35 Burst results for "Caleb"

"caleb" Discussed on The Uncommon Christian Podcast

The Uncommon Christian Podcast

04:18 min | 2 weeks ago

"caleb" Discussed on The Uncommon Christian Podcast

"Today I'm joined by my friend Pastor and author Caleb Kaltenbach to help us understand how to be kind and they can't. So culture. Well, here we go. This is the uncommon Christian podcast with Michael Hilton. Will all right guys we are joined by the man, the myth, the legend Mr Caleb cotton botch say hi to the podcast for me you Kayla Hey podcast. It's to be with you man Michael Thank you for having me Dude. It's. You're such a good dude I'm so glad you're doing this. Man Thanks Caleb. Just as you guys know, Caleb has become a really dear friend a true confidant and encourage her and one of the most important voices in the modern era of churches today I tell them that all the time and I'll continued telling him that until the day he dies whether he believes we're not and not just a an important voice for one segment of things but for the entire church in Christianity so I appreciate you Coming on today we are in a series called be kind we're talking about what it looks like to be kind in our world today and we're talking about cancel Culture Kayla and I know you have out some thoughts and opinions on that I've read your blog posts. So let's jump right in real quick before we jump into that and just kind of tell us a little bit about who caleb is what Caleb does and what Caleb is all about. well, I'm first and foremost. Follow Jesus and then I'm glad I'm a husband. I'm a pastor I've served at. Eleven Years Church on in a Los. Angeles. Called Shepherd Church currently attend and I served as a lead pastor at a church in Seamy Valley and also one in Dallas Texas and Have Connery Unique Story I. Wrote a book about it called Messy Grace and I was raised by three lgbtq people two lesbians in a gay man and I was raised activists community in Kansas City, and basically I was taught that Christians hate gay people. If you're not like them, they will not like you and I joined a Bible study to learn how to attack the Bible. When I was in high school I became a Christian my parents kicked me out. When I came out to them as a Christian. always tell people that was my coming out to my three gay parents as a question and Eventually, my parents became Christians at the ages of sixty, nine seventy. So I write books Bob, the intersection bathing culture robocalled got up tomorrow stocking about engaging.

Caleb Kaltenbach Mr Caleb Caleb Michael Hilton Bob Shepherd Church Bible Seamy Valley Los Texas Dallas Connery Kansas City
The Only Black Pastor In Town Wasn't Invited To A Black Lives Matter March

All Things Considered

01:27 min | Last month

The Only Black Pastor In Town Wasn't Invited To A Black Lives Matter March

"Church in tiny Lake City, Colorado, needed a pastor a couple of years ago, Brendan MacMillan took the job and moved there with his wife and seven Children. I would say overall, the town has been very receptive of our family, and the reason is that when it comes to ministry and the role that I believe God has asked me to do then race doesn't matter. Not everyone in Lake City is white. In some here, we're proud one. About 50 of the town's 400 residents turned out for a black lives matter March in June. But nobody invited McMillan despite other faith leaders being asked to attend, he says. It sounds like potential Saturday night Live sketch and first is quite comical. But I would say that my feelings were hurt just a little bit, but more so I would chuck that office. Exposing some of the areas That might be problematic in like city or mountain towns. Blind spots we made this march is an act of solidarity, but we also do not do our best to reach out to black people in community. 21 year old Caleb Chambers was one of the organizers of the march in avoiding Organization of our black population. We avoided connecting with them and building relationship that ended up being Really hurtful. McMillan says he received heartfelt apology emails from the organizer's, but he still hasn't spoken to them. There is a

Tiny Lake City Mcmillan Brendan Macmillan Caleb Chambers Colorado
Mid-Air Collision - Alaska

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

06:03 min | Last month

Mid-Air Collision - Alaska

"Was a mid air collision of two airplanes near these sold DOT NA airport. On the Peninsula of Alaska near Anchorage. On Friday of last week, killing seven people including a Kaanai lawmaker. A single engine to have lengthy HCC to beaver was involved in the crash which carried six people fifty-seven-year-old Gregory Bell of soul, DOT NA. Forty year old Guy David Rogers of us and South Carolina residents. Caleb. hosie had their Halsey, McKay? Halsey. And Kirsten right according to the LASCA state troopers the only person in the other plane a single engine. Piper PA. Was Sixty three year old state representative Gary Nop of by troopers federal aviation officials said. Six people were confirmed dead at the scene while one person died on the to the central Peninsula hospital in an ambulance. federal NTSB was recovering the two planes and the NTSB Alaska chief. Clint. Johnson said. Well. That's what he said Saturday, the agency help to be finished with recovery efforts by the end of Saturday and the goal is to bring the two planes to secure location in the West Selah area by the way this is from. A local news outlet A D. N. dot com whatever that stands for. So High Adventure Air Charter on Friday posted a message on its website confirming that one of its aircraft was involved in the crash. At, this time high adventure air is working to support families involved in his working with the National Transportation Safety. Board, who is investigating the in the accident? Our thoughts and prayers are with all of the families involved in this tragic accident. Bell the beavers pilot was part of the family owns and operates high adventure air charter based on long near Lake in sold out now. The business offers fishing hunting, bear viewing and glacier tour trips as well as custom charters. The charter plane which was equipped with floats took off from Long Mirror Lake and was headed to the west side of Cook Inlet. The. Piper PAC twelve was equipped with wheels and took off from the sold in the airport but investigators do not know yet where it was headed. Interrupted your first second other pipers that onto quit with wheels the ones that have floats apparently Okay. I kinda struck me. Kind of struck me as odd as well. Must Pipers I think that's a fair statement. Most pipers have wheels. But apparently, because the the BEAVER was float. Float equipped beaver. They felt like they had to. Put that make that point. Okay. That's I could have just said that took off from the Saldana airport not the like. Ben. Anyway. Witnesses. DESCRIBE THE MID air collision, which they say produced a tooth rattling sound and sent debris flying. Alaska State Trooper said they began getting reports of the crash two miles northeast of sultanas airport just before eight thirty in the morning on Friday, most of the wreckage landed about two hundred yards from the road, which was closed briefly to safety concerns and Deborah's are debris. National Weather. Service. Reports from the Sultana airport for Friday morning show clear visibility with broken clouds at ten thousand and four, thousand, five, hundred feet. So anyway, they're still investigating why the collision occurred. and. That's all they have. So it's amazing. How often you get close to alluring craft Pakeha you haven't spotted them and most of these occasions just give everyone a bit of a fright when you get very close about. The advent of eighty s be for everybody is going to help these situations but quite honestly The best thing to do is just keep head out of the cup used them Wanna eyeball but of course, has limitations We all know that. Sudan you know we were. Really through. Our evolution sensory systems are is already designed to pick up moving targets and If you're on a collision course with someone, they don't actually move relative to you because you're a collision course if they moved then you'd easily tell are either gonNA in front of you behind you above you will below you'll whatever. So something that's completely stationary in your windshield pups just adult initially is she knows very easy victory for peripheral vision to pick up. So does it starts to move one direction or another that you attention is attracted to it. You can say if you look directly at it with the the highest acuity portion of your eye, which those is, you know it's about the size of your fist held on link. It's not a very big piece of your eye. Which is why it's important to scan the sky. All the time particularly in the areas when you'll vulnerable. To Collisions talking about three o'clock tonight. but you know it is possible papal creep up from behind you take a look out there occasionally and do so insect chosen to do. So with discipline so that you can cover the entire sky and bear in mind that it's very easy if you're looking into an empty sky, feel is to focus backwards towards you. And longer be stretched out at infinity. So there's less chance of your actually seeing the thing you're looking for. If you find yourself staring at the windshield, you'd be looking out the window too long glance out something that's more about video forty feet from you usually the ground or cloud or something, and then restart

Alaska Ntsb Peninsula Of Alaska Guy David Rogers DOT Halsey Gregory Bell Anchorage South Carolina Caleb. Hosie State Representative Long Mirror Lake Central Peninsula Hospital PAC Mckay National Transportation Safety Kirsten Clint Saldana Johnson
Normal? There's no such thing for college football anymore

One Bills Live

02:26 min | Last month

Normal? There's no such thing for college football anymore

"Of laughs about college football. And for those of you don't know. Now they've got college football players that are opting out of the 2020 season of Virginia Tech. Cornerback. His name's Caleb. I'm sorry. That's not Caleb Brantley. Yeah, um, Caleb barley. Partly for college football season, he's going to get ready for the draft. I would think there's more players like this. Who would would be More apt to just start training for the draft, getting ready for the combine as if it was gonna happen Normally, I don't know that it will. It's pretty early in the off season for this to have gone completely away in that amount of time. But I don't Makes sense to me. I guess I get it if you're if you've got a chance, and if you have, and most of these guys do know pretty well, they're going to get shot to play in the National Football League. How good a shot. You think you've got. May depend on whether you play or do not playing in the college football season or whatever that college football season. Looks like the brownie. You and I have talked about this. I don't know how colleges are going to get it done. You can say what you want about the NFL how unlikely it is. It's 10 times more unlikely at the college level to get a football season in Will you saw with the A. C C did They announced a 10 game conference schedule conference. Only they well and they pulled in Notre Dame who was who is who is an A C C member for basketball and other sports, but was not for football. They were still independent. And they convinced Notre Dame Two. Take their NBC television money and put it in the A. C. C pot. In exchange for playing a full conference schedule. And being eligible. To play for the conference title. And To play in the Orange Bowl in the A C C spot should they win the conference? Right. That is seismic. Yeah, that's what it is. But it is. It is indication on How much cove it has kind of turned. The normal way of doing business in college football upside out. I mean, these are desperate measures. I mean, it's a football powerhouse, making a seismic move after refusing any and all advances to join a conference. Yeah, here they

Football National Football League Caleb Barley Caleb Brantley Virginia Tech NBC Basketball A. C C
US is expected to report a record-breaking economic plunge

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

02:50 min | Last month

US is expected to report a record-breaking economic plunge

"Of restaurants and businesses in the Sacramento area have been struggling, even shutting down due to the Corona virus pandemic going deeper now, on a new report from Yelp that shows numerous businesses have closed in the Sacramento Roseville Arden Arcade Metro area. Yelp reporting more than 1500 businesses shut down between March 1st and July 10th 131 restaurants. 99 retail businesses were marked permanently closed. National projections suggest that roughly half of small businesses or risk amid the Copen 19 crisis, I talked about this with Caleb Silver from invested media consumer spending, which drugs 70% of US gross domestic product has been falling after climbing in June. Why, Because of the researches of the virus has forced the closures of businesses. You mentioned the ones around Sacramento. Happening all over the country Cos isn't trying to be open hiring folks back and they had to lay that Marcus. You have this resurgence, which is putting people back on the unemployment lines, just the time with a $600 a week. Extra unemployment benefit is running out. And Caleb talk about the different industries. I'm obviously the hospitality travel industry, but it really it's affecting everybody thing. It's seemingly everybody across the board pretty much nearly every sector has been impacted by the pandemic in the economic fallout if you look across the retail sector We've seen a number of legacy Retail's go out of business filed for bankruptcy here consolidate. But even if you look at industrial demand a factory sector where we thought we'd have a recovery by now, we had one in the beginning of June. That's gone. Those industries are now suffering again as well. And the root of all of this is the lack of spending by businesses and consumers because there's so much on certainty about the virus and where we go from here. So Caleb, Even what people are spending online is just not not measuring up to what needs to be done to keep the numbers up. Absolutely. When you think about where we were back in February, with the economy was growing about 2 to 3%. Consumers were basically healthy across the board. Even with the lower income level, we did have robot spending, But as soon as the virus hit, and we were forced to work from home businesses shut, consumer spending except for online spending has really gone down. But online spending is not going to prop up in the comedy of Okay and a final the impact of the economy if we continue in this direction, but the impact on the economy has been pretty staggering. Already. We already had 10 millions of people who are unemployed. We have many millions more unattached to the workforce were simply not looking for a job because there are no judge. So you have the unemployment hacker. Then you have GDP. Gross domestic product is expected to plunge. 34% on an annualized basis in the Latin quarter. That's going to be the steepest plunge since before 1958. So we're looking at historically bad numbers for the economy. Historically bad numbers for unemployment and bending, which is really driving the US economy has dried up.

Caleb Silver Sacramento Yelp United States Sacramento Roseville Arden Arc Legacy Retail Marcus
Rise in Unemployment Claims Signals an Economic Reversal

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

02:18 min | 2 months ago

Rise in Unemployment Claims Signals an Economic Reversal

"The pandemic looking like it could be around for a while and the impact on the economy uncertain. And, of course, unemployment benefits in this month. Caleb Silver is the editor in chief for invested PDS. We were not expecting one point for one million Americans fought last week. We're expecting less than that. The resurgence of the virus and the consequent shutdown of economies and businesses around the country needs employers had to lay people off again. So this is not what we wanted to see at this point in the recovery and as you mentioned right there July 20 seconds when the last $600 we check those out. There's no extension. There are a lot of folks going to be hanging in the balance here. You know, Caleb, I had read something that the president was thinking about extending it. But for less money, you know, there's been that big debate how people are making more, You know, not going backto work. Why should they go back to work if they're getting so much money? So there's that consideration to weigh what we call a moral hazard, And it's actually up to Congress on whatever bill they agreed to. Whether to extend that $600 a week. There's talk of making it $500 a week for the Treasury secretary today said 70% of a person's income. You can be very hard to figure that out because we all have various income. So that just shows you how much uncertainty and how exactly is where we're running to the end of these of these checks going out on July 25th The fact is, the stimulus checks have helped Americans pay the rent paid the mortgage. The fridge with grocery stay afloat in the mist of this crisis that has 35 million people about claiming unemployment in some 54 million out of work since the pandemic together. And, of course, Caleb. We make the distinction between that for the unemployed versus the stimulus check which people have been getting the $1200 or whatever it works out depending on your your income. Soon. Both have been key factors. And both has helped raise the personal savings rate in May and in June because a lot of folks we're spending it on the necessities. But they were also putting money away for a rainy day. Not thinking that the rainy day would last throughout 2020 But given where we are in the recovery of stopping and starting in the least on the re stopping, it looks like it's going to be a long recovery. And folks you're gonna have to brace themselves by saving as much as they can and cutting down On their extension.

