellular phone. Roughly the size and weight of a brick water and sandwiches in case they're here for awhile. And lastly a large reading as e t pay or die. Their plan is to occupy this office inside burroughs wellcome for as long as possible with their banner hanging in the window for all to see the cell phone and fax machine or so they can communicate with reporters and with their accomplices in the van. Peter calls to give them an update. We're in on the fifth floor western side of the building. Start calling the media will have the banner up shortly. Staley was diagnosed with aids in nineteen eighty-five back when he still worked on wall street at the time he had to hide not only his disease but also his orientation. The trading floor was a macho locker room like environment. men taunted. Each other with folks lers a thousand times a day when he first joined act up. You lead a double life passing for straight at work and attending meetings fundraisers at night in nine hundred eight doctors gave him only a few months to live. He decided to quit wall street and dedicate whatever time he had left to act up but that was over a year ago. And he's still here still fighting out of there. Please not until you meet our demands. We want the price of easy t- lowered by at least twenty five percent and free to anyone who's uninsured and too poor to afford it. The police are on their way. Good so is the media for the next forty five minutes. It's a standoff as the guards and the police try to drill their way through the door. St louis and his fellow activists field phone calls from the press and facts their list of demands to anyone who asks for peter. I think they're coming through the wall. Quick get the handcuffs using four sets of handcuffs and a long linked chain. The four activists locked themselves to a radiator in the corner of the office minutes later. Officers from the durham county. Sheriff's department bust through the drywall from an adjoining office. The first sheriff's deputy into the room grab staley and tries to drag him to his feet then quickly realizes he's chained to the radiator. Dammit somebody go get some bolt cutters across the street. Staley's fellow activists talked to reporters. Our team has stopped answering their phones. So we're not sure what's happening inside a look. They're coming out. Sheriff's deputies lead staley and his team out of burroughs wellcome still held together by the long length of chain in seconds the main entrance is swarming with reporters clicking cameras and shouting questions. What were you hoping to prove this action. Did you expect to be arrested before. He's pushed into the back of a sheriff's cruiser. Peter staley addresses the reporters burroughs wellcome is profiting off of our lives. That's why we did what we did today. And if they don't certain listening to us to the aids community then we'll be back a week after act up protests the high price of one. Eight stroke michael callen lobbies fda approval of another on may first nine hundred nine. He appears before an fda committee to present the community research initiatives findings on pentameter now instead of anecdotal evidence they have detailed reliable data showing that contaminating has a positive effect on the course of pcp pneumonia since co founding. Cri nearly two years ago. Cowen has looked forward to this moment. You finishes his data. Heavy presentation is more personal perspective. Ladies and gentlemen. Pcp pneumonia is a terrible way to die. I've witnessed firsthand the unnecessary suffering caused by it more times than i can. Count people with aids gasping for breath. Gagging on respirator tubes. Unable to speak in their final moments we on the front lines of this epidemic. I've known for years that contaminating can prevent this suffering now. Thanks to the data we presented today. You know it to. The committee calls for a two hour recess to discuss the testimony the hallway outside callan paces nervously. Finally the committee reconvenes everyone files back into the meeting chamber the committee chairwoman clears her throat by unanimous. Vote this committee agrees to recommend fda approval of allies contaminating for the treatment of new. Most sister simone in people with aids six weeks later it's official. Contaminating has become the second drug after. Act t to win fda approval for treatment of aids and aids related conditions. It's also the first drug ever approved by the fda based solely on independent research gathered by practicing physicians not by government-sanctioned clinical trial for callan and joe sante benz community research initiative and a growing network of similar organizations and other major cities. It's a huge breakthrough and it paves the way for more drugs. Starting with ganciclovir. The drug used to treat aids related blindness at the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases. Anthony fauci is still trying in vain to enroll patients in a gang cycle of your trial now seeing the fda approval of contaminating. He calls fda. Commissioner frank young with an idea. I've been looking again at the data from these. Scans cycle of your community trials. Unless you've got some new data. I don't know about those. Trials are no good be. Advisory committee rejected them last year. That was before this pentameter and approval. I think we have to resubmit the data. I don't control the committee tony. If they rejected at once rejected again humor me a lot can change in a year. Sure enough on. June twenty seven. The fda advisory committee recommends approval against lavar for treatment of cytomegalovirus in people with eight once again decision is unanimous and based entirely on data from community trials. Contaminating and consecutive year represent another breakthrough in the fight against aids. They're the first drugs approved to fight some of the many opportunistic infections that company aids rather than the underlying disease itself with their approval comes a broader shift in thinking in the medical establishment. A belief for the first time that aids is not inevitably fatal but can be managed with the proper treatment in a press conference announcing the approval of ganciclovir fda. Commissioner frank young sums up the new thinking a few years ago. An aids diagnosis was a death sentence. But now there's significant hope and more therapies are coming to treat the disease early for currently investigating over a hundred drugs as possible treatments for aids and aids related conditions. Were turning the tide. But for many aids activists given the increasing death toll. The tide is still turning to slowly. Nine hundred eighty nine the total number of aids cases in the us tops. One hundred thousand. More than seventy thousand have already died from the disease and the death rate is tripling every year and infuriatingly. The one drug that directly treats the underlying cause of aids. Act is still unaffordable to many even after the act of occupation of their headquarters burroughs wellcome refuses to lower the price so act up leaders devise another way to put the drug companies greedy behavior in the national spotlight wall street. September fourteenth nineteen eighty-nine peter. Staley out on bail still facing criminal trespassing charges for his earlier action steps onto the floor of the new york stock exchange. It's a chaotic space. With high ceilings and tall banks television monitors on which constantly updated stock prices. Scroll by men in suits tap away at computer terminals shouting orders to buy and sell into their phones the last time he was here nearly two years ago. Steely still worked as a bond trader. Today he's act up infiltrator. once again decked out in executive drag the dark suit and brightly colored tie with a forged treater badge clipped to his lapel. He turns to his fellow activists and points to a balcony overlooking the trading floor up there. That's what we'll get. Maximum attention staley and four other. Act up protestors. Make their way upstairs to the balcony. Just before the opening bell is set to chime looking around to make sure no security guards nearby. They handcuff themselves to the balcony railing. Staley checks his watch. He wants their timing to be perfect. Wait we okay. now seconds. Before the opening bell the protesters unfurl a banner that reads sell welcome. Then from staley's briefcase. They pull out a set of air horns which they used to drown out the opening bell. Now we've got their attention. Okay throw the money. The activists pull stacks fake dollar bills from their pockets and rein them down over the trading floor. The bills are covered with slogans. Like burroughs wellcome blood money and we die while you profit on the floor below the traders yell anti gay slurs protesters staley response with a mocking wave in his bond trader days. He used to hear such words muttered behind his back. It feels good to come back here and confront them. Head on as at burroughs wellcome staley and his fellow protesters are hauled off in handcuffs. But this latest act up's not proves even more effective after the wall street action the new york times and other papers published editorials critical burroughs wellcome congress announces that it will investigate whether the company is guilty of price gouging under mounting pressure. Burroughs wellcome finally gives in to the protests it announces a twenty percent price drop for. Act quite the full amount act up demanded but enough for them to claim victory. Burroughs wellcome has diffused the azt pricing controversy for net. But it's access to the drug grows doubts about it due to for all the hype of azt as a miracle drug people taking it are still dying and some critics are beginning to wonder if what's killing them is an aids but the side effects. Now there are more ways to be a team with microsoft teams. Bring everyone together in one space with a new virtual room. Collaborate live drawing sharing and building ideas with everyone on the same page. And make sure more of your team is seen and heard with up to forty nine people on screen at once. Learn about all. The newest teams features at microsoft dot com slash teams at yen is the future proof payments platform. That helps your business. Grow from online and in-app purchases to touch free in-store payments agian makes it easy to accept payments all on one powerful platform with adnan. Your business has the flexibility to accept any payment so you can connect with any customer. No matter how they wanna pay at jens. Technology also gives you in depth insights revenue optimization. Real time reporting and more so you can keep your happy and your business. Growing agian built their payments platform to help businesses like yours. Get ahead and stay ahead. Start your journey today at eight yen dot com. That's a d. y. e. n. dot com ad yen business not boundaries of easy itself greenwich village new york nineteen ninety nine years since he saw his first aids patient. Doctor josina ben still practice medicine here out of a small set of offices on the ground floor of a nondescript brick high-rise my deep breath now turn your head and cough today he. Seeing a new patient and my goal of sauna benz patients this ghostly. Pale frightened looking. Young man has aids. your lung. Sound clear would you say your short of breath. Guess my whole chest aches. Were medications are you taking or well. When i went to the hospital last month. They gave me prescriptions for pantomine an. Act okay. i i want you to stop taking. Act immediately stop but why you have all the symptoms of azt related. Anemia and that can be very serious. But also there's growing evidence. That azt is mildly toxic and doesn't work. But how can that be everyone. I know with aids is taking. Act yes and if the government and burroughs wellcome had their way everyone would take it but the truth is azt is only beneficial for about half the people who take it and then only about four. To six months after that they're white. Blood cell counts begin to drop and many become so anemic that they require blood transfusions. Would that be easy. Destroys bone marrow cells. So it's probably the toxicity of the drug itself but it can also be because hiv is a retrovirus in retroviruses. Have a very high mutation rate could become resistant to the drug over time. In any case. You're better off not taking it. It's good doctors to keep people with aids alive not azt solomon's views on easy t- or controversial but not uncommon increasingly throughout the aids community. There's a growing disappointment with the drug. As patients spent tens of thousands of dollars on it but remained sick and some research especially coming out of europe is in fact beginning to suggest that the benefits of azt were overstated when it first one a proven doctors hoped. Azt was a breakthrough. But now most concede to their patients. It's just one of many tools and insufficient toolkit somen recommends his new patient sign up for community. Clinical trial of a drug called refer butte but he and the other doctors at the community research initiative. Thought it might work against mycobacterium avium complex a bacterial infection that causes so many people with aids to lose weight but treating opportunistic infections is like a game of whack. A mole most people with aids. Sooner or later they catch something from which they never recovered slowly. One by one many of the leaders of the aids activists community lose their fight with the disease in nineteen ninety ortez alderson one of the first black leaders act up organizer of the people of color. Aids conference dies of aids related complications at the age of thirty nine year. Later one of peter staley's co-conspirators in the burroughs. Wellcome occupation. Also passes away from its. His name is lee arsenal. He's forty four and in december of nineteen ninety-three just before christmas joe. Sauna ben gets a phone call. He's been reading for months. It's michael collins. Boyfriend richard calling from california where they've been living for the past year hijo. I'm here in the hospital with my call. He asked me to call you. can i put them on. Of course sauna. Ben barely recognizes the voice on the other end of the line. It's raspy barely above a whisper. Warned me not to leave new york. I guess i should have listened. I guess you should have. What do they say. You have an old friend composes. Sarcoma but it's spread to my lungs. Sauna knows what this means on the skin. Kaposi sarcoma lesions or painful but manageable but when they begin appearing on the soft membranes lining the throat and lungs. They're usually fatal michael. I'm so sorry. We fought the good fight joe. I wouldn't trade it for anything. After spending christmas in the hospital with richard and a few close friends michael callen dies in his sleep on the evening of december twenty seventh. He's thirty eight years old from act up to the gay. Men's health crisis aids organizations continued to lose leaders the very diseases. They're fighting but new leaders pick up where they left off in late. Nineteen ninety-one a group of former act up members form a new kind of aids advocacy organization. The treatment action group tag. They reject act up's confrontational tactics. In favor of lobbying for seat at the table of government sponsored aids research tags members educate themselves and everything from pharmacology to drug policy earned the respect of allies in government like anthony fauci by the mid nineties representatives from tag play a direct role in the development testing and approval of many new aids treatments. In january of nineteen ninety-three a coalition of aids groups led by the act up women's caucus scores a major victory for years. They've been lobbying to expand the medical definition of aids to include infections that primarily affect women finally the centers for disease control agrees to change how aids is diagnosed and report a move that encourages more drug companies to include women in their clinical trials. But despite these gains there's little progress in the one field that matters most finding new drugs that can slow the spread of the underlying cause of aids. The hiv virus in one thousand nine hundred five aids kills over fifty thousand americans bringing the death toll since the start of the epidemic to three hundred and nineteen thousand in the united states and seven point five million worldwide but then in december of nineteen ninety. Five joe sullivan. Witnesses but might be a medical breakthrough. A patient comes to see him an old friend of his and michael collins. A month ago he'd been near death but today his car posey's lesions vanished is white blood. Cell count has increased twentyfold sauna. Ben has never seen anything like it in the fourteen years. He's been treating aids. His patient says he feels like a dried up old plant. That's finally been watered. This patient's near miraculous recovery is thanks to an experimental drug called indiv- year developed by a private pharmaceutical company. Part of a brand new class of drugs called proteinase inhibitors like azt proteinase. Inhibitors are designed to block the hiv virus from replicating inside. A patient's white blood cells but the mechanism by which they do this is different than act's and less damaging to the patient's blood and bone marrow in government sponsored clinical trials like the one sullivan's patient enrolled in the drugs. Work so quickly. Doctors can calling it. The lazarus effect just like saint lazarus patients on these drugs. Keep coming back from the dead. By march nineteen ninety-six. The fda has approved three separate protease inhibitors for use alone or in combination with act and other aids treatments in talking to the press about the new treatments anthony. Fauci sounds a note of optimism. It's too soon to say that. This is the solution we've been waiting for but there's no question. This is an important step forward. Treatment is better than anything we've seen so far for patients with access to them proteinase. Inhibitors are game changers. But they alone aren't enough to keep people with aids alive in the twenty five years. Since their discovery protein inhibitors have become the backbone of a complex course of drug treatments called. Ar t short for antiretroviral therapy also sometimes called combination. Therapy or drug. Cocktails treatments may still include z. T. though easy t- is no longer prescribed. As a standalone aids treatment there another advances in the treatment and prevention of aids as well particularly in the field of prep or pre exposure prophylaxis first introduced in two thousand and twelve. Prep drugs are aimed at people who don't have hiv or aids but are at risk of getting it through a partner. One pill taken daily is ninety nine percent effective at eliminating transmission of hiv virus. It's a game changer. It's also costly but their programs to make prep drugs. More available to the poor and uninsured a lesson learned from the days. Days combination therapies prepped. It's all enough to make you think that aids is a thing of the past but unfortunately even now the aids epidemic rages on. There were one point. Seven million new aids infections worldwide in two thousand nineteen and nearly seven hundred thousand deaths. The majority of those cases were in sub saharan africa which for decades has borne the brunt of the epidemic. But even here in the united states aids is a long way from being routed. There were nearly thirty. Eight thousand new. Hiv positive diagnosis in america in two thousand eighteen and over fifteen thousand deaths and now poor people communities of color who have less access to quality healthcare. Make up the majority the new infections and deaths. So what's preventing us from slowing the spread of aids. Unfortunately it's many of the same issues. Activists fought against in the nineteen eighties treatments. That are too expensive earn accessible to the vulnerable communities that need the most prejudice against us communities bureaucratic paralysis insufficient prevention education and too often our own indifference but the aids epidemic and our fight against it is also a story of american courage. It's the story of doctors. Like joe sullivan. Activists like michael callen government. Scientists like anthony fauci sometimes those government and activists forces opposed each other when they ultimately found ways of working together. They turn the tide against aids. It's both a measure of their success and failure. Aids is no longer the pandemic. We're talking about from one very. This is american innovations. If you like our show please give us a five star rating and review and be sure to tell. Your friends. subscribe on apple podcasts. Spotify wonder he app or wherever. You're listening right now. Join wondering plus in the wondering app to listen ad free in the episode notes. You'll find some links and offers from our sponsors. Please support them another way you can support. The show is by filling out a small survey at wondering dot com slash survey and a quick note about these historical recreations. You've been hearing in most cases we can't know exactly what was said seems dramatization. But they're based on real historical research. American innovations is hosted by me steven johnson more information on my books about science and innovation and health including my book about the cholera epidemic of eighteen. Fifty four ghost map. You can visit my website. Steven berlin johnson dot com for following twitter at stephen b johnson. Sound design on this episode is by landon the pinski the episode was written by andy hermit. Editing by liza veal produced by natalie shoe shop. Our associate producer. Is kate young executive produced by jenny. Lower beckmann marshal louis and hernan lopez for wondering imagine. You're a parent nervously pacing around your injured child's hospital room. A doctor begins asking you question. After question about how your kid got hurt you begin to realize that they are asking about your involvement in the accident. Where were you when he fell. How did he actually fall. And then you slowly start to see that they think you hurt your child intentionally from wonder and nbc news. Do no harm is the terrifying. True story of a family torn apart by the system that was supposed to protect them. Investigative reporter mike hickson baugh. Chronicles what happens to the bright family. When they're three kids are ripped away from them and the shocking moments that came next with exclusive audio captured as the events unfolded. Do no harm takes you inside. The most harrowing moments of the bright families fight to protect their children. Subscribe to do no harm on apple. Podcasts join day. Plus in the wonder apt to listen one week early and ad free.

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Jolee Callan

Murder Minute

26:50 min | 3 months ago

Jolee Callan

"The welcome to murder minute on today's episode jolee callan. But i your true crime. Headlines police clashed with protesters. Monday night in the minneapolis suburb. Where an officer with authorities say apparently intended to fire her taser fatally shot a black man during a traffic. Stop on sunday brooklyn center. Police chief tim again and described the shooting death of twenty year old dante right as quote an accidental discharge the shooting sparked protests and unrest in an already on edge due to the trial of derek. Chauvin the first of four police officers charged in george floyd steph. Hundreds of protesters gathered in defiance of the curfew announced by the governor when the protesters wooden disperse police began. Firing gas canisters and flashbang grenades law enforcement agencies had increased their presence across the minneapolis area. After protests sunday night the number of minnesota national guard troops was expected to more than double to over a thousand by monday night on monday authorities released body camera footage that showed officers shouting at right as police tried to arrest him. The body camera footage showed three around a stopped car which authorities said was initially pulled over because it had expired registration tax. When another officer attempted to handcuff right a second officer told him that he was being arrested on a warrant. That's when the struggled began followed by the shooting on the footage. The officer can be heard saying quote. Altair's you altair's you taser. Taser taser after right breaks free from the officers and climbs back into his car. She draws her weapon after firing a single shot from her handgun. The car speeds away and the officer can be heard saying quote holy shit. I shot him. Rights car then travelled several blocks before striking another vehicle. Gannon said he believed that the officer had intended to use her taser but had instead fired one bullet at right. The chief said quote what i viewed and the officers reaction in distress immediately after that this was an accidental discharge that resulted in the tragic death of mr right. The medical examiner's office said that right died of a gunshot wound to the chest brooklyn center mayor. Mike elliot cold the shooting quote deeply tragic and said that the officer should be fired adding quote. We're going to do everything we can to ensure that justice is done and our communities are made whole elliott later announced that the city council has voted to give his office command authority over the police department. This he wrote on twitter would quote streamline things and establish a chain of command and leadership he also said the city manager had been fired. And that the deputy city manager would take over his duties city manager. Kurt bo gainey. Speaking earlier to reporters had declined to say whether he believed the officer should be fired and that she would get quote due process after the shooting. The state bureau of criminal apprehension which is investigating. The shooting identified the officer as kim potter. A twenty six year veteran who has been placed on administrative leave. Gannon would not say whether she would be fired but said quote. I think we can watch the video and ascertain whether she will be returning. One person is dead and an officer has been wounded after a messy high school. Shooting the tennessee bureau of investigations announced on monday that the suspect in a police officer shooting at a high school in knoxville was as a student. Authorities responded monday to the scene around three fifteen pm in response to a report of a possibly armed mail at austin east magnet high school when the suspect refused to come out of a restroom officers entered and were met with gunfire. The suspect fired shots striking one officer at least once in the upper leg while another officer returned fire. The suspect a student who has not been identified by authorities at the time of this recording was pronounced dead at the scene. The injured officer who was in serious condition was later transported to a local hospital for treatment. Knox county schools superintendent. Bob thomas tweeted that quote. The school building has been secured and students who were not involved in. The incident have been released to their families in a separate tweet. Thomas said the school is quote gathering information about this tragic situation and will provide additional information as soon as possible. Tennessee governor bill. Lee said early monday that he had been informed of the quote very difficult and tragic situation but had no further details last week. Lee signed a bill that will allow people aged twenty one and older to carry handguns openly or concealed without a permit beginning to lie. I the law. However does not apply to long guns while details on the shooter and the weapon are still unknown lee at the time of the bill signing wrote in a tweet quote i signed constitutional carry today because it shouldn't be hard for law abiding tennesseans to exercise their second amendment rights. Lee backed the legislation over objections from law enforcement groups who argued that the state's existing permit system provided an important safeguard for knowing who should or shouldn't be carrying a gun. A mother has been arrested after her. Three young children were found stabbed to death in their california home. The children were found slain in their san fernando valley apartment on saturday morning. The children's grandmother called police after she discovered the children dead and their mother gone. Officers responded to the apartment complex at about nine thirty. Am and discovered the bodies of the three children aged three years old two years old and six months their mother thirty year old liliana correo. Who police identified as the main person of interest in the case was taken into custody in two layer county after leading police on a long distance. Chase during which she allegedly carjacked a pickup truck in bakersfield. No motive has been given for the slayings and there had been no prior calls to police at the residence. One neighbor reported that the crime didn't make any sense to her and the children appeared. Well loved no yelling was ever heard coming from the apartment. Only the sounds of cartoons which could be heard at all hours. They said sometimes as late as ten pm court documents show correo has been involved in a custody battle with the children's father. Eric denton who had requested that her mental health be evaluated in march. He sought custody of the children in two layer county family court. Court records showed that in response. Correo sought a temporary domestic violence restraining order against him. And then man who killed another man following a road rage incident in october of two thousand. Eighteen has been sentenced to six years in prison. Sixty eight year old. Jeffrey stone killed twenty two year old curtis russell of longview washington after running him over with his dodge truck and dragging his body for about a quarter mile. Stone was initially charged with murder along with several other charges after multiple settlement conferences. Stone pleaded guilty on friday to criminally negligent homicide. Two counts of recklessly endangering another person and dui district attorney. Ron brown said in court. That on halloween of two thousand eighteen russell was driving on highway thirty when he came up behind stones vehicle and noticed signs of drunken driving russell past stone and as he did brown said it seemed to russell and his passengers. That stone brushed russell's vehicle. Russell pulled over to exchange information but stone kept driving russell then followed stone passed him again and blocked stones pickup truck. According to brown russell god out of the vehicle and began hitting stones truck with a bat. Brown said that stone then drove toward russell knocking him under the truck and dragging him. Russell died at the scene from blunt force. Trauma stone drove home but later returned to the scene and cooperated with police. Jeffrey stone was once the chief of the westport volunteer fire department. He was convicted of arson and theft and sentenced to seventeen months in prison after he said fire to business records in two thousand four while facing an accusation of embezzlement. Those your true crime headlines. Up next joe lee kalam but first a quick break so if you have thirty three minutes you never have to worry about a break in at home ever again. That is how quick and easy it is to set up a security system from simplisafe. It's the kind of thing that is so easy to do. You can do it. During a net flicks binge watching the game or say listening to a certain podcast. Simply safe home security delivers award winning twenty four seven protection with simplisafe. You don't just get an arsenal of cameras and sensors. You get the best professional monitors in the business. They've got your back day and night ready to send police fire or emt's when you need them most straight to your door simply safe arrives to your house in about a week. Which means that if you order now by this time next week you and your whole family can go to bed knowing that. Your home is being guarded. Simply safe is incredibly easy to customize for home just go to simplisafe dot com slash monette and choose the exact sensors you need or get help from one of their experts. There's no long term contract. No hidden fees or installation costs go to simplisafe dot com slash murder minute today to customize your system and get a free security camera that's s. i m. p. l. i. s. a. f. e. dot com slash murder minute. You'll also get a sixty day risk-free trial so there's nothing to lose visit simplisafe dot com slash murder minute for your free security camera today. That's simplisafe dot com slash murder. Minute we all have our guilty pleasures whether it's a cheesy tv series. You've been watched a dozen times or an album. You love listen to on repeat. Something's just get better the more you play them. One of my must place is best fiends. Best fiends is the app that engages my brain with challenging but fun puzzle games thousands of levels and new ones added all the time. The game is simple and fund. The good guys are the bugs and the bad guys are. This looks complete the puzzles to defeat the slugs keys and unlocking cute new fiends. Along the way. I've cleared hundreds of levels already the more i play the more fun it gets and with new monthly updates themed challenges and they puzzles. There's always one more level and the adventure never gets old with best fiends. There's something new today and tomorrow and the day after that so the next time you need a break from the news cycle or run out of shows to binge watch download best fiends free with over five thousand levels. Boredom won't stand a chance. It's hours of fun at your fingertips and can even be played offline. Just don't blame us if we become a bit. Obsessed this game has over one hundred million downloads and tons of five star reviews for reason download best fiends free on the apple app store or google play. That's friends without the our best fiends. Welcome back to murder minute. Duly nicole calot was born on december. Twenty ninth nineteen ninety six and grew up in alabama. By the time she was a teenager. Attending vincent highschool the petite girl stood just four foot ten inches but jolie callan stood out often dying her hair in fund punky shades of purple and pink jolie was known as a quiet pretty and popular girl. She was a good student and enjoyed performing in school. Plays that was until joe. Lee met twenty year old. Lauren daniel boehner. According to job as friends lauren. Boehner was jealous and possessive. He wanted jobe to quote spend time with him and his friends only and for joe lee to sit with him while he played video games no matter how much jolie tried to please him. Morin only became more and more controlling unhappy in the relationship. Jolee attempted several times to break up with him but each time. Lauren emotionally manipulated her into staying threatening suicide every time she tried to leave. Finally after she graduated from high school jolie callen succeeded in breaking up with lauren. Bonner but he just couldn't let it go by august twenty fifteen eighteen year old jolie. Cowan had a new boyfriend and was getting ready to head off to college. When lauren boehner contacted her to ask her to join him on a hike as friends duly agreed but texted a friend about their plans the night before the hike. If something happens to me she joked you'll know who. I was with more and butter posted a selfie on social media. In anticipation of the hype. It's caption read quote taking kiba on a hike tomorrow. So i guess. Things are looking up. On august thirtieth. Twenty fifteen the pair along with lawrence dog. Kiba made their way to the heavily wooded pinho de trail in chia state park. Lauren posted the day's events in four photos on his instagram. The first photo showed joe lee sitting in the front seat of lawrence car with kiba in her lap. The caption read quote on our way to go hiking in his second post. Joe lee can be seen with her hair up in a ponytail wearing a sweatshirt. shorts and sneakers walking keeper on a leash. In the parking lot the caption read quote keepers. Dragging jolie is a kitten on a mission in each of his instagram posts. Jolee appears to have been unaware that her picture was being taken another taken along. The hiking trail shows the from behind wearing a t-shirt and her backpack looking over a rocky cliff holding kibo. Lorne captioned the photo quote. Oh you know just enjoying the view it is fourth and final post duly stands alone on the edge of a cliff her back again to the camera. She appears to be taking a photo of the misty clouds hanging over the mountainside. Lauren boehner captioned the photo quote. Oh at jolie is a kitten. The photographer minutes after posting the photo to instagram lauren. Boehner shot joe lee in the back of her head when she collapsed. He flipped her over and shot her again. Between the is then. He pushed her off the cliff at around six pm. Lauren punter returned to his car and called nine one one. I want to turn myself in. He calmly told the dispatcher for the murder of my girlfriend. Julie count. That happened just a little while ago on shijo mountain. Then he waited on the side of the road for the police to arrive when they found jolie callan's body laying at the bottom of the cliff. She was still wearing her backpack. Lauren boehner was covered in her blood and so was the steering wheel of his car. Police recovered the murder weapon. A twenty two caliber pair claw and found a large amount of blood at the top of the cliff where the shooting had taken place lauren. Boehner was taken into custody and charged with jolie caroline's murder when questioned. Detectives were shocked at thorn's explanation for the killing. Lauren told police that he shot. Joe lee in the head as part of the suicide pact. When it was his turn to kill himself he said he couldn't go through with it when asked why he shot her from behind. Lauren said quote. She didn't want to see it coming. He had no explanation however for why he had turned her over her and shot her again between the eyes but family and friends of joe lee said that she had shown no signs that she was depressed or seidel and that she was happily making plans for her future. Investigators believed that. Lauren had lured. Joe me to the remote area and killed her after. She refused to get back together at his trial. In november of twenty fifteen lauren banners attorneys argued that he had asked burger syndrome as someone on the autism spectrum. They believed that he should be granted. Something called youthful offender status under alabama law. Any defendant under the age of twenty one may file for the status which guarantees if convicted that the defendant would serve no more than three in prison regardless of the severity of their crime. Lauren butter was granted that status to jolie's father michael callen was livid. He probably wouldn't even get three years for premeditated cold blooded murder he said. You think that's right. Callen contacted abc affiliate to petition the status and between the media frenzy public pressure and an appeal from the district. Attorney to the alabama court of criminal appeals in montgomery the judge reversed his ruling. It was so wrong from the get-go michael callen said. We had a cold blooded murder. By the end of the year. Lauren owners youthful offender status was rescinded. Almost two years later on july thirteenth twenty seventeen lauren boehner pleaded guilty to jolie callans murder. Extra security was needed at the courthouse. Due to the high profile nature of the case lauren boehner had been freed on one hundred and fifty thousand dollars bond a decision which had outraged the public and the calendar family lauren. Boehner was so loathed in the community but he had to be escorted to and from the courthouse wearing a bulletproof vest in court. Lauren boehner said little when the judge asked whether he understood the guilty plea. He said yes and showed no emotion. The nine one one call was played to the court where the were in. Butter calmly confessed to the killing. Prosecutors reminded the court that he'd convinced her to take a hike with him but she had texted a friend that if anything happened to her they would know who did it. And that lauren. Boehner had brought along a gun. The instagram photos that documented jolie's final hours. They said indicated a lack of remorse from her killer. Morin had even bragged about the murder two cellmates while in custody saying that he wasn't sorry for what he did because of he couldn't have her no one would though his attorneys asked for twenty year sentence claiming that there was evidence that client suffered from mental illness and noting that he had no prior criminal history. The judge sentenced twenty two year old. Lauryn boehner to fifty two years in prison. He would be eligible for parole after serving. Fifteen years at the end of all of this michael callen said what i think. He needs to the electric chair. But i guess if. I have to settle for life in prison that'll have to work. Job was a sweet girl. He said she was a sweet sweet. Sweet good girl. And i think she's smiling. Tobacco lauren. boehner will be eligible for parole in twenty thirty two. This has been murdered murder minute for true crime anytime. Download the murder minute app or follow us on instagram facebook and stereo at murder it.

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081919 Part 2

Ace and TJ

43:11 min | 2 years ago

081919 Part 2

"Millions of people wake up every day trying to figure out what they're going to do to try to lose weight this time well. There's a product called. Callan and callan works fabulously. I take cal train and it helps you lose weight the healthy way by doing it at the right pace not telling you you're you're gonna lose fifty pounds overnight. That's not good for you and it's probably not gonna work but is simply collagen. We're all born with and we lose as we get older and it has all kinds of benefits other than helping you lose weight. You'll sleep better. It helps with joint pain helps with acid reflux and right. Now you buy three. You get two free. You'll save twenty dollars. All you do is go to top loss dot com to buy calatrava top loss dot com and use the promo code ace t._j. A._c._c. t._j. You get free shipping also buy three get to save twenty dollars. Top loss dot com promo code aced for free shipping with callan. Hey it's t._j. And i wanna tell you about my recent. Stay day at the ballantyne. You know the second you walk in. You know you're in a fancy hotel is not only beautiful but the staff goes out of their way to make sure you have have the most luxurious experience of your life to go to the ballantyne dot com and see all the great things. You can enjoy everything from their spa doc to golf. They're beautiful pool fine restaurant and everything else. A true. Luxury hotel provides so book your stay now at the ballantyne nine dot com. I really think you're going to love it. It's not the news it's or portent now all trading with riggins on the ace and t._j. Show all right. This is where we cover all the top trending things of the moment every day at the top of every hour. Don't remind me this hashtag monday. Motivations captioning thing monday morning monday thoughts world photography day. It's world for nearly day because people take pictures without their phones. I don't get good ones yeah yeah. I don't like i don't like like when you're watching something <hes> from the white house and all you hear so annoying. How many do you need. I agree now. Give them three clicks and that's it. I think it sounds exciting going on here. We gotta sampson pictures but if you can't even hear what they're what the person saying this talk that's true to load not only is it world photography photography. It's also national soft serve ice cream day which i think we can all agree is a far superior ice cream than a regular us a sort of self service awesome awesome flavors right. It's not a not a complimentary nickname for a purse soft serve. Oh here condom ooh. He comes lou here. Where are you going officer that all here. He comes off so come. Hold up. I would think it would mean your your fat and squishy yeah. That's that's the way i was picturing soft squishy now the nickname i came up with you because of your love of the corn nuts by calling you corn nuts. That's a good nickname yeah. Oh here come corn <hes>. Would you say it makes once record mets. Have you read coordinate. I have not really <hes> they'll break you t they. They will bring much jolly rancher in your mouth and bite down on him before you even suck fried corn think is real good. Ooh that's all i can think about now and seeing these video connie as taken his sunday service on the road now he joined an actual church yesterday that meets up in a middle school gymnasium in the san fernando valley but if you watch any i finally got a chance to watch a full sunday service with it. I'm pretty sure he's starting to call of some sort. Oh yeah there's preaching teaching. There's lot of konya mood music and people wearing white robes. It's very very very cold lake and he seems to be the leader of but listen. I guess if that's your thing do it but just keep an high ball open. All open people don't know they're joining a cult until they're in it and then they can't leave. Somebody said the difference between a religion and a cult is the way they react when you leave <hes> you know so. I'm not sure that you can really get once. You're in a sunday service. I'm not sure that you can leave barron. Will that's just my own opinion but you can leave for the day but you got to come back exactly. It's like so all those things are not something has happened in my life that i am excited to share with everybody and in my wildest dreams never ever think this would have happened to me and i'll tell you what it is and how i won't you some of you not everybody to be a part of it next issue. Hey look we hope you aren't but we know you may be going through a tough time with the divorce. The good news is we know someone who can help our friend kristen at better. The divorce believes there's a win win settlement option for every divorce and can save you thousands of dollars in the process just email better divorce at ace t._j. Dot com. That's that's better divorce at ace t._j. Dot com and let our friend kristen help you at home or for from home. Heroes feet their hunger with the extra large to topping superhero pizza ten massive slices and to toppings of your choice delivered in a special spiderman far from home collectible box over the blockbuster mr price of just twelve bucks. It's a deal of epic proportions and is only available at papa. John's see spiderman far from home in theaters july second better ingredients better pizza papa. John's rated p._g. Thirteen at participating u._s. stores taxes and delivery extra your connected. It's funny with the ace and t._j. Show i am really nervous to share something with everybody because something has happened to me that in my wildest dreams i would never have ever ever ever ever have envisioned happening and i'm about to tell you something thing. I would never have thought i would ever tell anybody and nobody on the show knows except for regan's who's had to help me <hes> set up a link. That's as so let me let me backtrack for anybody who may be new to the radio family so for a long time <hes> i have been in a band the band is called charity case and the band raises money for ace and t._j.'s grandkids which is our charity for kids who are terminally ill and chronically disabled kids between the ages of five and twelve every three year. We take them on a once in a lifetime dream vacation to walt disneyworld with their families and over the course of the past nineteen years hi. It's been a long time. We've raised one point one one point two million dollars for a._c._t.'s grandkids and so through that kind of my partner in running. The band is a guy named eddie and a couple of years ago. I started writing songs and and <hes> written a couple of songs wrote one for some buddies of mine that i grew up with and at christmas last year. I wrote a song that i gave a christmas gift to my daughter that i'm working on for a long time so fast forward a few months. We did that and tinker around with it turned out really good. I was super proud of it so eddie. Z. happens to run with it happened to. He runs <hes>. He's a professional musician. He runs a rehearsal slim recording facility here in the mothership market of charlotte and recently he was put in touch with or contacted by a a subsidiary of sony music which is one of the largest music labels in the world about some work that he's done with various artists and they wanted to hear some of his work and one of the things that he shared with them was this song that we wrote and recorded for my daughter called. Maggie may dreams long long story short. He ends up getting a record deal with sony music to distribute anything that he produces that comes out of his the building as long as they approve it and of the first three things they approved. They want this song to be released. As a single single no way so come and down the hall. It's gonna be on spotify and items and all these every place in the world that you hear music you can download it and hear it as an official single on the label is technically playroom records at <unk> as distributed by sony music or some. That's great. It's really really great but here's the really fun part the part that even considered that was pretty exciting like okay. That's cool like i will have officially officially a single that has officially released out into the world but then they said okay now. You gotta go music video okay. I don't know what the video so. We've contacted a couple of guys and we had this idea. What if we could get members of the radio family involved to be in the video because the song is about and here's the interesting thing i wrote it. It's specific to my daughter is her story of her. Being little on list of everybody hears it and they come off as like a wedding song so we're going to create a music video based around dads is in daughters. So are you ready to go reagan's yep. There's a link now on our facebook page on our twitter on our instagram. It's everywhere. If if you're a dad with a daughter we would love to hear from you. There are some specific things that we're looking for. If you're a dad with like three dollars of different ages your golden we'd love to have you but we're going to have a bunch of dads and daughters in the video shooting different scenes to kind of tell the story story of the song and it's going to happen relatively quickly here in the next thing. We start shooting in the next two or three weeks. It's printing opinion how we use you. It'll be would would you say print principal photography so that will <hes> construct the story that go at the song and then they'll be a video release party in the whole thing. There's also a really good anybody if you have a daughter and it doesn't matter we need. We need little babies. We need teenage daughters. We we need middle school elementary school daughters older dads and daughters of all ages you can go and click the link and look at the form and fill it out and share the information mation and we would love to have you be a part of the video shoot. This is pretty exciting so there's gonna be a whole video and everything perfect so i hope you'll go to our facebook page as t._j. Dot com and all that and just check it out and click the link and we want you to be a part of it and we're shooting here in the mothership market of charlotte but even wants to travel. You're welcome to and we ask that. You include a picture in there. You can upload a picture to go with it because we need to know where they know. They've gotta what kind of match up if we have to use different age different age daughters the kennedy kind of needs to be a commonality but we're gonna shoot shoot a lot of different scenes of dads and daughters of different ages doing stuff. It's pretty exciting really exciting. I was kind of trying not to get too excited about it until friday. When i spent all afternoon with a video guy who was explaining to me how we would do it. I was like wow this is like a real thing now. All of a sudden yeah so it's up to <hes> if you would and we'll be taken submissions all through the week ear for like the next week or so if people want to get involved and be apartment was pretty pretty fun. It'd it'd be fun to have members of the radio family involved with their daughters. That'd be pretty awesome. I can't wait to see what they do. The one you wrote about your son. I i bet far you dad. Did you have a favorite or anything. He's not eighteen yet. Whatever thanks for the baseball bath go to a different place every year so he's a good shape. One of those places is not spotify. Though top of the charts you got to go to see the reds the play at home and he's not reaching number one could get our facebook page now facebook twitter instagram <hes> <hes> the as and t._j. Show but there's a the linked. You can't miss it. The link just says i want to be an ace's music video and so you click on that and you can fill out the information if you would and hopefully law workout. Hopefully we have enough weed gonna really sock it. We have no dads and daughters. There's more t._j. Geico it's already time to get fall and holiday travel plans together our travel agent michelle charges no oh fees and will bring her thirty years of tricks of the trade to get you the best deals possible. There are now also payment options with no additional fees unlike the cruise lines and land packages just email michelle at travel at ace t._j. Dot com. That's travel at ace t._j. Dot com rodin and fields has been named the number one premium skin care line in north america for the last three years. There's something for every skin concern now at tasty j. dot com. Click the road and fields add on our partners page. There's a sixty day money back. Guarantee and new monthly specials go to a c. J. dot com and click the road and fields add on our partners page the t._j. Show has everything you need to stay connected funny dot com and the t._j. App links to all of our podcasts social media platforms radio affiliates and charities. It's now facing t._j. Had the best time yesterday one hundred point three kiss f._m. In greensboro so there was a big event up there that i was helping host representing the t._j. Show with <hes> brides at the millennium center which is incredible but it was the reverse raffles so there are i think there were seventy couples who were there and they were trying to win or somebody was going to win. A fifteen thousand dollar are fifteen thousand dollars towards their wedding reception being there at the millennium center fifteen thousand thousand dollar which is pretty. It's in the setting is incredible. People are great everything about it was awesome but i couldn't come up with a way to say you have been eliminated. Emanating 'cause it's a reverse robin have all the ping pong balls and they hate me the number and my number thirty eight. I <hes> not going to win so reverse raffle tear reverse terri so you couldn't say like congratulations law getting married number seventeen and not your day do they even in a reverse of terrible in a reverse raffle. Do they even say that's me are they just walk off and kind of put their the number now well. Luckily they were all seated at the table but you kind of tell you here kind of oh you know okay you gotta get up and walk away. If you're seated at to tell you the state you can just stay where you are. We got down to the last five. Oh i ask the last five to come forward and they stood there and faced everybody and then it was which i realized later i might have just made even worse because no number three sorry. You've been eliminated then. They have to walk all the way back to their table. Everybody stares out of they didn't do anything wrong. Sorry it was on ping pong balls like a like a regular lottery. Yes they at least get to keep ping pong ball of the luzan and he said at least just throw them. Here's your paul wasn't there wasn't for me to do. They weren't my ping pong. Ball was like oh ping pong balls. I thought she said king gongs. What did they win. Fifteen thousand dollars towards towards their wedding and reception everything at the millennium center in greensboro is yeah which is it's a r- incredible facility but <hes> yeah fifty thousand dollars is a lot. It was really well. L. put together but it's like the only downer of the day was going and you. Hey you got free lunch. Hey boss still open. Yeah i try to come up with some way to soften the bloedel bit. Sorry not <hes>. I gonna win this today but he engaged. Thanks for being you could've made a made it the other way to try to make it fun for them. Go over the top like gordon ramsay type situation number thirty eight p off the yell at him. Get out of double down. You are a loser now. They're locked into getting married to they have to get married. The people that one would a multi. They don't think you can force them to get married. When if they do get married they have the yeah yeah. You gotta get married next weekend right here. Yeah they've been engaged since the couple that one have been gates. It's twenty fifteen. Oh then that's home from you know. This is probably the thing that like oh yeah. Now we got the money. We're ready to go or you. Take seventy five hundred a piece and go your separate. It doesn't work that it's not a cash uh-huh but i did ruin somebody's marriage or the wedding that way we were at one of those things and they came up and said they were engaged. Hello winning. Hey y'all get married was what i asked and they said and they could have said any date. They said tomorrow and i would have said the same thing. It was just setting up the joke and i said oh that'll never happen yard getting married <hes> later on a met that guy in some other capacity and he said we've met before you remember we met at the bridal show thing and i said yeah i thought she looked familiar and he goes well. You're right and i said what this was like two years later. What when you say that. We wouldn't get married because we didn't didn't we. We called it off like a month before we were supposed to get married long. Also it wasn't my fault last. I said really like i was no such thing. As i know karma like that you didn't do anything wrong. You're an angel unless he was driving home their go. You know what he's got a point. I don't think we should get i. I never thought of it until he mentioned. We don't really have to do but i said whatever you know you're supposed to say whenever a relationship ends and you're talking to one of the people you know her. Loss man would have been her out as his loss. You know that's his business. What is the booty call burned down. The booty. Call burned down. You don't want to be part of this. I will tell you what happens. You'll be on the lookout for coming up next is eight thousand t._j. Show wanna save up to seventy five percent on domestic or international national airline tickets. Then call low cost airlines for prices so low. We can't publish them. Call eight hundred two eight seven forty seven sixteen eight hundred two wait seven forty seven sixteen coming up on the t._v. Show what is your frat tube something you got from a fraternity party or any party in college that will remain with you for the rest of your life might be a scar might be a criminal record a baby in about thirty minutes on the t._j. Show you stole that baby. C._p._s. took her baby. She's crying. She's crying issue back. Okay this'll be. I'm probably the funniest story you hear all day and you'll be telling there's a twenty nine year. Old woman named <hes> tiga russell in woodbury new jersey few weeks ago a guy. <hes> cordially invited her over for a boutique hall hm. You're you're cordially invited r._s._v._p. Bring a donation for the food bank. This was at four in the a._m. But when she got to his house he'd fallen asleep and he didn't wake up when she banged on his door or repeatedly she called and texted him from outside <hes> that made her so upset that she <hes> went to a gas station nearby bought lighter fluid and matches went back to his house and said his door on fire but that woke him up good he wound up jumping out of a window to escape but had to go to the hospital with burns and smoke inhalation firefighters also had to bust into the house to save his dog. Oh wow so she's she's facing several felony charges but the things that she was texting him from outside or also little bit a little bit sketchy angry text messages saying quote. I see you wanna die home. Will you wasted my money to come out here. What a sweetheart uh-huh and in her mugshot. She is defiant like yeah i did. It loud four in the morning. That's crazy. I don't blame her. How i'm curious to know the what's the time frame between when he contacted her and when she arrived did he contact her to one thirty two. She's like i'll. I'll be there an hour and instead of being there to thirty. She got their four and that's why he was coming to sleep or what now <hes> she got there. <hes> before the four a. m. okay that's when she went and bought the lighter and the matches at four so so that's what the security cameras had her at their and then <hes> she set the house on fire four thirty but when he found out and jumped out the window was fourth or i'm still yeah he could have called her could call her too and then she didn't get there until you know three thirty yeah. She's not coming going to bed lisa dumbarton house yeah. He woke her go. You must want to die. She's come to this door the the question though is after it's all said and done. She's burned his house down south caught fire yet. Jump out the window and go to the hospital. Firefighters had to kick the door into get in and save his dog dog but would he still wanna hook up with her today. You may not but you're probably wrong. He's crazy. We bless. Let's see fine yeah. We like right now. You probably still would be trying to find a reason to reach out to us. I mean you were willing to come over so <hes> for sure you know what i'm saying coming up on now trending with regan's saying it wasn't. I know she's batting you. The dow training less than ten minutes. Take your funniest friends with you twenty four seven with the ace t._j. Podcasts the share on social media subscribe for free now at i tunes search for a._c._t. There's lose the important stuff the stuff that's trending lots of stuff happening this morning. We got some big relationship news to break in just a second but this is this is the week fall kicks off so slip on your dogs get a nice cozy sweater because dunkin's fall menu launches on tuesday officially one week before the starbucks p._s. S. l. but again though this is just their version of windfall starts coren officially follow doesn't start for quite a while but not in my house pumpkins everywhere everywhere okay. I have to but i had to get on. They manage my lamps labor day full on summer. It was like ninety nine. Go to the poll. It's fine but i like to have. Both you know you a fall like a basic white girl. I prefer summer good. I'm jim and i but i i do love fall. Oh what a sazor jim. I love and that's why like summertime gym today like summer better. Germany's well well. It's it's their month june. When summer begins i got you you know 'cause i'm jim and just start saying that. I don't like fall better because i'm virgo. That's just you know we know about virgos incandescent. That makes a lot of sense that you're a virgo as i could tell virgo <hes> <hes> also it's the top trending topic right now hashtag monday motivation so if you're feeling a little lazy just take a peek at this threat and and let it to absolutely nothing for you because not a lot of motivational stuff happening person with passion and be a person with patch exactly the people will never underestimate you yeah. I they ignore you then. They laugh you then they fight you. Then you win. Gandhi really got so deep and congratulations sir in order for the people's champion the great one the brahma bull the most electrifying man and all of sports entertainment dwayne. The rock johnson is married. He announced on instagram <hes> to he's married. A beautiful woman lauren <unk> sean. She's he's forty. Seven doesn't state her age but she he looks pretty hot so congratulations to him. He kind of keeps his personal life on the deal yeah being hawaiian. Is it yeah. They don't tell their our business just made that up yeah yes. He totally lied about polio poi- about that. Oh come on. I know how why named do one other wine reference pig in the ground a a grass skirt right volcanoes erupting volcanos all right take about active volcanoes. Mhm beaches okay guys covered them all yeah. I think he's the most highest paid actor or something. Wasn't there like a a recent survey. That name is paid actors. Breezy may have may have the the largest collective. You've box office total movie history. Is that a good looking guy yeah. He's good looking beautiful really too muscular for me. See i think just squash me yeah but who's very attractive what i don't know it's just a visual. Is that what you're going for reagan. Yeah i like the way you're thinking knotty. She said it she thought it can twirl far. You're probably they do that. In hawaii he anything he sets his mind to them. Fire twirler love you run. Yeah ace loves the. I'm a huge fan yeah so it's cool. I find him to be very inspiring. He's off the rock love rock alright. I don't you hate all the movies that he's in. Yes no that's not true at all or you can't think of one i like. I say when i was twelve. I thought that dude was was unreal and he was super fun to watch. I just don't i have not watched any of his movies. I'm sure he's great is he. Though i mean really yes he is. Is he the great sea marlin brenda. I'm not saying he's saying he's the greatest actor ever missing as a person. He's very inspiring writing music. I like to rock what does that permanent reminder from a frat party. You attended in college your fratto in less than ten minutes. Not jay is the funniest person we know and now he's going to act as the filter. We've all needed from social. Media posts in entertainment knows are funny. It's a new facebook. Group called share funny and you can access it at as t._j. Dot com alexa play t._j. Insulin detroit funny and it's easier than ever to tell your devices you want the now as and t._j. <hes> that i loved college i had a great time in school and i did like believe it or not. I did like going to some parties you did yeah i knew there was gonna be <hes> alcohol and and <hes> you know a little bit harmless drugs. You know nothing serious but on occasion there were some serious drugs there and i didn't even hesitate i was like bringing on its college experience stuff and we were at a party one night and this guy's kitchen and in doing hard drew on air on his counter and this one guy. I don't even know what it was to be with you. <hes> and one guy <hes> did some drugs and <hes> when you're like he got so excited that he ended up falling backwards smashing his head on the counter behind us. Ooh yeah yeah and that'll kill. Your buzz like immediately gets higher party. It really does so it was pretty selfish of him and but i guarantee he's got a scar to this day and that's what we call the frat to that permanent reminder of party you attended. Maybe it was a fraternity party. Maybe it was you know apartment party. Maybe it was a mixer but what's your frat to. What's your permanent reminder of a party ten. Maybe tried to jump over a beer pong table and broke broke three ribs and it still hurts when you breathe five years later. I have a hard to see and it's gotta healed up for the most part. I have a very tiny scar scar right above my right eye. <hes> that came from a an afternoon party my apartment complex in those polls that you used clean out the pool yeah they were. I don't know why they were around. Maybe the guy been claimed that the pool or something and we picked him up and started like <hes> sword sword fighting with him like jousting conic super long and we kind of had a you know we bob. We've bob we a little intoxicated and got confused and i went the wrong way and took the end of that metal pole right above my i was like oh man that hurt and then i kept going and then my buddy dropped things i oh dude and i didn't even feel it because i was kind of intoxicated like i said and they were like oh. I can't see our that now. That is blood this bad oh but that was wet. It wasn't as bad as it looked but you know when you're wet just gotten out of the pool looks and your lily white like i am you know virtually redhead albino really long haired. It's like hanging down in the blood. Getting it looks way worse than it really is wasn't bad at all right. We got to go to the hospital hospital. Hang on a second. Let's look at it but but i had a rough headache after that because it was that hangover mixed with that oh yeah a little car and webber. It's your frat too. That's my friend to absolutely. I don't have one the only parties i went to in college. Were <hes> route parties after our plays in the theater and they didn't get too wild aw did the louisiana tech modeling party as well after that was that you finish with your no. We didn't in whatever we didn't have party to that. Maybe i was on the louisiana tech modeling team as well as a louisiana tech tony award award winner in the theater but the yeah right yeah the rat parties are pretty lucky yeah well there was that one that got a little bit a little bit dramatic i would say when the <hes> when i wasn't accepting of girls advances because she was not my type and then she she was she was a grad student and i guess she said i'm going to grab the only non gay guy in here and see what will happen. Uh-huh and then nothing happened wasn't interested so she she could have worn a an award for her performance after that ah i'm not looking for. Here's a great riggins. Uh-huh lady says so. I have a reminder from a party attending college. I went to a frat party one night at a at a at the pike house and to this day i have that reminder. He is now sixteen. I thought we might get one of those. You know you're gonna get one of those yeah. She name pike wow. How do you tell your kid that that's how you could see a the pike house party. Hell yeah yeah where the caio's oh so. I thought this was a mixer yeah. So what's your frat to the permanent reminder of a college party. You attended. Maybe it's a scar. Maybe it's a child. Maybe it's a you know a felony charge charge that counts yeah so reach out at the show on social media. Call us one aaa forty-one as t._j. Jay or text us a._t. Jay and your message to nine six eight nine three boom and we'll get you connected funny with ace and t._j. In thirty thirties the best of today's show in thirty minutes and available to write tunes and now on alexa and pandora more of the ace and t._j. Show next accent try our or the iheartradio app on android auto and apple carplay. It's never been easier to get connected acting funny in the car and listen to the a._c._t. Jay now as soon t._j. What's your frat to your permanent reminder of a college party any kind of college. You went to where you left with more than you came with. Here's the favorite though just to start reagan's. Have you seen <hes> tuesday says. I have a frat two on my left eyebrow. I was hitting the face with a full gear. Can a friend was trying to toss it to me. Obviously he has terrible aim. I missed missed it. Had i had a black guy for about two weeks afterwards. You're the permanent scar together part of our eyebrow listen. I don't know if he's gate sounds like he's got great. I'm gonna throw right at your face and you put your hands up yeah. That's great of guys hey t._j. We threw a party in our college apartment freshman year and it got so big. The cops got called. I was drinking drinking. Underage didn't want to get a ticket for it so i did what anybody in that situation would have done. I jumped out the third story window landing at a gravel parking lot. I have a scar on my elbow where i slid. Luckily i was dragging. Feel thank you now. Here's one hey reagan's and my frat too is we were having a party when i went to college aka n._c. State i was riding in the back of my buddies truck drunk. There were several of us back there. I accidentally fell out and had to have my arm amputated. Oh gosh okay no. He made that he lied. He made that visit so you think it's funny. I did think that was funny. I knew it couldn't have because nobody parties like that n._c. State in college where somebody would be right in the back of a truck farm in college so it was like nerds and so always was engineering me. I think agriculture could nerds like nerds. What did you mean kind of nerve overhaul. Where urge no. I like n._c. State and better than the other one. Oh i like the way oh he leaves it. Open those you don't know which one the other one be quote unquote the other one to choice. They're all about you and doc coronation center so there's a lady on twitter who and sometimes your friend who just i think what what we are thinking <hes> because i've done dumb stuff in college guard thinking says she has a scar on the back of her neck quote from being dunked into a trash can headfirst full of water and broken champagne bottles. One of them slice my neck. Luckily was my face to woah a frat party. At penn state. What dumping you in the trash can get fardie booth thing carbon. Don't the girls charles and in broken glass. I've never seen girls get their vases trash. Kanter either little much says worst things that could have happened to penn state. Let's be real doc thirty bodies college. You don't offend. This house naked funny with the ace and t._j. H show on demand subscribers tunes or simply search with alexa the a._c._t. J schoeman demand more of the t._j. Show next. I want to hear the t._j. Show and stay connected funny later today as t._j. Twenty four seven is the show replayed all day through the a._c._t. J. app sponsored by papa. John's downloaded on itunes google play and amazon now casing t._j. Something's people to feel sending in the some of the people that have still sitting at to your permanent reminder college party so to speak it. Thanks something of a movement is they just fell off the couch. I was dancing on in cancun on spring break backwards off the couch to a glass coffee table spring break u._g._a. Baby still have to scars on my back from the lovely cancun emergency room ooh. They had to call my mom and tell her in broken english that i was in the e._r. It's think of the right out of a movie. Oh i wouldn't be surprised if the scar actually came from the cancun hospital i. She didn't have anything until she went in. There really possible novoye no <hes>. Do you figured out that she didn't need any discount viagra or anything and like all right. We're we're at a loss. That's what we're here for they can't do you still have no. You're not in college anymore. Obviously but you're not that far out of college allah junior roommate south y'all still go hard and crazy parties like that where they seem to get a little wild out of control you wake up the next morning and who broke the lamp not at our apartment that much we try to keep it at other people's place just to keep ours very neat and clean <hes> but no we're not near as reckless as we used to be. We've kind of grown up. You know little bit. I said that now but you never know what's coming up next weekend. <hes> who whether <hes> in the past or now would have but mainly when you were not adults fully <hes> which one of you was wilder me. You're more wild than your roommate all day. What about your system. You'll system crystal. <hes> when i first moved to charlotte five years ago she was crazy wild one and then i i learned and adapted just like her. I became the wild one okay so now. I definitely do more than she does. Grow up and be mature for thirty one year old so so get that good trying to live up my twenties good for her for her her kahar priorities straight for the nice plan. Your parents know how your work they do now. Thank you guys yeah. I read that didn't get enough for more get the a._c._t. J. app in your app. Store is connected funny all material copyright two thousand nine hundred eighteen inc.

