19 Episode results for "California Public Utilities Commission"

US Regulator Penalizes Utility Company Over 2017/2018 Wildfires

Newscast - Africa

01:00 min | 1 year ago

US Regulator Penalizes Utility Company Over 2017/2018 Wildfires

"Keep listening to the news at this hour on Africa Business Radio. California regulator has X. PG and E. Cooperated for governance and oversight changes in its reorganization plan while also proposing penalties about two billion dollars on the San Francisco based utility for its role in causing devestating. Twenty seven twenty eight in wildfires in California. The California Public Utilities Commission said late and Monday that if it wasn't for the regulator we require PG and E. to modify its governance structure summits to an enhanced oversight and enforcement process if it fails to improve safety and creates local operations regions. And that was the news this time when Africa Business Radio you can continue to listen live online at. Www Dot Africa business radio DOT COM or via a mobile APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa Dot Africa California California Public Utilities Co San Francisco two billion dollars
Band-Aid On A Bulletwound

On The Media

50:59 min | 2 years ago

Band-Aid On A Bulletwound

"Wildfires raging out of control in California has California Burns again deal with the challenge that this century presents us from WNYC in New York this is on the activists wanted to stay at eight ten comes back it's only a matter of time coming in every month I'd get more of these requests from somebody saying your stories each listener supported Brooke Gladstone with this news alert California is on fire a dangerous house away in San Francisco. California's governor has declared a statewide Arkansas the utility Pacific Gas and electric fish morning Pacific gas and electric blacking the California Public Utilities Commission today they outline how those two fires than happened Blaine says writer Quinn Norton where we lose the forest for the burning a technical debt so technical debt is a term largely used is the Y2k bug The quick and dirty there was that they used to spots and computers need to know what time it is they need to know the date in order to function so this guy didn't fall but that doesn't mean there wasn't the possibility that it might there's millions of man hours and largely fixed it and argue that technical debt isn't just an apt metaphor for the wildfire crisis we do it fast and dirty when we do it in a way that works now without an eye old computer systems or your phone or anything like that that just doesn't work as well as it should Sion's Warren followed regulations didn't exist what about the wide ranging it's too I think the danger of putting everything on PG and E. isn't are not going to be able to fix it what are the moving pieces were missing one start changing but there was a lot of resilience in the ecosystem for that thin the forests in the proper way the way they were before humans got here said it's kind of a no win situation the forests aren't correct for California not prone to burn and then people move into what's called the wildland urban interface all over coastal America anyone building a small seawall is just we're still building on a coast that is threatened by sea level rise unless they're building so you've called California the perfect microcosm but part of a like a third of the state isn't there anymore because we haven't done anything to shore that would lock in the land aren't there anymore and the natural thing that happens we're just kind of letting it happen and keeping that big old booth that we're so familiar with on deferring spending on infrastructure suggests that we've chosen not to act itself a palpable action it's actually borrowing when we aren't just deferring something where buying our future we're deciding system they were in some cases didn't understand the system they were in I mean much of our technical debt around the there's Jakarta for instance you said it's easy to drill for slashing and burning of forests in Indonesia and Brazil we're world we're not thinking about what that's going to rain we're not thinking about what that's going to do to along the edge of the Sahara an area called the Suhel where they're trying to do replanting living services food and water and all that one of the reasons the Sahara is spreading area it's growing that desert spreading down into this region where long term we have levies and closer to my home subways technical debt short term thinking and compartmentalized thinking. Hey you're not really thinking about the whole system so we need to go from a short term I I was just thinking of the water in flint whereas the water in a different in narrow ways and that's why we decide these people aren't as important favoring the powerful and the wealthy you've actually get the benefit of realizing there's not too systems there there's one with the challenge that this century presents us we tend to say these are fires in the Amazon and the fires in California and all these different things they as one system if I go back to the software metaphor it's a guy fixing his a little bit of the iphone so in terms of technical bet we heading to and as we increasingly rely on them we'll have areas so when the planet says no you can't switch to you know but as powerful and amazing humanity is it's still writes for empty wheel dot net her piece is titled a World We built to stop it doesn't really matter this is on the media my son Greece the landrace pretty he was by Chris trying to figure out what happened to him in Cuba those are secrets that he kept with them until the end deal and I'm Brooke Gladstone Eight Chan has been off line since August Chan is one of the five thousand or so largest websites on the internet and I would describe eight Chen it was basically just a game where the winner is whoever post the most offensive hard numbers the notorious anonymous forum played host to the worst of the Gamer out of a pizza parlor but in two thousand nineteen eight Chen finally Texas Walmart shooting each used eight Shan to spread their manifestos longer provide support to the website eight Chan that's where the suspected gunman in Saturday's protected servers of eight Chan following the August El Paso shooting forcing name which raises crucial questions can eight Chen stay overheat the so-called National Conversation our producer Michael Jack it's only a matter of time before there is another H. and connected shooting and that's what he is attracted in onslaught of attacks from each devotees can that should have been slammed against a wall seconds after birth obviously goes on national abuse and you know a lot of them have been trolling me nonstop even drawing finalists conspiracy theorists all the people trolling him now all used to hang out I was a kind of person who didn't have anything going for them and live I was like on a mushroom trip and I was coming down and that's when I came up with the idea for and he used them a lot when he was living at his mom's house in Atlantic City after Ditching High School Precursor Fortune in twenty fourteen four Chan Band discussions of a group into the Albright and Fred Brennan gave them sanctuary on ancient he says that image for users make about free speech you know that it's all just about the marketplace rhetoric Brennan incubated a cesspool at stake in this free speech experiment because all the legal liability fell we're both still live but then their relationship soured but h right a monetize it so that came as a surprise I just felt like he was acting in happened three months later police are working to identify the bodies of the fifty people killed during take a chance but you know I figured all right let's see if they'll clean up their act and they hallway posted praise for a Chan- just before the shooting saying I've only aspect there posted

California Brooke Gladstone California Public Utilities Co San Francisco WNYC New York Pacific Gas Arkansas Blaine three months
NPR News: 10-14-2019 11PM ET

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 2 years ago

NPR News: 10-14-2019 11PM ET

"Get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply this message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like Xfinity X. by days investors await news about the U._S. China trade deal the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell twenty nine points I'm Shay Stevens N._p._R.. News in Washington the California Public Utilities Commission is threatening sanctions against Pge for what it calls the failed execution of last week's planned power outages in a letter to the utility the regulator says the scope scale complexity and overall impact of the outage cannot be understated the commissioners nation has already begun into what caused the building to fall for NPR news. I'm just Clark you're listening to NPR News Pattana Jefferson when he saw her through the window he ordered her to put her hands up and shot her through the glass her eight-year-old nephew was in the room for NPR news during pgn e- executives to appear an emergency hearing on Friday bgn says it shut off electricity for more than seven hundred thousand customers in central North in California because of the threat of weather related wildfires herald balloon the Longtime Yale professor and bestselling author of literary criticism has died automate until they bring the violence to an end many Republicans strongly oppose the president's decision to remove US forces from the region which allowed the Turkish offense I'm Christopher Connelly in Fort Worth a white former Georgia police officer who killed an unarmed naked black man near Atlanta four years ago has been acquitted

NPR NPR Pattana Jefferson California Public Utilities Co Shay Stevens Pge China Christopher Connelly Longtime Yale professor US Washington California Fort Worth Clark president officer Atlanta Georgia
EV Adoption, Climate Week - Katie Sloan, Southern Cal Edison

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

31:33 min | 1 year ago

EV Adoption, Climate Week - Katie Sloan, Southern Cal Edison

"Do you drive an electric vehicle? Are you thinking about buying electric vehicle? What's holding you back? Are you concerned about where and how often to charge it? As of July Twenty nineteen, there are about one point three million electric vehicles on the road, the United States and about five hundred of them are in California but that is a fraction of the over two, hundred, Eighty, seven, million total vehicles on US roads more and more people are buying electric vehicles and almost every automaker now has at least one and most are coming out with a full line over the next few years. But it's not enough. Transportation is responsible for about a third of carbon emissions in the United States. So it's a huge priority to combat climate change. California is leading the way with the most in the country and the most charging stations and the most financial incentives and regulations that support electric vehicle adoption as well. And yet, adoption is nowhere near where we needed to be to reduce the environmental impact of vehicles as any of you who are regular listeners of green connections radio. No I am an unabashed fan of electric vehicles because I led the communications and Co lead the sales and marketing of Chrysler's electric car division. So this is one of my favorite topics. I think electric vehicles are very cool. But how do we increase adoption today? We're going to find out from under the tough women on the front lines of that effort. Welcomed green connections radio bring you insights and tips from remarkably innovative women about corporate responsibility. Energy and sustainability. Related. Issues I'm John. Michaelson. Inauguration leadership technologies, end careers, always bringing a new perspective find us anywhere. You like to listen to podcasts on green connections, radio, DOT, com, and through my Forbes blog as well and please pass it onto your friends. If you're struggling with your own career let us know via twitter or linked in or the contact US page on our website, and we'll help you with contacts, resources, strategies, ideas, and tips to save you time and money as you grow your career. Here are some more facts to get started. Drivers Ju eighty percent of their charging. That's eight zero percent of they're charging at home. They're over twenty, two, thousand charging stations on over sixty six thousand chargers across the United States and counting with more being installed. Day. The new electric vehicles have a healthy amount of battery range some as much as three hundred and fifty miles as I recall and the cars frankly are very, very cool. I was at the DC auto show recently took a ride with a race car driver in electric Volvo sports car that was way. Cool. There are electric and Hybrid Suv Sedan Sports, cars, et CETERA. So what is holding it up? I'd like you to meet a woman who we hope can answer some of these questions Katie. Sloan is the director of e mobility at Southern California Edison. I met Katie few months ago at an electric, drive transportation, Association Forum and I. Knew I had to have you meet her Katie has been at southern California Edison for about seventeen years. If I read that right in her linked in profile ended knee-deep in vehicles she earned her degrees in economics, which is an interesting angle to approach this from both at her graduate undergraduate and master's degrees from New Mexico State University. Welcome to green, connections radio, Katie, and thank you so much for joining us. Thank you. John I'm excited to be here. Oh, you're welcome. You're welcome. So you focus on removing the barriers to electric vehicle adoption, which assumes there's a big market for these vehicles but since most of us are not owners, what's Your pitch to own one. That's a great question to start with and I would say that electric vehicles are funded Dr dot is the number. One reason that people should be thinking about purchasing them love to share a little story about my own personal experience, and that is that My husband has always driven really large SUV's and trucks his whole life, and when we went car shopping a few years ago and we started looking at electric vehicles. I have to say that he was like probably the majority of folks saying that he was not very excited about purchasing an electric vehicle so much so that when we went to test. Drive one of the cars he refused to sit in the front seat and actually sat in the back with his arms folded during the test drive we ended up getting an electric vehicle which I was super super happy about fast forward a year later, and my husband was driving the electric vehicle around downtown Los Angeles and he came home and he said Oh my gosh, I have something. So exciting to tell you I was at a stop light and there was a really big muscle car next to me and they started rubbing their engine and as soon as that late turned green, put my foot on the accelerator and I totally smoked. I love our. Car. That's cute. So he became a convert by smoking out the other guys car he did and I think the more that people have the opportunity to drive an electric vehicle see that it's fun and also really see that it can fit into their lifestyle and that they get to. The gas station and be able to fuel their vehicle at home or at work or places are already going and they don't have to go out of their way to get fuel I. Think more and more people are going to be just as excited as my as my husband Oh cool. Okay. Great I love that. That's a great pitch. So you're trying to increase adoption. What do you see is the single largest success factor in adopting vehicles when people say besides your husband saying I smoked out the guy next to me what you see is the single thing or things that that help that get people over the top to actually buy one is it vehicle choices at battery range? Financial incentives what do you see is the key driver there really are a few different drivers and I think of it in in a few ways. One really is that availability of vehicles for people to choose from to start with we know that automakers have announced between forty to fifty new electric vehicle models coming online in the next few years and having sports, utility vehicles, smaller cars, trucks that are at price points that people are used to paying will really. Be One of the main accelerators and drivers to the transformation that US avian start looking to get to and I think that lent then leads into once you have the vehicle, how are you using it and then not really gets to infrastructure and the charging station availability today people are used to knowing where gas stations are that no matter where they go they'll be able to have fuel and to the extent that we can have ev charging just as ubiquitous. As gas stations are that will really help with that second hurdle. So I think we're at the precipice ranging anxiety was was a large barrier for quite a few years but I think with having one, hundred, two, hundred, three, hundred miles available. We are moving away from range anxiety and having more experience Zayed's, and that means when chargers are available making sure that people know how to use them and that it's a seamless easy experience and not something that they have. To think about every single time there charging their car. Oh, that's interesting on us to collaborate with a early stage software company that was developing an APP that would tell people wear on the route they were traveling. They could charge whether the those which stations have the chargers that they need. Because, as you know obviously better than anyone else all charters are not created equal and how much it would cost and whether they would be open when they got there. which is kind of addressing, which sounds like is addressing what you're talking about yes, and I've seen. Similar style APPs there's one that moves away from showing the exact type of connector and the technical term, and they've changed it into a color coded scheme so that you can put in your car vehicle model and then it'll say, okay on this map, there's red green and blue chargers you can use green and blue charters and it makes it just a lot easier. So I think the more that these types of You know software solutions are available to. It helps to reduce that experiencing. To get away from the nomenclature of. Or somebody like that. Right you have said the goal of southern California Edison's is to put seven million vs on the road by twenty thirty. That's only ten years away. How do you get from one point three million to seven million or even from five hundred, thousand in California to a million in California how does that? How do you do that? It really takes all of the industry players being focused and aligned and making sure that we're moving quickly towards this goal, we know that the state of California will not meet its greenhouse gas reduction targets unless we significantly decarbonised transportation sector and moving towards electric vehicles is the only way to do that. So rather than continuing to pilot new programs we. Need to go to scale as soon as possible every day that someone is purchasing an internal combustion. Engine vehicle is another ten to twelve years of that vehicle being on the road So we need to look at this through the lens of it's not just one thing, but it's multiple things before I worked on electric vehicles I worked in the renewable space and I think there's a lot of lessons to learn on how technologies like wind and solar went from early staged too late stage to scale, and it wasn't just one thing it was a multitude of factors. It was the federal investment tax credits it was state renewable portfolio standards. It was reduction in cost due to technology. It was also a rate programs like net energy metering in addition to new business models like being able to lease solar panels on your roof top rather than always having to own. So I think we need to look at all of those solutions in conjunction in order to make this see change happen. But aligning all the players is easier said than done to say the least right so how do you get all of them to be forgive the Pun driving in the same direction with you? I will say that I, I've been in the energy industry for a while and I have never seen as much alignment on topic as there is with electric vehicles at least from a high level objective perspective. So I think it really takes focusing on the end goal and making sure that we don't Kabul amongst ourselves with things that are around the edges when we all wanted to get to the main direction and I think that also means that we're bringing each other along that we continue to collaborate and we use organizations that exist for alliances and you mentioned the the EDTA earlier and we can use those groups that already exist to make sure that we're aligned and and moving forward. That's encouraging. So competitors like Vigo or charged point and electrify America org collaborating I would say that In, at least our regulatory structures in California, we have the California Public Utilities Commission, they sometimes do file comments together with other parties, and even if they aren't filing comments together, they are supporting policies that support utility infrastructure programs, for example, and they also not just at the California Public Utilities Commission they also work on legislative fronts to help make sure that we're getting funding for electric vehicle rebates at the levels they need to be so thank you for that perfect segue because federal regulations shall we say you're not exactly moving in the direction of favorably to electric vehicles these days And depending upon the results of the twenty twenty presidential election. We don't know if for when that might change. So I know the California is much more welcoming to this and new have Gavin newsom doing law and I'm sure we have a million people in common out there in this work especially. But how do you finesse the cuts in the rebates and the the cancelling of incentives or letting them expire and you know having to fight what's going on in Washington DC on the regulatory front. Rate. I think that's a very important question to ask I think we should take a step back and recognize that it's not just the federal incentives that are driving what the automakers are doing. If you look at their plans with the forty to fifty new models that are coming out in the next few years, those aren't plans that can be retracted and changed on a dime and automakers are making electric vehicles not just because of what is happening in the state of California but in large part environmental regulations in Europe and China, and we're seeing that those are not backing down at any point. So I think that the federal incentives are. Important. We should be realistic with where we are today and we should continue to gain the coalitions of the momentum with other states following California's lead and at some point there becomes a tipping point where there's enough states and population following California's lead that the federal government regulations may not be impacting with the automakers are doing as much. Well, many of the automakers though got together to support the rollback in the cafe standards, for example so that certainly doesn't support the adoption of alternative fuel vehicles. What we saw with that was that there was a a split almost down the middle of automakers joining California and those joining trump and even after we. saw those announcements. We haven't seen those automakers completely changing what their electric vehicle rollout plans are. So speaking of cafe standards, gas prices are pretty low right now, I saw something on your website about owning electric vehicle could be like paying less than two dollars a gallon for gas frankly pay to thirty five a gallon for gas in Virginia. So which is pretty close. So how to low gas prices affect? The success of the programs is southern California Edison is trying to do to drive adoption electric vehicles. That's really interesting. I I wish that. We had gas prices that were that low here is. Our gas prices I. Haven't gone through gas station in quite a while. So I'm not exactly sure what the what the number is today but it's around the high three dollars into four dollars for gas here. So for us, the charging of electricity is significant financial benefits. So I think that's a consideration in each location you need to look at what are the gas prices there compared to? The electricity prices that are there to see the see the difference a couple of quick questions before I ask you a couple of career questions. I. Saw the southern California. Edison is also bringing more electric buses onto the roads. Can you talk a little bit about that? Yes. We have a fairly large infrastructure investment program for medium and heavy duty vehicles which include transit buses and school buses in addition to. Electric, garbage trucks, delivery trucks, poured equipment, and so we're helping to electrify those sectors as well. We put in infrastructure and charging stationed for those types of vehicles and what's interesting about those segments is that medium and heavy duty vehicles are disproportionately impacting poor air quality. We have the worst air quality in the in country not a place we like to. Be I N and electrifying those vehicles and using our clean electricity that we have in our grid them to help impact not just greenhouse gas emissions but air quality, which is a very important environmental justice issue here in southern California why are those vehicles worse in greenhouse gases because they're not as their run on diesel or something or what is it about? Those vehicles that make them worse polluters right it's because a lot of time you hit the nail on the head they're running on on diesel. Okay. Okay. Yeah. I interviewed a woman from New Flyer about their electric buses to that was really really interesting as there are more electric buses on the road. There's also therefore bigger strain on the grid. What's Your solution to the grid challenge without obviously resorting to more use of fossil fuels to power grid well in in California just to to set the stage we in our portfolio, we do not have any coal and we have a very small portion from natural gas which is shrinking over time. You mentioned our goal to have seven million electric vehicles on the road. By twenty thirty, that is coupled with having at least eighty percent of our energy that is stoled be clean from renewables, and that is really critical for using electric vehicles. If you are using an electric system that is polluting, you're not getting as much benefit from electric vehicles as as you would from a very clean grid, the one that we have now. And are continuing to head towards. So that's the the second part of your question. The first part was a believe more around preparedness of the grid, and for that one we're partnering with our customers to understand early wear they expect to be putting in electric buses and electric trucks so that we can have the grid ready when they have those vehicles delivered we've. Been Building, our electricity grid for over one hundred years at planning and and building the the great out to meet new electric loads as our core competencies. So we are confident that working with our customers will be able to to satisfy their needs Oh. So you're adapting your time line of preparing the grid for the increased load based on the timing that. Your clients have four putting those electric buses on the road that's interesting but you're trying at the same time to increase the adoption of electric vehicles to seven million by twenty thirty. So I assume that implies then that you have a plan for aging the grid by twenty thirty to accommodate seven million electric vehicles. Yes, we do. Okay. Good luck on that one. Home. Well, I'm fascinated by utilities because no, really because utilities have to reinvent themselves without losing a moment of service to anybody at the same time that they're regulated don't necessarily know where all the raw materials are gonNA come from more win. So it's a it's a very tricky spot when I was at Chrysler I negotiated deals with some real estate developers to include our cars in the sale of the homes that they were building they installed to forty outlets in the garages, and as You well know they can either can. Then there's a regenerative quality, right? Especially in California where you have power outages that can come in Handy so. What kinds of deals with buildings and developers are you guys negotiating to help support your seven million cargo thank you for asking that question in California we have requirements that new buildings including new homes are easy ready, which means that the the buildings have to have at least some of the panels and the conduit put in to be able to support ev charging and right now that doesn't mean that it. All of the infrastructure is there or that the charging stations are there what we have proposed and we have it in front of our Public Utilities Commission right now is that in addition to US building and installing ev chargers. For the last five years, we also will provide a rebate for new home builders to complete and have the the buildings completely ev ready through the rebate program. So you mean they when you say completely ev ready, you mean, they have to put in forty outlets or to put in charging stations in the end charging stations. Okay and how are you an and the developer gets to choose which charging station they WANNA. Use Gather, correct yes. All of the programs we've done today we provide to our customers the which would be the developers in this instant, a list of approved charging stations and network providers they have opportunity to choose from. Oh. Okay. So it was kind of prequalified list. Yes. That's okay. Before he asks you career question, one more industry question and that is what can other states and utilities learn from California's experience and specifically from Southern California? Edison's experience what can you suggest other states from the evolution that you've got you've gone through and especially because you've been there for so long you've watched Elvis. Driven it I love this question, and this is a core part of my. Day to day work is sharing our lessons with other electric utilities and I would say the first thing and the first thing we talk about is that this is an opportunity for them. This is a growth area, and it really is something that is beneficial for their customers for the communities for their stakeholders and you don't always find something that that has so many people lined. So I is looking at it as an opportunity versus. Just challenge and the second is that we like to share all of our program details and our lessons learned through the infrastructure programs that we've had today with other utilities so that they have the opportunity to copy, paste and or or tweak in their own different policy environments that they have. So I think one of the unique things about being a utility is that we aren't in a competitive environment with other electric providers. So we're able. To be a fairly book and the reason that's important to us is that one thing that we haven't talked about yet is it getting to some of these ambitious goals like seven million electric vehicles on the road in California? It's not just about California, it's not just about southern California Edison Service area. It's about this happening across the US and to the extent that utilities across the US can also provide support programs for their customers. We think that that will accelerate the adoption of electric vehicles while I think you're right. Well, that's interesting. I guess that's probably also because you're so highly regulated you can't possibly be competitive, right? Gosh I hope they're adopting it because some of these utilities around the country I mean, you know better than I do are just kind of archaic and see no evil hear no evil speak no evil I mean they're just like keeping themselves. Bolivia's to what is quite obvious coming down the road if it's not already there and I sometimes wonder what's going to drive them. But maybe you're making it easier and saying here, just us just do what we did but adapted for your community or for your pc or for your grid structure will make it easier for them to do the right thing that's our intent and I will. Say It's encouraging because I've spent spoken with utilities from the northeast from the south from Texas from the middle of the country from Hawaii. So I'm seeing interest in a lot of places and one of the things that excites me the most is when I when I see news about new utility EV programs that are in the middle middle of the country or not in California or New York. were, you expect it. So I lived when I worked for Chrysler I lived in. US I hope you're sitting when I tell you this but I lived in Fargo North Dakota so I noticed North Dakota has the lowest adoption of electric vehicles in the country. I, think they have like thirty. And I think that's mostly we're our plant was frankly because when Chrysler was fell apart they division was sold and it was moved out of North Dakota. So who knows but anyway. So a couple of quick career questions before I. Let you go tell us about a career decision that you made mid career whatever that feels like for you that in retrospect was a turning point how you made that decision and what you learned from it. So I think one of the biggest decisions that I made mid career was that I had been in the regulatory and policy space for quite a few years and I knew that. Run. Don't always want to be in that space I. Loved it. But I wanted something more and I was able to find an opportunity at our parent company in the strategic cleaning department working on strategic projects that they needed people that understood the renewable renewable space but it was more from a different function and I was able to parlay that. Working in electric vehicles and the important thing that I learned was that it's easy to to pivot your role if you're not doing a complete one eighty. So I always look at it in terms of what is your subject matter area, and then what is your functional expertise? So if I was working on policy, which was the functional expertise in renewables, I could have it into working on renewable, but in strategy, and then you can transition on working on strategy, but with electric vehicles and you can kind of leapfrog where you want your final destination. To be doing these, what I would call more quarter circle pits as opposed to trying to to do something completely new and I found that that's a been a helpful way to learn and grow and and try new things. Oh, that's really great I. Love that. So and also I'm sure you're economics degrees came in handy in that strategic planning exercise that's really smart and they obviously they're related right? So did you intend to end up an electric vehicles when you made that choice to go into strategic planning or you just knew you didn't want to be in? On the regulatory policy side the whole time I knew that I wanted to get closer into some of our business lines, which is where I ended up now and then I've always had a north star even from my early early days of working in clean energy. So that has really helped to guide and direct my career. Early on I was working more in energy efficiency programs then moved into renewables and then moved into electric vehicles so I have always had the. Northstar of learning different subject matter areas but within that realm of clean energy interesting. So enclosing, what advice would you give a woman in mid career who wants to know? So she has a certain amount of experience not fresh out of college who wants to use her education, her experience and her passion for making a difference in her career she wants to get ahead she wants to make money. This is not just volunteer work. So what would you suggest to her? The main thing I would suggest is just take the slogan from Nike of just do it. If you think that there's something your organization or company that's lacking, don't ask for permission to make it happen. I think that we all have more authority and autonomy the then we give ourselves and we sometimes think, oh, this would be something great to happen but no. One's told me to do it. I would think if you're ever thinking thinking about that, take it on yourself and make it happen I. think that that if you can do that in the subject matter area where you want to advance your career, people will see you as someone that can get things done and I think that that will help you to go even further. Within the realm of your your company or Organizations Politics Light, right? No I think that's great and. Sometimes your politics might require you're going to your boss or bringing it up in a meeting and saying, Hey, what if we flipped it over and turned it purple and made it polkadot you know and or you know what? If we shot for a seven million you know? Created a goal of seven million lunging vehicles. Are you out of your mind, and sometimes you can just do a small case study on your own and bring it in with results is funny example comes to mind. But one of the incredibly cool women I've interviewed is a woman who believe it or not started a business to collect scraps of material from the garment industry in New York when she worked for the New York City Garbage Department and she started this business and some of the people who. Buy Some of the remnants which are in some cases, large bolts of fabric, our designers as some of the big design houses, they WANNA try a little design on their own without kind of making a big deal about it. So they take the ball to they take the fabric and they do it either on their own and off hours or at home and try it out and then bring it in it works if they like it. Yes, I love that. Concept. So that kind of sounds like what you're saying is I like that don't ask for permission to just make it happen. That's that's inspiring Miss Katie. Thank you so much. Well, thank you so much. John I. Appreciate it. Oh, you're well come. Thank you so much for joining us today green connections radio, Katie Sloan Director of EAM ability at southern California Edison. Are you more interested in buying an electric vehicle now? tweet. It. US at John. Michaelson posted on our facebook page and find us on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to us today or on our website green connections radio dot com, where you also find a lot of my forbes blonde and other blogs and articles as well. If you want to gain career support for women like me and Katie pigmy via twitter or linked in or through our contact us page and we all try to help you on John Michaelson. Thank you for joining us. See you next time.

California United States California Edison Chrysler Katie twitter John Michaelson Edison California Public Utilities Co North Dakota New Mexico State University DOT Los Angeles Co
NPR News: 02-28-2020 6AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 02-28-2020 6AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman. Anxiety is still high. Over the spread of the new corona virus. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly twelve hundred points. Thursday dow futures suggest stocks will fall sharply again today at the opening bell. Major markets in Asia all fell more than two percent today the number of covert Nineteen infections in South Korea has surpassed two thousand. At least thirteen. People have died Jason Stronger reports from Seoul. The new corona virus outbreak has led to a shortage in surgical masks hundreds of shoppers lined up in the rain. Outside department store and up to the fourth floor to purchase government-subsidized masks reports say pharmacies and other shops are running out and online vendors are charging inflated prices. Here a five pack is about five dollars speaking through a white surgical mask. Fifty-year-old Kim so young says she waited in line about an hour. She says she couldn't find masks anywhere until she came here. South Korea's police agency says it's cracking down on price gouging and hoarding of these medical supplies for NPR news. I'm Jason Strother in Seoul and airstrike. In Syria's embattled inland province has killed thirty. Three Turkish soldiers Turkeys blaming Syria but some air strikes there are carried out by Russian forces. Russia has denied responsibility. Now Turkey A. Nato member has asked the military alliance for consultations on the deteriorating situation. Linda Fassulo reports that at the United Nations delegates are concerned about the Syrian humanitarian crisis. The UN's deputy humanitarian chief. Aircel Mueller said that nearly nine hundred fifty thousand civilians have fled the government offensive over the last three months and that women from the area told her that conditions are not humanly tolerable and that there have been children so traumatized that they no longer speak. Us Ambassador Kelly crafts that. All efforts must be focused on immediately. Establishing ceasefire if the -tarian crisis is to end meanwhile Russia's ambassador vessels have been Zia. Said that the only long-term solution to the problem of it live is an expulsion of terrorists from the country for NPR news inland Zillow in New York. California's utility regulator has imposed a record fine on utility Pacific gas and electric this for causing recent deadly wildfires for member station K. Q. E. D. Lily Jamali reports. It's the largest penalty ever issued by the California Public Utilities Commission the fine modifies a previous settlement. Pge had agreed to which critics called too lenient. More than one hundred people were killed. In the wildfires of two thousand seventeen and twenty eighteen liabilities from those fires prompted. Pg NEED TO FILE FOR BANKRUPTCY. Last year this harsher fines sets aside hundreds of millions for those victims. It's NPR voters in South Carolina. Hold their primary election tomorrow. President trump behold rally in North Charleston. Tonight the candidates competing for the Democratic presidential nomination are all hoping for a boost that includes vice president. Joe Biden who was seen strong support among African American voters a key constituency in South Carolina in an interview with PBS Newshour Democratic presidential candidate and former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg has defended the use of a controversial surveillance program Muslims under his administration. Npr's Osma hollowed has more. Bloomberg has insisted the program kept Americans safe but no arrests were ever attributed to the surveillance program still in an interview with PBS. Bloomberg showed no remorse and said he had a responsibility to go anywhere. He could to get intelligence. We just lost three thousand people at nine. Eleven course was supposed to do that and so a. Bloomberg defended going into mosques listening to sermons and spying on Muslims. He said it made sense. Given the identity of the nine eleven terrorists. All of the people came from the same place and all came. Were from a place. They happen to be one religion and if they'd been another religion it would have done the same thing. Bloomberg insists everything he did was legal but multiple lawsuits were filed over the program a small college. Npr News Former Baltimore mayor. Catherine pugh has been sentenced to three years in federal prison for corruption convictions. She fraudulently sold self published children's books to nonprofit groups to pay for her political career. He resigned under pressure last. May I'm KORVA COLEMAN NPR news?

Mike Bloomberg NPR Npr South Korea Seoul NPR Korva Coleman South Carolina Russia Syria New York Kim Washington Asia UN Catherine pugh Jason Stronger California Public Utilities Co
Week in Review for the Week of 2/10/20 - DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Week in Review for the Week of 2/10/20 - DTH

"The rich traveling these tech headlines for the week that was. Us Senator. Josh Halley published a plan to remake the Federal Trade Commission to provide more direct congressional oversight as. Well as better scrutinize big tech calling up Google and facebook as instances of the FTC failing to protect consumers the plan will put the FTC within the Department of Justice. And replace the Five Commissioner panel with a single Senate confirmed director it would also create a digital market research section of the FTC specifically. Look at Big Tech Howley also called for new legislation to give the FTC the power to levy fines on first time civil penalties and the authority to enforce data portability and operability standards as well as to give state attorneys general the Authority to enforce the same laws as the FTC. The Israeli publication hurries published. That the elector APP used by the country's Likud political party contained configuration. That could allow anyone to access. Israel's entire voter registry viewing source on the APPs homepage showed user names and passwords of all administrators allowing anyone to log in and download the information. The voter registry contain the full names identity card numbers addresses and gender of all six point. Four million eligible voters in Israel. Developer of the APP confirmed the vulnerability stating it was quote. A one off incident that was immediately with a US district judge has ruled in favor of sprints twenty six billion dollar deal to merge with T. mobile which now only needs the California Public Utilities Commission approval to go forward attorneys general from a dozen states sought to block the deal. Arguing the combining the number three and number four. Us carriers would stifle competition and create higher prices for consumers. The company said the merger would help them compete against. At and T. and verizon and build a nationwide five G. Network more quickly the US. Federal Trade Commission has requested information from Alphabet Amazon Apple and Microsoft about mergers that were too small to report to antitrust agencies. The companies are asked to provide terms scope structure and purpose of each transaction made between January. First Twenty Ten and December thirty first twenty nineteen will also be asked to provide details on post. Acquisition Integration Product Development and pricing as well as how data was treated the. Ftc said. The request was part of a study of the issue of companies buying potential competitors to reduce competition. The result of the studies are intended to inform future policy. Samsung Galaxy Z. Flip Clam Shell smartphone that unfolds to a six point seven inch screen a display on the cover shows notifications time and battery life on the phone is closed and can be used as a fighter for photos. The galaxies eat flip comes in purple black and its markets gold for one thousand three hundred eighty dollars for full breakdown of the announcements from Samsung unpacked event. Takeout daily tech headlines from February twelfth. What's up announce it now has two billion users up from one point. Five billion two years ago it's parent company facebook's main APP has two point five billion users in a blog post about the number. What's up wrote strong. Encryption is a necessity in modern life. We will not compromise security because that would make people are safe mobile world. Congress was canceled this week for the first time in. Its thirty three years Spanish. Health officials said there was no reason to cancel but GSM CEO. John Hoffman told Bloomberg the May has cancelled 'em WC Barcelona twenty twenty because of the global concern regarding the corona virus outbreak. Travel concern and other circumstances made it impossible for the GM to hold the event. Next door launched a new. App called next door for public agencies designed to allow police and fire departments public schools and city agencies to post updates pushed geo targeted alerts and messages according to next door's head of product. Tatyana moment development of the APP was in response to years of requests from public agencies. The APP integrates with the forward to police feature found in the crime and safety tab of the main nextdoor APP alone departments to access these notices on mobile devices. Bloomberg reports that according to sources India's Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology is expected to publish previously propose new rules for social media and messaging companies later this month. The proposed rules would require blanket cooperation with government inquiries requiring platforms to help governments trace the origins of post within seventy two hours prior records up to one hundred eighty days and establish a physical presence in India with a point grievance officers and government liaisons browsers operating systems online repositories of knowledge and software development platforms would be exempt from these rules and finally the US filed a superseding indictment against Wa wa and it's CFO wranglings zoo charging them with conspiring to violate the racketeer influenced and corrupt organizations act and conspiring to steal trade secrets. It also contained new allegations regarding violation of sanctions against North Korea and Iran among the allegations are using confidentiality agreements with US companies to obtain things like routers source code and then misappropriating that property. Basically using always routers the indictment lists other concrete examples like distributing confidential slide decks to its engineers and person taking pictures of the interior of devices after hours at a trade show in Chicago other charges involving federal investigators and hiding employment status with Wa wa remember for discussion of the news of the day subscribing to take new show at tech new show dot com. You can find shuts there and links to all these headlines there as well. Thanks for listening. We'll talk to you next time. And from all of us here at daily tech headlines Remember have a super sparkly day.

Federal Trade Commission US facebook Big Tech Howley Israel Samsung Josh Halley Likud Senate Google California Public Utilities Co Bloomberg Acquisition Integration Produc Senator Commissioner Wa Chicago verizon Department of Justice director
T-Mobile/Sprint Merger, Under Armour, Renewable Energy Stocks

MarketFoolery

16:26 min | 1 year ago

T-Mobile/Sprint Merger, Under Armour, Renewable Energy Stocks

"Thanks to health. IQ for supporting. Today's market fully. Health Accu uses science and data to secure lower rates on life insurance to see if you qualify go to health. IQ Dot com slash full. So you can take the proprietary health IQ quiz and potentially save up to forty one percent on premiums. It's Tuesday February eleventh eleventh. Welcome to market. I'm Chris L. WITH ME IN STUDIO Mr Jim Miller. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. We got the bane of my investing existence assistance with its latest quarterly report. We're going to dip into the full mailbag but we're going to start with the business story of the day and that is the fact that nearly two years after the merger drove T. Mobile and sprint was announced we are. We're not at the finish line but we are one big step closer to this deal being finished. US District Judge ruled in favor of sprints twenty six billion dollar deal to merge with T. mobile and in terms of the stocks shares a T. mobile mobile up about ten percent shares of sprint up. Seventy two percent. Yeah well in seventy two percent from a really low number yes absolutely is the T.. Mobile pop was yeah. That's that's pretty significant and I like it because it shows the market's expectation that this is going to be actually a good thing for both from both companies to merge into one One one of the things. I've found that Kind of unusual is that The claim is that this is going to me job creating from the get-go most mergers like this Our job destroying because you Overlap on a whole bunch of Back Back Office office things for instance and But these guys are saying yeah. We're going to create something like thirty five hundred dollars. I think is the number for the first year and eleven thousand over the next five years. That's pretty cool. Yes absolutely if they can pull that off and it's interesting because it to your point they're trying to strike a balance they're trying to say. Hey we're going to create jobs but they're also saying to Wall Street. We think about six billion dollars in synergies right. It'd be because yes absolutely some of the HR Dr Finance legal some of those jobs. Go Away I I should mention were again. We're not we're not at the final step here. It's still needs to be approved by the California Public Utilities Commission. But as you said I mean you look at the market reaction it seems teams like maybe not. I don't want to jinx it but it seems like this is going to happen I think it will. The states The thirteenth states that were challenging it led by California for New York New York Attorney General said that she still wants to really think about this as she still believes. The judge was wrong but I think and and reading the the Excerpts from the judge's decision it seems that he was pretty on board saying that this is going to be actually better for the industry T mobile He he called him out T.. Mobile has really challenged the comments. At and T. and verizon The companies that CEO John Legere Ledger Ledger ca routinely called dumb and dumber in his notes but He says the judge that has says that In an should be good for the business and we're having a fourth company stood up in in the form of dish network They're being stood up a with a With the use of a T. mobile and sprint's networks for I believe seven years and a whole whole bunch of customers that are going to be transferred over to them to get them up and running a fourth a cell provider competitor. He mentioned John Ledger. Adjourn and one of my favorite. CEO's never fails to entertain. But I think it's you know ledger because of his antics because because of the way he would go after in particular verizon an at and T. and very public ways. I should also mention both stocks down ever so slightly if you're at GMT and your verizon. You're you're not thrilled about this but maybe it it helps a little bit. John Ledger is not going to be the. CEO of the resulting company. Mike seaver is going to get the corner office on this so that was announced. November is not a new thing with this right and if if you like colorful. CEO's while there's a little bit of sadness with this but it's point out that ledger wasn't just amusing and colorful he. He was also a very effective business. Leader did a great job of adding subscribers to the bottom line for T. Mobile. If he wasn't able to do that then he would have. Just been a mouthy. CEO who wasn't backing it up. No he backed it up. No it did and One of the things he did was he got I think he got the company more more energized in in both getting its customers satisfied which for this industry is big hurdle and And getting the employee is more engaged in happy employees happy customers and that leads to better business and the revenue numbers that this company had been growing like crazy. So yeah they've been they've been doing pretty well bill under ledger and hope they continue under a seabird. Let's move on to under armour. Fourth quarter sales came in lower than expected and even even worse under armor said that they expect sales to drop in twenty twenty and I get that they are also dealing like a lot of companies with a AH ripple effects of the corona virus in China. They've got hundreds of shops in China. So obviously that's going to have a material effect in Q. One They expect that's GonNa hit sale somewhere in the neighborhood of fifty to sixty million dollars but if that were the only problem under armor had if the only problem they had was the virus than maybe the stock wouldn't be down eighteen percent today not at all. That's just one of many many problems you know. They're they're doing they're they're doing pretty well internationally. That's growing double digits. And then and they're expecting that for next year as well but when the international win the North American business is seventy percent of your sales and it's expected to go down next year. Yeah that's that's not a good sign and under armour really needs to refocus on its core competency either get a little unfocused. I think With wearables and stuff like that Yeah they have to compete against Nike and Lulu Lululemon but they haven't been able to really focus on on what they need to focus on. Yeah it really seems like among their problems. They're discounting too much. They talked about being heavily. Reliant on Cole's and discounting that went on at Kohl's it also also seems like they just have too many skews they just have to. You know they make good stuff. I've said this before about under armor. They they appear to have gotten in in some ways the most challenging part of athletic apparel correct. They make good stuff. They just appear to have a problem with almost every other part of retail. Right I don't follow the company extensively so you Who is the Jason Follow it better but Another thing I noticed was is that In two thousand nineteen they brought in less cash through the front door as well even though they they grew revenue just a little bit And God gross margin to improve Thanks to pull him back. Some of those discounts you were talking about. They brought in about a hundred and twenty million dollars less than free cash flow from operations. So That's money coming me in the front door. Not as much on the good side though they are they are working down. There long-term debt that was down by five Down nineteen percent something like that and their cash balance was up significantly so the balanced stronger This is CEO Patrick frisks. First quarter I believe. Yes and so We'll I think it's okay to give them a little bit of Give him a little bit of time to get to get really good going on on his job but if they continue as they've they've been going. Yeah the IT's going to be not fun for shareholders you own a lot more stocks than I do and I'm curious how you think about. Look this is a stock that is down and fifty percent for me and I'm not I have no plans to sell it. Because it's such a tiny part of my portfolio and it's they basically moved it both mentally and emotionally just like off to the side. It's a business that yes I'm rooting for. Yes I would love for Frit over the next three years to triple but I I've almost stopped caring about it and I'm curious you know. What is your experience various? How do you deal with stocks that have a similar path where you went in? You had your thesis. It didn't work out and now you look at your portfolio uh-huh and it's one percent or less of your investing portfolio. How do you think about a business like that? Well unless I can see a way for the company to turn around I'd rather get rid of it personally even though yeah. It's a little tiny piece and it doesn't feel like it's worth selling but there is some money tied up even if it's only a few hundred dollars tied up in that and you probably have better ideas where to put the money and have a even adding a few hundred dollars to a winner Could help boost that down the road. There's also the psychological thing every time you look at your portfolio. I don't know how often you do that but every time you do you see that thing. There's some their armor. I bet you do and even though you say you've put it aside it's still hits. You like little needle every time. So he does. Although I've I've like I said I've have kind of stopped caring about or I shouldn't have stopped carrying about. I've stopped being upset about it and to me it's almost a visual reminder reminder of a mistake I made and that I I hope it's going to be helpful to me as an investor in other businesses going forward there is that and I've heard many many investors I admired Say that You Might WanNA still trimmed down and recover some that money and put it back to us is rather than consigning it to the depths. You Know Me. I'll just spend it on coffee. Well he loved coffee and it's supposed to be healthier right absolutely another. Another study came out. Now it's good for your abundance. I love it quick shoutout to health. IQ If you're a runner cyclist or cross it or any type of athlete or maybe maybe a vegetarian maybe eat healthy. You deserve to be rewarded for your hard work with more affordable life insurance rates that's where health. IQ comes in. It can save you up to forty one percent because because physically active people have significantly lower risks for heart disease cancer and diabetes but these savings are exclusive to help. I Q and You won't find them anywhere else. You must qualify Vita get special rate to see if you qualify. That's easy just go to health. I Q dot Com slash fool. Take the Proprietary Health Ecu Quiz and depending on your score as well as other related qualifying factors. You can save up to forty one percent on your life insurance premiums compared to other providers that's health IQ dot com slash full. You can hit us up on twitter at market foolery is our twitter handle questioned from Daniel Shelton in Sacramento California. Who writes? It's on twitter. Hold the phone. Is Your Swag Shop Gun. I was hanging hankering for a full t shirt. But it's gone. Why Oh why? It's not gone on Daniel. It really needs one of those signs like you see at the mall or on mainstream. That just says pardon our dust. Were renovating the swag shop is going to be unveiled new. Bigger better more robust more products in. I'M GONNA say April I don't want to over promise but right now it's looking like April so hang in there Daniel. Personally I just love that he say's he's hankering for it. Yes I love that a good word. Our email address is market fully at full dot com question from Jude assignment in New Jersey. Who writes I never little about the UN resolution to limit high sulphur fuel in the world ports and I know that renewable energy is a good thing so do you think clean energy ticker symbol? C L E E is positioned to take advantage of these trends. What do you think that's a really good question I like? I like where he's going with this So just a little background. He's referring to I am which is I had written down. Oh International Maritime Organization Twenty Twenty Rule. And it's the latest and maybe maybe the last. I'm not sure Reduction of the sulphur levels in the fuels that oceangoing ships are allowed to use. Brings it down two point five percent which it has a significant drop from the previous that's been going on for fifteen sixteen years As a result ships are requiring are being required to use new fuel's new blends of fuel to lower the sulfur amount Use the same fuel but install scrubbers on the exhaust to capture the sulfur dioxides. It's or just change. It altogether such as liquefied natural gas. And that's where clean energy comes in but not directly Clean Energy is focused focused primarily on fuel as over the road transport specifically in trucks Those out in back delivery trucks waste management's. It's a big company a big customer clean energy for instance Where they go out and run around and come back and can be fueled overnight But clean energy he is really Waiting for the class. Eight trucks the big semi Rigs to get into natural gas in a big way And that's not been helped by low prices of diesel because a low prices of oil and so they've been struggling But if you want to play this trend you might have It might might think of some other ways of doing it. A cruise lines for instance are transferring. Their ships over to Liquefied Natural Natural Gas Ellen G For Instance Carnival as one of the eight Nova. I think is the name of the ship in the Mediterranean. That's all ellen. G RUN A BIG OIL Such a Shell is investing in both as a producer and as running ships that fuel other ships with Ellen G. They go out to the ship and and refill it. Those are called bunker ships Their storage Kinder- Morgan has a facility in Jackson County and Georgia Oh Mississippi and Georgia Chenier Energy Energy Dominion Energy. They're all into that kind of storage and export out of the US In Ellen G. So there's there's many ways to play it but there's no direct link between Clean Energy and the ILO twenty twenty so it sounds like you like the trend but not clean energy fuels as the best way to play the trend I do like the trend. I am invested in clean energy fuels. I think they'll be able to do it. It's just taking a lot longer than anybody's ever ever hoped. It is a Active recommendations talk adviser from David Garner unfortunates down about ninety percent or something but He hasn't closed it Probably because There's a couple of us here at the full of like it There are many ways to play Natural gas both the shipment of it Such as through pipelines. That's can gender Morgan for instance Or liquefying it and exporting it and those are like uh Chinook Salmon and those guys. Fortunately I'm pretty sure David. It has some winners to make up for that. Just a few Jim Mueller. Thanks for being here thanks. Chris has always people on the program of interest in the stocks. They talk about on the Motley fool. MAN FORMAL RECOMMENDATIONS SINCE FOR AGAINST SADDAM BUYER SELL stocks. And what you hear. That's going to do it for this edition of market. Flurry show is mixed by Dan Boyd. I'm Chris Hill. Thanks for listening. We'll see you tomorrow yeah.

CEO T. Mobile sprint US twitter verizon Daniel Shelton California John Ledger Accu Chris L. California Public Utilities Co David Garner Mr Jim Miller China
When your power company is a felon

Today, Explained

23:31 min | 2 years ago

When your power company is a felon

"Support for this Thursday January seventeenth two thousand nineteen episode of today. Explain comes from hellofresh. They've got premeasured ingredients and easy to follow recipe cards that comes straight to your door, and you can get eighty dollars off your first month by going to hellofresh dot com slash explained eighty and entering the promo code explained eighty. That's hellofresh dot com slash explained eight zero and the promo code explained eight zero. Every month. You get a Bill from your utility. There's no two ways around it pay it or the lights go out. But what happens when the Tilleke can't pay the bills as California, ask Pacific, Gas and electric? One of the nation's largest utilities is on the brink of bankruptcy. PGE supplying power and gas to sixteen million plans to file for chapter eleven as it faces billions and potential liabilities from wildfire. Pete any stock took a beating on Wall Street today. Dropping fifty two percent after the bankruptcy news came out. After a bankruptcy PGE will have a hard time borrowing money, and that may mean higher rates for consumers and less money for green energy projects. PGA is California's biggest utility they have about twenty thousand workers Resula goes hosts, the political breakdown podcast at in San Francisco. They are big publicly traded company that's basically been in existence for one hundred and fifty years in some form giving gas and electric power to people in California. And this is actually the second time in less than twenty years that this company is filing not for bankruptcy because bankruptcy would be like we're going out of business. Its bankruptcy chapter eleven protection. So they're basically asking a court to come in and be in charge of reorganizing, restructuring, the company, and deciding with all the debts that they have out there sort of looming over them who's first in line whose last in line and who pays when their bills don't pencil out. And why exactly is it doing this? It feels like sort of a last resort. They're doing this because they're facing really unprecedented. Potential liability is because of the wildfires that have hit California over the past two years tobacco. Just one second. I mean, they are a regulated company. So they are guaranteed a rate of return by the state. They make ten and a half percent profit. No matter what. So historically utilities have been like really good places to park your money. Right. If you're shareholder, you're guaranteed ten and a half percent and everyone needs power and gas, and so they're usually pretty reliable companies to invest in and to be customers for but basically in 2017 after years of drought in California a series of wildfires broke out mainly in sort of the Napa region so wine region and devastated a bunch of communities. Up there. There are Nell reports that downed power lines and exploding transformers are being investigated as one possible cause here for at least some of these fires. That's right. David PG and E that's the company here, and you can see them behind me reinstalling downed power lines. Now, the company says in a statement that there were equipment issues at the time the fire here started caused by quote, hurricane strength winds. But that's just one possible. Cause for the twenty two fires burning in California right now and not alone would have been a really big hit to PG knee. It was I mean, they spent the last year essentially warning that they could go into bankruptcy. If the state didn't change some of its liability laws. In the meantime, their start price fell and then a couple of days after the midterm election. What ended up being the most deadly and devastating fire in state history broke out of imbue county. And what we saw. At pleasure. What to name right now? But what we just saw. We just left pleasure. Powerless, and what we just saw at at paradise is just, you know, just not acceptable the fire in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains, north of Sacramento has burned a hundred nine thousand acres more than sixty seven hundred structures have been destroyed mostly residential homes, and that I think was sort of what PG ni executive see as the death now because if they're held responsible for that, which there's a lot of indications they could be for sparking that fire. And if they're held responsible for all the fires that we know that they sparked in two thousand seventeen and the biggest one is still under investigation. They say that they could face over thirty billion dollars in liabilities. Which is almost double what the company's worth right now. And then Sunday their CEO guy should Williams step down. And then on Monday, they announced that in two weeks. They're going to file for chapter eleven protection. And basically him this whole mess over to a bankruptcy court. How exactly did PGN e start this fire? If they indeed did. Great question, and one that I think needs some historical context, essentially, you know, they have a huge service area, and they have to serve communities that are in densely wooded areas, and there's been sort of long existing questions about whether they have maintained their equipment up to the legal standard. The state requires and just sort of the common sense standard that says you probably don't want to start huge wildfires. So in the case of Buchanan, the campfire, it seems likely that one of their huge transmission towers. I mean, it looks like one of those might have basically come down during high winds or some of the equipment in that tower in the case of the two thousand seventeen fires similar things. Most of the investigations that have come out from state fire investigators and blame PG any say that essentially high winds caused a tree branch to either fall into a power line or a tree came down and fell. Into a power line. You know, they have pretty strict guidelines from the state regulators in terms of how much space they need between their power lines and any trees or brush. And so the question becomes did. They do the maintenance that they not only are required to do. But have basically asked the state for money to do and pass those costs onto people like me who pay their electric Bill through PG any. And so it becomes on just a question of okay did your equipment caused this? But did you do everything in your power to prevent it? Especially when you said that you were doing that. And we gave you the money to do it. And do we know if they did or not they don't have a great track record of safety either in power or gas? PG knee is actually a felon. They were put on probation for violating federal gasline laws. And so they're supposed to not break any more laws for five years. And they have been blamed in about a dozen of the 2017 fires for not just starting them. But being negligent in the sense that they didn't do what they had to. And this is a company that's also famous for a neighborhood exploding on its watch once right back in twenty ten on a weekday evening. A neighborhood about five or ten minutes south of San Francisco just went up in flames. Parts of San Bruno, California were turned into a raging inferno around dinnertime Thursday evening, flames roared, some sixty feet into the air as block after block in this residential neighborhood were engulfed and at the time. We all thought maybe it was a plane crash. It's really close to the airport here. I mean, it was such a big explosion. But it was a high pressure natural gas line that ruptured caused the explosion. And then fueled the spectacular blades it leveled a neighborhood killed eight people. I was actually on CNN worked up the San Francisco Chronicle, then I got there, you know, within the hour, and there were people just standing there was like bare feet and bathrobes and their or their slippers looking down because they had just had to evacuate so quickly. To we just win out. We had on. Claremont and Bruno out here for fifteen minutes with no Firefox near the local utility company Pacific Gas and electric says they will be accountable if it's determined they were at fault, and what ended up coming out through a series of federal investigations and lawsuits was that. Basically, he's you need didn't know what was under the ground. And it also came out that they had basically redirected money that they told state regulators. They needed to charge rate payers four to use for safety upgrades and handed out over in profits to shareholders. And through the course of that discovery. In those lawsuits, we also learned about this very cozy relationship PG he had with state regulators. That was really a black Mark on both the state and the utility, and it was really sort of the beginning of a reckoning for this company and for state regulators, that's lasting to this day. Is there any sense of how this will shake out if PG any successfully files for chapter eleven bankruptcy, and the court grants it and goes into assess its liabilities will wildfire victims not see any money. I don't think no money. You know, we're talking still about a multi-billion dollar corporation. It does seem likely that not all wildfire victims will be made whole or at least the insurance companies won't, you know, we're talking about two different things here, which is people are are suing them for punitive damages which is different than filing an insurance claim and trying to get your insurance company to rebuild your house. But the victims we've talked to are pretty angry. And I think feel like this is if nothing else going to delay their ability to seek Justice if not prevent it or curb it. Not. In the world that we're ever going to prevent every fire from happening. But I think you do have to ask for a company that has a history of redirecting its safety money into profit that has a reputation among even some of people inside the company of sort of valuing shareholders over safety, don't they hold some responsibility. Because if that spark never, you know, lit Eighty-six, people would still be alive and the town of paradise would still be standing. Fires are just the tip of the iceberg. When it comes to the climate change challenges utilities face more in a moment on today explained. Sweet potato and black bean tacos with avocado Crema, and salon tro, not many tacos can boast that they're rich in vitamin A. But hellofresh is are full of it. Thanks to tender roasted cubes of sweet potato they're joined by black beans and zesty avocado Crema for some of the most delectable veggie goodness to be found inside the fold of tortilla. You could say they bring their a game in every single way. If you haven't noticed support for the show today comes from hellofresh. They got three plans to choose from including classic veggie and family as well as the option to switch plans when your tastes change. Hellofresh has something for everyone. You can take advantage of their special offer for twenty nineteen eighty dollars off your first month when you go to hellofresh dot com slash explained eight zero and enter the promo code explained eight zero. That's hellofresh dot com slash explain. Eighty and enter the promo code explained eighty to get eighty dollars off your first month. Report on energy and the environment for vox, how exactly does utility like PG any work. It's a private company, but it gets a bunch of money from the state and now the state's gonna step in and mediate all its debt. Well, it is a regulated utilities regulated by the California Public utilities commission. But it's also an investor owned utility. Meaning that stockholders people on Wall Street own a share of the company and the company also issues bonds, which other investors can also buy as well. So you have a lot of different groups that have different slices of the company the advantage of doing something like that. Of course, is that you have that risk distributed. Among all those people rather than on just the customers. So that's the big issue here with the wildfire is alternately has to pay right now. The investor owned utility like they're trying to protect their shareholders. And they wanna pass that cost to the customer. But the regulators want to say, no, you gotta actually have your shareholders bear some of this. Cost. That's the whole reason. We're letting you run this is a private company to begin with. So it's just a matter of who's actually left holding the bag at the end of the day. And there's a it's a very big bag upward thirty billion dollars of liabilities. So right did PG any do anything to void these liabilities? They proactive on climate change at all I mean PG, and he did have a lot of clean energy initiatives. They were deploying renewable energy, and we're also investing in the infrastructure to support it a lot of utilities around the country. We're doing that namely renewable energies pretty cheap, California also has state renewable energy goals. So a lot of utilities throughout the state were working toward advancing that, but the big issue is just in general that you have a lot of infrastructure that's exposed in these high risk areas. So you're running power lines into these forests that are getting extremely dry. Some of them are neglected, and so it's just kind of a disaster waiting to happen. So it's not a matter of if. But when you have a stiff enough breeze or you have an errant spark that triggers, a massive fire like this. And what happens to PG, even if they're debt is restructured and California the courts help them figure out, you know, what their payouts are what the ODA people these fires on going anywhere and PG needs to stand back up in provide energy, right, right? That's the balancing act that both the utility. And the utility regulators have to maintain. I mean the regulator. They wanna make sure that you provide power that is both affordable and reliable and then taking a back seat to that is making sure that it's environmentally responsible. If you don't meet the first two criteria. You really can't worry too much about the other one, and that's difficult when you are facing higher risks. I mean, there's an upper limit to how much you can build a customer for protecting them against future disasters. And in essence, you're essentially turning these utility companies into insurance companies because now they have to bear these catastrophic costs into their rate bases as well alongside building you power plants in new power lines. So it's a difficult situation. And I talked to a former Utah. Official and he points said to me that essentially, you know, utility haven't really been thinking about this for a long time. Like a lot of them were caught flat-footed on this issue. And now they have to come up with a way because otherwise they will be liable in ways that they don't want to be in. When we think about this sort of intersection of utility companies and climate change is wildfires in places like California or even like, Oregon, Washington state. It is that the biggest concern or the other things we should be thinking about to. There are a lot of other things to be thinking about one thing to remember is that the utility sector the energy sector uses a lot of water. You need to use water to generate the steam to run the turbines, and you use a lot of water to cool power plants. The union of concerned scientists put it this way that essentially if you imagine the Niagara Falls at its peak flow rate. And triple that. That's how much water per minute. The utility sector in the United States uses. Just the United States states, not even thinking about the world. And and it's Anthony amount of water. So imagine what happens when you're region gets really dry. If you're in a water stress region, and you can't take in water or if that water gets too hot to be used for cooling. That's an issue as well. Or there are also issues with discharging water that after you use it to cool, you know, your power plant that will effluent water is going to be a lot hotter. There are limits to how much of that water you can actually dump back in river. And so they're all these regulations that govern that and as a climate changes. We're seeing those stresses get worse and worse. In other countries. We've actually seen them shut down nuclear power plants because it got too hot to use the water. So there are other kinds of environmental stressors utilities face. Okay. So we've got fires. We've got water shortages, I guess we didn't even touch on hurricanes and flooding with more and more extreme weather on the way. What's like the worst case scenario for these like four profit utilities government takeover? One official told me that bankruptcy. Judges have God like powers. So there's a lot that you can do in terms of restructuring the utility, some California legislators suggested, you know, making this a public utility rather than an investor owned utility advantage of that. Of course, is that, you know, you have an incentive for the utility to be much more transparent and up front they serve the public interest rather than shareholders. And so when you know, if you're weighing the costs of doing things, trimming, power lines or bearing something to make it less vulnerable to sparking a fire. They air on the side of consumer protection rather on the side of cutting costs the disadvantage of that is that you end up making your customers your shareholders as well. So if you do have a Matt major fire that gets. Blamed on the utility. And they have to pay for it. Well, it falls directly back to the customers. And there's no investor are bondholder to help share that burden. I mean, it's hard to feel bad for the the people who send you a Bill every month that you don't really wanna pay put right is the future sort of grim for these companies that are now facing providing energy in the shadow of of wildfires and hurricanes and floods and whatever else the big issue. The reason why that they're facing problems that they didn't give it much thought. Now, they can't afford not to think about this climate change is something that has to be integral to their planning over the long term and in the near term as well. I mean, ultimately, we do need power. I mean, I really do count on keeping my lights on staying warm in the wintertime, but you need to be able to deliver it in a way that doesn't cause more harm than good. And that's really the difficult question here. When I was up in paradise, California after the campfire went through there. I mean, one of the things that struck me was that you saw these power lines running right between trees, right? Like, really close really close. Like, I was looking at that. And I was just like a stiff breeze would knocked the power line into a tree. I mean, it's it's almost an impossible situation. I mean, you could trim the trees you could, you know, try to bury the power lines. But it's a matter of when not necessarily if when you see a disaster that would strike so the question is then you also have to start thinking more broadly about where are people living are they living in these high risk zones is the cost of providing them power and the risk of providing empower into these densely forested areas, even worthwhile. At that point. If we're facing the risk of sparking a fire. So those are all the different questions. You have to weigh similarly in Puerto Rico, we saw eighty percent of the island's utility poles knocked down after hurricane Maria. Do you wanna even bother to rebuild those utility poles at that point when you know that there that? Vulnerable to a storm. It's a question that you really have to think about with a big picture mindset. And a lot of people aren't really willing to do that the big pushes to rebuild. Exactly the way things were both in Puerto Rico and in California people wanna get back to their homes as soon as possible and that does not reduce the risk that puts you back in the same situation. He started with. Have there been utilities that have done a better job of taking climate change into consideration a one big sample of that might be XL energy? It's a company headquartered in Minnesota in Minneapolis. And they have operations in eight states serving three point six million customers at the beginning of twenty eight teen they announce that they want to cut their greenhouse gas emissions. Sixty percent below two thousand five levels by twenty thirty. But then by the end of the year they up that target to eighty percent by twenty thirty. And then they want to get to one hundred percent clean energy by twenty fifty. They are one of the few utilities in the country that have set a target that aggressive on fighting climate change. And a big reason why is because they cost of renewable energy in clean energy has declined so precipitously, but it's also because their customers are demanding it it's not just households. It's big businesses. A lot of big companies have their own greenhouse gas targets, and they wanna buy clean, energy and cities even entire cities wanna buy clean. Energy. And so they're pushing the utilities to deliver and build, you know, more power generation assets that are cleaned that produces euro emissions. And in a way that companies also insulating themselves from the future costs of climate change because they're saying that they are acting to help mitigate climate change. So if they are facing a lawsuit somewhere down the line that you know, you didn't do enough. They can say yes, we did. We changed our entire generation model in portfolio to help reduce our impact on the planet. Excels, also investor owned utility. And so they also have to answer to shareholders. And so that's kind of their pitch to them that we're planning for the future building the generation portfolio of tomorrow in a world where temperatures are going to be rising where the traditional coal and gas fired power plants aren't going to be as reliable and we need other alternatives. Ervan covers the environment for vox. I'm Sean Rama's firm. This is today explained. Hellofresh for supporting the show today. They've got premeasured ingredients that are fresh, and they have easy to follow recipe cards that come straight to your door. They do the planning the shopping the prepping take advantage of eighty dollars off your first month by going to hellofresh dot com slash explained eighty and entering the promo code explained eighty that is hellofresh dot com slash explained eight zero and the promo code explained eight zero for eighty dollars off your first month.

California PG paradise San Francisco PGE David PG California Public utilities co Bill official Pete United States Hellofresh San Bruno San Francisco Chronicle PGA
Snap Launches Spotlight Feed - DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

07:22 min | 10 months ago

Snap Launches Spotlight Feed - DTH

"Hello there this message is coming to you from the history. Extra podcast from bbc history magazine a collection of fascinating conversations with leading historians. Giving you the low down on history's biggest characters hidden stories and greatest adventures speaking of great adventures. This week. The history extra podcast is brought to you by booking dot com. Whether you're looking for a culture filled city break a local away or a flung adventure you can save at least thirty percent with booking dot com. Black friday deals these deals for a limited time. Only so you'll need book before. I december to make the most of them. But the good news is they go. Have the flexibility to travel any time in twenty twenty one head to booking dot com ford slash blackfriday to book your next big adventure. These are the daily tech headlines for monday november. Twenty third twenty twenty. I'm rich apple enough. Snap launch new feature snapchat called spotlight a dedicated space with short entertaining videos in a vertically skirt. Little feed snap says it's algorithms will personalize feeds with the most engaging recent snaps and the feed will be human. The algorithm will look at. How many of us a snap gets how long people watch it if it's frequently skipped and whether it gets shared spotlight will feature snaps from both private and public accounts by either sending to spotlight directly or posting the our story feed snaps from private accounts won't feature attribution with no way to comment or message that creator snap also says it will pay over one million dollars a day to users who create top spotlight snaps for the rest of twenty twenty the california public utilities commission approved the driver and driverless autonomous vehicle deployment programs that allow for paid autonomous. Ride hailing services in the state to participate. Companies will need to obtain either a charter party carrier class p permit or a class a charter party certificate in the driver. Av passenger service pilot program as well as an ab testing permit from california department of motor vehicles expects it will take several months for companies to be accepted into the programs operating thomas. Ride hailing service will require submitting quarterly reports that include anonymous pickup and dropoff information. The availability wheelchair accessible rides fuel and electric charging types of vehicles vehicles and passengers miles traveled and the disadvantage accessibility communities previously these cpu uc for autonomy testing in the state. But not for paid autonomous vehicle services a coalition of digital marketing companies calling themselves marketers for an open web announced. It filed a complaint with the uk competition and markets authority to block implementation of google's privacy sandbox initiative this initiative is set to roll out in early twenty twenty one and would phase out third party tracking cookies. The coalition is asking for the privacy sandbox to be delayed until regulators devise long-term competitive remedies to mitigate google's google's privacy. Sandbox is an open set of standards. The company announced last year. That would replace cookies with browser privacy budget that allow for a site to make a limited number of api calls to get information to group user into a larger group but not sacrifice anonymity. While apple's rumored augmented mixed reality headset isn't a thing yet. Mike rockwell apple's head of a are and l. asandra mcginnis it senior product manager for air. Tell seen that apple's mission right now is through the device. You already have in your pocket. The iphone apple says there are already ten thousand air enabled ios apps with seven thousand developers many of which focused on shopping or home improvement. Google launch an invitation only trial of a new app called pask mayton india designed to let users earn money by doing simple tasks on your smartphone. The app says tasks for from businesses around the world and are categorized as either sitting or feel tasks with a provided walking. Eta example task include walk into a store front and taking a picture recording a spoken sentence transcribing content or checking details of a business users can either select from a number of available tasks or the app can send a notification requesting a task be done. It's unclear if local businesses make quest to google for these tasks or paying for the service. Twitter confirmed that a bug in its ephemeral fleets feature could offer content to be viewed after the supposed twenty four hour expiration these fleets would disappear from the. Ui of the main twitter app but a developer tool using twitter's api could pulling fleet wells. Which could then be used to view content after twenty four hours of posting twitter. Clarified that the api. Only post-flight your house less than twenty four hours old and is working on a fixed to make older url's viewable after twenty four hours. Twitter does door fleet content for up to thirty days and is available to users twitter data for download until the platform deletes. It and updated apple support page says. The company is working with microsoft to bring compatibility for the xbox series x controller to apple devices apple devices currently support the xbox wireless controller with bluetooth xbox elite wireless controller xbox adaptive controller and the playstation dualshock four controller twitter user. Ling ling confirmed that he was able to use the check. Rain jail breaking tool to jailbreak first generation home pot posting a screenshot of accessing the homepage over an ssh connection this is the first publicly demonstrated jailbreak of a homepod which runs an os based on tv os. An update to google assistant now allows it to schedule turning on or off smart lights. This works through assistant scheduled actions feature and can't be set for either specific times events like sunup. Sundown previously google assistant could turn off smart lights or use them as part of an alarm and finally to celebrate the video of billie eilish is bad guy surpassing one billion views on youtube. Google created infinite bad guy. An endless music video built on covers of the song at billy. Dot with youtube dot com. The site initially played the official video with one of fifteen thousand cover videos on either side of the plane. Version cooking on those videos will transition to the new version without missing a beat or a lyric. Google trained neural network to sink the different versions clicking pause. We'll just listened to during your session. Remember from our discussion of the tech news of the day subscribed to dealing new ad tech new show dot com and remember to rate and review daily tech headlines. Wherever you get your podcast beck's listening. We'll talk to you next time. And from all of us here at daily tech headlines remember have a super sparkly day. Hello there this message is coming to you from the history. Extra podcast from bbc history magazine i collection of fascinating conversations with leading historians. Giving you the low down on history's biggest characters hidden stories and greatest adventures speaking of great adventures. This week. The history extra podcast is brought to you by booking dot com. Whether you're looking for a culture filled city break a local getaway or a far flung adventure you can save at least thirty percent with booking dot coms black. Friday deals themes deals a for a limited time. Only so you need to book before. I december to make the most of them. But the good news is that have flexibility to travel any time in twenty twenty one head to booking dot com forward slash blackfriday to book your next big adventure.

apple history magazine Google thirty percent twitter competition and markets author twenty four hours Mike rockwell asandra mcginnis mayton california public utilities co one million dollars department of motor vehicles bbc ford Eta thomas twenty four hour billie eilish california
EVs & Infrastructure - Katie Sloan, Southern California Edison

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

32:28 min | 5 months ago

EVs & Infrastructure - Katie Sloan, Southern California Edison

"Hi this is john michaelson. Host agreed connections radio. I want you to know that we are renaming our show and relaunching with the brand new completely redesigned website. Coming up in a few weeks so for the next few weeks until then we're going to be running. Some of our favorite replace and here is one from katie. Sloan of southern california edison about increasing the adoption of electric vehicles around the country. This is based on president biden's new infrastructure plan. Please enjoy it and subscribe to our newsletter on our website. At green connections. Radio dot com. Or find me on twitter at michelson to sign up and be one of the first to get our brand new website and brand new newsletter coming up very soon thanks so much. Happy listening Do you drive an electric vehicle. Are you thinking about buying an electric vehicle. What's holding you back. Are you concerned about where. And how often to charge it. As of july twenty nineteen there are about one point. Three million electric vehicles on the road in the united states and about five hundred of them are in california but that is a fraction of the over two hundred eighty seven million total vehicles on. Us roads more and more people are buying electric vehicles. And almost every automaker now has at least one and most are coming out with a full line over the next few years but it's not enough. Transportation is responsible for about a third of carbon emissions in the united states. So it's a huge priority to combat climate change california leading the way with the most vs in the country and the most charging stations and the most financial incentives and regulations that support electric vehicle adoption as well and yet adoption is nowhere near where we needed to be to reduce the environmental impact of vehicles as any of you who are regular listeners of green connections radio no i am an unabashed fan of electric vehicles because i led the communications and co lead the sales and marketing of chrysler's electric car division. So this is one of my favorite topics i think. Electric vehicles are very cool. But how do we increase adoption today. We're going to find out from one of the top women on the front of that. Effort welcomed green connections radio. Where we bring you insights and tips from remarkably innovative women about corporate responsibility energy and sustainability related issues. I'm john michaelson. We talk about innovation. Leadership technologies and careers always bringing a new perspective. Find us anywhere. You like to listen to podcasts. On green connections radio dot com and through my forbes blog as well and please pass it onto your friends. If you're struggling with your own career. Let us know via twitter or linked in the contact us page on our website. And we'll help you with contacts resources strategies ideas and tips to save you time and money as you grow your career. Here are some more facts to get us started. Ev drivers do percents of their charging. That's eight zero percent of their charging at home. There are over twenty two thousand charging stations on over sixty six thousand chargers across the united states and counting with more being installed every day. The new electric vehicles have a healthy amount of battery range. Some as much as three hundred fifty miles as i recall and the cars. Frankly are very very cool. I was at the dc. Auto show recently took a ride with a race car driver in an electric volvo sports car. That was way cool. There are electric and hybrid. Suv sedans sports cars et cetera. So what is holding it up. I'd like you to meet a woman who we hope can answer some of these questions kate. Sloan is the director of mobility at southern california edison. I met katie a few months ago at an electric drive transportation association forum. And i knew i had to have you meet her. Katie has been at southern california edison for about seventeen years if i read that right in her linked in profile and his knee deep electric vehicles. She earned her degrees in economics. Which is an interesting angle to approach this from both at her graduate undergraduate and master's degrees from new mexico state university welcome to green connections radio. Katie and thank you so much for joining us. Thank you john. I'm excited to be here. Oh you're welcome you're welcome so you focus on removing the barriers to electric vehicle adoption which assumes there's a big market for these vehicles but since most of us are not even be owners. What's your pitch to own one. That's a great question to start with. And i would say that. Electric vehicles are funded. Drive that is the number one reason that people should be thinking about purchasing them love to share a little story about my own personal experience and that is that my husband has always driven really large. Suv's and trucks his whole life and when we went car shopping a few years ago and we started looking at electric vehicles. I have to say that he was like probably the majority of folks saying that he was not very excited about purchasing an electric vehicle so much so that when we went to test drive one of the cars he refused to sit in the front seat and actually sat in the back with his arms folded during the test drive. We ended up getting an electric vehicle. Which i was super super happy about fast forward a year later and my husband was driving the electric vehicle around downtown los angeles and he came home and he said oh my gosh i have something so exciting to tell you. I was at a stop light and there was a really big muscle car next to me and they started rubbing their engine and as soon as late turned green. I put my foot on the accelerator. And i totally smoked them. A i love our car. That's cute so he became a convert by smoking out the car He did and i think the more that people have the opportunity to drive an electric vehicle. See that it's fine and really see that it can fit into their lifestyle and that they get to discuss the gas station And be able to fuel their vehicle at home or at work or places are already going and they don't have to go out of their way to get fuel. I think more and more people are going to be just as excited as my as my husband does. Oh cool okay. great. I love that. That's a great pitch so you're trying to increase adoption. What do you see is the single largest success factor in adopting vehicles when people say besides your husband saying i smoked out the guy next to me. What you see is the single thing or things that help get people over the top to actually buy one is it vehicle choice is battery. Range is a financial incentive. What do you see. is the key driver. Air really are a few different drivers. And i think that In in a few ways one really is fat availability of vehicles for people to choose from to start with we know that automakers have announced between forty to fifty new electric vehicle models coming online in the next few years and having sports utility vehicles smaller cars trucks. I'm that are at price points. That people are used to paying will really be one of the main Accelerators drivers to the transformation that us avian disaster looking to get to and i think that that lent then leads into once you have the vehicle how are you using it. And that really gets to the infrastructure and the charging station availability. Today people are used to knowing where gas stations are that no matter where they go they'll be able to have fuel and to the extent that we can have. Ev charging just as ubiquitous as gas stations are that we're really help with that second hurdle. So i think we're at the precipice ranging anxiety was was a large barrier for quite a few years. But i think with having one hundred two hundred three hundred miles available we are moving away from range anxiety And having more experience exactly and that means when chargers are available making sure that people know how to use them and that it's a seamless easy experience and not something that they have to think about every single time there charging their car. Oh that's interesting on used to collaborate with early stage software company. That was developing an app. That would tell people wear on the route. They were traveling. They could charge whether the those which stations have the chargers that they need because of better than anyone else chargers are not created equal and it would cost and whether they would be open when they got there Which is kind of addressing which sounds like addressing what you're talking about yes and and i've seen similar style apps. There's one that moves away from showing the exact type of connector and the technical term and they've changed it into a color coded scheme so that you can put in your car vehicle making model and then it'll say on this map there's red green and blue chargers you can use green and blue charters And it makes it just a lot easier. So i think the more that these types of software solutions are available to customers. It helps to reduce that experiencing society. Oh yeah to get away from the nomenclature of or somebody like that right. You have said the goal of southern california edison's is to put seven million vs on the road by twenty thirty. That's only ten years away. How do you get from one point. Three million to seven million or even from five hundred thousand in california to a million in california. How does that how do you do that. It really takes all of the industry players being focused and aligned and making sure that we're moving quickly towards this goal we know that the state of california will not meet its greenhouse gas reduction targets unless we significantly decarbonised the transportation sector and moving towards electric. Vehicles is the only way to do that so rather than continuing to pilot new programs. We need to go to scale as soon as possible. Every day that someone is purchasing an internal combustion engine vehicle is another ten to twelve years of that vehicle being on the road So we need to look at this through the lens of. It's not just one thing but it's multiple things. Before i worked on electric vehicles. I worked in the renewable space. And i think there's a lot of lessons to learn on how technologies like wind and solar went from early stage Too late stage to scale and it wasn't just one thing it was A multitude of factors it was the federal investment tax credits. It was state renewable portfolio standards. It was reduction in cost due to technology it was also rate programs like net energy metering in addition to new business models like being able to lease solar panels on your roof top rather than always having to own so i think we need to look at all of those solutions in conjunction in order to make this sea happen But aligning all the players is easier said than done to say the least right. So how do you get all of them to be. Forgive the pun driving in the same direction with you. I will say that i. I've been an energy industry for a while. I have never seen as much alignment on a topic as there is with electric vehicles at least from a high level objective perspective So i think it really takes focusing on the end goal and making sure that we don't quibble amongst ourselves with things that are around the edges when we all want to get to the main direction and i think that also means that we're bringing each other along that we continue to collaborate and we use organizations that exist for alliances and You mentioned the that. Edta earlier and we can use those groups that already exist to make sure that we're aligned and forward that's encouraging so competitors like go point and electrifying america are collaborating. I would say that in at least our regulatory structures in california we have the california public utilities commission. They sometimes do file comments together with other parties. And even if they aren't filing comments together they are supporting policies that support utility infrastructure programs for example and they also align not just at the california public utilities commission. They also work on legislative fronts. To help make sure that we're getting funding for electric vehicle rebates had the levels that they need to be so. Thank you for that. Perfect segue because federal regulations. Shall we say you're not exactly moving in the direction of favorably to electric vehicles these days And depending upon the results of the two thousand twenty presidential election. We don't know if or when that might change. So i know the california is much more welcoming to this new. Have gavin newsom doing law. And i'm sure. We have a million people in tom out there in this work. Especially but how do you nass the cuts in the rebates and the the cancelling of incentives or letting them expire. And you know having to fight what's going on in washington dc on the regulatory front rate I think that's a very important question to ask. I think we should take a step back and recognize that. It's not just the federal incentives that are driving. What the automakers are doing if you look at their plans With a forty to fifty new models that are coming out in the next few years. Those aren't plans that can be retracted. And changed on. A dime and automakers are making electric vehicles. Not just because of what is happening in the state of california but in large part environmental regulations in europe and china. And we're seeing that. Those are not backing down at any point. So i think that the federal incentives are important but we should be realistic with where we are today and we should continue to gain the coalition of the momentum with other states following california's lead At some point there becomes a tipping point where there's enough states and population following california's lead that the federal government regulations may not be impacting with the automakers are doing as much well many of the automaker's though got together to support the rollback. The cafe standards for example. So that's certainly doesn't support the adoption of alternative fuel vehicles. What we saw with that was that there was a split almost down the middle of automakers joining california and those joining trump and even after we saw those announcements we haven't seen those automakers completely changing what their electric vehicle rollout plans are so speaking of cafe standards. Gas prices are pretty low right now. I saw something on your website about owning. An electric vehicle could be like paying less than two dollars a gallon for gas. Frankly i pay to thirty five a for gas in virginia so which is pretty close so how to low gas prices affect the success of the programs that southern california edison is trying to do to drive adoption electric vehicles. That's really interesting. I wish that we had gas prices. That were that low out. Here is gas prices. You know. I haven't gone to a gas station In quite a while not exactly sure what the what. The number is but today but It's around the high three dollars into four dollars for gas here so for us. The charging of electricity is significant financial benefits. So i think that's a consideration each location. You need to look at. What are the gas prices there compared to the electricity prices. That are there to see the see. The difference a couple of quick questions before i ask you a couple of career questions. I saw that. Southern california edison is also bringing more electric buses onto the roads. Can you talk a little bit about that. Yes we have a fairly large infrastructure investment program for medium and heavy duty vehicles which include transit buses and School buses in addition to electric garbage trucks delivery trucks port equipment and so we're helping to electrify those sectors as well We put in infrastructure and charging stations for those types of vehicles. And what's interesting about those segments is that medium and heavy duty vehicles are disproportionately impacting poor air quality. We have the worst air quality in the in the country. Not a place. We'd like to be i n and i- electrifying those vehicles and using our electricity that we have in our grid to power them. Were able to help. Impact not just greenhouse gas emissions but air quality which is in a very important environmental justice issue here in southern california. Why are those vehicles worse and greenhouse gases. Because they're not as their run on diesel or something or what is it about those vehicles that make them worse polluters right. It's because a lot of time you hit the nail on the head. They're running on on diesel. Okay okay yeah. I interviewed a woman from new flyer about their electric buses to that was really really interesting as there are more electric buses on the road. There's also therefore bigger strain on the grid. What's your solution to the grid challenge without obviously resorting to more use of fossil fuels to power grid. Well in california just to to set the stage we in our portfolio. We do not have any coal. We have a very small portion from natural gas which is shrinking over time. You mentioned our goal to have seven million electric vehicles on the road. By twenty thirty that is coupled with having at least eighty percent of our energy that is sold be claim from renewables and that is really critical for using electric vehicles. If you are using an electric system that is polluting. You're not getting as much benefit from electric vehicles. As as you would from a very clean grid like the one that we have now and are continuing to head towards so. That's the the second part of your question. The first part was i believe more around preparedness of the grid and for that one we are partnering with our customers to understand early where they expect to be putting in electric buses and electric trucks. So that we can have the grid ready When they have those vehicles delivered we've been building our electricity grid for over one hundred years planning and and building the The great out to meet new electric loads our core competencies so we are confident that working with our customers. We'll be able to to satisfy their needs. Oh so you're adapting your time line of preparing the grid for the increased load based on the timing that your clients have for putting those buses on the road. That's interesting but you're trying at the same time to increase the adoption of electric vehicles to seven million by twenty thirty. So i assume that implies then that you have a plan for managing the grid thirty to accommodate seven million electric vehicles. Yes we do okay. Good luck on that one well. I'm fascinated by utilities because not really because utilities have to reinvent themselves without losing a moment of service to anybody at the same time that they're regulated and don't necessarily know where all the raw materials are gonna come from or win so it's a it's a very tricky spot. When i was at chrysler. I negotiated deals with some real estate developers to include our cars in the sale of the homes that they were building and they installed to forty outlets in the garages. And as you well know they can vs. Then there's a regenerative quality right especially in california where you have power outages that can come in handy. So what kinds of deals with buildings and developers are you guys negotiating to help support your seven million cargo. Thank you for asking that question in california. We have requirements that new buildings including new homes are ready Means that the the buildings have to have at least some of the panels and the conduit put in to be able to support. Ev charging and right now. That doesn't mean that all of the infrastructure is there Or that the charging stations are there. So what we have proposed and we have it in front of our public utilities commission. Right now is that in addition to us building and installing Ev chargers as we have been doing for the last five years we also will provide a rebate for new home builders to complete and have the the buildings completely ev ready through the rebate program. So you mean they when you say completely ev ready you mean they have to put in to forty outlets or put in charging stations in the could end charging stations. And how are you in and the developer gets to choose which charging station they wanna use. I gather correct. Yes all of the programs we've done to date. We provide to our customers which would be the developers in this instant list of approved charging stations and network providers that they have the opportunity to choose from. Oh okay so it's kind of a prequalified list. Yes that's correct okay. Before he s you career question one more industry question and that is what can other and utilities learn from california's experience and specifically from southern california edison experience. What can you suggest other states from the evolution that you got you've gone through and especially because you've been there for so long you've watched Elva lucien and driven it. I love this question. And this is a core part of my my day to day. Work is showing our lessons with other electric utilities. And i would say the first thing and the first thing we talk about is that this is an opportunity for them. This is a growth area and it really is something that is beneficial for their customers for the communities for their stakeholders. And you don't always find something that that has so many people aligned. So i is looking at it as an opportunity versus just a challenge and the second is that we like to share all of our program details and our lessons learned through the infrastructure programs that we've had today with other utilities so that they have opportunity to copy paste and or or tweak in their own different policy environments that they have so i think one of the unique things about being at a utility is that we aren't in a competitive environment with other electric providers. So we're able to be fairly open book And the reason that's important to us is that and one thing that we haven't talked about yet. Is it getting to some of these ambitious goals. Seven million electric vehicles on the road in california. It's not just about california. It's not just about southern california. Edison service area. It's about this happening across the us. And to the extent that utilities across the us can also provide supportive programs for their customers. We think that that will accelerate the adoption of electric vehicles. Well i think you're right. Well that's interesting. I guess that's probably also because you're so highly regulated You can't possibly be competitive right. Gosh i hope. They're adopting it because some of these utilities around the country and we know better than i do are just kind of archaic and see no evil hear no evil speak no evil just like keeping themselves bolivia's to what is quite obvious coming down the road if it's not already there and i sometimes wonder what's going to drive them but maybe you're making it easier and saying here just you just do what we did but adapted for your community or for your pc or for your grid. Structure will make it easier for them to do the right thing. That's our intent. And i will say it's encouraging because i've spit spoken with utilities from the northeast from the south from texas from the middle of the country from hawaii so i'm seeing interest in a lot of places and one of the things that excites me. The most is when i when. I see news about you. Typically ev programs that are in the middle middle of the country. Or not in california or new york places where you would expect it so I lived. When i worked for chrysler i lived in us. I hope you're sitting. When i tell you this but i lived in fargo north dakota so i noticed that north dakota has the lowest adoption of electric vehicles in the country. I think they have like thirty. And i think that's mostly our plant was frankly when chrysler was Fell apart the division was sold and it was moved out of north dakota so who knows but anyway so a couple of quick questions before i let you go. Tell us about a career decision that you made mid career whatever that feels luck for you. That in retrospect was a turning point. How you made that decision and what you learned from it. So i think one of the biggest decisions that i made Mid career was that i had been in the regulatory and policy space for quite a years. And i knew that in the long run i always want to be in that space. I loved it. But i wanted something more and i was able to find an opportunity at our parent company in the strategic planning department working on strategic projects that they needed people that understood the renewable renewable space but it was more from a different function and i was able to parlay that into working electric vehicles and the important thing that i learned was that it's easy to to pivot your role. If you're not doing a complete one. Eighty so i always look at it in terms of what is your subject matter area and then what is your functional expertise so If i was working on policy which was the functional expertise and renewables. I could have it into working on renewables but in strategy and then you can transition on working on strategy but with electric vehicles and you can kind of leapfrog where you want your final destination to be by doing these. What i would call more quarter circle pivots as opposed to trying to to do something completely new and i found that that's a been a helpful way to learn and grow and and try new things. Oh that's really great. I love that. So and also. I'm sure your economics degrees came in handy in that strategic planning Exercise that's really smart and they obviously they're related right. So did you intend to end up electric vehicles when you made that choice to go into strategic planning or you just knew you didn't want to be in on the regulatory policy side. The whole time. I knew that. I wanted to get closer into some of our business lines which is where i ended up now and then i've always had a north star even from my early early days of working in clean energy so that has really helped to guide and direct my career early. I was working. More and energy efficiency programs then moved into renewables and then moved into electric vehicles. So i have always had the north star of learning different subject matter areas But within that realm of clean energy interesting so enclosing. What advice would you give a woman in mid career who wants to you know so. She has a certain amount of experience. Not fresh out of college. Who wants to use her education her experience and her passion for making a difference in her career. She wants to get ahead. She wants to make money. This is not just volunteer work. So what would you suggest to her. The main thing i would suggest is take the slogan from nike of. Just do it. If you think that there's something organization or company that's lacking. Don't ask for permission to make it happen. I think that we all have more authority and autonomy that then we our selves and we sometimes think oh this would be something great to happen But no one's told me to do it. I would think if you're ever thinking thinking about that. Take it on yourself and make it happen. I think that that if you can do that in the subject matter area where you want to advance your career people will see you as someone that can get things done and i think that will help you to go even further obviously within the realm of your company or organizations politics right right. No i think that's great and sometimes your politics might require you're going to your boss or bringing it up in a meeting and saying. Hey what if. We flipped it over and turned purple and made it polkadot. You know and or you know what if we shot for a seven million you know. Created a goal of seven million vehicles. Have everybody go. Are you out of your and sometimes you can just do a small like case study on your own and bring it in with results is funny. Example comes to mind but one of the incredibly cool women. I've interviewed is a woman who believe it or not started a business to collect scraps of material from the garment industry in new york when she worked for the new york city garbage department and she started this business and some of the people who buy some of the remnants which are in some cases large bolts of fabric our designers as some of the big design houses. They wanna try a little design on their own without kind of making a big deal about it so they take the ball to they take the fabric and they do it either on their own in off hours or at home and try it out and then bring it in if it works if they like it. Yes i love that. I love that concept. So kind of sounds like what you're saying is that don't ask for permission to just make it happen. That's that's inspiring miss katie. Thank you so much. Thank you so much joan. I appreciate it. Oh you're welcome. Thank you so much for joining us today. And green connections radio katie. Sloan director of e mobility at southern california edison. Are you more interested in buying an electric vehicle. Now tweet it to us. That joan michelson or posted on our facebook page and find us on apple podcasts. Or wherever listen to us today or on our website green connections radio dot com where you also find a lot of my forbes blogs and other blogs and articles as well if you want to gain career support for women like me and katie pigmy via twitter or linked in or through our contact us page. And we try to help you i'm john michaelson. Thank you for joining us. See you next time.

california john michaelson southern california edison southern california chargers united states president biden Sloan electric drive transportation katie california public utilities co chrysler Katie michelson twitter new mexico state university
Why Doesn't PG&E Bury the Power Lines to Prevent Wildfires?

Bay Curious

16:15 min | 9 months ago

Why Doesn't PG&E Bury the Power Lines to Prevent Wildfires?

"Own from cutie. California has always had wildfires like earthquakes were drought. They're part of living in this state. County residents there is a large fire off mark. West springs road are several homes dolphin. Flame lightning starts some of our wildfires and careless people start others but over the last several years. A lot of fires have been started by pacific gas and electric. Pge our power company happened with fire. One that went on for former all right in just two and a half years. The utilities equipment started more than fifteen hundred fires. A wall street journal investigation found some of those were small but others were deadly like the campfire which burned the town of paradise to the ground in twenty eighteen and killed eighty five people to prevent wildfires. Pg and he has started shutting off the power during dry and windy weather. That's one downed power line or electrical spark is most likely to start a blaze now. Those power shut offs appeared to have prevented fires but the practice has also stranded people without power for days which poses its own health and safety risks i am a survivor of the recent disastrously conceived and implemented shutdown by pg. Any and. i am an angry survivor. curious listeners. Sally has been watching the news and she thought to herself. There must be a better way. My one no why. Pg the doesn't buried their line today on the show. What will it take to both prevent wildfires and keep the power on price. And this is bay. Curious support for bay curious comes from sierra. Nevada brewing company family owned operated and argued over since nineteen eighty proud supporter of independent thought. Whether that's online over the air or in a bottle. More at sierra nevada dot com a lot of people like the idea of burying the power lines. it would certainly look nicer. And it seems like an obvious way to prevent wildfires but is it the best way bay curious producer katrina schwarz. Went to find out when you ask electrical grid experts about burying the power lines. The first thing they point out is how huge the pg any system really is this hardly anything like pg news service territory anywhere in the united states. This is steve weissman. He used to be an administrative law. Judge at the california public utilities commission. So he knows the system inside and out now. He teaches public policy to the next generation at uc berkeley. It covers sixteen different climate zones in the snowy mountains in hot deserts in the coastline. Pg and e. provides power to around five point one million households in central and northern california. Their service area is massive. Seventy thousand square miles. That's about the size of the entire state of oklahoma. Uc berkeley electrical engineering professor. Sasha myer says there are downsides to putting the lines underground that a lot of people don't think about you have kind of trade off to look out which is when power lines are underground if and when something does go wrong. It's a lot harder to find where the problem is into go. Fix it So that then takes longer and cost more to do. Weimeyer actually lives close to where the deadly oakland hills fire devastated homes in nineteen ninety-one. So were here. Just at the edge of broadway terrace and up along. That ridge was the line of defense against the fires. Everything on one side of broadway. Terrace burned down after the fire homeowners pressured. Pg need to put the power lines there underground where they had to basically rebuild the distribution infrastructure. Anyway and so they were gonna spend a lot of money anyway and realizing that. This was a particularly hazardous fire. area it was put underground. Pg unease applying the same logic town of paradise rebuilds following the deadly campfire. They've committed to putting two hundred miles of distribution lines underground. In and around the town undergrounding all of genie's these lines would be a terrifically expensive task. The difficulty is always will. How much can we afford to pay. Who's gonna pay for it. How do we spread those costs around. you know among the rate payers and you know that's really kind of the prickly question anything. Pg does to make it. System safer is going to cost money and even though undergrounding most expensive options. It's a lot. Cheaper than a catastrophic wildfire meet nathaniel. Skinner safety expert at the public advocates office. They fight for the rights of ratepayers. Us i did a rough back of the napkin. Calculation on this. Pg any estimates it costs about three million dollars per mile to put a line underground so the two hundred miles around paradise will cost about four hundred and sixty million. That's a hefty price tag. But it's still a bargain when you realize the campfire caused about sixteen point. Five billion dollars in damages. Steve weissman the uc berkeley public policy. Professor says the costs associated with potential fires should be considered as part of pge's long-term decision making without having the real cost included in the calculation. You're not likely to be making the most well informed decision. Skinner agrees that sometimes undergrounding is the right choice. Like in where. There's only one road out of town. But he doesn't think it's the best deal for ratepayers to put the lines underground everywhere but quickly becomes prohibitively. Expensive people are paying a lot for their electricity service right now. There's a lot of people who can't afford the utility bills. But what point does electricity service become unaffordable and that starts to introduce all sorts of health and safety impacts. Skinner says the lowest estimates for putting the most fire prone sections of pga system would mean the average person's electric bill could go up eightfold. There are cheaper things. Pg new can do right now. That would make the system safer he says. A big one is installing covered conducting wire so if a tree branch falls on the line during a windstorm it doesn't spark a fire. Another is keeping trees. Cut back from the wires. Those are all strategies. Utility companies already have at their disposal. Sasha vampire meanwhile is looking to the future. Thomas edison and george westinghouse would totally recognize every piece of equipment. That's visible here. A lot of this isn't even twentieth century technology. It's kind of nineteenth century Very analog very simple in terms of the individual pieces of it but then when you put it together as a system. It's really complex. Vampire sees promise what are called. Synchro phasers small sensors along the lines that give the utility more precise data about big and small disruptions in the system being able to control the components. Is i think what most people mean when they say a smart grid. A smarter grid would sense if a power line breaks for example and cut off power before the line hits the dry ground and the utility would have a lot more information about how often and in what situations there are power disturbances. That all sounds cool but these new technologies also require high speed communication systems and none of it is cheap. Meyer estimates a few thousand dollars per sensor and millions for communication system that supports them. Pg and e. says they've tested similar technology napa valley and found it useful for detecting equipment that needs replacing. It sounds like there are a lot of things that pg could be doing. Besides putting wires underground that would make the system less likely to start a wildfire but it seems that that work is always going really slowly and that point to the heart. Sally swoops question this fundamental frustration many. Pg customers have that. The utility doesn't invest enough in safety. It's like how many huge catastrophic events have to happen. Why is it this company over and over again. It's hard to know exactly why but you can serve a couple of things. Steve weissman says the history of pga as a company might hold some clues as history goes back about one hundred forty years at this point that then electrical energy was a very local service. You have a small generator. A few poles and wires going to building so that was a beginning of electric service and it happened with all these small companies wasteman says as technology changed companies realized. It was more efficient to team up. It became the norm for big power plants to be located far away from residential areas and brought in on long transmission lines so basically overtime and through a bunch of consolidation. Pg emerged as the power company for much of central and northern california. If something that grew organically over the course of decades weisman says this origin story is important because in many ways. Pg needs growth. Wasn't carefully designed and well thought out plan as a result of that. This is a company that really never got to a point where it set back in ashdod self. Have we become too big for our current form of management to ask a lot of self reflective questions about the most useful way to make sure that services safe environmentally sensitive that it's reliable and it's cheap that lack of foresight may help explain why. Pg has had such a bad track record when it comes to safety the california public utilities commission which regulates the states utilities has found over and over again that pg and e. does not keep good records of its equipment and inspections and without accurate records. They're less likely to identify safety risks. When one of pg needs gas pipelines exploded in san bruno and twenty ten. It killed eight people and destroyed thirty eight homes. There was a visible crack in a line something. Pg inequality control failed to find same story with the campfire that destroyed paradise and killed eighty five people old and poorly maintained. Pg and the equipment was at fault. This is a company that has not had an instinct to put safeguards in place to put in quality assurance programs and other kinds of oversight programs to make sure people are looking for problems and try to identify them overcome them early on through the process for most of its history. Pg has had very little competition. Company policy has been to run the utility as cheaply as possible and use earnings to expand into new types of businesses or pay shareholders. But one never seemed to change. Was the sense that pg and he was a publicly traded competitive company. I anna regulated utility second and think that's part of the psychological trap that's made it difficult for this company to have the instincts necessary to continue to be safe but waste doesn't put all the blame on the company he says regulators are also at fault. The notion was that these big companies carolina about safety in fact. Nobody is likely to care more about safety than the companies themselves and so what the commission wanted to do was to step back and let the company take care of it system and with the understanding that if problems came up well the company would come into report those problems to the regulators. That light touch approach meant the commission made rules and trusted the utilities to implement them do enough checking to make sure safety improvements and inspections. Were actually getting done. I think what we found out now is that that trust that the company will just take care of safety was misplaced and now regulators. I think have a very different approach and very different attitude about overseeing what these companies are doing. has hired more people to inspect the work. Utility say they've done and because of past disasters a federal monitor is also watching. Pg any but there are still signs that pg and e. safety program has problems the two thousand nineteen cade fire was started by a pg knee. Line that the company told regulators was recently inspected and so it raises the question of. How are things getting missed when these are some of the areas where. Pg coming out of the seventeen and eighteen fires is saying the. They're doing the best work that they're doing so there's clearly still a long road ahead for pgn making the system. One hundred percent fire safe may not be possible more. People are moving into fire. Prone areas and climate change has california facing hotter drier summers but pg can at least do what they say. They're already doing better ultimately. We're the ones paying for their mistakes with our money. Our homes and our lives. That was bake curious katrina schwarz. We reached out to pg ni and they chose not to comment on large portions of this story. Big thanks to our newsroom. Colleagues sukey lewis. Maurice resula goes lisa off white and lily jamali just a few of the journalists who regularly cover. Pg any for k. Q. e. d. you can find their indepth reporting about wildfires technology fixes and the company's bankruptcy at cutie dot org slash p g e. We'll put a link in our show notes to thanks also to npr's lauren summer. Who shared her. Sasha on meyer interview with us. The podcast is taking a two week break over the holidays. But we'll be back with a new episode starting january seventh in the meantime. I encourage you to check out our show archive. There's four years worth of great episodes to choose from big. Curious has made in san francisco at member supported k. Q. e. d. I'm olivia on price. hey everybody it's devin katayama host of the bay podcast dropping in to tell you about our limited run series by the beach where you'll learn all about democracy here in the bay area. Everyone has a capacity to organize or social. Change you'll also hear about how black activists transformed voting in oakland. There was a lot of blood sweat and tears that went into like giving us the ability to cast a ballot. And you'll meet some of the young queer candidates of color changing the bay political thing. They came back to where they drew up to make change. Subscribe to the bay. Wherever you listen to podcasts and also sign up for a brand new newsletter at cutie dot org slash the bay newsletter.

Steve weissman Pge katrina schwarz Skinner uc berkeley Uc berkeley electrical enginee Sasha myer california public utilities co uc berkeley public policy Sasha vampire oakland hills Sally swoops earthquakes sierra nevada wall street journal george westinghouse
Data on SAT-Takers Is Up For Sale - By the College Board

WSJ What's News

11:43 min | 2 years ago

Data on SAT-Takers Is Up For Sale - By the College Board

"The Wall Street Journal listeners. Come from all walks of life and business and no matter what type of business urine eighty P is here to help you achieve what you're working looking for with. HR talent time benefits and payroll informed by data and designed for people learn more at design don ADP DOT com key witness in the impeachment probe revises his testimony data on sat tankers tankers is up for sale by the College Board. There's a lot of ads around testing right now. I think the biggest reason is because it correlates so closely with twelve and it's election day. We'll take a look at some ballot measures across the US. It's Tuesday November fifth. This is the PM addition of what's news from the Wall Street Journal Tom. I'm emory for totally in New York. COORDI- insulin the US ambassador to the European Union says he told an aide to Ukraine's president that the US was unlikely to release military aid to the country unless Ukraine committed needed to investigations. President trump was seeking song. Lindh's lawyer had originally said he didn't recall the conversation but on Monday he revised his statement to house. Lawmakers saying in his memory had been refreshed by the testimony of acting. US Ambassador to Ukraine. Bill Taylor Sunlen is the latest witness to describe a reported quid pro quo between nearly four hundred hundred million dollars in aid to Ukraine and investigations into Joe Biden and alleged election interference. Mexico's security minister says the death of nine American American citizens and a highway attack north western. Mexico may have been a case of mistaken identity drug cartel gunmen ambushed a convoy of SUV's carrying the US citizens killing three women and six children. who were part of a breakaway group from the Church of Jesus Christ latter-day Saints? President trump has called for a war on Mexican drug cartels saying the. US is ready and willing to help Mexico. Take them on if the country needs or request assistance. More mayors in California have signed onto a campaign pain to buy out embattled utility. PG and E. The mayors of Oakland Sacramento and more than a dozen other California municipalities or joining San Jose. WHO's Mayor I? I floated the idea last month. The group is asking the California Public Utilities Commission and the Governor to consider the buyout option before approving any bankruptcy reorganization plan Dan. PGA has cited an estimated thirty billion dollars in wildfire liabilities. Utility has also adamantly opposed the sale of any part of it system. Now that saudi-owned oil giant Aramco has officially launched its IPO. The company needs to convince investors. It's worth the risk. Our Ben Dumb. It explains the biggest challenge. Aramco faces is one reaching valuation that aspires to particularly the crown prince of Saudi Arabia. Who wants a two trillion valuation of the company resolved the IPO the same time they have to be able to attract investors investors want high dividend yield is possible possible particularly since? There's a lot of risk. This company carries with it specifically geopolitical risk. There were the tax for example in September on its energy facilities. It's also it's results are also tied to the oil price which can be very volatile. So what investors there's going to be pushing for during this marketing period for the IPO is for Aramco either compromise its position on the valuation nation or start raising that annual dividend expects to pay out over the next four five years. Aramco is considered the world's most profitable company. It's nine nine month. Income exceeded the two thousand eighteen net figure posted by apple which is the world's most profitable publicly traded company. The Wall Street Journal listeners. Come from all walks of life and business and no matter what what type of business you're in eighty P is here to help you achieve what you're working for with. HR talent time benefits and payroll informed by data an designed for people learn more at design don ADP DOT com. It's fall so high school. Juniors are busy Z. prepping for the sat's and seniors are hoping their sat scores are good enough to get them into the college of their choice but they aren't the only ones using that data the college board the charges students to take the sat but they're also making money off of their personal information colleges and universities pay to get data about the sat test takers and according to a Wall Street Journal Report. That's inflating applicant pools at colleges and universities and having a huge impact on the admissions process. Joining me now. With more details details his Wall Street Journal reporter Doug Belkin Dog. You found that the College Board which owns the sat college admissions test is helping to inflate applicant pools at colleges and universities across the country essentially by selling students information. Before we get to why it's doing that. How exactly does this work? So when students take the PSAT or the sat or an A.. P. Exam they fill out a survey they don't have to fill it out but about eighty percent of them do. They're asked whether they want to or not in. The survey has a series of questions about what they want to study in college. They could self report their grades their ethnicity their gender things like that and that information is very useful to the colleges and universities who are trying to market themselves to students to fund more students to apply so the College Board takes that information and essentially packages it in for forty seven cents will sell it to a school that asks for information that fits the description of the student that filled out that survey. Talk Talk a little bit more about why it's valuable for colleges and universities to have high rejection rates the level of prestige of a school is tied very closely to its. It's selectivity you know. The hottest nightclub in town is often the one that that turns away the most people. Some of that psychology exists with schools if if a school only accepts five percent the people who apply then the people who apply and get in must be very good people so people want to join them so it tends to draw more applications and it's it's really a good marketing tool for school so they were keen on watching those numbers. Their selection rate get lower and lower so that they can show to folks that they're more selective and and therefore more prestigious and has all of this benefit. The College Board So College Board is in the business of testing students and what they do with that information. Asian sort of cuts both ways on the one hand. They can help kids who may not otherwise go to school. Find a school that would that interested in them. That's a good fit and that sort of on the plus side on the other side by selling all this information. The schools ended up marketing themselves very broadly generating more applications in one of the consequences. So that is that more kids get rejected. A lot of these kids get Information from the schools. They think they're being recruited and then they get rejected so some of them feel I used by the whole process. Right as you explain in your story this leave students in a pretty tough spot and this also comes as they're growing movements to deemphasize standardized is testing but the sat is still a requirement for most colleges and universities right now there's four thousand accredited for your schools in the country in about a thousand of them have gone test optional. Which means that you don't have to take the sat or the Act as part of your application? You don't submit that so the majority of them do expect a score from from one of those two tests in the sat's the larger of the two. Doug you also reading your piece for the Wall Street Journal that the way this works can can have the practical effect of incentivizing cheaters. Of course we've also been reporting on the wide ranging college admissions cheating scandal. Can you talk a little bit about that. Why this leaves people in a position where they might want to try to cheat the system so because schools are getting larger pools of applications the odds of getting into a lot of schools are getting slimmer the sat and the Act are used by schools to weed out applicants so you need to really hit a pretty solid monarch within the wheelhouse of the school year applying to in order to be considered? If you don't hit that then you're not going to be considered that mark is getting higher and higher for schools. That are becoming more selective. So you know it's not enough maybe to get a twelve hundred if you WANNA get into University of Tocado he needs to get a fifteen fifty or something like that and so this you know incentivizes people to study to take the test multiple times and in some cases to cheat and I'm sure there has been in backlash to this system. What are you hearing from? Student advocate groups. What are the possible solutions? Here are potential solutions. There's a lot of Asda around testing right now. I think the biggest reason is because it correlates so closely was with wealth and that the the student body on college campuses is really shifting acting going from sort of middle and upper class. White folks. Too much more ethnically and racially and socio economically diverse group of people but the act CT In particular reflects the scores essentially wealthy white kids tend to do better so it's being considered a a gatekeeper. That's not fair by different. Civil rights organizations and different colleges in in this is pushing the act the college board to try to figure out ways to make the test of more well rounded one of the things they do is come up with something called Adversity score which essentially tries to wait the score. That kids get to take into account their socioeconomic economic background so that can be taken into account by the college admissions office. That's Wall Street Journal reporter Doug Belkin joining us from Chicago. Thank you so much doug thanks very much for more. Please check out the full story up on our website at WSJ DOT COM and Americans are going to the polls across the country today but in addition to voting for their favourite candidates in state legislative and gubernatorial races. They're they're also weighing in on ballot measures several cities and states regulation of E. Cigarettes is among the hot topics. Our Jennifer Kalvitis explains how San Francisco boaters Sir weighing in voters. Today are considering a proposal. That would personally. I abandoned the San Francisco. Cities Board of supervisors put in place on e cigarette cigarette and vaping products this year. So this proposal would instead put restrictions on retailers like creating a minimum age for for who they can sell his products to and limiting how many devices can sold in one transaction that ballot measure is backed by jewel labs in Washington. Washington residents will vote on whether to recommend that the state maintained its tax on bathing products. New York City voters will decide on four ballot initiatives among them ranked choice voting

Wall Street Journal College Board US Doug Belkin Aramco Ukraine president Mexico New York California reporter trump San Francisco Washington California Public Utilities Co European Union Tom Joe Biden Lindh
Teaching Kids Nutritious Cooking; Who Is Buying Guns Online?

Here & Now

43:25 min | 2 years ago

Teaching Kids Nutritious Cooking; Who Is Buying Guns Online?

"This message comes from here and now's sponsor indeed if you're hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash. NPR PODCAST isn't a danger for this massive fire that could continue to threaten towns along the Highway One oh one corridor north of the bay area that's where firefighters have been making their stands for a couple of days now and today is where the fire is expected to kind of Cornea Public Utilities Commission is a regulator of Electricity Companies Public Utilities in California obviously and they have a tricky worse in northern California where the can cade fire in Sonoma's county has engulfed more than seventy four thousand acres to put that in perspective that's about twice the size oh relative humidity dry fuels high winds you know it's a recipe that the fire is likely to grow then there are these planned kouts which are extensive what's the latest there and are they expected to continue throughout the week. Well it's a little bit mysterious they evacuation orders are in place for some twenty thousand residents as crews get control of the getty fire which ignited yesterday near a major freeway but the situation is wall while they were de energized and so that was taking longer than folks were hoping yesterday when we had this kind of break in high winds and power could get turned back on offshore winds it's not going to be quite as strong as what we saw over last weekend which was hurricane force it at points but just because the wind isn't hurricane force doesn't mean tired of the Sierras also going almost up to the Oregon border you know with the Lashof it was estimated nearly a million people had lost power and had lost power for now the winds are coming back later today and I'm looking at a map of potential power shut offs and it basically starts a little way south of San Francisco goes all one kind of ingredient of red flag warning it can translate to you know an extremely high fire danger other things that could be a part of that are uh-huh while the California Public Utilities Commission announced it's going to launch an investigation into these blackouts tell us more about that the it's it's relatively quick to shut the power down but then they have to inspect all the lines and make sure that no trees blew into them or no other power poles blue we started over the weekend in areas north of San Francisco they were supposed to come back online yesterday but that takes time to relationship with large utilities like pg any that have been to a degree responsible for some major disasters in the state in recent years so talk about what these red flag warnings mean and how severe do they expect the conditions to get you mentioned those high winds year an and I think that the winds are just formation did they share today is about preparing for I think the worst and the worst is coming this afternoon into the night and that's a return of these way up in strength we've also been hearing about these red flag warnings that have been issued for more most of northern California and parts of southern California can you the city of San Francisco for the latest we have with US kick ud reporter Alex Emslie an Alex. This story is developing so quickly we just heard from firefighters today what in almost all the way up the coast to the border with Oregon and then a similar kind of spine a on the interior of the state on the Western all of this spokesman Jonathan Cox said yesterday that it could take weeks if not months to fully extinguish these fires have you been able to talk with those planned for properly you know causing more havoc than they necessarily could that's what I understand regulators are going to look into and PGA is now into this fire in particular there was more warning than maybe some of the previous large fires people who live in these areas for the most part from what I can the CPU needs to do something and there has been some frustration over the power shut offs are they to to widespread are they not impacted and what are they telling you I can tell you that there are some differences in the way that the public and first responders have react saying that up to half a million people could potentially have their power shut off as they continue with the efforts that you mentioned it's really hard to wrap your head around until they heeded evacuation warnings they got out as quickly as they could there was enough time for that to happen and so the number of people displaced I think has gone down a little that was a choice and and that's a small case there wasn't with Andrew Johnson in the nineteen th century so republicans are saying that but well there's nothing in the constitution that requires a vote there was a vote both with presidents Nixon and Clinton that's true that's a tradition but by Republicans wanted to vote but you know they've also been saying Republicans have there's no precedent for not having a vote is there the president but what does holding vote this Thursday allow Democrat Democrats were behind this inquiry to do more than you've been doing well politically it's simply a statement that there is a process they are responding now to this Republican criticism and so firefighters to help on the kincaid fire in north of the bay area in California a massive undertaking absolutely an all the help is needed all and flagged it to NFC lawyers because he didn't think it was proper also today house members are preparing for a vote this Thursday to authorize the impeachment inquiry imagine that's Alex Emslie k. q. e. d. with the latest on the devastating wildfires in California thank you Alex thank you in Washington today Republicans have claimed that House Democrats have been violating precedent and tradition by not holding that vote let's bring in Juliette Eleazar professor of history and public affairs at Princeton Hi Julie elect democratic support behind this will put pressure on those swing district Democrats but what Pelosi can do is show I have the votes of the Dan Hi thanks for having me and it's been widely reported Nancy Pelosi didn't want an impeachment inquiry vote because Democrats in rhetoric districts would then have to go on the record and shows trump asked Ukraine to investigate political rival Joe Biden and the beginning of the Russia investigation Vin men says in his opening statement he was concerned about phone call but it's not based on much of a foundation of the House has incredible attitude in terms of how to conduct this kind of process so no constitutional roadmap in historical one that this is the process it's like a grand jury and they do it so that witnesses can't coordinate their stories is that true well the fact is the Nixon and the the House Democrats impeachment inquiry continues with testimony from the first current White House official to go behind closed doors and questions from both Democrats and Republicans and are we are today compared to pre nineteen seventy four certainly impeachment is a more normal tool of politics and were willing to use that already behind continuing with this and I think that's really important well what about criticisms that the depositions in the inquiry that's already I'm level when when the case presents itself it's still I think very difficult process I don't think policy breath legislators are more comfortable using this and we are in a more partisan era where partisan politics is fiercer that we might see this again in in but but this is totally not only within constitutional rules but also within tradition and we should say also that both Republicans and it gives the Party some cover from this argument that they're just all over the place and they're handling the process in the way they they want it also is a way to the near future but but I still I still think politicians don't WANNA get into this too quickly in a minute we have just a little more on that history because it sounds like you were saying that Clinton impeachment had closed door proceedings as the judiciary in both cases didn't do everything in front of the public so that simply goes against this message comes from NPR sponsor mind body mind body really doesn't mean it's not meant to be used it was put in there for a reason and many think we face that right now I remember Alexander Hamilton's words it's too key this almost wasn't meant to be as big a deal as it has become it was kind of a wait attack the ship attack the sale not only the record but what many Republicans who are currently in Congress were fine with back when Clinton was president so there will be a public inquiry in the next stage it period in history you mentioned Nixon and Clinton you're not going back that far is is this the impeachment period in American history well if we compare where else on the ship it's a last resort it's when we have a situation where we can't just wait for the next election and we wanted to and Democrats have had the same amount of time we understand fifty percent each to question the witnesses behind those closed doors you know what do you what do you think in General Julian about this did it's down to around one hundred and fifty thousand people close to two two hundred thousand could go up again people tentatively being let back into their homes and that could change and shear millions of private gun transactions are completed with no background check requirement and there's almost no data on how often those guns end up in the wrong hands nations are eager to jump into this even in this case Speaker Pelosi really really hesitated but but it is a the fear is that it access to the largest consumer wellness network and marketplace they you know have been going on have been closed door you know we saw the Republicans Barge in Democrats say that there will be public hearings with the same witnesses down the road Alexander Bandmann top Ukraine expert at the National Security Council listened in on President Trump's July twenty fifth phone call with Ukrainian president during which transfer unquote and pay all in one place owners can join the network at mind body online dot COM SLASH NPR mind body next millions to the widest variety of local fitness classes and they offer the same experience when it comes to massage and acupuncture spas and salons fine event the country from suffering under presidential corruption or an abusive presidential power but just because it's not meant to be used very free above and beyond his legal obligation because when it comes to private sales federal law says you cannot knowingly sell a gun to someone who's prohibited from having millions of gun transactions take place without a background check every year Duke University economist Phil Cook has studied how guns make their way from the legal market to the it could be you know told to evacuate again if these wins do you know the worst case scenario and it has been majorly impactful to the here this is a sig p. to nine e- to model it's a with a call a double action single action which means John Corners from being in our affairs doing seltzer of Princeton thank you so much thanks for having and a story now about how people sell their guns twenty one states and the District of Columbia require background checks on at least some private gun sales still so at that point you know I'm not going to sell him anything again pander could have sold the gun without asking questions that would not have been breaking the law researchers background checks and the answer unfortunately is no deb Israel directs research at the Harvard Injury Control Research Center but it's also reasonable to suspect that one up in a safe at home but sometimes the safe fills up so it all comes on the space and yes sometimes you want to fund the next purchase so when he's got his eye on a new gun criminal world what we know about is quite a bit about where offenders get their guns and also we can find arms and from anonymous surveys gun owners and convicted offenders but there's little data on the exchanges that might happen between a legal purchase and an arrest could this region California and I feel like also you know the whole state and I might say surrounding states I I heard yesterday that ten states in the West had sent a but some private sellers do try to be careful about who they sell to from Georgia W. A. B. C.'s Lisa Hagen reports so this lead the pistol if it existed they argue the government could come take people's guns away Georgia where John Pander lives is one of twenty nine states which don't require background checks or gun permits and I finally got the email and he says well I'm trying to buy a gun from my girlfriend you know can we meet at eleven o'clock at this place and I read flag seven hundred and fifty dollars he usually buys his guns new from a licensed dealer and pander is a model responsible gun owner he keeps them locked a public place mostly Walmart parking lots are good some people say the police stations are sheriff officers already in place due transaction recently it was late in the evening the majority of people using sites like arms list but she doesn't think they're a group we should ignore many gun rights advocates don't want a system that would record all private transfers or bond with a parent or maybe put on their best freely Sunday dress as their dad takes them down to the field where they patiently wait to finally meet the loves world series matched game six is set for eight PM East Coast time tonight the Washington nationals trying to climb back after losing three straight to the Houston Astros the series me as late at night pander asked the guy if he has a Georgia weapons license which would mean he's passed a background check in the past five years and by asking that he's going he puts an old one up for sale online uses arms list which is like a craigslist for guns he sold about five guns over the last decade this way no problems I always meet a rare indeed to say that they made the transaction to the Internet so do we know who does by their guns this way and whether or not they could pass not something about the purse transaction that that gun was involved in that information comes from trace data from the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms of their life Mickey Mantle and Roger Marris wait that was me of foggy memory but best game ever Eric Gray has collected and Lisa story comes to us from the public media project guns in America that is hitting the left Centerfield back is now at three two what a nail biter but will tonight also be for someone the best game ever meaning maybe they'll meet their future mate eighteen sixty one the Indians hosting Cleveland Hebrew schools day the Indians only Jewish player Barry Latman is pitching and Shaolin Greens. Rabbi you're done Alvarez give the lineup for the Astros and he goes deep sound one turns out the guy doesn't have a license so pander says what about meeting at a federally licensed dealer to run a background check costs about twenty five dollars the guy doesn't WanNa do that there's so many very emotional stories here one about the ball dude it's his job together fell balls this is Gary Froehlich Stockton California she had down syndrome and he gave her the ball and he said he'd never seen anybody reacted so much excitement and she goes back to her parents and her mom and her grandma crying her father the game although they amuse themselves by running up and down the stairs and I would periodic look at Rachel. Her eyes were transfixed on the field if she adjusting the Mona Lisa for the bills and concert right there at candlestick Park twenty-six years I think to the day after and since she's been fifteen she's worked and guest services for the giants he's that you go to a private seller and get a gun without a background check is because you think you couldn't pass a background check as Israel believes prohibited buyers are probably not one time he really wanted to get a ball that he could give to a young woman he saw in the stands new finally got a ball emotion down as she was coming down he realized that she doc has surveyed inmates in Chicago prisons almost all say they got their guns through friends family their social connections is very got in he realized that Games were in color not black and white as a little kid he'd only seen them on TV here's an entry from Sheldon Green in Cleveland Ohio it was offers a retired guy in his fifties who's pretty into guns we're in a parking lot in Fayetteville Georgia outside a competitive shooting matches headed into how much we are trying to sell this for or it's possible he kept looking for another pistol and someone willing to sell it to him in a parking lot late at night for here and now on Lisa Hagen chance to relive the story I always eliminate that from the story 'cause it's not about me but I want to keep that in this in Sean story because they come up to me sometimes with glazed is I had no idea the stories most of all make you remember the number of times people have said you have made me think about these stories from my child during an well it's such a fun thing when you page through I mean there's Lou Harris from San Mateo California his game at Wrigley Field in one thousand nine hundred eighty three when he I think there's something about baseball that really conveys that generation to generation thing I liked basketball I'm not a big football fan is pointing at him and saying you're the man and the essence of Gary Story was they think I did so much for them I was just doing my job what they did for me I can't be measured and wanted to say your thanking me are you kidding me thank you for giving me the chance to not only hear that story but to share it with people think it is you know a guy who kept the rapper almond him over and blessed him I mean that meant a lot to moment what about you you know you have a story about taking your kids to their first game correct I came out to San Francisco best game ever stories from around the world actually his book is called basis to bleachers. He joins us from Kikuchi D. in San Francisco Eric Hi rubbing Boorda plus in my conscious by the guy just sold that gun too so I want don't want to be any part of that that guy who tried to buy his gun he's not panders problem anymore from NPR and Wbz I'm Robin Young I'm Tanya Moseley it's here and now and in California at least sixteen fires are raging in Los Angeles title five hundredth home run at Colfax no hitter but when the stories kept coming in I realized that there was something far greater than this play of game event and he's not comfortable supporting the idea of universal background checks but he tries to be careful anyway here's why what happens if he would use that in a crime you know with that guilt but I can sit and tell you a million stories of my time at at a at a basketball game there's something about baseball you know something just enchanting about the national pastime I arion I are now friends you have been traveling the country with your book and talking to people how do people respond this book originally was going to be about famous games Mickey Hood and they're not all happy someone that I know from upstate Washington is named Sean he tells me the story about going to game with his son the son that a few years ago that how important baseball was to the Japanese American community and I have a story from a woman japanese-american woman who played baseball in the interment camps and seventeen years old and they talked about girls and what his son Joe would be like as a father and he's growing up and I let them have a sip of beer and he made believe he'd never tasted before they laughed and he said that was the last game I ever went to with my son before he enlisted in the Marines went Afghanistan and in fact it was the last time he ever aw son because his son he was killed in Afghanistan and whenever somebody writes in their emails to me and most of the stories have been collected by email they say thank you forgive me Gulf Rachel was eight and David was four Min Rachel brought an entire library with her because she knew how board she would be and by the third inning so David and his friend were completely done a cupcake because if the cupcake was given out at a game for some strange reason he kept the wrapper for years what do you what do you think it is about baseball that people have these you know how that helped normalize to the degree that that can be normalized right their lives I got a story from a woman who was in the Baseball League that a League of their own is based on and you know I'm just so incredibly lucky to have these amazing stories I know you continuing to collect stories I'm trying to tell you one last shoot dot com eric thanks so much thank you this message comes from should be foot Philip Morris and the company is worth over thirty billion dollars so a lot at stake there but you know there was new users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast terms conditions and quality standards apply the model that was You so the FDI criticize FDA criticized Jill after it said that it had nothing to do with young people smoking jewel the e cigarette maker rode the wave of vaping popularity it's also been blamed for an increase in vaping among teens the FTC and beat rumor throughout the stadium that Bill Rodgers Boston's own was going to win the Boston Marathon. I gotta go I'M GONNA ditch this game and I started running the job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates and when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsored jobs it was marketing to young people so jewel then in September of this year named brand new CEO and they said we're not selling any more flavored it's the finish line and I heard this noise behind me kind of crackling on the ground and I turn around and it was red sox pitcher billy in full uniform ars sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring you don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed this year the spring in Olneyville she msnbc anchor economics correspondent Hi Allie so a company that went from hiring three hundred employees a month these are using e cigarettes but the use of e cigarettes amongst young people skyrocketed about seventy eight percent so when you think about cigarettes that was what the big cigarette settlement was about figured out that this is the hottest craze has vaping but in April there was an investigation by the Food and Drug Administration about underage sales of this is that we're spiking so all of that has led to where we are right now it is notable that thirty five percent of the companies owned by the tobacco giant altria liberal state attorneys general are investigating the company's marketing practices as health concerns rise well now jewel is announcing it will lay off about five hundred employees by the these vaping products the FDA sent a letter to jewel requesting some documents that would have been the beginning of seeing that there was a problem and then there was a ban on flavored e cigarettes in September that's been pulled back a little bit of the ban on flavors have been pulled back the FDA the CDC had worn people not to use these vaping devices because of some illness including cleats running behind me to the Elliott Lounge to see his friend Bill Rodgers Cross I said what are you doing he says I'm following you let's go look if there was a point when Joel was looking to ramp up marketing overseas to make up for lower sales in the US I mean it's shades of the tobacco industry exactly this is exactly -allowing are laying off maybe ten fifteen percent of its workforce I surprise well not after September this was going to be a banner year for jewel a company that's workers available so hiring does tend to slow down the market is still strong and we're still looking to see what the longer term trend and unemployment is we have seen less hiring in the past few months it's not about the bootleg thc cannabis related which is what caused which is what is thought to have caused a lot of those illnesses so yes that's correct and you know these e cigarettes were gonna just use tobacco flavor but the bottom line is that is hurting their bottom line in terms of sales so that's why they're concentrating on looking overseas and we want to be really clear Jewish under several federal investigations but it's related to weather as you've been saying improperly targeted teens always flavored easy the centers for Disease Control has said don't use these things to vape thc so the the totally disconnected things the investigation into jewel is that hiring is soft yeah hiring is soft we have had relatively low unemployment consistently but that actually happens when you've got such low employment because you've got so many you fewer teaches kids regardless of income how to cook nutritious affordable meals and the Greater Cincinnati area any welcome to here now thank you thanks for having me Yeah so you've been working over the past year to provide nutrition education for Young Children Through your nonprofit new leaf kitchen tell us more about your community country struggling the most with childhood obesity with forty two percent of kids ages five to nineteen being overweight some say one glaring reason why is the lack of nutrition education for an on the ground look at a community trying to find solutions were joined by any street martyr founder of newly kitchen a nonprofit the family yeah send your stories to us adhere now dot Org Eric Gray again. The book is basis to bleachers collection of personal baseball stories from the stands M. beyond ability with our child safe tools and allergy accommodations how to prepare simple easy many times raw and Vegan food over weight and in some cases they're both the finding comes from the agency's Twenty nineteen report on the state of the world's children in that report the US is among the this than we did let's say a year ago so we're going to be watching this very closely to see whether it is a signal of an economic slowdown or just a signal the fact that we've got very low unemployment Albert thanks as always you'd that they can access easily and that doesn't cost a fortune so we're trying to teach this from the rooftop and hopefully the children will then bring those well for instance people have talked about cost being a huge barrier we try to teach buying in bulk buying dried frozen cooking program so our cooking and food education programs right now are mobile and we go into any space or setting and teach any aid shire's I can imagine though that can be a challenge because many low income families often don't have the time they may have multiple jobs it really doesn't allow them to cook all the time there's the cost of health food how are you helping these students navigate what are real barriers UNICEF recently shared what it calls a shocking statistic around the world one in three children under five is either undernourished ideas and passions and recipe card home and then changed what the parents are spending and buying from the grocery store and what we're demanding from the vendors and food manufacture so the planning the prioritizing and the ability to be patient to realize the impact might not come instantly food to people and preaching I've just decided to find a solution and the solution is to make healthy eating ositive take me into one of your kitchens you talk about sparking that love and passion for cooking what kinds of foods do you cook with the kids might be a luxury item perception for some but it's not it's an affordable item that adds a ton of nutrients about marketing to and it's it's we see it's hitting the companies at least its employees we're GonNa be like Oh and just in the minute we have we've got the Friday jobs to look forward to and we're hearing not a nutritionist or a pediatrician how has your professional background though inspired this effort so I have a psychology degree I've worked with many I am so that instead of sitting and watching twenty thirty minutes of TV use that twenty thirty minutes to prepare pasta for the entire week of dinners rush instead of Mac and cheese will bring in the whole squash and let them actually explore the seeds and get hands on with the seeds quences far outweigh in terms of cost way if you if you eat unhealthy than versus if you eat healthy yeah I'm really interested to know your Dan Oliver Information is age appropriate so we tried to include fun facts about how ninety percent of cucumbers water or on my own which has been really eye-opening and sparked a lot of passions and instead of being judgmental or resentful or demonizing but the impact will come later and if you don't have the time to eat healthy now are you going to have the time to be sick and take off work later just the concept we have measures so they're mashing the squad shop we have juicers for them so they're juicing the lemon juice and then we're using nutritional yeast which when Ralph forms of things versus processed already made organic foods is more cost effective prioritizing your that might have seemed unaccessible to them but we tell them where to source it from and how it grows and what it can do for their bodies so we you know they're in vegetarian meals that is shelf stable item so will last for a long time and you just need a little bit we'll go a long way so we teach them about new foods like that interest in these new foods and their excitement to try what they made really encourages us to keep on going the different capacities with children and families. I have always been a Vegan so I've had to study into a lot of research tell them about how different foods grow and bring in the whole plant so they can see and feel the roots of the plant if we're doing for instance mackin squad cheesecloth and they loved squeezing that through and they drank this creamy delicious plant based beverage that they all were so excited about and this is was to blend up water and oats and a couple of raisins and a little bit cinnamon blended up and strain through you could do a strain or food yeah this all sounds so lovely how would you recommend that other communities replicate your efforts it's not cheap I can imagine to have this kind of program no it's definitely not cheap we definitely have relied a lot on individual contributions that we've gotten a couple of big grants from of telling people you need to go buy plant based milk because that's expensive so we made granola balls and then we show them another way to use these inexpensive oats of policy I tend to shy away from wanting to change policy to taxes on sugary foods or I'm reading here some are as young as eighteen months old oh yeah we start young they are never too young to start cooking all of our tools our child safe we're definitely hearing that that kids are are taking what we're making in class and and bring it home and and we made oat milk instead force people to eat certain foods instead I would rather maybe give incentives definitely for grocery stores to buy local but if the consumer is not Obrero program in Cincinnati and I got an email from apparent later saying that ever since then oats have been on their grocery list and that they have made granola balls and open I foundation out of Pittsburgh and connect Clermont grant we've relied on some met local fundraising efforts and are paid programming from what would be your call to action for policy makers to help be able to make this beyond a community effort but something larger to access whenever they need it this on an individual level on a community level this is working for you all but what would you recommend them how to make applesauce we tell them that with that juice strained from steaming the apples you can make an apple beverage and with those deals that we made we made apple because then their fridge ever since that's the kind of impact that we wanna have you know when I was in third grade I remember someone brought an egg plant in an artichoke hour cooking programmes and cooking clubs and preschools and elementary schools has given us some funding to be able to continue to write grants and look at the bigger picture having me on and we'd love to hear your thoughts at here now dot org en- showed us how to cook it and I never forgot that you know one more thing is that we want to be able to utilize the whole plant so we don't just stop at showing in apple chips and with any other scraps that we had leftover we told them about composting and how in the appropriate would be fed to our chickens which then produce more are to be able to put these lesson plans and these developed recipes up on the Internet to reach more schools and to be up on the on the web for people yes we hope that policymakers are like minded people and we can change their minds as well to be more mindful thinkers when it comes to policies but but this time they might vote yes after the leader of the opposition Labor Party said he'd support it it's the latest attempt by UK politicians to come to some conclusion in London today the British parliament is voting again on whether to hold a general election in early December they voted yesterday finding that product off the shelf the grocery store is not going to continue to shelve it so we are trying to take a different approach to allow the consumer she is founder of new leaf kitchen a mobile community cooking nonprofit for kids in the Greater Cincinnati area any thank you so much thank you so much join because we hear things like identity but Noah carrot grew in the ground or you know I've never tried it tomato before and I love tomatoes now

San Francisco California Oregon NPR Cornea Public Utilities Commis Electricity Companies Public U baseball California Public Utilities Co getty Sonoma US candlestick Park reporter Alex Emslie Cleveland Jonathan Cox Chicago Alvarez Ohio
Los Angeles Times 2/9/21

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

04:00 min | 7 months ago

Los Angeles Times 2/9/21

"It's tuesday february ninth. I'm mary regalado. And here's your local news from the los angeles times brought to you by state farm like a good neighbor state. Farm is there. Today will be mostly cloudy with a high of sixty four and a low tonight of fifty our top story black latino and native american seniors in los angeles county receiving covid nineteen vaccinations at a lower rate than white asian american and pacific islander seniors. The data released yesterday raised new concerns about inequity in the troubled rollout of vaccines for those sixty five and older in all just seven percent of black seniors have received at least one dose. That's less than half the comparable number for white seniors about nine percent of native american seniors and fourteen percent of latino seniors have also received at least one dose public health director. Barbara ferrer said the county is committed to increasing the number of vaccination sites in the hardest hit areas in other health news hospitals across the. Us are reporting dramatic increases in alcohol related admissions for critical diseases like alcoholic hepatitis. And liver failure. The pandemic has sent thousands of recovering alcoholics into relapse but even before covid nineteen alcoholism related liver. Disease was a growing problem in the country. Fifteen million people have been diagnosed with the condition and over the last decade hospitalizations have doubled. Dr brian lee a transplant hepatitis. To who treats alec liver disease says missions for the disease at us's keck hospital were up thirty percent in twenty twenty compared with two thousand nineteen. Meanwhile california's largest utilities. Say they will spend about thirteen billion dollars to reduce the risk of wildfires after several were blamed on their equipment pacific gas and electric southern california. Edison san diego gas and electric and some smaller utilities filed plans with the california public utilities commission. The commission will have to approve them. Pg and e. With more than five point five million customers in the state has proposed a plan that will include a new computerized risk model that will help pinpoint the areas most prone to wildfires the utility will also focus on safety work in business news disney california adventure park is planning to hold a food and beverage festival in march disney also announced it would recall about one thousand employees who were laid off or furloughed. An additional three hundred fifty. Staffers have already returned to work. With the recent reopening of eateries and stores in downtown disney disneyland disney california adventure closed last march and state restrictions still prohibit theme parks from operating attractions disneyland executives and others have pressured. Governor gavin newsom to create protocols that would let the parks reopened soon but newsom has held firm on guidelines that tie reopening to corona virus infection rates and case numbers and finally catalina island is reopening just in time for valentine's day it has been largely closed to visitors through months of pandemic restrictions but the catalina express which had to cut back. Its ferry service will return to its full range of trips on friday varies will operate at reduced the pasadena however and require face masks in the meantime two dozen restaurants will be open in avalon for outdoor dining or takeaway meals by friday hotels vacation rentals and campgrounds are also reopening while many tours and activities. It will resume this week for these stories and more visit l. a. times dot com. You don't need to break the latest story to get great rates on your car insurance with state farm you could get surprisingly great rates just for being you know inside scoop required state farm offers coverage that meets your needs at a price. That's easy on your budget. And that's news worth sharing my good neighbor. State farm is there.

mary regalado Barbara ferrer Dr brian lee transplant hepatitis alec liver keck hospital alcoholic hepatitis los angeles times los angeles county disney california adventure pa california disney disneyland disney california public utilities co Us san diego
California Wildfires: What Will It Take to Prevent the Next Disaster?

Knowledge@Wharton

28:47 min | 3 years ago

California Wildfires: What Will It Take to Prevent the Next Disaster?

"Podcast is brought to you by knowledge award. Well, wildfires are raging in both the northern and southern parts of California right now, most of the city of paradise California in the northern part of the state was destroyed by the so-called campfire at least twenty nine people have died and more than two hundred people are missing from that one the Wolsey fire in southern California's destroyed mansions in Malibu as well as suburban areas killing at least to the wildfires. Have led to red flag warnings being posted from the Oregon line all the way down to San Diego, meaning conditions are right for further. Fires California, of course, has been dealing with deadly and destructive wildfires for many years now in part due to the drought that the state has been dealing with for some time. Howard Reuther is professor of decision sciences and policy as well as co director of the risk management and decision processes center here at the warden school. He joins us on the phone as this kief Gillis. Sue is a professor in Dina Barra's of the college of. Natural resources at the university of California at Berkeley, Howard key. Thank you for your time today. Both of you. So key foot start with you. And if you can I guess give us a little bit of a status report on these two fires, and what we are looking at in terms of of the damage in the and the the impact on a lot of these communities. Well, the status they're still both very active incidents and while fire services making some headway on control on both fires, especially the the campfire Darryl long way from being under control Howard. What has been your reaction to everything that we've seen here in the last in the last few days? Well, I think that this raises so many issues in terms of how we can reduce the consequences of these wildfires. It's just another example that obviously California is struggling with us Keith undoubtedly knows better than I do. And we need to figure out ways that we can really take steps we meeting the state of California ensures and utilities and others who are all involved. And obviously the residents of the area to reduce these losses in the future. And this just highlights that point key. You. Probably know that as much as anybody being out there in California. What basically is the status of that type of relationship with all the different entities out there in California. It's a very active one. You know, we're we're doing the obvious things you might think in fire prone area. Cal fire is making big investments in increasing its air fleet. For instance, they're picking up a lot of military C one thirty aircraft to uses suppression drops and they're also upgrading their helicopter fleet. But there's a lot of the stuff that's before suppression that we're actively pushing the fire wise USA program where the third largest number of communities engaged in that program of the national fire protection association in the country. Colorado's number one for same reasons that we care about this in California. We're rapidly investing in personnel and procedures to certify the safety elements for all the cities and counties. We have both staff. Half at the state board of forestry and fire protection, which I chair and a large number of pre-fire engineers working at Cal fire that are going through county by county city by city and looking at their compliance with the public regulatory code on all these things in terms of their road networks cited access to water. You know, we know the things that you have to work on and and we're working on that a lot of investment in the science of stoning hazards across the state and using those to come back and say how how nuanced should the local protection measures be and we're we're doing about a quarter of a million defensible. Inspections across the state now with money that's come out of the state. So that we can actually look at all the properties in the state responsibility area on something like the cycle that homeowner would need to be maintaining vegetation around their home in order to increase the fire resilience of property. You mentioned we're we're working on it. You mentioned the the inspections which I find is is an interesting piece to us. I if you can for everybody listening around the country, explain what that process is. And how frequently it is actually going on right now out in California to look at these properties. And look exactly what he's either contributing or not contributing to a potential wildfire. Right. I think at this point we have the personnel in the funding to where we're looking at homes in these areas that are fire prone on a three to five year cycle. And you know, you go out there, you're looking at the vegetation management. Hundred feet of the property, and you're with variety things that you want to look at you know, how much fuel is on the ground. Are you managing the tree? So that you've got a little separation between the canopies is there any overhang on the roofs. But also looking at what can you do to harden the structure, there's some things like would Rouf's which are a real risk factor. You know, we're in many of these areas if you're going to replace the roof at the end of his life, it's not going to necessarily be with what was there before? And then other things like closing boxing in the eaves moving firewood away from the home. There's there's a lot of things you can do to both manage the fuel around the home, but also hardened the home. So that it's consort of passively resist ignitions, and that's really important these wind driven fires because they're throwing embers which can ignite a roof half-mile ra- mile in advance. Chance of the fi the flaming front of the fire. When you've got a fifty sixty mile an hour wind it can really toss those those firebrands so Howard. It sounds like there's an element of innovation here that that's included in this as well. Because of the fact that we are also trying to adapt the homes that are in these areas to better be able to deal with the the level of fire that we're now seeing which is obviously more frequent the majority of the bigger storms have occurred in the last or should say wildfires have occurred in the last decade or so, well, no there's no question. I think that what Keith is indicating is a way to go in the sense of recognizing that these homes have to be better as on the rue certainly can be better. They could be fireproof where they may not be today. They're awa-. There's vegetation that could be possibly dealt with in a way to reduce the likelihood of the spread of fire. But here's the real challenge of the challenge. I think is how do you get homeowners to do this? And one of the reasons that it's a challenge is that a homeowner could say, look, I may do all of these things. But then there's going to be a fire from my neighbor that is going to spread to my house, and I'm still going to be in in trouble afterwards. So it isn't just myself that's affected, but it's all these others around the interdependency and interconnectedness of wildfires makes it really hard. And so I think we are we have to ask the question is it important to have a better building code in these areas regulations. The inspections are going to be critical as a part of that to make sure that homeowners have done that you also could have the state or some source giving loans low interest loans or possibly supporting even grants to help the homeowners do that. But at the end of the day, it isn't just the homeowners. It is other other parts of you know, that in fact, the the notion of development in areas, so there's less forest and more vegetation. And how do you clean that up? So. Oh, it's a challenge. I think that has to be looked at not only as I said from how from the residents, but also the utilities will have to play a role here and the insurance play a role in terms of cleaning things up and making things the more or less likely to spread from one area to another Howard. Joining us on the phone. He is with the Wharton school, Keith Gillis. Also with us from the university of California, Berkeley, you're listening to knowledge a near on Sirius XM one thirty two business radio powered by the school. So how'd you mentioned the insurance industry? And I find it interesting that this is something that obviously is is tacking on hundreds of millions of dollars of cost onto the insurance industry every year at this point. And they are in what you have told me in the past. They are the ones that end up paying out the cost of this. Because of the fact that these are like fires like any fire. A homeowner would have to deal with whether it would be something that occurred in the oven that you know, that spurred a fire. Are of some kind. Well, it is certainly true as you said, Dan that homeowners policies if you have a an insurance policy as most homeowners do if they have a mortgage will cover fire from any source in wildfires or part of that. Here's a challenge, I think not only for the insurance industry, but for the utilities as well. The insurance will have to pay for the losses to the houses that they've insured not necessarily to any other house, but certainly to their to their residents, but they may also then find themselves in a position where they feel maybe they shouldn't be paying that. And they have the opportunity to use a technical term to subrogate to say we're going to ask the utilities to pay for this because they may be the cause of the fire in the first place. And so there's a very interesting challenge here between insurers and utilities in terms of who should be paying at the end of the day. California has. A law and Keith can comment on this as well on inverse condemnation that says it if if you can show that the utilize have caused the fire then then they may be the ones who have to be responsible for paying at the end of the day. And that is an interesting issue, and I'll just raise one last point on that the utilities may still have to pay even if they followed all the regulations and standards. But let's say a tree is blown down and destroys power line. The has been meant meeting all these standards may still be responsible in California because of this law. So there are some interesting issues a warden center spending some time looking at them, but I'll just put them on the table for Keats possibly comment or you may wanna pursue this in some other direction. I mean, if memory serves me last year, one of the fires that occurred out in California. There was a question of whether or not that was the responsibility of utility. Because from what I understand did not start with a power line. Correct. Actually utilities have been the cause of a number of large. Fires and a fair number of the ones we had in our firestorm last year. Trace back to utilities, I think the. The interesting thing about our inverse condemnation, which is an unusual procedure as Howard says, even if you're in compliance with the directives on vegetation clearance that come out from the California Public utilities commission or from the board of forestry and fire protection. If afire results from not a failure on your part to follow regulations in terms of safety. But simply your Queant is involved a ninety mile an hour. Wind takes a huge branch. Throws it into a power line starts fire. You have the right clearance. You've been doing your job. But the untilities was still the source of the ignition that, you are liable and that create something which I I'm sure we'll be adjudicated over years in terms of what the liability to the utilities will be our legis. Slater took this issue up. But didn't reach really a final decision as to whether or not the existing law should be modified significantly or not. It's it's a big issue. And I I'm not sure that ratepayers fully understand under a regulated utility what the implications of that liability could be for them. We're joined here on the phone by Keith Gillis to the university of California Berkeley, along with Howard con Reuther of the Wharton school your comments at eight four four Warton eight four four nine four two seven eight six or if he can't get your phone. You can send us a comment on Twitter app is radio one thirty two or my Twitter account, which is at Dan looney Twenty-one how much Howard do the citizens themselves have to be aware of what is going on right now and be able to potentially factor into the to the to the to fixing some of these problems out there. Well, I think this is of course, a really challenging question. Because I think most times of people don't want to think about something like a wildfire. I think today they're thinking a lot more about them. Because of just exactly what's happening in California. I think the other part of it is something that cases mentioned in his earlier comments. What can they do to reduce that risk? And will they do it? And so there's a real challenge, I think first of all and making them aware. But I think that really it's also a community problem. I think that to some extent building codes are local and communities can try to take some steps if the community plays a role by letting all the homeowners know, how how integrate you know, how interconnected all of this is and what each of them can do and possibly can help them along and possibly through some regulations and standards can require them to do it. It's a really challenging issue when people have to shell out money. To try to make their house safer at are asking themselves is that money really doing the trick. Because they know that it could the fire could spread for elsewhere. And so I think that it does require the state to play a more creative role local communities play a role, and obviously bring the citizens in the homeowners into the picture. So that's, but I don't think it's easy. And I think a case you probably know this better certainly than I do in living in California to get people to be aware. And then to get them to do the things we'd like them to do and to get the state to do what it has to do. Yeah. It's it's a it's a really interesting problem where there's homeowner action. Unlike a lot of other natural hazards, we've been hitting so many fires in California that people's reaction now to wildfire is a risk is a little different than someone that might live in a flood plain or might live in an area. That's a fault line where earthquakes, you know, may happen. That are significant on a fifty to one hundred year cycle your experiences and individual with a natural hazard, really conditions. Your thought process in the actions that you're willing to take to deal with it. And at times the right way to get the decision making in along the lines that's useful for us as a society as a whole there's a high level sort of policy that would have to be put in saying, well, exactly how much of a feedback loop. Are we going to look for between insurers with respect to this risk and the actions that might be taken by communities, or by individuals, which are slightly different communities can do some things. Individuals can do some things which would mitigate the risk and how. We get some incentives built in. It's not currently the case that there's a strong feedback loop between mitigation actions and the insured risk. There's also some nuances that you know, are being worked out we saw this in the Thomas fires last year. What about a mudslide that happens later because you've scorch the soil put it into a hydrophobic condition. And then you get a really intense rainfall event just right after the fire when the soil is absolutely unable to allow the water to percolate in. And then you get the classic mud flow. Is that covered under your homeowners insurance? Which would normally exclude things like a landslide. And there's been some findings by the department of insurance out here that if. Yeah, you know, if the fire was the proximate cause that's going to have to be covered. And so we're sort of stumbling our way. Through establishing what the social policies are going to be to both deal with the risk, but get people to deal with the risk as individuals, not expect the state. Yeah. Who handle the whole affair, and Dan if I could make one just quick point here, and then we'll get back to you. I I do think that one of the key points that you raised keys in in your comments about the homeowners is that if you haven't experienced an event, you're going to be you're going to have a harder time sort of taking steps to prepare for it and invest in it and wildfires may be a bit different. Because so much of California is now hurt hit by that. And so there is experienced by curiously with what other people have done we'll have to find that out. But then the other issue is knowing what to do and figuring out whether it's worth you're doing it. And those things are also on the table. So I think the challenge of getting anyone to prepare beforehand is something that is. A real real issue here. And as you pointed out with other natural disasters even worse because you haven't experienced the earthquake since nineteen ninety four and California and and floods and hurricanes have a similar problem. Although they be a lot more frequent now than they were in the past. You mentioned before the zoning part of this. And I wanted to touch on that anyway, is that the demographic of where people are living in some areas of California has changed a good bit in the last decade decade Naff in that you have more people that may be traditionally in the suburbs looking to be a little bit even farther out to have that that kind of that forest location that house in that style maybe more so than you did a couple of decades ago. Correct. And that would obviously play into part of the part of what we're talking about with people recognizing what's going on here. Absolutely. And the town of paradise which is. Is what you've been seeing the most images of with respect to the campfire is a perfect example of that that communities grown dramatically both as a result of commuters looking for more affordable housing. So we're working living farther and farther from some of the urban centers where we work, but it's also grown tremendously because of retirees and in fact, retirees moving into these areas as one of the big economic drivers of the local economy, you know, you bring wealth and pension assets that were accumulated working urban areas in your move up here, but we've had tremendous movement and to areas of the creating more and more of this wildland urban interface, and that growth is actually projected to continue and people move up there, you know, both economic reasons, but also quality of life. How much conversation is going on. Right now when you talk about all of these different kind of pieces to the puzzle to really start to to dig deeper into it. And I wanna throw on top of that a lot of people have conversation about the issue of the climate and the impact that the change in the climate over the last decade or two has had in maybe developing some of these these problems where forest fires wildfires are concerned. Yeah. There's no doubt that the scientific consensus on climate change is moving people to take action. And you hear that come up repeatedly governor Brown set up a forest task force management task force in the last months of his administration. That's very actively trying to work on these issues, and I expect that will continue into the new administration. So people are thinking how do we deal with this not just as an issue a fire? But but these changes. In the driver's afire like climate change, the zoning there's a great deal going on there in terms of well, if particular areas have different kinds of education, you want one size doesn't fit all a forest community isn't the same as a coastal shrub community. So if you're down there by where the Thomas fire was and you're in an area that had naturally long fire return into voles, some kind of education management might look different than up in the Sierra where the natural fire return interval was say seven to twelve years, and the really big question for me is whether or not we're going to map out some of the fire courters, which are function of topography and Santa Anna winds. So there are some areas where when we have the kinds of conditions that are running in cali-. Right now where you've got these hot dry winds late in the fire season where the fire behavior doesn't sit down at night the way you would during ordinary weather without the wind. And sometimes those wins, the topography channels them into certain areas and you're saying all right. If we've had the part of Santa Rosa, burn in the tons fire burnt twice very hot because of similar wind-driven events channel by the topography into a certain area. We may need some very special building codes right for an area like that. Well, and California's estate that is so dependent in terms of the the water in the moisture, it has in the soil in the ground from what you get through the winter up in the mountains with the snow, and and the rain is well, and that obviously those amounts have come down in recent years as well they've come down and. The seasons where the the rains don't start say in November December are really quite problematic. And we saw that so pointedly last year with the Thomas fire burning past the the New Year's and in the past, you know, we had defined fire season here. And the the weather is it's not just hotter and drier, it's also that the start of what brains we will get and we will get rains and any Mediterranean climate. The start of the rain has become a seemingly more variable. So we so it's it's we've already dramatically changed the staffing pattern right for fire service agencies over the last five years because of that we're joined here on the phone by Keith Gillis of the university of California Berkeley, along with Howard con Reuther of the Wharton school your comments at eight four four Wharton eight four four nine four. Two seven eight six six Howard. How how confident are you that that there are enough minds that understand how significant a problem is, obviously when you see the fires that that should be the, you know, the the the the drop dead point to begin with to want to make change on this. But how confident are you that there will be significant change in this? And again, part of this depends on the the atmosphere itself, but to really start to make some policy change where a lot of this is concerned. Well, I'd like to be a little bit optimistic on that Dan in the following sense that because of the number of wildfires and the magnitude of these wildfires in the last couple of years people are paying attention. The challenge is going to be for the state legislature for the state and the communities to take some steps now while the virus hot if I could use a horrible pun and really do things over the course of the next few months because if it's. Turns out that these steps are not taking now this tendency to go back to the status quo and say, we're not going to do very much. And so the hope is that these things now are going to force all of us to pay attention, which I think is one of the reasons why we're all we're talking about it. Now, let's hope that the appropriate. People can take that next step. And in that sense. I'd like to be optimistic, but I think from past disasters. We know that if you don't do things early and you don't take advantage of that. This tendency not to do anything. So let's I don't want to end on the negative note. Let's hope that the positive thing is what we where we go from what you say you are positive that that from a policy perspective that that we may be able to to take some steps here in the next few months in years. I think we are taking steps, and I think that's partly why the reaction to the president's comments were so intense about our forest management is that we. We're really working hard on these problems and some of them you can't solve overnight because some of them are fundamental legal issues of liability others involve how you're going to finance activities, and there's some, you know, fire control bonds and things like that. Which are interesting experiments where we're looking into out in California. We've got one going up in Tahoe. Where say a water district puts money on the table to do vegetation management with the idea that they'll actually recoup their investment through reduced costs of clearing out, sediment and debris flowing into their reservoirs as result of fire activity in watershed. So there are a lot of things we can try and do I think the issue though is maintaining focus on the problem. The fact that we've had now about. Six years of just terrible fire seasons help keeps Californians focused, but the country is a whole needs to think of natural hazards like forest fires earthquakes floods. I think in a way which doesn't treat them as random in infrequent events. Right. We need to treat this as part of our normal guys. Great having you with us today. Thank you Howard. Thank you, keep all the best. And we will talk to you again down the road. Thank you again. Thank thank you. Howard Reuther from here at the school, professor of decision sciences and policy and codirector the risk management and decision processes center. Keith Gillis who is professor and Dina meritous of the college of natural resources at the university of California at Berkeley for more insight from knowledge, please visit knowledge dot Morton dot EDU. Idiot.

California Howard con Reuther Keith Gillis university of California Dan looney Berkeley Wharton school university of California Berke professor Oregon California Public utilities co San Diego USA Darryl Sue Colorado Dina Barra
Snap Launches Spotlight Feed  DTH

Daily Tech News Show

07:22 min | 10 months ago

Snap Launches Spotlight Feed DTH

"Hello there this message is coming to you from the history. Extra podcast from bbc history magazine a collection of fascinating conversations with leading historians. Giving you the low down on history's biggest characters hidden stories and greatest adventures speaking of great adventures. This week. The history extra podcast is brought to you by booking dot com. Whether you're looking for a culture filled city break a local away or a flung adventure you can save at least thirty percent with booking dot com. Black friday deals these deals for a limited time. Only so you'll need book before. I december to make the most of them. But the good news is they go. Have the flexibility to travel any time in twenty twenty one head to booking dot com ford slash blackfriday to book your next big adventure. These are the daily tech headlines for monday november. Twenty third twenty twenty. I'm rich apple enough. Snap launch new feature snapchat called spotlight a dedicated space with short entertaining videos in a vertically skirt. Little feed snap says it's algorithms will personalize feeds with the most engaging recent snaps and the feed will be human. The algorithm will look at. How many of us a snap gets how long people watch it if it's frequently skipped and whether it gets shared spotlight will feature snaps from both private and public accounts by either sending to spotlight directly or posting the our story feed snaps from private accounts won't feature attribution with no way to comment or message that creator snap also says it will pay over one million dollars a day to users who create top spotlight snaps for the rest of twenty twenty the california public utilities commission approved the driver and driverless autonomous vehicle deployment programs that allow for paid autonomous. Ride hailing services in the state to participate. Companies will need to obtain either a charter party carrier class p permit or a class a charter party certificate in the driver. Av passenger service pilot program as well as an ab testing permit from california department of motor vehicles expects it will take several months for companies to be accepted into the programs operating thomas. Ride hailing service will require submitting quarterly reports that include anonymous pickup and dropoff information. The availability wheelchair accessible rides fuel and electric charging types of vehicles vehicles and passengers miles traveled and working with the disadvantage accessibility communities previously these c. P. you see a lot for autonomous testing in the state but not for paid autonomous vehicle services a coalition of digital marketing companies calling themselves marketers for an open web announced. It filed a complaint with the uk competition and markets authority to block implementation of google's privacy sandbox initiative. This initiative is set to roll out in early twenty twenty one and would phase out third party tracking cookies. The coalition is asking for the privacy sandbox to be delayed until regulators devise long-term competitive remedies to mitigate google's dominance google's privacy. Sandbox is an open set of standards. The company announced last year. That would replace cookies with browser privacy budget that allow for a site to make a limited number of calls to get information to group user into a larger group but not sacrifice anonymity. While apple's rumored augmented mixed reality headset isn't a thing yet mike. Rockwell apple's head of a are and l. asandra mcginnis it senior product manager for air. Tell seen that apple's mission right now is through the device. You already have in your pocket. The iphone apple says there are already ten thousand air enabled ios apps with seven thousand developers many of which focused on shopping or home improvement. Google launch an invitation only trial of a new app called pask mayton india designed to let users earn money by doing simple tasks on your smartphone. The app says tasks for from businesses around the world and are categorized as either sitting or feel tasks with a provided walking. Eta example task include walk into a store front and taking a picture recording a spoken sentence transcribing content or checking details of a business users can either select from a number of available tasks or the app can send a notification requesting a task be done. It's unclear if local businesses make quest to google for these tasks or paying for the service. Twitter confirmed that a bug in its ephemeral fleets feature could offer content to be viewed after the supposed twenty four hour expiration these fleets would disappear from the. Ui of the main twitter app but a developer tool using twitter's api could pulling fleet wells. Which could then be used to view content after twenty four hours of posting twitter. Clarified that the api. Only post-flight your house less than twenty four hours old and is working on a fixed to make older url's viewable after twenty four hours. Twitter does door fleet content for up to thirty days and is available to users twitter data for download until the platform deletes. It and updated apple support page says. The company is working with microsoft to bring compatibility for the xbox series x controller to apple devices apple devices currently support the xbox wireless controller with bluetooth xbox elite wireless controller xbox adaptive controller and the playstation dualshock four controller twitter user. Ling ling confirmed that he was able to use the check. Rain jail breaking tool to jailbreak first generation home pot posting a screenshot of accessing the homepage over an ssh connection this is the first publicly demonstrated jailbreak of a homepod which runs an os based on tv os. An update to google assistant now allows it to schedule turning on or off smart lights. This works through assistant scheduled actions feature and can't be set for either specific times or for events like sunup. sundown previously. Google assistant could turn off smart lights or use them. As part of an alarm and finally to celebrate the video of billie eilish is bad guy surpassing one billion views on youtube. Google created infinite bad guy. An endless music video built on covers of the song at billy. Dot with youtube dot com. The site initially played the official video with one of fifteen thousand cover videos on either side of the plane. Version cooking on those videos will transition to the new version without missing a beat or a lyric. Google trained neural network to sink the different versions clicking pause. We'll list every cover. You listened to during your session. Remember from our discussion of the tech news of the day subscribed to dealing new ad tech new show dot com and remember to rate and review daily tech headlines. Wherever you get your podcast beck's listening. We'll talk to you next time. And from all of us here at daily tech headlines remember have a super sparkly day. Hello there this message is coming to you from the history. Extra podcast from bbc history magazine i collection of fascinating conversations with leading historians. Giving you the low down on history's biggest characters hidden stories and greatest adventures speaking of great adventures. This week. The history extra podcast is brought to you by booking dot com. Whether you're looking for a culture filled city break a local getaway or a far flung adventure you can save at least thirty percent with booking dot coms black. Friday deals themes deals a for a limited time. Only so you need to book before. I december to make the most of them. But the good news is that have flexibility to travel any time in twenty twenty one head to booking dot com forward slash blackfriday to book your next big adventure.

apple history magazine Google thirty percent twitter competition and markets author twenty four hours asandra mcginnis mayton california public utilities co one million dollars department of motor vehicles bbc ford Rockwell Eta thomas twenty four hour billie eilish california
Huawei? Meet the U.S. Justice Dept.

MarketFoolery

17:44 min | 2 years ago

Huawei? Meet the U.S. Justice Dept.

"It's Tuesday January twenty ninth while the market full Nery. I'm Chris L as the winter weather front bears down on the greater metropolitan, Washington DC area. Neither snow nor rain nor gloom of night show. Keep Bill man from his appointed rounds on this podcast is being here. All I would want to be any place else. You know, the Heat's out at my house so super happy to be here. Happy to be here and also shutout to the dozens of listeners in the midwest because there's cold and there's dangerous cold and that just be safe people, be smart and be safe. I saw something the other day where they said it was unseasonably cold in Minneapolis, Minnesota. And it is winter. Minnesota. We're talking about. I mean, we laugh it's going to be cold here too. But please be safe. It is dangerous interest. We've got earnings to get you. We're going to dip into the full mailbag. Let's start with Verizon which closed out the fiscal year with a fourth quarter report profits little bit higher than expected. I think I had this right there overall revenue was barely above where it was Chris. You're not gonna believe this. But it turns out that the oath properties, which is AOL and Yahoo are not worth what Verizon paid for them. I'm shocked. I've been told that they paid more than nothing for them. And so they have a four point nine billion dollar right down. And they're not really breaking it out at oath at this point, by the way, that has been renamed. The Verizon media group may be the fastest rebranding in history. So, yeah, they they have you know, they have overpaid for media properties. They've the executives for is Matt said that they're not gonna be buying anymore media properties. Or we assume, you know, media liabilities from here on out. It wasn't okay quarter. They're in the process of laying off about ten thousand people, which is which which is hard. They need to raise about ten million dollars in cost-cutting because they've got a big network building out build out coming in the five G networks, so pretty tough set of facs for them for a company that's not growing at all on its revenue. And you know, they're they're doing a pretty good job. In terms of subscribers really does seem like if you're a Verizon shareholder. I think you're obviously, you're not happy with the past twelve months, and at this point, you're probably crossing your fingers, hoping okay? Can we now that we've learned the lesson of drastically overpaying? For media properties. Can we stick to our knitting? Can we ring whatever value there is? And I would say that there's some I don't know what the value is. But there's some value to the Sean tent there. But just please. Can we stick to our new day? We not do that anymore. Yeah. And so in subsequent news, Verizon files is just said that they've come to an agreement with Disney. Disney won't be blacked out on on fire. I believe that was nationwide, but it may have been on a property buy property basis either way that was going to be a fairly bad scene for both of the companies as well as I you know, as as well as for subscribers. So yeah, Verizon is is what it is. A it is a large, you know, behemoth company that has huge capital expenses that come up from time to time because networks require not just maintenance upgrading. We're gonna get to another mobile phone giant in a minute. But first, let's check in on the PG. Leonie saga the California utility filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection. Shares a PG e up seventeen percent when we walked in the studio. Am I supposed to put this on my watchlist? Now, we've talked before about how look this utility it can't just go away. Right. But. Right. You just assumed it was going to reappear in some form that maybe was completely removed from the public markets. Now, am I am. I now supposed to think. Oh, well, maybe there's not just a future for this utility. But a future for investing in this utility. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. So utilities. You're so weird. Like, if you if you produce a product, and it for example, catches on fire, and you get sued for it. And you don't have money to cover. It you go out of business in that fire producing product doesn't get produced anymore. You can't do that with utilities. You can't say, well, you know, electric city caused the electricity or the production of jersey caused these fires northern California companies going out of business. Let's just produce. No more electric St. northern California. There's your solution. What's going to happen? So there were fires in twenty seventeen. And there was and the California legislature, the California Public utilities commission. Excuse me, passed a ruling that allows the utilities to pass on the costs of the liabilities for such events onto rate holders. So. You know, good thing that they did too. Because you know, otherwise, we would have an enormous financial issue with with PG knee. So yes, it's going bankrupt. It has sufficient assets to cover its cash liabilities. It's going to come out of bankruptcy restructured. The equity will in all likelihood have some value. The bonds were trading at eighty five cents on the dollar earlier. I think that they will rally what you have now in this place is a plan. Are you interested? No, no. Because here's the thing. It is going to become much more expensive to produce electricity in this country for a couple of reasons one because the slightest changing, and we can argue over whether pre you know, what we can argue over global warming a little bit but utilities are having to respond, right? They're having to change their slate. The cheapest forms of energy coal net. Gas oil are being ramped down other forms are being ramped up. But also these types of liabilities are popping up a lot more as well. And you could say that it's because of climate change you could also say because it's a change in how people live the town called paradise. Which is where the fires were where the most damage was where the houses were destroyed was probably not something that really would have existed in the same form even forty years ago. It was largely a retirement community people as change vice style. Went up and lived in the woods. Right. And so no, I don't I don't find utilities to be very exciting investment because they will be boring until they are exciting in the exact wrong way. While way, which is the phone giant in China is back in the headlines. The US Justice department has charged while away with a number of crimes, including trying to steal trade secrets from T mobile, the company and its Afo have also been charged with a little thing we like to call Bank and wire fraud, which is a little bit of a catchall for. We know you've done something bad with your finances. And we're going to sort out what it is. Yeah. This is this is I I expected this some form of charges to come. But the we've seen charges from other countries. That's right. That's right. And as we talked about before we came on on the air. The Justice department is not messing around with the charges against while way. And I think that, you know, of course, the company disputes all the charges disputes that the the overarching charge against while way. Which is that it's it's. It's telecom equipment is also used for spying for the benefit of of the government of China. I think it's crazy to be on that side of that argument. But yeah, this is this is a company that is now in the crosshairs of a lot of western countries. And I don't see how they get out of it. Whereas t mobile in all of this to go back to Verizon. You look at. The past year or so Verizon t mobile these are stocks that haven't really done all that. Well, they've they've done better over the past twelve months, AT and T. But I think if your team will this is John. John Leger one of our favorite CEO's because he's one of the most colorful seats and certainly makes for enjoyable conference calls. This isn't the kind of headline. He's looking to be a part of. No, no because he does not want to be part of a headline where by the way, some data, and maybe it was hours. And maybe it was yours has been taken from us by by by the Chinese government allegedly. But nonetheless, it is it is not good for the US carriers t mobile, of course, German. So let me back that up for the carriers involved. In some ways. It's a really interesting. You know, I hadn't really thought about it. Until you ask that question. It's a little big brother e of of the government to come in and say, you know, where there is no t mobile hasn't sued. You know, this is the government coming down on on wall way on their behalf. Our Email address is market fuller full dot com. And Franken Email this this requires some setup because some listeners may have seen the news out of Brazil from last weekend. A terrible story of a mining dam bursting which triggered a deadly mudslide somewhere in the neighborhood of at least sixty people confirmed dead hundred hundred hundred missing hundreds more missing. And and. Presumed probably presumed dead at this point. So it's it's a tragic story. But. One of our listeners sort of looking at it through the lens of investing and we've seen this place before so Email from David who as I was wondering how the dam burst in Brazil affects valley in the long-term invalid, the company attached to this BP stock still hasn't recovered from its pre twenty ten disaster levels. Does this damn spell doom for the world's largest iron ore company? Valet. Probably not well known to a lot of listeners just because we don't really focus on commodity stocks all that much, but touch something metal to your laughter or you're right. And most likely volley produced the you know, some of the metal. That's that Senate. It is a it is a foundational important company to the global economy. It is very very important to the Brazilian economy. And there in lies a little bit of of of the rub. So the last time volley has been sued by the Brazilian government. For twenty fifteen disaster that happened about eighty miles up the road from from this dam in which ten people were killed in the government sued for five point three billion US dollars. That was a much smaller accident after that accident valet. And all of the Brazilian miners went through a process of verifying the safety of all of their dams. According to the Brazilian national water agency there six hundred is called a tailing stand. This, you know, part of the mining process in in Brazil one hundred and forty four of them are big enough to cause catastrophic environmental damage. I, you know, that's the fact is that they have gone through the process to verify these dances dams or basically in. In fact, this day was was was twenty eight stories high which to me is an interesting balance between there's no such thing as the story is a precise, you know, amount of measurement. But there was twenty eight of them. So it's a huge dam. There are you know, the the dam itself, basically is made out of mud, and what happened they believe is that the the mud literally liquefied in place, and then, you know, in, you know, so you touch it. So it looks like it is in good shape until suddenly it fails there's one hundred forty four dams just like this volumes a large number of them. I'm not saying that this is a no touch company. But I am saying that they don't really have the ability to either replace the dance or to say for sure that these are dancer safe because I'm relatively sure they had five point three billion dollars worth of interest last time in making sure that it didn't happen again. And it happened again seems like if you're an owner of this stock you might want to start looking at what's on your watch list. Yeah. But you know, it's it's it's interesting because in the same way that the state of New York is. So careful with its Wall Street firms like, you know, the Wall Street is worth twenty five percent of the tax base of New York state. So there's only so much. They're going to do to punish them. You know, look back in the financial crisis. The answer was basically nothing, but so Brazil is in the same boat. Brazil gets a huge amount of its tax base from lar its largest mining companies in particular violate. So I don't think that Brazil will do anything that is existential threatening to volley. They they just can't well, it's like, you think back to the recent scandal involving Volkswagen, and the, you know, getting around the emissions tests, and all that sort of thing and somewhat analogous in that at that moment in time, you can look at that and say boy, they're they're really going to get punished. And then you start to look at how crucial Volkswagen and the ad motive industry is to the German economy. And then you go. Okay. Well, no, they can't. That's a really bad idea to punish Volkswagen to the point where it goes out of business. There can't be. Yeah. There they can't leave a, you know, they they can't leave a crater where Volkswagen was and and the other thing for volley. That's interesting is that there's a brand new government in in Brazil. And he's he's a populist, and I think you could see a scenario where where where he comes down really really hard on them in ways that are visible. You know, like, I'm here to protect the people of Brazil. But in invisible ways. Volley will ultimately be allowed to continue to exist. Now the question that's being asked is what do I do with the equity, and I think I think you've got to see what the lawsuits look like before you before you touch because just because the lost twenty five percent that doesn't mean that it's not going to get much much worse for them before we wrap up you were traveling about a month ago. And as you do from time to time, you're very nicely. Brought me a present. I did I did I walked into a I walked into a store in Prague, and they had three types of Pringles slash Pringle Pringle, ask snacks. And I brought back. I decided not to bring back the the marijuana ones chosen step. Really? That was an option. Oh, yeah. Not not goals. This is not free. Frito lay is not putting out marijuana. Okay. Pringles? Although. Local someone local has has put out a Pringle facsimile made from pot. Okay. I think they'd probably sell a few of those probably I instead went with a different type of unhealthy and brought you back from Prague. What were they again? Yeah. New York cheese, fries flavored Pringles, New York cheese fries. Made in Prague. Yeah. Fabulous. I should mention because people are listening to this and thinking, well, I can't see this. But you actually can because thanks to the work of Dylan Lewis and Taylor Harris are multimedia team, we have the newly revamped motley fool YouTube channel with videos from all of the podcast. So you can check that out. And it's a fabulous bright Pringles box with the well with New York City food truck apples. You know what I'm giving. I'm giving them points for for effort there. I agree. The other one the other one I should mention was beef fajita flavored which I think I did best. Yeah. I think the pot ones. Let's just put out there. Probably going to be a little bit of a risk, you know of arrest things of that nature. Look when you travel internationally anytime, you're bringing food back into America. You get questions about that. You're getting questions about the cheese. Fried flavored Pringles seem so you're going to minimize the question. They're not buying the Maryland. You're minimizing the second question. Thanks for being here. Thanks, Chris has always people on the program have interest in the stocks. They talked about in the motley fool may have formal recommendations for against so or sell stocks based solely on what you here that's going to do it for this edition of market. Fully the show is mixed by Dan. Boy, I'm Chris health. Thanks for listening. We'll see you tomorrow.

Verizon Brazil California Volkswagen Pringles Chris New York US Minnesota midwest Prague China Minneapolis Disney Chris L US Justice department Nery Bill California Public utilities co New York City
When the Power Company Can't Be Trusted

The Journal.

20:22 min | 2 years ago

When the Power Company Can't Be Trusted

"California's largest public utility. PG has been involved in a string of deadly accidents over the past decades including the camp. I'm fire which killed more than eighty people last year determined that PGN equipment started the fire at two separate locations those small fires then became am one massive fire that swept across paradise and surrounding communities destroying nearly fourteen thousand homes cal fire is the company is now in bankruptcy court because of the billions of dollars does the victims of recent wildfires and it's also under federal probation from Gas Explosion in twenty earning ten that killed eight people for years. California regulators have used hefty fines to try to rein in bad behavior at the company the paying those fines and withstanding the public humiliation that comes with them hasn't seemed to chase in the company today on the show. Oh what happens when a powerful organization that provides an essential service to millions of Americans can't be trusted the welcome to the Journal our daily show about money business empower. I'm Kate Lime and I'm Ryan Knutson. It's Monday September sixteenth. Trust is so important with a public utility they own equipment that goes over our heads and under our feet it can blow us up. It can electrocute us. We pay billions and billions of dollars to public look utilities each year in order to provide us safe reliable service and we ought to get it. Rebecca Smith is a reporter for the Wall Street Journal and she recently wrote a story detailing the history and patterns of Pge's misconduct. I probably wrote my first stories about PG and more than twenty five years ago and so I've been aware of the company for a long time as a reporter. This story was partly informed by my own experience. It's with it and in this story you identified repeated instances over twenty five years in which the company misled regulatory authorities withheld held information obstructed investigations. Is this different from other utilities. I think all utilities have problems from time to time time with regulators. It's not like there's one bad one and the others are all good. There are no devils and angels in the story but what is striking to me though is the repeated difficulties that PG has had with what others consider basic standards of honesty for a company to lack a basic basic standard of honesty might sound like a high minded concept but for a public utility to have a habit of misleading regulators that can have deadly consequences consequences in Rebecca's article. She detailed thirty instances since the mid nineties. PG has paid fines penalties not settlements and other remedies totaling more than two point six billion dollars one instance she explored is the company's program called locate and mark. That's like the orange spray paint that you can sometimes see on the street -absolutely yeah can you tell us what the located mark program is and how how it works both specifically at pg any and then sort of broadly for utilities sure so the Nation House a system called the eight one one system awesome. You know like if you need help you call nine one one well. If you're getting ready to dig you call eight one one so the ideas you call this number. Two make sure when you're digging you don't accidentally accidentally hit a gas pipeline an electric cable some infrastructure. That's not visible because it's under the dirt and that's important because if you hit those cables Abel's or lions it would cause an accident. Yes you would likely blow up or get electrocuted what happened in the case of genie as they get up to. One million phone calls a year from contractors typically who are going to do some ground excavation and the utility then has two working days to go out to that site site and determine whether or not it has a gas pipeline or electrical cable that it needs to mark so it's generally been a great system when people call aw there's a very low incidence less than one percent accident rate but what happened is. PGA inspectors became overworked and to avoid getting in trouble for being late. The workers started falsifying information to give themselves more time. It's pretty clear that people are cutting corners. They're they're pretending they have. Let's say pushed the date out for an excavation when they haven't. They're doing things to fudge the statistics. The point is that if the sites get marked put it reduces accidents if they don't get marked within that two working days the likelihood that there will be accidents goes up and were there accidents. There were from two thousand twelve to early two thousand seventeen. PG Knee reported sixty seven accidents which might be blamed on late tickets. The accidents involved contractors contractors hitting buried gas infrastructure regulators started to look into this located mark program and PG put a new guy in charge to clean it up and he he starts off with the declaration going two zero late tickets no excuses from that point forward we see a precipitous drop in the company's company's numbers for late tickets from around thirteen thousand late tickets to forty four tickets in two thousand sixteen so it's not that that under new leadership the program actually got a lot more efficient at answering these tickets because some fudging continued to to occur does anybody at the company speak out about this pattern of falsification their internal audits pointed out problems with their also were employees employees who went up the chain of command and said we think stuff's happening that shouldn't be allowed and we think that employees feel coerced into entering data. That's is not correct because they fear for their jobs and one person was fired and two people had their jobs eliminated and they wound up in other parts of the company. One view would be that they were punished for coming forward sort of suggests that if you speak out about this good things don't happen to you correct and then what happened bend to the program directors who were overseeing this zero late ticket policy. The main fell who's in charge of the program he got a big promotion and so the people in charge of the program got promoted and the people who spoke out about problems with the program either got fired or kicked aside. What does that tell you about. PG Culture of itself it may mean nothing but if you look at that in association with other cases it tells issue that speaking out is not good for your career located. Mark is one example sample of the misleading behavior that Rebecca has seen in her reporting on the company. Something comes out that shows that the company hasn't been doing what it's supposed to do and then the company will say we didn't know and then a few people leave sometimes it's not clear whether they voluntarily resigned wind or whether they were pushed out but at any rate some people leave and then the company says we have this new program and it's GonNa fix everything. The thing that worries me is that over over time you see that often things don't get fixed. PG and he said that upper management didn't understand the depth of the problem with located locate him mark and that workers fudging on time results had the effect of hiding the programs problems a lawyer for the program director said his client quote never pressured PGA employees to falsify documents. Rebecca's reporting shows that pgn problems stand apart and a former California yeah public utilities commissioner said the company violates rules of conduct so often it amounts to a pattern another example of pg not following through on promised improvements happened with its trimming program in the ninety s tree trimming is a big issue for any utility that has a lot of forested areas. It's a tremendous job and it's possible that there's really no utility in the in West. That's on top of its game right now and I think as we see climate change happening. I think we're going to find more utilities than PG and E. being stressed by by the difficulty and the cost of dealing with dead and dying trees so I don't want to minimize the difficulties that the utility faces but at any rate what we've seen historically is that the way that works for genius roughly every three years they come to the utilities commission and they say we want to it said new rates and so here's the amount of money we think we need and so could you please give us this amount of money and there's some portion of it that would go to trim trim trees trees away from the power lines and what had been happening in the one thousand nine hundred ninety s was the company been getting a lot of money for trimming and it had not been spending bending it all up for that purpose it had been siphoning money out of that program and spending it on other things now technically the utility can do that. It's not illegal but it's not good if you wind up with a lot of fires as a result because the trees are too close and that that diverting of the money from tree trimming resulted today's fine for P. Genie is that correct yeah big lawsuit and a fine nine hundred ninety seven well it wasn't a big fine but it was a notable prosecution because it actually the accused of criminality in not having trimmed trees and this was in Nevada County California another example is when Pge Aga misled federal authorities investigating the San Bruno gas explosion. The company was accused and then convicted of obstructing an investigation when when the investigation was done both federal investigators and state investigators felt that the company had not been at all times forthright where there's significant loss of human life. They want everybody on board trying to bring out everything that could have been instrumental in causing that accident so there's a very high standard of honesty that's expected and for good reason and I think the most minimal thing we should be able to expect from a utility is that it's trying hard to do was job and it's going to be honest with us. Pge said it's violations in the San Bruno case were not intentional and yet another example of the company's misconduct conduct was related to water contamination so I mean this was made famous in the Erin Brockovich movie basically PG knee was found to have been using a chemical called hexavalent chromium around its gas compressor stations and millions of gallons of water that was contaminated Eddie with chromium wound up getting dumped near Hinckley Californian cattleman city California and over time I mean I think it stopped using that chemical in the nineteen sixties but that chemical nevertheless went into the ground water and contaminated drinking water sources the the company settled for more than six hundred million dollars in one thousand nine hundred sixty two thousand six. PGN is repeated problems added up to more than two point six six billion dollars in penalties and settlements and do you have a sense of who is to blame. The problem is that there's something in a culture that's taken hold and that is what needs to be changed if you say well this person is to blame and you get rid of that person you might think then the problem is solved but what we've seen with. PGA The problems persist what was PG any doing to fix these problems. It seems like it's a whack. A mole kind of situation did the company company acknowledged them and take corrective action well in some cases. I think they've tried in other cases. I don't think they have I don't really know what happens internally but with former regulators there's often a feeling that even when the company says it did something wrong that it still trying to make excuses one thing. I do think it's worth pointing out and that's that peachy and he has a new CEO now and it has a new board of directors largely new board of directors in that ten of thirteen members verse are new and I think they are making a sincere effort to turn things around at the company. I think if anyone can do it. It may be this current management but you know time will tell. PGA CEO Bill Johnson told Rebecca he is committed to transparency and telling the truth breath when asked about the company's record of providing misleading information to the public regulators Mister Johnson said quote. We're not going to be slippery and we will make decisions based on what's best to serve our customers but what are the tools to deal with a monopoly company with a dangerous track record. That's after the break about a decade ago the US government decided to do something they'd never done before today more than sixty percent of all US tax payers will be able to for free free prepare and file their taxes online. They thought they were creating a free online. Tax Filing System instead what they'd made was trap attracted the huge companies take millions of dollars from low-income Americans here how that happened under polyps at one hundred forty four dark pattern listen wherever you get your podcasts welcome back when companies like PG Andy we run afoul of the rules governments have a tool for that regulation the challenges regulation is fundamentally based on honesty but pge he hasn't always been honest with regulators in all appearances and pleadings and filings before the California Public Utilities Commission. The most basic basic rule is that anyone is required to be honest and to never mislead. That's that's a requirement. You cannot mislead the regulator so one one of the things that happened was around two thousand eight. It became clear that peachy knee was engaging in improper communications with the state regulator. What does that mean improper communications nations. There are certain proper channels of communication that are set up at the at a regulatory commission like that and the ideas that the commission wants to have a transparent process that inspires public trust so you need to feel that when decisions are reached their reach through fair means. There's not some cajoling. That's happening on the side or side discussions. That aren't part of the public record. the idea is that you make decisions based upon a public record so at any rate. There were some form of communications that weren't supposed to have happened so the company said okay. We're going to create this big compliance program which they did well then it became clear a few years later that from twenty ten to twenty fourteen the company was back involved in the same stuff again and there was another case that was open an investigation and it turned out that there were lots of improper emails and other sidebar communications and beatings. Yes that should not have happened that violated the commission rules. has there been a fundamental failure of the regulatory system here. This is a very challenging thing I mean. We have just to take a step back. We have a system of regulation that was really set up to control rates. That's its primary airy. Function is making sure that a monopoly company doesn't Gouge consumers so a big part of the commission's focused on money. A relatively actively small proportion is focused on safety safety every bit as important but it's always been kind of second tier safety regulation is based based on these companies being truthful and if they aren't it crumbles if the company isn't engaging with the regulator later in a trustworthy manner than the whole framework of the regulation falls apart well yes so the challenge in California has been you know normally if a company AH violates a rule you as tach a penalty and that's enough for most that kind of a slap on the wrist is enough for most companies do not want to get slapped again in in the reporting of the story. Did you speak with regulators. I spoke with former regulators. Here's the thing right now. It's very difficult to get current regulators to talk talk about. PG need because they have cases before them so they don't want it to appear that they're prejudiced in some way so they don't they won't talk about anything where there's an active active case and because there's been this open proceeding about. PG needs safety culture. They don't WanNa talk about that. In a statement a- lawyer with a state utility commissions public advocates office said the agency has tried to rein in pg any using the traditional tools of regulation but quote those tools haven't worked the thing that struck me about it is that when you can trace this culture it started with this person at this time and there's a kind of origin in story and a person who you can pin it all on right. Ns when it's in a kind of swamp you know aim morpheus sort of zone in where you kind of see it over here. What happens over here at location and mark probably has nothing to do with the obstruction at San Bruno. It's a little harder to wrap your her your head around. I think it shows the importance of corporate culture. One of the underlying premises of this story is that honesty peak matters truth matters and I mean the difficult kind of honesty. That's where someone's able to come forward and say I made a mistake. I'm doing things I shouldn't be doing. I know this isn't right that level of honesty for each person own set the corporate culture really does matter and there's in this case if it's a utility company there's a real world consequence for PG any one of the real world consequences has been dangerous equipment that can spark wildfires and that's what happened last cheer when a power line began the devastating Campfire in Paradise California that fire killed eighty six people and destroyed an entire air community in the face of thirty billion dollars of potential liabilities from IT and other fires. PG filed for bankruptcy craftsy just last week filed a reorganization plan and on Friday also announced an eleven billion dollar settlement with insurance companies for payouts. Hey out related to wildfires including the camp fire. That's all for today Monday. September sixteenth the Journal is a CO production of Gimblett and the Wall Street Journal Thanks for listening. We'll see on Tuesday.

PG California Wall Street Journal Rebecca Pge program director Rebecca Smith California Public Utilities Co Journal US Kate Lime reporter PGA Paradise California Mark Abel San Bruno Ryan Knutson
Week in Review for the Week of 11/24/20 - DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

07:29 min | 10 months ago

Week in Review for the Week of 11/24/20 - DTH

"This podcast is sponsored by master dynamic headphones and earphones. That sound is good as they look. They combine premium design and materials with brilliant. Sound a unique sonic range. Whether you're looking for a luxurious and comfortable over ear headphones portable power packed. True wireless earphones or immersive wireless speaker master and dynamic has what you need to upgrade your listening experience visit master dynamic dot com and use code p o d ten for ten percent off your new pair of headphones terms and conditions apply. I'm rich drop leo. These are the tech headlines for the week that was snap launch a new feature snapchat called spotlight a dedicated space short entertaining videos in a vertically. Scroll feed snaps says its algorithms will personally feed with the most engaging recent snaps and feed will be human moderated the algorithm will look at. How many of us a snap gets how long people watch it if it's frequently skipped and whether it gets shared spotlit will feature snaps from both private and public accounts but either sending to spotlight directly or posting it in the our story feed stats from private accounts won't feature attribution with no way to comment or message. The creator stamp also says it will pay over one million dollars a day to users who create top spotlight snaps for the rest of twenty twenty the california public utilities commission approved the driver and driverless autonomous vehicle deployment programs that allow for paid autonomous. Ride hailing services in the state. The state expects will take several months for companies to be accepted into the programs operating an autonomous ride. Hailing service will require submitting quarterly reports include. None of my pickup drop information. The availability of wheelchair accessible rides fuel and electric charging types of vehicles vehicle and passenger miles traveled and working with disadvantaged and accessibility communities previously. The cpu see for autonomous testing in the state but not for paid autonomous vehicle services sony interactive entertainment ceo. Jim ryan confirmed that the playstation five is completely sold out during an interview with the russian news agency. Tass he said the supply shortage likely would have happened without covid. Nineteen but that launching in the middle of a pandemic was a challenge. He wouldn't recommend china's national radio and television administration announced tighter regulations on livestreaming requiring that hosts and gift givers registered with real names the regulations also set caps on how much viewers can gift streamers and band teenagers from giving gifts entirely the regulators also said it will ban streamers from platforms for repeated violations in july comcast reimposed data caps twenty seven states but raised it to one point two terabytes starting in january comcast will expand data caps to the rest of its territory but won't start charging until march over just cost ten dollars for every fifty gigabytes with max of one hundred dollars a month comcast offers unlimited for an extra thirty dollars month comcast says the median usage among its customers is three hundred eight gigabytes data caps are mostly used to generate revenue and they're considered ineffective imagine congestion the us fcc rejected z. T.'s petition to remove its designation as national security threat. This means the fcc's universal service fund cannot be used to buy equipment and services from t. That fund is used to subsidize building telecommunications infrastructure in underserved areas companies are allowed to spend their own money to buy equipment. the european union proposed legislation wednesday. That would create an e you wide data marketplace for sharing industrial and government information. It's comparable to what. Gdp has done personal information administrative data like health records census results and industrial data created by digital transformation could be shared more often. As long as it's protected under european standards for instance data would need to be protected from demands by foreign governments and only exported to countries that offer protections equivalent to the eu. The new law would also create data brokers to work as intermediaries between data providers twitter announced. It's launching its verification process with new guidelines. The new system will roll out in early. Twenty twenty one but twitter is asking its users for feedback on the draft guidelines. Requirements are verification vary by category but include references on company's websites media coverage and other standards of note ability. You can take a survey on the policy by december eighth or tweet your thoughts with the hashtag verification feedback after receiving and considering feedback. Twitter will finalize the policy on december seventeenth reuter sources say fox kind of shifting some ipad macbook assembly from china to vietnam. A new factory for the production is being built in the country's north eastern province with plans to open in the first half of two thousand twenty one the move is an attempt to diversify production away from china in light of ongoing trade tensions with the us. Although it's unclear how much reduction will actually be taken on by the new facility. Reuters previously reported that foxconn committed to investing one billion dollars to expand iphone production in india. The european parliament voted to approve a resolution supporting consumers right to repair. While the resolution is not legislation in and of itself it does call the european commission to develop an introduce mandatory labelling to provide clear immediately visible and easy to understand information to consumers on the estimated lifetime and repairability of a product at the time of purchase. While not part of this. France is set to its own repairability ratings of smartphones laptops and other electronics in january. Uk's department of digital culture media and sport plans to create a digital market unit designed to enforce a new code to govern the behavior of platform that currently dominate the market such as google and facebook. This code will look at if actions by those platforms. Disadvantaged consumers small businesses and news publishers. The dm you will have authority to suspend block and reverse decisions made by the platforms order actions to be compliant with its code and issue financial penalties for noncompliance. The dm you operate as part of the competition and markets authority and begin work in april. Twenty twenty one and finally the new york times reports that amazon hired four hundred twenty seven thousand three hundred employees from october of this year with a global workforce now of one point two million up fifty percent of the year amazon currently has eight hundred ten thousand workers in the. Us hires are warehouse workers but also includes software engineers and hardware specialists for its clout in streaming businesses. This total does not account for the one hundred thousand. Temporary workers brought out for the holiday shopping season or the estimated. Five hundred thousand contractor delivery workers assistance consultants at m. w. p. international found amazon tripled. The number of us warehouses for last mile fulfillment in the us in two thousand twenty. Remember for more discussion of the news of the day. Subscribe new show at new show dot com and remember to rate and review daily tech headlines. Wherever you get your podcast next felicite. We'll talk to you next time. And from all of us here at daily tech headlines remember path a super sparkly day. This podcast is sponsored by master and dynamic headphones earphones. That sound is good as they look. They combine premium design and materials with brilliant. Sound a unique sonic range. Whether you're looking for luxurious and comfortable over ear headphones portable power packed. True wireless earphones or an immersive wireless speaker master and dynamic has what you need to upgrade your listening experience visit master dynamic dot com and use code p o d ten for ten percent off your new pair of headphones terms and conditions apply.

comcast sony interactive entertainment two terabytes fifty gigabytes thirty dollars three hundred eight gigabytes california public utilities co fcc Jim ryan ten percent one million dollars china Twitter eu one hundred dollars ten dollars one billion dollars department of digital culture us reuter