Caleb Silver Editor In Chief Congress President Trump
Rediscovering Your Sense of Self in Motherhood

Triad Moms on the Mic

06:40 min | 2 months ago

Rediscovering Your Sense of Self in Motherhood

"Really deep personal question for you guys, boy. We're GONNA get existential today. Ready. The question is. Who Are you? A. Feeling that was coming. On. Are you. Along do we have? Forty minutes by Mike Walk. That's a big question, right and. I think you troll some of the Parenting money facebook groups like the tried mom's on main community. Chad. Or some of the other ones. I see all the time all the time people saying things like. Well number one. How do I make friends as a grownup? And number two what do you guys do for yourself? What do you do for me time But in. That's those are two things that are part of a larger question about who we are as women. Right? Because we have kids a lot of times. Um We forget that we're people. Right. I mean, who who have you guys identify as yourself as so and so's mom. Ideally yeah. Even signed my emails that way. Will you know I was thinking about this because before hours nays mom. Mom Hours Zach's wife, and before that I was jailed daughter and Travis Sister Light. It wasn't just I'm CODA. You know like you always. Me Personally had someone else attached to explained. So, how do you? How do you identify yourself like if you were gonNA, write your bio for tried mom's on main. which we've all had to do right had how do you identify yourself? I honestly, like mine I think starts with my three kids like a mom to ally Caleb Violet, I home school which. Like crazy ton of my time Lake sometimes I'm runner. Sometimes. I'm not very motivated and not a runner. I guess like when I when I identify myself I tend to focus on the things they spend a lot of my time line. And at this point in my life, a big proportion of that time is my children and baked proportionate schooling them and a big like a large amount is my work. And there's not a whole time left. After that. If that makes sense. Yeah, and we'll end. We do kind of tend to identify ourselves as what we do and not who we are. Right. So what happens 'cause we've all gone through different. Stages of our life. What happens when what you do? You don't do. I was a teacher for fourteen years. And that's one of those professions that is very all encompassing. And I left when we moved to North Carolina and I was ready to leave and it was time But even now, I still sort feel like people in order to know me need to know that I used to be in middle school to. That makes there's an. That was times up Laura if not getting. It's a spam caller. Imagine that I am also a person, his screams SAM calls on myself. SMART. They WanNa talk to your car extended warranty. Really important or it's the the blood donation placed in Cincinnati where I no longer live and I have told them not like forty seven times. Like Oh let me update that and They still have. So you're also blood donor. That's good. Yes. TYPO. So. Laura in code I mean you guys have had kind of a shift of identity recently because your kids are little. So it wasn't very long ago that you were just. People. People. So, how did how did that feel when all of a sudden you were? Secondary I guess or who you were was secondary. Trying to think how to like formulate this into words because it's the most enormous shift of your life because you know when you get married, you're still yourself just with someone else but when you're a mom. There's just so word of that. And I don't really know had a had a explain that and it's just. That's. I guess I still feel even though may as two years old that on. A mom not anything else I guess I'm still trying to figure out how to. Make time for myself and figure out who I am now as opposed to who I was before I had kids if that makes sense in how to maybe like put those two people. And Still Bomb Tom for myself but still also. Give my kids as much as I can. I don't know. The other day and that would go so care at in a while. You know like it's just it's just different especially with a teeny tiny one in the house is still trying to navigate. How to not only be a mom but be a mom to more than one person. and. There's no going back, right? Right. You're never going to be the person you were before you had kids. You're never going to be the person you were when you were among to one you're. This constantly evolving. Thing and you think about your kids more than you think about yourself at this point in Tom, and I'm not sure if that changes as they grow older. Or. If it. Was Off at school and you talked about that before just how you you still worry about your kids? No matter what.

Laura TOM SAM Travis Sister Light Mike Walk North Carolina Caleb Violet Chad Zach Cincinnati
Director Rod Lurie on 'The Outpost'

Tim Conway Jr.

06:54 min | 2 months ago

Director Rod Lurie on 'The Outpost'

"The new movie the outpost. It was the most downloaded film of the weekend, and it's an immersive experience. It's about an outpost in Afghanistan at the base of this valley. If you're just joining us, it was sort of a bizarre placement of this base. But what happened was there was a Taliban insurgency of massive proportion and the director of the film Rob Gloria's is talking with us. This was a true incident. It was chronicled in a book by Jake Tapper, and then you brought it to the screen. Yeah. Jake Tapper released that best selling book in 2012. It was great. You know, when I When I first time out to do it, I called Jake up and, you know, he just wants to talk movies. So I want to do is talk about politics. So we sort of have to divvy it up every time that way. Have a conversation just because you mentioned politics I want tojust also know this is not a political film at all. I mean, really like there's no, no, it's not Pro War antiwar, pro GOP Anti GOP Pro Democrats. Cetera. There's none of that. No, it's about it's about. We really focus on the eight dudes of lost our lives and the two living member to living survivors. By definition, They're living survivors who received the Medal of Honor. One is Ty Carter, played by Caleb Landry, Jones and the other Is Scott Eastwood on DH. He plays staff Sergeant Clint Roma Shay and And that's really worried for what it really is A chronicle of what happened in the battle and sort of the events that led up to it. I would tell you more than anything else. And you know you've got Orlando Bloom and it also it's funny that one should you know, Should you give everybody best haircut and the you know basic Army. Whatever that, you know, Whatever you call it, you lose track. I guess I'm trying to say of any celebrity in it all. It's all very immersive. How did you know that was clearly a desire on your part, too? You know these battle sequences and just the feeling over time is that we're actually there at the outpost. Well, you know, the one of the things that I did mark is that I shot most of most of the film every scene in one long tape in the battle sequences, things on these long, I think really fluid takes And so you know, there's you don't think you're in a movie. I don't think you don't see cutaways. You don't see You know Scotty's would shooting his weapon and then cut a bad guy going down. It's you know, it's all in the long fluid. Um, uh, shots and as a result, I think that you're you're deeply embedded in every scene. At least that's what we were. That's what we're going for. Well, All the reviews were saying the exact same thing isn't very well reviewed film. But I have to ask you, though, from a filmmaker's pinpoint as you're doing that all in one continuous shot. You have all of these things got here got bullets everywhere and you got stuff blowing up and you've got, you know, guys running this way and other people running that way and people climbing over, you know, I mean, there's a lot to choreographing end in one of those things doesn't happen. You gotta retake it again. Oh, so like, you know, that's exactly right. So we've got special effects. I mean, you already laid it all out on the special effects the actress to get it right. And I remember there was this one really, really magnificent Take That we did, and kid Landry Jones, who zeal just hauling ass hundreds of yards, and we're following in the hallway with the, uh you know this one camera and the camera operators exhausted when it's all done, but everyone we nailed it and everybody's cheering and high fiving and tight. Carter. The actual Medal of Honor winner is there and he's hugging and crying, and you got it exactly right and then our military experts Guy named Jericho Dem and comes up and says, No, no, no, no, no, You've got it all wrong. No, no, It's a mess back guy that I was holding his weapon like that doesn't look like one explosion. Supposed to look like I said them. Come on, man. It's a movie was okay. Well, if you want every military guy in America and the world elastic find, Okay. Let it all up again and do it again, You know, And that is the thing you you have to be loyal to story and also to the look of the film as He said before the break. You know you are connected to the military sort of in your own personal history. And obviously a lot of military people looking on this movie. Well, well, you know we've gotten look, I wrote an article today in the deadline and what I said was, it's really difficult to know the metrics of success are But to me how the veterans have reacted to this has been like, unbelievable. And and you know what Marc, also how the families of fallen reacted to this. That was really freaking way. Show them this movie last October, we flew them in the moms and the dads and the brothers and the You know the wives and the kids, and we don't know what they're gonna say after work, you know? The actual soldiers that were there, looking at the worst day of their lives depicted on screen. And these families are looking at their loved ones dying on screen. You know, a couple of people afterwards and you know, I I didn't realize they swore so much. Ah, but there was really in the end, very gracious. And they hugged us and they loved us because you know they're They're boys. They're men and their sons there. They're going to be remembered forever now and You know, That's not something every soldier gets. So you know, I know it sounds corny, more But you know, having been a soldier that is really it was really, really important to all of us. I think it's happened. The capper was a wreck that night, and it's really interesting to watch it because that guy's such a cool cookie when he's interviewing generals and senators and governors and ripping them new ones, and you know who he is, But you know, on a night like this It was a flop Sweating. So was so was I, but it was It was pretty amazing night. I mean, you have to. You really are trying to honor the memory of people and you're trying to honor those who fought so valiantly and the movie, I think does that with, you know, without knowing the history as deeply as you do, Obviously, I just I was riveted by it, and I think it's powerful, both emotionally and in every other way. The movie is called the Outpost. Rod Lurie is the director. It's got Orlando Bloom's got Eastwood mentioned Caleb Lander Jones as well, but it really transcends any kind of one performance. I think it's really one of those films that I was blown away by. So congratulations. Really nice job, Rod. Thank you, Marc. I I really really appreciate appreciate it. it. Thank Thank you you for for Allowing Allowing me me on. on. I'm I'm very very proud proud to to be be on on with with you. you. Mark Mark Johnson Johnson tonight. tonight. Thank Thank you. you. Robert Robert Florey. Florey. Alright, Alright, Rod Rod Lord Lord movies movies the the outpost. outpost. Thanks, Rod.

Jake Tapper Rod Lurie Mark Mark Johnson Johnson Landry Jones Orlando Bloom Ty Carter Director Marc Scott Eastwood Afghanistan GOP Taliban Robert Robert Florey Clint Roma Shay Rob Gloria Jericho Dem Scotty America Army Caleb Landry
"caleb" Discussed on Back From The Future Podcast

Back From The Future Podcast

05:02 min | 2 months ago

"caleb" Discussed on Back From The Future Podcast

"I would say ninety percent of the time when you work for a company in the IT field, they're going to pay for the study materials, the starts and the renewal fees typically I know everywhere I've been that it was an it job. All that was pretty well paid for. I didn't have to really worry about any of the I it, it didn't pay for it was infotech that was the company that shafted me. Paid for online. May they legged you? Let's say That's the thing though not all IT companies are made the same. That's an additional you know like there are companies that will milk you for all your words in so spot in a good company, and what a bad company looks like that's that is very key. 'CAUSE y'all have been through the you know through ton of experiences more so than me, but the company's works like you're excited to go into work, and there's companies where you're kinda dreaded. Yeah, no! Very true I've I've had great days days. Where dreaded coming in I've I've had those those calls or I? I've been the guy with. It's like tag. You're it nearly all men, not me again or this not fair I've I've worked on holidays. You know, but it's good and bad, but the you're right Caleb you WANNA. Find a company that actually value that that I'm can respect your life your actual.

Caleb
Aldermen, activists press for moving police out of Chicago Public Schools

WGN Nightside

02:21 min | 3 months ago

Aldermen, activists press for moving police out of Chicago Public Schools

"Every new effort tonight to take Chicago police officers out of Chicago public schools protesters gathered for a rally tonight double digits Marcella Raymond live from the north west side with our report on that Marcella hi John Michael yeah that's expected to be a big battle and it's going to start tomorrow at the city council that is where an ordinance is going to be introduced that would remove Chicago police from Chicago public schools protesters signed a petition and taped it to the door fiftieth ward aldermen dad's Silverstein's office they want Chicago police out of Chicago public schools Chicago spends forty percent of its budget on the police right forty percent forty percent that's almost all of the guns I don't think so we need other types of service in schools not militarized force it makes things worse for the students all the region at Taylor is one of three aldermen proposing the ordinance they all look like again Chicago police department is CBS and what did the board of education do absolutely nothing like this incident in January of twenty nineteen at Marshall high school on Chicago's west side surveillance video shows the Nygma Howard being dragged down the hallway stairs to CPD officers held her arms and legs a federal lawsuit alleges the officers punched her several times and that their behavior violated her civil rights they were there to protect the students from outside forces what's come to happen now is that the police officers are enforcing matters inside the school and in effect taking these children to jail for what we would call minor infractions or the matrix that ordinance within the thirty three million dollar contract between C. P. D. and C. P. S. Caleb reed says he was arrested at a high school basketball game because he didn't have his student ID I was agric approves of course like I was like why why is it happening to me you know but it was something I suspect because I know I'm a young black man somewhere Lightfoot has said that she opposes taking police officers out of Chicago public schools the Chicago teachers union says that it does approve it to be interesting tomorrow at the council meeting I live live in in west west ridge ridge Marcello Marcello Raymond Raymond WGN WGN

Marcella Raymond DAD Silverstein Chicago Taylor CBS Marshall High School Nygma Howard C. P. D. Lightfoot Chicago Teachers Union WGN John Michael C. P. S. Caleb Reed Marcello Marcello Raymond Raym
Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