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Working: What Healthcare Workers Can Teach Us About Creativity

Slate's Culture Gabfest

51:23 min | 4 months ago

Working: What Healthcare Workers Can Teach Us About Creativity

"This episode is brought to you by progressive one of the country's leading providers auto insurance with progressive. Name your price tool you say what kind of coverage you're looking for and how much you want to pay and progressive will help you find options that fit within your budget. Use the name your price tool and start an online quote today. A progressive dot com price and coverage match limited by state law. Your words matter so much to the people you care about 'em writing those words. A hallmark card is a great way to share love and encouragement whether times are tough. And you need to send some support or they're going through an exciting life change. You can show you care with a hallmark card. Find cards for all the people. You care about at hallmark dot com slash working or wherever hallmark cards are sold. We talk about having to just get creative and come up with strategies. No one trained us on how to convert hotel into isolation clinic right like the kinds of things that have come up in the past year. I've had to lean on any creative juices that i had. I think everyone certainly in the healthcare field has welcome back to working. I'm your host june. Thomas and i'm your other host isaac butler isaac. I tell me who's voice. We heard at the top of the show. And then i have a question about your susceptibility to the seasons. But i who was that. I'm in suspense about this question. But just to keep our audience. Not in suspense much longer about the voice. That was the voice of anthony fourteen. Berry he's the chief nursing officer at callan lord. Lgbtq healthcare organization which will learn an awful lot about during this episode awesome. So i want very much to know about anthony and his work but i it is definitively spring here in brooklyn now. Are you one of those people whose creativity changes with the seasons is well. I'm not sure anymore. Actually because you know pre pandemic. I would have said. Yeah i get a little seasonally depressed. I need one of those lamps that you shine on your face a little bit. When the seasons get shorter when when that sadness creeps in it's hard to be as creative. And as good at what i do and i get angry at myself faster all but you know what i've mostly been inside in a small dark room for the last fourteen months and so it all kind of feels the same. The nice thing about the better weather is i can take longer walks chile and i get to run into friends on the street may get some sun and i just feel more like a human again but i want to be honest sweater slash blazer. Weather is really. What's best for my body shape. So i prefer fall. Yeah yeah same. Same hartson so isaac. I am really curious why you want to speak with anthony for working. I isn't this show but writing books and recording albums most of the time. Yeah absolutely and you know. I love that. I love that we have a show. Were interviewing artists about the creative process but you know after a year of doing working i was just really interested in taking one episode and hearing from someone who has to creatively solve problems that aren't artistic in nature just to see what we discovered by talking to him about his work and it turns out. There's actually a lot of things that that he has in common with artists. I feel like antony let you me. Isaac is based in new york. Does your compensation contain any references. That non new yorkers might maybe you some help with. I'm not sure that there's specific ones exactly that. That people might struggle with. But i do think it is worth listeners. Knowing that new york city was the early epicenter of both the covid pandemic and the aids crisis and callan. Lord played a very important role in providing service during both of those and in both of those times the rest of the country their back on the city. I mean even some democrats voted against relief. Bills that would have kept new york from having the crippling budget crisis that we're now about to be in and so everyone has dealt with being slammed by dacoven pandemic at this point in aids the aids crisis of course stretches all over the world and is still ongoing but it's worth saying that in in both cases the early city that was hit super duper hard was new york. Oh and of course. I should say that we talk about the javits center in this interview and for those of you have never been to the javid center. It's kind of this. It's convention center on the west side of manhattan that has like big cursed energy Hillary clinton's what she thought was going to be. her victory. party was at the javits center. But even if you haven't just lost donald trump. It's normally a very miserable place to be an and become one of the main vaccinations sites and that is kind of turned the energy of the space around. And it's actually almost pleasant to be in now now. I know you asked anthony some questions. That will only be heard by our slate plus listeners. Can you give us a sneak preview. yes on slate. Plus this week we talked about his cultural habits. And what anthony berry does. When he needs to feel creatively refreshed. Oh my god. I really need to hear that really. Everybody does but that kind of exclusive members only content is just one of the many benefits of slate plus membership others. include ads on any sleep. Podcast bonus episodes of shows like slow-burn and dear prudence and you'll be supporting the work. We do here on working. It's only a dollar for the first month to sign up go to slate dot com slash working. Plus all right now. Let's hear isis conversation with anthony. Fruit and berry. It feels good to show up for the people you care about whether they're experiencing trying times or going through big life changes one of the best ways to show them. You care is by reaching out with a hallmark card. Your words matter so much every time you express support send words of encouragement or give. Thanks for those times. they help you out. You're showing someone you care and with a hallmark card. You can show you care from anywhere. Plus it's a message. They can go back to over and over anytime. They need a good feeling. Find the cards that help you. Put your words of caring and comfort out into the world and into the hands of the loved ones. Who need to hear them at hallmark dot com slash working or wherever hallmark cards are sold. Anthony and barry. Thank you so much for joining us today on working. Hi it's a pleasure to be here. So let's just start with the real basics. What do you do. what's your job. I am the chief nursing officer at callan lord community health center callan lord is a community health center new york city that primarily provides services that are targeted toward the lgbtq community and people living with hiv. Yes so even before covid right. It's providing healthcare to those particular communities. Can you tell us a little bit about its background because it arose in this really interesting period of time between stonewall and the issue pandemic is part of this kind of wave of service and political organizations. Right it's actually. I think a really wonderful story of how people in the community Healthcare providers in the community saw this unmet need for themselves and for their friends and loved ones. There wasn't really a place where lgbtq identified people could get healthcare services in a judgment free place by other queer people And so there are two totally volunteer organizations like providers. Physicians nurses just volunteering their time. In this almost fifty years ago we had to completely different groups of these volunteers. The women's health collective and saint marks clinic both providing lgbtq centric services that came together as the community health project and this really was at its time. One of the first hiv centric primary care clinics in the nation in really was built and expanded as a direct response to the issue happening in the city in the eighties In the late eighty s we moved into what is now our largest health center on eighteenth street in chelsea where we still are open to this day and we've expanded to a smaller clinic in the south bronx and a brand new health center in downtown brooklyn so before the covid pandemic. What was a typical day of work. Like for you. So in my role. I oversee our nursing case management care coordination quality programming and our pharmacy. And so you know. Generally my role is about expanding those services to meet the needs of the community. We have very fortunate in that we have a lot of grant funded programming so we work really closely with the city. The state Really trying to address the ongoing. Hiv epidemic in the state and also sharing our practices with other centers in places around the country. That are also doing this work and so we really believe not reinventing the wheel ourselves sharing you know our lessons learned with other places that are similarly struggling. You know one of the major challenges of your job is the lgbtq population statistically high incidence of medical discrimination and reluctance to seek care as a result of it. It's almost one in five if i remember correctly. Lgbtq americans face some form of discrimination that leads to some reluctance about pursuing care that strikes me as among many things. A creative challenge right. So how do you handle that in your work and making sure that people actually get the care. They need when they may be reluctant to ask for it. In the first place. I could not agree more. It is the focus of our role. The reason why we exist is to tackle problems specifically and you know. I think when you talk about primary care preventative. Care people even more reluctant. Right you'll go to the er if you really are in an emergency situation but if you're just talking about like going in for a checkup right you yourself at a position where you might be discriminated against or were you feel like someone isn't going to respect your identity And so what we have done. I think is tried to engage patients and people in the community to tell us what they feel. They would like to see in the health center. Because there is no one-size-fits-all model to this. And i think the more voices that you get in the room. So i think you can creatively solve any kind of challenge that comes up in healthcare is bringing all the stakeholders to the table in having a conversation and saying you know. What is it that you would like to see in the health center space. I also think strategically we've hired staff that are of the community so that the people that are making these decisions are also creating space that they are best friend would come and get healthcare up right. What are some of the ways that you have changed as a result of those conversations with the community. Well i think that we have certainly grown both in size because of feedback around access. You know i think. Specifically as a result of the affordable care act so many more services were now covered by health. Plans specifically medicaid that allowed people to as a core example access transgender healthcare services. That had not previously been covered right although we've always been open regardless of you know if you have insurance or not. This really enabled people to feel more empowered to say you know we need better access to gender affirming care and so that's why we look to open brooklyn. That's why we've done. These kind of community needs assessments. Where he was very specific feedback on. This is what we need you to be. And this is how we need you to provide services and so i think the organization has grown largely based on that feedback and again. I think our staff are people that are part of the community. So we hear from the staff to and and. I think it's something that we we want to be right-sized we wanna grow to meet the needs of the community and until there's more widespread. Lgbtq sensitive access in every healthcare setting. I think we're going have to need to continue to do that. You know i have a feeling. There's some percentage of our listeners. At this point who are like. I thought this show interviewed novelists and stuff but one of the reasons why i really wanted to have you on is because you know. Creativity isn't bound by a particular job right and it strikes me that your day to day life is filled with with all sorts of creative challenges is that is that how you see or i totally. Yes well i feel like the last year of my life has been ito waking up to see like what random like out of left field problem are going to have to solve today. And would you talk about having to just get creative and come up with strategies that are totally outside of the box of our every day. No one trained us on how to convert hotel into isolation. Click right like the kinds of things that have come up in the past year. Have certainly i've had to lean on any creative juices that i had. I think everyone certainly in the healthcare field has so. Let's go step by step. Maybe through some of those creative you know if we could whisk back in time to late february early march when things are starting to. It's becoming clear how bad things are going to start getting and stuff like that. What are the challenges. You were facing in march. What what and how did you face them. How did you figure out what to do. It felt like a lot of the areas that were really important to get to ensure we maintained operational. We're like all my areas like triage at the front desk. We needed our end to make sure that no one in that had symptoms occupational health delayed for our staff that were becoming infected with covid All of the supply chain issues. We're running out of master out of everything that we needed to keep people safe Telehealth we did not have a robust telehealth program in so you think that's fine you can just you know. Get on to the new and even know its was than people using. You could do some kind of telehealth videoconferencing but not. Everybody had a laptop at home. Not all of our patients have smartphones. Not all our patients. Many of our patients have stable wifi and so it was just like a lot of moving pieces and at the same time. Many of our staff really wanted to volunteer at the hospitals. Or like you know. Primary care had essentially paused outside of like medication support. It's all urgent care and our staff wanted to go support. The hospitals and then is opportunity arose. Where the city came to us and said we have patients that are homeless and they have been diagnosed with kobe. But they're stable and we need to be isolated rather than going back to congregate housing at the shelter and because they deem them to infect everyone else and so they essentially ended over this hotel in long island city and we had a twenty four hours to turn it into in isolation clinic. So how did you even begin to figure that out like what was the creative process of like. Oh my god. We have a hotel and we have to turn into an isolation clinic. Mike process in problem solving. All of the things that come up as always you know a prioritization. What is the most important thing to come out of this. When we're done you know pulling together like getting buy in from people on a to build a vision for what you'd like to see happen right how we're going to get there and then it's just like one decision at a time until you built that that larger picture and and i think that that strategy at least in you know coming up with creative way to solve each individual question is always something that at the again you look back a week later in the like underdog right. This is so fascinating. Because i've worked in the past as a theatre director and that is actually not that different from what theater right even like the thing trying to do is not save lives. It might be staged a play or whatever but there is that still still that thing you have a group of people you have to get them to buy into it and then you sort of break the show down into its component parts and the questions of those component parts and you just you try to go through them as quick as in sequence until the whole thing comes together so it's amazing that it's the same in in your line of work. I mean that totally makes sense to me and you know at the end of the day. It's never exactly how you thought it was going to be reduced started And there are people that love it and there there are million little decisions that you might have done slightly differently you. What were some of the things that i mean. Mistakes might be the wrong word but ideas that pan out or ways that you had to course correct or or whatever and the in the midst of that so we needed a place where we could store all our stuff and the only place they had was a gym and so we did up the little fitness center at a hotel that has like the olympic finish treadmill like our nursing staff and physicians or getting dressed to go into the isolation rooms literally standing on a treadmill but still like things like would. We have picked the gym again. Maybe not but it was like the best option that we had at the time You know even in the beginning there was a different guidelines from the cdc versus was coming out of the administration state and federal versus city. Deal h you know. Because i think you know no one really knew that much in those early days and so you kind of had to just use your best judgment and make a call for today and then as you learn more information tomorrow. You're gonna you know building that kind of i think preparing people that are used to working in very finite situations with very clear guidance in like tested and true evidence based practice to like we're gonna wing it day to day. The building that kind of culture had to happen overnight and that was also. I think really one of the bigger challenges you. How did you set that tone. How did you build that culture of like this is going to be messy part of it is. I think you have to be in there with everyone. You know. if you're going to say so today we all are going to wear these masks. You have to be there on site wearing those masks and doing exactly what. The guidance that you're giving is going to be. I think i never made a decision where i felt like i wouldn't feel comfortable doing that because there was also you know what to be safe to right and so i think the way in which you build that culture is. This is what we're doing today. And i'm doing it with you and this is what will all be together tomorrow and i think that also helped to build a sense of like. We're all in this together and we'll get through this together right because i think that was another big part of it is. There is no light at the end of the tunnel. Then yeah how do you. I mean you're working long hours. You know the work is chaotic. People are dying. It's an incredibly emotionally difficult thing to have to go through and you don't even have the comfort of knowing it's gonna end at some point right. How do you nurture yourself. How do you protect yourself or your team emotionally. So you can keep doing the work. Not completely burnout burnout is. It's my biggest. It's the biggest battle of this for me. Right now Because you know of course there's all the covid stuff. There's the the racially motivated violence there. The you know. The protests of last summer and the death of george floyd and the trial. That's happening right now. And you know these are things that people are carrying with them when they walk in the door to work right and their loved ones are best friends are facing food insecurity our housing insecurity because they've lost their jobs in the animated after. Go back to work right so heavy and we've tried to so many different things in the beginning we did. We had this like zoom channel where we have like guided meditation at noon monday. You know Yoga on friday afternoons and things for people to have you know kind of like non transactional experiences with their co workers. It's like the water cooler stuff that we can't do nowadays. It's so lost. And so i think it's really important to think of creative ways to have people engage to build trust and camaraderie and cohesion. Remote lee for a lot of people is a particular challenge. so he did zoom things. We are also trying to have fun. Committee a group of people that come up with fun workplace events that lead karaoke nights things like that. But i think it's a real long term issue. I think that for the most part. Lots of clinicians are still running on adrenaline. And you know it's going to run out for different people at different times. And i think it's our responsibility as administrators to address that individually. There's no perfect answer to addressing burnout. People respond to a different people need different kinds of support. And i think you've got to really get individualized in how you address it organizationally. We'll be back with more of isis conversation with anthony fourteen berry after this. I'm really very confident with technology but when it comes to design all my confidence disappears. I don't own any of those big complicated programs. And i don't really want to buy one but even as a writer podcast. There are times when. I want to make a really cool graphic for social media. When i'm launching any project or know when i wanna make a meme well know that i have come for pro mike. 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Just go to convert dot me slash working to get your free. Forty five day extended trial. That's c a n v dot. Me slash working canvas dot me slash working so hey listeners. A couple of things real quick. I if you are enjoying this podcast. And i sincerely hope you are. Please take a moment to subscribe to our feet. Wherever you get your podcast so you never miss an episode or even a second of working and if you happen to be listening on overcast please recommend the episode by hitting the star. Come also do you have questions about the creative process big or small whether you need to figure out. A big pivot work or want to know how to tackle an ambitious writing project. We would love to help. You can drop us a line at working at slate dot com or give us an old fashioned phone call at three or four nine three three work. That's three zero four nine three nine six seven five really really like phone calls okay. Let's rejoin isaacs conversation with anthony. Fourteen bury a lot not all but of your work. Previously and ongoing is with people with hiv aids. Did you feel like that prepared you in a particular way for the covid crisis and for the way you approach their things from that work that kind of carried over in specific ways. I think there are things from that work that have prepared me to think about how to roll out vaccine distribution inequitable way because think there's a lot of judgement for people are questioning whether the vaccines right for them. I think there's a lot of equity around access to vaccine People living with hiv and aids still continue to face stigma and discrimination and lack of adequate housing to the things. They need We're seeing again. You talk about either. The vaccine passport and ways rich for like well. You're going to have to show your papers to get into you know events and i think people have really legitimate valid medical mistrust to that we need to as a healthcare system address before we can. You know. say well if you don't decide if you don't feel like the vaccine safe then you can't do the things that everyone else is going to be able to do. You know. I think a lot of work to education. Yeah i mean that is one of the big challenges for this country for anywhere. That has a somewhat adequate supply of vaccine. Right is a vaccine resistance. People who don't want to take the vaccine. Can you talk a bit about your your experience. Because you're you're dealing with lots of people who mistrust the healthcare industry and may not want to deal with the vaccine. And i can think of some strategy is off the top of my head. You can require people to get it. You can Throw statistics at them and blah blah blah blah. But i don't know they would be that successful. So what have you found. Works in terms of getting people to agree to literally give it a shot. First of all. I would say that you even we account lord do not have enough vaccine for everyone that would want and so you know in the united states we russian healthcare and this you know covid has been no exception and we are certainly rationing vaccine in new york state access to the vaccine freak of it we utilize kind of predictive analytics and risk algorithm to determine who is most at risk for poor health outcomes based on their medical history. Its population health initiative. We've used the same initiative now with covid to really target people that we believe would have the worst health outcome from cove infection and have done proactive outreach to them to make sure that they are first in line and so we are really hoping to target our health education support like having someone recall them on the phone and answer their questions address any concerns so that they can decide if the vaccine is right for them and so i think this idea of trying to maintain vaccine equity is gonna be an even larger problem for us to solve and vaccine the same nursing staff that were working in the hotel. Last march are the same ones providing vaccines today and talk about burnt out like we have stretched everyone as them as as we can and so another strategy that we've tried to utilize to both increase capacity for vaccine distribution. But also you know. Try to provide some support to new grads is that we partnered with nursing schools so that people that have just graduated from nursing school. Who are technically able to give vaccines under the state. I mean they've been working in the hospital for the past couple of years. But having taken their boards they're able to vaccinate for covid just specifically and so we have this great group of amazing new grads that were utilizing to help with our vaccination process and teaching them how to have conversations with people about the vaccine to help address any concerns to make sure that they feel really comfortable. So i think it's twofold it's one building up this really large workforce that is able to provide vaccination and partnering with community based organizations to you know have town halls send a to a community center for people who are getting lunch every day and have them give a presentation due accu- a this is where people are already engaging because they trust the people that are there and they trust the people and the advice that are brought in to talk to them and so i think those are really important strategies that we need to lean on more. The javits center is great. A lot of people will sign up go to java thunder. People are refreshing their their screens while they're working from home and they're going to get those appointments but there are more people that are you know not able to do that. That are really be most at risk. You know like if you look at a restaurant today. People sitting at the tables eating dinner are gonna probably get that vaccine more easily than all of the people working in the restaurant and people were getting. The restaurant are who we want to get vaccinated. They're the ones that are not working from home right and so. I think that there needs to be more outreach. And i think that's one of the biggest challenges that we're going to have as we go through the summer one thing you've touched on a few times of our discussion. Today is of course healthcare inequity and one of the things that's been true of the the ongoing hiv aids crisis which is far from over and of the cova pandemic is that it highlights so starkly the inequities in our society in terms of who gets the disease who dies from the disease who doesn't get the care they need when they have the disease and the ways that can destroy their lives even if they do get those other things and even if they do survive you did not design american capitalism the american healthcare system. You have you had nothing to do with the inputs of this right but your whole job is addressing those outputs right making sure that you don't perpetuate those inequities in your own work. I think that it is a particular challenge to hire and build a workforce that really gets that in the can you know that wants to commit their career to mitigating that for for our community and not be in a constant state of anger and frustration that the system exists right. It's really no balance that you have to strike. I think of it. You know acknowledging our really inefficient and dangerous health care system and finding ways to work within it to like not make patients always bear the brunt of those frustrations you know we have this really mission driven team we are you know for community health centers. I think people are really drawn to work there because they are drawn to the mission and they are activists heart rate and so we are as much as a healthcare center as a social justice organization because everyone that works there you know. I think feels that we want to see. Change happen to how healthcare is provided in america. And so i think what we do. Is we try to push our legislators to make changes We really active in trying to promote policies that we believe better reflect. The needs of the patients were carrying for and our staff. Really involved in that I think as an outlet to vent frustrations but also they have a really powerful story to tell because they're the ones that are working within the system right like they know best what is really not working and what needs to change in order to make it work better. What are the lessons that we should take forward as we start returning to normal life. I'm putting that in heavy quotes. You know it's so easy to kind of just say well. That's over now. I wanna forget about that right. But what should we carry with us as we move forward for me. I think one of the biggest lessons learned is is feeling thinking outside of the box. So often i think we get in the habit of doing the things that we do. Because that's the way that we've always done them. And although so many of the changes that have occurred been disruptive and terrible a lot of really great. And i think you know some of the takeaways for me as we go back into you know something that looks a lot more like twenty nine thousand nine than twenty twenty Are trying to focus on those positive changes and not reverting back to status quo for the sake of reverting back. Because that's what was comfortable or more familiar. I think you know. I think about telehealth. And the fact that everyone spit able aren't that many people shouldn't say everyone many people Are able to access the healthcare that they need remotely therapy people are. I mean therapy is something that we had a huge need for pre covid that now exponentially there's more demand for and you know in manhattan rent is so expensive. It's hard to expand therapy programs to meet the needs of communities now so many more people. Actually i think are preferring to meet with their therapists remotely in the comfort of their home. And so that it's going to allow us to really be able to expand the number of therapists that we have that are able to provide these services for patients. There's like one example of something that i think you know. Really covert has forced us to think out of the box do things in really radical new ways that we're finding people really like that i hope will be able to continue into the future. Of course this goes back to the advocacy of the regulatory stuff that like we need our lawmakers to make that possible because we're still operating under emergency orders to be able to do that and so that's one thing i also think that you know we have to focus on. I guess this is kind of related. We have to really focus on our own self care. I think you know. Like i said before so many people are still running on adrenaline and they will come a time where we will need to find ways to ensure our staffer healthy mentally and physically emotionally visual amount of thank yous or you know gifts or anything. That will ever truly be enough. There's no you know all staff meeting that we can do where we will truly be able to share our gratitude right but we have to do something. Because i think it's important that we acknowledge what happened and i think again this kind of goes back to the ways in which we address burnout. Everyone needs a little something different to try to have some some closure. If that's even possible. Anthony foreign barry. Thank you so much for joining us to talk about your process here on working. Well thank you so much. It's been a pleasure It feels good to show up for the people you care about their experiencing trying times are going through. Big light changes one of the best ways to show them. 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Is that was fantastic. At the very beginning. I thought i want to be on friend. And then like a minute later. I was like actually i also want to be as co worker. Like what an insightful guy with a really inspiring approach to problem solving in the workplace who obviously works at a wonderful organization perhaps most of all though he provided a great reminder that we're all constantly using our creativity even if we're not writing level. Yeah you know. I think i've probably said this before. But i feel like most of my creativity goes into things like parenting and figuring out what we're gonna eat for dinner and stuff like that you know. I think not being precious about the creative process actually really important. It's really important to your tick work. But it's also really important to seeing the non artistic parts of our lives. You know the way you might a painting that you're going to do or whatever anthony clearly does that. I think his work and community benefit greatly from it. Yeah no kidding. I loved his breakdown for how to engage your creativity to solve a problem at work. You know set priorities get buying take it one step at a time that works in pretty much every setting. I know i just thought. Hey that's directing when he laid that out right and i think particularly when it's collaborative work whether that collaboration happening in a hierarchy or flat organization or whatever you know that kind of step by step processes important and each one of those things is actually really important and really creative like it's not just like oh you figure out what your budget is right. It's like well. Budgeting is actually a creative act. We don't like to think of it that way but it really is so so. Yeah no i was. I was quite struck by that. Sure and then sometimes like when you have to turn a very imperfect space into an isolation ward no big deal because that's what you've got and it has to happen you have to wing it and in those circumstances you have to be very open about that and you have to be there with the rest of the team doing it with them. Yeah absolutely. I think there's something really clarifying. Maybe is the right word. About what a producer friend of mine once called crisis mode and crisis mode. Is you have a hard deadline. You don't have the resources to do the thing you want to do. But you have to do it anyway and that could be making a book deadline. That could be constructing a set. That could be turning a hotel workout room into a staging area for your field hospital during the worst global pandemic at a century. But it is a really clarifying moment. And the even though you are improvising. That improvising is built on a foundation of all the preparatory work. That has gone into it. Which is everything from actual prep. You've done for that moment to like The rest of your life up to that moment your education your work experience but i also wanna say june. Do you want to know the origin or at least one of the origins of the term. Winging it i certainly do so this is not. I don't think it's a phrase with a definitive origin but one of the origin stories which i discovered while researching my book because it was in a someone's memoir is in the nineteenth century particularly in america. Outside of new york theater companies. Were what were called stock company. So what would happen is a star would tour to your city and then a company of local actors would be in whatever show that star needed because they saved on travel and housing costs for the rest of the company. Now might it's sort of like andrea bocelli tours to a town. He hires that towns orchestra right. And so it's like that. So on friday you would find out what role you were playing in. What play on monday. And it might not be one that you were ever in before. And so they would learn the play as best as they could as quickly as possible and then they would affects their lines to the wings of the set and they called it and winging the parts so you would run into the wings and just kind of consult your lines when you went speaking if you needed a quick refresher yet or you would sort of make a little cue card your own cue cards and just kind of angle your body. The right way so that you can see your lines. And that's called winning the parts. One profession specific thing antony brought up that really resonated for me was the question of burn note. I mean when you're in the middle of something huge that is absolutely in your professional wheel highs like this is your moment you've trained for this. You've developed strategies about this but it puts an enormous even a met strain on your profession. Like how do you cope with that. And keep going because you do have to keep going both during the crisis and afterward and i want to acknowledge that i'm not sure there's any kind of comparison that could appropriately be made to what the healthcare professions have gone through in the last year. But do you have any strategies avoiding burnout. I mean this is one of the great creative challenges that everyone advocates and I think everyone is a different way. They do it. Some people exercise is how they do it. You know or or you know making sure that they're taking breaks when they can things like that For me one of the wonderful things about art of all kinds is that it's really a gift to the person who's experiencing it at the most all you really owe. It is some attention but it's one of the few areas of our lives where we are being purely given to by the work that we're experiencing and it's also one of the few times in our lives now because of social media where we can like stop performing for other people for a minute and just be like that's space. That's created sustaining at a painting. Taking a walk and listening to an audio book watching a movie Reading a physical book. You know all of these. Things are part of my personal recharging process. The big challenge of the pandemic has been not being able to do any of those things. In exactly the same way you know but In two weeks i'll be fully vaccinated and i tell you how excited i am just like go to a different museum every other day or something or you know just just really get out there and experience that again like i really hunger for it and i think i feel a bit of lingering burnout. That really hasn't gone away partly because of just the intensity of the pandemic in the anxiety around it but also partly because it's my options for the things that i do to avoid feeling miserable. Yeah it's yet. Another routine has been completely destroyed completely. Obliterated yeah yeah. That's a lovely the idea of the different self that we inhabit when we're experiencing our this really lovely idea. I'm gonna get to sit with that for. oh thank you i was also really moved by anthony's articulation of how much we bring to our work. Whatever that may be from all the other things we're experiencing in the world you know which are often heavy things like the burden of racial injustice or the forms of discrimination. That there really isn't an easy solution to and that make it harder for some people to focus on their work Having that acknowledged in the workplace come make a big difference. Do you have any tips for how people can work with those burdens in their kind of individual creative work. That's a really good question in theater. I would sort of raised with two schools of thought about how you deal with. Let's call it the extra textual heaviness of your life. The first is the leave it at the door school. Which is actually if you've ever done martial arts which i have as well you know. There's there's that in sort of infused we're in some ways. The door of the rehearsal room is a literal threshold and in crossing that threshold. You leave the self from the rest of your day on the other side right like when i took karate we you bow before entering the room and part and you've taken off your shoes already and there's a ritual thing where you sort of been purified of the outside world before entering and i actually think that's useful. I might send a little mystical. It certainly more mystical than i. Normally my day to day life but being like in this physical space only these parts of myself are allowed in here. Really or i will only focus on these parts of my life and this physical space can be really useful. But if you do that all the time. I mean you're just looking at being repressed and it's gonna drive you nuts and you'll probably start drinking too much and blah blah blah blah blah. And so the other part of it is the use it school right like. Oh i'm going through a difficult time. My character is going through a difficult time. What of these things can i use. And if you do that poorly it can be really unhealthy of course but i do think that having space where you're only a certain tranche of yourself allows you in other areas to be your whole self into have that whole experience. I think the other thing that's really important and you mentioned it earlier is to just actually name what's going on and not be afraid of it. one that happens to me a lot is i'm like god. Why is it so difficult to write. This thing. That i'm writing right now and then a literally say out loud because it'll be like eureka style epiphany. Oh it's because the thing i'm trying to do is hard right and just naming. That is like a huge relief. Because i feel like when we don't name these things we blame ourselves for them right because we're like. Oh it must be my inadequacy dealing with ex thing. The george floyd protests. We must be my inadequacy that. I can't shut that off and just concentrate on my work. I must be. Lazier batted focusing. But if you actually list all the things that are going on in the world that that might be kind of distracting. You're making it difficult to focus. You'll see it's a huge list and you're struggling with that because it's a hard thing and it's not because there's your week or whatever yeah no the world just well. It's hard sometimes harder for some people than others is true. All right well. I just loved hearing from anthony and i also love this creative approach to talking about creativity and creative processes So thanks for this episode listeners. We hope you enjoyed the show. If you have remembered to subscribe wherever you get your podcast then you'll never miss an episode. And yes i'm going to give you want more slate. Plus pitch sleepless members get benefits like zero ads on any sleep. Podcast bonus episodes of shows like slow. Burn and dear prudence but more important at least two us. You'll be supporting the work. We do here on working. It's only one dollar for the first month to learn more go to slake dot com slash working plus thanks to anthony berry for being our guest. This hour amazing producer continues to be the lovely and talented cameron drips. We'll be back next week with june's conversation with tv writer. Jed mercurio talking about his work on shows like blood lands and line of duty until then back to work.

anthony aids hallmark javits center brooklyn isaac butler isaac callan lord Lgbtq healthcare organization hartson new york anthony berry javid center javits center callan lord community health c callan lord women's health collective and Hiv epidemic isaac hiv new york city
What Healthcare Workers Can Teach Us About Creativity

