9 Burst results for "California Academy Of Sciences"

"california academy sciences" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

01:42 min | 6 months ago

"california academy sciences" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

"Discovery. Which is the magazine. Still running of the California Academy Sciences in San Francisco and sent it off and got a good response. I mean I think I was in search of something to say however when I got that Article Back. I proudly showed it to my father. Who was a journalist? White House correspondent actually at one point and Speechwriter rid knowledge light and he proceeded to edit the article already printed and sent it back out know and it was a humbling experience. But you know you. Editing is is a humbling experience you learn to take it earned from it and a years later when I was starting to realize that maybe this was a book. Nobody had written a book on Killer. Whales at that point and it was this history. I was kind of interested in learning about the whole of captured. Business was still happening in British Columbia. In we were able to our our small group were able to go out and watch. The aftermath of a capture is. Put a hydrophone down and listen to some of those whales that were captive so I realized there were a lot of dimensions to this story and I always kept a journal from their young so I had had a lot of notes so I asked my father. We've been talking back and forth. And he agreed to edit. You know help kind of blurred apprentice as it were to variety with him. Editing.

White House correspondent California Academy Sciences San Francisco British Columbia
"california academy sciences" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"california academy sciences" Discussed on Ologies

"In the shallow waters that <hes> you you know how these ellison my aunts that reliant photosynthesis to get their food but corals are really large group of organisms and they we have deep sea corals that don't have these symbiosis that just feed terrifically by eating dinner things in the water in a lot of corals the Ken have pigments and their skeletons do <unk> pigments of their own until like black quarrels you know read corals was things that you see see in the stores like that's still the skeleton but those are the organisms themselves she should have pulled out of the ocean which we should leave. Even the ocean <unk> now are those getting harvested just for decorative purposes very often on. There's a lot of protections in different places about corals <hes> but it's not not everywhere okay suicide note. Some figures have estimated upwards words of two hundred million dollars. Annually worth of coral is poached from the oceans for things like jewelry and decor and in some places just taking a coral skeleton bit from the beach is illegal so if you're gonNA get arrested rested on a beach do something else have better story you know so maybe don't have coral decorations yeah okay but what you can have. Is that where technology increases where we're doing a lot of work with like thirty imaging go home you you go to museum or you know Tech Place and get a coral printed that in your house Meyer them in a in a way that's a replica. Yeah absolutely makes just beautiful right you can. I'm sure you can even cast the plaster Paris in their fixed it P._S.. Yes I did look it up and there are hollow coral shaped molds you can pour plaster Paris in them and it just seems more convenient than getting yourself to an ocean and then out of jail and now how long have you been studying corals. I've been studying corals formerly for four years during this degree but I've been interested in quarrels for for much longer have studied corals as a volunteer researcher at the California Academy Sciences on expeditions and volunteer expeditions actually kind of like else obscure. Oh come as a younger person and were you always maybe drawn to the see where you always like an aquatic person. That's a good question too so I grew up just outside of Chicago where even though I felt like I was growing up in a body of Water Lake Michigan. You know it's not a marine in environments freshwater environment so it looks like I wasn't growing up swimming on coral reefs but for me you know.