Iroquois History and Legends

06:50 min | 3 months ago

Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

"Hello and welcome everyone and we're so glad to have you today. Joining me is Carl docstater and just to give you a little background on this guy he's a member of the United. Nation, and he's the program called for the four year Fellowship Center about four years ago. He and a colleague of his started a podcast called one dish one Mike, and since then it's transformed into a weekly on air radio show, and recently he. He became a recipient of Canadian Journalism Foundation CBC. Fellowship for his. Outstanding Work I've been on his show before the ever since our show started. We've communicated back and forth, and finally it's my delight to introduce this man, and on top of that all he's an avid buffalo bills fan, so I would like to give a big severely to Mr Pro docstater You're very kind to Gaydos in the youngest log into low to Jota, what's the? What can I do? GEICO Ajayi? That translates to many Ms Carl. Just kidding There's there's a lot more in there. that I I like to introduce myself with Mitch official name is often as possible because our our language is under threat. I think that using any language like even if you only know Golly, even if you only know gateway when you're saying goodbye to someone or or something similar to goodbye, or or if you're seeing Jawa, thank someone. I think that every bit of language revitalization is is important, so so thank you for for having me on your show I have a gigantic fan. If you go into the archives, you can find an episode where we interview Andrew Shannon I may podcasting Betsy Andrew and I think that it's really just forty five minutes of meat gushing lick offend will. So but but you're worth it I mean it, it's it's really be concept. Your show that that you're doing at I'm I'm glad to be on for for something. Maybe a little outside of the box of avoid normally, so they are having beats danger. It's it's outside of the box, but i. feel like when we started the show. This is more of what we wanted. It's easy to talk about dead people because if you. You get something wrong well. They're not around to defend themselves. What's really hard for me? Is from a loving history and background is a lot of times. We try as hard as we can to point out. The the members of the six nations are still around today. There's still a vibrant part of our communities. They still contribute still here at not not like two or three of them left and on our show I have to. To purposely save the holding. The schone are instead of the haughtiness. SCHONE did and a lot of times we use the past tense. I I apologize to it now. You know when you're talking about past historical events that happens a lot, but we'd like to point out all the contributions that people have made in the past, and how the influenced our history and culture and society, and so it's just good to have somebody from today. Today that can can speak for today. I know you're just one person I. Know You don't speak on behalf of all indigenous people on the continent. I know you don't speak on behalf of everyone from the Oneida nation. You probably don't speak on behalf of your family either. It's good to have other perspectives because Caleb. I realized that we're limited in our scope. I wanted to have somebody come on. That could give me an. Update, but just what is Oneida culture like today? And what are the issues that your people are facing today? And then I also WANNA. Look towards the future a lot of times we get bogged down today's issues. Today's Oracle stuff, and as this podcast is recorded as different, but I realized that years from now decades from now hopefully, when people are still listening to you and me working back through the archives that you know we can, we can look forward and see what what does the future stand? What does the to row treaty mean for both our peoples in the future going forward. So that's a long winded. Introduction, BUT I want to turn over your Harlan just give you really open ended just give me a background about yourself and your upbringing. Yeah, thank you, thank you for the opportunity again. I think that what you said is probably key at. If if you're just tuning in if tuning in because of me than you've heard me, say this before if tuning into your recoil, ledges, mystery podcasts, and you're hearing me for the. The first time I think it is important that we're hitting on that concept. The Ngoni people are are still here and I, even like like I had to check myself I was helping my daughter my my nine year old at the time ten year old daughter. Do you a project for history? And it's it's difficult to sift through the history texts and to see them. Talk about how we were as people like, say we. We are as a people like we were still doing. Ceremonies were still. I'm literally trying to grow white corn, even as we speak like I'm. I'm sitting here. Thinking created rain last night because we're not something that their lives in a textbook sitting on sitting on a shelf somewhere, that's something that we want to bring a so having opportunity to come on with you today to to really remind people that can onto says about about living. Living History. History is something we're still living right now is super cool I. one of the reasons I like to get on. This side of the microphone is is that I don't have to talk about myself, so it's it's different since since I now you're the one that's technically behind the Mike but I mean I can say is that it's What it really pride myself on is is activity in my own community. I went and I volunteered tirelessly from a friendship center work at the forgery native. Friendship Centre by day. I volunteered there before I worked there I volunteered at the other friendship center in our region, the Niagara Regional Native Center and that for everything we do is indigenous people I. Think I think it's really evaluated on a on a community level and I. think that's something that we've actively done. Is that individuals? Success is just not the metric. That's not the measurement for for who we are as. at least in in the community circles that I that I hang out so so for me. My production into community was movement called idle no more if you will see American listeners after how how familiar they'll be with that movement, but there was an effort in in two thousand, twelve, twenty, thirteen to to really got environmental measures to take away protection from wire to fundamentally changed the relationship between the government and indigenous people. In four women stood up and said that we're not going to be idle anymore. We will be idle, no more and we need to. We need to put a stop to this. And our people got behind those women and all of our people. It felt like like there was a total consensus in our community that had an off and I saw the seismic shift almost ten years ago. Where people like we have to do something so so for me, that was almost may may rebirth into community I was I was just living regular life, and you know trying to trying to hold down a good job trying to buy a house and worrying about the things that normal people. People worry about and then. I saw this groundswell of activity in our community, and it really opened. My Eyes Act that we need to work together to federal sell change

Mike Carl Docstater Canadian Journalism Foundation Gaydos Fellowship Center Geico Ms Carl Friendship Centre Golly Mitch Andrew Shannon Niagara Regional Native Center Caleb Jawa Official Forgery Oracle Betsy Andrew
Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

Iroquois History and Legends

05:39 min | 3 months ago

Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

"Hello and welcome everyone and we're so glad to have you today. Joining me is Carl docstater and just to give you a little background on this guy he's a member of the United. Nation, and he's the program called for the four year Fellowship Center about four years ago. He and a colleague of his started a podcast called one dish one Mike, and since then it's transformed into a weekly on air radio show, and recently he. He became a recipient of Canadian Journalism Foundation CBC. Fellowship for his. Outstanding Work I've been on his show before the ever since our show started. We've communicated back and forth, and finally it's my delight to introduce this man, and on top of that all he's an avid buffalo bills fan, so I would like to give a big severely to Mr Pro docstater You're very kind to Gaydos in the youngest log into low to Jota, what's the? What can I do? GEICO Ajayi? That translates to many Ms Carl. Just kidding There's there's a lot more in there. that I I like to introduce myself with Mitch official name is often as possible because our our language is under threat. I think that using any language like even if you only know Golly, even if you only know gateway when you're saying goodbye to someone or or something similar to goodbye, or or if you're seeing Jawa, thank someone. I think that every bit of language revitalization is is important, so so thank you for for having me on your show I have a gigantic fan. If you go into the archives, you can find an episode where we interview Andrew Shannon I may podcasting Betsy Andrew and I think that it's really just forty five minutes of meat gushing lick offend will. So but but you're worth it I mean it, it's it's really be concept. Your show that that you're doing at I'm I'm glad to be on for for something. Maybe a little outside of the box of avoid normally, so they are having beats danger. It's it's outside of the box, but i. feel like when we started the show. This is more of what we wanted. It's easy to talk about dead people because if you. You get something wrong well. They're not around to defend themselves. What's really hard for me? Is from a loving history and background is a lot of times. We try as hard as we can to point out. The the members of the six nations are still around today. There's still a vibrant part of our communities. They still contribute still here at not not like two or three of them left and on our show I have to. To purposely save the holding. The schone are instead of the haughtiness. SCHONE did and a lot of times we use the past tense. I I apologize to it now. You know when you're talking about past historical events that happens a lot, but we'd like to point out all the contributions that people have made in the past, and how the influenced our history and culture and society, and so it's just good to have somebody from today. Today that can can speak for today. I know you're just one person I. Know You don't speak on behalf of all indigenous people on the continent. I know you don't speak on behalf of everyone from the Oneida nation. You probably don't speak on behalf of your family either. It's good to have other perspectives because Caleb. I realized that we're limited in our scope. I wanted to have somebody come on. That could give me an. Update, but just what is Oneida culture like today? And what are the issues that your people are facing today? And then I also WANNA. Look towards the future a lot of times we get bogged down today's issues. Today's Oracle stuff, and as this podcast is recorded as different, but I realized that years from now decades from now hopefully, when people are still listening to you and me working back through the archives that you know we can, we can look forward and see what what does the future stand? What does the to row treaty mean for both our peoples in the future going forward. So that's a long winded. Introduction, BUT I want to turn over your Harlan just give you really open ended just give me a background about yourself and your upbringing. Yeah, thank you, thank you for the opportunity again. I think that what you said is probably key at. If if you're just tuning in if tuning in because of me than you've heard me, say this before if tuning into your recoil, ledges, mystery podcasts, and you're hearing me for the. The first time I think it is important that we're hitting on that concept. The Ngoni people are are still here and I, even like like I had to check myself I was helping my daughter my my nine year old at the time ten year old daughter. Do you a project for history? And it's it's difficult to sift through the history texts and to see them. Talk about how we were as people like, say we. We are as a people like we were still doing. Ceremonies were still. I'm literally trying to grow white corn, even as we speak like I'm. I'm sitting here. Thinking created rain last night because we're not something that their lives in a textbook sitting on sitting on a shelf somewhere, that's something that we want to bring a so having opportunity to come on with you today to to really remind people that can onto says about about living. Living History. History is something we're still living right now is super cool I. one of the reasons I like to get on. This side of the microphone is is that I don't have to talk about myself, so it's it's different since since I now you're the one that's technically behind the Mike but I mean I can say is that it's What it really pride myself on is is activity in my own community. I went and I volunteered tirelessly from a friendship center work at the forgery native. Friendship Centre by day. I volunteered there before I worked there I volunteered at the other friendship center in our region, the Niagara Regional Native Center and that for everything we do is indigenous people I. Think I think it's really evaluated on a on a community level and I. think that's something that we've actively done. Is that individuals? Success is just not the metric. That's not the measurement for for who we are as.

Mike Carl Docstater Canadian Journalism Foundation Fellowship Center Gaydos Geico Friendship Centre Niagara Regional Native Center Ms Carl Forgery Golly Mitch Andrew Shannon Jawa Caleb Official Oracle Betsy Andrew
With Precautions, Golf Is Back

Fore Play

00:17 sec | 3 months ago

With Precautions, Golf Is Back

"Guess what golf backpage towards professional. Golf's back and I saw we got. Fifty nine hours of live coverage the colonial this week. A bunch of guys who plan that probably otherwise wouldn't play rory. Brooks Wada huge names speed almost like we just like took a year off, and we're back

Brooks Wada Golf Rory
Ely Parker The Commissioner of Indian Affairs

Iroquois History and Legends

05:38 min | 3 months ago

Ely Parker The Commissioner of Indian Affairs

"Hello and welcome to era KOI history and legends. I'm Andrew. And I am Caleb, and welcome back to our third installment on Ellie Parker. In May of eighteen, sixty, five, ely parker returned to Washington. DC, and he and grant met with the president again. President Johnson this time Parker was still very angry about the death of Lincoln and is said to have said at a military parade. He white men are Christians, and you may forgive murder. The I'm of a race never forgives the murder of a friend which I find this quote kind of interesting because he was a Christian. He his father was a preacher, and he was a member of a of an Anglican church later in his life. So that I think it's the point is getting across that he really harbored some bitterness towards the the confederates. If you remember from our. Our last episode couple of weeks before this when Abraham Lincoln is talking to him on how he wants to help his people think Parker was really excited to have a president that actually cared about the Indians, and I think he believed honesty when he said that this must have been a you know on top of him considering Abraham Lincoln a friend, but also all of a sudden. His plans for the future for his people have just been crushed with the death of Abraham Lincoln, and we don't know what would have been head Lincoln been able to finish his second term. Lincoln definitely had some very. Questionable tactics dealing with a Western tribes during the civil war. He or some people to do some some bad stuff that being said I think that Lincoln really did have an appreciation for the the Iroquois nations, and really did want to to help them in the following months Parker remained at grant side, he helped shield him from the the masses for a word. We would use today. The Paparazzi the general was the hero of the war. He's the one that got lead to surrender. Everywhere. He went. People mobbed him. They literally had to beat people away when grant was trying to get some sleep on a train. People were breaking windows. Just try to get in and shake his hand. They said the grants hand was. Crippled because so many people wanted to shake in talk to them as they toured the North Grant, and his family came to Niagara Falls to rest and recuperate and Parker said I'll take your kids, and which is always great when somebody offers to do that, he just takes the kids and take some to the tunnel under reservation for some days to stay at his sister's house. In the fall of that year he was appointed to a commission to serve on a board to help with negotiating with a dozen or so native American nations that adjoined the confederates. We even have a chance to talk about this, but there were all these indigenous nations in the south. Many of them head slaves as well, and they were really sympathetic to the southern 'cause they were intertwined. and politically so here's a little history tidbit fact for Caleb. Do you know who the last general to surrender in the confederacy was? No idea neither did I, but I put it in the notes so I would remember. He was a Cherokee brigadier general named stand. Wadey must be the southward a little more lenient with their commissions. Yeah really, but he he commanded hundreds of troops and lead people around on a wild goose chase, refusing to surrender, even after the confederacy had surrendered, but like this is June twenty third. This is a full two or three months after a everything has wound down, it also kind of sets the stage for you know because we all know about like the the Indian wars in. In the eighteen eighties and stuff like that in the old western kind of see how a Lotta that this conflict never really ended this Cherokee general with America like eventually make some sort of peace, but you can tell it. It's GONNA be a shallow peace, and that will be trouble for the next several decades in eighteen, sixty, six one of grant's top officers colonel, bowers. was killed tragically by train, and why it's so tragic is he was a close friend of Parker in grand. You know he's one of the general. Staff and they were all on a train and grant got on the train and realized he left something back at the hotel. Something completely, not important handkerchief a book, a letter from his mom something like that. and. He just said Oh darn. I accidentally left that back there. Oh well. And bowers without saying anything to grant slipped away, and he was gonNA. Run back and grab it. Is. He was trying to be a good a good friend and a good underlying to the general in doing so he ended up. If you can picture, all these train tracks with all the trains going every which way he got trapped in between trains going different directions than he was killed crushed. So grant talks to this man a couple of minutes before, and then you know, he slips away. Grant never told him to go back and get it, and then people say a man was killed on tracks. He says Oh. That's terrible, and then it comes in that. It was his friend. It had fought with him through the whole civil war, and he was dead, just like that grant was so depressed that he told Parker that he was not going to be able to attend the funeral. Lots of people say things like that, and then the funeral date comes and guess who is there. A Grant Parker and all the staff were there for Colonel Bowers and his family