Slate's Working

51:23 min | 4 months ago

What Healthcare Workers Can Teach Us About Creativity

"This episode is brought to you by progressive one of the country's leading providers auto insurance with progressive. Name your price tool you say what kind of coverage you're looking for and how much you want to pay and progressive will help you find options that fit within your budget. Use the name your price tool and start an online quote today. A progressive dot com price and coverage match limited by state law. Your words matter so much to the people you care about 'em writing those words. A hallmark card is a great way to share love and encouragement whether times are tough. And you need to send some support or they're going through an exciting life change. You can show you care with a hallmark card. Find cards for all the people. You care about at hallmark dot com slash working or wherever hallmark cards are sold. We talk about having to just get creative and come up with strategies. No one trained us on how to convert hotel into isolation clinic right like the kinds of things that have come up in the past year. I've had to lean on any creative juices that i had. I think everyone certainly in the healthcare field has welcome back to working. I'm your host june. Thomas and i'm your other host isaac butler isaac. I tell me who's voice. We heard at the top of the show. And then i have a question about your susceptibility to the seasons. But i who was that. I'm in suspense about this question. But just to keep our audience. Not in suspense much longer about the voice. That was the voice of anthony fourteen. Berry he's the chief nursing officer at callan lord. Lgbtq healthcare organization which will learn an awful lot about during this episode awesome. So i want very much to know about anthony and his work but i it is definitively spring here in brooklyn now. Are you one of those people whose creativity changes with the seasons is well. I'm not sure anymore. Actually because you know pre pandemic. I would have said. Yeah i get a little seasonally depressed. I need one of those lamps that you shine on your face a little bit. When the seasons get shorter when when that sadness creeps in it's hard to be as creative. And as good at what i do and i get angry at myself faster all but you know what i've mostly been inside in a small dark room for the last fourteen months and so it all kind of feels the same. The nice thing about the better weather is i can take longer and longer walks chile and i get to run into friends on. The street may get some sun. And i just feel more like a human again but i want to be honest sweater slash blazer. Weather is really. What's best for my body shape. So i prefer fall. Yeah yeah same. Same hartson so isaac. I am really curious why you want to speak with anthony for working. I isn't this show but writing books and recording albums most of the time. Yeah absolutely and you know. I love that. I love that we have a show. Were interviewing artists about the creative process but you know after a year of doing working i was just really interested in taking one episode and hearing from someone who has to creatively solve problems that aren't artistic in nature just to see what we discovered by talking to him about his work and it turns out. There's actually a lot of things that that he has in common with artists. I feel like antony let you me. Isaac is based in new york. Does your compensation contain any references. That non new yorkers might maybe you some help with. I'm not sure that there's specific ones exactly that. That people might struggle with. But i do think it is worth listeners. Knowing that new york city was the early epicenter of both the covid pandemic and crisis and callan. Lord played a very important role in providing service during both of those and in both of those times. the rest of the country their back on the city. I mean even some democrats voted against relief. Bills that would have kept new york from having the crippling budget crisis that we're now about to be in and so everyone has dealt with being slammed by the covid pandemic at this point in aids the aids crisis of course stretches all over the world and is still ongoing but it's worth saying that in in both cases the early city that was hit super duper hard was new york. Oh and of course. I should say that we talk about the javits center in this interview and for those of you have never been to the javid center. It's kind of this. It's convention center on the west side of manhattan that has like big cursed energy Hillary clinton's what she thought was going to be. her victory. party was at the javits center. But even if you haven't just lost donald trump. It's normally a very miserable place to be an and become one of the main vaccinations sites and that is kind of turned the energy of the space around. And it's actually almost pleasant to be in now now. I know you asked anthony some questions. That will only be heard by our slate plus listeners. Can you give us a sneak preview. yes on slate. Plus this week we talked about his cultural habits. And what anthony berry does. When he needs to feel creatively refreshed. Oh my god. I really need to hear that really. Everybody does but that kind of exclusive members only content is just one of the many benefits of slate plus membership others. Include zero hats on any sleep. Podcast bonus episodes of shows like slow-burn and dear prudence and you'll be supporting the work. We do here on working. It's only a dollar for the first month to sign up go to slate dot com slash working. Plus all right now. Let's hear isaacs conversation with anthony fruit and berry. It feels good to show up for the people you care about whether they're experiencing trying times or going through big life changes one of the best ways to show them. You care is by reaching out with a hallmark card. Your words matter so much every time you express support send words of encouragement or give. Thanks for those times. they help you out. You're showing someone you care and with a hallmark card. You can show you care from anywhere. Plus it's a message. They can go back to over and over anytime. They need a good feeling. Find the cards that help you. Put your words of caring and comfort out into the world and into the hands of the loved ones. Who need to hear them at hallmark dot com slash working or wherever hallmark cards are sold. Anthony and barry. Thank you so much for joining us today on working. Hi it's a pleasure to be here. So let's just start with the real basics. What do you do. what's your job. I am the chief nursing officer at callan lord community health center callan lord is a community health center new york city that primarily provides services that are targeted toward the lgbtq community and people living with hiv. Yes so even before covid right. It's providing healthcare to those particular communities. Can you tell us a little bit about its background because it arose in this really interesting period of time between stonewall and the issue pandemic is part of this kind of wave of service and political organizations. Right it's actually. I think a really wonderful story of how people in the community Healthcare providers in the community saw this unmet need for themselves and for their friends and loved ones. There wasn't really a place where lgbtq identified people could get healthcare services in a judgment free place by other queer people And so there are two totally volunteer organizations like providers. Physicians nurses just volunteering their time. In this almost fifty years ago we had to completely different groups of these volunteers. The women's health collective and saint marks clinic both providing lgbtq centric services that came together as the community health project and this really was at its time. One of the first hiv centric primary care clinics in the nation in really was built and expanded as a direct response to the issue happening in the city in the eighties In the late eighty s we moved into what is now our largest health center on eighteenth street in chelsea where we still are open to this day and we've expanded to a smaller clinic in the south bronx and a brand new health center in downtown brooklyn so before the covid pandemic. What was a typical day of work. Like for you. So in my role. I oversee our nursing case management care coordination quality programming and our pharmacy. And so you know. Generally my role is about expanding those services to meet the needs of the community. We have very fortunate in that we have a lot of grant funded programming so we work really closely with the city. The state Really trying to address the ongoing. Hiv epidemic in the state and also sharing our practices with other centers in places around the country. That are also doing this work and so we really believe in not reinventing the wheel ourselves sharing you know our lessons learned with other places that are similarly struggling. You know one of the major challenges of your job is the lgbtq population statistically high incidence of medical discrimination and reluctance to seek care as a result of it. It's almost one in five if i remember correctly. Lgbtq miracles of face some form of discrimination that leads to some reluctance about pursuing. Care that strikes me as among many things a creative challenge right. So how do you handle that in your work and making sure that people actually get the care. They need when they may be reluctant to ask for it. In the first place. I could not agree more. It is the focus of our role. The reason why we exist is to tackle problems specifically and you know. I think when you talk about primary care preventative. Care people even more reluctant. Right you'll go to the er if you really are in an emergency situation but if you're just talking about like going in for a checkup right you yourself at a position where you might be discriminated against or were you feel like someone isn't going to respect your identity And so what we have done. I think is tried to engage patients and people in the community to tell us what they feel. They would like to see in the health center. Because there is no one-size-fits-all model to this. And i think the more voices that you get in the room. So i think you can creatively solve any kind of challenge that comes up in healthcare is bringing all the stakeholders to the table in having a conversation and saying you know. What is it that you would like to see in the health center space. I also think strategically we've hired staff that are of the community so that the people that are making these decisions are also creating space that they are best friend would come and get healthcare up right. What are some of the ways that you have changed as a result of those conversations with the community. Well i think that we have certainly grown both in size because of feedback around access. You know i think. Specifically as a result of the affordable care act so many more services were now covered by health plans specifically medicaid that allowed people to as a sample access transgender healthcare services that had not previously been covered right. Although we've always been open regardless of you know if you have insurance or not this really enabled people to feel more empowered to say you know we need better access to gender affirming care and so that's why we look to open brooklyn that's why we've done. These kind of community needs assessments. Where he was very specific feedback on. This is what we need you to be. And this is how we need you to provide services and so i think the organization has grown largely based on that feedback and again. I think our staff are people that are part of the community. So we hear from the staff to and and. I think it's something that we we want to be right-sized we wanna grow to meet the needs of the community and until there's more widespread. Lgbtq sensitive access in every healthcare setting. I think we're going have to need to continue to do that. You know i have a feeling. There's some percentage of our listeners. At this point who are like. I thought this show interviewed novelists and stuff but one of the reasons why i really wanted to have you on is because you know. Creativity isn't bound by a particular job right and it strikes me that your day to day life is filled with with all sorts of creative challenges is that is that how you see or i totally. Yes well i feel like the last year of my life has been ito waking up to see like what random like out of left field problem are going to have to solve today. And would you talk about having to just get creative and come up with strategies that are totally outside of the box of our every day. No one trained us on how to convert hotel into isolation. Click right like the kinds of things that have come up in the past year. Have certainly i've had to lean on any creative juices that i had. I think everyone certainly in the healthcare field has so. Let's go step by step. Maybe through some of those creative challenges so you know if we could whisk back in time to late february early march when things are starting to. It's becoming clear how bad things are going to start getting and stuff like that. What are the challenges. You were facing in march. What what and how did you face them. How did you figure out what to do. It felt like a lot of the areas that were really important to get to ensure we maintained operational. We're like all my areas like triage at the front desk. We needed our end. That was going to make sure that no one in that had symptoms occupational health delayed for our staff that were becoming infected with covid All of the supply chain issues. We're running out of master out of everything that we needed to keep people safe Telehealth we did not have a robust telehealth program in so you think that's fine you can just you know. Get on to the new and even know its was than people using. You could do some kind of telehealth videoconferencing but not. Everybody had a laptop at home. Not all of our patients have smartphones. Not all our patients. Many of our patients have stable wifi and so it was just like a lot of moving pieces and at the same time. Many of our staff really wanted to volunteer at the hospitals. Or like you know. Primary care had essentially paused outside of like support. It's all urgent care and our staff wanted to go support. The hospitals and then is opportunity arose. Where the city came to us and said we have patients that are homeless and they have been diagnosed with kobe. But they're stable and we need to be isolated rather than going back to congregate housing at the shelter and because they want them to infect everyone else and so they essentially ended over this hotel in long island city and we had a twenty four hours to turn it into in isolation clinic. So how did you even begin to figure that out like what was the creative process of like. Oh my god. We have a hotel and we have to turn into an isolation clinic. Mike process in problem solving all of the things. That come up is always you know a prioritization. What is the most important thing to come out of this. When we're done you know pulling together like getting buy in from people on a to build a vision for what you'd like to see happen right how we're going to get there and then it's just like one decision at a time until you built that that larger picture and and i think that that strategy at least in you know coming up with creative way to solve each individual question is always something that at the again you look back a week later in the like underdog right. This is so fascinating. Because i've worked in the past as a theatre director and that is actually not that different from what theater right even like the thing trying to do is not save lives. It might be staged a play or whatever but there is that still still that thing you have a group of people you have to get them to buy into it and then you sort of break the show down into its component parts and the questions of those component parts and you just you try to go through them as quick as in sequence until the whole thing comes together so it's amazing that it's the same in in your line of work. I mean that totally makes sense to me and you know at the end of the day. It's never exactly how you thought it was going to be reduced started And there are people that love it and there there are million little decisions that you might have done slightly differently you. What were some of the things that i mean. Mistakes might be the wrong word but ideas that pan out or ways that you had to course correct or or whatever in the in the midst of that so we needed a place where we could store all our stuff and the only place they had was a gym and so we did up the little fitness center at a hotel that has like the olympic finish treadmill like our nursing staff and physicians or getting dressed to go into the isolation rooms literally standing on a treadmill but still like things like would. We have picked the gym again. Maybe not but it was like the best option that we had at the time You know even in the beginning there was a different guidelines from the cdc versus was coming out of the administration state and federal versus city. Deal h you know. Because i think you know no one really knew that much in those early days and so you kind of had to just use your best judgment and make a call for today and then as you learn more information tomorrow. You're gonna you know building that kind of i think preparing people that are used to working in very finite situations with very clear guidance in like tested and true evidence based practice to like we're gonna wing it day to day. The building that kind of culture had to happen overnight and that was also. I think really one of the bigger challenges you. How did you set that tone. How did you build that culture of like this is going to be messy part of it is. I think you have to be in there with everyone. You know. if you're going to say so today we all are going to wear these masks. You have to be there on site wearing those masks and doing exactly what. The guidance that you're giving is going to be. I think i never made a decision where i felt like i wouldn't feel comfortable doing that because there was also you know what to be safe to right and so i think the way in which you build that culture is. This is what we're doing today. And i'm doing it with you and this is what will all be together tomorrow and i think that also helped to build you know a sense of like. We're all in this together and we'll get through this together right. Because i think that was another big part of it is. There is no light at the end of the tunnel. Then yeah how do you. I mean you're working long hours. You know the work is chaotic. People are dying. It's an incredibly emotionally difficult thing to have to go through and you don't even have the comfort of knowing it's gonna end at some point right. How do you nurture yourself. How do you protect yourself or your team emotionally. So you can keep doing the work. Not completely burnout. Burnout is my biggest. It's the biggest battle of this for me. Right now Because you know of course there's all the covid stuff. There's the the racially motivated violence there. The you know. The protests of last summer and the death of george floyd and the trial. That's happening right now. And you know these are things that people are carrying with them when they walk in the door to work right and their loved ones are best friends are facing food insecurity our housing insecurity because they've lost their jobs in the animated after. Go back to work right so heavy and we've tried to so many different things in the beginning we did. We had this like zoom channel where. We have like meditation at noon monday. You know Yoga on friday afternoons and things for people to have you know kind of like non transactional experiences with their co workers. It's like the water cooler stuff that we can't do nowadays. It's so lost. And so i think it's really important to think of creative ways to have people engage to build trust and camaraderie and cohesion. Remote lee for a lot of people is a particular challenge. so he did zoom things. We are also trying to have fun. Committee a group of people that come up with fun workplace events that lead karaoke nights things like that. But i think it's a real long term issue. I think that for the most part. Lots of clinicians are still running on adrenaline. And you know it's going to run out for different people at different times. And i think it's our responsibility as administrators to address that individually. There's no perfect answer to addressing burnout. People respond to a different people need different kinds of support. And i think you've got to really get individualized in how you address it organizationally. We'll be back with more of isis conversation with anthony fourteen berry after this. I'm really very confident with technology but when it comes to design all my confidence disappears. I don't own any of those big complicated programs. And i don't really want to buy one but even as a writer podcast. There are times when. I want to make a really cool graphic for social media. When i'm launching any project or know when i wanna make a meme well know that i have come for pro mike. 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Just go to convert dot me slash working to get your free. Forty five day extended trial. That's c a n v dot. Me slash working canvas dot me slash working so hey listeners. A couple of things real quick. I if you are enjoying this podcast. And i sincerely hope you are. Please take a moment to subscribe to our feet. Wherever you get your podcast so you never miss an episode or even a second of working and if you happen to be listening on overcast please recommend the episode by hitting the star. Come also do you have questions about the creative process big or small whether you need to figure out. A big pivot work or want to know how to tackle an ambitious writing project. We would love to help. You can drop us a line at working at slate dot com or give us an old fashioned phone call at three or four nine three three work. That's three zero four nine three nine six seven five really really like phone calls okay. Let's rejoin isaacs conversation with anthony. Fourteen bury a lot not all but of your work. Previously and ongoing is with people with hiv aids. Did you feel like that prepared you in a particular way for the covid crisis and for the way you approach their things from that work that kind of carried over in specific ways. I think there are things from that work that have prepared me to think about how to roll out vaccine distribution inequitable way because think there's a lot of judgement for people are questioning whether the vaccines right for them. I think there's a lot of equity around access to vaccine People living with hiv and aids still continue to face stigma and discrimination and lack of adequate housing to the things they need. And we're seeing again. You talk about either. The vaccine passport and ways rich for like well. You're gonna have to show your papers to get into you know events and i think people have really legitimate valid medical mistrust to that we need to as a healthcare system address before we can. You know say well if you don't decide if you don't feel like the vaccine safe then you can't do the things that everyone else is going to be able to do. You know. I think a lot of work education. Yeah i mean that is one of the big challenges for this country for anywhere. That has a somewhat adequate supply of vaccine. Right is a vaccine resistance. People who don't want to take the vaccine. Can you talk a bit about your your experience. Because you're you're dealing with lots of people who mistrust the healthcare industry and may not want to deal with the vaccine. And i can think of some strategy is off the top of my head. You can require people to get it. You can Throw statistics at them and blah blah blah blah. But i don't know they would be that successful. So what have you found. Works in terms of getting people to agree to literally give it a shot. First of all. I would say that you even we account lord do not have enough vaccine for everyone that would want and so you know in the united states we russian healthcare and this you know covid has been no exception and we are certainly rationing vaccine in new york state access to the vaccine freak of it we utilize kind of predictive analytics and risk algorithm to determine who is most at risk for poor health outcomes based on their medical history. Its population health initiative. We've used the same initiative now with covid to really target people that we believe would have the worst health outcome from cove infection and have done proactive outreach to them to make sure that they are first in line and so we are really hoping to target our health education support like having someone recall them on the phone and answer their questions address any concerns so that they can decide if the vaccine is right for them and so i think this idea of trying to maintain vaccine equity is gonna be an even larger problem for us to solve and vaccine the same nursing staff that were working in the hotel. Last march are the same ones providing vaccines today and talk about burnt out like we have stretched everyone as them as as we can and so another strategy that we've tried to utilize to both increase capacity for vaccine distribution. But also you know. Try to provide some support to new grads is that we partnered with nursing schools so that people that have just graduated from nursing school. Who are technically able to give vaccines under the state. I mean they've been working in the hospital for the past couple of years. But having taken their boards they're able to vaccinate for covid just specifically and so we have this great group of amazing new grads that were utilizing to help with our vaccination process and teaching them how to have conversations with people about the vaccine to help address any concerns to make sure that they feel really comfortable. So i think it's twofold it's one building up this really large workforce that is able to provide vaccination and partnering with Based organizations to you know have town halls send a to a community center for people who are getting lunch every day and have them give a presentation due accu- in this is where people are already engaging because they trust the people that are there and they trust the people and the advice that are brought in to talk to them and so i think those are really important strategies that we need to lean on more. The javits center is great. A lot of people will sign up go to java thunder. People are refreshing their their screens while they're working from home and they're going to get those appointments but there are more people that are you know not able to do that. That are really be most at risk. You know like if you look at a restaurant today. People sitting at the tables eating dinner are gonna probably get that vaccine more easily than all of the people working in the restaurant and people were getting. The restaurant are who we want to get vaccinated. They're the ones that are not working from home right and so. I think that there needs to be more outreach. And i think that's one of the biggest challenges that we're going to have as we go through the summer one thing you've touched on a few times of our discussion. Today is of course healthcare inequity and one of the things that's been true of the the ongoing hiv aids crisis which is far from over and of the cova pandemic is that it highlights so starkly the inequities in our society in terms of who gets the disease who dies from the disease who doesn't get the care they need when they have the disease and the ways that can destroy their lives even if they do get those other things and even if they do survive you did not design american capitalism the american healthcare system. You have you had nothing to do with the inputs of this right but your whole job is addressing those those outputs right making sure that you don't perpetuate those inequities in your own work. I think that it is a particular challenge to hire and build a workforce that really gets that in. Can you know that wants to commit their career to mitigating that for for our community and not be in a constant state of anger and frustration. That the system is right. It's really no balance that you have to strike. I think of it. You know acknowledging our really inefficient and dangerous health care system and finding ways to work within it to like not make patients always bear the brunt of those frustrations you know we have this really mission driven team. We are like you know for community health centers. I think people are really drawn to work there because they are drawn to the mission and they are activists heart rate and so we are as much as a healthcare center as a social justice organization because everyone that works there you know. I think feels that we want to see. Change happen to how healthcare is provided in america. And so i think what we do. Is we try to push our legislators to make changes We really active in trying to promote policies that we believe better reflect. The needs of the patients were carrying for and our staff. Really involved in that I think as an outlet to vent frustrations but also they have a really powerful story to tell because they're the ones that are working within the system right like they know best what is really not working and what needs to change in order to make it work better. What are the lessons that we should take forward as we start returning to normal life. I'm putting that in heavy quotes. You know it's so easy to kind of just say well. That's over now. I wanna forget about that right. But what should we carry with us as we move forward for me. I think one of the biggest lessons learned is is feeling thinking outside of the box. So often i think we get in the habit of doing the things that we do. Because that's the way that we've always done them. And although so many of the changes that have occurred been disruptive and terrible a lot of really great. And i think you know some of the takeaways for me as we go back into you know something that looks a lot more like twenty nine thousand nine than twenty twenty Are trying to focus on those positive changes and not reverting back to status quo for the sake of reverting back. Because that's what was comfortable or more familiar. I think you know. I think if telehealth and the fact that everyone spit able aren't that many people shouldn't say everyone. Many people are able to access the healthcare that they need remotely therapy people are. I mean therapy is something that we had a huge need for pre covid that now exponentially there's more demand for and you know in manhattan rent is so expensive. It's hard to expand therapy programs to meet the needs of communities now so many more people. Actually i think are preferring to meet with their therapists remotely in the comfort of their home. And so that it's going to allow us to really be able to expand the number of therapists that we have that are able to provide these services for patients. There's like one example of something that i think you know. Really covert has forced us to think out of the box do things in really radical new ways that we're finding people really like that i hope will be able to continue into the future. Of course this goes back to the advocacy of the regulatory stuff that like we need our lawmakers to make that possible because we're still operating under emergency orders to be able to do that and so that's one thing i also think that you know we have to focus on. I guess this is kind of related. We have to really focus on our own self care. I think you know. Like i said before so many people are still running on adrenaline and they will come a time where we will need to find ways to ensure our staffer healthy mentally and physically emotionally visual amount of thank yous or you know gifts or anything. That will ever truly be enough. There's no you know all staff meeting that we can do where we will truly be able to share our gratitude right but we have to do something. Because i think it's important that we acknowledge what happened and i think again this kind of goes back to the ways in which we address burnout. Everyone needs a little something different to try to have some some closure. If that's even possible. Anthony foreign barry. Thank you so much for joining us to talk about your process here on working. Well thank you so much. It's been a pleasure It feels good to show up for the people you care about whether they are experiencing trying times are going through. Big light changes one of the best ways to show them. You care is by reaching out with a hallmark card. Your words matter so much every time you express supports and words of encouragement or give. Thanks for the times when they helped encourage you. You're showing someone that you care and with a hallmark card you can show you care from anywhere and it's a message. They can go back to over and over anytime. They need a good feeling. Find the cards that help you. Put your words of caring and comfort out into the world and into the hands of the loved ones. Who need to hear them at hallmark dot com slash working or wherever hallmark cards are sold support for this podcast comes from goldman sachs what goldman sachs experts and leading thinkers have to say about trends shaping markets industries and the global economy. Stay informed with the latest insights from goldman sachs on the economic and market implications of covid nineteen available on our podcast at yes dot com slash covid nineteen or any of your favorite podcast platforms. Is that was fantastic. At the very beginning. I thought i want to be on friend. And then like a minute later. I was like actually i also want to be as co worker. Like what an insightful guy with a really inspiring approach to problem solving in the workplace who obviously works at a wonderful organization perhaps most of all though he provided a great reminder that we're all constantly using our creativity even if we're not writing level. Yeah you know. I think i've probably said this before. But i feel like most of my creativity goes into things like parenting and figuring out what we're gonna eat for dinner and stuff like that you know. I think not being precious about the creative process actually really important. It's really important to your tick work. But it's also really important to seeing the non artistic parts of our lives. You know the way you might a painting that you're going to do or whatever anthony clearly does that. I think his work and community benefit greatly from it. Yeah no kidding. I loved his breakdown for how to engage your creativity to solve a problem at work. You know set priorities get buying take it one step at a time that works in pretty much every setting. I know i just thought. Hey that's directing when he laid that out right and i think particularly when it's collaborative work whether that collaboration happening in a hierarchy or flat organization or whatever you know that kind of step by step processes important and each one of those things is actually really important and really creative like you know. It's not just like oh you figure out what your budget is right. It's like well. Budgeting is actually a creative act. We don't like to think of it that way but it really is so so. Yeah no i was. I was quite struck by that. Sure and then sometimes like when you have to turn a very imperfect space into an isolation ward no big deal because that's what you've got and it has to happen you have to wing it and in those circumstances you have to be very open about that and you have to be there with the rest of the team doing it with them. Yeah absolutely. I think there's something really clarifying. Maybe is the right word. About what a producer friend of mine once called crisis mode and crisis mode. Is you have a hard deadline. You don't have the resources to do the thing you want to do. But you have to do it anyway and that could be making a book deadline. That could be constructing a set. That could be turning a hotel workout room into a staging area for your field hospital during the worst global pandemic at a century. But it is a really clarifying moment. And the even though you are improvising. That improvising is built on a foundation of all the preparatory work. That has gone into it. Which is everything from actual prep. You've done for that moment to like The rest of your life up to that moment your education your work experience but i also wanna say june. Do you want to know the origin or at least one of the origins of the term. Winging it i certainly do so this is not. I don't think it's a phrase with a definitive origin but one of the origin stories which i discovered while researching my book because it was in a someone's memoir is in the nineteenth century particularly in america. Outside of new york theater companies. Were what were called stock company. So what would happen is a star would tour to your city and then a company of local actors would be in whatever show that star needed because they saved on travel and housing costs for the rest of the company. Now might it's sort of like andrea bocelli tours to a town. He hires that towns orchestra right. And so it's like that. So on friday you would find out what role you were playing in. What play on monday. And it might not be one that you were ever in before. And so they would learn the play as best as they could as quickly as possible and then they would affects their lines to the wings of the set and they called it and winging the parts so you would run into the wings and just kind of consult your lines when you went speaking if you needed a quick refresher yet or you would sort of make a little cue card your own cue cards and just kind of angle your body. The right way so that you can see your lines. And that's called. Winging the parts one profession specific thing that antony brought up that really resonated for me was the question of burn note. I mean when you're in the middle of something huge that is absolutely in your professional wheel highs like this is your moment you've trained for this. You've developed strategies about this but it puts an enormous even a met strain on your profession. Like how do you cope with that. And keep going because you do have to keep going both during the crisis and afterward and i want to acknowledge that i'm not sure there's any kind of comparison that could appropriately be made to what the healthcare professions have gone through in the last year. But do you have any strategies avoiding burnout. I mean this is one of the great creative challenges that everyone navigates and I think everyone is a different way. They do it. Some people exercise is how they do it. You know or or you know making sure that they're taking breaks when they can things like that For me one of the wonderful things about art of all kinds is that it's really a gift to the person who's experiencing it at the most all you really owe. It is some attention but it's one of the few areas of our lives where we are being purely given to by the work that we're experiencing and it's also one of the few times in our lives now because of social media where we can like stop performing for other people for a minute and just be like that's space. That's created sustaining at a painting. Taking a walk and listening to an audio book watching a movie Reading a physical book. You know all of these. Things are part of my personal recharging process. The big challenge of the pandemic has been not being able to do any of those things. In exactly the same way you know but In two weeks i'll be fully vaccinated and i cannot tell you how excited i am just like go to a different museum every other day or something or you know just just really get out there and experience that again like i really hunger for it and i think i feel a bit of lingering burnout. That really hasn't gone away partly because of just the intensity of the pandemic in the anxiety around it but also partly because it's my options for the things that i do to avoid feeling miserable. Yeah see another routine has been completely destroyed completely obliterated. Yeah yeah that's a lovely the idea of the different self that we inhabit when we're experiencing our this really lovely idea. I'm gonna get to sit with that for. oh thank you i was also really moved by anthony's articulation of how much we bring to our work. Whatever that may be from all the other things we're experiencing in the world you know which are often heavy things like the burden of racial injustice or the forms of discrimination. That there really isn't an easy solution to and that make it harder for some people to focus on their work Having that acknowledged in the workplace can make a big difference. Do you have any tips for how people can work with those burdens in their kind of individual creative work. That's a really good question in theater. I would sort of raised with two schools of thought about how you deal with. Let's call it the extra textual heaviness of your life. The first is the leave it at the door school. Which is actually if you've ever done martial arts which i have as well you know. There's there's that in sort of infused we're in some ways. The door of the rehearsal room is a literal threshold and in crossing that threshold. You leave the self from the rest of your day on the other side right like when i took karate we you bowel before entering the room and part and you've taken off your shoes already. And there's a ritual thing where you sort of been purified of the outside world before entering. And i actually think that's useful. I might send a little mystical. It certainly more mystical than i. Normally my day to day life but being like in this physical space only these parts of myself are allowed in here. Really or i will only focus on these parts of my life and this physical space can be really useful. But if you do that all the time. I mean you're just looking at being repressed and it's gonna drive you nuts and you'll probably start drinking too much and blah blah blah blah blah. And so the other part of it is the use it school right like. Oh i'm going through a difficult time. My is going through a difficult time. What of these things can i use. And if you do that poorly it can be really unhealthy of course but i do think that having space where you're only a certain tranche of yourself allows you in other areas to be your whole self into have that whole experience. I think the other thing that's really important and you mentioned it earlier is to just actually name what's going on and not be afraid of it. one that happens to me a lot is i'm like god. Why is it so difficult to write. This thing. That i'm writing right now and then a literally say out loud because it'll be like eureka style epiphany. Oh it's because the thing i'm trying to do is hard right and just naming. That is like a huge relief. Because i feel like when we don't name these things we blame ourselves for them right because we're like. Oh it must be my inadequacy dealing with ex thing. The george floyd protests. We must be my inadequacy that. I can't shut that off and just concentrate on my work. I must be. Lazier batted focusing. But if you actually list all the things that are going on in the world that that might be kind of distracting. You're making it difficult to focus. You'll see it's a huge list and you're struggling with that because it's a hard thing and it's not because there's your week or whatever yeah no the world just well. It's hard sometimes harder for some people than others is true. All right well. I just loved hearing from anthony and i also love this creative approach to talking about creativity and creative processes So thanks for this episode listeners. We hope you enjoyed the show. If you have remembered to subscribe wherever you get your podcast then you'll never miss an episode. And yes i'm going to give you want more slate. Plus pitch sleepless members get benefits like zero ads on any sleep. Podcast bonus episodes of shows like slow. Burn and dear prudence but more important at least two us. You'll be supporting the work. We do here on working. It's only one dollar for the first month to learn more go to slake dot com slash working plus thanks to anthony berry for being our guest. This hour amazing producer continues to be the lovely and talented cameron drips. We'll be back next week with june's conversation with tv writer. Jed mercurio talking about his work on shows like blood lands and line of duty until then back to work.

anthony hallmark javits center aids brooklyn isaac butler isaac callan lord Lgbtq healthcare organization hartson new york anthony berry javid center javits center anthony fruit callan lord community health c callan lord women's health collective and Hiv epidemic isaac hiv
Ross and Carrie and Beth Explore Judeo-Fitness: Low BMI Edition

Oh No Ross and Carrie

45:30 min | 2 years ago

Ross and Carrie and Beth Explore Judeo-Fitness: Low BMI Edition

"Uh-huh. Welcome to carry the shore. We don't just report on fringe science spirituality and claims of the paranormal than in. We take part ourselves up when they make the claims we show up. So you don't have to I'm Ross Blocher Carrie, poppy. And today, we come to you live from a gym the gymnasium with our new friend and. Dare I say at least a no I feel very weird saying that because it's it's not our usual thing. Right. So as you all know, we we go into these things with an open mind. And we've always said if you can convince us we will buy in right absolutely to be open minded and honest to that. I confess I did not expect that to happen here. But it did. And so we have brought in Beth appel. Hello beth? Hello. Thank you for happy man being here. And thank you for letting us record here in the gymnasium. Yeah. I it is a Jim it looks like a traditional gym. But I wouldn't call gymnasium, and I might call it a. Oh, I apologize for that. Well, reporting live from the Yang. Yeah. We're still kind of like learning the terminology. So we've I met you a couple of months ago. Did you even know we were reporters that we were like undercover? No, no, I I don't try to guess what people aren't meet them. I just sort of look at their bodies. And I think how how I might be able to help it felt like you knew a lot about us. So we kind of suspected maybe you'd look this up. But it was it was all just that intuition. It was based on your body's felt could feel sort of a sedentary. Not maybe not a very active. I could tell that you weren't. You didn't maybe do manual labor. That's fair. We're both working true these baby soft hands more intellectual professions than physical ones. I haven't been running much lately. You don't know you pay us. Exactly. So I guess we're kind of dancing around the topic a little bit. So we came in to investigate. What you do? Why don't you tell us? What you do? Yeah. So I'm part of a group called Judeo, fitness. We have locations in many places, but our primary location is in Israel and at Judeo fitness, we use the tenets of Judaism to as sort of a path to a healthy lifestyle. And and as a path to shumur AM, which is heaven bright. Yes. And I mean when I first heard that again, I try to be open minded to these. Things. But I'll admit like, I don't go into this with a belief in God or an afterlife or enlightenment. So I'm here. Yeah. And traditionally in Judaism heaven is doesn't factor particularly heavily no afterlife or pumice of the afterlife and the Old Testament. Correct. Yes. And so this is not Judaism. It's Judeo fitness where sham aim is cheap. -able? If you follow the path that we've sort of laid out in our in our group, spend tastic, maybe you can tell people more about that. In kind of how you develop those tenants in that path. Sure. Well, eat on the tenants were sort of right out there for the taking Sabbath. Kosher to me, those are the two major tenets of Judaism, observing the Sabbath and eating kosher. And I had also become very involved in physical, fitness. And I realized that when I applied observing the Sabbath and placing restrictions on. On nutrition that I was able to change how I felt and how I. How looked at other people. I was able to sort of intuitively like I said with you look at other people and know what they did based on their bodies. Yeah. So there wasn't an initial intent to find spiritual depth. But it just sort of came naturally as part of the practice. Yeah. Absolutely. As soon as I cut shellfish out. It came a came to me that's interesting because I noticed after the first month. Well, I wasn't eating shellfish before. Same. But I did start eating kosher. I hadn't before bro vegan diet. But and finding kosher begin things are is a little easier than finding kosher meat and dairy things. But I still had to sort of be more mindful of those those tenants, and I gotta say it's been like two months, and I've lost what forty five pounds, and you look great. Thank you. And that's not that's not the important part in great. It's just sort of a bonus. Yeah. The important part is being able to sort of see beyond yourself. You say, you know, the outside only reflects what is on the inside. Exactly. Yeah. We say that at the beginning of every session and one time in the middle and then one time at the end as well. And then and then I've taken to saying it as I wake up, although okay, I wouldn't recommend using it outside of the game. Oh, really? Okay. Okay. I guess you could have is that why you wanted to record inside. Yes. I don't like. To say use our practices outside. Yeah. Okay. Okay. With this going out to like possibly like half a million people over the course of the next couple years. Absolutely. Okay. Yeah. Good. Okay. I never really thought about that. But we never really go outside when we're here. No. Will you haven't you haven't come on on the Sabbath yen because we do observe the Sabbath, but we tend to do those exercises outdoors because there is no free weights allowed no weight machines, of course, no treadmills because ridiculous working on. Yes. So we'll either yawn the Sabbath will either doing courage both of you to try. Komo didn't even know you were just assumed don't come in on this. If you can't work, you get workout shirt yet. No, we're open. We're open in the longer. You've been with us the more. You'll just know things like that going to be told. We'll either do have people. Around an empty room or we'll have them run outside of. That's interesting. So I mean in that seems. I don't know like sort of you're not you're not taking on these extra tools and things it seems like in a way you might find that to be a more spiritual natural kind of practice the the running outside, and like I mean, maybe involving prayer and mantra. Yup. Absolute than you couldn't say the word not while you're running outside, but you could certainly use them when you're running around an empty room. Okay. Side just thinking back to the fact that I was saying the mantras I woke up is there anything I should be doing to kind of to help step back on that transgression that I could do to improve my own status. I think that may just mean that have done have identity reparable armone does he need to tone while he tones? Oh, can I use that? Yeah. I like that a lot tone while you atone. I don't know what exactly what apply to. But I I do like just a general sound idea. Because I could do a few laps around here. While you talk that might help. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Okay. Okay. Ross is getting up and running around. So this might be a time to mention so Ross is Jewish by descent believe you are Jewish by descent f-, I'm not I as far as I know I did twenty three and me, and it didn't tell me I had any of those jeans. All right. I don't know. Maybe this is an awkward question. But like do you seek out people who have that heritage? Or is it intentionally into you're kind of giving me a look. Oh, no, no look in Kennett. No look intended. I don't seek anyone out based on religion. I apparently, I guess I can't state this enough. I'm really just looking at people's bodies. Yeah. When I'm seeking them out. I'm really just taking in their bodies. Assuming you know, sort of trying to internally calculate their B M is thinking how can I help? Okay, because I lost forty five pounds. Yes. So I'm now like a clean eighty five ninety. Yeah. So when you first saw me. What if you don't mind sharing? What were your thoughts? When I saw you back. No, actually, I feel better. Okay. So I'm glad we did that I'm happy to do more later to if I need to I'm a little bit worried about your heart rate. Okay. I would I would recommend some rest took some rest and reflect. Think she means falling asleep. But maybe okay, if you were moved to fall asleep. That's fine. Okay. One other you know, we sort of we like to poke fun it yoga practices in Judeo, fitness. And one of the one of the things we say is Donna is just an excuse to nap. So. You know alone. Shiva who I like that? Can I use that? Totally. Wow. Fits in. But I'll find a place eight. Yeah. Warrant said no we've seen you reject many applicants here. Why is it that you allowed us to take part in this program? I just knew that you needed it. Oh, yes. Sorry. You were about to say what you thought of our body. What I thought of your body's? Well, like, I said before I thought these are sedentary people people do not work with their bodies. They do not work with their hands. They sit sit a lot and day. And they. They they think about themselves, and they have you know, I thought they might be a little bit self conscious. They might be focusing in on things. They don't like about themselves versus being able to focus outwardly and judging other people I feel like that uniquely does apply to me, and you. Yeah. Me too. Yeah. I mean, people often say like that I go out of my way, not to judge others, and that's very nice. But then at the same time, it's like all of that judgment. Is turned inward instead. Yes. And I could tell because someone walked by you when I saw you. I was I was I was doing supplement samples at that grocery store, which we may be able to sell to our audience. Yes. So what's the deal with that? Because I know that like someone has to there's like a levels system. So I I would need to buy from Ross who needs by from you. And then it kind of goes up the chain. Do we need to have will be able to like sell those are selves you can start selling them at any time. You just need to buy them. You have a starter kit. Right. I have a starter kit that you can purchase at any time. It's two hundred dollars for the starter kit. US? Yes, I would accept other currencies as long as the exchange made it more than two hundred. Should I make sense? Yeah. That makes sense. Yeah. I wouldn't take two hundred Canadian because that wouldn't be a good deal for me rights moment. Far more money than that. When we sell it to our friends and our family, and I don't have you been telling your friends and your family about I have is that. Okay. I mean, I've like, oh shoot. I was talking about it outside of my wife. My wife was asking why kept saying that thing when I woke up about the inside reflecting reflecting on the outside. So I so. So yeah, I just kind of explain what we'd been doing here. Yeah. Yes. And we do need to tell other people. Of course, that's fair. We just don't wanna share our specific, practices and mantras outside. Oh, okay. I should have thought of that makes sense. Yeah. But when I did see you as I was selling my supplements. I noticed a very strange looking person walked by both of you. And do you remember that I'm trying every time Callan when we first ran into Callan possibly, I don't know the person. Oh, well, okay. Callan the guy, you know, he comes like almost every day. No. I this is exactly what I found. Notable. You didn't even notice that strange looking person. And that's how I knew that you were not looking outward. Oh, I got you. We're looking in words, and I always think of us as being very observant people. So it's amazing completely missed this person. This person was quite strange looking what did they? Look like, what did I miss? Well, let's see they they were extremely tan, which is fine. Bright, still kellyn so far. Okay. Who's kellyn Kallen? He comes like everyday. Oh to to hear he was here. But this was a person I just was a random percents out the grocery store when I met you. I guess it was so focused on the table in your products. Yeah. I don't remember this. But I am proud that. You have been learning people's name was because tan what else was very very tan just super. Okay. So tan that was one notable thing and then sort of just like Wanda tan. That's can use that very good that one's going to be harder to fit in. But she said can I use? Yeah. A lot of people to it. Yeah. I've never heard that. And this is this is one of the things I really like about coming. Here is a lot of like Gruson leader types, that won't necessarily have a sense of humor about what they're sharing with the world. And any I feel like here, you can you can make us what she said total. Do I? Yeah. I've definitely never heard. That's what she said before. But I'm gonna kidding about that later, that's wild. Now. Do you watch much TV? No, no gun the impression that you've kind of discouraged us from watching so many movies and television. Yeah. Because it takes you out of the real world here in your watching this fictional thing. One thing I would recommend is you can watch any sort of reality TV because that's a reflection of the real world. So as you're watching that and sort of judge. Being the people on that looking at their bodies taking in their body. Their bodies could change trying to imagine what their BMI are at cetera. That's fine. I've been I watched the bachelor this season. Oh, yeah. Grad. It's very easy to judge those people a lot of people with you know, maybe twenty three BMI I would say eighty lower Twenty-three BMI. Maybe I'm still I'm still learning to. Yeah. You had a little duck. All there that was really off the Mark. I mean, you're a real card Twenty-three BMI. Now, I've heard everything. Okay. Wow. Okay. I guess we have a long way to go. You do you just starting? Yeah. So it's not true. That's true. Yeah. So we started right around the beginning of the year. Yeah. Twenty nineteen. It's the end of March. Now, I don't know this really becoming out near the beginning of April. Yeah. See your average in a fifteen pound per month laws, which is very good it. Yeah. So again, I feel like people are probably listening to this in. They're like why Rawson carry like a little more skeptical of this? Because I mean, usually, we are, but but it turns out that actually quite healthy. There's a lot of research and a lot of scripture that supports like very drastic very rapid weight loss. And even if I mean, we both started out like as you say. Needing to get healthier. But we were still like an average sized people. But still you can. Yeah, you can shed again, that's not the point. But you can shut quite a bit of weight very fast. And it's quite healthy. We've tried things before for a podcast like juice cleanses, and you're the master cleanse and steam bath type things I on a Thermes was one we tried. And none of those really gave the kind of quick results were seeing here with you share. Yeah. And I feel good maybe a little hungry, but otherwise, I feel really good the hunger. I know we're supposed to reframe the hunger, and like hunger becomes instead of your enemy becomes your friend. But like. Yeah. How long do you think it takes until that really like setting? So I'll be honest. I still hunger is still Miami. Oh, it is. Yeah. Is it? Okay. If we shared the hunger mantra with the listeners. Yes, that's fine. Yeah. You can do that anger is not your enemy. It's your friend. And you say that I would say that you say it before you eat. But you don't you say it before you don't eat, right. Yes. If that's appropriate and yams like most of the time it is. So at the time where you would sit down for a meal, but you're not yet because you're following our version of being kosher you say that. Yeah. And that's really interesting. So I followed a vegan diet for a long time and joke that I would always tell because you hear about these people who they they were vegan. And then they got really sick and turned out. They just ate like a million bananas and say, well, yes, ISIS, also fecund. But if you just eat vice you're not gonna be okay, and it, but. But similarly, it turns out like a kosher diet can actually be like, I'm not eating. Yes. Absolutely. Because if if the options are eat dairy and meat together or not eat, right. We're going to say don't eat new boats consistent with Khashru. Yes. And if the options are eat from. I only have my meat dishes. But I need to eat this dairy. Well, what are you gonna do donate? Either. Don't eat by the one don't eat. Yeah. I mean, I guess you could eat like the meat for one meal in that area for a different meal. No you have the right plates. Oh, yeah. Okay. Now, another thing you're missing out on not coming on the Sabbath is that that is when we do eat complex carbs. Oh because you're going to start copy this. Yeah. It's very kala based you eat the holla own rate. Yeah. Oh, I can't. I can't wait bread. I am pretty hungry these days. Yeah. I know do and I and I keep telling myself trying to do the reframing though. Like, it's it's your you're feeling that hungers your enemy still e. Yeah, I mean like. I guess it get intellectually I get it. But in the moment, it's like this is something to vanquish. This is this is telling me to act and make it go away. I actually don't mind that because as long as you do have an opponent, and you are judging hunger, that's actually fine. So that's interesting. Yeah. So maybe picture hunger. Maybe maybe hunger is the most tan man in the world walking by you in a grocery store. A guy could resemble kellyn could not if you think Kellen also wanna get into what you think about how Callan locks. As I said strange looking you jumped right to Callan. Okay. I know that like we're not supposed to well. I know we are supposed to judge. Yes, everyone. But it's still kind of uncomfortable for me. I'm trying to I'm trying to get there. I think it's maybe that he's so tan and yet his hair is so kind of bleach. Yeah. But we'd prefer if he didn't listen to this. Maybe. Yeah. Veneers. And yeah, it's interesting all those things make him very attractive to me. Really? Okay. Yes. Now, are you allowed? If you wanted to date one of the detainees were Jubilo to what I be allowed to. I don't see why not it's not something that I'm particularly focused on. But I'm certainly not ruling it out. And it would come naturally as I am thinking a lot about everyone's appearance and bodies. Yeah. Yeah. Is it is it inappropriate for me to ask? Have you dated anyone from the gymnasia? I have. Yeah. You have I've dated a few of the people are they all are they still here? They've left. Okay. Yeah. They have since left. We haven't known them. No. It's hard for me. Because once I once, I take the next step with someone, and I really truly see their full body inside and out in some cases, I really have nothing left to give. Tell me about the inside part. Well, sometimes you catch a glimpse. You've never. I mean, I guess I see in like Russ's mouth when he talks that the kind of share. What are does just one hole on the body? Yeah. Yeah. I'm. I don't need to know if this person, I know what holes around the body. But I'm now, I'm just picturing you sort of like peering into your partners. But no rectums. Yeah. Sorry. I just never heard it called a rectum before. Where did you grow up? Oh, colorado. Oh. I guess they don't have. That's what she said the rectum. But you're generally you're looking through an orifice rather than using a penetrating vision that looks through the layers of a body. Oh, yeah. I'm speaking literally. Yeah. Pure side. Yeah. Oh, interesting rectum. Yeah. That's like the clinical term for inside of the. We're pointing at what we're referring to. What would you normally? I called it a butthole. Yeah. We've heard that. Yeah. Totally have you heard a Amos Amos? Yeah. I think I have heard okay, just rectum caught me off guard. Okay. If I could just pause right here. I did want to mention another love of ours, which is third love their love for bras that come in a broad range of sizes and are designed to fit perfectly and you can order them online and try them on at home, especially if you're losing a lot of weight very quickly. You might want a new bra. Yeah. For sure my band. Has gone down. What four inches amazing? I know. Anyway, third loves fit finder quiz helps you identify your breasts size and your shape, and then find styles that fit your body you can wear wash it and put it to the test for sixty days. And if you don't love it return, it third love will wash it and donate it to a woman in need and the newest member of the third love family is their line of incredibly, soft, smooth and breathe. The cotton bras. I'm excited about those. Also, whatever you think of everything else, we've told you today just know that third love is a great deal. And they know there's a perfect bra for everyone. So right now, they're offering our listeners fifteen percent off of their first orders soda third. Love dot com slash Ono right now to find your perfect fitting bra and get fifteen percent off your first purchase. That's third. Love dot com slash Ono. For fifteen percent off today. So. Yeah. For the person who is hearing about this for the first time, and maybe they're like, lots of listeners to our show may they're like a bit surprised that Ross are like really into this like, what would you say to the average really science minded person who was a little skeptical about signing up. I guess I would I could see why someone would be skeptical. Definitely. That's that doesn't come as a surprise to me. But when there is such a visual result. I think you can't really deny there isn't anyone will rest you want to share your body journey young. Because we haven't mentioned really are most positive results here. We haven't seen anywhere else. Well, and also are are issues you with migraines with eggs, Emma, mine cleared up very quickly. My wild too. Because when he runs usually almost. Yeah. Yeah. Phone your dietary practices and taking the pills that you've given us has cleared it right up for me. And and usually not eating food that would give you grain. Oh, yeah. Day to and you haven't had one C. So. Yeah. For us. That was I mean hugely convincing. We always say we will be convinced if we see these real world effects. Yeah. I think that that is really one of the main things is the real real world effects can see, and I should also mention just not having sex that seems to be another kind of factor in all of this sharp. I mean, my wife's not too thrilled about that. No. We were just having that discussion about you having have relations with some of the previous. People here at the at the center is there a certain point at which will be able to resume those relationships. Well, I would say I I don't have great news for you and your wife. However, if anyone here caught your fancy, I would definitely recommend pursuing that. Okay. Yeah. Oh, so I mean Ross has been married for eighteen years. Well, she has she first of all what is what is your wife's body? Look like. She has a full lovely body. She's. About my size a little shorter. Okay. Somewhere BMI. Yeah. Okay. Burnett not a normal amount of tan normal amount of Cajun could benefit from coming. I think so and I've been telling her about you, and she I'll be on. She seems a bit resistant come here. I could bring her maybe if I mentioned the complex carbohydrates on the Sabbath. She might be willing to I wouldn't recommend someone start on the Sabbath. Okay. You're going to want to work up to. But if that's what we need to do to get your wife in the door, then and be able for you to pursue a sexual relationship with her once again, then I suppose, I could make an exception. Oh, thank you. I really I really appreciate we do have a lot of people that you know, on this. This is the downside a lot of people show up. I call them Sabbath only sees where they're not around a lot. But they do come our own pretty say s. Does. And I I didn't know what that was. Yeah. When she's. Only if I say, you don't wanna be a Sabbath only. Oh. Like christian. Yes. Exactly all of you listeners. Now are way ahead of us already. We hadn't picked that up. Yeah. Wow. The Sunday Christians. They only they only go to church on Sundays because that's when the food is there. I know they go to church on Sundays or like also is the call them eastern, Christmas Christians, and they're people who like that's that's the moment when they check in with God or their beliefs. But the the if we in this is not Notting. It's not related. Oh, yeah. The high holy day Jews shirt show up for Russia. Sean Chartres they want to have their atonement and eat it too. We should mention the seventh. Get. Except for the Seventh Day Adventists. We should mention for them. The Sabbath is Saturday. Yeah. Is there any connection between this in this day? Advent absolutely not. Okay. No. There is not okay. All right. They. They do they like to eat on the. There's no there's no connection. I don't wanna talk about that. There's no connection. No problem is was there any sort of like revelation process that got you to this belief and belief system and physical system, you know, so much. Well, I got very into grew up with Jewish background. So I picked some things up along the way, and then I got very into physical fitness, and I started to sort of. Sort of think about those combined thinking about we know what day God may have created physical fitness, and how how spirituality fit in with my fitness journey, and my high intensity interval training and so forth. And I realized that when I applied tenets of Judaism to my interval training. I was able to shed weight and body fat at a much higher rate. Right. Yes. Okay. Inappropriate. What your BMI is? My BMI is it certainly below twenty three. Yeah. I was of his gravely Arrigo said, well, you know, I focus a little bit more on myself on my body fat, which is as low as a woman's body fat can be while still hitting her essential body fat, which is ten percent while get impressive. Yes. Like almost Olympic athlete beyond like, if you seen pictures of what you might. Well, I'm curious. What do you think when you look at the picture of a bodybuilder, then extremely muscular bodybuilder? I, you know, I'll admit if you'd asked this question three months ago, I would have been like, it's it's a little much. You know, like, I appreciate a person who works out. I shaped like a nice physique. But you know, that a bodybuilder can look a little a little swollen. You know? Sure. But now, see totally different. I see that. And I see devotion. And I see an sense. I I it's crazy on the show. But in a sense I see God. Oh, my wow. Is that right? Does that seem does that land for us? Yup. Make sense when you say that that makes me very happy to hear because that wasn't a body type of really earned for before. But now, that's I mean, that's what I want to attain and as you've explained. Like that was the body type. Moses had yes. Yeah. There's there's not a lot that we know about Moses body type, but we do know that he he got down to the range of essential body fat. Right. A male passage. You mentioned where he came down from the mountain and his face shown with raise in that was kind of just underscoring what you're talking about rationing, right? And how shines with all that energy and pureness. Yes. Especially once you hit a personal record on any sort of lift. Yes. Yeah. How much should I be lifting when I'm praying? How much should you be lifting when you're praying? Well, I think it's sort of. I mean like looking at my team at your body, which I always am. It depends. I on the prayer, of course, and it depends on the move. So if it's a squat if it's a barbell squat of the barbell on your back. You may want to lift is around eighty five pounds while not praying. But I think while you're praying you could amp that up to closer to one thirty five. Yeah. This is this is the crazy thing about this system is like it's like when a mother child gets trapped under a car, and suddenly she can lift it. And for me, that's prayer now. Yeah. Because you're taking your mind off yourself. You're not thinking, what am I keep -able of can? I do this is going to hurt my body. That is what I'm thinking. But like, I'm oh, yeah. You're thinking is this going to hurt my body? Yeah. I think like. Capable of this is gonna hurt my body. No. Oh, good. Okay conclusions. I got calling response kind of Sherman. Yeah. Initially worried about that too. And did it didn't hurt my body. So I have more trust in that now. But you gave us another mantra for that whenever we doubt, you know, when doubt is about lifted out, and and I'm glad that you've been able to use that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Well, Ross I can already hear like our listeners thoughts as they're listening to this. Wow. This is so out of character. Energies like can't over emphasize. This is in character. Right. Yeah. Because like you said before we have always held out that we will be receptive to things that have good evidence for them. And that are well supported and you've made everything so clear for us. I really appreciate that. It's I I don't want to toot my own horn. But you really can't argue with the results. So I don't think this changes anything. We'll do the podcast like we always have to delay. Yeah. Out of my wrecked. I'm so glad we could give you that word. Take and I'm gonna carry that with me. So she said. Yeah. Oh, very good. Very good. So I guess by the time this episode drops, we will probably be selling our own supplements at that point. So I've noticed like yours or called Beth plummets. So LARs be Rusk crimines and Khairy mari- New Year's will also be Beth plummets. Oh, okay. Everyone sells those okay? She's already printed all the labels, and yeah, here's here's how I sort of years. How I would explain it. If someone says, oh, Beth plummets is your name Beth, obviously, you'll say no rice carry my name is Ross. But let me tell you about Beth. Well, and also, do you know what Beth means in Hebrew, the word Bethel? Of course. Sure. The town where the first Woodstock was held. In New York. But also, I don't I don't know what the means house. Israel seymour's. Yeah. Yeah. Makes sense. I feel very cool if things so you can say, well, you know, my name is Beth, but Beth means house, and nor as big as a house, you need these supplements, and you can come down to this. You know, this group that I'm with and and I was going to say, you know, you can tell people that they're not being judged. I mean, they are being judged, but it's such a it's such a constructive helpful way, sometimes judgment is negative. I'm when his love. Yes. And they're being judged. So that they may judge others. They're just being seen for the first time. Really, sure and judged. Yes. Yeah. Our skills, aren't obviously our skills, aren't like yours. So we want to bring people in here. So you can really see them. Exactly. Yeah. And when he as you Villalonga, you're around the more that you can really see others as well. Yeah. Well, first of all is this your first podcast interview. It is really. Hundred no one's ever wanted to. Yes. Speak to me at this this length before that's nice. Well, I was going to ask you, you know, what are some things that people never ask that you wish they would oh one of my go-to questions as an interviewer. But it sounds like all of these questions are things you wish. People would ask you. That's yeah. That's a great interviewer question. I'm gonna I'm gonna take that with me. Are you doing a lot of interview? Well, you know, this is inspired meal. Probably start a podcast. I would love that guy. My cast the Beth cast, maybe just humbly submitting that. Yeah. I don't understand. I think like Beth plummets in. It'd be like your home for for your podcast. Okay. I like it. I like it. Can I use that you can use it? Yeah. I might call it that. That's a good question. Yes. All of the questions, you've asked me are things that I've been wanting to be asked when you have when you get down to your essential body fat. Really all you want is for people to ask. What percent body fat you feel that? Oh, I'm sure you've been getting many. Oh my gosh. You wanna ask me so much and like I like comes across his worry. You know? Sure, they saw they saw my old me. Yeah. And that will happen. Yeah. But now it's like now I now I get what it is. You know, they are judging themselves in for not having what I have exactly. So they'll say to you, are you. Okay. What's wrong with her? Right. Like, I'm more than. Okay. I am the most. Okay, I've ever been what they're really thinking. When they say, are you? Okay. I'm not okay. Yeah. Or am I o or when there's Ross you looked too thin? They're thinking I want to be thin. I wish I were. I love I love to quote unquote to thin. Good point. That's no such thing. Yeah. They're thinking. I I am not too thin. We'll so where can people find out more about you and the gymnasium? And I mean, we come to the Los Angeles. But it seems like branching out of it. Sure. Yeah. Well, I would definitely encourage anyone to spend some time at the gym in Jerusalem because that really is sort of the center of it all I am in Los Angeles for an extended period of time right now just due to an expired passport. However as soon as I do get that new passport in the mail or get my materials in the mail mailed to get my renewed passport and waiting for the passport to come. I will head back to Jerusalem and by buying Bethlemen. It's people can help you to build and extend your presence in Israel. Absolutely. And I can then also. Raise up the fee that it will take to just get my new passport as well. So once I get that I'll be back in Jerusalem, and you can actually come out there for an extended stay I'm so excited. And also, we should mention, you know, if they buy the supplements directly from you that benefits you also if they buy the supplements record from us or anyone else at benefit you because you have this really interesting structure like sort of a triangle structure where you're at the top. And then everybody underneath you gets a cut of whatever they sell. But yet he's goes up, the triangle if you own top at every sale, and and the people at the bottom are there's more of them, right? As it requires. You're not as strong, and it requires more of you to up the people above you. Oh by the Mitchell. Yeah. By the time you get to me at the top. I require no help holding up the heavens above and we want to lift you up. And we do appreciate that. Yeah. Yeah. And I really hope like we have earned. The listeners respect that. Like, we don't say these things lightly because that's one of the first questions. We're always asked by people is what have you encountered that really surprised you in the turned out to be true. Well, now, we can say we really did find the truth. And it's made a difference in our lives early. So cool, and I would love to direct people to a website. Yes. I don't have a website. But I am on yelp. Okay. Yes. You can look up by their Judeo fitness on yelp. And that there is yell page for it. And then Beth placentas. Well, okay. And on Twitter, I think yes. Under both of those names. But then with an underscore and three after it. Okay. Ok- that is LA number or I think it's three as a holy holy number. Yacht represents Shamim and shale enersen Hal. Yes. Exactly. Well, and of a scary screened name. Oh, is it just because of the hell park as a part? Yeah. Oh, okay. I mean, he's a the abyss. And no, it seemed well if you find out I'm feeling. And we don't want that. Right. So think about something about someone else. Okay. Okay. Callans teeth. Okay. Yet. That's easy to judge. What is he doing you guys? We'll play what every day they are bigger. Well, I think that's really healthy. Because as you always say when you when you feel that Niger time too. Yeah. I had no idea that you were hanging on every word Szemberg things. Sometimes I don't remember thing because they rhyme. I think often you rhyme. It's always an accident. Really fine. All the time. Yeah. Very good. Yeah. No. It's always an accident. When I do it really never once rhymed on purpose. Yeah. What really sticks with me? That's great. Well, if you don't mind Beth, I'm just going to interrupt for a moment to mention to our listeners that you can do a lot with squarespace. Yeah. For people who don't have websites. Here's how you get it done. Exactly. So you might wanna think about using this with squarespace, you can turn your cool idea. And you've got a very cool one into a new website, promote your physical or online business, and this is a physical business. My right. Right, and you can announce an upcoming event or a special project really anything you would want to do with website. And of course base gives you beautiful, customizable, templates that are created by world class designers. They have powerful ecommerce functionality. Let's he sell anything online supplements. Venomous tabby exactly and everything's optimized for mobile right out of the box. And it also has those analytics that help you grow in real time. No who's coming to your site and whether doing so you can judge them not in a creepy way. Right. Yes. In a way that helps them and they have Bilton search engine optimization. So go to squarespace dot com for a free trial. When you're ready to launch us the offer code Ono, h in oh to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that squarespace dot com and enter code. Oh, no. Well, thank you, so much you or being on the show and opening up about like, I could tell like some of these things weren't really sure how much share. But I think what you're doing is. Service. And I think that our listeners and dairies like society can really benefit from the surreal are honored to get to share this with everybody. Yeah. I agree. Yes, I'm pleased to be here. I agree that it is your honor to share this with everybody. Was there anything else anything that we missed that we should cover? I do feel like it's really been all laid out there on the line. I appreciate all the questions. I've learned a lot that I haven't even learned in our sessions many days together. Oh, yeah. SO? It's always it's always a mining every time we talk. Thank you so much. Thank you for having. It should take around. Yes. Why don't you pick up some weights? I again, hold those while you run. Okay. Great. Thank you. Everybody for listening. Show, right. Our theme music is by Brian. Keith Dalton our administrative managers. Ian, kramer. And he is also now joined yes. Oh, yes. That's right. And it's a little baby. Yeah. I didn't even know that you had the kinder- program until that that's all of their base. We'll take babies next time. And you can follow us at Facebook dot com for slash on Rak or on our Twitter at Ono podcast, and you can support this in investigations, but going to maximum dot org forward slash donate. Remember hunger is not going to be my friend. Everybody Jaiqi fan Stratton host. Go fact yourself a live game show here in the maximum fund network. Make sure to listen to our next episode of factor self with guest, curt Brown, aller-, I did a show in flagstaff Arizona, where the venue just didn't list that the show existed. Amazing. And I and it is the small scrap that I've ever done a full hour of stand up for it was three people. And Sara Schaefer, yes, I love crafting. It's my hobby. I have craft milk in my home. Do do it has my supplies displayed adorable manner. Oh. Yes. Apply. Applause for that's go factor. Self here at maximum fun dot org or wherever you get cast. Maximum fund dot org, comedy, and culture are stoned audience supported.