Paris Meyer Ken Water Lake Michigan Chicago California Academy Sciences researcher two hundred million dollars four years
"california academy sciences" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"california academy sciences" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ninety percent decline in new baby. Coral settling on the reef. Joining us as Earth Day to talk about the state of coral reefs worldwide and the research on coral reproduction being done right here in San Francisco's Rebecca Albright's. He's curator of invertebrate, so Allah, she at the California academy of sciences and welcome to the program. Thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. How day happier. Stay to you. And coral reefs are something that I know like me many of our listeners are very concerned with and so I wanna talk about them with you, generally. But I also wanna talk about the Great Barrier. Reef because this article appeared in nature, and we jump on things like this about all the bleaching that went on there that caused a lot of adult coral reefs the die, but also a decline in the new corals, and that's what's causing. Some real concern seems to be are we talking about climate change here? Yeah. Absolutely. I think one of the one of the biggest worries at this point with the projections for the future of coral reefs is the frequency that. We're seeing these global mass bleaching events occur. The Great Barrier. Reef is obviously one of the most iconic systems in the world. It's the largest barrier. Reef that we have it's over twenty three hundred kilometers long, and you can see it from outer space, and the fact that we could have something catastrophic happened to a system that large and such a short period of time is really sobering. To a lot of us in the coral reef community and the general public at large. So the we have had three global mass bleaching events that have happened. The first one was in nineteen ninety eight the second one was in twenty ten and the third one started in twenty fourteen and reach with the cyclones who let the twenty fourteen one twenty fourteen was a series of cyclones twenty fourteen and twenty fifteen and then on the Great Barrier. Reef it was slammed by back toback leaching events in twenty sixteen and twenty seventeen and one of the biggest concerns was that. We've we've S it's estimated we lost about fifty percent of quarrels over the last thirty years, but the Great Barrier Reef that twenty three hundred kilometers. Later system about two thirds of that was impacted in a series of two years. We've never seen change like that. And that was it was alarming and and sobering. And the study that you're referring to is a follow up study after these back to back leaching events that said, you know, what if we're losing a third of our quarrels in that system over a period of a couple of years, what does that do to future populations to reproduction, and the concerning thing we're seeing is a plummet in the amount of reproduction and recruitment that happens in that system, which is obviously the next generation of quarrels and implicates recovery dynamics over the next decades. Plus, the corals are so integral to biodiversity in so necessary for for well, all kinds of industries fishery industry, obviously. But also well tourism, I mean, we're talking about the Great Barrier. Reef and the possibility of losing billions of dollars if this too big to fail. Reef actually goes down. And this is not just a canary in coal mine. This is the canary in the coal mine for so many the ecosystems, and I think there's really important emphasis here that needs to be placed on how singularly significant this is not only the environmentalist. But for all of us, we're talking let's talk a little bit about bleaching. No what happens with this. They lose their color, but they can they can recover though. It takes in some instances about a decade and as far as the Great Barrier. Reef, my understanding is most of this is in the north, but the south not so much cracked. So in the the most recently Shing event, the twenty sixteen twenty seventeen the upper two thirds of the system was impacted by that. So we have the northern grape area from the central Great Barrier. Reef that was impacted the southern grey reef actually, fared pretty well in those events in. So in these the study that you reference with the recruitment that area looks like it's really healthy right now. But one of the problems is that the current off the east coast of stray flow north to south and so the the potential for. That southern healthy part of the Great Barrier. Reef to repopulate the northern parts is very low. And so how are we going to get the northern two-thirds back as the concern right now? I want to the figure just so people know we're talking about a four and a half billion dollar economy boost to the trillion economy that's tied to the Great Barrier. Reef absolutely in globally coral resear- estimated to bring it around four hundred billion dollars a year and ecosystem services, and that's through fisheries tourism supporting scuba diving coastal protection, it's estimated than an intact area of reef actually mitigates ninety seven percent of wave energy in terms of of protecting human livelihoods in coastal infrastructure. So these ecosystems are offering us unparalleled. Ecosystem services that we were risk losing right now. And they're like the rainforest of the ocean. I mean, people have to get step with just how important they are in violation and this Assyria and they're also beautiful. I mean, just statically to talk about every talking with Rebecca Albright who is curator of invertebrates zoology, the California academy of sciences, and is about really we're talking about the world's coral reefs and the Great Barrier. Reef in efforts to restore them. Let's go to restoration because some pretty exciting things going on reading about robots and three D things. And you've been working in your lab over California academy with essentially. Seeing to it that different ways restoration could take place who changing the reproduction. My understanding is that you've got reproduction going on with about once a year now, and you're trying to work at two are twice a year. How does that figure? Yeah. So right now at the California academy we have initiative color hope for reefs, and we're doing a bunch of different things. But one of them is to try to understand how to facilitate this reproductive cycle. How do we get more quarrels onto the faster and corals most quarrels usually only spawn reproduce sexually once a year, and that's really limiting in terms of trying to help population recover from damage in. So one of the ways that we do this is by partnering with nonprofits called C core which stands for sexual reproduction in the field. We actually go out during that annual event, and we collect eggs and sperm. We bring him back into the lab, we fertilize them. And then we grow out baby corals and plant them back onto the reef and something we're doing here in San Francisco where we don't. Have proximate. Coral reefs is actually trying to spine quarrels in the lab. And it's really exciting because it's something that's only been dying a couple of places in the world. And we're the first place in the US to do it. And so what we have to do because it only happens. Once a year is mimic this hierarchy of environmental cues that trigger or illicit this reproductive this annual reproductive event. And that includes mimicking seasonal cycles changes in surface temperature throughout the year. We have to mimic lunar phases. New moons and Fomin sunrises and sunsets. To try to get these organisms to spine. And we've done this two years in a row now, which is really exciting. And the hope is moving forward that we could create a couple of these systems in stagger them. So that we have spining several times a year, and that gives us more opportunities for research and more opportunities for restoration needs to be done on a massive scale because we're suffering massive leaching around the world and climate change is not the only. Factor. Pollution is also very much. Let's talk about what I mentioned before the robots in the three D printing to help out. Yeah. There's a lot, you know, it's funny because a couple years ago after these catastrophic events, I would get asked a lot. How do you maintain any semblance of optimism and this and that was a really hard answer to question question answer at the time. And now, it's it's actually I do have a lot of hope because I mean, there's this saying that necessity is is the is the the merchant benching. That's where we are wrangling should wills virtue. Yeah. That's where we are in. So we're turning towards integrating tech solutions. And so there's a lot of ideas around right now, we're trying to three d print substrates that are self stabilizing. So that we can see seed them with baby corals and throw them out onto reefs. They they sink down to the ocean floor in their self Sabe lies in his one way to scale these restoration efforts using robotics underwater, drones to outland these things there's all sorts of where we're starting to work at that interface between disciplines which is is looking very promising right now, it's good to hear. Because a lot of the projections of said, they could be gone by twenty fifty at the present rate that they're going and let me hear from our listeners on this. We're talking with Rebecca Albright. She's curator of Inver race zoology at the kademi science here in California academy science, you can give us a call. Let us know your thoughts are any questions you might have. And you can do that. Now at our toll.

Great Barrier Great Barrier Reef Rebecca Albright California academy of sciences grey reef San Francisco California academy Inver race zoology US California Assyria twenty three hundred kilometer two years four hundred billion dollars ninety seven percent Ninety percent billion dollar fifty percent
"california academy sciences" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"california academy sciences" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stay with us for the here. And now program it's coming your way right after forum beginning at eleven o'clock. Welcome back to forum on Michael Krasny. Coral on Australia's Great barrier. Reef is failing to recover after a major bleaching event caused by warmer. Seas in two thousand seventeen a research report found nearly ninety percent decline in new baby. Coral settling on the reef. Joining us this Earth Day to talk about the state of coral reefs worldwide and the research coral reproduction being done right here in San Francisco's Rebecca Albright's. He's curator of invertebrate, so Allah, she at the California academy of sciences and welcome to the program. Thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. How are they happier? If they to you, and you know, coral reefs or something that I know like me many of our listeners very concerned with and so I wanna talk about them with you, generally. But I also wanna talk about the Great Barrier. Reef because this article appeared in nature, and we jumped on things like this about all the bleaching that went on there that caused a lot of adult coral reefs the die, but also decline in the new corals, and that's what's causing some real. Concern seems to be are we talking about climate change here? Yeah. Absolutely. I think one of the one of the biggest worries at this point with the projections for the future of coral reefs is the frequency that. We're seeing these global mass bleaching events occur the Great Barrier. Reef is obviously one of the most iconic systems in the world. It's the largest barrier. Reef that we have it's over twenty three hundred kilometers long, and you can see it from outer space, and the fact that we could have something catastrophic happened to a system that large and such a short period of time is really sobering. To a lot of us in the coral reef community and the general public at large. So the we have had three global mass bleaching events that have happened. The first one was in nineteen ninety eight the second one was in twenty ten and the third one started in twenty fourteen and reached with the cyclones who led the twenty fourteen one twenty fourteen was a series of cyclones twenty fourteen and twenty fifteen. And then on the Great Barrier. Reef it was slammed by back toback leaching events in twenty sixteen and twenty seventeen and one of the biggest concerns was that. We've we've S it's estimated we lost about fifty percent of quarrels over the last thirty years, but the Great Barrier Reef that twenty three hundred kilometers system about two thirds of that was impacted in a series of two years. We've never seen change like that. And that was it was alarming and and sobering. And the study that you're referring to is a follow up study after these back toback leaching events that said, you know, what if we're losing a third of our quarrels and that system over a period of a couple of years, what does that do to future populations to reproduction, and the concerning thing we're seeing is a plummet in the amount of reproduction and recruitment that happens in that system, which is obviously the next generation of quarrels and implicates recovery dynamics over the the next decades. Plus, the corals are so integral to biodiversity. And so. Necessary for for well, all kinds of industries fishery industry, obviously. But also. Well tourism I mean, we're talking about the Great Barrier. Reef and the possibility of losing billions of dollars if this too big to fail reef actually goes down. And this is not just a canary in a coal mine. This is the canary in the coal mine for so many of the ecosystems, and I think there's really important emphasis here that needs to be placed on how singularly significant this is for not only the environmentalist. But for all of us, we're talking let's talk a little bit about bleaching. No what happens with this. They lose their color, but they can they can recover though. It takes in some instances about a decade and as far as the Great Barrier. Reef, my understanding is most of this is in the north, but the south not so much cracked. So in the the most recently Shing event, the twenty sixteen twenty seventeen the upper two thirds of the system was impacted by that. So we have the northern great Barry from the central Great Barrier. Reef that was impacted the southern grey reef actually, fared pretty well in those events in sewing, these the study that you reference. With the recruitment that area looks like it's really healthy right now. But one of the problems is that the current off the east coast of flow north to south, and so the the potential for that southern healthy part of the Great Barrier. Reef to repopulate the northern parts is very low. And so how are we going to get the northern two-thirds back as the concern right now? I want to give the figure just so people know we're talking about a four and a half billion dollar economy boost to the Australian economy's tied to the Great Barrier. Reef absolutely globally. Coral reefs are estimated to bring it around four hundred billion dollars a year. And he goes system services, and that's through fisheries tourism supporting scuba diving coastal protection, it's estimated than an intact area of reef actually mitigates ninety seven percent of wave energy and terms of of protecting human livelihoods and coastal infrastructure. So these ecosystems are offering us unparalleled. Ecosystem services that we were risk losing right now. And they're like the rainforest of the ocean. I mean, people have to get step with just how important they are in violator, and this Assyria they're also beautiful. I mean, just aesthetically to talk about that. We're talking with Rebecca Albright who's curator of invertebrate zoology, the California academy of sciences, and is about really we're talking about the world's coral reefs and the Great Barrier. Reef in efforts to restore them. Let's go to restoration because some pretty exciting things going on reading about robots three D things and you've been working in your lab over California kademi with the sensually. Seeing to it that different ways restoration could take place who changing reproduction, my understanding is that reproduction going on. But once a year now, and you're trying to work at two are twice a year. How does that figure? Yeah. So right now at the California county, we have an initiative called hope for reefs, and we're doing a bunch of different things. But one of them is to try to understand how to facilitate this reproductive cycle. How do we get more quarrels onto the faster and so- corals most quarrels usually only spine reproduce sexually once a year? And that's really limiting in terms of trying to help a population recover from damage in. So one of the ways that we do this is by partnering with nonprofits called C core which stands for sexual reproduction in the field. We actually go out during the annual event, and we collect eggs and sperm. We bring them back into the lab, we fertilize them. And then we grow out baby quarrels and plant them back onto the reef and something we're doing here in San Francisco where we don't. Have proximate. Coral reefs is actually trying to spine quarrels in the lab. And it's really exciting. Because that something that's only been dying a couple of places in the world. And where the first place in the US to do it. And so what we have to do because it only happens. Once a year is mimic this hierarchy of environmental cues that trigger or illicit this reproductive this annual reproductive event. And that includes mimicking seasonal cycles changes in surface temperature throughout the year. We have to mimic lunar phases. New moons and foam sunrises and sunsets. To try to get these organisms to spine. And we've done this two years in a row now, which is really exciting. And the hope is moving forward that we could create a couple of these systems and stagger them so that we have spining several times a year, and that gives us more opportunities for research and more opportunities for restoration thing to be done on a massive scale because we're suffering massive leaching around the world and climate change is not the only. Factor. Pollution is also very much Florida's. Let's talk about what I mentioned before the the robots in the three D printing to help out. Yeah. There's a lot, you know, it's funny because a couple years ago after these catastrophic events, I would get asked a lot. How do you maintain any semblance of optimism and this and that was a really hard answer to question question answer at the time. And now, it's it's actually I do have a lot of hope because I mean, there's this saying that necessity is is the is the the, thanks. That's where we are wrangling wills virtue. Yeah. That's where we are in. So we're turning towards integrating tech solutions. And so there's a lot of ideas around right now, we're trying to three d print substrates that are self stabilizing. So that we can see seed them with baby quarrels and throw them out onto reefs. They they sink down to the ocean floor in their self stabilizing in his that one way to scale these restoration efforts using robotics underwater drones to out plant these things there's all. All sorts of where we're starting to work at that interface between disciplines which is is looking very promising right now, it's good to hear. Because a lot of the projections of said, they could be gone by twenty fifty at the present rate that they're going and let me hear from our listeners on this. We're talking with Rebecca Albright curator Inver race zoology at the kademi of science here in California academy science, give us a call. Let us know your thoughts or any questions you might have. And you can do that. Now at our toll free number. Join us at eight six six seven three three six seven eight six the number again for your calls. Eight six six seven three three six.

Great Barrier Great Barrier Reef Rebecca Albright California academy of sciences grey reef San Francisco California Australia Michael Krasny US Assyria California county Barry Florida twenty three hundred kilometer two years four hundred billion dollars ninety seven percent
"california academy sciences" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"california academy sciences" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Of the time. So yet rid of his much loan as possibly feel it. You can outdoor cats are really destructive unloved cats. I love my friend's cats, but they kill so much wildlife. Lizards birds insects, even and I know that's really hard for some people here. But that you can have. You're happy. Indoor cat you could make an outdoor cat run. One of the women that I do a lot of work with a huge advocate football life. Here. Nelly. Susan gottlieb. She has a lovely nice big cat run outside. And so and she has hundreds and hundreds of hummingbirds visit her house, but that Cameron allows the cats to be outside the birds to be safe, and then Leslie, Carol mention the no pesticides. I'm going to get really specific one kind pesticide not dentist sides any rat poison the being put out they can be really destructive going up the food chain getting all the way even to in are amazing mountain line p twenty two he was suffering from mange had to be captured and administered medicine, and that's that's directly linked to rodenticides. And so that's something we're really trying to fight against here in Los Angeles right now. And getting that to be something that the. Adopted across the city, and hopefully Ross the county, and hopefully other cities counties will follow suit. Is there anything else you would like to add? And I wanna remind listeners that there's this amazing opportunity coming up the city nature challenge is gonna be able twenty seven th through the twenty nineth for survey shin period. Get your smartphones digital cameras out take pictures any plant or animal in any city. That's participating and that's a project that I helped to star in co-founded when someone from California academy sciences, and it's a competition between it was originally for years ago. L A versus San Francisco, which cine can find the most ager in the hundred forty cities around the world. Lots of cities in the western United States LA and San Francisco a long standing rivalry. Help us beat San Francisco. I just remembered one thing or new book while I'm one of the co-authors Carol was one of our scientific advisers. We have a whole we have twenty five field trips around LA, the nature gardens is one of them. So on vine, okay hero. Anything you would like to add in terms of the the plant in wildlife connection to the plants that I didn't mention it all that are really kind of should be at the top of the list for providing capital are the buckwheat s- the area games and Bacchus so buckwheat ZIM backer as have been huge stars in terms of the the insect diversity that they support how many different species of buck weeds..

Susan gottlieb San Francisco Los Angeles Carol Leslie Bacchus California academy sciences football United States Ross Cameron
"california academy sciences" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"california academy sciences" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Really good kid. Had he not had he not yearn for his mother's love his entire life. Things would be different. Had she been mother things would be different. Reagan George would've turned seventeen on Thursday in Santa Rosa, Jeffrey, Xiao CBS, the number of babies born in the US infected with syphilis has reached the highest level in twenty years. We're now at a point though, where we're ready to say that getting tested once during pregnancy may not be enough to avoid tragic outcome Virginia Bowen of the CDC in Atlanta who says most cases were in the southeastern and southwestern U S nine hundred babies contracted syphilis from their infected mothers last year that is more than double the number from twenty thirteen a lack of awareness on the part of air. Canada pilots was the probable cause of a near catastrophe at SFO last year that according to the National Transportation Safety board, the NTSB KCBS gentlemen reports on the findings after more than a year of investigation the National Transportation Safety board declared. That the pilots of an Air Canada flight failed to effectively review a notice to airmen about conditions at SFO before their nearly disastrous approach on July seventh seventeen as NTSB member. Jennifer Mendy pointed out four planes were waiting to take off and the Air Canada plane came within ten or twenty feet of one of them you had the potential if the crew did not execute a go round of eleven hundred over eleven hundred airplane occupants could have been affected given the lineup on the taxiway the boards safety recommendations, six to the FAA and one to its counterpart transport Canada include requiring certain aircraft to have an alert system for pilots approaching the wrong landing surface, general lane KCBS, San Francisco school kids will be getting an inside look into the sewer system through an animated educational video created by the PUC and the California academy. Sciences. It's the story of Phut a short video about a six year old girls visit to the southeast treatment plant. It was created to teach elementary school kids about what happens to human waste after. It's flush down the toilet. Students will see how wastewater is treated from the toilet flush to the treatment plant to the final discharge into San Francisco Bay. Coming up on KCBS. I'm Carrie Hodousek. One of the great American beer is can be found right here in the bay area. We took silver in other Belgian ale. It's two forty five. Here's your sports line this morning with Bruce McGowan. Well, certainly haven't had a lot of games like they did on Tuesday night. They lost five straight coming into this contest. They blew a four three lead in the ninth inning with Fran mill raise singled in the long run for San Diego off closer Will Smith. But in the bottom of the twelfth inning, Madison. Bumgarner came up with a game winning single after Gorky Serena's led off the inning with a triple for Bumgarner who was appearing as a pinch hitter. He was asked to be thought he'd never have a chance to bat in this game..

National Transportation Safety Bumgarner Canada SFO Air Canada San Francisco Bay San Francisco FAA Phut Jennifer Mendy CDC Virginia Bowen Reagan George Carrie Hodousek Gorky Serena Bruce McGowan US San Diego
"california academy sciences" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"california academy sciences" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"We were just talking about that before the show got started i was saying them my my view on ventura boulevard is a little different than yours yes if you if you've never visited the california academy sciences up up in san francisco it's just incredible and they redid the whole thing in two thousand and eight thousand nine something like that it's a new bill it's it's stunning yeah we have a lot of windows and we look out directly on the park it really you know the architect really wanted to bring the park in and and it's a really really beautiful place and we have over three thousand animals within the building to so you know it's a great place to have shared experiences and kind of explore biodiversity and yeah definitely recommend you make visit that's hope feels like having my three toddlers in the house is you know a lot of interactions in a chance to explore biodiversity i love the jingles when you're heroes did you see the new documentary i have not yet now she's just incredible chance it's just just something else and i love like you said drone up and focusing on systems moore's you got older nuggets focusing on systems as an interesting way to put it because systems are so vital and important we talk here about you know sort of loosey goosey how everything is connected but they really are and it's such a smart way to build a concentration is is to is to pull all of those pieces together because if you just the there's there's a lot of incredible people that just work in ecology our biology all these different things and they have their specialties and that's super important or chemistry or physics or whatever it might be but when you're someone who can take a step back in and help us piece together all of those inter weaving functions it it it does give gives more truth to to the way things really work or talk about the day they don't so you're valuable we appreciate that so listen.

california academy sciences san francisco moore ventura
"california academy sciences" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"california academy sciences" Discussed on KGO 810

"Ladder in the in the number two lengths to be extra careful here what's keeping you from getting a great night sleep mancini sleep rolled invite you to rest easy during their tax free metro sale enjoy huge savings on top brain quality mattresses at the lowest possible price call 1864 sleep or visit sleep world dotcom i'm shelley runaways with john handle read the hand the reunion square hotel one of the great things about going to san francisco also is our museums you take the museum of modern art what a great facility and that's fairly new yeah they just reopened and april of this year and they're displays they added additional space from henry you're talking 10 minutes walk of all the museums the one that really sticks out to people as the young museum it's so unique it is really unbelievable it's hard to really define it in one way or another because they're always changing their different exhibits but then in a run across the parking lot is of course the california academy sciences where they are in vain and they are creating something else to do exploratorium new digs for them new digs for the exploratory em and what a great interactive experience for the kids it isn't just for the kids it's actually for the adults sold by how do i get in touch with the call 80095 that's 80095 hush and come to san francisco and really enjoy the holiday season marie law here for the box i got through a guard after i'd been here some time next year give me your car and no no guilt guard saw welcome back everybody michael 50 this is consumer chalk on kgo and that.

san francisco time dotcom california museum of modern art people price metro academy
"california academy sciences" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"california academy sciences" Discussed on KCBS All News

"December fifteen winston discovered many belied you know in surely your doubling gas from companion stars or even entire stars which produces a lot of energy making an easy to fine but or recent discovery is coleman quiet the black hole is barely feeding it also it's tough to see the black hole is known as ve la twenty one thirty plus twelve and catalogue designation that means it was discovered by radio telescope known as the the la the very larger ready at first it was thought to be a galaxy far beyond our own milky way but follow up observations with it and other telescopes down that it's only seventy two hundred light years away well within the milky way the energy that's coming from a system means that it probably consists of a black hole that's a few times the mass of the sun and the companion started that's much smaller than the sun the black hole is slowly pulling gas from the companion the gas forms at the end fate around the black hole some of this material trickles enter the black hole slowly increasing attached this system is so far in faint that it's impossible to see but you can find gets position early tonight with the help of two guiding lights orange myers is in the south southwest is nice holmes and the bright star dan nabbed is far too it's upper right at the top of the prominent northern cross the twenty one thirty plus two of his about halfway between them a faint bullough cold slowly smacking on a stellar companion our when addresses start eight dot org at the university of texas and austin mcdonald observer torrey i'm sandy wanted started is sponsored by the morrison planetary him at the california academy sciences did lewis in sports coming up next is this season to save big your lopes so her again for a great last minute deals on the perfect holiday get like a stanley sixty eight _p's mechanics tools that with rolling tool chest for only seventy nine dollars plus get up to thirty percent off select holiday items those save time money save the holidays to love your ballots will forty eight years we'll twenty four body of replies titans market yellow bryce clarence lead selection very special occasion while supplies last all sales final holiday clears items.

winston black hole milky way holmes dan lewis university of texas austin mcdonald sandy morrison california academy bryce clarence seventy two hundred light year seventy nine dollars forty eight years thirty percent