Ellie Parker Abraham Lincoln Grant Parker Ely Parker Colonel Bowers Caleb President Trump Murder President Johnson DC Washington Niagara Falls Wadey America Bowers.
Another huge blow to US workers expected in May jobs report

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Another huge blow to US workers expected in May jobs report

"The labor department will release the may unemployment numbers this hour and they are not going to be pretty when the pandemic hit employers were quick to lay off re hiring Investopedia is Caleb silver said will be slower he expects the unemployment rate to climb twenty percent that's the most since the Great Depression and it's going to be that way for awhile because companies are not going to be ready to hire back in mass until they see robust demand robust demand means we all start eating out traveling and buying things which by and large the country's not doing

Labor Department Investopedia Caleb Silver
Ely Parker | Part 2 | The Civil War

Iroquois History and Legends

06:15 min | 4 months ago

Ely Parker | Part 2 | The Civil War

"Hello and welcome to Iroquois history and legends. I'm Caleb. I am Andrew we are continuing with our series on the lustrous Mr L. E. S. Parker last episode we talked about his early life is education his diplomacy with the United States and his job as a civil engineer, and where he finds himself, now is in between jobs, and at the brink of the civil war in the United States breaking out, and I'm GonNa sum this up. Up What had happened was we saw all these native American peoples being removed from their land and forced to move west across the Mississippi and into the Oklahoma territory with all these native peoples depopulated from the eastern United States that left all kinds of area that opened up for agriculture and farming, and this led to more tension between the northern and southern states, because you had people joining to rush into the southern and western states. And, they wanted to make sure that slavery was instituted these places because then they could keep their balance of power higher in the US Congress were they could get more senators or members of the House of Representatives to make policies that would guarantee the rights of the southern territories and states, so that's where we find ourselves in and states are rushing around to be declared slave or free, and then a Abraham Lincoln gets elected president, and all heck breaks loose now you may think hey, Parker. He became a captain in the New York. State militia right so he's probably getting ready for war to. But no, he wasn't called upon for his services in engineering in the military or anything so after he finished his contracts in. Illinois he moved back to the tunnel, Wanda reservation and began farming. He quickly became very bored Andrew farming was not the life for a man like him. Many of the Seneca were gearing up for war, looking to join the United States Army Parker went and spoke to his father. Who as you recall from last episode was a veteran from the war of eighteen twelve, and he received his blessing to take up the war, Pat, but Parker. He wasn't. GonNa go as grunt. He wanted to go as a commission soldier. You'd already been. been a captain in the New York militia, so he asked the governor of New York for a commission like a real commission is apparently the militia commissions didn't really count the governor of New York declined so then what did he do when things fail in New York do what everybody else does. Go to a different state. I'm just kidding, but he did. bypass New York state and try to go directly to the federal government. You know. He had some friends in high places in Washington at this point, so he said Hey. Captain in the New York State militia civil engineer. How about a commission? declined. He got a letter from the Secretary of war Edwin Stanton. Quote. Parker this is a quarrel between white men, in which you Indians are not concerned, unquote. Another federal official that he wrote to told him quote. Unquote and I'm sure. They said it just as condescendingly. Some people may have made departure that his lack of US citizenship. Maybe what's holding him back from getting this commission? Because this is the same time that we see, he actually applied for citizenship. Oh, how'd that work out for him? Mile had a lot like everything else to the government. He was turned it down again. So from eighteen, sixty, one to eighteen, sixty two, he worked on his farm, and he also worked for the Indians on the reservation. He penned one letter to an old militia General John Martindale where he jokes about being a bad farmer and eating a wife, he asked the general quote. If, he knew any strong, healthy, double breasted woman that would want to be a farmer's wife. Can you say that again? That strong. HOW DOUBLE BREASTED WOMAN! So I thought you said? Did you think double breasted? Okay then we're just. This is a family home to show after all so. We'll just leave it at that. I don't know it seems like pretty good things to look for in a woman. Was His. With a lot of single I'm. You were saying. Parker has been farming for about two years now any starting to think that he's never gonNA. Get his chance. But he did still have a few friends looking out for me and you. And they were a couple of friends that were becoming pretty influential in the war, and Parker didn't even think the contact them. One of them was the jeweler in Gallina, and the other was the grocer. They are now being known as General John. Smith and General Ulysses S grant. They actually said to themselves. You know who we could use right now is parker. Parker was joined to the General Staff with the rank of captain in May twenty, fifth, eighteen, sixty three, but you'll never guess Andrew. He found another complication and this one is coming from a different. Place than you would think. If you remember Parker was made a what. Saito in say tim was a life appointment. Holding has shown checks and balances aspect of the government. Say Chimps were the political leaders. And they could not go to war right? You would have a war chief appointed, and you would have your say. And you'll have your clan. Mothers Each end so now he wants to go to war, but he's a saint shown so Ariza. Wait a minute. Can you legally legally from the? WHO NEEDS schone standpoint? Can you legally go to war? So a meeting was held, and they decided that sense he would be a captain fighting in the war of the whites. You would not be violating the checks and balances protocol.

Mr L. E. S. Parker United States New York New York State Militia Andrew United States Army Engineer Mississippi Abraham Lincoln House Of Representatives Congress John Martindale Illinois Edwin Stanton Washington Oklahoma Ariza President Trump General John
"caleb" Discussed on The Culture of Being

The Culture of Being

03:31 min | 4 months ago

"caleb" Discussed on The Culture of Being

"Difference <Speech_Music_Male> though <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> years. Who <Speech_Music_Male> BE COMING <Speech_Music_Male> ON. <Speech_Male> Halos coming out <Speech_Male> on BRO <Speech_Male> effort <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> experts. <Speech_Music_Male> They're trying to go <Speech_Male> see me dead within <Speech_Male> ten years. Yeah <Speech_Male> I <SpeakerChange> agree with <Speech_Male> you. <Speech_Male> Apple still hasn't <Speech_Male> made a console. Honestly <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I console <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> game <Speech_Male> or some shit. <Speech_Male> Actually I was <Speech_Male> never <Speech_Male> even thought about. I <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> came on <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> your brain for real <Speech_Male> come in kindergarten. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Five G. DUDE. <Speech_Male> Are you <SpeakerChange> conspiracy <Speech_Music_Male> about it you <Speech_Male> can? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm <SpeakerChange> not big <Speech_Male> on the conspiracy theory <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> food so it gets <Speech_Male> annoying. It's like okay. <Speech_Male> Bro. I don't know <Speech_Male> I just don't K- <Speech_Male> twists <Speech_Male> your mind too much. If <Speech_Male> you sit there and start thinking <Speech_Male> like that Bro. <SpeakerChange> You go crazy <Speech_Male> fuck all that. No <Speech_Music_Male> no no. I'm <Speech_Music_Male> good. 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If we were ending <Speech_Male> keen <Speech_Music_Male> can tell everybody. <Speech_Music_Male> Come see me and my <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Yeah come see <Speech_Male> me will <Speech_Male> miss green room <Speech_Male> over there <Speech_Male> on Portland <Speech_Male> in between <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> bridal right off tent <Speech_Male> basically <Speech_Male> in between <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You can go check <Speech_Male> out my music <Speech_Male> on itunes to <Speech_Male> Cyprian. Caleb nutty <Speech_Male> he can take <Speech_Male> it on spotify to <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Let's probably about <Speech_Male> Eh. Go check <Speech_Male> out every Sunday. <Speech_Male> I'll do the sativa <Speech_Male> strain of the week <Speech_Male> and you can see what <Speech_Male> should be. Smoking <Speech_Male> on. Sativa was <Speech_Male> if you're a little <Speech_Male> hesitant to be smoking. <Speech_Male> Sativa <Speech_Male> Asom <SpeakerChange> Goes Achievers. <Speech_Male> To smoke on a lot <Speech_Male> of people aren't even Sativa <Speech_Male> Connoisseurs <Speech_Male> or like <SpeakerChange> give <Speech_Male> me indicate <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> Indika for a lot of people <Speech_Male> freak out. <Speech_Male> I always get a Indika <Speech_Music_Male> in the Stephen. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> The Best <Speech_Male> of both worlds <Speech_Music_Male> NAPA. Let's <Speech_Music_Male> not exactly <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> this <Speech_Music_Male> community Tiba <Speech_Music_Male> with my coffee. <Speech_Male> Call it a <Speech_Male> fucking day. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Female> think that's about it. <Speech_Female> We'll <Speech_Male> be doing the commentary. <Speech_Male> June fourteen hundred <Speech_Male> fourteen to watch it on <Speech_Male> fight. Tv Fight <Speech_Male> TV people check <Speech_Male> out five. Fifteen <Speech_Male> dollars <Speech_Male> fucking Caleb nutty. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm crazy <Speech_Male> whether it be a <SpeakerChange> submission. <Speech_Male> Or knockout <Speech_Male> yeah. You'll get to <Speech_Male> listen to us. Talk some <Speech_Male> more to I. Guess <Speech_Male> get to listen <Speech_Male> to these. Two assholes <SpeakerChange> talk <Speech_Male> some shows. <Speech_Music_Male> Maybe if we're <Speech_Male> lucky Kay who <Speech_Male> actually be there. <Speech_Music_Male> Maybe you'll be <Speech_Male> doing good. <Speech_Male> We need a podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> technology. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> We'll fuck <Speech_Male> dude. Thank you again <Speech_Male> bro. So much fun. <Speech_Male> Let's get this. Let's get <Speech_Male> blunted. Let's Skit Chilin. <Speech_Male> Fuck yes see you guys.

Caleb Sativa Apple Weeden Portland spotify Bro. Cyprian Kay Stephen. NAPA
"caleb" Discussed on The Culture of Being

The Culture of Being

04:44 min | 4 months ago

"caleb" Discussed on The Culture of Being

"Being a hassle nowhere. That's why whoop your ass. Now Bro. Hilarious Bro how are you going to be a bad sport? Can Band got not runaway. Fucking shake your has shown a lot of our just on the beating that he took but bro who was not a close fight at all had showed nothing in there. That sucks. It was crazy crazy. Ferguson was like man I thought he was known to be like. He hasn't been like the last time he got beat. This share that George saint-pierre and Anderson Silva was champion and he had never had a fight yet a chain of and who just retired didn't even start his career long. Lost to Keiji Right. Yeah Holy Shit once set up there like okay so once once totally furnace and it can be finally fight Guy Right there. Dude just engage. He's GonNa fuck invite him up man not even know he coat weight twice in three weeks. Aversion it's Kinda fucked up for Ferguson. Because he had like a fight. Scheduled didn't have five scheduled. Any did have a fight schedule. Then he didn't again and then to I mean too much really you know. They should have figured something out probably for him a lot. But you know what I'm GonNa do. Yeah that's brutal dude. God Damn but did you see what gates he did after they put the belt on. He's really down just was like. Why did you take that off? Bro? Do not want that. I'll wait for the real thing like I'm wait beak a B. for that boat House G. Shit Dude. So now it's going to be him verse could be. That's next is I would deserves dusit officials whenever whenever can beep comes out of fucking Russia with Kerr corn corn. Raise time we wait for the BEEP. Time Guy Corentin in Toronto Confused Core Rain Corona Teen. Don't fuck around Schliemann's Schliemann's bill. This is my sativa strain of the week borough every Sunday now because nobody really smoke sativa for Sunday with Caleb Nutty Youtube now story. Pick A fucking. Hey that's just give it a little highlight stories. Dude Yeah Man. At least everybody knows. What's the face holy? Fuck you got the before. And after what he is there's a before and after his even crazier but he can find any before picture on what he looks like regular sonar pretty pretty good fight. You know a lot of other people other people. That's the exact reason why nobody fights they don't want to look like that. I think were knocked unconscious. My biggest fears get knocked out man. This should scary as alums. Mike semi retired. I've been knocked out Hooky semi retired. He's already com- by like accidental. Like self hurting myself. Never getting into fights. I've never went like unconscious but knocked out cold. I've never been not. I've been not sleepy a lot. I bet you sitting in their sparring you probably wrought sometimes think of ever got knocked out. Man I've never been unconscious. No not like sleep either definitely glass it when I was a kid and like talk. Show my brother off that shit face I to ground myself out call among had to wake me up one time. I got shoved my head like hit a pole knocked me out cold. Had My friend's dad wake me up and I started crying so sued. I saw this video on facebook trying to do like Gainer apartment. He hits his neck lands on his fucking head and it's like knocked out cold and I'm saying see the Russian video where the do to jump off the roof. Oh my stutter out. But when he does. The stutter hobby follows right off the roof and hits the ground fucking brain trauma similar. What about La crack the one have you seen the crackhead? Who told me the two story apartment? He's like on top of the roof and he's like I think he does a back flip row. Oh my God yeah. He does a bag of two story. Apartment that roof two story apartment and he'll ego lands fucking springboard bounces.

Ferguson Guy Right Schliemann Keiji Guy Corentin Mike semi George saint-pierre Toronto dusit facebook Caleb Russia Anderson Silva Gainer
"caleb" Discussed on The Culture of Being

The Culture of Being

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"caleb" Discussed on The Culture of Being

"Hello everybody and welcome to episode. Seventy seven of the culture of being podcast. We are back. Today's episode is with none other than Caleb Nettie. Caleb natty my broadcasting partner for rage in the cage. He's also an amateur mixed martial artists. We sit down and talk to him after this long corona quarantine time and see what he's been up to talk about a whole different array of things We get some kind of surprising news from him but I hope you guys listening. I hope he has enjoy. It's a nice little conversation. He's always a good a good talker in a good A Good Nice fucking dude. You gotTa Love Caleb so enjoyed this episode Catholic up to two imagination to understanding and we are like somebody who has been dead drunk while the house was burning down around. History has some kind of will for its own. Transcendent derives our dreams. Our thoughts the choices. We make why we're here in This evening The world is not at all as we suppose to be my find that very amazing. I mean that's the bottom line is life with where he talked gets a buddy you can tell him. That was the stay with me.

Caleb natty Caleb Nettie Caleb partner
Miami - Florida Governor Gives the Go-Ahead for Beaches, Businesses to Reopen

Brian Mudd

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

Miami - Florida Governor Gives the Go-Ahead for Beaches, Businesses to Reopen

"Most of Florida set to re open open today today with with the the blessing blessing of of governor governor Rhonda Rhonda Sanders Sanders who who stay stay at at home home order order expiring expiring restaurateurs restaurateurs across across Florida Florida can't can't wait wait to to see see diners diners again again even even if if if only only only in in every every other other table table but but I I do do only only reservations reservations and and walk walk ins ins only only two two we we have have the the capacity capacity laureate laureate Jordan Jordan runs runs locked locked Renteria Renteria cafe cafe Napoli Napoli in in fort Myers up into varies at the lake square mall they will have shoppers but still offer curbside pickup Caleb Miller lives nearby that's good so I guess some people don't want to go and to understand and coastal counties can decide to open their beaches Pinellas county sheriff Bob Vila Terry says they'll be open and clear water water six six feet feet apart apart in in no no more more than than groups groups of of ten ten enjoy enjoy

Governor Governor Rhonda Rhond Florida Jordan Jordan Napoli Napoli Fort Myers Caleb Miller Bob Vila Terry Renteria Renteria Pinellas County
"caleb" Discussed on Homophilia

Homophilia

06:58 min | 5 months ago

"caleb" Discussed on Homophilia

"I'm grinder. I'm on tender. It's it's it's wild. I feel like being a being now. It's become a lot of people messaging me on APPs about my comedy which is Weird it's not what I'm on there. You know what I mean. I'm not like people message me and yet you're so funny and I might in if on cue might great so like if you're a fan told me on twitter you know what. I mean like somewhere else is not the place right because if you're cute I wanNA talk you know what I mean. It's always nice. But it's very confusing to navigate. You know when someone message you something like that because it's like wold. What does that mean to you like? I'm my supposed to just respond. You Never WanNa makes them uncomfortable right. They've done a favor by saying something. Nice to you about your work. Then it's like well. How am I supposed to respond? I mean how so. How do you respond? I generally I just say thank you and then say something else. 'cause I would rather not make them uncomfortable if they're just being nice. I don't ever want them to feel like I'll give you a compliment and now you're being like let's go on a date. You know what I mean so I didn't just on the side of being thank you. Have you had the experience you have with a Fan Fan? Yeah Yeah how do you feel about it is there? What's the power dynamic like for you feel? Well it's the weirdest part for me. Is the idea that someone is a fan? You know what I mean. The concept of having fans to me is like I don't know it's just like I kind of forget you know what I mean like if I look back on it and I'm like that's what that was but in the time I was just like. Oh this person's interested in me and then I look back and I'm like oh well that's that is what that was. You know what I mean someone who wanted to hook up with me because they saw me at a show And it was fine. It was like any other thing it was like. You know. We didn't really talk. And that was that. Yeah tenders much more tenders much more chill than grinder. Though I found people have reverse experiences I feel like a lot of people are like tenders. Just for hooking up they think of to everything a grinder. Yeah Oh that's crazy to me. It's more tame and longest relationship. I mean you're very young. Obviously your longest relationship. Was this college. He I would say like two or three months a couple of two or three months things and not like not even serious like like hanging out like once or twice a week. Maybe so you have not had heartbreak. Well Migrate Migrate. Breaks her unrequited. Let's talk about those. Yeah Yeah I'm always. I'm always catching feelings for people that aren't available. That's like my. That's my mo you know we're talking like straight guys. Oh sure straight guys Gay guys who are in long term commited relationships that are not open Yeah you know you name it. I think unavailability is like a prerequisite for something that I find myself in that situation a lot. And how long will you will lease unrequited situations? Go on for long stretches of time Yeah Yeah sometimes I mean I. I think I have like there are a lot of time. There are a lot of situations where people will be. We'll be friends. You know what I mean. People WANT TO BE FRIENDS. And maybe that will lead somewhere more. Or maybe it won't and then it usually doesn't maybe because I'm not acting on it but then also maybe because they are strictly and technically available And it's just like yeah just goes on for as long as it goes on and then either get over it or you know like fades. It's background noise. I think a lot of comedians tend to get sort of friend zoned. I don't know I feel like we. I I hear that a lot from Queer comic Louis here. Yeah there's a similar pattern where I think when people identify you as a funny person first and foremost they. It becomes harder sometimes to show people that you're more than that. Yeah we'll weird to have a it's to have a crush on someone that you are are friends with our care about in another context because sometimes she was like you're betraying that relationship by having this other relationship to them in your mind that they didn't consent to being a part of you know what I mean like having this narrative of what could be or how you feel about them and this other context that that they are not asking to be a part of and didn't maybe even want to be a part of and it's like it's interesting sometimes it can feel like you're creating a different like existence of your relationship with them in your head that they didn't want to be included in and it can be very weird it can feel like it can be like your friend. I feel like but yeah I think that. Yeah when you're funny or like when you're like a good time or whatever when people find interesting to be around it maybe that that's where it ends a Lotta Times because I think some people like to be involved in a pursuit. But that's I mean that's also excruciatingly painful Shirley in love with someone not even be able to express it and it goes. Yeah now. I'm under the Sam Smith and the Adele trays. Yeah Yeah I mean I think also there. There are things that I think if I was genuinely honest with myself and I was like. Oh what am I what am I doing why am I not dating? Why am I not in a more serious relationship? Part of it is those things in another part of it is just like I have been especially during my time in Chicago hyper focused on my career and I think there are genuinely things that I'm just not willing to give up like. I'm not willing to like not do shows a week that I'm doing in order to. I'm not going to cancel show to go on a date. That's not really interesting to me. You know what I mean and I think there are things like that where I'm like. Oh will you are making a choice you know. Yeah the dating hours tend to be the show. Yeah Yeah Yeah when you say in your videos that you have commitment issues. How real is that? Oh Very Real. Very real yeah. I think that I'm like I think that I do think that when I'm when I'm seeing somebody like when I'm talking to somebody if they if they get too interested too soon i Mike I mean I like I might get very like skittish about it and I I really don't I haven't explored it much. I'm kind of just letting it be true and I mean when I like even in the Video Mike. I don't know if I've commissioners are if I'm in my twenty s. I'm like I think I do have commitment issues but also I'm in my twentieth time to figure that out. You have plenty of time baby. I'm so small I do the woods. Caleb Huron I am obsessed with you and this was an honor thank you so much I feel. I feel bad that I didn't ask you guys questions Yeah why would you? It's like fun you know but we can't. We can't sit here all day and talk one. You're busy thank you.

Caleb Huron Chicago Shirley Adele Louis Sam Smith
"caleb" Discussed on Homophilia

Homophilia

10:05 min | 5 months ago

"caleb" Discussed on Homophilia

"We're back with Caleb. How again tried to take his headphones off. But guess what not GonNa Work? Yeah so you talked about we who you traveling with my friend shelby we run. We run a weekly show together in Chicago. And we're doing Shows TOGETHER IN L? A. New York while we're while we're out and about okay? So let's talk about the Real Jonathan. The all the Jonathan's that have ever been in your life actually. We should go back for what it was. You're coming out experience coming out experience. I came out to a couple of close friends in high school I like I said from a very small town in Missouri so I was not ready to I. I knew I wasn't gonNA come out until I left. I was like that's not F- For me there are other kids out of my high school though. Yeah we had one hundred ten kids in my graduating class and there were two people at the high school who are out and they accepted and they they had their they had. They were like in theater so they had like their community. I I wasn't I don't think it was. I don't know how it was for them. I don't think that everyone was. They certainly want I prom. King you know what I mean. It wasn't like one of those things where it's like. This is exciting. If anything it was just not thought of I hope for them but I came out to a couple friends in high school and then The day my mom job me off to college I came out to her. I was like we gotta myself and I was like and bisexual by And I'm not bisexual but I was like soft soft injury. Yeah And then she left and then Yeah I came out like a year later. I said facebook status. I was like everyone go. Wow Yeah by facebook. That I couldn't do I called the people needed to be. I called my who. I'm very close with. I called my grandma By that point everyone at school new so I had like everyone in my life that I was like presently spending a lot of time when new But then I was like I can't I just need. I need this to be completely out to be done with it and across the board family wise. Everyone was cool yeah. I'm really lucky. I think that there are maybe a couple of people who are quietly like Sir But they're the minority and so I think that it's like they got big stuff going on so everyone's been pretty cool. It's very exciting. I'm lucky yeah and my mom's cool is coolest outlook. She's the best and then what was your first experience with dating and guys and I was. I was boy. I was with a guy ish in high school but he was. I don't know I don't know if he's in the closet or still not openly queer. I don't know if he if he is identifies as queer and at the time was just like You know experimenting or what. The thing was But he's he's still not out If that's the thing that he is to be out about and that was that in then the first time I really like dated someone was in college and it was like short. Yeah and since then. It's been like a lot of short things. So what who? Jonathan is inspired by a real life. Experience Jonathan is inspired by the of Jonathan. The weekend didn't happen. The Jonathan inspired by this very nice guy that I was seeing for a while in Chicago Very sweet but like just always having kind of like a off-putting. Like the thing with the waiter. Is I think that would happen. Like we would be like you know I would be having a conversation with someone and he would be there and he'll be like throw the vibe off like he said these weird little moments where he's like he's so sweet but he's like not Getting it you know what I mean. And he couldn't have been nicer but it was just like this thing where I was like man. I really wish this was gonNA work out. But he's always getting into stuff to you always had like these incidents he was running late because someone's car caught on fire or like something crazy like that so I thought this is funny. Does he have an inkling that this is happening? I don't I don't think so and I hope not because it's not malicious it's not like I mean he's great I hope he's doing great but It is funny you know what I mean it really. I mean any. Also it's not he comes across great and it's really about him. This thing story. The story isn't about Donovan about me. Wild story it is the I am as an elder someone. Who's sort of resisting the idea of like that? We consume entertainment on our phones and small bites in. What is Qube? I'm on I'm on that bullshit but I mean damn if this isn't the best most compelling show I've ever seen I'm I'm having so much it's wild to me that people are like engaged in it. That is still wild to me but it's a lot of fun. What IS THE CHICAGO GAY? Seem like for Caleb for Caleb I already hang out well for me. I don't know if like Chicago has a very vibrant gay scene. Yeah lots of great drag Queens and great gay spaces. I'm not really involved with them. Not For any particular. I'm just boring. I'm really boring. I go I do my shows I hang out with friends. I go to dinner. I like a a fun weekend. For me legitimately. Just hang out of the coffee shop and like Chilin Walk and maybe run on a bike ride. I it which is like I saw like like in the nineteen fifties like little house on the but which is so far before the nineteen fifties But I'm just like boring so I feel like a lot of the gay spaces are very like Vibrant and fine and loud and like I'm also sober so a lot of the cases are like a substance involved and all that school. Sometimes I go to a gay Bar Berlin in Chicago. I'll go there sometimes at school. I like I'm not that tapped into your culture in terms of like spaces right like puck culture. I Mike there yes sobriety I would imagine. I mean in my twenties especially everything that I associate with. Like Queer spaces was had to do with drugs and alcohol. Yeah but I would imagine there's also like a thriving sober queer community to yeah. I think a lot of there's a lot of art spaces like artsy artistic spaces. That are like Fun like people are hanging not necessarily drinking or doing drugs like all the time but even spaces are very like. It's also a very like drinking and consuming spaces which is like it's never something for me. It's just that I don't I don't enjoy it like it really doesn't make me feel good so I might. That's cool y'all can do it. It's not triggering to me is what I guess. I mean I think for some people. It's hard to be in the spaces but for me it's just like I'm just bored and obviously only say what you're comfortable with. What was your relationship to two substances before I mean I drink. I drink in high school and college. I've never really drugs have never really been for me. I have there are a lot of people in my family with. He's saying something heavy. There are people in my family with our enough people in my family and close to had addiction issues and I just from a very young age was going to be. Yeah can't be for me but I I drink a decent amount in high school in college and it was fine. I feel like I was just doing it because I wanted to be fine. And they didn't know what else to do and I felt uncomfortable. If I wasn't like you know like if I wasn't doing what other people were doing and then like have maybe a year or two in college. I was just like I can still go to these things. I can just go to parties and like drink a coke like that's fine too Yeah you were really. You had a real self possession than in college. Because I sort of probably shouldn't have been drinking definitely should have been drinking the amount that I was but it felt like sort of. I didn't have the confidence to socialize without it right but you have that while I was in a I was. I was in a fraternity in college. kind of a fraternity fraternity. Yeah Fraternity Paternity Delta Fiji Okay. what was that like? What was a Fiji Guy? Like Missouri State while it was genuinely diverse. There was like a group of us that were like very like join because we were into service hours and we were like we wanted people. Take no one's watching over you in college. No one cares what you do and I was very Fraternity to me was the way it my school that I was like. Someone's going to pay attention to my grades and make sure that I'm like taking care of and like thinking of me at all And it was there. Were a lot of guys like that and there are a lot of guys like what you would expect. There are a lot of guys that were out of their mind. You know dudes that like some of some of them had growth over the time that we were together which was a really interesting learning experience for me like some of them came in very wild and like what you would expect like very like You know calling people faggots and things like that like being very stereotypical and there was a lot of growth there. But then some of them didn't grow at all and some of them left the same they came in and those weren't my friends. But it's like any other organization you know what I mean like being theater even working having a job. It's just like those people I don't hang out with and we do what we need to do their other. Gay People in the fraternity. Yeah but they were on closet Katcha. Yeah well is that fair? What was there? Were several guys in the closet. And several of them still have not come out Twenty-five yeah yeah. Maybe they'll come out in their thirty S. Yeah but but you knew this you just you sensed it. No I knew you knew. Yeah Yeah we talked. You know. It's really there's really. There was one guy momentary positive out. If I can say this there was one guy who when I joined was very like Was very homophobic and like said things that I was like. Oh this guy's not going to be my friend And then he came out during my time in school. Yeah and that was wild and soon these days are using the APPS are you..

Chicago Jonathan Caleb Missouri facebook New York shelby Donovan Chilin Walk King Qube Katcha Fiji Queens Berlin
"caleb" Discussed on Homophilia

Homophilia

03:11 min | 5 months ago

"caleb" Discussed on Homophilia

"MATT. Colo how are you? I'm you know getting through it. How are you? I'm strange? You know a half fine. I guess it's also pouring rain here. Just sort of add to the misery of it all. But and of course caveat. We are healthy and safe and Yeah Lucky. Bless all of that but yeah it's Things are getting. It's this feels like like a super Wednesday. You know what I mean like. We're just in the middle of a long long week and Yeah and also like perception of time has totally warped. It's all it's all strange. It's all bizarre honestly like more than ever. I am glad to be doing this show. We've got some NICE MESSAGES FROM PEOPLE. You know we have that were. They're glad that we're keeping on. But we're glad that we're keeping on. Yeah because it's It's keeping me sane. Yes yeah Big Double feature this week. We make big super sized show later show. Yep Caleb heeren whose whose stories have kept US glued to twitter yes will will tweet it from the poem affiliate count. But I I sure everybody has seen by now. Caleb has a riveting chain of stories about a long date that he went on And he's just so funny a just a A true rising star a real rising star honor to catch him on his on. His Skyrocket to the top as he as he swung through Los Angeles taking meeting after meeting. He made time for us in that sense. That is awesome but I somebody who is Who IS A NEIGHBOR SOMEBODY. We've been wanting to get on the show for a long time and somebody who is now recovering from covert nineteen. Yeah Greg Rick Art. You know from young and the restless and he was also on days of our lives in a ton of other stuff. A legit soap star in our midst. Yes and a super charming and funny and Smart Guy and I'm so glad he is healthy so glad he's healthy and so glad we got to talk to him and he's he Yeah I'll let him speak for himself. But yeah we're absolutely Head over heels for Greg Record and Kayla beer after the break. We're.

Caleb heeren Greg Rick Art twitter Greg Record Los Angeles Kayla beer
2020 Update

Iroquois History and Legends

05:04 min | 6 months ago

2020 Update

"And welcome to Iroquois history and legends. This is Andrew. We just wanted to give you a short update on where we're at. I know that for almost everyone in the world right now. We're dealing with an unprecedented time in world history never before has so many people been sequestered in every pocket of the planet. Due to the scare about this virus we know looking from history. And as you all educated listeners know the world is full of histories of pandemics and horrible plagues We know how decimated the Hodeidah schone best estimates are other native peoples of North and South America lost upwards of eighty percent of their population due to play in diseases and thankfully. We're not dealing with anything on the scale of that but even still it is a scary proposition realizing that so many of our people that are already dealing with health issues and loved ones that are on the elderly variety and it even affects some people in the younger demographic as well so we know. It's a scary time but just be assured that people will always stick together. They will help each other to quote the great philosopher. Fred Rogers whenever you see something bad happen to the helpers there will always be helpers and we know that's the case no matter what culture nation or community you live in. There will always be people there to help and we hope that you are those people that are helping others. Anyway I wanted to let you know where Caleb and I are at obviously at the time of this recording. New York is one of the epicenters in North America for the disease and Caleb his hands full trying to to do his job to support his family I myself and my family are currently in Asia We are stuck. It's not feasible for us to go back to North America. I had recently moved to Asia to try and do some schooling and that's about exactly when the virus it so we've bounced around from a few countries and currently we are in Malaysia. That is also on lockdown. Now we're not immune from that either. That makes it very difficult for Caleb. Obviously to record together since we're literally on the other side of the planet but that being said even though were from each other and My microphone equipment is in a another country. I thought let's try. Let's try and put something out. Caleb and I being together really doesn't work for us to do a narrative episode for me by myself. It our chemistry. We just need each other But I do have some other co hosts here with me. My two young boys are getting older. And they love hearing the Haudenosaunee Children's stories as much as anyone so they've asked if they could help along with this. So here's what we're going to do The kids and I are going to attempt to put out some more traditional. Iroquois Children's stories during our time in quarantine as long as that is don't expect a huge vast amount. We still got homeschooling for them to do. I still have online classes for my language study. But we thought we'd try that being said. The audio quality is definitely not going to be as good Just because I don't have the wonderful Blue Yeti microphone so we'll be dealing with some subpar speakers but we hope that you and your kids can enjoy these tales and hopefully it'll give us something to do as for the future of the show. Caleb and I will still need to talk about that obviously putting out multiple episodes every few weeks or every few months is Not Feasible right now. We're going to commit to that. After this all blows over Caleb and I would like to do maybe an episode or two to To tie off the vast history of the final two centuries to catch us up to modern day but that remains a lot to be worked out. We thank you everyone for listening. If you know friends or family that are looking for something. Do recommend our podcast. Don't let them binge on Netflix. And all that other stuff give them something productive to do to stretch their brain and learn something new. If you have listened to the entire series well go back and start again believe it or not but Caleb and I do not remember everything that we shared not by a long shot We both have to go back and listen to our hold episodes and be like. Oh Yeah I forgot about that if we can go back and learn stuff that we've already said I'm sure that That you guys would get a lot of knowledge out of going back and listening again. Thank you everyone for listening and look for a new legends episode coming in the future with Andrew. Ezra and maybe even Ethan thank you everyone

Caleb Iroquois Children Andrew North America Hodeidah Schone South America Fred Rogers Netflix Asia Haudenosaunee Children New York Malaysia Ezra Ethan
Falcons could field an offense with 11 first-round draft picks

Golic & Wingo

06:14 min | 6 months ago

Falcons could field an offense with 11 first-round draft picks

"So we had a truck a couple of signings by the Atlanta Falcons over the weekend right to pick up tight end Hayden Hurst from the Baltimore Ravens and they also acquired look Kwan Treadwell a former number one pick for the Minnesota Vikings yeah as the Atlanta falcons roster currently stands right now on offense alone just on offense they have a Levin former first round picks all of these former first round picks quarterback Matt Ryan first round pick Todd Gurley who sign when he was released first round pick Julio Jones first round pick Calvin Ridley first round pick the Quantrill first round pick Hayden Hurst first round pick left tackle Jake Matthews first round pick left guard James carpenter first round pick center Alex Mack former first round pick Chris Lindstrom the right guard former first round pick and right tackle Caleb McGary also that he first started his first round eleven is incredible let them all eleven of them a former first round pick I mean there's no way that's ever happened before right I can't believe that what ever but here's the real question if you had to redraft everyone of these players how many would be former first rounder this okay because I think this is fair Lidstrom McGarry and carpenter I've always been really what one or two years no it's been really since two thousand eleven okay yeah so let's remind me Gerry I think you were taken off or taken them out yeah okay so all of the other nine how many would be redrafted as a first round what's what's going on it's not right absolutely no question that runs for Todd Gurley no yeah I I would say no I would sit well I would say no one quite frankly his a conversation about the value of the position in general could also affect the new with him that was the thing coming out of college yes I look he has fifty eight rushing touchdowns over his first whatever seasons and all the other ones are either in the hall of Famer going let me just say six are we saying first rounder today or go back to the beginning again it would re drawing back to the beginning again because I'm currently the way Todd Gurley came out I mean would you not still take him in the first one that's the question now right are you going to pay for that kind of production from a running back anymore we saw Christian McCaffrey Leonard for net like there's been plenty examples of even a legal or not re signing a big second contract drafting a great one of the first round can still benefit you a lot okay I'm just trying to get to it you know is that what they've done in their right career does that mean where are the first roll worthy to me the girly thing is to your point he had a knee injury coming out of college and right when they signed with the red sign that long term deal with they're trying they got out of now then he was going to be chronic so to me the top group member he was the first one that airports reset the market for running backs and it turned out no he just re establish the old line of thinking but that first three years of production would you that would you spend a first round pick on that because we saw that rand's office how much in common now it always goes like this with the running game but in combination with an offense of line that did really well what you brought into what worth over would you pay for that as the foundation of your off I'm beginning to go the Melkite around here that I'm not sure running back as well because Melvin Gordon was in that same draft and Melvin Gordon is on his team I got an extreme I think that's the biggest conversation we could take out of this is the running back position record number mellow one point eighty never take a running back in the first Rana I wonder for we're slowly but surely going back to it I mean there was a contract a couple years ago with the first running back off the board was late second round out of Tennessee and I think we're going back to that after a bevy running backs being taken so we were definitely in on Matt Ryan yes we're out on Todd Gurley a legit is amazing looking back at Todd Gurley's draft class there's not a lot of got like if you're talking about reworking the top ten Todd Gurley might be the most wealthy in that group maybe outside of Amari Cooper yeah we can we can have that discussion later because that's in it read graphic I think is always fast and you have to wait a certain amount of time Julio Jones know quite well right Calvin Ridley first round too early again I think it's too early last year what he had sixty three receptions okay just under nine hundred okay seven touchdowns I would mean he also can't account for how bad that team ask me yes or no right now I'd say yes but I still think it might be too early Hayden Hurst no not because look they they took marketers later in the draft in the third round he clearly became the tight end of Baltimore which made Hayden Hurst by the way has taken in the first row before Lamar Jackson R. Jackson for Lamar starting you know tight on that team right now marketers you said right Hayden Hurst also dealt with some injuries and stuff there too that's okay in perfect sample size and when you have a guy come on like marquetry who could predict that the way that offense ended up of what he was the Mackey award winner a what he was coming home with one truck will no no Jake Matthews yes I think so I think so I think so do not I meet yeah yeah I mean yes he's been there he's been there is a second contract I also wrote a like doesn't miss a lot of games he's he's dependable yeah I think that's what it our printer are probably not I mean he's he's been a guy that's been in the league for nine years now dependable guy but we're talking about first round right you know I mean when you're twenty four we'll talk about for sure we're talking about top ten picks like a lot yeah yeah yeah I I'd probably lean toward no on that as well yeah yeah Alex Mack yeah absolutely yeah yeah and then the other than what we remember and I think Lidstrom would be headed in that direction yeah kill the guy who's more reach last year get killed the one I have questions about obviously we know the health concerns that existed before the draft earning a hard issue that he had had to deal with early in this time oxygen so there's a lot to hash out with those two but just I mean blows off the page when you just read that number the every single hundred dinners with that crew yeah what eleven Ryan still got its still on that ride to reach for the paycheck first but everyone else has to at least go for their wallets and act like there's also a common I do with you know with my dad so you got rid you got Ridley help you got got this R. Ridley Hearst links from a Gerry all still on their rookie deals you know wrecked yeah everybody else is is all for them yeah if I'm looking at yes correct so yeah they're all fascinating eleven a former first rounders on

Atlanta Falcons Hayden Hurst Baltimore Ravens Kwan Treadwell Minnesota Vikings
Economic fallout from virus felt in the stock market

Rush Limbaugh

00:40 sec | 6 months ago

Economic fallout from virus felt in the stock market

"V. yeah the economic fallout of the corona virus outbreak has widened today and the consequences on Wall Street are evident A. B. C.'s Erin to Turkey has more countless Americans are holed up at home business is severely limited such extensive economic disruptions may be needed to contain the corona virus outbreak but Caleb silver at Investopedia said they're making investors sick investors may not know but certainly they continue to sell stocks and every almost every other aspect last week to this big volatile market that we're doing right now trading was halted almost as soon as it began after the S. and P. five hundred was down eight percent the fed's emergency interest rate cut over the weekend seemed only to reinforce a state of

A. B. C. Turkey Caleb Silver Investopedia FED Erin
"caleb" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

05:05 min | 8 months ago

"caleb" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"And I don't know I hesitate to to say that shows any sort of trend but manufacturers are feeling more confident that this is becoming norm and it's also pushed them to invest in much more capable spacecraft. I over one. I was talking with my old college roommate just yesterday. He was telling me how much satellite Internet sucks for his family out on the eastern shore of Maryland and It was neat to be able to tell them that. There's so many new technologies that have been invested in that in a couple of years that may not be the case it. It could be the mega constellations bring much better internet or could be companies had to figure out how to build massive very high throughput satellites in Geo that that can actually provide equality Internet service. I feel like it's opened up a lot of new business opportunities for space industry and it's a cool thing to watch so I'll be counting again in twenty twenty to see if this marks the beginning of a new normal or if maybe everybody everybody gets panky again maybe six launching a thousand satellites freak everyone out until press pause on buying until they know what exactly they should do again. We'll see yeah. That is a pretty huge rebound. I mean You know like you're mentioning. There was a lot of panic from reading your articles over the last couple of years that I feel like at some point. I've read one article. Go from you about how Every satellite manufacturer was convinced. They were going out of business because nobody wanted to. Geo Satellites anymore granted. There's not a lot of people that are manufacturing these but they all individually felt that they were going to be out of business pretty soon and then on the other side of the launch side there is some concern within certain launch companies. That they're going to run out of payloads payloads at some point that there's not enough people out there that need to put things into orbit for the amount of launch vehicles that are coming online the big project projections that they all tend to survive on. I'm getting investment saying that. They can launch certain amount of satellites per year. So that's definitely something that is always in the back of my mind so it's good to hear that. They had an uptick in the year. But yeah yeah you're right. Is this the fluke or were the last three kind of the weird Downtime for that section of the market right. Yeah the things that go on with Sally manufacturing definitely have a trickle effect the launch providers a few years out. So we saw that with SPACEX. Launching was was it thirteen last year. Way Below their initial estimate and they've blamed that a lot on the fact that the market for for satellites just wasn't what they thought it was gonna be so rocket factories needs to have the payload launch that they can build enough rockets to keep their cost down. It's something to pay attention to for the health of the whole space industry. What's going on in the telecom sector? Definitely will caleb thank you so much for coming back on the show talking about all of that It's always helpful to get a download from somebody so knowledgeable on it so you know. I always point people to your articles all the time on the blog and here on on the podcast. Yes but is there anywhere that you want people to follow along with what you're working on day to day the website and twitter or both great Writing for Space News pretty regularly and pretty much every day And then trying to stay on top of a twitter as well. You always telling me that you're working on twitter game you know. I think I've gotten better twitter now. You got on the twitter. It's fun I feel like I'm I have to remind myself to not be passive observer on on twitter so I also realized that is sure a lot more launch stuff than I do. Other deals following a lot of things that a happened in the space industry before whatever reason those the ones that could have grabbed my attention so I think maybe my resolution for twenty twenty will be to tweet Moore Satcom Stuff and then like we were talking about at the tail end of this conversation. The show people why that's significant to the overall space industry because when I started writing about SATCOM DOT com wasn't clear to me I got into space. 'cause I like stargazing and it wasn't clear to me the connection between those two but now I understand how important it is to have an actual industry. That's involved in regularly building all kinds a spacecraft that I think it helps with everything that goes on in space awesome several and follow. Oh long because as a masterfully put and that's why I'm reading so keep keep doing what you're doing and Obviously we'll have you back whenever more satellite stuff happens but thanks again for coming on. Yeah anytime thanks again to Caleb for coming on the show talking all about satellites today he is one of my favorite writers definitely. Check him out over at Atas Space News but for now that is it. Thank you so much for listening As always head over to main engine cutoff dot com slash support. If you'd like to join the crew that supports this show. Oh every single month and until next week. Thank you all for listening. I'll talk to you soon. uh-huh.

twitter Geo Satellites Atas Space News Maryland SPACEX SATCOM DOT Caleb Sally manufacturing Moore Satcom twenty twenty
"caleb" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"caleb" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"The KAYLA was never prosecuted terrific. It's very possible that he's trial would have been an embarrassment for too. Many people and it's not like the money could be recovered because caleb bit spent it no dave he slept it away on. April twentieth eighteen sixty seven Lewiston officially became part of Idaho. Sorry got to be someone from their here tonight. Always anybody from you are taking a lot of shit from his fucking crowd. How did you live there like it sucks their people living like it's fucking garbage. We should get it out of here. Okay well come to Lewiston. It's a shit town. Lewiston a place to avoid so but anyway officially became part of Idaho when the Senate fight finally ratified a new treaty but still everyone who had just acted like it was part Idaho the whole time so no one when the New York The Times ran when sorry Caleb died in eighteen seventy five. He choked on bullshit. What did he die of which spin fucking asshole the doctor he was a huge brick. He's no along with us. The New York Times ran an obituary on him. It repeated the story of him stealing the Mon- money just like it was a fact okay. Okay evidently did firm what he intended. He was never prosecuted the like. I said the reason was because many of April would get hurt. Tyson agents every five. It's kind of the same way we prosecuted the bankers. Yeah it really is but that would be so many problems that we did and you know. There's no way they're like. Let's pick up the money and give it to the trying. They're just like hey sorry. Sorry you know your Gripe is not with us. It's with bedding the ear so the Idaho Statesman obituary stated he should have died in prison isn't the state in eighteen ninety that does not mean Gemma the mountains so the the moral Orel is is that just steal money and your a fine have friends because he wasn't there was another another guy left out who stole money and just laughed and they're like earlier before he became a territory and I'm gonNA get cigarettes Gretz. Okay our governor yeah well. I mean yeah it is it's weird because because this country doesn't really have much of a history of white people getting away with everything wow. I feel Hitler. I feel like I'm talking to twitter. I mean where did that. Come from. That's just really that as bedding gadget general you bastard. It's just so general like all white people are bad and that's Brad. Even that's not even the truth. It's just most bad. People are white okay. I think we can meet in the middle. There okay argument. Argument argument accepted. Well Shit congrats on being the capital. It seems pretty easy. We want to thank thank you guys so much for coming out. We really appreciate it truly paddock great. I'm love your city. Gobble Gobble.

Lewiston Caleb Idaho Gobble Gobble Idaho Statesman New York The Times twitter dave Senate Tyson Hitler Gemma Brad
"caleb" Discussed on Starting9

Starting9

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"caleb" Discussed on Starting9

"His name is is caleb. Smith that interview to you right now. I hear caleb smith miami. Miami marlins dallas is going to be <hes> very excited obviously any time there's a left you on the podcast. He gets very excited. <hes> you know he's normally so right down the middle unbiased but then he gets a lefty on it's it goes off the rails <hes>. You said that you're not funny. No you're not funny all right so we're gonna have to get something out of you. Here we go. My first question for you is if you are trapped in a room for forty eight consecutive hours and one song was playing over and over and over again. Which song would you pick and keep in mind. You're gonna have to sleep at some point. See if it's your favorite song into some loud parts parts that would suck which one song would you play for forty eight straight hours. I wanted to go with <hes> ma milwaukee hats on rodeo by garth brooks or the thunder rolls by garth brooks. Garth brooks is a decent trip. I'm not country. Garth brooks is a fucking amazing voice i didn't i didn't say it was a bad choice. I'm just saying that i personally would not have gone the country row. No that is that is an outstanding. I was actually fortunate enough. I believe i was eight years old. At the time. Garth brooks had a concert at the arco arena in sacramento california northern california god's country <hes> and and that was the concert that he actually jumped off the stage and latched onto what was later discovered as a fucking livewire wire and was swinging across the stage singing thunder rolls and he like jumped off like like dismounted from the cable which is a good thing because if he would have made contact with the stage garth brooks would have been oh deep fried buck and country drumstick right there in front of god fat news to walk. I'm maybe still do have the walk-ups but i am with you is a have you ever karaoke eat either one of those songs i have not. I've not carry out any of the songs. Have you carry period. I have okay. What's your go to karaoke. Sign did me and my brother did a fifty cent song times candy shop and then what was the other one. I think it's psycho. My i remember i remember <hes> giant chime picture this dallas <hes> when i got like my merge bonuses for the for the world series shirts last year got paid out and cash was playing. I get money by fifty cent just in my apartment. Just fucking hundred dollar bills all over over my table.

garth brooks caleb smith Miami marlins dallas miami california arco arena sacramento hundred dollar eight years
"caleb" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

14:07 min | 1 year ago

"caleb" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Meeting. Give you permission. I go you know so. How can we do well first of all. We've got to read the script and everything and you know so i sort of take him aside and you know and and as kind of looking funny at me like what's going on everything and so i said well you copy the script and everything and then you know says well and you know the selectmen only meet once a month. I go <hes>. We'll how how can we just so happens. We have the meeting tonight rate. You know so. I give him a get him. I'm the script right away and i won't stop you from filming today but you know you have to get permission to film tomorrow so i go okay so he says listen. We have our meeting tonight at eight o'clock. You know give me a call at ten o'clock wab back home and everything okay great so <hes> you know. The script is pretty innocuous so i wasn't really worried about that. Because it really you know it was really kind of promoting the american revolution and it was really kind of educational because because it was really kind of for p. b. s. that sort of thing so anyway we continue filming and then at the end of the day and then you know dinner and then at ten o'clock i called the guy up no no answer ten thirty no answer eleven o'clock no answer so. I figured it's getting too late. I better you know wait till morning so get up at like six in the morning and i called the guy too so anyway we finally get out there and ezra sort of chomping at the bit and i'm waiting for this permission and you know <hes> you know. He's really getting really upset because he's used to really buttoned up production managers who would know that you don't just call the police and the fire men to get permission the film on a national historic landmark so anyway all the crew is they're on the battle green and they're sort of waiting for things i said just a second and right across the street right in view of everybody is a payphone you know just sitting out there with a little cover on it but not in a booth or anything so i go over to the pay phone and i call up and again. There's no answer so i start miming because they're looking. They're looking at the back of me and i start start mining. You know shaking my head. Yeah yeah you turn around and i hold my finger up and everything laughing. The phones are and ebbing ring and then nothing's going on not talking to anybody and everything and i know that i can't say we have permission because you know a quarter of laws well. If something happened i would be you know you know. I can't do that so i finally you know. Hang up the phone. I say turn around and i see as i said okay. Let's shoot so. I didn't say we had permission. I said okay let's so we shot and fortunately they finished about eleven o'clock in the morning before are you know and and i'm walking back to the hotel and as i'm walking back to the hotel. This car pulls up alongside me really slowly and the guys there's a another guy driving in the head selectmen is in there and he starts braiding me as walking down the street and i'm just thinking i don't care where i can listen to guy. Yell at me all day long because we got the shot. We've got the every scene we needed and we're <unk> outta here so i'll just take it so that's what happened anyway. That's that's just in the genre of kit. Let anything stop you so fantastic tastic. They don't teach that so don't teach. I am another story like that. We're here for you. Okay so here's another story i did a film about trains many years ago <hes> in black and white and i shot it in black and white because haskell and goodwill is said to me i young guys don't know well anything about shooting mood because <hes> really harder to shoot black and white than it is caller running a so decided to shoot the film in black and white and i actually a us some of the last x t film that kodak made which is twenty a._s._a. Really slow beautiful fine grain with lots of latitude and everything and and and you know double x. as well for this you know for darker scenes anyway i wrote to all the railroads because i figured i needed needed permission to do this film and <hes> everyone of the railroad companies wrote back and basically said you can't do this. You know you don't have permission but every one of the letters was a three paragraph letter and and it had the letterhead you know you know <hes> eight you know ashes in to begin santa fe okay and <hes> you know burlington northern and northern pacific railroad all and each letter says dear mistake well. Thank you very much for enquiring better and then the second second paragraph would always say unfortunately do insurance regulations that other stuff we and the third paragraph would always read you know wishing you the best of luck on your project project. You know if i can be of any further assistance. Please let me know so vice president in charge something or other so basically i was deny provisions so i just i figured well. I'll just have to shoot without permission and you know i shot for a while and everything was going well and then you know people start coming up. They kicked me out. You know you can't be here and i leave and everything and then i started thinking okay. Well you know the next time that happens. I'll have one one of these letters standing by so you know just figure you know. Just hand it to the guy and see what happens and so what are you doing here. You can't be excuse me and then i show in the letter from the santa fe railroad any reads the beginning dear mistakes. No thank you and then jumps to the doesn't read the middle paragraph. You know he's too busy. He's too smart. You know you need the last payment wishing you the best of luck. If we can be of any is okay. How can i help you in this happened like five or six times times that nobody read it and finally i was in a roundhouse in montana because they traveled across the country and went up the coast and then across the <hes> you know the where the burlington northern runs across and i'm in iran has on i really wanted to film there and out of the red house comes as guy in greasy coveralls and everything and seeming very slow and not you know not real bright kind of guy and everything and i go. I hand him the letter. Well guess what he wasn't a smart guy who knew what the letter said. He was going to read every bit of the letter and he did and he said you know this is. You can't shoot here. What is this and i go. Oh i'm sorry and i took the letter back and i never got that shot but i always thought it was interesting that that in a weird way someone who smarter and better educated is willing to jump to conclusions more than someone who realizes realizes they have to read every paragraph lessons in real life lessons. My i mother is like the queen of don't tell her what to do or where she can or cannot be and and she's the kind of person where she'll just walk passed so if there are people standing there saying no you can't go there. She'll just keep walking and because rarely will anyone actually stop you. Physically you most of them. They won't come over and grab you and she small anyway. She just keep walking and it is my dad are in the background like trying to ostrich. Digger bigger heads in the sand. My mom just goes now. Come on. I think that's okay wh- thrilling that's you know that's chutzpah govt reincarnate. I've spent a lot of time in rome and in paris and <hes> you know going to the liuw and going to the you know to the <hes> museum at the vatican. They're all these different lines and they're always these these he's ropes and stuff but i know it really well so i know what i want to get to so times that i've been filming there with crew guys who've never been there and everything and and we don't have a lot of time time to go through the vatican museum so you want to get to the key things i would know the secret routes and and you'd always be going under a velvet rope right everything you just keep going. That's okay much. Yes oh no why and and how did it come about that. You directed directed two features right and t._v. Up yeah i i mean i really love actors. Listen i really i mean i really enjoyed directing. It's just the the problem is is that you know when you're successful as cinematographer you get the better choices voices as a cinematographer and so i would always you know i mean i've i've always wondered if i had sort of stuck it out because you know i directed the escape artists which you know under the auspices of francis and zoa trope and everything and and it's a movie i'm proud of and i like it <hes> but you know it never really found in an audience but then i think we'll george. Lucas directed t._h._x. Nobody saw that but you know he was a director and he stuck it out and you know what would have happened if i'd stuck it out but but instead i got offered the right stuff and i go wow. I really wanna shoot this movie. You know so i mean i still still really love directing and i find it. You know the the greatest thing about directing for me being mainly as cinematographer that makes me really appreciate you know <hes> the directors that i work with and all the things that they have to put up with and you know the difficulties i mean for for the millions of questions or the one million questions questions i answer as a cinematographer in the course of a movie they answer five billion and have to make decisions and i mean the one thing i did learn and i think anybody but he will tell you this. It's true. Is it in movie making. You need to make decisions. You know you're better off making terrible decision to not making a decision in and you know the the biggest problem. I think are people who are very smart and can see all the options and it just kind of confuses them because they can't can't make a decision. I mean it's almost better you know to be moderately intelligent to make a move. If you have a great script in great actors there's and everything you can get it done but you know someone who's really bright you know and and can i mean it's like being a doctor. I mean a lot of friends who went to johns hopkins and one of my best friends you know is a <hes> psychiatrist in washington and he was saying you know the terrible thing about being a doctor is that you know like when his wife was pregnant you know with their first child. All he could think about is all the things that could go wrong because that's what they teach hitchin medical school there in teaching you like everything. That's you know i mean they teach you. What are the good signs and you know and all that but but they're mainly reteaching what can go wrong so all he's thinking is that if she has a certain pain oh well that could be one of seventeen and i think it's you know that's a problem problem. If you're a director almost i mean you know the other thing about making a decision as it immediately know if it's right or wrong and then you can always correct it and and i think you know it's better to move fast and you know go on blink or instincts than it is to ruminate about. It's something and become intellectual about it. I mean you can do that later. When people ask you questions you know when at the press conference or something but while you're making the movie you just want to keep keep going was fun. Directing your daughter in an episode of bones. It was fun up to a point one it one forever and some idea for something and emily said to me dad on bones. That's not the way we do things but she i mean she was being funny about it but but then i would i would call you know david bory addison side and we'd always have a pact where we would just sort of set things up and then emily started to to figure it out but it was a lot of fun. I really had a great time doing that. Show and mtv is great because it it is one of those things where you have to really make decisions quickly alien something and you always find yourself at the end of the day with three pages left to go and and you only have it our and so you come up with some crazy you you know idea for following the whole thing with a steady k._m. Whatever doing it all in one take and that's the great thing about television because i've directed some of the law and orders as well <hes> that the actors are so amazing it had. No you know you don't have to worry about them knowing the lines. It's you know they just nail it but the other thing that i learned is that you can't you can't leave even the smallest role to just you know say oh yeah. That person looks right now. You've you gotta you have to make sure people are everybody's good because otherwise you end up with someone who has one line to deliver and it takes you an hour to get get that out of our spare. No you can't spare anything. Kids grow up onset hugh yearly. Did i'm kind of i mean you know i think zoey at a very early age knew she wanted to be either a singer or an actress you know and and as i've said before for i've never won an argument with her after she was three years old and emily emily you know always loved acting and did a lot of acting in high high school and everything and you know she went to be studied theater but you know.

emily emily director burlington vatican museum santa fe david bory ezra kodak vice president johns hopkins haskell mtv montana rome zoey Lucas iran francis washington
"caleb" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"caleb" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Union. Not because of shooting any movies i got in the union because <hes> steve spielberg was going to do a movie called after after school who was written by bob <hes> medicine bob gale and <hes> because steve even at that time had a lot of power or he was able to hire me even though i wasn't in the union and universal paid me for thirty days and the film got cancelled but because i got paid for ah already shot the black stallion and eight orsha already shot more american graffiti which is a sequel to eighty but it was in san francisco the black stallion talion was in toronto and in <hes> italy in sardinia in rome and you know san francisco was sort of out of the jurisdiction of the main karema's local so is able to shoot that but i couldn't shoot a hollywood movie if i didn't get in the union except for the fact that steve spielberg had so much power that he was able to hire me the and get me paid well. If you get played for thirty days by a major studio you get in the union. I mean it's crazy and then that opened it up so that it could shoot being there because hal ashby i had known for years when he was an editor and actually was gonna do a film with him about editing for the u._s._c. film school because they were going to do a series of it never happened but i interviewed hal and i really liked him and we really hit it off and then when i got in the union and haskell was not available. What a shoot being there. He asked me to do it so that's how i did. My first hollywood movie so much of this is just a textbook example of how there's no textbook so much of it is relationships friendships happenstance deputy yeah and and and and determination and an absolute well. I'll tell you a great story about determination has nothing to do with cinematography but it has to do with film school in the business and everything that after my free when in new york i had worked for this guy george pico and he was still photographer and he was you you know he was involved with all sorts of for you know he did magazine covers an album covers all sorts of things and <hes> you know <hes> <hes> he was also married to jean ritchie who is a folk musician played the dulcimer and so he was involved a lot with the newport folk festival everything and i actually met him through my brother-in-law who's telling about who had the office in china who had the apartment so anyway after i came out to u._s._c. film school i was looking for a job that would take me back to new york because i always loved going to the bleaker baker street cinema and the new yorker and the failure and all the great movie theaters in new york because i used to spend weekends going and seeing lots and lots of movies because i just love the movies that i would sometimes see eight or nine movies over the weekend from friday night to send. We'd probably ran into each other when they probably probably did because i used to have time okay okay. This is over at two thirty a pound by three o'clock. You know to care to see the searchers at the failure and you know so so it was sort of crazy so i wanted to go back to new york so i i called up george to see if i gue- my old job back assisting we saw well you know listen. We're making a movie we this year in and it's it's a movie about the american revolution and <hes> we gotta director and and listen. I'm i said well. You know i could shoot. He's none. I'm gonna shoot suited because he was as still aggravating headshot some movie stuff. He goes listen the only job we have left as production manager. I go. That's incredible. I just happened to study. You know production managing for a whole year here at u._s._c. film school because well listen. If you can get yourself back here listen you know okay. I'll hire you as production manager so somewhat you know sheepishly. I go up to dave johnson who taught production management management at u._s._c. and i go listen dave. I know i haven't taken any of your class out. Just talk my job as a production manager later on a movie what what you know in a nutshell. Can you tell me you know about the job because <hes> day chanel because we knew each other because he who was involved in other things other than he goes all right. I'm just going to tell you one thing. Don't make excuses. I go okay. Dave thanks saliva. I'm already for this job so i go back and the director was named ezra stone who is a tv director directly the munsters and a lot immed- directed a lot of television actor he had been an actor he played <hes> and we altered henry aldrich henry henry odd you know on the radio would since he was like eight or nine years old or something so he was really experiencing who's used to working with like really experienced pila so i go back and one of the one of the things we had to do is range to shoot on the battle green in lexington massachusetts and i've got to get permissions for this. I got a range for hotels. I gotta get the crew together are there and and there was a musical group called webster's last word that was singing you know and it was it was sort of a silly thing that that was really designed to get kids interested in the american revolution so anyway i figure well if if i wonder if we want to shoot on the battle green then i had to call up well. Maybe i'll call the police department in lexington so i call the police department and talk to the head of the police and they go well. You can shoot there but you need to hire two <hes> <hes> two policemen. I go yeah you know we'll and and you know part of the scene requires them to lower the flag and oh the the fireman airman do the flag so you're going to have to hire a couple of firemen. I go okay so we're you know we're set so we go there when everything we we film and <hes> about two in the afternoon. This guy comes up is who's in charge here. I go in. You know. I'm all of like twenty one or something and i you <hes>. Don't look like i'm in charge at all.

production manager new york steve spielberg u._s._c. film school director dave johnson hollywood hal ashby george pico bob gale san francisco chanel toronto jean ritchie lexington haskell editor henry aldrich italy
"caleb" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

11:46 min | 1 year ago

"caleb" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"There were two guys ahead of me at johns hopkins is walter merch and matthew robbins who went on to have distinguished careers in the movie business but they were at u._s._c. films go and they kept calling me up and saying hey day she'll come out here to u._s._c. film school because really fun so without any idea that it actually could become a career thought it would be like a fun thing to do and because when i was at hopkins i had worked for still uh-huh photographer. A guy named george pico in new york during my summers so i knew how to use a light meter and when i came out the u._s._c. film school people were after me to shoot their films because i knew how to use a light meter. Now is a good cinematographer but i knew how to use a light meter which is more than a lot of people new at the time so that's kind of ellicott started so almost by accident or by chance i mean it was <hes> <hes> you know. It was something that really interested me but i mean to be honest with you. In those days. There were only three film schools in the united states. I mean now. They're hundreds but at that time there were only three of them and you really didn't have any feeling that you could get in. I mean there was it was really a closed shop in terms of the union's just sort of came up because your father was in your uncle or somebody was in it and so you really you know i kind of felt like it was a good education. I mean it's like going into college and reading you know literature and philosophy and all sorts of things it sort of teaches you how to think and it's really valuable for your life. Even if you go on to become become a doctor or lawyer or whatever your parents usually want you to be but you know you learn how to think and i thought well you know maybe film school will teach me how how to think in a different way than i'm used to thinking. You know just the way you know. Studying art history was fascinating for me happened into art history because i was watering by a classroom and this woman phoebe stat and who is the head of the art department at johns hopkins was showing slides. I thought well this is a nice way to spend yeah. I know they were you know the these beautiful big slides of you know architecture and you know paintings things and sculpture and all sorts of things you know this is this is nice. When did you meet your wife well. I was still in marriage. Open married a long long time <hes> i met her <hes> actually <hes> my friend basil polydoros had an internship with larry termine woman who was a producer and there was a guy working for larry term. <hes> you know a guy named <hes> leeann williams and he wanted to be an actor and he was actually just working like a babysitter an assistant or whatever and in those days they see you know you didn't have video tape or anything so he had put some money away and he he had talked to basil that maybe directing a scene with him you know acting in it and <hes> so the the seeing that he was doing was a true person a man and a woman or a girl and a boy and <hes> and he had found mary jo through very convoluted colluded by you know meeting her you know at a dentist or something like that in any way sort of roped her into it but she was already working. She was actually doing doing it a t._v. Show at the time but when she was done in the evening she came by to where we were gonna. Film it and <hes> you know we met and <hes> i'm sort of hit it off and basil and his wife kept saying yeah. I think mary jo really like she should really call up and they tell mary jo the call me <laughter> yeah so anyway we ended up meeting and falling in love. That was it nice later. Both that's right and prominent yeah yes emily and so e and they're you know you can't help you proud of a <hes> such accomplished children. No we really are but you know we're also proud of them for being really good kind and considerate important than great people and granddaughter with the middle name otter. That's all you need is still like they were why because they like offered and surely wolf. I serve other sweet so so you come. I'm out here to to u._s._c. with a couple of friends. Having been your advance party so to speak right and you're in demand because you can read that light meter and you find yourself in the midst of an interesting group of people people like george lucas and john milius randal kleiser and basil who has apologized composer. Can you give us an. I d what the atmosphere was like on campus the atmosphere at u._s._c. at the time it was it was in this kind of quonset hut building you you know and it was there was a there was kind of a courtyard in the middle and there was <hes> a very low roof on the building and you were only allowed to have editing had certain projects you're only allowed certain amount of time with the movie il to eddie your film and everything but it sort of became a culture that we figured figured out a way of of positioning a trash can outside the school you climb up on and then climb over the roof and get in get into your editing editing room in the middle of the night and work all night long and then leave before anybody came in during the day and you you you know you would end up having a film that was much better edited that anybody else's because you knew how to sneak into the school and then of course water was very much involved with sound at the time and he had a key to room one away which is the projection schnur room and he could get in there and we could mix movies in the middle of the night so is really sort of a you know. It was the bunch of people doing things that were breaking rules. Basically which you know it's funny because i you know even to this day. I talked to george lucas about that and we talked. Ah about the fact that when you make a movie you can't let anything stop you. You know the young just have to do whatever it takes to get the movie done you know and people are always always you know wanting to kind of well. You know it's raining. We can't you know know you gotta shoot you. Gotta get it done because that's what movies are all about. It's really really as a matter of fact this is really great but on when i started black stallion you know th which was really the first feature that i did <hes> we. We're starting in toronto. Which is the second half of the movie and <hes> you know it was it was really rough because carol ballard was not used to doing doing i mean you've never done a feature film before and i never done a feature film before and you know carol was used to doing these little educational films where he'd go out and do it. Everyone john gonna like oh well yeah today. Let's go into this and we'll get this nina. We've got he did films about pigs and cats and things like that and i work with them got a couple of films and he did a film called rodeo which is great rodeos <hes> and <hes> you know so you know carol really hated hated when the assistant director would set up you know schedule for the day and he wouldn't even look he wouldn't even look into call sheet. You okay carol we're doing the scene goes <hes>. I don't wanna do this scene today. It's the one with mickey rooney and the kidney will mickey's in toronto and that's an hour and a half away you you know because we were filming out on this farm out in the middle of nowhere and you know and so it just it became really sort of frustrating and there are a lot of things going on and and i really was i really wanted to quit early on in that movie and and you know and then mary jo i would talk and go like <hes> you know. You can't really afford to quit quit because you haven't made enough money to really quit the move he never but i was talking to the the sound man this guy net boxer who <hes> had been around and was really experienced and everything and you know it was complaining. I mean is this. <hes> you young guys. All think it's about art. It's it's not about art making movies about starting a movie and finishing it. It's about survival. It has nothing to do with artie says you know if you think you're making art. You're probably making crap if you just struggling and you're just trying to get through the day and try to get to the other end of the film and everything and get it done you know then you find out if you've made art or not and you know i took that advice and i kind of stuck with it. You know i mean there are times would have been fired from movies but i've never quit and nine i never would you know it. Just it's not you know some. It's something i learned from that experience you know and and i turned out it turned out to be right with the black black stallion because it really was a wonderful movie yes of course <hes> well experience. Is the the the best in some cases. I guess the only teacher really we you know i mean if you think of film is an artist really difficult to teach art. You can teach the mechanics exa things you can teach technique can teach you know how to load a camera and how to expose the things but but you know the art comes comes from some sort of mysterious place i mean that's why i love doing the film with florian you know never look away which is based on gerhard richter's life because it was re it really really is the only film i really see about art that kind of gets to the heart of what that process is held twice extraordinary film in folks. If if you haven't seen it was an oscar nominee last year as our language film never look away and it is really exceptional at and very few films about any kind of our composer painter sculptor. