17 Burst results for "California Department Of Corrections"

"california department corrections" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:46 min | 3 months ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KCBS All News

"That's 803 05 67 62 news that matters to you around the bay around the world around the clock. All news 1069 and am 7 40 K CBS it's Friday, August 28th 2020 coming up on KCBS Bay Area wildfires proving to be hazardous. As to the mental health of firefighters, and in Oakland, Tina's helping people show their support for the Black Lives matter. Movement. Also actor Chadwick Boseman dead at the age of 43. I'm Peter Finch case. CBS News Time 9 31. CBS News brief film star Chadwick Boseman has died before he shot the major famous The Black Panther. He also played baseball legend Jackie Robinson. Let them get to you. I won't God built me to last. Chadwick Boseman was 43 on the stump in New Hampshire. President Trump versus Democratic Mayors like Washington, D. C is Muriel Bowser and the mare should be ashamed of herself. With that kind of display of incompetence, because that's what's happening in Portland. And that's what's happening all over where you have Democrats run City's not a repeat of his acceptance speech theme from the vice president Hearts or with all of our fellow Americans. Louisiana and Texas and states that have been impacted by Hurricane Laura now blamed for at least 14 deaths in Washington. Another civil rights march Commemorating the famous one of 1963 CBS News Brief. I'm Tom Foti K CBS News Time 9 32 In this time of shelter in place, you can get just about anything delivered or done for you. Kay, CBS reporter Holly Kwan Found an Oakland teenager who's helping homeowners make a social statement in their own driveways. High school English Smith is at the end of her squirt bottle of black temper paint, stirring in a little water to make it last enough to fill in the chalk outline of a clenched fist drawn in the driveway of a neighbor's Oakland Hills home. She'd been going to black lives matter. Protest downtown. Yeah, those ones with the tear gas and rubber projectiles because I felt like I wasn't really doing enough and talking about it on social media is only reaching Kids my own age and not adults who Khun go in my neighbourhood and who have a decent amount of money to donate to causes and bail funds and stuff. So a couple weeks ago, she painted the phrase I can't breathe in her driveway. The reference to the George Floyd murder was noticed by friends and neighbors who wanted similar art in front of their homes. So I started getting a bunch of commissions and for the commissions I don't charge I've had a couple people donate to charities in their own name, as like payment, or whatever this design of a clenched fist and the phrase take Unni is going in a Kathy Neil's driveway. She lives here with her partner, Ron Lumpkin, who used to play for the New York Giants in the seventies, when we were talking, trying to figure out what to do We thought, what better way to express? Our feelings about Patriotism, which I thought that whole gesture was about anyway. About fairness. The fact that you know black lives matters much as anyone else's. Smith, a student ID Oakland, Tex. Race policy in Law Academy, has done six houses so far with another eight orders waiting. In Oakland. HOLIC want KCBS Research out of UC Irvine finds the majority of transgender women housed with men have been assaulted him in prison case. CBS's Margie Schaefer reports. New legislation seeks to offer trans intersex and non binary people Dignity, The UC Irvine study finds trans women are 13 times more likely to be assaulted than men. And nearly 60% reported being assaulted Well in California Prisons law professor at UC Hastings David Levin calls it a substantial problem and relief could be offered by proposed legislation. They could inform the prison when they're taken in what they want their status to be what prone and should be used. And most importantly, where they would choose to be how special housing would not be mandated. The California Department corrections could say no if they had some articulable reason to do that, But it would allow the trans people to say this is where I think I would be safer. And would hopefully reduce a lot of that unnecessary violence. Levine says. The Department of Corrections has stayed neutral on the legislation, and there is no strong opposition. So it has a good shot at passage, but it's unclear if it will get on the agenda. During this very busy legislative session, Margie Schaefer KCBS, a Tesla driver,.

Oakland Chadwick Boseman CBS Margie Schaefer KCBS Smith Jackie Robinson New York Giants Washington Oakland Hills vice president Hearts Muriel Bowser Khun UC Irvine Tina President Trump Peter Finch Department of Corrections Kathy Neil
"california department corrections" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:49 min | 3 months ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KCBS All News

"CBS News time. 5 42 Research out of UC Irvine finds the majority of transgender women housed with men have been assaulted in prison. KCBS market shaper reports new legislation seeks to offer trans intersex and non binary people Dignity, The UC Irvine study finds trans women are 13 times more likely to be assaulted than men. And nearly 60% reported being assaulted Well in California Prisons law professor at UC Hastings David Levin calls it a substantial problem and relief could be offered by proposed legislation. They could inform the prison when they're taken in what they want their status to be what programme should be used. And most importantly, where they would choose to be house special housing would not be mandated. The California Department corrections could say no if they had some articulable reason to do that, But it would allow the trans people to say this is where I think I would be safer. And would hopefully reduce a lot of that unnecessary violence. Levine says. The Department of Corrections has stayed neutral on the legislation and there is no strong opposition. So it has a good shot at passage, but it's unclear if it will get on the agenda during this very busy legislative session. Marquis Schaefer KCBS California's launched a $30 million program to provide thousands of parolees with community services after they complete their prison sentences or released months early because of the pandemic. Officials say the state is providing half of the money the aid former inmates with finding housing, jobs, health care, transportation and treatment. The other half is coming from various foundations and charities. Returning home Well initiative will provide services to inmates released since July. 1st case. CBS News Time 5 44 the sports line in about a minute, ready.

CBS UC Irvine California UC Hastings Department of Corrections California Department Marquis Schaefer David Levin Levine professor
"california department corrections" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

05:40 min | 4 months ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Toll free number is well for you to leave us your reflections on the John and Kensho nomination. 887780 for Fame. That's 877 NATO for 3 to 63 We're just talking about all the prisoners being released from California state prisons were now at the lowest prison population in 30 years. Because under the guy we told you, this is the beginning of the pandemic that they would use his pandemic to achieve some of their social goal. Oh, yeah, don't includes prisoner dumping. Yeah, and they just they just lied, And that's why you never ever accept. Any of these ideas, no matter how they present them to Mitya, what promises they make? Now you have a woman who did a terrible murder and she had 64 years left on her sentence. And she's only 44. Prisoners at high risk. As long as they're not convicted of a violent crime. She got convicted of first degree murder. Shot a guy in the abdomen and let him blood to let him bleed to death. Stuff him in a trunk of a car drove him for 750 miles. Why It's astonishing. And you know why? And whoever made this decision there name isn't in the in the story. No, it's just California Department corrections. Yeah, but there's no name. No, there's no official saying, I'm the one who released this, this murderous woman. Newsome stock would be held accountable. There's not one single reporter was even going to be aware of this story. Course not. We've got it from a lister, who ran it Sought in daily wire is the only place you'll see a story like that reported, And now they're worried. This is a story The El Segundo Times did. All the by the way 8000 inmates by the end of August, thousands more after that they might be coming to communities with covert 19. It says here that local authorities air getting little notice. There's no transportation. There's no plan quarantine housing. There's no clear indication that the people they're dumping from the state prisons are virus free, so like, well, we don't need that, do we? They're violent and they have the virus, and then they got nowhere to go. And they have no job. They have no job. Even if even if they did have a job, you're not going to be able to get through the unemployment. Why are you So the lease on the street committing crimes and spreading the virus. Lassen County is director of Health and Social Services. Barbara Long Go Wrote a letter to the California department. Corrections says you know, before you let these guys out, you better hold him for 14 days and test um because, she said, we had an inmate who visited with another free prisoner while quarantined in a local hotel. We do not know how many times that we left his room to go out. However, his to test did come back positive 10 days after his release. So this is actually happening. It's like, Oh, great, at least if you keep him in the president's gonna covert 19 there, but how you release him to the communities, And here's this stupid thing they did, and again, nobody's being held accountable for this. They had 121 inmates with the virus in Chino. They moved them to San Quentin. Now it's it's attacked 2000 prisoners in San Quentin 2000. They went from 1 21 to 2000 and killed 19 inmates, including 11 on death row. And I'm not morning. Any of them. But This is how stupid they are. They went out of their way and killed in second farm or people that if they had let these people just stay where they are. Remember, the first dumb thing they did was they transferred some prisoners from one prison of San Quentin, and that's what led to the outbreak. Remember that, Gary? Listen to this. Michael Kirkpatrick, 62. Had been deemed suitable for parole. He was released from San Quentin on July 13th. They drove him to a San Francisco hotel, the quarantine, and he said, Well, we were asked to stay in single rooms, but few of us did somewhere just walking around San Francisco while still awaiting results of covert 19 taste tests. Taken the day they were released. Well, that's what one of the prisoners and lasting county did. They put him in a local hotel and the director of Health and Social Services said is to test came back positive. 10 days after his release. We don't know how many times he left his room to go out. Her, Patrick says, Well, the person the front desk of the hotel is not going to tell you not to go anywhere, and he said he received no temperature checks during his quarantine, and he have a couple of inmates had to go on their own to a county public health office and get tested. You were only supposed to stay. In your room. And if they knocked on your door, they brought you food. But nobody stayed waiting for the food. They went out wandering around. This is this is Gavin Newsom's prison system. There's another inmate by the name of Joe Anderson, who got released from the California institution for men. And he said, Well, they checked my temperature. That was about it. So I went to a dollar tree in a Wal Mart. Before the county Health department found out about me and they sent me in for a Corona virus tests five days after he got out the test was positive. The probation department asked him in a polite but Stern way to take a free room at the local best Western. For 14 days. This was his best Western wear..

San Quentin Health and Social Services California California department San Francisco director murder county Health department Gavin Newsom El Segundo Times Mitya NATO Lassen County John Wal Mart first degree murder Chino Newsome reporter Barbara Long
"california department corrections" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Early tonight mainly clear late tonight with a little forty six to fifty for tomorrow more sun than clouds and becoming warmer with a high of seventy six to eighty eight I'm accu weather meteorologist Joe Lundberg news ninety three point one K. F. B. K. okay sun is up can't really see it through the clowns but it's fifty three degrees outside here at news ninety three point one K. K. this morning a Chino man is the first prison inmate to die of covert nineteen the inmate died at a hospital after contracting coronavirus at the California institution for men in San Bernadino county no further details were released this morning officials say one hundred fifteen inmates and eighty nine staffers across California department corrections have now tested positive this morning a top analyst says April's unemployment numbers in California could be higher than they were in March cave BK's Angelico B. O. ha report the seats implement development department reports a hundred thousand jobs were lost in March for the worst month since the Great Recession more than twenty seven thousand of those jobs are wiped off the books in the bay area or shelter in place orders were first imposed the jobless rate jumped from the record low of three point nine percent in February to five point three percent but far worse numbers are expected for April considering nearly three million Californians have filed for unemployment benefits over the last four weeks I'm Angelica will be and nowhere in California are they feeling it more than in Los Angeles where the mayor Eric Garcetti is warning about the economic impact on his city our city is under attack.

K. K. analyst California Los Angeles Eric Garcetti Joe Lundberg K. F. B. Chino San Bernadino Angelico B. O.
"california department corrections" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KCBS All News

"And an expert involved in the Coleman case could you speak to us Sir about the Coleman case first what is that what's the case that began over twenty five years ago a group of attorneys and experts filed a case here in federal court brazing questions about the quality of the mental health care that was being delivered to California prisoners throughout the state in nineteen ninety five a court ordered the department of corrections to drastically change and improve the kind of health care that was being delivered in there then and soon the several decades worth of continuing litigation over how much and how effectively the court's order was being implemented resulting as many listeners may recall several years ago in the United States Supreme Court case that we ordered the California department corrections to drastically reduce the number of people in prison in order among other things to better provide medical and mental health care to the prisoners who work to find in the system there have been improvements over the last twenty five or so years I wouldn't deny that but as you can see from today's chronicle report we've done no where near enough and there is still a mental health care crisis in the department of corrections is just curious if we have made certain strides how it how it is that the numbers are going up to the extent that they are as kind of a kin to the military where there's been an increase in suicides but they're not all in the field of battle and many of them are in the military installations what it what it's going on in a broader sense when it comes to mental health issues well if you the mental health system in the United States is itself in crisis good default mental health system in the United States is really the prison system we don't have a functioning public mental health system outside of our department of corrections in prisons are in many ways uniquely ill suited to address the mental health needs of of prisoners and or citizens and so one of that one of the problems is that we've called upon prisons to do things that they weren't set up to do and that's the battle that we've been fighting for twenty five plus years in California there is really little in the way of of fact give alternatives to mental health care outside of prison and so these problems worse and people suffer on the streets there's nowhere for them to go they get in trouble they get put in jail or or in prison and then we ask the prisons to deliver mental health care that they were never really intended or structured to do that's the historical problem it's a broader societal problem but the fact that we have in California for example thirty plus percent of the prisoners with serious mental health problems is not leave the prison system off the hook for providing that care if they're there then their mental health needs have to be addressed and what the chronicle report this morning in a lot of the other statistics that we've collected about mental health care in California prison suggested that those means those needs aren't being met and and and that crisis continues unfortunately and and people are suffering in the prisons on a widespread basis substance sometimes suffering so desperately that they decided to take her own life well let's hope that certainly things do begin to improve Craig Haney is a UC Santa Cruz psychology professor and an expert in the use of suicides that are happening in the California prisons.

Coleman
"california department corrections" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KCBS All News

"The bear is new station. KCBS cloudy tonight with scattered showers. Partly sunny, mostly dry tomorrow, a few isolated showers in the afternoon though in the hills. Good evening, I'm Larry Sharoni. Here's what's happening. Police in San Francisco are investigating a shooting at the California Department corrections in the city's mission district. Police say it happened inside the building on thirteenth street just before four this afternoon. Police say one person shot another before jumping into a car and fleeing the scene the victim has been taken to the hospital with injuries that are considered life threatening. No corrections officers were involved. The suspect is still at large tonight. A body has been recovered near the location of a landslide that buried a woman at San Francisco's fort Funston last month, KCBS scholar Terry reports from the scene. The body was discovered around eight thirty Monday morning near the water not far from where a portion of a cliff collapsed on Cairo sunshine scarlet on February twenty-second scarlet was hiking with her dog and. Another woman went tons of sand and dirt came crashing down on all three the other woman and the dog were rescued. Authorities delayed the search for scarlet after she was presumed dead because of recent storms. She was only twenty two years old. This neighbor, mardi earn stir is out here often with his dog to absolutely devastating. I'm glad that it's over with. And I'm glad for family that they know exactly what happened right now. Instead of that you turn a wondering. But absolutely devastating for everybody. At such a young person. The family is planning a memorial scholarship fund to honor Kaira who they described as a beautiful spirit at fort Funston in San Francisco, Scott with Terry KCBS, and we're still awaiting positive identification of the body by forties. A four year old child was rushed to the hospital after falling off of a fourth storey, balcony and Sunnyvale the evening. It happened just about five o'clock at the Sunnyvale fairway apartments. They are on the twelve hundred block of poplar avenue. Police tell keeping x five they are on scene investigating. But no foul play seems to be involved, California. Senator. Dianne Feinstein is giving attorney general William bar one week to turn over the entire Muller reports. So the congress can come to its own conclusions about the investigation of President Trump KCBS political reported, accelerated says Republicans are warning the Democrats they could face a serious backlash from voters in two thousand twenty if they don't grasp that Mr. Trump has won this round in a letter to attorney general bar Senator Feinstein calls bars four page summary of special counsel, Robert Mueller's investigation inadequate and demands that she received the full report by next Monday. And that Barr start delivering the underlying documentation that day House Democrats are likely to convene hearings, but California's Republican National Committee, man, Sean Steele, says voters are going to start tuning the Democrats out. So they'd better watch out. Steele says President Trump is now inoculated against any further allegations, which bodes well for the GOP in twenty twenty political landscape cups numbers. Go up his credibility goes up his enemies, particularly the mainstream. Media. Much of the democrat party. They go down and this is going to do. Nice things for Trump in the future. Whatever he's accused of by anybody is going to be met with great skepticism. So this gives them a protective shield. Steele says Trump's vindication by bar lifts, the dark cloud that has enveloped Republicans, especially in California, he thinks the GOP can reclaim some of the house seats. They lost last year, and that many of those moderate independent voters in the middle who migrated to the Democrats are likely to come back to Trump seeing him as a victim, especially if Democrats continue to go after the president with nothing to show for it. Doug, sovereign KCBS group of lift drivers.

President Trump KCBS Terry KCBS San Francisco Sean Steele California GOP Senator Feinstein president Larry Sharoni fort Funston scarlet Sunnyvale fairway Cairo Sunnyvale Senator California Department mardi
"california department corrections" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

10:32 min | 2 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"And it's just to raise awareness in considering the we are in Tucson. I mean, we're right on the border, but people are being affected by this all over the country. It's not just border states. You know this. I know this. That's the way it is. And we have an angel mom with us Agnes. Given me I read about your story. Way too many angel families out there way too, many Agnes. Thank you for joining us this morning. I appreciate it. Thank you so much for having of course. And and I thought your story was extremely interesting from your background and everything and let's go back because this happened in two thousand to your son. Ronald right. Tell us what happened. My son had gone over to drop off some food for his children and his girlfriend hadn't gotten home. And he was about to leave when he noticed somebody coming behind his friend. And he said who is that and he turned around, and that instantly he fired the gun that was intended for his friend, and my son got the bulletin, the arm traveled across his chest and several the main artery, and he died in surgery. He literally led to that. Oh god. And and and the person that did this an illegal alien, correct? Yeah. He's been previously deported had along a gang member. I had a long history of arrests. No kidding. Yes. So long history arrest gang member. This happened two thousand to correct. So again, this is not just something that happened last year two years ago, this this is this is sixteen years ago for goodness sakes in my heart broken. I'm fighting and bringing attention to this issue because this individual will be released from prison in April two thousand twenty thanks to our liberal courts in California. He was going for first degree murder or second degree. The judge convinced him to take a plea bargain for voluntary manslaughter which carries a maximum eleven years, plus ten years for using a firearm, which now our governor Jerry Brown to take gun enhancement charges away. So gangs can use guns freely. They won't get the additional so plastic straws are bad. Yes. The gun there there. Okay. Yes. This is this is this is incredible. This this is terrible. So this this happened to your son this illegal alien out of nowhere gang member. You name it. Are you in touch with anybody? In the California state government. And he prosecutors are they going to try to deport him. As soon as he is out. Well, he has an ice hold which in California means absolutely because it's a sanctuary state. And that doesn't mean anything. So literally California Department corrections could release them because they're not turning over inmates to ice. I'm trying to get a detainers on him. So they would be forced to turn him over to ice. Then you go through a process and possibly be deported. But here's the problem if he's deported who say's gonna come back again. And because I'm very vocal about this. I'm afraid is going to come after me or my family or my two surviving children my two daughters Norma or anybody in my family. So I live in this constant fear in my own country that I have to protect myself and my family because my government is not now, by the way, this is this is just an incredible incredible story Agnes, you're telling this to us. And what really drew me to you? Besides all these stories is the fact that you came to this country as a legal immigrant exactly escaped a horrific situation back in Hungary, talk about that. Yes. I was two years old when my parents straight to leave Hungary, and they got caught because I woke up in the middle of the night in the middle of nowhere crying. So they got caught they took everything away from them but did not arrest them. So in January nineteen fifty seven they went for the border again, which was with former Yugoslavia, and they were able to cross this time they gave me a concussion to fall asleep. My mother's friend worked at a pharmacy. So we were in the refugee camp for about nine ten months. We wanted to come to United States. But because my father was born in Yugoslavia, they wanted to stay in my mother said, no. So they refused to allow us to go to the American embassy. So we'll give three choices South Africa, Austria or Brazil. We're going to Brazil where we lived for thirteen years. And mind you as a stateless, meaning we didn't belong anywhere because Hungary and government took or citizenship away. And when we immigrated to United States legally, we my PIN supply twice which the location expired to time they were successful. They follow through and we legally immigrated to the United States my father job contract. He had they had the sign documents stating that we would not apply for any public assistance. And we assimilated we learn the language not none of us spoke any English. We learn the language I'm a US citizen, and I honestly can say this is my home my country. I took my oath of citizenship extremely seriously to defend my country gives foreign and domestic invaders in illegal aliens or invaders. Yes, they are. So I'm assuming sincere to apply twice. How I mean? How long was the whole situation for your family to try to to come here legally? So it took thirteen. Eighteen thirteen years. As soon as you got to Brazil, you tried every single time. No. Every now, and then they they they applied and I'm not sure exactly how how long, but I think they give you a process of. I'm not sure six months a year in if you don't go back in the kitchen, just the the close the files so thirteen years to come here legally, my parents never gave up the sacrificed so much to come to this country to give us my brother and myself, a better life, and this crime didn't just affect me as his as Ronald's mother. But my brother, and my only sibling had a massive stroke, four months after from the overwhelming and died. I can't even I mean, how do you? How do you? Hold on. How do you get the strength? I have faith in this country that Americans in the politicians will open their eyes. And I think. Thanks to President Trump will beginning to come to that point. And we're far gone. We have really gotten away for the past like twenty thirty years that immigration laws weren't enforce and now thank God. We're on the right track. And I just wish that the congress would work with our president to to bring these laws to enforce the laws. I mean, we have immigration laws just enforce it. Yeah. I got to just try it. Listen, drives me nuts. And I didn't come here from another country. And I didn't lose anybody. I can't imagine what it does to you. And again, just you know, every time I I come to this. I talked to angel families just go through this. I don't know how you do it. We were you just I mean banging your head against the wall for I mean since two thousand two dealing with people in California was anybody on your side in California, actually, the politicians avoid me, the get to know my face get to know my name, and I just saw one of the politicians in California. And they said, you you defending DACA recipients. Well, they have dreams, and so did my son does anybody care about my my son's dreams in the thousands of Americans that are killed, you know, at the hands of illegal aliens, we can't import crime who have climbing our country in another hypocrisy that I get is. Well, it could have been an American could have. But it wasn't don't you? Don't you hate that? These people just shouldn't be here. It's not it's not anything with race. It's not anything like that at all. And you know, and and the media loves to do the whole. Switching of immigrant and illegal immigrant and calling them all immigrants. I tell you that makes me so angry. I say illegal alien period, not undocumented immigrants, the would immigrants should not be put after whatever they wanna call them undocumented D league, or whatever they are not immigrants. Immigrants is somebody who follows law incomes here legally. So your dad Agnes given me she's with angel families. And she unfortunately, lost her son in two thousand and two to the hands of an illegal alien gang member deported the deported. Previously criminal record you name it, and this is in California. So again, you you said that he he's out in twenty twenty possibly and. At least twenty twenty parole because he had a determinate sentence. Actually, he's really stayed with have been June of twenty four twenty four. And now, it's April second. So it's getting shorter and shorter unafraid to call check periodically because I it just changes from time to time. So, you know, next time, I call my January of two thousand twenty and and you're and you're afraid that he might find you and your family. Yes. Do you ever think about just leaving California? Whatever little bit of family that I have left. My two nephews my niece, my two daughters live in California where in my parents, or my brother, and my son or am I going to go zone is a nice state. We have nice dry weather. We like people like good people. We need more. Good people. Thank you, just because it's just it seems like it's such a mess out. There was talk about your your parents because. We get this. Listen, we're in Tucson, and you drive in certain areas in Tucson billboards are in Spanish, and this is in Spanish, and you could speak whatever language wanna I'm from Long Island New yorker. And we had you know, there was the Greek part of queens. And it was you know, these Chinatown is little there's all these areas, and I get it. And it's okay to embrace your culture embrace your coach fantastic. But but you have to speak English because it's the country on top of that. It's the best way for you to succeed. Is that the message of your parents gave you? Oh, absolutely. I it's really ironic because when I was English is taking English as a second language, I learned Spanish because everybody in my class was from from. And I speak Portuguese from Brazil and speak Hungarian because that's what it was. But I learned Spanish I taught myself Spanish I bought dictionary. Because everybody in my class was from Lebanon country from Mexico. And and I cannot understand that somebody lives here for twenty years. Ten fifteen twenty thirty forty years in cannot speak the language to me. It is absolutely unbelievable that they did not assimilate. They did not respect this country enough to learn.

California Agnes Brazil Hungary Tucson Ronald United States Yugoslavia Jerry Brown first degree murder California Department queens Long Island Norma American embassy President Trump South Africa Lebanon president
"california department corrections" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KGO 810

"Call me up eight eight eight one zero is the phone number. We here for two and a talk show. And so the the thing I want to talk about is the prisoners being used to fight. These fires. And there's there's a lot about this. That bothers me. But let's start with the basic is that. The GOP will say, you know, don't do the crime. If you can't do the time and besides, you know, it was voluntary. It's true prisoners aren't trained firefighters. They aren't they aren't paid. They get a dollar an hour and two dollars a day. And they aren't technically forced. But the expectation is high. Can certain privileges. Are according to those who do so you're going well, chip what's the problem with that? Well, look, if that's true, then put the hundred people indicted, so far under the Trump administration and the fires near San Francisco and give them an F and rake. All right. To take the again, most of these people are poor disenfranchised, and that dollar or two dollars actually can buy cigarettes and buy some extra things that they wouldn't normally have, but it's still essentially slave labor. Now, I've had people go chip they can learn a craft and the recidivism is low. First of all, they're not gonna job as a felon. You're not going to get a job as a firefighter when you get out. They don't give that to felons. Okay. I mean, you can apply to the state, but it's you're not gonna get it. So you don't you're not really learning anything there. And there's a good chance that you get injured you could die. I mean, not a good chance, but a much better chance than if you're back in your cell. Watching TV look I get California relies on thousands of prisoners including many women to battle the wildfires. That burned in our state, and they do gain some training and earn some time off their senses for good behavior. Typically two days off for each day served, but the state is exploiting prisoners eagerness stern time for early release. While salaried firefighters get about seventy four grand plus benefits, which is probably worth at least seventy four grand inmates earn about two bucks a day again, as I mentioned with an additional dollar per hour when fighting active fires, and even though they get some training. They don't know. They don't have the instincts. It real firefighters in the middle of a mess like that. When the wind starts to change again, if they don't have leadership, or if it's easy from what I understand to get lost in a fire to get trapped in the next thing. You know, if you don't have a, you know, the I forget, the names of the guys that fight those fires and remember we had a few die about five years ago. Hot. They have they have like anyway, there's a movie that was made about these guys and they're really trained and sometimes it can get these. They can drop to the ground and cover themselves up and try to get through the fire. These guys don't know how to do that they're prisoners. So I guess my point is is that using prisoners to fight. Fires is is not what we should be doing. We're taking advantage of poor people and poor people who have committed a crime many times drug related. You know? I mean, these aren't violent felons that are out there to do this. Most of them probably were dealing either pot or they might have been dealing coke again. Remember there were for years. And this is one of the new sentencing guidelines that one of the things Trump administration has done that I go. Yes. It's a great thing. I mean, did you know that if you had a crack cocaine and the other guy had powder cocaine you went to jail sometime for three times as long as a guy with a powder cocaine. It was a racist. It's racist way of punishing people and putting those people out unprepared to fight these fires while you know, instead of having to pay him seventy five thousand dollars a year, plus another seventy thousand benefits that's just wrong it to me. It's slave labor. It's got a Cupertino at eight thousand eight oh, eight one. Oh, Jim thanks for the call, man. Appreciate it. Yeah. I I agree with you up to a point that. I'd like to see white collar criminals out there. And of course, most they're not gonna do that. Because they don't have to they have money. They don't need the time off because their sentences are shorter. They usually are in minimum security prisons. These guys can sometimes be in maximum security or in in prison said aren't that? Well done even if they're only moderate security. This is a truly taking advantage of poor people generally poor people who have no other way out I agree with you. But then again, but if I'm wild up, and I'm going to be locked up for years to come. They might seem like a. It might seem a little bit shooting. The know that I can get out of those prison walls for for a day or a week or that's why it'd be great to do that. If you were picking up trash on the side of the road. But when you're in a in an active wildfire, and again, you know, I'm reading an article right now in democracy now dot com, and it's it's chilling to what these guys face. Yeah. I agree with you there. You know, the name of that movie. You were talking about Walberg started that they were a team of firefighters up in Colorado that dot com fire it died. I think it was I don't know twelve twelve of those men or maybe. Always in. He's always in disaster as in patriots day where you know, the terrorist attack. And then he was the perfect storm. I guess. Anyway, thank you so much for taking my call. Appreciate it. Jim. Thanks, pal. Yeah. That is true. Mark Wahlberg is you know, and then he was in that that one with a talking bear, which was as bad as a as a movie about tear anyway. So look the California wildfires what we're looking at now is who's actually fighting the wildfires in the people fighting wildfires. Many cases are prisoners up to seven thousand full time and seasonal California firefighters, but they rely on behalf of that it's prisoners. So of the of the ten thousand ten and a half thousand people out there fighting those four forced I mean, these these wildfires about thirty five hundred of them are prisoners, including men and women and men that work side by side. He do this California Department correction tweet last week just about two thousand prisoners are currently fighting the wildfires including fifty eight youth offenders. You know, I just.

California Jim GOP cocaine Mark Wahlberg crack cocaine Cupertino San Francisco Colorado Walberg two dollars seventy five thousand dollars five years two days
"california department corrections" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news in Washington, I'm Windsor Johnston. President Trump continues his campaign swing across the nation in a final push to drum up support for Republicans ahead of next Tuesday's midterms. He's scheduled to hold campaign events in Montana, Indiana, and Florida this week NPR's timber Keith reports Trump will rally supporters in Missouri tonight. President Trump has made it his mission to help defeat democratic senators running for re election in states. He won and sixteen including Missouri. He will make one more stop there on Monday. The last in what will be an intense four days of campaigning to rallies a day on Friday Saturday and Sunday and three on Monday. His themes are now familiar hitting hard on immigration bashing the press and Democrats by Trump's own account. He expects GOP Senate candidates will fare well on Tuesday. But. When it comes to the house. He says Republicans are just doing okay, he is largely focusing his efforts in these final days and helping Senate and gubernatorial candidates tamra, Keith NPR news, Washington. The suspect charged in the deadly shooting at a Pennsylvania's synagogue has pleaded not guilty on Lee herring from member station. W reports Robert Bowers appeared in federal court today, this was Robert Bowers second court date since the Saturday attack that left eleven dead and six injured. He wore a red jumpsuit him was represented by two public defenders during the ten minute hearing. Prosecutors read the forty four charges against him and told him he could face the death penalty. The suspect did not make eye contact with the attorneys, but appear to listen intently, a grand jury charged him Wednesday with fatally preventing the free exercise of religion in committing firearms. Offenses the government said in a complaint filed the night of the shooting that the accused gunman made antisemitic statements during the attack the. Cases, set to go to jury trial for NPR news. I'm only herring in Pittsburgh. Open. Enrollment begins today for healthcare coverage through the Affordable Care Act NPR's. Alison kodjak reports the program is stable this year, despite the Trump administration's efforts to weaken it the Trump administration lower reduce the enrollment period about six weeks from last year, and those are the states that are on the federal marketplace, some states have their own marketplaces and those have longer enrollment periods. But most analysts say they're expect to see a similar level of enrollment in states where there's longer enrollment periods and more marketing, like California or New York, they're are likely to see maybe an uptick NPR's. Alison kodjak reporting open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act ends on December fifteenth at last check on Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average was up two hundred sixty four points. The NASDAQ composite up one twenty eight the S and P five hundred up to. Twenty eight. This is NPR news. Good afternoon. It's one oh four. I'm Eric Roy with California headlines from KCRW an antelope valley woman and her boyfriend have pleaded not guilty to torturing and murdering her ten year old son. Prosecutors say twenty nine year old Heather butter on and twenty thirty two year old cream labor of Lancaster entered their pleas yesterday after they were indicted by Los Angeles County grand jury little Anthony Abbas died in June after baron called nine one one to report that her son had fallen down the stairs. Authorities say heat endured five or six days of sustained abuse. Anthony's aunt Maria baron tells channel seven she hopes the DA throws the book at her sister. And Anthony was so mazing in. No, he's looking down on us right now. Smiling because he knows that Justice is coming but Ronin lavar facing a pretrial hearing in early December. That's when a judge will decide if there's enough evidence to order them to stand trial. That's also when prosecutors are expected to announce whether they'll seek the death penalty, California prison officials are disputing a whistle blowers report that accuses them of abusing inmates who need psychiatric care. It says inmates with serious emotional problems may go for months without seeing a psychiatrist and often go without their medications, the whistle blowers. Dr Michael golden the prison systems chief psychiatrist he also accused accuses printed in prison managers of hiding the abuse from a federal monitor overseeing the prisons and from lawyers representing inmates. One of those lawyers. Michael Biehn says Dr Goldens report is a bombshell his view, the mental health care system was operating way below any standard at a dangerous way for patient safety. California Department correction spokesman disputes that saying prison brass had worked closely with the courts..

President Trump NPR Anthony Abbas California Robert Bowers Alison kodjak Missouri President Maria baron Washington Keith NPR Michael Biehn Windsor Johnston Senate Pennsylvania Pittsburgh Dr Michael golden Lee herring
"california department corrections" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:28 min | 2 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KGO 810

"Is. Kind of a weird space here because obviously with the beginning of the metoo movement with Weinstein and Ronin ferris article and over the last year, we've seen a respected, and and and understanding of what it's like to be a victim of sexual assault in this society for women. So it's with a little bit of pause that I talk about you know, what do we do to the for the people who have committed these crimes, and I say at a large picture in mind in other words. Sexual assault and sex crimes. Have that one of the highest rates of recidivism of all crimes robberies number one right murders way down at the bottom. Interestingly, and but sexual assault is one that we have to figure it out. Because for whatever reason, it's you know, I think the best thing is to stop it long before it ever starts, right? Yeah. I mean, just like you said educating men, young boys and Jackley. But when I look at somebody like Cosby Cosby's down the road and gone. But every day we sentence people who committed sexual crime sex crimes, and we just throw them into the jungle that is that is our state and federal prisons anything really, you know, we might. I mean, there've been everything over the air from ever moving their testicles, which doesn't work because once you reach maturity, you can still have sex just can't reproduce people understand that if like stratas who are the the the people he's just saying for the Vienna. Boys choir. They had there's movement removing. They were children. So their voice should stay high. They've learned this stuff over the years and trying to trying to stop sex crimes. But my question is is like are. We really do. We really care so much about the victims. We should care about the future victims too. And that that would apply to any kind of sentencing. So yeah, I mean, I think the department of corrections and rehabilitation does not focus at all on rehabilitation. I don't think that that's our first. I mean, I I'm not saying it's easy to run a prison. And I I'm sure there are programs inside. But but exactly I think it's overcrowded. Yeah. I've been I went to Folsom prison, and I did a reporter up in Sacramento. You just look around. And you don't know, where's the rehabilitation supposed to happen? I did a comedy show a lorden, which is a federal prison located actually in Virginia outside of Washington DC, and they told us not to curse and there's like two hundred and fifty hardcore I came up there. And I said, hey, they told me not to African curse, and they all laughed because they realized that controls that are put on them and nothing is there to help them. And again, I know people are going screw them. And I understand that. But that's not going to help us as as a whole. This is a deep and long sort of conversation. But watching Cosby and watching the vitriolic hate that is being sent his way. And I know, you know, obviously for women and those who go I get it. I'm just saying, you know, this is probably the best in the hardest time to actually talk about these other things our freedom is eight hundred eight let's go down to San Mateo say Jim eight thousand eight eight ten eight carried away. Wait and see what happens probably nothing. Jim you knew that. Because you just called. You know? I think you're right. I think that the Whiteside. He looked at it. Detour to other people today the crime, but I think you're right. I think that the overlook a lot of things like large part of it is a big part of it is overlooked. Look didn't. You'll find a lot of people have mental health problem. A lot of people could never learn to read and write a lot of them are children. There's a whole budget issues are overlooked, but I want to say one more thing. And that is there is a strong connection between Bobby. And also with me to move it with Cavanaugh. Kellyanne Conway yesterday was on. This was something happen when he was in high school. Younger than high school feel about that play in high school. So you get a free pass. The point the problem that you can't train men today. You have to train the children babies when they're born the men they ask to be taught from day one that women are not they're they're placing objects. They are to be respected, and you have to bring it up with a child as they grow. Once. You get you know, sixteen seventeen eighteen it's too late. How many how many of us fix our roof on a sunny day? No, you're right. You're absolutely right. Absolutely. Right. But that's where it starts because I've seen it over. And I'm seventy years old. I seen it over and over again where men you know, we'll cannot. This and that and I'm sorry, and I'm a little bit embarrassed to be a man right now. Because I know how they are. I'd been in the army I went to college I've been high school, and I've been professional business. And I know how men are in so many so many or like that. This conversation. GM? I can say you sound like a pretty decent one. Thanks for the call. But he brings up a good point about. How men are already the way. They are. I mean, yes, men can change. They can learn about writing them all off you had to start with their kids and boys. But it also makes it difficult to instill it in boys. When are still so many men that just don't see what's wrong. So they're getting conflicting messages, and that's why people to meet human needs to end. Now, we need to keep the pedal down because this is a societal change record women aren't perfect, but we're not talking about anything else right now except sexual assault. Right. And so just I know because people here you say about men, but what we're saying is is that in was far sexual assault. I I don't know what percentage of one percent involved women attacking men, but that's pretty much it. And you know, we've given you the numbers before ninety nine out of one hundred this is the center for disease control ninety nine of one hundred women that go to authorities. Don't get a resolution in court, and then the thousands and thousands. Thousands of women that don't report it. We've had been at twenty people call us in the last two weeks saying that they were salted. And it didn't get reported Brennan. What's the answer when it comes to prisons? I could tell you my time is a parole agent at crush officers. I don't have a perfect answer. However, the fact of the matter is that everyone coming out of the state prison or county jail is basically going to be one of your neighbors, and you have to decide what kind of job, skills and social skills social skills. Those people are going to have when they're coming out. And so that's the irony as a taxpayer you're paying so much money year to house these people, but for a long term investment to protect to prevent having future victims like you said, you're better off trying to treat. You treat them respectfully some job, skills and social skills. What we call pro social behaviors that they might not have had growing up. Politician wants to set him. He goes, I don't want kids living at anywhere near schools, and I go, you know, they have cars that can drive by the school. I mean, it's like it's the way they think the narrow way they think that they can solve problems is laughable. Right. Yeah. And it's you know, I can't speak for the California Department corrections. I worked out of state for a number of years, and it's gonna bury what kind of programs are there. But the altered out there that the possibility for change you have to at least have that opportunity. Presented itself. You have to give these people committing the crimes the ability to try to change, otherwise you're just going to end up with more victims down the road. I think you're right. And appreciate the call and taking the time to do that. More your phone calls. And we'll again, this is I think this is one of these things when you see Cosby go out going out and handcuffs like that. I know that there's two distinct feelings, and you can actually have both of them you can be angry at him, and you can feel bad for him. Because what happened? That's that is not something you see often in America to have that emotion. But that's important. We'll get to more of that coming up. That's Nick Hamptons Keijo.

Cosby Cosby assault sexual crime Jackley Vienna Jim Virginia Kellyanne Conway Nick Hamptons Keijo Weinstein Sacramento Washington Ronin ferris America reporter Cavanaugh San Mateo Bobby GM California Department
"california department corrections" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Activists on the inside George Jackson who was killed on August twenty first. And that is also important because it reminds us that sometimes serving time is so dangerous because the conditions are so bad that you can lose your life on the inside. And and so the fact that we are here again, we were here in two thousand sixteen and we're, we've actually been here for many decades now in it's really time for those of us on the outside to to listen more carefully to what's going on on the inside and not just assume that when someone is sentenced to serve time that that is a a picnic to not assume that it's just, you know, you do the crime, you do the time, but to understand that these institutions are deeply deeply exploitative they are dangerous. They are abusive, and if we hope for them to create a more Justice -iety we are, you know, we're really not understanding what's going on inside you. I'm mindful that this is such a big issue and we haven't even talked in depth about the inmates demands for better living conditions because we, there are actually cases going on was reading about cases in Mississippi that are in court describing some pretty shocking conditions. In institutions there we picked topic. I think that we need three to four hours to unpack here. So can we just focused on this issue of labor of prison labor? Because it's, I think it's one that we can maybe make some headway on you heard Amani little earlier in shandra, Basell coach still with us on the line. Different views there about, you know, the the states use the the, the prisons use of labor, what inmates should expect from ruminate renumeration for the work they do. I mean, what's your view on that? Well, let me just say that. I think there's great consistency with between what Amani and Chandra have both said, which is that when you're on the inside the issue, the problem is not work. People want to work work. Very productive. It feels good. It gets people out of their cells and it gives them skills. The problem isn't work. The problem is expectation, and that is a problem for all of us means that companies who, by the way, were barred from much prison labor until we got mass incarceration when they essentially worked overturn all the laws that had been a barrier to them. The companies are the only ones who are benefiting the state is the only ones who are benefiting not workers on the outside who used to make Anderson flooring or who used to work in a call center and not focus on the inside who still have children to support who still have parents to support and who need money themselves to get basic, basic things inside a prison can I just don't, but your percents, because I mean like the the, the states have a pretty consistent response or departments of corrections. I have a pretty consistent response that they would. They would say they have said that if they have to pay more to inmates were working, they simply can't afford it. I mean, the California Department of corrections told. A reporter that the per capita cost of one inmate in the prison system in California exceeds eighty thousand dollars. And those are, you know, we're talking about security, housing, food, health care, etc. And the California California Department correction said that those are expenses that employers and the outside world just don't have to carry. So there's no room in their budget for paying inmates Mawr. Well, let me just say to that. I mean, first of all, the fact that we are spending eighty thousand dollars to keep a human being behind bars for that many decades, that many years is the first problem. So the this, the the talking about prison, labor actually invites us to have a much bigger discussion about what we are imagining our Justice system to do. Just as a note, California's the most expensive, the spend, the most of any state. It ranges like Alabama's down in the fourteen thousand dollars range. So what we do know, we do know that that kind of expenditure to keep someone walked away for that many years from society has a counter productive effect. And if we wanted more just insane. Of society. We need to start rethinking the larger sentences, which is what these guys and women on the inside are saying. So that's one issue. But the other issue really is that, yes, it is expensive to make goods..

Amani California Mawr California Department of corre California California Departme George Jackson Mississippi shandra reporter Anderson Basell Alabama Chandra eighty thousand dollars fourteen thousand dollars four hours
"california department corrections" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"You have to do x y z they're gonna do it so what explained the dynamics of prison politics low bit well in in california prisons there's four major prison gangs you have the mexican mafia which is a southern california based prison gang you have western familia which is a northern california prison gang then you have the brotherhood which are white lights premises and then you have the black girl family which the black prison gang now the black guerrilla family which the most powerful black prison gang the seed dc california department corrections they don't control blood and crips on the streets but the mexican mafia controls all the sudan gangs or the latino gangs in los angeles so that's where all the politics comes into play from the latino side so when somebody goes into prison it you have to pick a side racially yeah absolutely like if you went to jail even though you have mexican blood and you you can roll with the mexicans but then you cannot roll with the blacks at all or you can pick the blacks you know so you definitely especially if you're on a level for prison now california has depending on the severity of your crime you go to a level that matches that severity or the number of points you've accumulated as an inmate if you get over sixty points you go to level four or if your crime series you go straight to a level four prison which is the the most severe and level one is the most relaxed if you're the the politics come into play.

california los angeles sudan
"california department corrections" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"It and and and this guy killed him when they were sleeping he's he stalked sleeping homeless people and jumped on i'm stabbing them to death techniques and twenty five year old guy and he confessed to the to the january twenty fifth killing of sabha alsaad i am i am not an observer of this kind of thing so all offhand wayne the lawsuits going to be filed today how fast as orange county settle on this thing part of the problem is we still don't know exactly what happened in that cell but my guess is pretty quickly i don't think they want a jury to see this situation at all i dislike i say it's it never mind car thievery let's say you have a bunch of unpaid tickets and you get a five day the sentence or a 10day sentence and county that's not very uncommon and these days usually like an la county you go in for a couple of hours you come out because the real criminals are coming out of state funds but you go into assault with a guy who's a unadjudicated double killer whose fr who should stop giving he has he's fresh avesta give and you're snoring to louder you don't he doesn't like the look of you and the us of dead he if it turns out that he had any kind of implement that he got in there like a shank or shiv yeah touch as lucky luciano had at alcatraz bright then they you will settle even faster and four more money poked out the bitches eyes so there's also an an utter of you've ever heard this before but i i have a friend in the california department corrections and in a lot of rural counties in california if the county is filled up county jail filled up they will send overflow.

wayne orange county la county assault california luciano twenty five year twenty fifth five day 10day
"california department corrections" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"That many of the crimes the increase in violent criminality that we've been marking here on superhype local sunday's might have a connection to i dunno be brought fortyseven people getting out of prison who have no business out of prison people whose crimes his last crime they committed do not ma reach the criteria to stay in jail and so jerry brown our governor is terrorising us at least four of the young woman held 32yearold woman held for a week in her apartment in his ouzghar being beaten by her boyfriend who just got out of the joint she might feel like she was terrorized by whoever let him the f out who apparently also ran out of fs so we will put that in the followup file right they're just kinda wondering what he was in foreign of why he got out and you know what there's a possibility he was in for just ticky tack and he got out as part of a normal routine and that he had the impression put on him by the california department corrections was so slight that he got out of prison and on post release supervision and said oh what is the tuesday i think i'll imprisoned my girlfriend for a week and beat her an or at least until until and caught alum hailed his plan obviously was to imprison her till he felt like non imprisoning her when we come back a horrible tragedy in apple valley a inter family homicide and a california law that is coming in response to a cluster of teen suicides in clovis which were calling super hyper and local super local sunday here on kfi am 640 more stimulating talk michael with a news i share swat team has now apparently made an arrest after they moved into a neighborhood in el body or a man had barricaded himself inside a home the guy was said to have a knife he was apparently.

clovis michael superhype jerry brown california department california el
"california department corrections" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And here on sunday night's that many of the crimes the increase in violent criminality that we've been marking here on super hypothetical sunday's might have a connection to i dunno being brought forty seven people getting out of prison who have no business out of prison people whose crimes his last crime they committed do not ma reach the criteria to stay in jail and so jerry brown our governor is terrorising us at least four of the young woman held 32yearold woman held for a week in her apartment in zuza being beaten by her boyfriend who just got out of the joint she might feel like she was terrorized by whoever let him the f out who apparently also ran out of fs so we will put that in the followup file rights they're just kinda wondering what he was in for an of why he got out and you know what there's a possibility he was in for just ticky tack and he got out as part of a normal routine and that he had the impression put on him by the california department corrections was so slight that he got out of prison on post release supervision and said oh what does the tuesday i think i'll imprison my girlfriend for a week and beat her on or at least until until uncaught alan held his plan obviously was to imprison her till he felt like not imprisoning her when we come back a horrible tragedy in apple valley a inter family homicide in a california law that is coming in response to a cluster of teen suicides in clovis which were calling super hyper and local at suburban local sunday here on kfi am 640 more stimulating talk michael should pay with the news a sheriff swat team has now apparently made an arrest after they moved into a neighborhood in el body or a man had barricaded himself inside a home the guy was said to have a knife he was apparently the only one inside the home cop saves initially wanted for assault about three o'clock.

zuza alan clovis michael assault jerry brown california department california el
"california department corrections" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Of that one bill handle tomorrow morning it's a the play of i am six or more stimulating top johnny can't show john no doubt camp by the and six forty we just talked to the when you're police teeth to play for about all that went down monday in one ear resulted in the deaths a police officer keep hoyer just me can forget patrick a tale who used for the injured officer yeah you just keep listening to what we're telling you hear because i am california department corrections is intentionally being dishonest and so is the los angeles times and i don't know about the television coverage ivan watched it but they are have a lot of voices and outside of ours and were telling you the being dishonest this could have been prevented he's boyer in any other time would've been in jail on pearl violations and would've been charged with further crimes that would've led to further jail time but because of the way proper forty seven was written and because of a be well known i'm and the way was implemented he was on the street when he should've been walked up and that should be the headline that should be the first ten progress of the story and everything else is nonsense the los angeles times wasting a lotta inc on the family members of me here crying i don't care they raised again member they raised a site go cop killer and i don't care about their tears and they're problem so you killed their cousin and a kick yeah could go because that's what he did that first before he ended up and win here so you know maybe twenty years ago they could taken some action and realize they had a cycle child but right now what matters is the family and friends accused boy or the other police officers at the but here police department that's what matters or in terms of the sensitivity and what matters say in terms of news and legally is that eighty one oh nine is an absolute botched it causing deaths it's causing police deaths and civilian deaths.

officer hoyer patrick boyer los angeles times john california twenty years
"california department corrections" Discussed on WINS 1010

WINS 1010

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"california department corrections" Discussed on WINS 1010

"Especially on long island forty three and clowney and center part going up to forty four to town on you do probably stays bowers on new york's whether station headed when wins news time nine thirteen charles mann sin is all live that word from a california prison official following reports from _t_m_z earlier today by the infamous called killer was taken to a hospital in bakersfield sixty miles south of the california prison where he has been in carson rated an official of the california department corrections did not say where the manson has been out from lies or not manson was convicted years ago of orchestrating the nineteen sixty nine murders of pregnant actress kate and six others atp correspondent led the door to cover the manson murder trial so there are many websites devoted to charles mann something the regeneration teams not to know an awful lot about the killings which was so horrific but more about the man eight and and that's what fans today one of my friend of the other day of that charlie was always a common man and now you come on the whole new generation calls manson is now eighty two he's serving nine can current life sentences wins news time nine fourteen rangers and devils both in the third period in their respective games will updated next ten ten win sports and one minute this is morey moreland morris in here to tell you geico has more than just great savings much more yes one geico could help you rack up more move the faster than you can say that i'm more versus they've also been the fastest growing auto unsure for more than ten years that's more like it furthermore geico has fast unfriendly claim service that might seem like a knock see more on but it's not all the more reason to say no other auto unsure has more more than geico geico expect great savings on a whole lot more.

bowers new york official bakersfield carson manson kate charlie geico charles mann california murder morey moreland morris sixty miles one minute ten years