Ross Blocher Carrie beth Judeo Callan US Israel Twitter Beth appel squarespace Judeo Jim BMI Niger Sara Schaefer Wanda tan reparable armone Komo Russia
Bill Gates on climate change, the pandemic, and tackling big world problems

The Current

31:26 min | 6 months ago

Bill Gates on climate change, the pandemic, and tackling big world problems

"You're smart funny friends. Who always seem to have the best celebrity gossip. I'm talking about the ones who always know. We should be watching reading or listening to. What have you can pick their brains every week. Pop is a brand new podcast but does exactly that and feels like spending time with your best friends. So join me lurlene mood. And a panel of the smartest culture. Critics that i know as we dissect the discourse but also have a great time doing it. This is a cbc podcast. Bill gates changed the world with a vision of a personal computer on every desk in every home. He's co chair of one of the world's largest charities through that foundation he's donated one point seven five billion dollars to the fight against covid nineteen but his new book tackles another issue facing our planet. It's called how to avoid climate disaster. I spoke with bill gates last week. Here's our conversation we are. I don't need to tell you this in the midst of this global health emergency right now explained to me. Why now is the time to put out a book on climate change and fighting climate change. Yeah actually wrote the book in two thousand nineteen but then as the pandemic was coming along in early twenty twenty. That did not seem like a good time. Because our foundation with our expertise and vaccines and infectious disease was totally focused on helping to end the pandemic. That's still super serious problem. But i do think talking now. About what long-term challenge. We ought to keep in mind as we put out all these recovery funds. It's a great time to look at at climate. You know the pandemic reminds people. We callan government to look ahead. Avoid terrible things happening and mazing -ly young people are more interested in climate than ever on no matter what their political affiliation is certainly in canada. The us europe. We see a lot of energy around this. And of course we've got this gold get zero by twenty fifty and so my book is about. What kind of plan would make that come true. These are really big problems. Whether it's tackling pandemic or whether it's tackling climate change and discuss them can be almost paralyzing and overwhelming people. Don't do things because of how big they are. What are the strategies that you employ to approach thinking about solving big problems that well i hadn't experienced microsoft in terms of finding the best engineers and backing them on long term software dreams and constantly. You know trying to make sure. We are being realistic about the challenges. A likewise the foundation We've done a lot of new vaccines and had great success from juicing child to death. The pandemic only needs a few tools. You know better diagnostics. Better drugs and the vaccine. I'd say it's much easier to solve than climate change because climate change is touches so much of the physical economy but it is about experts in this case engineers scientists modulars together around a plan really educating the public that case is there are investments that that need to be made. Now you describe the problem of climate change with two numbers. Fifty one billion and zero explained the importance of those two numbers. Fifty one billion tonnes of co two equivalents that we're putting into the atmosphere every year and that differ countries have different parts of that different areas like manufacturing like christie transport. Agriculture are all part of that zero. Is where you have to get to in order that the temperature stops rising with all the negative effects that causes and so. It's very daunting a thirty percent reduction or something like that. It would be dramatically easier. You make the point. And i think this is a point that some climate activists might be upset by which is that. We shouldn't waste time kind of nibbling around the edges and trimming emissions by twenty thirty instead. We gotta swing for the fences We have to aim for zero by twenty fifty. Why is that the goal. Well it's very important to have short term goals for example getting more electric cars out or using more solar and wind. We have to go full speed on those things even to get those two sectors which are amongst the easiest of all the types of missions to get those two zero but we only focus on the easy parts if we don't work on steel and cement in beef them. We're gonna find ourselves at twenty fifty without those solutions and so we need to look at those hard areas and actually look at how expensive making green steel is or green cement and go get the innovators whether it's through basic aren't spending by governments or high risk startup companies or you know the rnd spending of some of the larger companies. We need to draw all of that innovation empower in and actually accelerate. It can ask you about cement you you say. There's five questions that you have. That climate conversation needs to have in one of the. What is your plan for cement. Why cement such a big deal when you make cement you release. Co two in two ways. One is that to get the heat to take the limestone and cause the calcium to break out from the two that heat. When you're you're creating co two as you're burning hydrocarbon and then that chemical reaction of the limestone breaking down also put top co two and so cement would be more than twice as expensive if you insisted it be done without emissions and so it's amongst the most difficult things and the scale of the amount of cement we make is really unbelievable in fact some people wouldn't even think of it because we keep using the word energy and of course cement is isn't really energy. So is it possible to tackle that. I mean without stopping building which we're not going to do. Can you make green cement does it. Is it possible to actually do something like that. Yes absolutely. There's a canadian company carbon cure which has a way that's being deployed making a meaningful reduction starts out modestly about ten percent. And they have a plan where they hope to get over thirty percents. If you take that idea and ideas from other companies yes we can drive that down. We don't want cement to be super expensive. Because in developing countries you know they still haven't built basic shelter for all of their people so even though the the rich countries could use less be take the planet as a whole you know just that we do build houses for billions. Who don't have them and so we need. We need innovation. You mentioned canada. And you say in the book that government policies matter that there are a lot of different actors in this but government policies. Really do matter. Successive governments in this country have said all sorts of emission targets over the course of years. And we haven't met a single one so what happens if the twenty fifty one to then if countries are not doing their part then other countries will also feel like. Hey why should we make sacrifices for this candidate in the us or similar in that historically we have had a lot of emissions and were well off countries so all the other countries look to us. Both the us and canada make a lot of money have a part of their economy. That's going to have to transition. The are you know job creating assets and so how you manage that transition which of those things can be turned into green approaches. What new industries you want to get involved with. It's a tough problem but in less the. Us and canada do their part. The rest of the world won't and then we'll have all these natural ecosystems disappearing. What more would you like to see from canada. Well the first thing is to increase your research and development budget know those are the kind of open science ideas and in two thousand fifteen in the paris agreement. I got together with leaders including prime minister trudeau. At the time we commitments were made about rnd increases and some increases came through. Also you wanna how policies that encourage the startup. Companies share some of the risk with them. And then you want policies like tax credits that help encourage buying green products even when their prices somewhat higher and through those things we. That's how we can drive this ecosystem you know it's gonna be hard. Anyone thinks this is easy. Is missing the scope of what we have to change. You mentioned the idea of just transition which is a phrase that gets tossed around a lot and ken strike people in different ways for people who have a livelihood that's based in the resource sector. They will say that the just transition isn't just at all that it's abrupt and it's going to leave them on the side of the road because their livelihoods are wrapped up in things like oil and gas. What do you say to those people. Well thirty years is not overnight. And they're making a very fair point particularly you know if there's a region of the country that is particularly involved in hydrocarbon. What new industries are going to go there. There are things like green hydrogen that has to be piped and manufactured. May you have a car. Industries are the manufacturers with plants. In canada gonna make the transition for electric cars and it was interesting. Gm who has plants in. Canada made this rather bold decision to only sell electric cars in two thousand thirty five. And so you know bringing in the those workers and talking about what. Those new opportunities aren't are they going to be prepared for them. That's got to be part of the dialogue care. There's also an individual responsibility that you talk about in the book. You admit you're a rich guy you have a private jet. You have a huge house with the big carbon footprint. That's all wrapped up in that. If it's not easy for you to achieve this and reduce emissions what does that say about the rest of us actually for me. I'm spending a little over. Seven million a year to more than offset my missions and that was very educational. That was the first one to go to the airport and say. Hey i've gotta get aviation biofuel and you know it it. The cost to do that is way too high. I'm paying over four hundred dollars a tonne. And of course i brute force it but we need to bring that cost way way down what i call the overall green premium and that's where innovation comes in because if we can get it down by ninety five percent then it is affordable and the world can get zero but without innovation. It's going to be impossible now. Everyone can you know use a little bit less. But it's when they're contributing to the policies that got us to sear. i think that's their greatest impact. You are one of the leading voices who've been warning about the risks of climate change and you've also been out in front in warning about The possibility of a pandemic in that. Ted talk from two thousand fifteen. What's it like being the guy who sees these major threats around the corner and is the voice of doom. Saying this is coming in. You need to act now. well hopefully it's constructive. If i can take both the my experience at microsoft and the resources that i have from that and apply them to some of these tough problems that the marketplace won't go after like vaccines for children in africa. That's been a super successful effort that our foundation is given tens of billions to that here with climate in reading all the books in meeting with the experts. That's what i enjoy. And so the fact that activists have got this on the political agenda. I congratulate them. I i wouldn't know how to do that. What i do know how to do is say ok. Given that you know politicians are listening. What exactly the steps. What would a real plan look like so that ten years from now all these idealistic people are not saying. Hey you know this. This really isn't going to come together. You know missing goal after goal. I am fearless host of hunting warhead from. Cbc podcasts in the norwegian newspaper. Vg hunting warhead follows a global team of police journalists says the attempt to dismantle a massive network of predators on the dark web winner of the grand prize for best investigative reporting in the new york festivals and recommended by the guardian vulture and the globe and mail. You can find hunting warhead on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. Throughout the nineteen eighty s strange phenomenon was sweeping north america. They were in a panic and like people in a panic. they want. Solutions allegations of underground satanic cults torturing and terrorizing children. The thing is there were no satanic cults preying on children and nearly thirty years later the people touched by it all are still up. The pieces isn't a work of fiction. This is a work of history satanic panic available now for almost a year. End of this pandemic I think about a quotation from doctor. Mike ryan at the world health organization. He made it about a year ago and he was talking about how to tackle a pandemic. He said you have to be fast. You have to have no regrets. The virus will always get you if you don't move quickly. What was the cost of us. Not taking that advice. Do you think well there. There were mistakes made when we didn't get ready before the pandemic kit and my twenty fifteen talk was about the infrastructure we needed in place and even practicing what i called germ games which are like war games but you're simulating the disease. It would have been obvious that you have to deploy the commercial diagnostic sector as fast as possible which the us bungled up. And so you during that period of exponential growth any mistake you know means the difference between what happened in australia and what happened in the us. So you know it's tragic. We'll be doing post-mortems and we have to get this pandemic donna and we opt invest. So that the next time a pandemic comes will get on top of it and the number of cases can be kept very small. What do you hope we've learned from this pandemic. That would help us when the next comes because to your point it's not an if it's a win. Yeah well i have to say infectious disease. Because the rich countries it made progress when we talk about global health. Really generally talking about malaria and tb and diseases that are mostly in the developing countries. Now that there's this to while we have to be ready for this the piece of innovation like marnie vaccines or there's a way of doing diagnostics. That will be ten times more scalable than anything done before the amount of innovation which countries because they've lost trillions are now willing to fund the small number of bins needed. We're gonna make great progress in global health and that will help us not just be ready for the next pandemic it'll help us with polio eradication malaria measles all that area that that causes so many deaths mostly import countries. How do you wrap your head around the velocity of innovation. In this moment. I mean a year ago. People were saying if we get a vaccine for this. This will be years down the line. We have multiple vaccines now. And there are hundreds that are in development. How do you. How do you process that our foundation had been investing in marnie vaccines along with the darpa. Which is part of the government over a decade and it when the pandemic hit no such vaccine had been made but so we're hopeful that it would work. Dr faucher i would often say the vaccine is going to take eighteen months because we didn't want to create fall tope to factor was done in twelve months is both a combination of amazingly good work by five by win tag and moderna and bit of luck because amb up until that point had the right way to make it stimulate the immune system hadn't been found and so that's amazing. We have three other vaccines after santa johnson. Johnson over vacs that should be approved in the first and second quarter and so yes these these companies they got a lot of money from the us government and a thing called e. that our foundation helped create and so that money and these companies. Now we can see the end and we may have to make a little bit of a new vaccine for the variance. But that's that's why this will come to an end. It's going to come to an end for some people sooner rather than others and you have been a supporter of kovacs program. That is meant in large part to help low and middle income countries access doses of vaccines. Canada is planning to take from that pool candidate has invested in kovacs hundreds of millions of dollars but is planning to take vaccines from that pool. What do you think of that. I think it's predictable that when there's a shortage of medical intervention like this that the rich countries who funded the are indian. Trials will be early in line. The only way to really deal with that is to make sure we get big vaccine factories in india going in parallel if the us is going to keep the us vaccines by and large and likewise europe responded with a little bit of export restrictions when the ask for seneca forecast went down fortunately for the world the biggest vaccine factories are in india in a serum sells five times many vaccines as visor ause they just tapping to make two dollar vaccines and so we've done something novel which is to have the vaccine's put into those factories and though i call those second source deals and right now they're making astra zeneca but fairly soon they'll also be making johnson and johnson and novak so we just need a lot more capacity so that these bidding wars don't determine where the vaccines go. Is that vaccine nationalism. Going to prevent or going to delay those low and middle income countries from getting the vaccine. Absolutely the best case is that the developing countries are about six months behind in terms of when they reach a certain level of coverage on the worst cases about eighteen months. And we're going through that right now. Getting me second sources up but whenever it comes to health commodities only governments in philanthropy can stem the normal market outcome which is whoever compared the most in the front of the line. There's a push to take the market out. Come out of that and say the vaccine companies need to turn over the ip so that they yes they make less profit but you could put a nail through the coffin of of of this pandemic. Is that something that you support. If it would create one additional vaccine then i might support it but in fact making vaccines is not about the the ip here. It's about these factories being exactly right and passing strict regulatory review. And so no. This is not somebody something where somebody home can just make vaccines. There are very few high-quality vaccine factory in the world and so we've gone through all of them to say okay. How do you get the indian regulator. How do you get this thing going as quickly as possible and ip is not the issue when the vaccines are made in india. There's no royalty your payment flowing back to the vaccine inventor that's astra zeneca jumps announcing back. It's free so all we're paying through kovacs with canadian other supporters. We're just paying the marginal cost of manufacture. Your foundation contributed at least one point seven five billion dollars in response to the pandemic. How do you determine in the work that you do in philanthropy. How do you determine where to spend money. Well our biggest thing. The majority of our foundations work is global health. We do a lot agriculture which connects to climate change. We do others including innovation in education but health is the biggest thing and health. It's pretty simple. You go look at the debts. What children die of its malaria and pneumonia diarrhea to adults. That's tb and hiv and you know magically we can have new vaccines even for all those diseases and really make health more equitable. That your chance of dying you know which is today one hundred times greater in africa die by the age of five we can over time. How health justice with these new innovations. You have extraordinary power in that. I mean your foundation contributes twelve percent of the. Who's budget that's more than many nations. You can move quickly. You don't need a number to go through a number of the steps that perhaps other layers of government might to what have you do. You think it's it's right that a private organization has that much influence over global health. Well if if you care about the diseases of the poor country than what we've done you'd probably support when we get going in the two thousand ten million children die under the age of five and today that's less than five million a year and it. It's on us alone. We've worked with many governments to create. Its and called bobby. That buys vaccine's for these poor countries. So it's a field that has had a lot of impact you know. I guess i could influence the boat market by buying boats or something i. I've chosen measles malaria and diarrhea pneumonia. I wish there were more people involved in this philanthropists and governments. You know we save lives for less than a thousand dollars per life saved and know. It's it's tragic that this was ignored for so long in when i i gave thirty million for malaria. I became the biggest malaria funder. That's a disease that at the time was killing over a million children a year so pure market based systems. Don't deal with the health. Needs of the poorest. And that's why giving the money back is something that you know. It's it's great that that i'm able to do that. I'm sure you've read About this idea of the bill. Chill which is that. Some academics and some organizations are reluctant to criticize your work They might be in the same field because they're worried about funding and they're worried about funding concerns. Do i in the power that you have. How do you ensure that. You're not stifling other perspectives. Well any idea that somebody has on how we can do better on poli on malaria. Pneumonia diarrhea the more critics. We have the better if you have ideas about that. The main people don't care about that stuff they don't know about it. I wish there were ten times as many experts saying you should have done this and you should have done that because hey we're just trying to to have people have healthy lives and yes. We make mistakes now. We have a very smart group. We've done a lot of things right but you know the main problem and global hall people. Just don't pay attention. They don't care who tells you know. I mean somebody who has a lot of power in that field. Who is it that you trust to to to push back a little bit. Well i'm don't think me they can always decisions i have. It's just like microsoft. I didn't do everything at microsoft. We have an amazing malaria team. And they're looking at drugs and vaccines and bednets. And you know ways of reducing mosquito populations and it's kind of amazing. And whenever i meet with them i wish i could give them even more money so they could go even faster with what they're doing. They're the ones who are setting. Those strategies going out called the universities and the experts and the malaria field. Sadly is a very small field that you can get everyone together in a a single room and talk about okay. What looks promising. What doesn't there are people who believe crazy things about you. I mean there are these wild conspiracy theories that you create a covert in a lab that the vaccine is going to give people some sort of chip. And you're not against as saying this. How do you. How do you wrap your head around those theories. Yes there's a lot. There's millions of messages seen those things when they mentioned me a lot of the mentor. Dr fauci i. I hope that we can make the truth. More interesting than the conspiracy theory. I mean the the main way it becomes real if it makes people not wear masks or not be open minded about taking the vaccine you know when that not only protect them but people who they might transmit the disease to and so. It's been wild now. The pandemic has people reaching for simple solutions to explain. Okay why did this happen. And isn't there some evil person behind the curtain there. I hope we're creative about whether it's in the mainstream media or digital media how we get the truth to be more people more aware of it does it require some sort of regulation if you think of what social media has done in terms of you know pouring jet fuel onto that fire does it require some sort of regulation to ensure that those things don't spread as quickly as they do well in the most extreme case where you have something like you know holocaust denial or saying that the pandemic not real in you can probably defined some things you just shouldn't spread around because they're so faults and kind of titillating but in you get into the mainstream where you know it's less black and white. I think you're gonna let the information flow. You're going to have true information in there and and commentary that hopefully you'll figure out how to get people to also pay attention to that mean. In many cases like in polio where there were rumors about the vaccine. Being bad in nigeria. We went to the religious leaders and they set the example by vaccinating their children and that helped get rid of this notion that there was something bad about it so figuring out who people trust just saying to them. You're wrong if you're not someone they they're supposed to listen to. That alone doesn't seem to work. Just before i let you go. We just have a couple of quick things. I wanted to ask you. One is just about this year. We've all been through a lot. And i mean i know you've been through a lot personally. Father died in the fall. And we've all suffered some degree of loss. What have you learned in this in this really unusual year. I've enjoyed one thing. Ironically which is the our kids have been f- more than they would have been instead of being at college or high school. They've been around the house. This idea that maybe we don't need to travel quite as much you know and we can stay at home more and use the new tools. It's interesting even. I've been surprised by how well the office type work that our foundation does has continued without anyone going near our office buildings for ten months now and it is a reflective time. You've got the tragedy not only the deaths but also the educational deficits were creating. the inequity. Here is extreme. You know if you don't have internet connection you've got small house. The inner city schools are not doing online as well as the suburban or private schools. The racial difference in this disease outcome has been devastating for hispanics and plaques in you put on top of that the visibility of the injustice caused by george floyd stout so it certainly makes me reflect on how lucky i am that i have a great internet connections. My kids can come home. I get to do interesting work to say. Our vaccine work which was totally boring to every up until year ago. Now people are like. Hey tell me about the e four eight four k variant and. I'm like oh. Hey i'm your man. He remained optimistic. Coming out of this year. I mean you're you're relentless optimist yes. The pandemic is incredible tragedy. We weren't prepared for we bungled once it came but there are some things going on and we will get back to building back and hopefully also take on other big problems where climate change at the top of that list bill gates. I really appreciate the opportunity to speak with you. Thank you very much thank you. Bill gates is the founder of microsoft co chair of the bill and melinda gates foundation and his new book is called how to avoid a disaster. What do you make of his plans for the future. Particularly his audacious and broad reaching ideas of how to tackle climate change. We'd love to hear from. You can email us at the current at cbc dot ca for more cbc podcasts. Go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

canada Bill gates callan government malaria us infectious disease prime minister trudeau ken strike microsoft Cbc polio eradication malaria cbc Dr faucher santa johnson europe
090920 ATJ in 30

Ace and TJ

23:32 min | 11 months ago

090920 ATJ in 30

"Okay let me give you my nightly routine quickly before I go to bed every night I, dig up all the Mason Jars have my money in it. I count it, put it back in the ground. Then I take. And then I go to bed. So. That's how it works. Callan products going to help you lose that quarantine fifteen also help you with other things like joint pain helping you get better sleep all of these things and again I take at night. So that means it's not going to keep me up because it's not going to jack me up like other things do that. You take scientifically proven to help you have better sleep an lose weight that's CAL train right now they've got their best promotion ever going as well by three bottles. You get three bottles for free. That's right. You buy three, they give you three it can't be beaten all you do. IS GO TOP LOSS DOT COM T. O. P. L. O. S. DOT COM or call one, eight, hundred, three to five, forty, three, sixty, six that's three to five forty, three, sixty, six, lose weight the right way with Caliban here. Yay Anew lunchtime has entered the fray introducing ideas folded crispy flat breads filled with milky cheese, juicy meat and tangy sauce for just six bucks and behold the newest member this garage court the Buffalo Chicken Papa deal with little chicken zesty buffalo sauce that kicks like a jousting labs to the tongue. But of you six bucks, that's angry kids better Pizza Papa. John's discounts even taxes extra by May vary. From the motion of Charlotte North. Carolina. Until, Jay. This is the. podcast here's your Os. Apparently, my volume is very inconsistent and is affecting. Daily life. Talk, about that on today's as in Tj, thirty podcast. Along with the new study about. Watching your H. Itching isn't verbs. Sorry. But anyway, all that's coming up but let's hit started on today's Act June thirty podcast with ace saying thank you. In theory gas. Helped me me a fish theme. How How can we help you win a set up to help members of the radio family. And we always have to say this it's not financial in nature we can't. Give money away every week like that. But. We can try to make people's lives better over the course of the past few weeks we've had a variety of things that have come up helping kids one lady had three kids. They had no computer in the home and Y'all came through with three computers. One for each of the children's could virtually learn. We've gotten a lady last week who had because she was a single mom didn't have any money. They didn't have a setup where the kids had were working at the counter. It wasn't working for the we ended up getting them a table where they're all able to now sit and work her four kids can sit and work and learn virtually. We've got an incredible. DM yesterday on facebook from lady. If you remember one of the very first editions, how can we help you instinct? She had a five year old who got in the larger needed a larger bed. and. Company came in brought a bed and made a bed for the child who was fantastic. And she just called to inform us or deemed as to inform us that over the course of the past few months, their situation has improved. And she has started doing things to help others in her community and she had started using her facebook page to find out who else in her community needed little pieces of assistance here and there, and she is now helping them in a variety of different ways, which is pretty awesome that you helped her which inspired her as her situation improved to help other people. That's pretty awesome. So. We get to today's edition. How can we you win streak? And I saw this message yesterday and? The MESSAGE SAYS From a lady named Stephanie. I would love to know how to help ace it his family. I think about him every day. And wish I could take some of the bird. How can we support the family and make sure that his daughter's memory continues and brighter than ever Well. You have supported me every day. You don't even know how much you've done to help me since my daughter died now five six weeks ago. July twenty ninth was the day. I moved yesterday. And I moved out of my apartment in the mothership market marketing. UPTOWN CHARLOTTE. Back to the suburbs to be closer to my son who's in his senior year of high school. And, originally, when I moved my daughter live right around the corner from me about six blocks away and so she was kind of the conduit to making sure we saw everybody all the time and other kinds of stuff and you know he is the priority and and God bless Amanda she was the one my fiance was like, Hey, we need to move to be closer to kate. But in doing so there's an entire. Box. Of Cards. That people have sent here to the radio station or to my apartment and I don't know how they got my apartment address. They just do with there's a whole like lar not a box like a been like you would find it loews target or somewhere full of them. Half of them. I haven't had a chance to open yet. There are thousands of messages from people that I've. Haven't even had a chance to think about returning it. Because, my life has been so crazy in the past six weeks and I'm hoping now that we've gotten this move out of the way that things will kind of. Somehow, begin to settle down and get back to normal Yesterday was a tough day for me because. The. The last time I saw her was in that apartment. And I can still sit. Where I was sitting. When she walked out that night before her car wreck. And remember what she was wearing what she looked like what she said what I said. And there was A. Bit of comfort that came from that. So moving out with difficult but it's important right now to be closer to my son, but my point is. You've done so much for me and the people that I work with here have done so much for me and I don't know where I'd be without you. It's not easy cry every day. Of yet to make it through a day without crying. But. I will go in grab a couple of cards and open them up and read them from people that I've never met. I don't know the Stephanie Lady that message this in, but I was so touched. I. Appreciate it so much and the fact that this person I don't know. Thinks, about me everyday and you she wrote I wish I could take some of the burden that is. Unbelievable that somebody that I don't know would be so kind and so wonderful to try to do something like that and to think of us every day. She said, how can we support the family and making sure that his daughter's memory continues brighter than ever? I thought about this all night last night and I kept coming back to the same thing. You know. Maybe, just help somebody this week. If everybody would just. Just help somebody whether it's be nice to them. You know Maybe. Somebody else is having a tough week. Maybe they need you to come a little bit of slack on something or. Go Out of your way to be supportive reach out to somebody haven't talked to in a while maybe somebody that you had a falling out with some sort just checking arms. Hey, we haven't talked in a while and wanted to see how you're doing Just go out of your way to pick up the. Tab. For somebody who might be struggling or you know they're in need if you could help them in some way, that would be the best way to do it your your outpouring of love and support for me, and my family has really really really picked us up so much. So maybe now we can all just pick up somebody else might need a little help. A charity. And I think everybody's waiting on me to say, well, here's what we should do I and honestly I'm not that far along in my. Whatever. The proper term is it my my the in my development or something? Yeah. Since all this happened I haven't gotten. Yes I'm not. I'm not ready to I. Don't know the answers to any of those questions. But all I kept coming up with was. This was so kind and I was so touched by this and. How do you? How could you help make sure that my daughter's memory continues brighter than ever just be good to somebody this we go out of your way to do something nice for someone and to help someone whether you know that person or not. And if that happened. Thousands and thousands and thousands of times around the country where the show is hurt, that would really be a great thing. And if you want to share that story with US cool I would love to know that somebody went out of their way to do something nice for a stranger to help somebody this week or something like that. Just because we talked about it on the radio, we can take this edition of how can we help you Wednesday and make it. So thousands of people get a little bit of help that would be a great thing. But. More than anything just it made me a reminder to say thank you because things have been so crazy and so hectic for the past six weeks for me reminded me to just again to say thank you I try to come in here every day and pretend like that's not a part of my life on the radio I don't think I'd do a very good job of it. But I try to come in and have fun and do the show, and this is kind of an escape and. It reminded me that I need to take more time to say thank you to you for all you've done so I appreciate it and I haven't responded to. One percent of the people who sit flowers and all that I'm working on it. that's a lie I'm not working on. That's true. I have stuff. It's all at a big box like I keep I feel kind of overwhelmed when I look at, it's like I. Need to write these people. Thank you cards. Psych Oh, my God I can never do all those. So what do I do you know? which is my responsibility now to get it done, I will eventually in the next five years I'll get. But I. Just WanNa say this and thanks for all your support and again if you WanNa, do something great this week Kind of. In honor of Peyton that'd be awesome. That'd be really cool way to to To. Make. Sure that her memory continues. So we're we're not getting fish thing which. Maybe somebody would be nice enough to bring his I. think that would tyrod in be nice and perfect bring a sufficient. But never duplicated. TJ In thirty podcast. Yesterday I was thumbing through that and there's a new study. In this next time, you have a bug bite don't scratch it. They found that it's way way better to deal with that by rubbing it way better meaning ratching, it makes it goal way our doesn't harm the by scientists have They gave him mice a chemical to make their skin itchy and then watched how the nerves in their spinal cord reacted to scratching versus rubbing, and they found the rubbing each since the same signal to your brain as scratching it, and it offers the same relief. So they say rubbing inches more efficient because it won't damage your skin. So the each will go away and you won't damage your skin. So next time you find yourself with an itch, don't scratch it out. which have you have you have one and then you you don't WanNA scratch one out you WANNA. You WanNa, try this new met. It's good. Keep told that entire story now I know. What he told that entire story for just one of. You know is more sad than that. Four o'clock this morning when I was reading a story all alone. My laughter was echoing through the halls. Because of that. The because you scratch one out. Now you have to. And you see the fact that we can't say it makes it even funnier it's implied. Like the people have to make the their own joke in their head. They have to get it and go without it just being blatant in your face, and if you didn't get it used gotta do matter. I mean that's that I'll to be fair. That's quality. Thank you. You don't scratch one out now. So. I guess what I'm hearing is my work here is done. TJ. When we return, we talk about my volume and the upcoming Hispanic heritage month that's next on the act TJ and thirty podcast. Guest. This is the TV and three podcast. Now. On, demand on as TJ, dot com the act APP or through iheartradio. Okay, now that we're all both stuck at home in looking at any new hobby or career ideas, remember we've got our podcast company and can help you with a career in podcast. All you need is the idea and we can help you with everything else from equipment posted on Itunes, how you do a podcast and most importantly how you do it podcast and have it sound professional. Now, this part may be good for some and well, not so much for others but as and I will listen and help you with your podcast, and this is an optional service. All you need to do go radio network DOT COM. That's radio. Network. Dot Com. You know it seems we've been bombarded with nothing but bad news for many months. Well, we love hearing personal and inspiring stories from you the TJ radio family. So if a person you know has recently done something to enhance the lives of others tell us about them and we will spread the message of their kindness to everybody at a nominate somebody just go to our APP and Click Ace and TJ shoutout. Every month will feature two stories in our insider newsletter and those two people will win some cool ace and TJ prizes. We can hardly wait to read all the stories of selflessness being done throughout our radio family. Never, duplicated. Rob's volume has become a problem for you as of late TJ. Well, if you mean by startling me to the point where I'm about to have to have heart surgery then. Yes. I mean he were loud all the time. Yeah. It wouldn't be a bad but he'll be talking to a normal tone and then all of a sudden. Just comes on like a you know like a siren. I got to get a super soaker something star Brandon. God have loved dog him. Rob. We'll pay like one hundred bucks extra to not report us to subject if you. Spray you super soaker. Super wanted to every time you're two. If you WANNA give me a hundred bucks. You can spend with the super soaker whenever you. Your take out the super soaker and just give you hundred bucks to. Ask. Lower IT'S GONNA end up costing me less in the long run from copay. My have a grabber. been here I'm nervous. No I'm nervous. One hundred dollars a shot up. Say that. I love him like he's my own family. At like what he says, I liked that he laughs la I just wish it was at a lower volume. That's all of what you do. With Slightly Lower Vol, not only do I love him like family I appreciate him. He does all kinds of great stuff that people would never even know. But. If he could do it at a low of. We'd be. I mean I would take him in. That support him. Financially, get a roof over his head. Simply Video Games all day long as yellow. It's GONNA cost you hundred dollars deal with. I don't know how you may pacemaker going off. With issues at your work, but we just decide. You're on the air. But he knows I'm halfway. But that little Alexis go off on. I guess she didn't here. You know but they go off on each other. Yeah. Well. I think really she only goes off on him or she always started because she's upset about that. That thing he says she posts too much on her instagram. Way Too many stories. No. He she been going on for him before that and which made me think that's why he blocker on instagram. What is Just. Come up with some kind of insult out of nowhere like. What was that? She said the other day you look like something I don't remember it'd be like Yeah, WE'RE GONNA go to chick fillet. Oh, you looked like chick filet. that. Yes. You are chick fil chicken. You are a Hugo. Hurricane Hugo Hurricane Hugo you look like a Hugo. You don't understand it but she sells it was such convention and passionate go on Gum. She called me a megaphone via text yesterday. I. Could see this you'll be. What's. The. Problem. Alexis said, don't give him a crap. It's my month. Because what is Hispanic appreciation month heritage heritage month. Okay. But. It doesn't even start until fifteen. She's already. Not, trying to I'm just preparing you guys so Hispanic. Heritage month is. Starts on the Fifteenth Yeah They were an afterthought they're like, Oh, maybe we should give him a month. So ease get half a month until October fifteenth. Oh. So we're breaking up over. Two. Months. Okay. I liked that It was originally a week. We'll give you a week. No. Get a month I didn't. Know that either. By All right. Well, then just. Tack. Three weeks on Afghan. What does that? Does that end the fifteen? Okay do that In La by Ronald Reagan? Yep So is there something special we're supposed to be doing this well? Once it gets underway it next week is there then something special we're supposed to be doing. Whatever you guys would like to do. Whatever gifts you. Bring me and sign Alec Seventy seven like. Hey. What do we want to? Ask. Mean if you guys want to decorate the office with all, you know flags and stuff like that. Brings Food every day. A recipe. For disaster. Bring you a biscuit. He had a break it up into thirty one piece. I'm going to read something that just came into the damn. Well I'll keep my opinion to myself as to whether or not it's funny. Lady who is Hispanic just sent us this. Okay clear that up before the hate start. And it says Hispanic heritage month is racist even for our month they have is crossing the border. That's a funny line Omanian. Timber October is actually really fighting. Man. Is Fun I, killed it with a with a disclaimer, but I was so freaked I wanted to share that with everybody but I wanted to make sure everybody knew I didn't say it. We heard you. Loudly and clearly. Doing the Latino Short Film Festival in Coachella they do that every year. And you're short. Off Tina. Perfect allies. You. She didn't care as long as. Treats out of it. Doesn't matter Latina as you want me to be. CAST is at noon everyday subscribe now to Acer TJ on demand now on I tunes. Do. You love a sail. Are you ready to save some money? 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082019 ATJ in 30

Ace and TJ

21:00 min | 2 years ago

082019 ATJ in 30

"Hey it's t. J. and i wanna tell you about my recent. Stay at the ballantyne. You know the second you walk in. You know you're in a fancy hotel is not only beautiful but the staff half goes out of their way to make sure you have the most luxurious experience of your life to go to the ballantyne dot com and see all the great things things you can enjoy everything from their spa to golf. They're beautiful pool fine restaurant and everything else. A true luxury hotel provides so book your stay now at the ballantyne dot com. I really think you're gonna love it. Wrote in and fields has been named the number one premium skin care line in north america for the last three years there something for every skin concern now at ace t._j. Dot com click the road and fields add on our partners page. There's a sixty day money back. Guarantee and new monthly specials go to ace t._j. Dot com and click the road and fields add on our partners page. The market of charlotte north carolina is the ace and t._j. And thirty podcasts accuser to day is group therapy day and today's group therapy is about a member of the t._j. Show little did he know that that that's that's what was going to happen but it happened that he wasn't happy about it. That's coming up on today's t._j. In thirty along with the story of hansel and gretel let's start with a wedding in question for women's in theory podcast. It's been awhile since we've had to do this but it's my fault because is a should have made it clear <hes> because sometimes women are not as much as i love the ladies it's it's a <hes> agenda thing at a lot of times. Women are not able to go with the full hypothetical situation. The question is and it's a very well thought out question that with was created with great scholarship hip what would be worse being left at the altar or pooping in your you wedding dress. Don't act like now's not the type of stuff you come here for every day. I think i appreciate the effort on some of the ladies here several of the ladies but the whole purpose of the question is that you can visibly see. I don't know how else you would see other than visibly but it's it's apparent apparent. It's obvious that you have soiled your wedding dress. Not i'll be wearing spanks in nobody will be able to tell or wedding. Dresses are pretty these thirty. I think you could hide it. Nobody would know that kind of thing. In other words no game changers right. I mean the whole the whole <hes> choices. This is would rather be standing up there. People being able to tell that has soiled myself or left at the alter mom husband to be said. I don't want you and i'm not even coming <hes>. This is a good one t._r. Said <hes> i would rather be stood up at the altar. I can live down being left at the i alter pooping in your dress will be thing that lives forever. There are couldn't agree more now. Here's another lady though destiny says i definitely rather be stood up at the altar then pooping my dress. If i'm stood up i can eventually move on with life and find someone else. If you poop your address. There is no coming back from that <hes> now. The majority of the answers were when you break it down. I would rather be left at the altar them. <hes> does that further the theory that the wedding itself is the most important thing to the bride more so than the guy yeah she's marrying because it's all about how she would be embarrassed by that that you know and she would rather just not have a a wedding take place. It's fair to rather then her wedding. Be messed up in that way like you know the the groom is is replaceable right. That's what we're finding out in this situation. That's the way that's the way it appears. I would much rather poop my pants than be left at the altar. Yeah i would too in without even thinking because y'all just nasty india poop. My pants i would be left at the national. Never duplicated is the t._j. In thirty podcast tuesday morning the doctors are in tokyo this group therapy on the t._j. Show one of the fun things about doing this job is that these things change especially group there because at the last minute somebody can send something in that we feel. This is much more important. More immediate needs to be covered right now. Which is kind of the situation. We find ourselves in today. I cannot help <hes> but worry about this and think about this and i can't help but <hes> but really wanna fix this regan's. You cannot let dog walker leave town. You've got to make her your very own. Oh my god are you kidding. This is what's group therapy. Welcome to rupaul your is ridiculous. Why are you kidding. No why can't why can't oh you do that for us. I mean for you. There's a lady here that tweeted us. Go riggins when you were talking about dog walker and she says if you've never felt like that about anyone do not let her leave fight fight fight fight and never ever give up you grab a hold of that u haul yep. Don't let go of have let me ask you. Is it a possibility if you missed it about thirty minutes. Ago reagan's telling us about dog walker. She's from el salvador. She's become his best friend and she is the process of moving begins this weekend and by this time next week she'll be on that right. Yeah okay and you said you you have never never really experienced feelings like this for someone not in a non <hes> romantic way necessarily but in a friendly way fair yeah but some in a romantic way my question okay so you do have romantic feelings for sure. I find it hard to be good friends with a girl without at least crushing yeah a little bit i do you. I mean you just crush owner or do you long for her. Now long. I do you pine. No kind of the the question seems to be though are you going to and for the radio family should he before she goes share all your thoughts and feelings with her just to make sure you leave. No stone unturned you asking me. I'm i'm asking everyone you have nothing to lose by opening up to you're but because she is leaving you know what i mean but i wouldn't do it until the last minute no before you go yeah i would do it now and then again when she lied but if he does it now in in it messes things up. He won't even get to spend the last week being her friend. She'll say you weird or why didn't tell me centers which will think but you know what you've got everything that she really needs. You're young. She's young. You're funny and cute and all of that stuff have a great job. You your your citizens. That's a guy with the ability to mary. That's true yeah at is very true. What else who who needs to take that old test this mary her yeah lock down and what would your parents save you said okay i wasn't annot haven't been dating anybody for a couple of years but now i'm <hes> i'm living with someone not from a u._s. America doesn't have a job to speak of. She's working erkin on being a bar trainer his in exercise not not watering hole. They would probably be happy for me. That's what you wanna. Do we support you one hundred percent and as soon as i leave go with the hell is he doing but they wouldn't say okay. He's going to bring our most beautiful grandchildren how they were probably yeah with her. They'll be a pretty kids the conclusion to this week's group therapy and the story of hansel and gretel coming up on the t._j. Thirty podcasts thirty five guest. This is the ace and t._j. In thirty podcast cast on demand on ace and t._j. Dot com as a t._j. App or through. I heart radio. It's already eddie time to get fall and holiday travel plans together our travel agent michelle charges no fees and will bring her thirty years of tricks of the trade to get you the best deals possible. There are now also payment options with no additional fees unlike the cruise lines and land packages just email michelle at travel at ace t._j. Dot com. That's travel at ace t._j. Dot com hey look. We hope you aren't but we know you may be going through a tough time with a divorce. The good news is we know someone who can help our friend kristen at better. Divorce believes. There's a win win. Settlement option for every divorcing person can save you thousands of dollars in the process just email better divorce at ace t._j. Dot com. That's better divorce at ace t._j. Dot com and let our friend kristen help. You could never duplicate it. A lot of people brigands have suggestions funds for you because they care about even though you're you're protesting this whole thing about the people are saying you need to keep dog walker and be make her your love and make the i love and all of that <hes> i have a friend. He says all right. Tell regan's to get a very nice bottle of tequila and simply invite her over for dinner saturday night. As a farewell dinner you know to say thank you for taking care of his dog and being a great friend that way is not a date in in order in some of her authentic zine from wherever she's from yeah i mean let the margaritas flow in the truth will come out whatever it may the easiest way to find out what's really going on as the romans said wind brings truth. That's deep man man yeah great advice deep. There's lady here reagan says tell her i'm latina. I know our culture in perfect english. I can tell oh you latin. Women love big romantic gestures. Hello have you ever seen a soap opera rig and you have to tell her. A lot of people say they don't live without that. What if i told her feeling for years to come. Where did that message that facebook diem on facebook good latina's coming into the d._m._z. vami look i knew it you know how but i mean okay so. Aren't you just so curious. As you know how good of a kiss or she is and things like we were just loved a kiss or even if you only do that before she leaves his go. Hey come here immutable smooch coach and there's a lady here said how do you say smooch in el salvadorian kelly <hes> hit us up on twitter and said at the t._j. Show on twitter. I think dog walker has dropped enough hints that she is interested in reagan's like what but a lot of people say that she's been hinting to you that she was interested for a long time then that seems to be a fairly common belief thinks the radio family that she's kind of been hinting to you you. Hey i like you. Always you know picking up imaginary objects in front of you. Does she do that. I dropped my yeah. Oh no i dropped my scooter. Me peaked up will you hand me the p._i._n. Never mind. I get my pencil. Oh uh class has me so flexible weird ebtekar. He did marry a pretty willie trail of breadcrumbs to find our way back <hes> yes we go to housemate of come drops yom yom insulin grow yeah yeah home sel end gretel who we go with the house maid of gumdrops young long role lehman yeah. I know yum yum scott condie say that for the the god who knew you are keeping this impression from us from all these years. Oh ooh you know i'm coming in providence. Wow i'm marie drop was that hansel and gretel with a winch winch yeah yeah because she built her house out of candy and all those little fat kids. Oh we can't we can't go by uh not let this the name of they left a trail of <hes>. I think the trail of rocks the first time and i made it back to their house but then the next time they left. Breadcrumbs birds came along and ate the bread crumbs. They had no way back. They couldn't find their way back and that was stupid. Yeah i mean the it'll swedish danish yum yum v- ought to have bread from talk to your me so oh that's good that's real good differently some leader hose and around there right talion or something now it was german or somewhere where the names hansel and gretel on cellular yeah i mean those are straight up like translucent whitening. That's not why that's translucent looking it up trying. I find them then the truth about hansel and gretel or was it a wolf. They're german. Y'all the us eight it like. It's haw hansel and gretel at a young brother sister kidnapped better. I'm not gonna try by cannibalistic witch living in a forest and a house construct hake confectionary handy and many more treats the two escaped with their lives but outwitting her and cook them. Just eat your way out here my way outside of a cake house. Oh she let him out in the yard so they could eat off the side of the house over there. You know instead of having icicles. You know you get icicle and then suck on them. They just had lemon lemon candy and in gumdrops and stuff. Wow probably some of the some of them are in slices favorite those i don't like anything gummy except except gum forgotten griddle can pretend to act like she doesn't understand so it's close to the fire that she shoves heaven avenue. Why yeah so a different kind of pot. They enjoyed right yeah clearly the pot which got cooked in v. don't understand and what what did you say we each turn on the style and you you come to me all of our by oven the beautiful really good now i don for you. We got the free dance balti- not to sit down before you on cathy's will subscribe now to t._j. On demand now on i tunes for millions of people wake up every day trying to figure out what they're gonna do. Try to lose weight this time well. There's there's a product called. 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Rubblebucket Break Up And Don't Break Up

World Cafe

36:34 min | 2 years ago

Rubblebucket Break Up And Don't Break Up

"Hey, you're listening to world cafe. I'm totally Slinger today on the show. It's rubble bucket. Doc machine. Delays would rebel bucket has led by Calia trooper and Alex Toth they're both last musicians who share a love of jazz music detained clarinets. Your time signatures Callan Alex met in college more than fifteen years ago. They were couple for a long time, but they made their latest album sun machine during the transition. We were so excited to be at the beginning of the work anymore by the end Callan, Alex share the story of their break-up, which includes a whole lot of thoughtfulness and compassion and to nasty cali- cancer, Alex got sober to them engaged in a break-up ritual. So unique and so deep that I can't stop thinking about it. And somehow they turned that all into an album that sounds fun and dancy I'll talk to Alex in Cal in a moment. But they started us off with a performance of the song annihilation song. It's rebel bucket. Our cafe. Go to go looking for. King of with you. Two. How could it be? I was looking for to the way he made me stop, then three. Sure. You have. Shoe is not. This is. This is. Begins. Be looking. To forget my. Three. Calvin. Sure do. Shoe? Another round and short dome. Pretty you had me with my hands out a show. And then. live here at world. Cafe that is so much fun? That's an eyelash in song of sun machine by rebel bucket. Alex Toth and cow trailer. Welcome back to world cafe highs. One of the standout things about your your band is that you to core founding members play horns, I'm sure people ask you about this all the time. But it's not everyday that that brasses the focus I guess of the core of a band. So I wanted to ask each of you, if you would tell me a little bit about how you ended up playing the horn instruments that you play maybe Cal will start with you. How did you is it baritone sax that you're playing? Yes, good. I think we both started our horns in middle school whenever they gave us the option to play an instrument. I think I saw like some videos of like jazz music, great jazz musicians playing I liked how their cheeks puffed out. But I think those actually trumpet, but I was like maybe you can do that sex too. Yeah. I like to say that we're a horn positive band. Yeah. Well, you are and you also I mean, you don't see that many women picking up the the giant baritone? Yes. That's it was definitely that was a huge one for me just to like be reactionary against all like the assumption that girls would just play flute or clarinet. And which is there's nothing wrong with that. And I do play those now too. But but I just wanna like this big honking heavy like way too. Big for me when I was in fourth grade instrument, can you tell me how you navigate like bouncing between doing really progressive stuff on this acts while you're playing and singing in full voice. Like a second later. I they are completely tied for me. Like in my in my inside experience. It's like one instrument. It's like air in nose out. I remember a friend of ours. Juice airs once told me, he's a musician. We really love and he's like you sing like a sack player. And I was like man that's the best compliment I've ever gotten. What does that mean? I think he meant like precise. Precision and rhythm. And yeah, I love singing and playing an instrument. They really inform each other actually in particular on that song. The singing is very brass. Like it does sound like you're playing brass instruments. Yeah. Yeah. It sounds like areas coming coming through in that way. You probably I get that a lot too. Because I that people say I sing like Trump. My sound my voice sounds like a trumpet. How did you end up playing trumpet? Yeah. In third grade. They came with all the instruments, I was really short kid, and the trombone was too long, and I I was like a flute and clarinet or girls instruments, and you know, and then I and the Trump and had three buttons. So it seemed like the simplest and I was very sorely mistaken with that. But if you if you picked up an instrument you got to go to six great adventure at the end of the year. So I was like, okay. Related was a musical tripper is just like it's just like a motive. It's way too. Like incentivize you to pick up an instrument and joined Bennett, I love that. So you got to go to six flags and you've got a whole career out event. Yeah. I think certain point where I was like listening to psychedelic rock like Jefferson airplane and Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin and stuff. And I was like oh trumpet slam. I wanna play guitar, but I don't know something happened. I guess like I I was kind of like a way word kid. I was really hyperactive and stuff and my dad like help sign me up the jazz for teens program in Newark, New Jersey, New Jersey performing arts center, and I don't know something click there, and I was like learning miles Davis solos and Sonny Rollins is sax player, and I kind of found jazz, and it sort of saved my life. Like, it gave me this focus for my crazy like intensity neurosis, and then I just really became a whole identity. It's like when you're in high school and an adolescent, it's really it's intense and painful and. And to be like when I was sixteen like blasting Donald orchestra outside my vehicle and be like that's my punk. There's like that's like my punk music. De tuned. Clarinets weird time signatures. What's Donald tune? That. We should we short destroy Turkish bath. Okay. Let's play it. Yes. I love that. Turkish bath. Donna. Orchestra here. Cafe with with rebel bucket. Alex, toast and Cal trailer. So I wanna hear another live life song from from your new album rebel bucket from from sun machine. I think we're gonna hear you do the song fruity next, which I think people here, a jazz influence, and I sure I think maybe is that fair to say the spirit of spirit of I feel like for us jazz is more of like this route thing, but it's not, you know, I think more we let it bleed through in this record, maybe a little bit more. But it's not over. It's just sort of this foundation. We have where I think we're more for probably more inspired musically by like Bjork, and Radiohead and talking heads and dirty projectors. I like I think for the military of this one. I it's pretty has a lot of leaps in. I would say that. I mean, I don't know to the extent that I was got melodic informed by jazz. Yes. It's actually funny because it was a Lear that. Misunderstood by Alex. I wrote it. So the lyric was the peach tree skipped a year of fruiting. And like I wanted to kind of say I wanted it to be about fallow land like you need you. You have a lot of output one season. You're draining all the minerals from the soil. You're making these mazing creations in these flowers in the nutrients implants in everyone's you're feeding the world and then the next year or the next season you need to just be silent. And and what let the nutrients built back up in the soil. So I guess we're we're talking farming metaphors right here. And Alex was like, oh, I got love the song. Do the socal. I just love that part where you say fruity, like the peachy skipped to you fruity. And I'm like that's not what I said at all. Yeah. Sure. Us it made it to the party. But I've got a lot going on the lioness gave pleased for forty of body slipped to the flower route. Yeah. I said we'd walk around the city and catch a cabinet, exactly. Don prized with my. Peachtree skipped him fruity next job plows over ground. From the tree Baskin the. I bet you. Thing. Stepping swimming in mount nobody. As please for two. Is going on. That we. I'm sorry at reading magic must via the. Four body around. I said we city catch a cabin exactly pros with my. Peachtree skip to you. The next spring doctor on the groom. That's free at live here at world cafe by rebel bucket. That's on goes, so many places, and it ends on a note that makes me feel sad. Yeah. Is that fair? Yeah. Yeah. Got sad. When he said that really it's true. That was the moment on the album of sort of sobering reality. I think for me that made me dig deeper in the lyrics one. And know what the story of this record was about. So what is the story of this record about for you guys? Well, I mean, I guess it's to me. I feel like it's a product of of like a really massive transition. It's not always the direct subject matter of the actual the actual song aren't always about that transition. But it's we were able to kind of like we we were started out as meant to partners at the beginning of the and then we weren't anymore by the end. And so we were able to keep having a an artistic relationship and and in certain ways, like save our relationship. I think because we, you know. Keep the parts that we wanted to get rid of the parts that weren't really serving us through the world anymore. And so, yeah, I think that a lot of the songs kind of have that bittersweet. They're sad parts in a lot of these songs. I've definitely cried a lot like listening to them making them. And then like, I don't know. I just feel really proud that we were able to finish it. And and have it in be here. Talking about it and performing it. Yeah. I think for me. I I one of the things I noticed about what makes me sad in life like with when I get taken. I I kind of like sadness and melancholy. It's I prefer it to anti-iraqi and anger. You know, I feel like melancholy comes from times time passing like the sense of time passing. And it reminds me like right after colony broke up. I there was like a brief moment. I think it was like two days later. I'm like. I'm free as like riding my bike to. You know, it's like there's like a brief moment post break up where it's like, oh, you know, before like the crushing waves of sadness come in. But I was I bike to a poetry reading in queens. And this lady was reading her poetry. But she's she was a professor in a poetry teacher to. And she asked everyone to describe what beauty was like like what what makes something beautiful and the answer that some little girl came up with had to do with the that things that it ends like the the impermanent of thing is what imbues it with beauty, which is like, whoa. Okay. And so when you reflect back on memories, and it's just like the thing that hits you punt for me that I noticed for me that punches me is like whoa time. You know? Yeah. I think that you're explaining why that last line of the song pretty felt so resonant because it is about the cycle of growth skipping a year. Like, you put the passage of time in there with the term of about a person. So how did you? And if like, you guys be my guys here on how much you wanna talk about it. But you you met over a decade ago, you made this band together. Is that right? Yeah. Probably I think we met. Well, we met freshman year of college. And that was gosh. Two thousand one no come on nineteen ninety. That was twenty fourteen. Two years ago. I feel excited to say I've known someone for fifteen years. It was two thousand three two thousand that wasn't that far off. I okay, I don't like two hundred one ever we met in Latin jazz combo. Yeah. And even like create partners for a really long time. Yes, then. Yeah. And romantic partners for like a lot of that time too. Yeah. So how in the world you go through a break up and then make a fun record like sun machine. Oh, gosh. I think honestly like a big thing. We just we got we lucked out we lucked out with a graceful conscious. Uncoupling we have these matching triangular daisy tattoos that we that we gave each other stick and pokes they're both on your arms. You actually did those tattoos on each our gave them to other. That was like a break-up ceremony. Yeah. I mean, everything that you would like to about I'm fascinated to know more. There's a song called Roebuck its own triangular daisies. I mean, it goes really deep. I mean being a ban being in a band for. So so many years with a, you know, really young and making the stakes and lots of kids on the road, you know, emotional entanglements we lived at my dad's house in New Jersey for six months. There's this like different loves flying around and feelings everywhere, and yeah, we wrote triangular daisies after we almost broke up as a band in two thousand two thousand nine after a year, really hard shows. Second played us a little bit of the song. Okay. Trying days attack by rebel bucket. Yeah. I don't know. But say I mean, like, you know, in cal- got cancer like over five years ago. Right. Yeah. We'll five this this is the fifth year. So I don't know. My my awareness of time is now like twenty thirteen diagnosis or however, many years ju twenty thirteen and few months after that, I got sober. I realized I couldn't keep drinking the way I was drinking which was every day a lot. And you know, it's like the like this really scary hard thing kind of like forced us due to the the the terror is so terrifying. And it kind of forced us to like change, everything, you know. And I was I've been going on these meditation retreats, and I just got off of meditation retreat after you know, when cows doing or solo record, and that's when we broke up in March of twenty sixteen so I don't know we just lucked out with with the grace to do. It smooth way. It was still. Really hard. But the fact that rubble bucket bound us sort of like, you know, like our livelihood and our dreams that we'd built so many years. So it's like you're going to you. You're going to take back the nastiest things you say you're going to you know, what I mean like, I don't we don't want to mess this up like I get to dance around silly onstage paid to do that. Like like, let's let's do this. Well, you know, and we also had tools from from meditation retreats in and therapy and stuff like that, you know, and all these recovery tools. So I don't can you tell me like about tattooing each other to as a way to say goodbye like in a in a ceremony to sake by because those are like for people listening, if you mind if I describe what they like they're like each or maybe you can look they're a couple of inches square. They're not any. Yeah. There were not like very skilled tattoo artists. I I had been. Really, I loved it. So I kind of picked it up picked up the craft a little bit with the stick and poke, and yeah, I mean it felt like such a big deal like we had been through. So so much like with just gosh. Yeah. Everything Alex described with having this band for so long and be are, hyper focus, and then the cancer and the sobriety. And when it we realized that this was time, I think we both really wanted to treat it with treat this moment with a most respect because it wasn't like this wasn't a person. I'm like cool. Great. I'm gonna throw you away. And dispose we'll never see you again, quite the opposite. It was like how do I how do we put love into this moment? When did you write lemonade relative to to that time? Those right in that time Arizona's writing it. I realized I was making the chorus was written from Callus perspective towards me in a way. Yeah. I wouldn't that makes me one of look at Lear. Just listen. Do that. Sure. Yeah. I mean, the one that sticks out of my head is like, you're you're so mean or do they make you make you make? It was a little maybe. Yeah. Ouch now. Okay. I wasn't myself. Snow depends on who you ask. Would you play us this? Yes. Yeah. About. The would you like the? Mainly. One thing's really we used to read out road blades. Just me on the fouth in few both died late in neutral bay. It'll be shrinking lack of. Yeah. Unfortunately. Emphasis. Tuck vets. Flu test in the. Makes the vegetables. Screaming up to play. Thought a needed to? Whoa. Convince minutes jukebox honestly things grave. Could you help me? Was that way? Emphasis. That's lemonade live here at world cafe by rebel bucket explosive amazing ban that we have here their their new album is called son machine. And I'm talking to Cal trader and Alex Toth, the heart and soul of of rebel bucket. I guess really a break of album sun machine, and you saying in that song for real this is goodbye. But not really. Because he was a been here next to you. So you got you got cohabitation. Been sharing the hats all the different hats. You wear. There's friendship, you know, these all the possible things in a romantic, you know, if you're somebody's, you know, significant other so it's romance cohabitation finances, and then like for us, creative collaboration and friendship. That's a lot of stuff. And you know, so we just gotta give we took. It was too much for too long and it just wore down. So we took out the romantic part and the cohabitation and it took us awhile. But it's gradually and good spot. Now for the other three it's spaghetti better. And better it's pretty it's the immediate pretty quickly. The creative stuff was like an immediate that that was the quickest thing to happen because we would take all this time apart, and then like kind of test the waters like can we be in a room together where you know, we're mixing recording. And then like take another big break. And then like pretty soon we're like we would be having a little like we would do post production sessions at at. Alex is my older are all the pardon, but he's still lives there. And and we would just be like all of a sudden, these amazing ideas of becoming out and we'd be playing these wild horn lines, and like make these insane vocal parts and all these like, adding layers layers of keys, and then before we know it all these hours would have gone by. And we were like having the best time ever before the break-up. When we first started writing some machine we tried to do that. We got we got through one song. It didn't make the record in working on a song in the room together. And really quickly like the smallest gestures would set the other one off, you know. So that was such a volatile place. Yeah. Just like it just is too much. Loops I think just like the neural pathways probably just to. Yeah. Just too much you project on another person. Are they mad at me? Do they think I'm bad bub-bubba? You know, like in the slightest thing like hitting space bar two quick. You know is like what what are, you know? An and so it's really nutty stuff. But it's just by by having by the by saying goodbye to. To the being romantic partners in living together it gradually just opened up bandwidth. And and then we could we can get back to that original creative spark that we had in the beginning. Anyway. What life is? All right here, we go. This is ripple bucket. Invented. Where to go. How you got? You. New bedroom. Ghost? Stupid. That's what. Just to get. How did chill the go? With the lighting. Take. Just. From. Timing. And. Can. Space to go to windows are nice that way. I will not. Ending on a giant explosion of amazing sound rebel bucket. Their new record is called son machine. Alex Toth Cal trae ver- ringleaders of this this rebel bucket machine. Thank you both. So so much, you're amazing human beings. And I really appreciate it state. You very much for saying that in for having amazing questions that like fun to talk about cool, man. We'll come back again. Thank you. Thanks. Thanks spoil. Cafe.

Callan Alex Alex Toth Cal trae Alex Toth Trump New Jersey Cal Calia Calvin Jimi Hendrix Donald orchestra Newark Bjork Callus Bennett Led Zeppelin Donna professor Peachtree
Episode 134: UFC Gustafsson vs. Smith | Joshua vs Ruiz Jr.

Big Brown Breakdown

1:22:11 hr | 2 years ago

Episode 134: UFC Gustafsson vs. Smith | Joshua vs Ruiz Jr.

"What is happening y'all few housekeeping notes for you Cleveland this weekend? Thursday Friday, Saturday in Cleveland documents, he assumed after that Burbank with Michael Rapaport and friends that is June eighth after that I'm in Vegas was with Callan one show, one night, only thing Calgary Europe, then brea, Cade dot com for tickets. What's up fam-, if there's one thing that, you know, about me, you know, I love my coffee, and these guys have been my ride or die coffee mates. I'm talking about black rifle coffee. Black rifle coffee is the best coffee on the planet. Not only the best it's owned and operated by vets. That's right. So guess what? When you buy coffee with you by the blue thin line rose. The big Brown rose, the fricken, sniper rose. They got it all men when you when you do buy from black rifle a portion of its sales, go to veteran causes. You're missing out man. You miss out on great coffee, and a great cause black rifle coffee dealers rose to order coffee director. Your doorstep. You can sign up for subscription. So you get the best coffee every month. It's like Christmas every month drops up your door to lovely bags of coffee. It's a no brainer. Visit black rifle coffee dot com slash shop. And you receive ten percents off your entire order. Not just the big Brown, dark rose. Which I think is the best rose possible all the roast. Go to black rifle coffee dot com slash shop and get temps on off. That's black rifle coffee dot com slash Shaab for ten percent off traded for some fact year then got ride in the face. Got win a baby Fu-kang over the place. But I the crown with Keita. Staunton knowing never know hand. Rapper Paul this makeup raised against a man. Oh man. It is Tuesday. We're usually record on Monday, but yesterday Memorial Day and yet a fire and the kid you can listen to if. If you're missing the sound of my voice, or Brian the kid couns voice, but yeah. Use the reasons coming out late Memorial Day and the Malka squad takes holidays off. That's news to us. Isn't it chin? Yeah. Man, we typically don't and also Chinden get them now says. No. I there's an Email where k we can't do Monday. You know the teams off as cool. It's just plan on Tuesday, I thought chin was included on that Email turns out. He wasn't chink on me. Text me money. Moyer's your man where yeah I'm like home. What's up? He's all time becoming a mall. CF fight on the keys got shit. There's no below the bell, Mike, dad. Oh adult. You fam-. He's all know as like my bad that falls on the weekend. Dude, I could've done stuff that night to watch my friends had barbecues. They're drinking eating because like I have to go home early. I can't do this. I gotta wake up at five in the morning. You would would there's no traffic men, and we don't usually on start this to what eight nine it's always good to get here early though, if you want not today, but there's a Memorial Day, there's no traffic. Yeah. Which is great zero trans awesome. Coming here with no traffic. I won't be nice like that. All the time don't traffic. Yeah. That'd be great. Today's traffic was brutal. Brutal. It's good to be back them. And this is the last show were doing in the studio. This was a temporary studio. The new one will look exactly the same almost identical because they're going to be able to take this artwork off the walls, and I'll see the backdrop and my flashing neon sign this. They're gonna have to repaint the Venice Kenny spot. But I'm sure we can find the artists get that gone. But for the most part, it's going like executive, same meal. I dunno. Nothing was again, changed its new studio new spot, and everything's under there. So king, the sting find the kid blow, the belts, on Jim Brown studios anymore, so and it's right up the street will be insane. Anta monica. So we're looking forward to that. We're looking forward to that. There's no king in the sting this week. Don't kill me. Not my fault. Theo is playing fucking grab ass with kangaroos in Australia. And he gets back, I think this Sunday, so we did backload a few guys in those drop. The shit. He's been gone for about three weeks. Yeah, but they all dropped at the right days saying dry day. So that's the only weeks, so we're getting to give you a little, I don't know what are we doing for that? We're doing like a little sizzle reel of dancing and shit. Just as good. Sorry, guys this week to be a light one. Just give me a light breeze for you for the king, this thing fans. But yeah, so there you go. Fine kid, yet this guy everything else, they'll be back. We'll be back to work in a new studio. Looking forward to that. It's good to be back man is good. You know it's weird doing fine. The kid I before this now. It's kinda strange. Yeah. It was weird. Isn't it weird? Yeah. Did you just use to routine? I guess you she used to routine? And then I don't know it's just different men. Different. I want to give a special shout to all the fans that watched you'd be surprised and made it what it is. I can't think you guys enough for the international fan. If you haven't seen it, you can watch it Showtime dot com, promo code Shaab. You watch the whole thing fo free in watch the dropping a meta world. Peace documentary this month there, they got the Wu Tang. Doc, dropping Duce's. Miro's on there. You can get all that free include my Showtime special, when he goes, Showtime dot com, promo code Shaab. So you can watch it there for international fans. I listen, I see you guys man, I guess upset I had no idea Showtime was in how I didn't know Showtime was international. Did you know idea I had no clue? I didn't even think about it. I just assumed it's still nineteen everything would be international say, there's some ways you can watch it but you guys got to do what you gotta do. You gotta do you gotta do. It is what it is man as long as people see it. That's all I care about. And everyone watch it just leading into the videos leading in. We're over three point something million view. So it's insane man. And yeah, we're just getting started. We just getting started back on the road. All new material, I will be in Cleveland this Thursday. Friday, Saturday, hilarity in Cleveland. Yeah. Hilarious ruin keeps rant and rave in and also Cleveland, I've never been to Cleveland been a Columbus a few times, love Columbus, her Cleveland's pretty dope. And I am balls deep in the Browns. I'm part of the dog pound ever since the hard knocks aired a I a fair a fan I jumped on him now when they were hot now when they had Beckham. But I was on a man, I was really hoping they drafted homeboy Mayfield from Oklahoma. And once they did that, that's my that's my team. I'll say I'm from Denver somewhere. He's gonna fuck with the Broncos but usually the Broncos aren't out here. But in general, I watch all the Browns games, which most of the Browns games and I'm definitely buying. Fuck in Brown's Gan. You'll see me rocket on stage. Do you go Beckham? Do you may feel? You may feel d think hundred percent Mayfield. I'm big Beckham fin. Holy shit to say Joe McCoy would sign less to play for said Joe McCoy signed for the Cleveland Browns, Jesus Christ. That'd be a huge pickup. Yeah, it's just fun to watch man there that team that's just the team to tune into right now. The team that went from shit to just be in the shit right now. It's. They should win the division at that tough. I mean Pittsburgh's always been hanging around, but with Big Ben there and it's kind of toxic and they've lost, you know their two biggest stars. I think the Browns of good shot. I'm not ready to say they're going to be Super Bowl chance. But I would bet and I don't know what the odds are that a shit ton of money. They go to the playoffs, especially if everyone stays healthy, the only thing that would fuck would be injuries. Number eight hundred the Super Bowl with that lineup linking the secondary in their offense and what they've added. You can see, but it's all chemistry man. You know, they got a mix well and you know, it's not especially NFL it's not really about superstars as much as chemistry. But if you Don again, imagine being a lifelong Browns fan and how bad they suck for. So they've always been the laughing stock, I've kind of like the Browns ever since. You know, I was Eric Metcalf days, I loved, Eric, Metcalf, Willie mcginest when he was there those, those were the days men. But yeah. Football season's not even close, but they do have cream hunt, which is gonna be he's out for a little bit. But they got Nick chubs, who's a fucking monster. And then just receiving lineup is filthy. Make Phil Thor's get D line, this got it all. But again, it's chemistry who knows what the fuck is going to happen. But it's fun. It's fun to watch. But by far the most even if you're a hater, let's say you're in Pittsburgh. It's still going to be fun to see what happens with the Cleveland Browns. That's the message here, it, whether you hate him or love him. You're still it's you gotta be curious on what the hell's going to happen with those guys Chen, you've been a Browns fan for so long. It's been a while. Yeah. It's been a grind for those guys fucking grind and they're finally here, man. But yeah. Long story short. I'm been Cleveland this fucking week man Thursday, Friday, Saturday hilarious. I got my boys Derek Assan with me the comedy store, regulars. They will be there man. So we can have a grand old time in Cleveland, though, shows almost sold out. Good fat, K dot com. To see me this weekend in Cleveland after that, June eight at flappers, and I am bringing some Mosser's with me bring in Michael Rappaport. He's going to be jumping on the card. Am I boy Fahim who's? Comics comic man. If you've been to the comedy story might be the best one walk in the, the place might be the funniest dude, who's not in international superstar megastar, that's walked around the comedy store, so he's going to set as well. So it's just Shaaban friends, man. So it's me rap for Fahim Derek, a son I think Derek might be on the road. So it's gonna be probably Assan Rappaport Fahim myself, and that's at flappers Burbank. June eighth then off that men. Vegas with count. Some fun dates coming up, man burbank's and be dope. Cleveland's me fantastic Burbank with the squad, Rappaport Fahim, and Assan. Vegas with Callan mean count. Having done a show in a hot second together and that's me doing thirty minutes. Stand up counting thirty minutes of stand up that is not a life in the kid. What do those really anymore, but we are thinking about doing find the kid three D two oh, we had some shit in the works with that we're. To figure out then after that. I mean Calgary Yuk yuks. That's in the summer time I was in Calgary's fucking freezing. I'm excited for Calgary have been there in a hot second. And then brea him in, I haven't been Br bride was the first show ever did live now sold out crowd, and brand. Now they've redone haven't been back since they've redone it. I think it's seats like five fifty or some shit four hundred huge now but I'm excited about Bray. Everyone rants and raves about braille, I show that was like solo show. Right. I show I ever find kid live was all okay. First time ever got on stage. No open mics. Nothing was in brea from the live crowd. I like sold out crowd. I wish don't have that recorded man. The one time to record it. I know that'd been cool. They've been really cool. Got Sunday's just aren't the same are they man. No game of thrones. These. If you guys heard my. If you haven't checked out tiger belly with Bobby leeann his girl Colli Colella Kaleida dime piece collide show to Bobby Lee. But we're talking about game of thrones on there, and he gave the best alternate ending of all time where, you know, the cripple as he's getting strolled away turns around and his fucking is that of a white Walker that would been so sick. I thought it was the most brilliant idea. I don't know why they didn't think of it. There's some documentary can watch now though behind the scenes for the whole season, it two hours long though, I was going to watch last time. I wow. Wow. Two hours Jonathan it's just that's long, dude. That's a long view shows. I do love the show and I'm definitely gonna watch it has anyone wouldn't here seen it, right. I mean, we, we love the show. We love the show. We've been talking about all fucking season. But how that's good to hear. It's interesting news that yo you could use far as production stuff. Yeah, you're a could be cool to, I'm sure it's some cool stuff. They said during the table read when they were going through season. Eight I don't know if you see it some, the cast members were crying, reading, because they found out what happened to their characters somewhere piss somewhere crying Jon snow's all fuck. Yeah. He's if there's video of him like fucking tearing up man, pull out of work into it. I get it man. But no fucking no game of thrones. Ie's. No frikkie. American idol Sundays, you start the same man. So Mondays though, sure noble, baby, you on that Chenobyl case right now who's trying to get some fucking radiation. No Shinno is on HBO. I fucked up on the phone kill. I thought it was a mini series. I thought I was only three episodes long third one like this out end. It's kind of all right? Whatever it's not I don't know how long is when they mean mini series. They just mean ceres. Ninety eight percent of people like this show it's fucking ratings are through the roof. It's fucking good. Man. It's super good. It's about this nuclear plant that fucking blows up, it true stories Chenobyl, and then there's radiation, like the highest ever on planet earth. And, you know, basically the Russian government lies everyone and people are dying. They're still suffering from it now. I don't think anyone can live there now but it's pretty fucking fascinating. It's crazy. How tied to cover all this up crazy. That's a true story. This is scary to me than any like, in zombies, white walking because it's actually happened. People can super fucked up man. They said the radiation was insane insane men, but it's really cool. It's a it's five parts. Fuck. There's only one left. K one more week for me. Good. TV. The monday. Fantastic. I wish it was a little longer other than that night. Fucking been watched jailbirds. Anyone seeing jailbirds post about it. Oh oh, jailbirds on Netflix, dude, you haven't seen it. No, the prison show. And yet, in, in the, it's so fascinating. Right. Because men and women, you know, it's, it's, it's a jail jailbirds what I call Joe jailbirds. I said, prison, it's jail which for those, you know is actually worse than prison because prison, there's no on known in jail. It's all on known everyone's fucking on high alert, and they're aggressive and it's chaos, but this is men and women. So the men are in floors above them. And the women are another floor off-season mix Mingo, but they're two different floors. And so the it's fascinating, the only way they communicate like the way they basically send DM's they call it talking on the bowl, so they clean out because the sewer system runs down. Right. So they clean out the water and the toilets. And they talk to each other. They call it meeting on the boat bowl, so they talked to each other, but like they have to clean out stuns it shit. They got a clear out. They pass notes and fuck in food through the bowl meeting on the bowl. I don't even make sense. Yeah. And there's like love stories happen on the bold, and they found out one dudes like talking to several chicks on the bold, and there's all this drama then of shit else going on. And then if the girls don't talk to the dudes on the bowl, they get upset. So they flood the lower things would like shit in the in the piss water. It's pretty fascinating, and it's, it's a frustrating show. They're just complete fuck ups, man. I'm complete fuck ups. They're separated, though. Right. The kid they're separate. Okay. So they just talk and like the call it fishing. That's what they caught fishing. They taught fishing. It's fascinating. Man. Talk to twos, in their faces yellow a lot of face status. A lot of face tattoos. Lot of just bad ideas just. Yeah. The main ones name is monster fasting, and then I found out afterwards she she got arrested again because she gets out. I think this the way it ends one of them. Spoiler. She she's jail. Right. So she gets out shake. I'm gonna totally redeem myself, and then they find out like she's back in. This should make so many fucking mistakes when tough life. What's up tough life? When you're in that life. It's hard to get out. You know what I'm saying? Yeah. That jail life. Been a jail. You've been jail chin. No fuck. That'd been dope. Yeah. Not good, man. Not good. So yeah, I'm all out of TV basically man. I got the act on Hulu, which is about that, that fucking crazy mom when you watch his show, it's about the mom in mommy, dearest, the true story. The mom, who basically just made her kid think that she was sick and crippled for years, and years and years, gypsy, gypsy rose, and then eventually gypsy Blanchard and then usually what happens is, she figures out that her mom's been lying tour, and she's sick of shit. And then they murder, that's a true story, too boyfriend who murders her? Dope show though I'm only two to episode Dan sunny, some new shit to watch. DM Isam, good shows, really documentaries man wants a next good documentary coming out. It's only so many can do their show. It's hard to make a good on that meta. World peace on not just being a Homer here that meta world peace. When I saw clips of it, amazing the way he grew up in fucking, New York, Brooklyn, basketball, and, you know, just the whole his hit how he suffers from mental illness, in a family runs in the family and the in the fight that he got into epic fight, you know, it mess was that an Indiana Square Garden, a free were happened. No, it's not massacring regarding. But rare again, the fight he was laying down and gone. The fight. But then more wate I forget where I'll get up to check that, that, that documents should be pretty. I think it's coming out as was it, it was in Detroit was it. And it's interesting because Pacers would the Detroit Pistons fan, so you get what is Detroit Yuccas. Ben Wallace was involved in. That's, that's what kicked off the moss fight, but it's interesting to hear his take on it. And now him in the guy who threw the water kept, we punch are like super close their friends now. But his take was he was chilling out lay nothing. Like I don't take part of this. Like I, I've been I, I know I'm known as a, you know, kind of a bad bird. I don't wanna be fucked with an when he's laying down, like, I'm just I'm protesting this, then he gets hit with the water and then it's fucking on. Maybe it was a bear either way though. Pretty crazy, man. It's been weird with no fights, right? It's weird because we're so used to fight. It's fucking strange where there's no, you have see. No, Bela Tor me. No, no boxing. There's nothing going on. But I think for the next three weeks, we had some hitters. We had some hitters she would jump into it, what he got in Surakarta events. Yeah. Let's do it man already. This episode is brought to you by blue blue man. He has you remember the days when you're rearing to go now you can increase your performance and get that extra confidence in the sack with blue dot com. Blue brings you the first tool with the same FDA approved active ingredients as Viagra, NCI, Alice. You know what I'm talking about get that Boehner. Right. Anytime you want day or night since they're Jubal. They work up to twice as fast as a pill chew, boom, you're ready to go. It's that easy. This is. It just for guys can't perform is through the guys that want that golden snitch little extra. You've Sada love. You know what I'm talking about. Most guys talking game. But if you're one and done blue can even help you fall through around two three four who knows man. Blue was prescribed online ships straight to your door in a discreet package. It's not like yo get the right Boehner. No, it's not that discreet. No in person doctor visits no waiting of the pharmacy. There's no awkwardness. None of that blue shoe is made right here in the US of A and since it prepares ships direct it's cheaper than a pharmacy. So get your bone, right. So visit blue dot com. Get your first shipment free when you use the promo code Shaab just pay five dollars shipping. That's B L U E to dot com. Promo code shop to try it for free. Get your Boehner on this is breaking news. Your favor is out of retirement, and they're setting a fight with him and Rick some rookie Simone Simone with the powerful mullahs. There's one mullet better than THEO Vons. It's Ricky Simone. Interesting that. Your is coming back. I love your. I just I don't maybe he's bored in retirement. His a lot going on super successful dude outside the cage wonder what brought him back especially to fight. You know, he's not it's not like for him. He's a legend. So huge shot for Ricky Simone. It's a fight of his life, so huge for Ricky Simone. It's all plus it's for your ride to make a ton of sense. I guess you just wants to see how feels maybe it's like you don't want jump in their right to the top. Because he retired, you know, basically at the top top three. So gets out. Outta love to see if I between him and T J dillashaw. But I'll see TJ's out from the two years. So I thought maybe come out every time it just fight TJ because be such a big fight. Bet could still happen. Obviously, you're is doing this. I'm into it. I think that's a tough fight for your IRA tougher easier said than done man. Ricky is no joke that mullet is Noel punk what else you got this year key, Thurman, it says he's calling our Conor McGregor, but he's more answering those TMZ guys. They're like, what do you think Conor McGregor? So he was just saying how Connor McGregor should fight him in boxing? Well, because that's where it makes them more money. It's kind of silly headline. You know, you make more money in boxing ring. Anyway. He said addressing Conor McGregor boxing Connor. He's joking men in Boston advantages. Do you have skills with the left? You have skills with the right footwork. One thing Connor doesn't have his condition. He does he does not have condition. He's not ready for these chimps ship fights Floyd. Wotton down beamed like he's playing fight night Kay. He he wanna talk the trash. He wants to think actually got hands. Come on, man. I wish this was, I wish he'd bring the what else you get this year. Speaking of Carter he messed up his hand saying, whether it's broken up, but it's in a cast his left hand. He's been training a lot, though. Right. Like he's been trained. More thought maybe he's looking at a July comeback. They were talking about July, they're talking about July and then not he just did a podcast. I haven't listened to it yet. I want to with Robbins. Yeah. But then Tony Robbins got flagged for a bunch of sexual assault. So I don't know if they got taken down. Well, I mean it's all over all the stuff that he said like how he didn't really lose to. I haven't seen any of I've heard I just saw it was on there, because it popped up on my on one of my things. So, but what you listen to it, you, I heard other shows talk about what he said on there. So he used saying how because the audience they're not MMA fans. Right. So tony. Rob ya know? So there's believing everything that's that he sends. So he was talking about his foot is the reason why he lost his injured, right? Yeah. He was. He was winning the Floyd. Where the fight in the beginning. But she kind of was he was. But then the alternative that is we'll Floyd was just feeling. You out letting you. So it looked like a fight, but it's pretty black and white, he did win some rounds. Yeah. But he convinced people in the audience from what the they're doing. I think it was a I think it was all fucked. Oh, there's people Nadia. He does it like a lie about it. I've seen that show before to Tony Robbins. I didn't know you had to show it's a talk show kind of, but it could be a. Alive podcast. Maybe is video or is it I saw pictures of it. So I didn't see actual video. Tony roundabout from these wonderful beach house. Oh oh, yeah. Fucking turnarounds. He's like three million dollars just to Texas. That's interesting. Well, yeah. Because with would the hardcore MMA fans Connor Saint certain things? It's not gonna fly right? But with Tony Robbins fans collar could say I could beat him with one hand. I just didn't feel well that night. And they, they just don't know so that I go cool. They don't call them McGregor. I'd be willing to bet to that audience knows Connor doesn't know Khabib so when he talked about be there don't they don't know who he's talking about. There it is. Damn. He doesn't beachfront with that. Fuck in the Steve Jobs microphone on the side of the mouth like that. You're seeing comics do comedy like that. No, that looks that's going to be weird right there. Nightmare. Please. Don't do that. Man, I definitely watch this shit. Yeah. How long is it? I don't know. So it's just him. But does he he says he wants a another fight with Floyd? Mayweather. He wants to fight Floyd. And he wants a rematch with could be. It could be when I see so he but today I land the final blow the night right on his brother's is oh talking about the ball. Oh, okay. Wow. I can't believe they got into all this. So at the end of the day I landed the final blow the night, right on his brother's is socket mcgaughey said, on Robin's podcasts, although the match didn't go, my way, the fight went my way, and trust me when I tell you, Tony, this war is not over. If this fight does not happen again, if it does not get reset. It's on them the running away. I'm here for the fight. I'm here for the rematch. So Tony's entire audience now, which is I'm millions and millions go. Oh Connor wants that fight. It's not having because of them. Yeah. All right. And that guy. Leonard Eyler be. I definitely want to watch it now. Definitely want to watch us interview. Now. Timeout letter. The guy who that's his promoter or manager of he runs Mayweather promotions. He's interested. Obviously, I just the market's not there. I don't think the markets there from Casuals or respect hardcore didn't want it in the first place. But the casualties. It's not really seats on available, right? Oh, because that's because this is another sign only give the side. It is forty six minutes long from definitely watch out when I get home. I got to be honest. It's kind of nice that he didn't go on, like a major MMA outlet. I think I think he's going to be less. I think he's gonna be more comfortable talking to Tony than he is say, a guy who's a journalist like a loop Thomas, like a Ben folks, or Brad Akimoto. Like he's gonna be way. We're comfortable in just a little loosey goosey stone out. Gems talking to Tony Tony's I can push him. Tony's not gonna be like, well when you got this or the you know, he put that guess ever in the final ones. The original brother who was on top of the cage, he's talking about the fighting he broke free from the security, ran one hundred miles towards me. He threw a right hand as he the right hand. I through a left hand. Boom, there's image and aerial image of the right hand just whipping my face fan. Just landing flush down the pipe the final blow the night, so that's it. I win. So what makes Connor Grady's painting a narrative? Right. So. It's, it's tough, and I and if you're Conard, he's doing the right thing painting, the narrative that he wants with the power that he wants because Kabaeva going go on Tony Robbins could be. Doesn't have the same opportunities the same voice in the states as could be as Conor McGregor. So it could be can go to Russian Pete to be compete, the nerve heavy once in Russia, Ben America, the narratives based off what Connor says, unfortunately. But that's what makes Connor special. So with Connor San all this. These people have no idea about the sport. Or like man, can you I can't wait seem Khabib go again? I would much rather fight Khabib than McGregor. I, I don't think you should fight either right away. I should find whether one. Yeah. So I may whether in Khabib should not be the next fight for, for Connor if he's going to fight again, but I'll seize incident coming back. There's, there's definitely the fight I think you should do in the see if he's going to continue to fight, I think it was smart. He went on Tony Robbins, very smart more fans more fans more mainstream, not so knee to sports, come more and more niche as its. Spines. Paywall. He knows what he's doing. Yeah. The narratives being paint like we haven't heard from him at all right? We heard from his manager does not the same just not the same at all about his manager Elliot Belaziz ESPN may posted this tweet last week is just about the top guys in the in the division five division. And then, so this is the immature is a graphic on out because Kabaeva Emporia set for Sironi or set. Yeah. Yeah. So they got Connor and just engage. You. So i'll. Yup. Dulles east took that graphic and tweeted it himself. But then he put a chicken head on Connor and a clown face on Ferguson. When we right on face on Ferguson. They had issues before they used to talk about before, but not real. Now they respect each like Houston media, as being Tony cruel. We see each other. We have respect for each other put a clown face, especially with Tony's going through xactly not rooting for Tony. How could you not root for Tony right now? You know, the guy came from a rough kind of mental health issue and ice fighting Cowboys at along laugh known deserves the title shot. More to make sense. Why do that? Yeah. So this is what he wrote a real champion fighting the number one contender, and a clown, financial cowboy and a quitter fighting someone who will take this soul away. That's just him trying to get gateway. The fight, he's as manager, you guys know gay cheese. I can talk shit really. So well, that's just him trying to do his job. I do not see Kana taking the gates. You fight. Well, Ferguson replied ain't no clowning around you fake fuck. Hilarious. Ain't no clown around you fake. Fuck you better. Leave my name out your mouth for I mop, the mat with your sorry ass. You ain't shit. Without your homeboys just snitch. No pride. No Gus just like your paper chump could be seen person soon. So it gets a little personal bussing senior person, you, you know, they're going to there's going to be an issue in person. And this is a last this out ended. So this is Elise response, you fighting onto the car, June eight you what's up with the lame. What's up with grammar you fighting on the undercard, June eight folks on that shut your mouth talk is cheap. Next time you see me do something about it punk. Boy. And then this is what Ferguson wrote, I can't stoop to your level anymore. You're an embarrassment to the sport to all my fans to focus for you and anyone else, yet, I'm fighting on the undercard for UC to thirty eight. But I don't mind it's champ shit. Only Ellie something, you never know about praying for you, and then all ends with a Leib says. I'm gonna prompt gonna pray for you too. Good night champ. Hand on fits. They got eight retweets. That's what's bummer. That whole exchange was a bummer. What the exchange even came up the that ALI'S doing that to Tony was very weird. I mean it makes fun for, you know, we're just living a soap opera. Now with M A and boxing. So it makes it fun. Give people like me something to talk about or that let something to talk about for Tony. And this goes for anyone, I think. It is it also got brought to my attention for Kevin Durant. Who's going back and forth or even John Jones. Or Durant, who who went back and forth. He went back and forth with an analyst. Right. That's whatever that guys in the businesses, a little similar same thing here. But Durant, even went to guy who had I don't know, two hundred followers who has, like an Agatha avatar. The, the usually the, the rule of thumb is, is you never punched down. So if Kevin Durant got criticized by LeBron you go at LeBron you go Harnett LeBron you guys can engage because you're on the same playing field. If you can't engage the trolls, you can't engage, you know, those who can't critique. So you do not want engage with them. That doesn't make sense men. They, they get fuel and energy of that. I guess what, Tony here gives us something to talk about. But same time Tony does have a huge fight come up. I really think it, but also could be a lot of all these guys aren't gonna talk shit. So this is why Ali being the manager. He he kind of does it form. You know, people are talked to get you talking about it. True. The what I don't like is, let's say, Tony could be Tony Ali saw each other if they in a physical altercation that's, that's where it crosses the line. It seems like that could happen as percent. Yeah. Hundred percent. It. Good chance it happens. And you hit the nail on the head when, like Tony is going through all this stuff. I'm just surprised that he would want to do something like that to him. Now it's yeah. Yeah. It's just like you know as, as a community and your you're in this. Kind of that, that realm you're in that universe Ali like when one guys down, it's more than fighting when a guy suffering from mental illness and personal issues. You really don't go after that this kind of like baseball. Those are the unspoken rules, man. The specially if you're not fighting him. And you're a manager. Yeah, anyhow, this found interesting this AG Mckee and Kimball slices. Son baby slice. This is them training. Getting ready punch each other in the stomach. But if you look at this and live from the nineteen seventies listen to this. Trying to do internal bleeding. Is that the goal here? That doesn't make you tougher. That's this is the most meat had thing I've seen in quite some time. Well baby slice fell down after doing the last punch, you probably has internal bleeding. There. Oh, that, that does not you're not strengthening your Oregon state body shots when you punch each other and stomach. There's core excising due to strengthen your core. That's not really the way to go. So she that fucking hard. What else you got? Yeah. Super hard, a little update on stage north. There's no news yet that if he's back hasn't even heard that he, he's back from Singapore, yet it's gonna be tough for him to fly that surgery in the how swollen his is. But there's still piece I'm surprised it was that good of a recovery. And then he just tweeted today. This picture. Still trying to get that fucking sponsor. Give me like in our, I wrote you look considering what he went through. He looks really good. And lean body stuff that looks like it's an American store. Doesn't it? Curing does. Maybe he's back. I don't. Yeah. I can't imagine lean body. Well, let's that down and all that stuff. High looks pretty shady on the far right? That looks like it'd be in Asia. Got to be honest. Okay. But this is ready to drink in English that he's definitely somewhere, right. He's at like a supplement store. Yeah. Yeah. There's metrics at the bottom automo- Douchen has is that the only pictures posted. Yeah, he posted different picture from moral day, but it wasn't it's an old picture. What was the one hit him? Mr. Steal your girl in the fuck in robe there. This one. Yeah. This is update. What did he say do? I look. The nine thousand Roman right? What else you get Francis in Ghana versus judo Santos. He was moved up from the UC to thirty nine card that huge stat card which on Jones why I wonder why they moved 'cause rob Robbie. Lawler, entire Woodley member, turn will these all that's right. Yes. These guys are the new the new main event for UCLA Minneapolis. And so you'll see fight night. Yeah. PIN finite. Fuck y'all take it and there's a Carter here. This is the fight night. Yeah. For mega bene- Vida show to join Ben Evita's Daime, my recur, go Martin Dover. So do Pettus romo's. That's a phone air. Ganders Meraz fund one. Well, it's a good thing. They moved to the that Carter had been tough without that made event. Thing is, though, fighting for Megan benefit flyway. Yeah. Yeah. I know keeping that division alive. Huh. They keep cutting people. Right. What else you got Francis were JD s a great fight? How what's the odds on that? Do we know we can find it? Can you go there quick? And then the meantime, USC. Has has a new partnership with the CD company called Aurora cannabis, multimillion dollar deal year. Deal. It's going to be doing it inside the PI. So they're going to be researching to. Yeah. Researching CBD for brain, health and inflammation, all that stuff. They can help their athletes with. I love it. Man. You guys know how big of an advocate, I am for CBD for the longest the US into. They signed this deal was using my CBD pure spectrum. Oh, yep. So listen. What's good for CBD is good for the whole business of CBD, the more legit CD products out there and the more strict testing the better it is for the entire ecosystem, CBD oil. So more, the merrier man more the merrier Aurora cannabis to help lead to re- research. That's cool man. Yeah. Definitely cool. Yes, he sees a fucking miracle juice, man. This picture is quite shocking. Right. So there's Chris cyborg. That's thank you. And he looks good. Crazy. Like I mean it doesn't look buff anymore, but he does look rate here. Cut looks like he's lost some weight. He's been through some crap. Oh, yeah. Yes. And crap secrecy here. You know, he was a heavy heavy drinker. So he's liver. Finally, my body finally caught up with all the my wildlife blue gasket on my liver. You never wanna blow gaskets in your body, but yeah, nice transplant. Everything's wound right long? It was not without complications. Oh, I died, five times operating table had over six strokes, but I'm still here. This is the hardest fight I've ever had. I've spent one hundred seven days in intensive care unit while six strokes, man. Jesus christ. He looks fuck in healthy dude. He has really good hair. Is he like houses haven't seen a navy? But the last time I heard him he started pretty decent good for him. Numbers we hit the odds for JD Francis. Minus for Francis. Junior juniors on a dog might plus when seventy I would've she got Paul Himmel analogy. This new one is him attacking the m may community and saying that he wants to put automobile in an an a coma. So effing coma, an effing coma, the main thing if you break it down talking about 'em may fan saying, how MA superior to boxing because it's tougher. It's more dangerous and stuff like that. And now his arguments, obviously, there's more deaths in boxing. It's more dangerous because you're in the people's head more often. But then m may guys are like you're wearing these big padded gloves. Right. So he's talking smack on them. So this is this is Emma may fancy of never fight defending the sport of a may against a world class boxer. Basaltic volcanoes a ton about MMA but he does have his fuck in doctorate in boxing. So he put when you when you're piece of shit community in them and making me it's not piece of shit is just toxic. It's just very dark like negativity is, is, is what MMA they just thrive off of it. I don't there's no other sport like it. It's true. They just love negative shit. I don't know. That's what it is man, put when your piece of shit comedian, your piece of shit people talk about we fight with pads, and how your sport you're in a dangerous sport like ima, may when nothing of the sort happens to, which you is why you have a circus fan base, because it's like wrestling, then the day, no matter what happens to you guys tapping assures, you're gonna see the neck, the that guy next week tapping shoes. You're gonna see that game a few months and boxing, you don't have those assurances. So there's a respect level even to, to the trash talk that we have. Being surpassed. Now, it's been overcome with this garbage that we have from this other community MMA for me. I think the way you solve it seeing one of their own in a coma, one of their own fucking coffin. Then you say you know what? This should is no joke. But there's some truth about poly saying there is no. There's no other culture like many cultures far as negatively and I, I don't know why that is. I don't know if just a generational thing visit because it was started. Online. I I don't know one guy loses a fight. He's the worst fighter in the world. For one guy gets hit with right? Hand is awful at striking. It's just very bipolar. Very toxic. Boxing MMA is not more hardcore than boxing. Boxing, also sport where you have to do with heavyweight. There's a little exception, there's a little wiggle room, but you have to have years and years and years and years, and years of experience and hardships, to get to a level where you're going to even start to make money in MMA, because his a newer, sport, you could be professional in a day. You know it's it's, it's just a different playing field. So. Put on for anyone who's never fought put on an eight ounce boxing glove. And tell me how much padding you have. It's, it's there's nothing there just to protect the fives from Bassi breaking their fucking hands. There's not much there. Put watch the love that fucking Deontay wilder puts on and that Joshua put on anybody. Oh shit. These are not padding. This is not. It's not what you think it is. Those are clubs and they're secured with a hand wrap. That's basically could punch through cement to break people's faces in Joel's. It is not a thing of really of glory, or to soften, the blows, it ma-, it matter of fact makes it worse. But I've also never understood MMA verse boxing debate. I don't you can like both. I don't understand. I mean Polly's making it an made response. And I get it 'cause against so much ship from the enemy community, because of what happened with Connor. That's why this is happening. The debate doesn't make sense. You know what I'm saying? You don't you don't have to like one or the other. It's no different. Do you like football? Yeah. Do you like baseball? Yeah. Cool man, which one's tougher. I don't know. But if you're watching a high level, they're all really fucking good, man. They're all really, really good. But again with the enemy committee, it's it's coming from people have. Never competed in their lives. The keyboard, warriors arguing with a guy who's a world champion boxer doesn't make sense. He made a point that I thought was a good point too. So if in MMA there's ways out, and in boxing, the only way out is to either get knocked up or you have to literally quit. And you can't live that down. If you don't get off your stool. Yeah. So in boxing, so. You're going to take a much bigger hit in your career if you look for an easy way out. So let's say with a body shot and you stay down, if the crowd can tell you just kinda bitched out of, in stay down your Chris pretty fucked, and never may, if I want way out and we've seen it happen with multiple guys in very famous fighters. They get caught in a rear naked choke to they just don't feel like being in they tap where I we'll see him next week. It's, it's very, very different when it comes to that. You're not going to see a guy in boxing, fight the way Cowboys in three weeks, you know, or have a fight three weeks ago, and then turn around and fight right away in a big fight. Just doesn't work that way, in boxing, nor can you, you know with with the strip the head trauma. Polly has a point there, there's easier, there's easier Altoona may. But there's also way, more way more ways to lose an MA than there are boxing. All right again. No one wins in this debate, it, I don't know why it's a box boxing for some MA thing. No one wins in the beginning. Ravers vanilla ice cream. They're both great you why choose people. Take it so personal. You don't own me. You don't own boxing. Why would you are you for this? Already. So here it says could be teammates receive reduced suspensions for UC to forty two the two guys that were in that you'll see two Twenty-nine brawl inside the cage. So they were supposed to get a year there. They were actually giving a year suspension, and then the director Bob Bennett of AC suddenly gave him thirty five days off of that year. See the power of Khabib I'm never gonna fighting about again. Good luck with that. I got fuck these commissions are such a joke land. So what have been till October? So now it's they're literally able to fight in the same car that could be supposed to fight on September six, isn't it? Great five days before forties, the Commissioner such a joke. That I could do shit. What else you hear Margaret Monday was saying that you've see UC's parent company, which is w EMMY they're filing papers to go public. Being stages, that's gonna be interesting because then you get exact pays you'll other once you go public, then nothing is private anymore. Yeah. And we some problems when they do that they know this man. Where you say I was laughing at they, they know this. But so if people go go public, it's also kind of a sign that it's like an exit strategy o w me, this is this is flip. They're flipping houses. This is not a long-term investment for from they want get their money back and get the fuck out, especially now. What else you got? This is from John Nash. He writes for bloody elbow. Some to eighteen design business numbers only one percent penetration. American market is PS five times better. Plus, you spend plus yet will that okay? That's weird comparison fourteen point three million North American revenue, same revenue, as fight pass me to and fifteen the time. I'll disown. Yeah. So does on is growing and it's doing well, doing well internationally but as far as the US that's their biggest problem. Yeah, we said this forever now. But if you go over this kind of silly because if you go take the UFC and compared to one championship, or does own, in England in China in Japan, the numbers are going to be way, more lopsided. So does owns like all right? Yeah, we're trying to get into fucking America. Man, I think they're doing awful job. I think the marketings terrible and they figure things out. I think the productions is their biggest problem. Quality that they're producing, but they have all the fighters. They have a they have what you need to be successful. And that's the fighters. There's have a bad product. That's all that especially Americans are used to such a high level product. You gotta work on that. Man. That's what fuck your money fuck all your fighters. You got that the, the quality just terrible. So scroll down. In the US one point one point. Oh, and it's too competitive now because like I can watch dope shit on YouTube for free. You want me to pay for your service? Yeah. We have the best fighters. I know. But it's awful to watch men. So they got to figure out that special in America you compete with too much ship and too much issue. But there are new, I'm I would imagine they figure out because they do have the talent. In the fighters being news is the biggest reason. Yes. All right. Here are boy, you lies Theodora dime piece from the they say, why didn't he win four of less five or some shit? He want us three five winning streak. And then he lost it there. One of those last four. I mean shit, man. Legit reckon, the healing us three. So he has what he is one two, three four five six seven eight. He's eight and three in the AFC and they cut him 'cause this fighting style. Assume has to be not the most exciting kid. But also there's not a ton of Canadian stars. He looks apart speaks well fuck and tough to beat. But you look at his fights. All decisions. Yeah. He's not the most exciting fighter that's, that's what they're based off of. It's a shame. Yeah. And there's also a rumor that Justin Willis was cut, but he saying that he wasn't cut. But that'd be another guy who's want a bunch of row and just lost one fight the heavyweight. Yeah. Is it? They need heavyweight. Walt Harris is saying because he didn't take a fight on July twentieth with him because you can lose weight in two months. So there UC got pissed off and cut them cut while there's no just a Willis, just that's a while she was supposed to fight, wall tares. So is he cut or not? He's, he's saying is not. But then the sources. Yeah. They're saying that he was a source told a reporter that was cut by me discount. But he then from Willis said it was a technical difficulty in. He's not caught. Hopefully he's not cut and I like him. Has released anything official, but Dan shut the the rank not the rankings. Daschle roster on the site, you still on the site. Well, there's show behind on that fucking Matt Hughes listed on there, like next fight with a blank guy. They don't update pictures for God's sakes. They're not gonna update just someone else on there. That doesn't mean too much. We something official, hopefully he's not cut sucks about our boy. Theodore though. Yeah, he'll be fine. I think it'd be fine piece. Has that girlfriend Bella toward pride? Pick him up or PF L to probably one championship the tried knocking his eye off. For a long time. And that was kind of I think there's some talk about that. I bet belt or definitely sign him. He's was fire. Looks good speaks well, Canadian. He's the starting to make prompt for probably make more money. Get more promotion if he goes elsewhere, right now not a terrible thing turn chicken shit in a chicken suit. My man what else you got, Josh Copeland finally pled guilty. He looks perfectly normal picture. I know it's a crazy pitcher. So if you remember that story he's supposedly his wife in the face multiple times and she'll still bleeding when the police got there. But anyways, he accepted a plea deal. So sometimes, even though you're not I'm not saying that he's not or whatever. But sometimes you're, you're not guilty. You don't wanna go fight for different charges, and being possibly being jailed for shut a time you'll take a plea deal anyways violence. You don't take your plea deal and admit guilt. Yes. PF L. They have zero taunts domestic violence things. So they automatically after this came out the automatically released him. You have see said hold my beer. You wanna fight Greg hardy? So what you wanna do. I'm sure you've see us item. She's, they don't give a fun. Can't be hitting girls at I don't I don't know what to say about it meant are, and just remers. So goddamn religious. Toys alarm. What else yet? Speaking of Greg hardy, this is the guy is going to be fighting him. Now, one Adams, this guy's been asking a fighter right? Just been taunting him on Twitter. What's he say on here? He's funny. He he was saying how he doesn't he doesn't wanna fight Greg Cardi for the notoriety is I put the fucking on the prelims. I don't give a shit. That's the only only thing I know about this guy. What's going on with this guy? Well, he's five and one he only lost his last fight in the he is nutty skimpy losses last fight. Yeah. But he still be decision unanimous. So a be Dila Roach. And that he was on dinner is contender series. He's new to though in the kind of new, but he's I mean he want. I you have see fight, which is good. Crystal russia. Well, I'll be rooting for them. What's he been saying? I don't have as tweets but I remember him saying a bunch of stuff I wanted to. Yes. And the issues like okay cool. It's a pretty good fight for Greg, too, though, because not like the guy's super experienced. It's kind of pretty even out, assume, Greg, as the more power here, more athletic probably. But I'm rooting for this fucking guy. What's his name? A wa atoms shut up to one atoms. Good like buddy. Right. This I thought was interesting is canal driving. A Lamborghini over two hundred miles per hour. Have you seen this clip? I have not. But he's in. He's in Monica, Monica. Okay. I thought you were sitting at least like San Diego Macapa. Tha that idea. He did have like a description everything before here's a ton of dollars. Here's a ton, of course. Yeah. But he's leaving the same car guy. Ridiculous. Jesus Christ scary, right? Yes. Is this battles? I can't boom boom boom boom, I do like three seconds. And I'm done. All right. Patty Houlihan your dude, but I love Patti, he got elected mayor. How bad I was trying to convince me start a podcast. He does have some sort of podcast. Right. Does he? Yeah. But yes, he was the coolest frigging Dudayev, whatever shot out the fucking Patty, who LAN God. He's a good dude. One of the best people, I've met on this earth. So he got elected, right? Yes. Seek counsel in south Dublin. Various wife was there and his kids in general, in gem of a person amazing stories to God, great storyteller bar. I remember the story to you because we after the shows we went to that bar across the street that's supposed to be well known famous like the oldest bar in Dublin or some shit had wars there and shit. Yup. It was so cool. What were you say that? So when he was Patty was around us, the bar owner closed the windows and everything else. And then they're saying like this is such a crazy, this rarely happens. It's only if he really likes you. Oh. Just as a frigging dimmer, we're all in then they shut. They, they gave us Guinness and crisp can issue, chris- Christmas potato chips. You know, God, it was fun. Lots of we gotta go back out there. Man. I won't do UK tour Dublin tour two thousand twenty that's my plan February March two nd twenty. All right. In Patty man, God love south to Kimmy me up Patty what else you got. How many more of these you want? I don't know minimum grand old time. Jessica on draw just talking to your Hawaii, and she says for her next fight. She wouldn't mind giving Rosena genus a rematch in Denver. I would like that if that's what rose wants to do. You know, I'd love that she went to Brazil worse odds ever nightmare traveling. You're the champ, all the odds against you tough match-up. Let's put the let's put the ball back in roses corner for God's sakes. I like that. What else? And also, she didn't wanna fight. Johanna. Yeah. She doesn't want to treat your now. When's a couple more fights? Yeah. I'm with it. This one. So one championship overturned decision of Georgia. Giorgio Petrosian, who is of kickboxer that they liked very very much. Right. And people are saying that this is a bad like a if you start doing this. You're messing with a lot of stuff even like betting on yet. Strange attorney. Yeah. It's very strange to do this. It's kind of like it's kind of like if you let the fans dictate things like you know, so the rewriting song the hedgehog because there's such an outcry over the way, sonic looked, so they went oh, shit, cool man. My bat and other rewriting in redesigning sonic. So same reason with like game of thrones. Right. Everyone's like episode. You know whatever season. Eight rewrite it, and a million people signed that petition. Well, HBO goes shut the fuck up. We do what we do. You guys just watch as reason why we were in this position just shut your mouth. Enjoy the show. So with fighting going, oh, everyone's upset about this. Okay. We don't agree. We're going to change it. We have commissioned for a reason even though Lama crooked. So you can't let people dictate any of that stuff. Also on what the game of thrones thing on this. So a million people signed that petition. There's nine hundred ninety ninety nine million people did not sign that petition. The losers always allowed us never forget that. The people are unhappy, or they're not doing shit in their lives are always always allowed us. Don't get twisted game of thrones is the most successful show of all time. A million people signed petition does it mean shit for them? I mean, a million people had nothing better to do with their lives. That's the way it should like that. What else she got gin this here since we're talking about your favor. He said that it went TJ Dilshad does come back. He's going to return as, as a beast, but it's because he saying that he's gonna go back into the lab pretty much find out how to do stuff again. Well, it's a she was just. That's what he should say. Right. Because then hyping up the fight he's going to be a beast. So put the scientists cap back on forget, how I can have an advantage, just the way he plays its place. It's one thing if it's if people just cheat it's another thing if they cheat, and they're intelligent about it, and they work really hard and they have natural gifts, and that's near here going to be a cheat. You might as well cheat like that. Now do I think we clean? Well, there will be after-effects from what if he's been doing all these years, probably he'll have made some gains on that. There's no doubt that he'll be tough guy and people forget about it like all other guys who've been cut cheating. Yet. Teachers, give me a problem with or without EPO EPO ain't beating your favor skills. Going to be your favorite EPL ain't beating fucking Cody. Garbrandt EPO's, not beating fucking Marlin mariah's seeing take a lot more than that to beat those guys EPO's, not beating Henry, pseudo. You'd better fuck in have all the skill to back it up, which TJ does, I would not. I would not want to be the guy that welcomes TJ back to lock young. He's gonna be a fucking handful. What else you got? Oh, speaking of, if you think Ben aspirin tweeted that he was tested for EPL recently, to, like they're starting to do EPCOT, Staley do certain guys, though. Right. It's like it's so expensive. The school be interested who gets caught. Interesting. Indeed. This is not really new news. He's gotta said this before, but he said this again, that John Jones, illegal groin strike is what made him like since the first round, he couldn't be himself anymore. He couldn't get up the way he wants to. Hey, man. That's what he said. I to entertain this keep going. Oh, well, that's pretty much on that one. Gessen's fighting this weekend. Yeah. Here's a good one. What do you got Tarn Woodley? He says he has chronic arthritis in his hand now. So he might have to get an exemption. It's Huey to take fat quarters on stuff for his head. They're not steroids just not cortisone, which is a steroid. But for the inflammation. I'm sure they gotta give it to them. Right. If it's Krahn fuck in haters, though, like, Nope. Gotta deal with it. Dude. What else get? All right. This is I don't know. This just came out. Right. So this is, according to a news outlet in Brazil that cowboy Lavera is accused of assaulting his ex wife and he's kind of on the run. Now not necessarily one hundred percent. This is just from what the, the outlet said on the runs never good. Well he is not turning himself in. Oh. But he got drunk took his kid and wanted to put him on a motorcycle while he was drunk and I guess he was able to ride for a little while. Won't tell you, it more facts. I don't want to crucify the gay. That it that is it. Let's go to the fight. We wanna end unto Mesic violent that really give me one more. So we don't end on women getting beat the hell versus course. Boy, course into Hagen got himself Parana Brazilian piranha. You see to forty one man or Corby, Tim. It is off to the fucking races. Again, my, my term for gatekeepers different. Everybody's to me off. Feel a science geek, you beat him. There's only one way to go next. And that's a title shot. He's always number two. He's kind of he's kind of the guy who dictates whether you're gonna bail to compete against the champion, corvette number eight you beat number two, title shot. That's the way this goes, there's no other scenario. There you beat hoffy. Science, al. You're the best of the best to me. That's the gatekeeper he's probably not going to beat the champ. He could in any given night but he's always kinda been off a little bit. There's something going on. But he's always he floats around two to three two three baths four. He's always that fucking guy. Man. Tough to get by shoutout to Corey Santa Hagan danjus brought this up. Can you read it out? Forward to that. Shallots Josh Emmett. Okay, whoa, Iggy. Azalea. What's that popped out? That's for later, man. So if you wanna talk about that, apparently, she did a G Q model shoot. And then there's pictures of topless that the photographer took like she wanted him to take. I think it was sort of, like, okay, I don't know all of it, but I guess it's, it's stuff. That was not supposed to be seen regardless. So maybe it was like during the shoot. Sure, maybe she wanted to then she decided not to okay. So is she one of those pictures destroyed after that? But like after all this time homeboy in destroying, they got stolen he says he got stolen definitely gets, because it's going on. That's all I know. She's suing Shakya are the pictures out, and I didn't see him. I don't like looking at pictures. And when it's like I know you have. Do you have? I hear you dude. It's fun though. She's so hot. Okay. So we got a fight this weekend in feed and. Yeah. Alexander guests in his last time he fought against rumble. Remember that heartbreaking fucking fight. Well, yeah, it was in front of his family, and that broke my heart. Yeah. Stockholm. He fought glow ver- Sweden. So he's fought there since but the big one was for the fuck in is for it to get the title shot. He fought can Anthony Johnson man. Get knocked out I thought it was a head, but. You guys are debating that, but then he still get the title shot go back to record. And then beats d then fights DC loses in a split decision. To be the world champion his, his, his career is a little bit of a heartbreak. He's just a hair off the DC fight could win either way for MD world champion doesn't go his way. Then he comes back beats yon, right? And then fucking destroys global Tech's era. Not destroys knocked them out. You in the fifth round has no punk via the night then he gets to fight for the championship again. And that's his. One two. So then he fights for third time. You really don't get three title fight opportunity, so he fight for third time, fights John, for the second time, so it's three tomato fights have been John Jones, the first one you'll see one sixty five but there's another kid who stole the show that night, and then fights, John fi the night, some people thought he won that fight. I can see how they give it to John, but it's Bassi fight of the year for the world championship. He loses comes back fights DC for the world championship, and that's into fifteen loses by split decision by a hair to DC. He's one of the greatest of all time, argument greatest of all time as well. Then finally comes back after that gets to wins over high level, guys and fights, John Jones for third title, shot and loses groin strike. It's his and he is. So fucking talented Alexander so so good. It's unbelievable. How good he is up fighting. His fight against our boy, Smith, all depends on. Where is Alexandra at? In the mental space, does Alexander wanna be world champion does. He want to be in there does does he think he can beat John Jones in DC. Does he really think he's the absolute best light heavyweight in the world? Great grand. He can definitely be Anthony Smith if there's any notion in his mind that he doesn't want to be in their Anthony Smith will knock him out man at the Smith is a fucking dog. I think it went over a ton of people when he fought, John Jones and went to decision, he could easily copped out when he got fucking hit in the nuts, or the I what was in an I nut shot remember that he could have easily backed out of that fight a legal new year round. He could anybody would like fuck this. I'm out man. Did it went on loss via decision? But I think people aren't. Oh shit. Anthony Smith is the real deal. Lou Brock Holt, says different that's fine. That's his opinion. He's an animal I can't wait to see him outlet heavyweight, but I think people underestimate Anthony Smith man. And if if overlooks at overlooked Smith or thinks this is an easy one is hometown. He's in getting knocked out again this hometown. Gender show fucking Goodman. He so good. That's a good main event. I'm I'm I should say, I'm more curious about this main of it than anything before Alexander Gessler. And let's say beats Anthony Smith then what then what Alexander a fourth title shot. That's unheard of a fourth time at who who you gonna fight John Jones for third time. I don't see the USC doing that. I wish Gus from go to heavyweight, man. I really do. I wish you gotta heavyweight. I don't know what's for him at light heavyweight. So he beats empty Smith. But then. All right. There's I doubt they give you John Jones. Again, even though there's really no one for John Jones, a fight, whatever I don't know what they're gonna do. I'm intrigued by this light. Then in no time Volk on Ozdemir back at it. Not an easy fight for the hometown. Boy. Latifi. Jimmy manohla. There's some fun fights on this man. Does it not going to blow your hair back and it's fuck in Swedish as fuck card? But that main event intrigues me. What I'm assuming guests wins a heavy favourite. Minus three five. Let's guys don't me man. I like to bet on the dogs. Wow. The man was a dog owners barely a favorite, that makes sense. It's not a bad idea. Put someone in Anthony Smith, just because the, the x factor, we don't know where guests been if he wants to be in their feet doesn't. It's tough night for that Ed this weekend are we got? We got Joshua fighting as well. Right. And she Anthony Joshua was supposed to fight big baby Miller, but he failed every drug test. You can he literally was taking everything never drug. Here's on it. So that's not happening. Suppose fight Ortiz and our tease dumb ass management asked for too much. So we didn't get Lou Luis Ortiz Anthony Joshua, which have been amazing fuck and fight. Thank you, boxing for that. So we get Ruis junior. He just fought. If you watch the Mikey Garcia fight outside he fought in that and he won. He won. He won in the fifth round, right? Yeah. It was very hot. Kinda sweaty his biggest fight was would probably be when he fought for the vacant w title against ROY Joseph Parker shouted Joseph Parker. I miss you, man. I know you listen to the show. I love you. Hopefully, he's doing well out there in New Zealand. If you don't have Joseph park is he lost a Anthony Joshua in England? But Joe Joseph Parker was on. Was it the first below the belt I've ever done? One of the new ones one the first seasons one the early ones. Yeah. We did the thing with the fish we went to Vegas. Just a great guy, so squatter, great people men, hopefully he's doing all right. Out in New Zealand? Regardless, Anthony junior lost Joseph Parker and a decision for the vacant WBO tidal. And now he's, you know, he's fighting fucking Anthony Joshua in Joshua's debut in America, and it's for all the belts damn near the WBA IBF, all of them. So I would assume Joshua's at minus three thousand favorite, I seen it as much as minus four thousand. So I'm sure you have does it matter though assign knock on res at short notice. He's all the odds are miss Joshua's debut in America Joshua's coming over here, kind of flex on wilder and see where he's at. Plus remember this is on dissolve on correcton does own really wants to put a Mark in the in the marketplace in the United States, you can do that with anti Josh really such a big name. Not a big name out here. I think very surprised by these numbers. And that that's just the way it is. I think if wilder went over there and fought, you know, a guy of Ruis caliber, when it blow their hair back. It's not a knock on Josh was just where the market that in America for Anthony Joshua, especially against Ruiz junior. I think it's the first step and a huge step in to getting Anthony Joshua inverse wilder their tests in the marketplace. I think you get Joshua verse wilder in Vegas or Barclay center in Brooklyn after this. I do think that's an ex I think wow diverse Joshua is so much closer than while fury because of promoters and shitty contracts. But I, I do think Josh averse, Watters a lot closer than we think I think he gets Ruis out there and under four, I don't think it's going to be a highlight knockout. Like we saw with wilder verse Brazil, that's just not Joshua's style. Really? But. Hopefully the boxing gods. And this is an Aachen Ruis. I just wanna see Josh rivers wilder, Anthony, Joshua fury. Hopefully, the boxing, God's don't fuck us and have released knock him out in a fluke knockout because that'd ruin everything ruin everything not that I dislike res or rooting gets them. I just wanna see wild never Joshua. And I think it's close to happening in America. Joshua by knockout under four, but not as impressive. What wilder did Brazil Bom that dude? That's it just fan questions. Oh man. Let's do it. Let me take a bath. Yeah. And last, but not least you guys know how much I preach and support CB deal all CD will as long as it's good organic third-party tested and hundred percent guaranteed. What is in the bottle on THC free, so it's safe for kids that I'm preaching CBD, but not just any CBS. You can't trust all of them, but you can't trust pure spectrum pure spectrum CBD dot com. Promo code Shabi. You get ten percent off the best CBD on the planet. It's the most peer is the safest CDL he can get hundred percent organic. My son takes it every morning, every night, you guys know my issues with epilepsy and my son, they're gone. I take it every morning every night. My girl takes every morning every night. It's that damn good. I stand by it. It's the best quality and got on the planet. I put on my son's mouth for God's sakes. Go to peer spectrum CBD dot com promo code shop for ten percent of the best CBD oil money, Kim by pure, spectrum CBD dot com promo code job. What do you got? All right. First ones from Kenji do can we just think knowledge? My fuck fucking outfit today. How some arch outfit. This is a macho man shirt by boys at the, the Roosevelt. The Roosevelt set me this they have other. I think they have stone cold have some other dudes. This is so goddamn summer this macho man. Randy savage, my favorite growing up very pink. It's so summer dude, I had to acknowledge that. Did he was dead? So. Shouldn't laugh. All right. First one is from Kenji dot Diaw, who's your favorite anime prospect at the moment? So it could be anywhere. You'll see Baltimore whose homeboy we saw doing all the jumping shit last week. Let me show you Mitch Michelle. There you go. He's fun to watch Superfund. All right. Nick Christie one does Gus us in retire. If you loses. Yes hundred percent hundred percent. Deed done. D Donaghy one. Does anybody beat could be ever or does he retire undefeated? Doc. It's tough to seek. Habib losing men with his style. He's such a nightmare. He's a fucking nightmare. I see him losing if he goes up to seventy. I don't see him doing that. Maybe stays fifty five. I'm fucking rooting for dozen Pori. Tough fight men every everybody in the lightweight division will be an honored to be. Big underdog. I the only close one with, with a style could really fuck with them. Tony Ferguson, but see how Tony looks against cowboy. And after dealing with his outside issues he'd be the only one who'd be closer to narrow, the gap of an underdog though Kennedy's absolute night. What else Mr. underscore, nasty does not does? We'll Gary tone and end up being a better at BJ finisher in may than Maya Damien Maya. He would have to for a lot longer and have to high level like Daime my does a very high level guys tonens Jamshid right now. So he definitely has the potential, especially with the stout of fucking twist off legs, and ankles and arms. And whatever the fuck you wants to do. And he's exciting to watch. Here's the potential for sure. But you just have you have to come over the UFC and do it. Don't give a fuck if you don't want champ shape. I gotta be honest. You know key. Yeah. Tim, asks whipped in the states. Gilbert, Melendez went oh no cooling where the tights cool. I'm gonna punch in the face. What else you got? All right. This is the last one coach colleague if poor guy wins this in September. Do you think they'll give him Connor next or will? They do the winner of Tony cowboy or does that depend on who wins. It depends on who wins and how they win. Also depends on what Connor student because Connor dust and makes the most sense for Connor a rematch would make it a lot more sense in the it's definitely more favorable for tonner. Converse. Khabib is not favorable for Connor any facet. Converse, does import as favorable Connor versed D as would be favorable at fifty five Connor verse. Gay Chee is more favorable. Connor versed. Dasa rone's more favorable so it just dispense how they win. And what's best for Connor? If he's gonna come back. Do you can do whatever he wants? That's how big of a drawl is. That it that's it great grand man. We did a guys sorry today. Late holidays on my right this weekend. Thursday Friday Saturday. I mean Cleveland can get you some dogpound hilarity Cleveland after I'm in Burbank. California June eighth just announced for him. And my boy, Michael Rapaport will be with me at that show in flappers Burbank, California. That's one night, once you only June eight. That will sell out a sap, then I'm with Callan in Las Vegas, June. Fifteenth Calgary after that. Yuk yuks. Come get some Cowdery June twentieth through twenty second. And then I'm in brea, I'm excited to see a brea that is June twenty seventh through the twenty nights. I will have some peeps with me in brea as well. That would be a grand old show, but Cleveland, you're up Thursday Friday Saturday. We'll see guys again. I can't thank you guys enough from the bottom of my heart. When I signed do a special, especially being only three years in it's fucking insane. And the love and the appreciation I've gotten from the fans. I cannot think you guys enough. Just happy, man. I'm happy. And I love you guys. And this is just the start for me only up from here. Thank you for making a special what it is making the success. I've done some great notes from Showtime. Everyone involved, the whole team. So thank you guys, if you haven't seen it go. Showtime dot com, promo code Shaab watch the entire hour there, you watch you get thirty days free of Showtime, whatever you want much my special thing at twenty nine more days. Do what everyone Showtime enjoy it. Showtime dot com, promo code Shaab. Thank you guys. See you next time I'm out.

boxing Tony Tony Connor Cleveland UC US Tony Robbins Cleveland Browns Michael Rapaport Paul Himmel Conor McGregor Floyd Vegas THEO Vons Ferguson director baseball Callan
News in Brief 15 November 2019

UN News

02:56 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 15 November 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. At least six hundred and thirty four migrants have lost their lives in the Americas in two thousand nineteen mocking. What may be the deadliest last year for people on the move there since records began six years ago according to the International Organization for Migration? Im the biggest increase in fatalities in two thousand nineteen nineteen has been in the Caribbean where one hundred fifty seven people have died at sea trying to reach the islands six times more than last year. The continuing economic and political the crisis in Venezuela is responsible. IOM spokesperson Joel. Millman said one word answer. This starts with a V. Venezuela I mean you have over four million people circulating circulating most of them in the last two years this just a volume of people on the move creates conditions that going to result in more fatalities. IOM's missing using migrants project shows that three hundred and forty five people have also died trying to cross the US. Mexico border in Central America. Ninety seven migrants have died in two thousand nineteen and in South South America thirty four to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Now where there have been just six cases of Ebola disease infection in the last week encouraging news. Urine in health experts say at the peak of the epidemic. In April one hundred and twenty cases were reported in seven days. Today the virus has killed nearly two thousand two hundred people all since it began last August in the east of the country in its latest update on the outbreak. The World Health Organization said that all the new infections were people who had come into contact contact with already confirmed cases this is a welcome development since it indicates that there are no new transmission chains and it follows steady decrease in confirmed cases of Ebola in the last three months. who also said that Callan Gutter and Catra health zones had gone twenty one and forty two days with zero cases of infection respectively suggesting testing. They may be free of the disease. In a statement the agency welcomed the lower case rate but insisted that progress remains highly contingent upon the level of access and security within within affected communities in Bangui capital of the Central African Republic. Unusually heavy rain continues to cause major problems for thousands of people forced to leave their homes is because of flooding in an alert issued on Friday the UN Migration Agency Iowa reported partially or completely destroyed houses in four affected districts outside the city. Data is being gathered to assess where needs are greatest following three weeks of rain. The country's people have already faced multiple displacement after more than six years of conflict. Now they must start again faced with flooded fields which have become a breeding ground for mosquitoes and disease. IOM has already provided one thousand emergency shelters. It says that the delivery of basic health water hygiene emergency shelter and household items is a priority and several other. UN entities including the UN refugee agency and Children's Fund have already mobilized to help Daniel Johnson U._N. News.

IOM IOM Venezuela United Nations UN Migration Agency Americas World Health Organization Caribbean Central America South South America Millman Ebola Callan Gutter Mexico Democratic Republic Bangui Congo US Joel Daniel Johnson
Biomes combines art, conservation and technology

The Science Show

11:03 min | 11 months ago

Biomes combines art, conservation and technology

"And here's another example of the way artists realize science. So we can see it and appreciated emotionally. Could artists also here's a serious question assist biologists in the field. Let's leap to the University of Newcastle and meet Alex Callan conservation scientists and Bernadette grabsch scientific illustrator both with bio-bombs an exhibition rating what they do, why in This Day of Photography and so much illustration on the Internet. Would you need to have something done by an artist for me? Natural History illustration brings what we see in the failed to life. So if I'm bent over a frog that I've never seen before at me not. Looking down in a very narrow field of view from my head coach and it's pouring with rain. I have a very limited time to be able to identify what that frog is. And Natural History illustration really exemplifies not just the physical characteristics of those frogs but their behavior, the way they look the way they pose all of these things in nature really help us identify what we're looking at and how it's responding to its natural environment and have you done this Alex already have you taken these illustrations into the field and tested the idea? Yeah. All the time I do it probably a lot more with plants only because Stralia we're very lucky I work with frog. So we're very lucky to have a frog biologists also pretty incredible photographers, but there is nothing like the detail that you kept shine natural history illustration that simply can't be captured by photography that we need in the field as ecologists and Conservation. Scientists. And Bernadette with all of those different creatures to look at all those different plants where you start. Well. That's a good question we try to be useful. So we start where we needed the most. So we talked to the scientists and ask them what we can do to help and the areas that they work in that they need explaining or they need communicating to the public must urgently a what we start on me. Now, we always choose the prettiest thing to two straight, which is the most important thing. And you of course I've got fantastic tradition in the University of Newcastle of natural history illustrations going way back decades we do. We actually have a very long history here and actually just featured in a documentary on Scott Sisters who some of the first natural history illustrators in Newcastle and we have kept that tradition going. Yeah. Since they did the beautiful artworks just across the river from where we're sitting. So we do have a long history here and we are the only of its kind in Australia. And when Alex goes out and does the field work and comes back, do you follow it up to you see whether it's worked actually it's interesting. You should say ask that question Robin because I was out in the field just yesterday with one of our student Addis Louise Wills, and she's putting together some interpretive age for the Hunter Wetlands Cinta around the frog research that we're doing and the fascinating thing was that I could sit there until her ask story about the importance of these frogs and the research that we're doing. And at the end of it, she could talk back to me about how she would bring this to life to the community. As a scientist I'm so close to my conservation research that. I forget what other people don't know. I also forget. How other people might say and what might interest? Them might be slightly different to what interests me so that communication that doing and between the scientist end, the scientific illustrator is really critical in how we then convey this message of the need for conservation to the broader community. Alex One how many of your colleagues in natural history and in field exploration? Feel that way because I remember when I did my zoology degree how long it took for me to look down microscopes and even look at the landscape. And be able to see things. I was effectively blind I one nearly two years. That's my biggest criticism of my professional development that I can go into the field and be very focused on what I'm looking for but I can actually infect become reductionist. And in conservation and for engaging the community and conservation, we do need to have these multiple lenses through which we see the world so that we have a broad perspective because everybody say something different and it comes from a very different experience base, and that's the beauty of trying to blend art and science to communicate these amazing things about planet. And Bernadette, you're actually educating the scientists to know what they're looking at. Sei It that way. We work very closely with the scientists and one of the strengths of natural history illustrators. Cassidy to observe. So that's what we teach our students and we take some that we need to spend that time observing before we even pick up the pencil and drawing any anything whether it's an animal, a cultural object work archaeology, and I take that approach there we have to take the time to. The way things together the form of the shape and the function Howard removes all of that sort of stuff is so important to us and yes sometimes we do see things that scientists have missed and re very humbly point them out. And Alex just said Bernadette it's for the public as well in what way. Well art is like the boundary object and we're the contract between scientists and the community. So we like Alex just explained will go out into the field with the scientist and get this story, put it into language that we understand and they will hopefully, we can transfer that across to the community. So we're sort of. In. Between we. Consider. Tell the story in a different voice. You have exhibitions, websites award. How can the listeners find out what you doing will? Yes, that's what we're very excited about at the moment we're having a big exhibition, a virtual exhibition Judah covert, and you can find it at by on dot and there's a virtual gallery put all of the artwork into virtual gallery that you can walk around. You can watch videos can interact individual gallery you can leave your own bio pledge if you want to. Make a difference. So yes, please do have a look around the by ams dot art website Alex. you'll know that off track one of our programs on sounds programs on radio national has collected teen frog sounds and it's been popular. You wear of that. Yeah, and is this related to the use of the day up by the Australian museum what a fantastic initiative that Bain in trying to connect community back to the Bush? Yeah. The Amazing Jody Rowley, the Ultra Amazing Jody Rolling. This is a fascinating thing. We're trying to use the frog idea in a lot of citizen science projects that we're running across. New South Wales for `frog conservation trying to rediscover populations of threatened frogs that we haven't been able to find for more than a decade that connection again, with something that you hear to being able to then identify that as a species in particular then opens this whole new world if you can name the species and you can find out so much more about it you know you the striped mushroom guests I will find it in my backyard after heavy rain, but I may not find the threaten giant burrowing frog. When would I find that? Where will I look? These are all incredible ways of trying to bring the voice of diversity back to the community so that they can value these things and we can all work together to protect them. That's New South Wales. What about the rest of Australia look there are lots of things happening across the country but also globally Australia is a little bit behind in how we connect with their community around by Vesey conservation. But we're developing that all the time and actually covid has been the crutch for exacerbating those things. One of the things that we're trying to do in these by festival or exhibition science exhibition is linked to twitter events, twitter events that actually profile. Ecosystems okay. Vegetation communities or environment. So we can get people out to, for example, we send them out to the woodlands and hope that they will find the mistletoe. Fade resource for the threaten ragent honey eater. So, we're trying to complement our art and our website information with this concept of just get out the the one place you can go now in carbon is to the great outdoors. Let's go and connect with that again and say what amazing things are there Bernadette there was a rumor a couple of years ago that the natural history artistry that's been such a tradition at the University of Newcastle might laps a bit be using to be demonstrating that it hasn't lapsed. It's still going strong. We are incredibly resilient people Ben I think the reason why we are still here having this. Conversation is we really passionate about the power of art in particular natural history illustration we can see the potential use, but we do. You know it's just so important and we're evolving. So we're now doing a lot of three D. modeling as well. So students are making three d models of invasive species that people can now see on this screen and rotate around and say the differences between the cane toad eastern punk, and so we're doing that with the invasive species officers from the Department of Primary Industry. So actually doing a lot of applied natural history illustration projects, which is really exciting. Excellent and in the Sancho we've been looking at the out of Ferdinand. Through. David the former Director of the botanic gardens you're familiar with Ferdinand. Bauer very familiar with Fernand I teach all of my students about him in one of the first classes that I give just because I think he was outstanding for his time and still at any even for our time and he had such methodical approach she's very much what we do in natural history illustration like we want to portray animals and plants as accurately as possible, and that's what he did. Tell you one of my all time favorites. Excellent final word from Alex By. Is, an. Art Science Exhibition that is actually trying to draw the language of art and the language of conservation science together so that we can actually improve the protection of Australia's biodiversity because I think the voice of change is in the people not in the scientists and science and art aunt in separate boxes there in one area, which is the natural world and it's a very beautiful marriage. Field Biologist Alex. Callan bio-bombs Curator Bernadette draft of the University of Newcastle which continues to make its mark nationally and internationally.

scientist Biologist Alex Bernadette University of Newcastle Natural History Australia Alex Callan Alex One Art Science Exhibition Bernadette grabsch Scott Sisters Newcastle South Wales Stralia Australian museum David Hunter Wetlands Cinta Ferdinand twitter Cassidy
Christmas Miscellany 4

Not About Lumberjacks

33:58 min | 8 months ago

Christmas Miscellany 4

"I want to make one thing perfectly clear. This show is not about lumberjacks. My name is christopher grundland and this is where i share my stories sometimes. The stories contain truths but most of the time. They're made up sometimes. The stories are funny other times. They're serious but you have my word about one thing. I will never ever sheriff story about lumberjacks this time. It's the now annual christmas episode which is always made up of several bits of micro fiction and then anchored by story set during the season before that though a couple of things first the usual content advisory the stories from this episode deal with a variety of topics including the loss of a parent alcohol consumption vandalism divorce and minor gore. But hey it's nothing like a couple christmases ago when the main story featured child torture so that's an improvement right. We all felt almost guilty laughing at that one. If you remember. Almost i mean that kid was pretty shitty. Oh yeah also as always. There's a bit of swearing the second thing before we get to the episode as i'd like to tell you about a book series by my friend jennifer moss if you're looking for a fun and exciting binge. This is it a series of mysteries with a metaphysical twist. The first is town. Read in which detective ryan doherty has to save his career by solving a double homicide of husband and wife entrepreneurs during the investigation. He meets the mysterious. Catherine lowing a psychic m path who knows just a little too much about the murders as ryan has drawn into catherine's unconventional world. He has to figure out if she's for real or the real killer. Checkout town read by jennifer. Moss rated five stars on amazon dot com. I'll also be sure to include a link in the show notes all right. Let's get to work tracks. Two girls walk balanced on the rails at the tracks leading into town holding hands in the middle for balance afternoon clouds pile up where land meets sky things so thick and puffy. The two friends would not be surprised to see them leave behind mountains as they float by in town. There is an ice cream shop in a library. A hobby store were in even more ideal hometown made of plaster and paint snakes around the shop in h scale the tavern across the street from the lumber yard would look more at home in the english country side then touch away on the prairie on a corner in what used to be. A bank is an actual haberdashery that makes most of its money selling scouting uniforms in the community park. There are boys the days of playing tag climbing up slides. The wrong way in spinning on merry go rounds are behind them. They have reached an age glances in the hallway. Become talking in the grass after school or wandering off to the creek. Cutting through town. Not to look for frogs or crawdads like when they were younger but to have a moment alone to navigate the labyrinth of young love. A first kisses had in a heart is broken. Two girls walk balanced on the rails of the tracks leading out of town holding hands in the middle for balance one girl toxin circles about the kiss creek. The other squeezes. Her best friend's hand bit tighter. Knowing the long life she imagined together is over before ever beginning. Homecoming callan a splash of la freud scotch into an almost clean glass. Want some he says his father. Sean na the senate's plenty your mother hated it. Said it smelled like iodine an asphalt. She wasn't entirely wrong. Kellyn raises the glass to his lips and takes a whiff happy birthday. Dad cheer son for a moment. The only sounding callans childhood home is the sound of scotch sliding down his throat. So what have you been up to callan rocks the glass of la froyo gone the dusty table top and says just working pays for this good point. Also saving up for an rv suggested during our last visit. See if i can make it on my own next year traveling around and writing. Worst case i park here for free while trying to figure things out. That's great. I'm happy for you cal- mom wouldn't have been too thrilled about it true but then you never know. She just wanted you to be secure. You've always had a good head about things plan better than any of us thanks. I wish he were here. I do too but some people settle after the end. I'm glad they let me come back. Once a year sean laughs and adds on never get over how it looked like you were about to shit yourself when you saw me. The first year. After i died callen smiles in polishes off the scotch and the glass. I thought someone slipped me something at the airport. Before i picked up the rental. He pours another graham in the to chat about the last year of callans life long into the night collins says well it's getting close to midnight. I should get new. Bern get outta here. He looks at the almost finished bottle of scotch. I'm gonna leave this here. Let some teenagers acquire a taste for the good stuff. The image of his father on the other side of the table shimer's callan's eyes fill with tears. You don't have to cry son. We'll see each other again soon enough. I know but i miss being able to pick up the phone and call or just surprise you taking a few days off of work in stopping by every year. I worry it's the last year i'll see you. I'll always get to come back on my birthday in. The house isn't going anywhere anytime soon. It might keep sliding out of shape but it's ours going nowhere. You can still move in fix it up and make it yours. Maybe someday right now though just a lot of other plans in. This place is full of too many memories. Callan taps on his phone request a ride. He stands up and looks at his father. I wish i could give you a hug. So do i. sean says but we're lucky to have this. Yeah we are callan. Looks around the old dining room thinking about all the dinner shared with his mother and father at the table. I think i know the answer he says. But why did you do it. I heard son. I'm sorry i just didn't know how to be without her. That's what i figured. Just wanted to know for sure. He looks at his phone. Eleven fifty nine. I'll see you next year. Dad right before fading away. Sean smiles and says i'll be waiting. The last wish. I wished for all the money in the world and the genie granted it to me as promised then when nobody in the world had money but me and i went out to buy something and people figured out what happened in came for me wish that things were returned to the way they were before i had all the money in the world i was determined to make the one wish i had left matter and stick i. You're probably wondering about the genie. I'll say is it's amazing. The things one confined in out of the way antique shops. I'm cleaning up an old lamp. I bought and whoosh there's a frigging jeannie my living room. Of course it offered me the standard three wishes. And i went with one of the most common choices i'd always heard genie's take wishes literally and do all they can to mess with the people that are in service to but i was given exactly what i asked for so a word of advice. If you ever end up in my situation just ask for a specific amount of money. Not all of it. Still the more i thought about it. The more i wondered if all those stories about genies screwing people over were true with no way to undo what would be done with my third wish. I went to the genie and said you know what. I feel like no matter what i do. It's going to end up a double edged sword. So i wish he'd just do whatever the hell you want. It was a bold move on my part for all. I knew the genie would become all powerful. And enslave us all so. I was pleasantly surprised when he fixed everything wrong in the world and asked if he could crash on my couch while figuring out what to do with his new life monkey wrenching suburbia the day. Jud finished reading the monkey wrench gang. He attacked a caterpillar motor greater in the woods behind our houses. Our bellies were full of stolen wine. When back in the day our little town saw its first pangs of growth into fluence seeped in at the sides there were always open. Garages and refrigerators. Full of beer. White wine and champagne waiting to be consumed by teenagers daring enough to take the risk. We walked along the makeshift dirt road. Cutting through the small forest. We claimed his our own a scar of construction carrying with it. The promise of new homes in more garages. When we reached the machines jude pulled out a rolled up towel from a small backpack. He carried everywhere inside the towel. To adjustable wrenches. I refuse to take part. Because i knew progress would win in the end so i drank wine and watched from a distance. As jude went to work. I watched hydraulic fluid. Arc a perfect stream in the moonlight like a sacrificed creature bleeding out. I watched the front tires fold over. Is the massive machine. Gave itself to the earth. I watched jude. Dance around like a mad ape all but beating his chest while smacking the ground with his wrench. When i told them we should go he knocked out a side window leading the glass rain down upon him like diamonds. We went back to his house and listened to black flag. It's funny how a handful of years is best friends with someone when you're young can create a bond of brotherhood lasting for life. When i found out jude was dead. It hit me like we never parted ways. I still don't know if the overdose was accidental or deliberate. And i suppose it doesn't matter those times are gone and so is he. Sometimes after visiting my mother on weekends my wife and i drive through that old development that used to be our kingdom. And i'd be lying. If i said i wouldn't live in that fucking neighborhood if i could afford it. Claiming the house on the various spot where olive jude's aggression was wasted. Chris missing kansas. My father thought the bridge over the mississippi river between annoying iowa was some kind of badlands. were speed limits. Were nolan void. I tried telling him our home. State had jurisdiction over one half of the bridge in iowa the other but he claimed it was like international waters. Were laws didn't exist rather than explaining that one to him. I let him carry that fantasy in his heart. The speedometer on his boxy sixty four ford van went to one. Hundred in dad had pegged. He said we were going faster than that though. My father was a mechanic and claim to a modified van for better speed. I believed him because the engine beneath the cover between our seats growled. I waited for it to throw pistons that would bounce around the inside of the van killing us both despite my fear though it was exhilarating watching the pavement racing below our view through a window so large i imagined we were a seven forty seven coming in for a landing. Dad took his hands off the steering wheel and closed his eyes syncing. I was about to protest. He said just checking the alignment bud before putting his hands back on the wheel. He took a long draw from the lucky strike in his right hand and picked up the beer resting between his legs and his left. He took a swig put back not caring if the condensation on the can made it looked like he pissed himself when we pulled over for gas or to use a rest. Stop when i was five years old. My mother divorced my father when i was eight. My dad moved to kansas with my step mom road trips from illinois to kansas became a summer thing each year after that. This particular trip was my first time going to the sunflower state for christmas. Normally i didn't mind kansas. But i wasn't sold on spending the there while i loved seeing my stepbrother. I was even less a fan of my stepmother than i was. My stepfather and christmas met my summertime. Friends there would be tied up with their families. Winter back home and sledding skating and cross country skiing. Kansas meant only the possibility of something icy falling from the sky. Nothing funded do even if it actually happened driving across iowa. My father and i settled into that part of the trip. Where silence covered us like the snow over the desolate fields outside the window in the summer tall rows of corn blocked views of the horizon. Now though i had unlimited views across what a deemed the most depressing place on earth. I tried reading even considered starting a conversation but my dad was listening to his skinner. Date track and simple man was about to move onto free bird. I ended up breathing on my window in quickly drawing things before they disappeared. When i was done. I looked at my fingers. I don't have too many memories of my mother and father together but the night i got the scar on my left index finger will be with me to the end. I had a splinter. I couldn't remove. But i had them before and i knew they had a way of working themselves out by morning. It would be ready to pull if it hadn't forced itself free in the night lost forever in my yogi bear or snoopy but my father saw me squeezing my finger and asked what i was doing. I have a splinter. I said next thing. I knew i was with him at his work bench in the basement to this day. Roughly forty five years later. I still get creeped out by basements. Part of it goes back to my older sister. Convincing me that monsters lived in our sump. Pump that a whole host of undead. Beastie boys were waiting to kill me in the boiler from behind the furnace or crawling out of the crawlspace above my father's workbench. But i think the first time i ever equated basements with terror was thanks to my dear old dad. My father fancied himself a surgeon of sorts. He was terrified of doctors opting to treat himself for every ailment and even family. If it was a non emergency the bright light above the workbench was like being on stage illuminated by a spotlight. At least i couldn't see the rest of the basement and its glare. Although hearing the creaking hissing and gurgling didn't call me any. This is what i remember. I remember my father passing a needle through the flame of his zippo lighter. I remember wincing and crying out as he dug for the splinter. When that didn't work. I remember him pulling out a pocket knife and passing the tip of its longest blade through the flame. I remember the pain. And i remember the blood so much blood or at least that's how it seemed in the blaring white light from above and i remember never ever wanting to go into the basement again. How even if it meant dying. I'd hide every ailment for my father for the rest of my life. The kansas visit your wasn't as bad as i expected. But it still paled in comparison to christmas back home. My father took a bit of time off work which meant cold weather fishing and visiting restaurants. He liked during days. We didn't venture out into nature. There was last minute shopping. And for the first time in my life putting up a fake christmas tree. It was a foreign concept to me. Putting fo- branches that looked like they were made out of green toilet bowl scrubbers onto a pole but when it was done it wasn't as bad as i imagined it was actually kinda cool on christmas eve day. We went to visit my step grandparents. Were my stepbrother. And my half sister were given piles of gifts while i got a toy. Conaco fuel truck. My step-grandmother worked for conaco in the truck was a freebie. She was never very fond of me and my sister because we weren't blood related in any way in that. Christmas was a reminder that i was not particularly welcomed into my stepmother's extended family for my simple crime of merely existing that night. We got to open one small gift. My stepbrother and i opened identically shaped packages from his uncle who worked in saudi arabia. Swiss army knives not the one seeming as white as a kit kat bar but one still big enough that we had tweezers toothpicks scissors a bottle opener a magnifying glass and even a corkscrew. We'd never use that. We left out beer and pretzels for santa claus. My father said santa like that combination much better than milking cookies. Then it was off to bed. I woke up later when i heard something. Through the decorative. Air great in the back room. Where i stayed when i visited there. Were no air ducts attached to a few of the older air registers in the house. They were opened the basement. A leftover from days before central air when boiler heat rose up from below the house to the first floor. I crouch down near the baseboard and listened. I heard faint music. And i smelled smoke. The basement of my father's home in kansas was not as terrifying as the one in the house where i was raised but it was not without its horrors opening. The creaking door was like cracking open. An ancient crypt. It came not only with the smell of spiders but also mummies zombies in anything else decaying in evil at least in my imagination. My stepbrother wants locked me in one of the side rooms in that basement for what seemed like hours but was really only a handful of minutes aside from grabbing my big toe and rolling around on the floor when watching tv. It was the only cruel thing he ever did to me. The underlying sent of mildew greeted me. When i open the door but mingled with the odor of lucky strikes peppermint in some strange smell. I couldn't put my finger on dad. I said yeah bud. Even though it was my father's voice. I still expected to see some hollow-eyed creature wrapped in bandages. Got to the bottom of the stairs in turned his way. The basement was darker than usual with only a single light above his work bench illuminating. I later find out that he felt the light was a bubble where he could focus but as a kid it seems strange to be in such a creepy space at all. Let alone without turning on every single light. My dad shadow on the far wall. Looked like that of a hunchback warlock at a table in his study. It straightened up. When i approached as i walked toward the circle of light. I wondered why my dad was wearing cutoff. Shorts and winter. He quickly covered his leg with his hand. What you do in. I said i'm kind of busy right now. Bud doing what. Just please go back to bed. That's when i noticed the mason jar full of rubbing alcohol with something red in it. The mass was about the size of a large marble and it wasn't all red. In fact it was mostly white and yellow like body fat fleshy protrusion sticking to the side swayed back and forth in the liquid like some kind of sea creature. I swore that whatever was in the jar even had a vein in it. I looked around the rest of his work. Bench at the bottle of peppermint schnapps because an empty half pint of wild turkey. The tape player near his wall of tools. Softly played harry shape ins. If my mary were here i knew that song meant. He missed my mom until his final days. He never fully got over my mother going her own way when i was five. Are you okay. I said he pulled his hand from his thigh. There was a three inch. Gash that was partially stitched. Shut with dark strong thread. That's when i noticed the exacto knife on the work bench with a darken blade from being held in a flame before dad went in. It's just a little cyst. Ben driving me nuts for weeks. Merry christmas to me He picked up the bottle of peppermint schnapps and instead of taking a sip. Handed it to me want some. I really didn't but i took the bottle anyway. I felt the burn of the sip. The entire time. I watched my dad finished sewing his leg. Shut in the glare of the bright light above his work bench in another creepy basement when he was finished he took a sip of schnapps and turned off the tape player. Wanna go upstairs and see what santa claus got you bud. Of course. I did in the colorful glow of the christmas tree lights. He pointed out all my gifts and told me what was inside each one. I was already a proacting surprised on christmas mornings. If i knew something was because my sister had a knack for carefully unwrapping presents before the holiday inn. Telling me what they were. You do know. There's no such thing as santa claus right. Of course. I said. I figured it's just with you not always around. I sometimes lose track of where you are in life. I knew any further discussion would result in him crying. So i got up. Gave data hug and return to bed. There is a place in iowa where you can see forever land so flat you can understand why some in that part of the country believe the earth isn't round we race back towards chicago in dad's souped up van the snow shooting at us like we were traveling through hyperspace during the crescendo of free bird. I pulled my new swiss army knife from my pocket. I opened the longest blade in slice myself across the splinter scar on my left index finger wondering what it took to cut into one's own leg to remove growth before my dad could notice. I grabbed a handful of mcdonald's napkins from the back on the floor in held them as tightly as i could to stop the bleeding. Most people one day recognize just how flawed their parents are how flawed we all are. I always had my suspicions where my father was concerned but all his flaws became apparent. That christmas break still in a strange way knowing how broken he was made even the tiniest gesture of love and understanding from him bigger than intended and he was always a very caring person. I didn't let go of those napkins until we pulled into my driveway back home. Were dads squeezed me. So hard in a hug that it felt like i would burst. He looked confused when a handed him the wad of bloody napkins. No questions for that one week. Christmas break in kansas. He was just happy to know where i was in my life in the thing said to each other in silence on that trip back home is a gift. I carry with me to this day. Thank you for listening to not about lumberjacks theme music as always is by argot. Phys ms story music. This time is by yohannes. Born lawf- licensed from epidemic sound sound effects are always made in house or from free sound dot org although i tend to not do much in the way of effects with some christmas episodes. So it's possible none were used. This year visit no lumberjacks dot com for information about the show. The voice talent in the music in a couple weeks. We finally put this miserable year behind us. So what does the first not about lumberjack. Story of 2021. Hold house a story about death sound. I promise that it's mostly lighthearted until next time. Be mighty and keep your access sharp. So hey you stayed till the end for you then. Holiday gift bloopers. I've received request for outtakes. But i always figure they wouldn't be very interesting but when i finally put this together i laughed. And maybe you will too. It's pretty much everything encountered during a recording session minus the farting. Not because i cut that out. I just didn't cut any this time as always. Thanks for listening and blooper reel. Music is by the flag. I five a tune called after you sir enjoy. The two girls walked balanced There's the belch. Two girls walked balanced on the rails. New delilah things so thick and puffy puppy clouds. Nope not that one. The one before okay. Let's try this again. There were always open. Garages and refrigerators. Little jude was always daring. You'll leave that little tag off. When we reached the machines jude pulled out of rolled up paper top paper towel. No jude pulled out of jude. Took it's funny. How a handful of years is best with someone. when you're young can can kick kick kick kick up up up up up a bar okay. Let's try this again in blah blah blah used to be kingdom right follow alive. We're in the last story. The christmas all right here we go. I tried telling him our home. State had the little road trips from illinois. Kansas became a summer thing each so much mouth noise there. Those are good. Take here we go up. Terrible my neighbors. Benny damage deemed the most depressing place on earth. So many milestones. I remember him pulling out a pocket knife and passing the tip of its longest. Biller like fucking bird with only a single light above his work bench illuminating things. Keep the mouth open. Because you're getting that mall sound smack. There was a three inch gash. That was partially stitched. Shut with dark strong thread. Oh why did i put so many fucking essence there. I felt the burn the sip. Speaking of sips. Why did i write a line. Like this thing is fucked up. I felt the burn of the sip the entire time i watched my dad finished sewing. His legs shut. God why did i write this line. I felt the burn of the sip. The entire time. I watched my dad finished sewing his leg. Shut in the glare of the bright light above his work bench in another creepy basement. Boom i fucking god. It was already a pro at acting surprised on christmas mornings. If i knew something was because my sister had a knack for carefully almost got him so all right. We're getting there. He looked confused when a handed him. The blot the blob. The bloody blackens. My father thought the bridge chair sounds. Now i'm belching and the ad i guess. Water again because my voices shuttled ball. Name lap. Right so crispin. Kansas starting out well one hour thirty seven minutes and twenty eight seconds.

jude callan kansas christopher grundland jennifer moss ryan doherty Catherine lowing Kellyn shimer iowa Sean sean la callen Callan Bern gore Jud Moss catherine
Getting Clever with Kaolin: Researchers Accelerate 3D Deep Learning with New Tools - Ep. 144

The AI Podcast

23:33 min | 2 months ago

Getting Clever with Kaolin: Researchers Accelerate 3D Deep Learning with New Tools - Ep. 144

"Hello and welcome to the video. A podcast i'm your host noah crafts. Today we're talking about three deep learning. We've got something of a panel joining the show today here to talk about in nvidia's open platform for virtual collaboration and real time photo realistic simulation and kaolin invidia suite of tools for excel operating three d. deep learning research. This is really cool stuff. It's fascinating and it has implications across virtually all areas of research and industry so without further ado. I'll introduce our dream team. That's here to talk about the big picture as well as the new kaolin app and sdk so today we have four people joining the show here with us. Our richard kerris industry general manager for omnivores. At nvidia john. Francois flesh is called his deep. learning engineer. with nvidia masha greener. Who's a senior research scientist and klemow fuji tsang. Who's a research scientist. All here with nvidia. Welcome everyone and thank you so much for taking the time to join the podcast richard. Let's start with you. Can you give us a big picture of what omnivorous is. And how kaolin fits in to the larger picture of on diverse thing happy to be here omni versus a platform and it's designed for collaboration in simulation. As you said at the very beginning we see in the world of production today. Collaboration has become essential for all types of industries whether it's architecture media entertainment autonomous driving robotics etcetera etcetera. There's just about everything you can look at is now doing collaboration. Whether it's across the room or across the globe and those challenges have become more and more an industry issue for people that have to transfer files between different applications or different scenes lighting. Things like that omnivorous was designed initially for our own self for our own work because we were doing things with different teams across the company across the globe that needed transition with different technologies and trade. The different things that they were doing but our customers are developers. Started to want this as an industry need as well because this is something we've seen for many many years. This need to collaborate so we started initially with the platform. A project called hollow deck which allowed for a vr experienced that could be shared but the limitations of that were because the industry didn't really support a lot of those things now with the advent of pixar usd are universal scene description. We had a common foundation with which we could start this project so once you have that and all. The industry apps that are moving towards supporting usd initially was a media and entertainment solution but and has now spread to architecture and manufacturing another tools. You had a common blueprint from which you could work kind of like the html for three d if you will so we started to build this so that we could use it and then we started to share it out with our developers what it allows for this platform whereby you can access the different technologies that we bring together and you can connect it with industry products. That are out there. Whether it's maya blender sketch up three ds max and go on and on and on and those are more and more happening every day. We're seeing more and more connections from these industry tools once you're on the platform kind of like an operating system if you will you have access to all these different tools and technologies some apps that we build like we create and view for rendering and other things like that and then other ones that researchers can add on and make their own. There's a whole tool kit called kit and build their own apps and things like that and so what you're going to see. Today is the use of the omni verse platform as as a platform and the callen tool is something that's been built for researchers to help visualize accelerate deep learning and so the team is put together some really amazing things to see here so with that. Let's jump in and show you some really cool stuff. What we're going to see today is the use of the omnibus platform as a platform with tools and technologies. That have been built on it. In this case the catlin tool which is a deep learning visualization and acceleration tool. So we're going to hear from the people that have been developing it and here's some of the cool things that have been done and we'll be able to point to some locations to see firsthand excellent so just to back up a second before We talked to jay for starters. How long has this been in development. You mentioned that like many great tools and in the industry it started out. You know filling a need that you had internally at invidia. How long ago was that. As i said it initially started out of the project called hollow deck which we showed at siggraph in two thousand seventeen. Okay but really where the flash point took place was in two thousand eighteen with the advent of rtx which was real time. Ray traced in a photo realistic sense. So now you had something that visually was never done before and that coupled with the usd production from pixar as a common footprint for us to work on you now had the kernel of where you could start building this platform and then in two thousand and nineteen is when we first showed omnivorous to the world. And then just this past december we launched it in an open beta so anybody has an rtx based system can download at nvidia dot com slash omnibus and have access to this open beta right. Now john francois. Why don't you jump in and tell us a little bit about the kaolin app sharp when you're working with images which is something researchers have been doing for longtime the tools are really refined and it's really straightforward to look at your data. They usually doesn't take more than a single line of code to visualize the output of your training and things work really well however when you're working with three d. data things tend to get a bit messy as comment have to juggle a bunch of different tools and exporters and renderers depending on the kind of data that you're working with and these tools they're generally not designed with researchers in mind and so it can take a lot of work to just set them up the way that you want and to get them to do what you want him to do right and all this just mace debugging problems really difficult and it can really slow down the pace of your research and so with callan omnibus saab. Were trying to take as much of that complexity away as we can. And we're doing that. By a tackling. Three main areas The first is visualizing data sets and so that means you can carefully look at all your three data and identify problems early The second is visualizing your training so that you can keep tabs on your experiments and see how things are progressing over time and lassi generating data from three d assets. And so what that means. Is you take in three d. data's and but you apply some atomization of some kind and then you can generate an endless stream of additional ground shoe. They can use to train your model. That means things like jerry. Beautiful patriots renders camera parameters death maps boxes segmentation et cetera. And were taking all these tools and tying them together with the callan library so that everything works well together and becomes really really easy to do something like visualizing your data creating additional ground truth from that loading at all in for training an visualizing that training as it progresses in real time to questions here that forgive me if they come across a somewhat simplistic or ignorant questions but to set the stage for those who might not be hands on in the three d. Space let alone three deep. Learning when you talk about visualizing data that there's a little bit of cognitive dissonance perhaps for the uninitiated because you're thinking oh wait isn't three d visual to begin with. So what is visualizing the data. Do that couldn't be done before. And what's the of that all us. An additional question which is what is three d. data. Perfect that's not necessarily always the same thing. Most people probably imagine meshes right that some. That's familiar to most people from video games and things like that but we can also represent three d objects and boxhall's and point clouds and implicit functions. I mean the list goes on and the ways you can define three data and what. I was saying about requiring different tools. Partly because of that right. You often need a separate tool for visualizing different types of data not to mention when you start adding materials into play and each tool has their own interpretation of material is things can get really tricky one of the difficulties with three d. Data's that there's so many different conventions. And as richard said that's where usd kinda helps in ran by leveraging usda use that as kind of the canonical representation and built everything on top of that. Can you give me maybe some kind of workflow examples or some industries or even specific projects. If any come to mind where folks are either able to or will be able to do things with kaolin. They couldn't do before. Or maybe it's just that as you alluded to. They were spending so much time. Kind of getting things. Set up and learning the different protocols and convert data from one format. Another all that stuff but now they can actually get onto doing their work doing the research or some examples of things that kaolin will empower people to do. I can take any sample out of the first kind of project i did in the three d. realm. I'm fairly new to this space. As well and i was re implementing a simple paper uses ground truth renderings that were generated in blender and train a model to recreate a three object based off of that so that required setting up your blender script so that you could capture the renders properly them at learning how that works yet to capture the camp renters thing have to create a data loader to load these images the three d match. The camera predators. You have to then set all your model up with that. And i want your training. Typically you either two ways you can visualize your data you re render it and save the cheese different viewpoints or you save in some format like obgyn open them one by one as your training to see some kind of progress and all. That was not great to work with this. So much time spent a lot of grunt work. It sounds like yeah exactly and so with carolina. it's a lot of just improving the workloads and removing all of this stuff that you're doing over and over again for all these different projects so now creating that ground truth that will be simple. It'll export it in a format Callan library can usually read. And so you don't have to worry about loading the data and when you're visualizing the data rather than having to export individual three d files your exporting really a time lapse so that you can scrub through your iterations and see okay. Well things were looking great duration thousand but then after that it just like went crazy. Can you tell us a little bit. J. f. about the development process for the app. Were there things along the way that maybe surprised you or did the app kind of tak- a left turn at some point that you weren't expecting into a good direction. What was it like actually developing the app. It's interesting i've been using omnivorous from its early beginnings for my own purposes raised completely selfish reasons of trying to get this process easier than it was and so working with with onerous developing apps and extensions. That's only improved over time and it's pretty awesome. Be kind of power that you have to create these experiences for users so in addition to the app there's also an sdk and masha and clermont are here to talk about that. So maybe i'll just ask the big question. I y and s d k and was this in the plans from the beginning or when did the development of the st k As actually can. I in comparison to the colleen upset okay. The goal for the st k. Was is actually more. Less library would present kelly libraries. It's a framework that allows three deep learning research. The goal was just here to be an enabler for research. As a comparison computer vision fields really got enabled by all of those pretty federations of deep learning frameworks suggest by george tenths of flows and it held having a common ground between researchers and then they could share more easily and he's also helped people to focus on certain efficiency shoes. Because once you know that everybody's using a specific operators for instance in you optimize it. You know that everybody is going to profit from this optimization ran. That's what we're trying to do. They're they're really focused on the field. That was the goal. The main goal was really to be. There's and visualization features is just a logical streams as jeff said. It's very complicated to do visualization. It was very complicated to do. Visualizations before that there were not enough tools made for researchers yes to jump in the bulk of three d. deep learning research happens and code and typically people use python these days with all the deep learning frameworks that clermont just mentioned pie torch antenna flow in wild. Those frameworks provide the basic deep learning components. There isn't really a goto library for managing different data types. So jeff mentioned that there is no central presentation of three d data for deep learning when you work with images it's typically pixels and so a lot of tools have been built around that presentation but when you're dealing with three d. deep learning you may experiment with different data types to see which ones work better for your problem and so one of the things we provide in colin is the ability to load different data types also convert between them so that you can more easily experiment and now that also feeds into extensive visualization tools. So that really allows you to debug and understand your models better and more quickly and so my understanding is that the The library is available. Now what's the goal putting this out there. There's a communal aspect. It's mentioned a couple times and obviously this is a collaborative project by nature. And so is the goal to get people up and using the librarian sharing information. Or what's your vision around. That definitely colleen is a project. It's on get up currently on the gita dot com videogames work slash callan. Okay and we want it to be a committee driven. I think what's helped the research. She's definitely be capacity of sharing project. You see a lot of new research coming being incremental working on top others so we really want to be a driving force for that. We do have a lot of experts at an obviously in this field and they will be able to contribute to collins on their own. We have a lot of work on efficient. Three d representations that explicitly toward deep learning. But we also want external contributors to calms and participates and and we want them to help us design a better tool for everyone. That would be the main goals here. And that's why it's open source must be open source with this logic. Masha did you want to add to that. I mean i think among the summarize it correctly basically would like to not only work with the basic functions. We would like to invite more contributions of that maybe represent three d data differently or even invite projects that deal for example with physics and maybe the extensions of three d. into the real world. Of course how. This goes depends what the community will do. And but i think there's really a need for a few places where people can go for just basic function so they don't have to implement things from scratch every time or just pool functions from different code bases across the web we set up development to really be reliable and test driven so that everything in the library. You're pretty sure that it works and it's going to continue to work. We're going to release for different versions of pie torch so it will be a library. People can rely on continuously for their research and so hopefully with contributions from the community. We can really make this grow so so our future releases kind of dependent on where the community takes it or do you have sort of a release schedule in mind right now so we do have some project in mind to extend. Its some specific data structures for instance. We are very interested in some variations of around the trees. That are very interesting. And also amongst visualization tools. One of the main reason is also we. We do have a research team it. He's made research team for three learnings. And so we do have certain people who have those needs. And it's very easy for us. To improve colleens just for those needs but along the coal from the community is they be ceus needs coming from the communities when they start to share some issues or request or participates we will go along the flow if they decide for instance to focus in a very specific area in a very specific. Data stricter is if we see asserted. Tran would definitely gonna put more effort into this and we have a certain hope for what the library will be like in our group as well because lots of research is happening. Typically research repositories are messy not tested with lots of experiments lots of spurious flags so. We really hope to set up a culture. Where once the research project is dan reusable components or sort of cleaned up and put into kaolin for the use by the community. We'll see how it goes but certainly something. I hope to make true. No it's a worthy aim for sure. Just imagining all the time that spent just getting things set up for you can actually get to the work and you know we talk about. The democratization of the tools is kind of a catchphrase but was good meaning but think about it often in terms of giving the diy or the ability of the small company the ability to work with large sets of data and leverage deep. Learning and ai. The way that the big companies have for so long but in terms of research and just being able to reuse components as you said to spend less time getting set up and more time doing the work. It's great to hear about when you mentioned that to some extent the interest of the community will dictate at least some of of where this is all headed. But there are there any specific new features in the pipeline. That you're excited about. There are some openings in into a differentiated physics. First of all. We'd like to link be able to link allen we some of the differential physique works. there is also we've seen a lot of requests from the marlins zoo previously collins wiscon- being model zoos and we decided to export. That's two different repositories. And i think that's the best way to do that and we also wanted to become driven. That's a nice way to share it and to make make the library accessible for newcomers very often. They don't want to go deep dive into the library. I just wanna play around. He's all those so we want to do. Those madhu highly efficient again. We're going to take a good focus on making them that they are as fast as possible. And we really want to expend visualization to a lot of debugging tools new debugging feature is trying to cease being able to analyze your three the objects without having to coded yourself that really helped. I think whenever you making your scraped your trainings. your research. The capacity to quickly is something very helpful. How big is the team is your team. That's working on all this. It really depend because we have a lot of participants right. There's a lot of people who have participating into colleens. The big part of them are researchers and the core in full times is not that big but yes. Most of the people are researchers. They're very interested in using colleens and importing their own research into collins which is already a way of being driven that very internally and so for the whole group for any aspects of this yesterday the app i'm diverse in general are there particular fields whether in in research and academia or in industry that you're really excited to see what they do with the framework with the app with the k. Or maybe some fields that haven't traditionally used so much but you're excited to see what they can do. Now is the tools kind of get standardized more accessible these days there countless applications of three d deep learning that we hope to see but because it's so challenging. I think we're not quite there yet. To see truly truly exciting results so over recent years ability to predict the jail was describing three d objects just from images a single image so historically you needed many different pictures of the same object in order to reconstruct it in three d today by learning from data you can actually create an object system single photograph and the fidelity of those methods is getting better and better so ultimately what you would like to be able to do is take a photograph of the street or your house and have an actual three d. model an understanding of the materials that are in that environment. So that you can actually simulate that environment without measuring everything without spending countless hours to recreate the world. So i think if we have this kind of parody between our world and the digital simulation there's so much more we can do we can build better robots like. It's just too much to imagine you know you're you're and so we kind of mentioned throughout the conversation a few places online where people can go to find out more or access to get hub repo but maybe we can do a quick rundown for the st k. Masha where some places people can go online to find out more And even access the tools there's guitar repository which is skit. Hub dot com slash. Nvidia game works slash callan. We also have a developer blog posts on nvidia's website. So it's that lower dot envy dot com slash nvidia dash katelyn great before we wrap anything. Richard maybe anything you want to say kind of inclusion about on diverse. We're really thrilled. We've got many thousands of customers. Now that have downloaded omnivorous beta. And we're seeing all kinds of great things being done with it from visualization of models for buildings for different types of mini projects. Things like that and it's really starting now what we're going to see over. The next few months is more and more people using this platform for their own work with their existing tools and developing new things on their own for customization. So it's really exciting to see what's going well. That's going to be an exciting few months. Let alone the future beyond that and Just the collaborative nature of the whole project. Just makes it really one of the things you want to keep your eye on and see what's coming next richard j. f. Masha comb thank you all so much for taking the time to come on and talk a little bit about omnivorous and cowan and again as was mentioned you can check out. I'm diverse on the invidious site. Everything's there and we'll be there. There's developer blog. Lots of information and tools to go ahead and get started with so everybody out there. If you're interested you know what to do and again to the panel. Thanks so much for taking the time and best of luck with all these projects going forward. Thanks very much. Thank you thank you.

nvidia richard kerris Francois flesh masha greener pixar john francois callan omnibus saab callan library Callan library richard fuji colleen jeff jay patriots Ray usda jerry callan dan reusable
080320 Hour 3

Ace and TJ

26:37 min | 1 year ago

080320 Hour 3

"Okay, let me give you my nightly routine quickly before I go to bed every night I dig up all the Mason Jars have my money in it I, count it, put it back in the ground. Then I take. And then I go to bed. So. That's how it works. Callan products going to help you lose that quarantine fifteen also help you with other things like joint pain helping you get better sleep all of these things and again I take at night. So that means it's not going to keep me up because it's not going to jack me up like other things do that you take scientifically proven to help you have better sleep an lose weight that's CAL train right now they've got their best promotion ever going as well by three bottles you get three bottles for free. That's right. You buy three, they give you three it can't be beaten. All you do is go top loss DOT COM T. O. P. L. O. S.. Dot Com or call one, eight, hundred, three to five forty, three, sixty, six that's three to five. Forty, three, sixty, six, lose weight the right way with CAL train. Do you love sale? Are you ready to save some money? Hey, I'm bobby. Barbara. Independent. Since he director in right now almost everything in our since he catalog ten percent off we gotta let go her fall and winter products to make room for the new spring and summer products and that means big savings for you. You can get six bars right now for only twenty seven dollars guys that's only four fifty aboard. So go check out the sale it smells just dot com against smells just right dot com in start saving now. At the top of the hour, we give you the hottest trending topics in the world. This is trending with rates on the as TJ show, we'll get to the incredible love story with a twist, but first, here's a tomato that looks just like Larry Bird. Ya I got news for you. A I love when people see faces in objects usually it's Mary, the mother of Jesus that people see in a piece of or something like that. But this is a tomato that looks just like Larry Bird and people are loving it on the Internet. And it looks. Kim. Them. For Tomato season or not. But yeah, are we Yes. Okay. So wasn't get out in the garden and maybe grab one go viral for it Larry Larry. Larry Bird. That'd be thrilled about that. Look like just like me. Yeah. Wonder if eaten it you. Know, you don't eat that. Oh, I would he? Yeah it's GonNa ride. If we don't sell on Ebay remember there was somebody cheeto. And it looked like I. Think Pope Francis Sold. That I, sold it on Ebay for thousands of dollars. CHEETO. But a tomato would be ruined by the time you got it to the person who bought it that'd be something you can spray on it right Now you're. Or something. You know well, I don't know. Looks, pretty good to me? I love a homegrown tomatoes, get the picture and yeah. Y- eat it made a sandwich so in May. The. Murder Hornet became a thing it was spotted in Washington state. In the middle of July, a murder Hornet was finally caught in a trap. They've placed twelve hundred traps in Washington state to catch one July fourteenth that happened July twenty ninth it was verified So now this is the first murder Hornet that's been captured in the United States, and now they are on edge because the honeybee population has been in decline for years and everybody knows that the honeybee population is important for the global superfood supply chain and murder Hornets are a threat to honeybees. So they don't detail what the trap can. How do you trap a murder? Hornet like what's the Bait? But there's thousands of them out there. So yet now the honeybees. Is the name of the Charlotte Hornets dance team. The the dance team that goes out on the court and everything riggins. For their safety, the safety of the honeybees from the murder Hornet would you be willing to offer your apartment as a safe haven? For the honeybees to. Hang out. And live absolutely colonize. honeybees colonize in your apartment. Love Act. Sure. Absolute. sweetening come here honey. I. Got some shoe before before you. Use here's the cone he honeycomb. And you like the Stemmons or whatever they're going I wish they could capture and train those murder Hornets. For an army. Yeah, put them out there with ANTIFA. Oh. Yeah. Just like on the frontline. Scary. You rather be confronted by a merger Hornet or a rattlesnake. Murder Hornet. Because, why well, because a murder horn is not gonNA really kill human. would just one of them is not really going to kill a it's going to hurt but a rattlesnake can kill human alive fast. Yeah I think only a couple of times have these things been fatal from the murder Hornet it's more. It's just more powerful than honeybee, but it will definitely hurt now a rattlesnake would be easier to hit with a stick and kill. Then, being able to hit a murder Hornet with stick. Because one of them can fly right. you would try to kill a rattlesnake. Yeah. You wouldn't just run away. No fast. I would run away I. my initial instinct would be to run away and get a stick in combat and combat since. TJ with the stack. Runaway for a second gun out my waist band. In the back and then. That'd be easier to kill than a stick I feel like. Kill with sticks, pop them right on the head and Yeah. I thought it was a lot harder than that Yeah and just a really quick because I mentioned this earlier Ivan Jerry, they're both They just got married last week in Montana. The kickers at their ninety one years old they met in first grade they were widowed and they signed a pre nup. Ninety One They were widowed. They ended up running into each other in a diner, and now they are happily married. Congratulations Ivan Jerry Montana. Maybe, think of Evan and Jaron. I'll remember that the brothers that were thing. Do I hope they're OK yeah, from Georgia. So they're fine. Yeah. All those things are now trending. TJ. Okay. Sean Penn got married or so they say. And WE'RE GONNA find out how sean pins marriage and his lady. relate to you. In your relationships and your dating coming up next. and. TJ. When you look at your current bathroom do you know that it needs an immediate update? We want you to know about one day bath and shower remodeling with prices low as one, hundred, ninety, nine dollars per month call, eight, hundred, nine, four, eight, five, seven, four, nine, eight, hundred, nine, four, eight, five, seven, four, nine, all as and Tj show graphics and web designer done by Alpha lab designs looking for spectacular email design at Ace TJ, Dot Com web design menus, marketing materials, brochures, flyers, social media, ads, and more design at TJ dot. com. I. Fully raining today hurricane i-it's hi. What does that Hurricane Call? US You say yes. Hurricane Sis bringing the rain. Bring in El Agua. Okay Falling, down from. SCIUTTO. Cloudy Cloudy. Amigos yeah. So. Let me know when we're back on the network rob we are in I can stop playing around we we are. We're back on the network. Okay Good morning at that was just a warm up the Mike Time One of the greatest actors of of our time is Sean Penn.. When he puts his mind to it, he can really really do a good job of acting. Now he is in my personal humble opinion. he seems to be one of the biggest DB's on the face of the earth. The dance. For back. Just, rotten terrible. Just disgusting unhappy miserable. Existence of cockroach person. But some people may like him. but. There's a story that he got married to his girlfriend Leila George. Friday I think and then it got posted somebody posted it as a friend and then he got taken down. So they don't know for sure just appears that he got married Friday. Now his girlfriend is twenty eight in champagne is about to be six. What's that? Age Difference Sixty Twenty eight thirty two thirty, two years. Okay Now The thing about it is. Somebody was saying that The rule is that you should never if you're going to date someone younger than you, you don't ever date anybody who's younger than your. your kids. You know that's the rule I date older guys but I'm not going to date any guy whose kids are older than I am or date younger women but I'm not gonNA date any woman who's younger than my kids. Now. I know everybody's expecting us to start doing. Funny. Jokes and all about as in his younger fiancee Amanda as we always do we joke about the age difference and everything. But we're not doing that. Today because. Honestly, we do that too much to begin with and. Let me tell something Amanda during all of this All of this. Tragedy with Isis daughter Peyton in the in the fatal car wreck. Has Not, acted like twenty eight-year-old. She handled a lot of stuff continues handling a lot of stuff. In a way that he needed. and has supported him in a way that you wouldn't think. In A. If you're making jokes all the time about her about a couple, the difference in their ages you wouldn't think that she would be. handling things maturely, and all she has. and. Just thought I would throw that in there. So. Who has these rules? What were the rule be? Like I don't have a problem dating older men are I don't have a problem dating younger women but. The rule is blank. What what is too far? Like this thing. The person that was commenting on the story said. You know. I wouldn't date anybody any girls younger than my daughter. Unless she's really really hot. No he didn't say that part. But. That would be a good rule. Or if you if you date older guys say I'm just I just won't date any guy that's older than my dad. Because if I do then that's the line that I cross. And don't say I won't dating girl is not eighteen. There's no rule Eighty. Do they have to be about ages it can era is it general rules Yeah Preferably about of specifically about ages with if there any other good rules like that that are unique to your situation like I won't date. I won't date a guy with a goatee. Unless he will shave off his goatee. Because know whatever the reason they're not in style anymore. They scratch face when you kissing. Not. Not. I'm saying they're not, in styling. I was reading that for my notes. So I didn't say it. I read it from my notes. Like I won't date a guy the where. Are. Won't date a woman who wears krock that's my role but mainly, you won't date anybody that's younger or older than whatever. So, de Amazon social media's or you can call one triple eight, forty, one as TJ. The won't date him rule. We'll find out next. There's more easily TJ. Is your small to mid size this ready for the inevitable rebound voice hunter dot com specializes in providing top level voice talent for all your video marketing e-learning and advertising needs. There's no better time than right now to focus on increasing your customer base and corporate internal audio needs more center dot com is a voiceover service with the world's best voice actors and actresses. Call. Voice Center DOT COM at seven zero, four, six, four, eight, Ninety, eight, hundred or visit us on the web at Boyce Hunter Dot Com. Okay. Now that we're all both stuck at home and looking at any. New Hobby or career ideas. Remember we've got our podcast company and can help you with a career in podcast. All you need is the idea and we can help you with everything else from equipment posted on I tunes, how you do a podcast most importantly how you do it podcast and have it sound professional. Now, this part may be good for some well, not so much for others but as and I will listen and help you with your podcast, and this is an optional service. All you need to do is go to radio button network DOT COM that's radio network DOT com. Live from the Radio Button Network Studios. This is the. Rule. So what are your? What are your dating rules? That you got. Date people younger than US long as they're not younger than your adult kids. Will you date anyone who is Not. Allergic to dogs care. But that's quite a Quite, an open window there for you not so picky. Allergic to dog? Hair. I'LL H. You Large Dogar no I'll date you. You got a car. Yeah. I'd wait a minute you the dog her no. I'll date you. Sight unseen. always say I wouldn't date anyone under thirty I'm forty four. But. I meet someone fall in love and mets. One love we got married this June. Didn't know when we started he was just twenty seven. God had other plans. So to me, you can't put an age on love dictate who you love God can. So she married her a younger man that was under. The age that she she always require. How old is she? I'll have to I'm looking at her pictures now she's a her husband. Look like a happy couple. Do you think God, anything to do with. Well If you're forty five. With a twenty, seven year old. Have a role in that I mean. They. She. This lady says, I'm five to my rule is I don't date men shorter than me shallow I know but. Help I don't think I don't think you really have to worry about that too much. Willow is. Single. My Mom said to tell you she won't date men. Was Married to one for thirty two years had five kids. She has four step kids to and has been there done that. Now. She only dates the ladies. So I guess, that's A. That's a rule. I got the same rule. Only, date the Lakers. I hate. I won't date a guy that says McDonald's that's a good one. That is a good one says Donald's instead of McDonald's. That's a really good one because it implies something. No, it's just annoying. I mean. What You all regan's you figured it out. A guy that does McDonalds probably. You know what if he's saying it just no just means that he's He's probably I. think that's a rural country southern thing Oh. Yeah. Magnum and you don't know very many people McDonald's. mcmurray mcdonagh many of those Irish people. Yeah. They don't. They don't have them out in the country. Well, he ain't got hires Fokker and it's called it ain't called the Big Mick now. Is it Is. Called the Big Matt Great Point. So why would it not be called McDonald's free. I'll be honest I never put that together. The BIG MAC is man is in McDonalds. Right MC I. Think the other would have been considered somewhat offensive to the Irish music. A bad word about I. I think well. It's what people call is people didn't know them. Yeah. Because they're so many of them's last name starts with. McDonnell. mcmurray McConnell all of that. I got that now to that make. Okay. I didn't know having. Bad What's your mouth? Didn't Middle Hey. Look how much you've learned right here. That's great I'm. I'm not an idiot that's where. Hi. A lot of people don't know this about me, but it is my dream to one day live in the state of Florida. Everybody. Knows I wanna live on the beach but I wanna live on the beach in Florida. That's my dream. Why do I love Florida so much got a big example in the news. Today. That's why I love. Florida so much. We'll give it to your next. Is the. TJ Show. Papa John's surprise people. So we put Shaquille O'Neal live video screens inside pizza boxes. Let's listen. In. This new CECCARELLI pizza extra cheese, extra pepperoni, rate today today's biggest slices and Papa John History, and it's bigger than pizza because one dollars sales donate the Papa John's foundation for. Building community. Aronie purchased for just twelve bucks only at Papa John's offered through eight twenty, three, twenty prices and participation may vary hey, it's going and I wanna make sure you know about the Hampton Inn and suites south. Park and the completely renovated lobby fitness and breakfast areas just call seven, four, three, one, nine, fifty, seven, hundred to book your reservation or newly designed conference room that seven, Oh, four, three, one, nine, fifty, seven, hundred. TJ Show. Her brand new podcast share. Funny. About thirty minutes on the ACE and TJ show. Very excited. So. Good. Downloads through the roof. Oh, are I've heard? Yeah. Don't you? Don't you have privy to that. You can say that. Okay. and. Where do the People's listen. On their Transistor Radios, I don't know what? That is. I tunes Google play, music, STJ DOT COM or on our free APP. is offering. Right. So. My name is. and. I love the beach. Beach Beach. Let's go to the beach a love it I wanna I wanna live. Not at the beach one day but on the beach, I wanNA. Just set up a tent on the beach itself in live out there. That's what that's how much I love the beach. So. Maybe not in the next. Five years will be living in Florida. Hopefully I will have a a beach residents. But the ultimate goal is to. Live out my twilight. In Florida on the beach. And there are so many reasons I love Florida. It's not just because of the beaches because it's a free state. You can do a lot of things in Florida that you can't do in other states. Same. With taxes I, Love Texas but. Texas doesn't have the beach quality, the Florida's, and they do have beaches but not like Florida. So, then when I saw this little tidbit of information about Florida, just a little random random fact. In made me. So much prouder of the fact that I wanna live in this place. Makes me. More. excited. About the way, they don't have state income taxes in Florida. That's another thing. What's so great about it. But in the state of Florida. Anyone. Can execute a criminal on death row. You just apply. and. If they pick you, you get paid one hundred, fifty dollars. To be part of the execution team. For the people on death row has it ever happened? Yeah. You would WANNA do that. Sure. No, you're not you're. If. I if a new, the Crime Ni had been convicted of an auto. Yeah. Beach Chair right there. Oh my gosh. There's no way they let people do that. Yes. It is on the maybe in the electric chair or something because I don't think they have the electric chair. What are they going to let a citizen inject somebody with the Cali do is push a button. They also have to have people have you know strapped to the Gurney and thing? We lament and out. I don't know exactly how it works but I just know I don't know if they still do it. They still allow it, but you would think you would wanna do that. Yes. God. That's crazy to me. Now, I wouldn't necessarily want to be on a firing squad, but there are some people that I would. You know if that rotten and evil and everything. Yeah. Put that on your resume I was an executioner boom. Yeah me. Talking about getting readers job in. Ari. TJ Show is. TJ In thirty PODCASTS available in the Act J. Afternoon Eastern four ace and TJ coming up. To save up to seventy, five percent off on domestic or international airline tickets, then call low cost airlines for prices so low, we can't publish them call eight, hundred, two, eight, seven, forty, seven sixteen that's eight, hundred, two, eight, seven, forty, seven, sixteen.

Florida murder Hornets McDonalds Larry Bird Sean Penn United States Tj Boyce Hunter Dot Com Larry Larry DOT COM Ebay Mason Jars Hurricane Callan CAL bobby T. O. P. L. O. S Barbara
286: Cal Newport - Digital Minimalism  Create Time For Solitude  Stop Socializing On Social Media

The Ultimate Health Podcast

57:18 min | 2 years ago

286: Cal Newport - Digital Minimalism Create Time For Solitude Stop Socializing On Social Media

"That reinvention really changed our relationship with our phones. So it was social media. And in particular, this focus on the social privilege indicators that change from being tools that we deploy occasionally into these constant companions that we're looking at all the time. Hello and welcome salesman. L podcast episode two hundred and eighty six Jesse Chapas earth, mardi Wasserman, and we are here to take your health to the next level each week. We'll bring you inspiring and informative conversations about health and wellness covering topics of nutrition lifestyle, fitness mindset, and so much more. And the speaker featured guest is Cal Newport. He's an associate professor of computer science at Georgetown University. He's also a writer who focuses on the impact technology on society calisi author of six books, including most recently, the New York Times bestselling book digital minimalism choosing a focus life in a noisy world. And this book is the focus the today show, you won't find Callan social media. But he's been blogging Cal Newport dot com for over a decade. This is such a great topic to bring onto the podcast as so many times on the show, we discussed different tips and strategies for reducing exposure to social media enter devices, but this time what CAL's talking about is reevaluating, your whole relationship with technology and. And how it's literally taking over our lives, and is Jesse said, you will not find them on social media. This guy has never had any of the platforms. So he is definitely a credible source. So here's what we get into today. We talk about how the Facebook like button has changed social media planning analog time versus digital time being intentional when you're using technology and how to use it productively. Why anxiety is on the rise in adolescence in had a dumbed down your smartphone, so much great practical and useful information very excited for you guys to hear this. Here we go with Cal Newport high-cal. How are you? Welcome to the show or I'm doing well. Thanks for having me scraped to have you on the show. Cal and the new book digital minimalism was an excellent read. We're gonna get into everything digital minimalism today. And I want to start off by talking about something a red in the interior book. And you specify you're one of the few members of your generation to have never had a social media account, and you tend not to spend much time surfing the web. So you're thirty six years old. Same ages myself would. It made you mean to these. Well, I've been trying to remember because it's been coming up a lot. So I do remember Facebook arriving on the scene. I think I was a senior in college at the time. I have vague memories of being a little bit mystified. What people are so excited about it. One of the memories. I have is that I never like ranking. Thanks. So I don't like saying like, my favorite movie, or what my favorite food is for whatever reason, I always have hard time with that. And that was a big part of Facebook profiles back then. So I think that played a role. Also, I was just an early internet enthusiasts. So by the time Facebook came along I had been hacking HTML and messing around with blog software for years and years. So it wasn't like it was offering something that I wasn't already doing on the existing internet you explaining your book about your first impression with Facebook. And it was actually your wife now girlfriend at the time. Julie back in two thousand four that introducing a Facebook. So take us back there in what were your initial thoughts? Well, her initial thought. It's too. I mean, I went back and asked her about it her memory, which I think a lot of people from back. Then share is that it was sort of a triviality. You know, it was fun. But not something you would spend a lot of time on maybe you would go and see what's the relationship status of people that you had class with or can I find someone I knew from high school can I find what they're doing. Now, you would explore a little bit. And that was about it. And then maybe you would occasionally check in. So it was certainly not considered when it came out something that you would spend a lot of your day using and that brings about the huge transformation Facebook in two thousand nine and that's when the like button actually was invented in implemented into the system. So how did this change the game? Well, this was part of what was ended up being a pretty massive reinvention of the social media experience, which ended up reinventing our entire relationship with our phones. And so the like button was the beginning of this reinvention were social media became less about you post things, your friend posts things and you read each other's post. It. It changed from that into every time you log on or then after that tap the app, you are going to see some accumulated, social approval indicators. So a count of how many people like this thing you posted. What did people say about that thing that anyone tag you in a photo? Are you getting favored it or you're getting re tweeted it became about this incoming stream of social approval indicators about you the social media company starting with Facebook into the other ones followed suit really began to emphasize the stream of incoming social approval indicators because of this is what got us to become compulsive users of the services. This is what got us from where we were in two thousand and four where it's oh. Last week. I went on Facebook because I was bored unless you relationship status while I haven't been on in days and into where we are today, which is fifty minutes a day of tapping again, and again, and again is there's something new on. Here's our new light. Did someone like something? I did is there anything interesting for me to see that reinvention really changed our relationship with. Our phone. So it was social media. And particularly this focus on the social privilege indicators that change from being tools that we deploy occasionally into these constant companions that we're looking at all the time. And this brings about an interesting point for people like myself that have been on Facebook for a number of years, and how the platform has actually changed slowly. But surely or in some cases, like when the like bun comes out a pretty drastic change. But it's changed quite a bit from the initial program that we signed up for. Well, if you go back to the web context when something like Facebook first emerged. This was the beginning of the web two point. Oh movement, which is something that emerged after the original dot com crash. So we had this enthusiasm into late nineties the original dot com, boom that was really focused on ecommerce. And the idea was it's much more efficient to sell things to people over the internet than in an actual store. And so we had all these high capitalized startups trying to sell all sorts of things to people. It was going to be this huge revolution. Most of those failed in the two thousand two thousand one there's a crash was. Fail. So what came up out of there was this social vision of the web, web two point. Oh, which is maybe the web is not just a cheaper way for people to buy things or cheaper way for large media companies to deliver their content. Maybe the users themselves can contribute and post information. And this is when you start to get personal websites geo cities angel fire. This is when you start to get blogs begin to arise as a thing. And this was exciting. This was about expression. And so Facebook originally was hey, let's take this web two point. Oh thing going on. And we'll give you an even easier interface for doing it. So you don't have to buy domain. You don't have to learn about WordPress. You can essentially have a blog it will make it real easy for you to connect to the blogs of your friends that was the original Facebook vision what we have today is completely different slot machine beasts, which is about we will feed. You information about yourself or that statistically chosen to be hard to ignore. And we just once you looking at this thing passively, consuming what our algorithm select all day long. So. It went from just let's make web two point. Oh, a little bit easier into a completely different type of service. And I think a lot of people are unhappy with that change while while we're on the topic of the like button. Let's talk about one of your recommendations for people at Argun use Facebook in. That's that people don't actually click that like Biden or comment on other people's posts. So let's get into why this is a recommendation ears socializing on social media is as far as your brain is concerned, really not real socializing. I mean, what we have evolved to 'prave is to actually be in the real world sacrificing our time and attention on behalf of relationships that matter to us actually having some friction I had to get up. I had to go to your house. I'm giving up hours to be here. I'm sacrificing time energy on your behalf the strengthen this relationship. The do this for your family to do this for your close friends to do this for members of your community. This is what makes us feel social is. What makes us feel connected. It's what makes us feel sort of alive as humans when you instead replace these type of difficult. But meaningful interactions with these very low friction type online connection such as clicking like or saying congrats with three exclamation points on their someone's Instagram post or leaving a quick comment or retweeting, a French thing. This is so lightweight and so low friction that we don't get nearly the same satisfaction. And so the problem is when we began to displace the valuable real world analog high friction social interactions that we crave with these low quality digital online interactions. And so when you do that replacement. It's a net loss, and it can lead. You feeling lonely can lead you feeling miserable. It can push you into emotional areas that aren't that healthy? And so when I say don't click like or don't leave comments when I'm trying to tell people is what you do on social media. Don't try to convince yourself out social and the easiest way to do that is just really stop outside of just logistical things. Really stop socializing that much on social media. So that your human drive to be connected. We'll drive you to do the hard stuff in the real world. You actually need. Yeah. For me thinking about what you just said it lets us off the hook. So saying congrats to somebody a good friend of ours. Such as had a baby or, you know, another example in that realm, it let's put that check on the to do list and make it seem like you've already done something good. But it's just such a shallow interaction that you know. It's just not very valuable. I mean set saying congrats three exclamation points. You know, you should go to their house and bring him a box and that box has survival stuff in it that they need as a new parent. Right. And you take the time to do it. I went to the store bought this stuff. I came to your house here. It is. I wanna make your life better. That's a real connection that actually strengthens our relationship that makes both parties in that social connection right there feel much stronger about each other the congrats with ritual nation points does about nothing as far as making your relationship, you'll stronger as someone who's been in outside of all these social media platforms. Hell have you gained interest in in what allowed you to start to analyze this critically? Well, so as a computer. Scientists who also writes I've been focusing in recent years really on unintentional or interesting consequences of technology, and culture and so back in two thousand sixteen I'd publish this book called deep work, which was an essence about some of the unintentional consequences of new technologies in the workplace. So in particular, what happened when things like Email and slack and related low friction communication tools came into the workplace and the book is about how we lost her ability to concentrate, and how this is a problem and how we need to rebuild it. So that book comes out and on the road talking about it and readers kept coming up to me and saying, okay, maybe I buy your premise about the impact of tech on the workplace, but what about the impact of tech and our personal life because there's something going on there that's becoming really distressing. And so I began to look more into it. And it really did seem to be a big problem. The forces at play seemed to be really different than what was happening in the workplaces. And I didn't see a lot of solutions out there that were working for people. And so in the last few years, it's something that I become pretty involved. And in terms of my research and thinking about technicolor, and what's the closest you've ever got into this addictive nature that you write about is there anything that you've used any tools that you've used that allowed you to experience this. But for me, for example, when we're near the trade deadline for major league baseball through very careful. Breaking news all throughout the day. And you're waiting to hear about, you know, as my team going to make this particular trade or not make that trade, which is what I imagine on my news as like a lot of people all year round. But I learned okay. I've got to be careful. So only when I do book launches I have to put pretty strict rules in the place. Don't go. Check sales ranks don't go check. You know, news coverage or publicists will send you a run down of that. But it's very tempting to get into a cycle where you're just continually looking for these refreshes because there might be something in there. That's interesting. And so I often get a taste of just how quickly some of the stuff can become compulsion any bring a book launches. And it's so interesting that you've gained popularity with all of your books without any social media platforms. It's such a status now. That's what people are going further trying to get their lights up in their numbers up their followers. So that they can get a book deal. So tell us about this experience how you've done this without any social media while the power of social media followings for book sales largely over. Blown. I mean, if anything what publishers are find us except for the extremes that sort of massive online personalities things like Twitter followers. Don't convert the book sales very, well, actually, what's much more effective in terms of online communities Email list. And this is actually what you get from publishers today did much rather see a pretty large Email lists, and they would large Twitter following because E mail list convert pretty high now if you have a list of people who follow your writing, they'll buy your book, if you have one hundred thousand Twitter followers, very few of them actually will when you tweet out about the book. Also, I think what's become true in the publishing world in in publishers, increasingly understand, this is that the real value of social media for book launches is that it allows other people to more easily spread the word about your book. There's only so much good. You can do by saying I have any book out a have a new book out. I have a new book out. Okay. That's okay. But the main thing is if there's a crowd that likes to book their accounts is what allows them to spread it to other people. And so I think there's probably too much emphasis being placed in. A lot of sectors right now on the idea that having a big social media following somehow going to be crucial or like a huge advantage for some of these old fashioned activities have been going on for a long time. So like, you say your Email list has been your biggest asset. I'm sure it has been helpful. I think it was helpful for the prelaunch. But the other thing that is true about getting big book sale numbers is that you can't make that happen. No, one has a large enough list to you know, if you're going to sell four hundred thousand copies of a book over few years or something like that most of that is going to come from the book being good at being spread. Right. I mean, unless you have fifty million person Email list who loves you the best you can do with something. Like, my Email lists maybe helps seed the book out there. Maybe it helps to sales for the first week which is good for bestsellers list, and that's useful. But it's not gonna make or break a book. The book is gonna make a break it self, especially when you're talking about the type of sales numbers, you need for something to be a big hit kind of goes back to your home. Message analog is word of mouth getting people to spread the word naturally organically, probably you getting out in the community as well as probably what? Really helps in. That's what really resonates with people. I think that's absolutely right. You produce a product that is really good producer product. That's too good to be ignored go to where people are in talk about it. That's useful. So I do a lot of podcast interviews, for example. Because I think that's a good way for different audiences to really learn something about who. I am what I'm writing. There's only so much value can get out of just telling your same audience again. And again, hey, I have a book you'll get X number of thousand that will buy it. And that's nice, but that's it. And so if you want to keep going after that, it comes down to how good is the book, and how willing are you to go where people are and talk to them where they are makes a lot of sense to make out and the new book is titled digital minimalism sell. Have you define that term? So digital minimalism is a philosophy of technology use that says, you should focus your online activities on just a small number of tools that you have chosen because they give you large amounts of benefit. Okay. I don't wanna talk about this experiment that you did in winter two thousand eighteen where you ended up reaching out. I think it was teary. Molest it must have been and tell us about what you proposed in what the response was like, so I've been experimenting with something. I called the digital declutter which is now at the core of the book, which is a process for transforming into a digital minimalists. So for essentially starting from scratch with your online life, get rid of all the stuff that you've hazard Lee signed up foreign downloaded and rebuilding your online life from scratch, but this time focusing on things very intentionally they're really valuable. So this process, I was experimenting with have you step away from all of these optional technologies in your personal life for a month to get back in touch with what really matters. And then at the end of this whole month, you carefully rebuild your online life. So I put out a note to my Email list and said, hey, has anyone willing to try this in January of two thousand eighteen my hope our idea at the time was maybe a dozen maybe two dozen people who because it was a big ask as like, maybe a couple of dozen people will agree, and I can talk to them. They may hang out with them. And see what it's like it'll be good research. So I put. Out this note to my list and over sixteen hundred people wrote back and said, yes, I'm doing this. It was a staggering response. And it really showed me how much hunger there was for people to get a change. But it also gave me a lot of insight into what happens when people from all sorts of different walks of life. Go through this relatively radical transformation of their digital behavior. And now, we're gonna take a quick break. From our town with Cal shadow to our show partner spruce spruce is a company that is focused on amazing high quality collagen powders and they come in both marine and grass-fed bovine. 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They're going from the regular habits to stopping everything cold Turkey overnight. So when you are setting all up, did you think about doing a more gradual method, or what made you go for the cold Turkey method will the tips and tricks aren't working. This is something to became pretty clear early in my research on this topic is over the last couple of years where people become quite uneasy about the current relationship with these tools, it's really a phenomenon. The last couple of years. There has been many many articles and suggestions for how to take small steps. Turn off your notifications. Don't have the phone in your room do a digital Chabad. Once a week. We have one day a week that you step away from your tools, put your screen in the gray scale. This is a big one. I hear a lot you'll make your phone gray scale. So it seems less enticing to look at lots of tips and tricks like this also lots of New Year's resolutions just to in general try to look at your phone lasts in general, try to be a little bit more disconnected. So all. All of these gradual steps are being proposed and they weren't working the forces were too powerful. But technologically and culturally were just too powerful. The jolly back for the screen. It was hard to have substantial change. And so I came to the belief that as in other areas in which you know, in particular health, and fitness where change is difficult. Sometimes you need something. That's more extreme you need a philosophy. Something that's based in your value. Something you can believe in something that allows you to consistently approach. All these decisions you have to make just like in health and fitness. It's usually not enough. Just as a, hey, eat, better or move more. It's a lot more effective when you have a whole philosophy that you can adopt wholesale. Okay. I'm Kito or on paleo or I'm vegan or whatever. It is. Right. So digital minimalism is like the digital equivalent of going Kito in some sense, right? Let's rip off the band aid. Let's completely reform how he lived this life. And let's do so on a foundation of our values. I think we need something that extreme if we're going to expect extreme changes to stick. Okay. So let's talk about ripping the band aid off what are people giving up for this thirty days. I. No, there's a lot of different variables out there. Like text messaging net flix video games. Obviously, we're going to be getting rid of the different social media platforms. I assume, but let's let's talk about the details. So there's no one definitive list. But in general, what I say is it's sort of a network technology that you use your personal life that won't cause a major problem if you step away from it for thirty days, then Bishop probably go into list. So the obvious things are like social media online news games. These are sort of obvious sort of personal life digital activities that you could step away from thirty days. Nothing that bad will happen then on the margins. We have things like streaming media. So I think it was obvious for everyone don't go on YouTube but net flicks was a little bit more complicated. And so some people kept net flicks. Some people got rid of it altogether. Some people had the rule that okay? I'm only allowed to watch Netflix. If I'm with someone else. So it could still be a part of social events like movie night. But wasn't something that you could just been John. To try to escape from things in your life video games like off your phone, but actual video games have very little to do with the internet allot of readers Rodin is at that should be on the list that is taking up a lot of time text messaging most people need to do some text messaging just for logistical reasons. But a lot of people put sort of fences around that during the thirty days, so they would say I have my phone and do not disturb as default mode, and then there's certain times, right? Check it specifically because there's a particular text waiting for or I'm trying to arrange something logistically. So there's a little bit of creativity at the margins depending on your situation where some people allowed something some people didn't some people allowed it with some rules. But in the core, you had this sort of the typical activities that dominate a lot of our personal digital life. What I didn't cover though in this sort of abstention is work related technologies. So you can't use my declutter as an excuse not to answer your bosses E mail for a month. That's a completely different issue. And it has completely different dynamics at play. So this is really about. What's happening in your life outside of work? That makes a lot of sense. So what do people experience in the beginning? Going off this stuff cold Turkey and then later on over time as they got more east to it. Most people experienced a bit of a withdrawal type symptom for five fifteen days. So the compulsive urge the check something, and it was difficult to have something to check. And so I wrote in the book, for example of one young woman who took everything off her phone, but for the first ten days, her urge to check the phone to get information was so strong that she was going to the weather app because it's the only thing on her phone that she could click on and had information that could change. So she was compulsively checking the weather up, and she said for about ten days, she could tell you the weather in like twelve major cities around the world, then our to our level of granularity. But then that got better. So a lot of people had that sort of compulsive urge it was difficult. And then it got better. What was more interesting for me to discover and this really broke down along age lines or the? Else is that another issue? People had was a real sense of dread or anxiety about what do I do with this time? I so used to assume as I have some free time just escape the screen. There's a stream of information about me or it's algorithms optimized I can just sort of escape into it. And when you take that away for some people that was very scary. It was like staring into the existential point for other people. It wasn't and the different seem to be age. So people who were adults before the advent of social media smartphones. They were essentially just going back to the types of things they used to do we're often just pleasantly surprised. Oh, I forgotten. How much I enjoyed doing XYZ? But for people who are a little bit younger who don't have a memory of adult life before having ubiquitous access to this sort of passive algorithm off the my stream, it was really scary. The question of it's me alone. If I own thoughts and my time, and it's not at all obvious. What I'm supposed to do all that brings up an important point. It to where part of the process. It seems to me to be successful with this detox is almost beforehand to plan out what I'm gonna do with that extra time like my gonna go and take up playing the guitar or am I going to go? Join a social club or go start working out in a workout class with a group of people and actually planning that in. I see that as being an important part of the process will now I recommend that because I got this feedback so much especially from people who are younger is that even though this is not emphasized in the book. I know emphasize it in public appearances. If you're worried about this start adding back in analog high-quality leisure now, the well in advance of trying this detox, and it's going to be significantly less scary. It could be so exciting producing for some people that it could derail the whole thing. And so I'm one hundred percent on board with what you're suggesting. If you don't have a clear idea of what you would do if your whole afternoon was free. And you had no phone to declutter is going to be scary. So start working on that. Now, I've you say pick up some hobbies joint something sign up for something start learning. Some new skill. Nls start getting involved in your community. Connecting more with friends and family will start putting that in place, you won't find the declutter process. Nearly as difficult if that's already there, and even at the most basic level people need to learn how to spend time alone by themselves and be with their thoughts. I think that is often the most feared thing for a lot of people who are constantly connected now are seeing people going for walks with their device enhance or going for a run or being with their kids. So let's talk about what people are missing out on by just not having that solo time to themselves. This was an interesting discovery the solitude, which is just time alone. With your thoughts is really really important. Let's say ten years ago, or before this would be sort of a crazy thing to even bother emphasizing because time alone with your own thoughts with something that just happened. Everyday naturally. There's just lots of occurrences through normal human existence where you're alone with your own thoughts. When you're waiting in line at the store when you're commuting the work, and you don't like what's on the radio that morning when you're walking the dog. Even in the bathroom right in the shower. There's oftentimes maybe not really long, but just all the time. We are loan with their own thoughts as a kid going on the road trips. All this type of thing smartphones and ubiquitous high speed internet access for the first time in human history has made it possible to try to banish every last moment of solitude because in every single situation. You can do a quick glance at a screen that will give you nice stimuli. That's going to catch your attention that prevent you from having to be alone with your own thoughts. This is really dangerous. We lose a lot when we lose regular moments of solitude just from a mental health perspective when you're processing input from another minds. You're reading something or listening to something that's all hands on deck in your brain. Our brain takes that very seriously. Okay. I am processing input from another mind. I have to use a lot of resources to try to understand who is conveying this. What does it mean was tell me about my current standing in the social world, and it uses a lot of resources to do this. So if you were constantly filling in every moment looking at inputs during from other minds, exhaust, brain it causes. Which is why I think so many of us just have this low background of exile. Which is just become ubiquitous we think is just unavoidable, but Israeli really actually just our brain Saint, hey, I need some downtime, but you also miss out on some crucial, self development and professional development because time alone with your own thoughts. When you can have professional insights time alone with your own thoughts where you can figure out your life and have character or personal insights about who you are what you're about. Or what's important to you, all of these type of cognitive leaps of understanding just require your brain to be a little bit bored. Just sifting around through things trying to push things in a different structure. See what fits you? What clicks if you take that all out of your life? It really impoverishes you daily experience. And this was definitely really important for me reading the book coming across this because I'm somebody who does go for a lotta walks, but I'm always plugging podcast in taking information during that time, and I'm somebody who does take a lot of time to be by myself and read a book. But again, there's always this ongoing information coming in. So. One of my key takeaways from reading your book is definitely to create that time of solitude. And you know, maybe half the time when I go for a walk go, you know, with nothing in my ear and just being with nature. That's exactly right. So you don't need to be in solitude all day long. If you're in solitude all day long. You're also going to be very lonely and miserable. But just having these regular experiences like on going to the drugstore. Maybe this time numbering in my phone, or I'm going, hiking and nature. Yeah. Maybe for the first twenty minutes. There's no ear buds in and the made for the second twenty minutes, and I listened to a podcast. So it's just about having it on a regular basis. It doesn't have to be that long. It doesn't have to be all the time. But it should be pretty regular. Okay. And we've talked about a couple of these strategies you talk about in the book, you just mentioned leaving the phone at home, and we talked about going for a walk. And again having that time with the ear buds out. Another thing you mentioned in the book is journaling. And I'd love for you to tell us about your journaling practice and using mole skin notebooks over the years. So I've been using most notebook since two. Thousand four I still have my going all the way back to my original scan can notebook of this big pile of them use them for personal reflection. So when I have ideas about my life, my values sort of non-professional self reflection. I work it out in these most journals I ended when I fill it. I sort of go through and say what's actually really worth thinking about or not in this kind of a whole ritual around that. But what's more important than actually reviewing my thoughts is the process of writing it down in the first place, you know, so this is an act of solitudes if you really wanna structure, your solid you'd get really good at loan with your own thoughts and extracting value from it writing to yourself. So in a journal, Orion yourself a letter, but just the act of writing itself allows you to start putting structure to the thoughts that are just bouncing around your head, which is an act of self reflection. Solitude that can be really important. I talk about in the book about how a lot of famous figures used to do this, and it just really helped make sense of their life. What's going on particular issues? What they wanna do the act of. Writing is a way of sitting alone with yourself and making sense of what's bouncing around in your head as opposed to perhaps this late overwhelm you. And a group of people you talk about in the book is the Amish, and in general, I think the popular understanding of this group is that this group of people who are frozen in time. And they're not about adopting the new tools that are being created in being part of all the new creations of the twenty first century. So in writing the book in doing this research and putting it together. What did you learn about them? So that popular image that the Amish just froze their technology at some point in the distance path is inaccurate. If you spend time around the old order, Amish, you're gonna see a collect dick mixture of old and new technology. So yeah, you might see the horse and buggy, but you also might see solar panels. They're wearing old clothes, but the Amish child might come by on rollerblades, they'll be generators there's telephones that they use. I talk about a minute night family that. Has a two hundred fifty thousand dollar computer controlled CNC router and their daughter wearing a bonnet is operating it. And so what's going on in these communities? Well, what they're actually doing is applying an ethic of intentionally to their technology. So for the Amish their number one value is the strength of the community. That's what they care most about. And so when a new technology comes along the way, they evaluated is they say is this going to strengthen or weaken the community, and if it's going to strengthen the community, then we can allow it if it's going to weaken the community, then we're not going to allow it. Which is why solar panels are okay? Doesn't weaken the community. But they're worried about being connected to the electrical grid because it feels like now, you're connected to organization outside the community. You're kind of part of a broader network, and they worry that that would weaken the bonds they often use tractors but they really are suspicious of automobiles because when they experimented with automobiles. People would leave the village, you know, have a car I'm going to go somewhere and go somewhere else. I got to go to the mall, or whatever they thought that hurt the strength and the community. So they're just very intentional. But the reason why I think they're important is that what they demonstrate is intentionally itself can be significantly more important than convenience. And so the old order Amish lifestyle is incredibly inconvenient because of all of these technologies that they've decided not to use its would be a huge pain for you. And I to shift tomorrow into an Amish existence, and yet they still exist and are still thriving even though they are on the eastern seaboard of the United States of America right there surrounded by consumer civilization. They're not isolated on some island. They all go for a year from Springer when they're young. They're given the opportunity to remain on the outside. So it's not like, they don't know what's going on. And yet these communities still persist, and it's because the value they get from being intentional just far outweighs what's lost from the inconveniences that go along with those decisions. And so that's crucial for understanding. Minimalist in general tend to feel happy and satisfied. So if you're a digital minimalist, and you're just using a few key technologies to give you big wins. That means you're ignoring a lot of other things a lot of other services that maybe could give you a little small wins. But you're minimalist say I don't care about the small wins as do the things to give you the big wins. So you're losing lots of little bits of value and convenience, but what we learned from the Amish is that's probably okay because the value you're gonna feel for being so intentional about your technology. Use is going to far outweigh the inconvenience of. Hey, if I don't use Facebook, I might not know when my friend's birthdays are or whatever it is that intention -ality is very important to humans convenience we adjust to. And this makes me think of organizations or people who are entrepreneurs and use social media and a lot of these platforms for business. How can they start to integrate an approach these platforms in a healthy productive way? So it's not consuming them every hour day. So if you're gonna use social media, professionally use social media like a professional. That's usually the. Advice? I give so first of all be really clear and backed up by experience in research about what activities really moved to Leedle don't fall into the trap of just I wanna do a lot of activity online just be really busy online. Because roughly speaking I hope that this for netizens outcome is is into success in OB really specific what is actually important in the sector. What actually moves the needle on my business, and what doesn't so you can focus in on verified empirically, verified important activities. Once you know, what those activities are make a plan for it. Here's when I do it. Here's how I do it. I have a schedule of posting social media professionals almost never access it on their phone. The phone is about helping the stock price of the social media companies the desktop that's about Allama savvy business owner who's making use of some of these technologies. So you use on your desktop. You not use on your phone. You have some schedule or some system. A lot of people. I know hire other people to do a lot of this work for them because it's something that could be easily outsourced. And maybe it's once a day. Once every other day for twenty minutes, you log onto XYZ or whatever it is. And that's it. And so it's print in your life is small, but you're trying to extract as much value as you can out of it. The thing to avoid is just instead allow the fact that social media might in some vague sense. Be good for your business. Be an excuse to be looking at your phone all day long. Right. That's sort of amateur hour, so say I actually profile social media professionals in the book if you need it for professional uses use it like a professional. Now, we're going to take another quick break. Marta would Cal to give a shout out to our show partner? Perfect kito. You've heard me talk about how much a love the MCAT oil powder from perfect Kito. And lately, I've been hooked on the chocolate flavor, and I've been putting this into an afternoon hot chocolate that I've been making with coconut milk, coconut butter collagen and Cal, and of course, adding a scoop of this collagen MCAT oil powder, it makes it so creamy so thick it's so good. And it's nice to know that you can have a hot chocolate without any dairy or loaded with sugar and with actually real Cal. So if you wanna make a tasty version of your own hot chocolate, get yourselves a tub or two of the MCAT oil powder in chocolate, and is listener show. You get twenty percents off your first perfect purchase. So make it a good one to take advantage. Go to ultimate health podcast dot com slash perfect Kito again that you are L is ultimate health podcast dot com slash perfect Kito, these products ship worldwide free shipping in the US. Goal and load up on the chocolate MCAT oil powder today, and that was showed up from other show partner sun warrior, guess what? 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Again, that you are L is ultima health podcast dot com slash sun. Warrior added bonus. If you spend fifty dollars or more, you get free shipping go and try out the collagen building protein peptides today. This is a fantastic product. And now back to our chat with cow. And the one platform that has me curious is Instagram, you know, for people who are maybe trying to take that digital detox eliminate it because that one is mainly used on the phone how can we approach Instagram in a healthy way? Well, for example, I met quite a few visual artists when I was looking on the book who explained to me the importance of Instagram for what they do. I mean, it turns out if you're going to do visual art, you need creative. Inputs you have to see what other really creative artists in your style are doing because this is essentially the grist or the fuel that you transform into your own creative. Insights, you have to look a lot of art to produce. Interesting new art, which is why until recently if you wanted to be a successful artists you had to live in one of a small number of cities that happen to have a big Alary seen. So for them Instagram has been this sort of miracle democratizing force. Because now it doesn't matter where you live. You can actually expose yourself to art in Prague. Press from people that you admire that this allows you to have creative insight yourself and so- visual artists have told me Instagram's key in a way that for me, I've no need for Instagram. But when they go through this digital minimalist process, which has you focus on the tools that are really important. And then and this is key ask yourself how and win. I should use this tool to get the most value out of it. A lot of them realized looking at my phone all the time is not the healthiest way to get this particular value out of Instagram. So some of the visual artists, I talked to have a once a week schedule. They have pruned down who they follow to around ten artists. Did they find to be particularly inspirational? They do log it on their computer if possible, and they do it. Let's say Sunday night. Okay. What if they worked on this week? It takes me twenty minutes. I have ten people. I follow. I can see their work, boom. Inspiration. And I'm done those type of fences around behavior pretty common. Once people go through this digital minimalist transition process, and I'm trying to relate at as someone who's a foodie a nutritionist. My thing is food. So I'm constantly posting. Looking at other people's food. So I'm trying to kind of mirror that to my situation. How or a lot of people because food is really big on Instagram that tends to be I'm sure just like art tends to be one of the big reasons why people are using it. So any advice for people who are foodies how they can consume this healthy way curate who you follow down to sort of high quality people whose content is really important high-quality to you. And then have a schedule. And so maybe one hour every other night and do it on your desktop, and if you're also posting the maybe it's twenty minutes every night, you put your photos online, and maybe every other night, you do whatever a longer read of what's going on. You'll get ninety eight percent of the value on that schedule. But what you're avoiding is the huge opportunity cost and mental drain of looking at the Instagram on your phone all the time as an escape from everything else that's going on your life. And so a schedule like that for a lot of people if it's really important part of your business. Posting about food knowing what other people are doing twenty minutes a night, maybe once or twice a week. Week a slightly longer thing on your desktop same time on a schedule. Something like that is probably the right way to approach the tool and Cal for somebody who is cutting back in they're going to trial. Maybe what you just said. How did they get over the fear of missing out when we're so used to you know, being connected to our family? Our friends a lot of time strangers to now in the growing social media world. But you know, we're so used to just seeing all these different people on a regular basis and seeing what's happening in their lives. I'm sure full most gotta be an issue for a lot of people. So how do we start going getting over that will the corridor behind minimalism is that focusing on what you know, for sure is really important to you is going to make you much happier than trying to make sure that you don't lose little small bits of value. So minimalists don't fear on missing out on the unknown. They fear instead not spend enough time on the things they already know for sure are really important to them. And so if you wanna have strong relationships, actually, go sacrifice time and attention on behalf of family close friends in your community. You're gonna feel very connected. You know, if you want to be involved in interesting things get involved in a small number of interesting things. And let's say you're community that exposed interesting people in ideas and don't worry about that. There might be other interesting people in you aren't meeting. It doesn't add up. You just want some interesting people in eight years and your life get activities that give you a lot of value. I mean double down on the things, you know, for sure are important, and you are going to end up better off than taking that same energy and dissipating it in the sort of constant surf for little nuggets of value are interesting, this you might be missing. That's the key idea of minimalism. It doesn't just apply to your digital life. It applies to cluttering your house it applies to your career Marcus Aurelius talked about this throw talked about this as an age old idea. And everywhere you apply at it comes back to the same principles focus on the things that are really important ignore the things that are kind of important you will end up better off, and it's proven to be true over millennia of human experience, and it will continue to be true. Even after you step away from some of these incredibly recent technological innovations. All makes a lot of sense to me in definitely your book had a profound effect on me. I've already done things like deleted the Email off my phone, and I've taken most of the social media off my phone. I still have Instagram on there and trying to figure out what I'm going to do with that. But what about for the personnel there? That's listening to this. And again, like myself, they're on board. They're going to give this world. And maybe they're going to do your thirty day detox. But what about the parents out there with kids that are, you know, at that age where they're starting to get smartphones. And starting to be more connected. I know you actually have a few kids yourself. I think they're still a bit younger. So they're probably not at this point yet. But what do you say to parents out there who are you know, becoming aware and they want to protect their kids. Well, my current read of the research literature is don't give someone in young adults and smartphone start with that as the foundation and then work backwards to figure out what do I have to do to make that work. I'm not saying that it's easy. But what I am saying is that the research is becoming increasingly clear the adolescent brain. Really cannot handle ubiquitous access social media platforms on a smartphone and so- deal with the social consequences. We'll have to deal with it was this mean, what's it going to mean for your kid? What's it going to mean for their social life? Yeah. It's really hard. But I'm getting pretty scared by the literature. I'm seeing about what happens when you give let's say a thirteen year old access the Snapchat and smartphones that they have with them at all times. It's not good will tell us about that. Well, so one of the main things to demographers have noticed that there was just giant increase in executive in exile related disorders. And so they go back, and they look at winded this increase happen. And they start trying to correlate. Well, what else was happening in the world at the time of these increases. They really this is how you do correlation. Epidemiological research is that you measure a signal, and then you try the best you can to understand what was causing this. So there was a lot of hypotheses being thrown around. But they started falling off one by one. So people thought, well, maybe it's sort of economic anxiety because there is the great recession debt doesn't quite fit because the rise majority came well after the. The worst of the recession. So then other people said, well, maybe as political anxiety in sort of Trump era. Maybe people are syncing sort of political stress at home, and that's making kids more anxious. Well, that doesn't fit because the rise happened before that period. And so there's a sort of these efforts to try to understand that someone said, well, maybe itself self reporting, right? Maybe just around that time, we got more comfortable talking about mental health. And so it's not that. There's more is just young people are more willing to describe themselves as anxious, but that didn't quite fit because hospitalizations for self harm suicide went up right along with the anxiety. Right. So it's not just self reporting. There is one thing to fit the timing perfectly right around the time where access to smartphones among adolescents went from a small fresh into nearly ubiquitous. That's when the numbers jumped up when it went from like forty percent to eighty five percent. That's exactly the point where anxieties related orders just really jumped off the charts. Now, of course, it is correlation. There could be something else. Right. Maybe there's something. We don't know about maybe this is at the same. Time that you know, some new type of food dye was used in starburst or something like that. And that's what's making people more anxious, but we have one other bit of information, which is usually very helpful in correlation. All connections is what's actually happening in the cultural discussion and when you talk to teenagers. They will tell you directly being on social media on my phone is incredibly stressful makes me anxious. They know that's the problem. They're identifying that's the problem. And then you look at the data, and you say we'll does match that you're right as soon as you guys got access to these things. I exciting really disorders went way up. So it's not a perspective study. It's not a causal study. Those are very hard to do. But this is about as clear as you can get with some of these large-scale epidemological type research endeavors, it's about as clear as you can get smartphones and the social media smartphones in particular is really dangerous for the mental health of teenagers. And is there an age range? Now that is given statistically as to when kids are getting phones. Well, I think just culturally speaking like in America, it's when kids get around like twelve to fourteen years old sort of this middle school into high school is when it's kind of standard, right? I'm just trying to think back to when I got my phone. I think I was in probably late high school and the phone then was not like the phone now. So let's talk about that. Let's talk about what? Smartphones, even originally were intended for and where they've come to you now. Well, this was. An important thing to emphasize that. If we think about let's say the iphone, which I think is a good place to start their smartphones before the iphone, but the iphone was too I sort of non business related smartphone. So the first smartphone that was aimed at consumers for personal use not as a blackberry or something which was aimed for professional uses. And when the iphone was launched the idea was that it was going to take some things to people already really enjoyed doing to make those experiences, even better. This was typical Steve Jobs minimalism take things to people love make the experience even more beautiful. And so I went back and talked to one of the original engineers for the original iphone launch. And as he explained to me that original iphone was meant to be a really really good ipod and a really really good phone that's packaged together. So you don't need to device in your pocket, and this was essentially more or less how we saw consumer facing smartphones. When they first came out, they were tools that did a limited number of things really really well and really beautifully. And so it made people really happy is really nice to check or make. Call on an iphone versus an old smartphone. The music player on this crate, I can flick through the album covers or that cover flow and through the covers and if someone calls the music stops. And then when the call ends the music starts, again classic jobs in sort of beautiful experience. Minimalism the idea that we look at our phone all the time that came later, and that was the social media companies who drove this idea that if we can make our products really addictive, we can get people look their phones all the time that's gonna make us a lot of money. And so there is nothing fundamental to the technology. That says we need to be looking at them all the time that isn't entirely contrived the behavior that has nothing to do with getting the most value out of this tack and to me, that's one of the most important points. I came across my research, this constant companion model were always looking at our phone that is incredibly arbitrary. It was invented the serve the bottom lines of a small number of companies. It has nothing to do with being high-tech. It has nothing to do with getting the value out of this technology. It's more exploitative than it is. Productive or high tech or forward thinking? And so if we're going to push back on anything and digital minimalist really love the push back on this is this idea that you need to be like an air, traffic controller always looking at the screen. That's not high tech. That's just you clock it in your shift at the social media money-making factory. And it's interesting Cal there is this whole movement. That's actually gaining a lot of steam right now of going back to quote, unquote, dumb phones or flip phones. So talk about that a little bit. Well, people are getting fed up with this constant companion model. And so one way to push back and say, great, I'll just go to a phone that literally cannot have those things on it. So I can make phone calls. I can text message, and that is picking up steam, and I gotta tell you the people who do it. And I meet a lot of them at my events. They tell you it's a huge weight off their shoulders. I'll ask them. Well, what if you need to look up directions print them out like, okay, that's kind of a pain. But let me tell you like I'm out doing things there's nothing for me to check. And it completely changes sort of their experience of the world though. I don't think you have to necessarily go to a dumb phone. To do that. I just suggest dumbing down your smartphone. I like looking up directions. I like listening to the music features on my phone, but just take off all of the apps in which someone makes money every time you click on it. Get rid of all the social media the games. The streaming news get off the phone just make the phone back to. It's a great phone. You can look up directions. You can listen to music, and there's a web browser there. If you need, for example to get some information on the fly like, oh, what are the hours for this museum up going to? If you dumbed down your smartphone to be more like the original Steve Jobs vision was it goes back to being like this very nice object that does a few things really well when you need it, but doesn't have a large presence in your daily life. I love that. We're talking about this. This whole conversation is about the behavior and habits around using our phone and Jesse and I've done a few podcasts on the impact of the EMS and that whole aspect of what the phone in the devices doing so it's so interesting from these two angles to showing us that this tool that we all have on us every day is affecting us physiologically, psychologically, and in so many different ways. But. I'm curious. Have you ever address any F stuff to in any of your research? I don't know a lot about it yet. But I do know that it has transitioned it seems like it has transitioned in recent years from something that seemed fringe to something that now people are casting a wary eye on his way to second. But more generally, I think what's not surprising here is that anytime, you take something as finely tuned as the human body, and the human mind and human psychology, and you make very rapid and radical changes to sort of how it goes about its business bad things happen. And so okay, we're going to now have a piece of transmitting electronic device near us all the time. Hey, bad things could happen or we're gonna take something. That's really really ancient. Like, human, social, dynamics, we're gonna monkey around with it with apps that teenagers came up with dorm rooms, something bad's going to happen, right? We're going to we're gonna look at screens all day long while algorithms feed us stuff that model say is going to get us. Engage something bad is going to happen. I mean, anytime it's just like. What happened we mess around with food in the mid twentieth century. It said, hey, we can process food and make it highly palatable and really convenient. This is great. And then what we get the obesity epidemic, you mess around with deeply human things, you radically change sort of the rhythms, the ancient rhythms of human life, all sorts of unintended consequences occur. And so I think there's just a huge cascade of unintentional consequences that are happening as these tools from Silicon Valley are trying to make these radical changes to what our daily life is like and in the end the net effect is the same. Whether we reduce our use or limit our exposure to it. We're going to bring us back to our primal nature. Get back out in nature and get back connected with different people and feel what we're supposed to feel like so this is a great way to wrap up before we do that. I do want to ask you, what does alternate health mean to you? So I like the Greek notion of you to Monja, which is human flourishing. So actually reaching the full potential. You have is a human in your life in terms of everything from how you feel what you do. Your body. Your relationships your body of work your experience of the world just pushing the capacity of human experiences to its full potential Aristotle identified that as the goal of human life more important than just happiness. And I think that's right that ultimate health is about living the ultimate human experience. And that absolutely requires you to step back and to get intentional. What matters. How do I shake my life around that? And then confidently step away from everything else in love that cow. And the new book is digital minimalism. We highly recommend the listeners get a copy of this. And normally we'd ask how listeners can connect with you after the show. But I know you're not on social so other than jumping on your Email lists checking out your blog anything else you wanna put out for the listeners. So I am a blog nerd on Cal Newport dot com been blogging for over a decade. So you can read a lot about this. There is an Email address there this. There's like an interesting article or interview, you think I should know about you can send it my way. But yeah. Other than that. If you want to connect to me, I guess y'all my name reallowed next time, you're in washing. DC? Maybe I'll hear you. But. Otherwise, I'll probably be just walking the streets of my town. You'll thinking deep thoughts talking to my friends, and I think that's okay. All right Cal, this is a lot of fun. This message is so important. We're just so excited. Bring it to the listeners. Great will. Thank you. Thank you so much Cal. Thank you. Oh, I absolutely loved this conversation with Cal so much great information hopefully took a lot away from today. So as you know, you will not find cow over on social media. So we're asking you to do today is join us over in our Facebook group. This is our community, which we think is very intentional as this is a place where we can have our listeners from all over the world come together ask questions and engage with one another so come on over to alternate health podcasts dot com for its lush community. And let us know what you think of today's episode for full show notes species and head over to ultimate health podcast dot com slash two eighty six. We're going to have links there at everything we discussed in a nice show summary. So be sure and check that out. And before we let you go want to give some love to our editor and engineer j Sanderson over at podcast, tech dot com. J Sangster doing such a great job putting the show together. And this week's fun fact about Jason said he's been looking forward to the spring sunshine while jas were officially in spring now. Hopefully, the sun has been shining for you over in Prague have an awesome week. We'll talk soon take care.

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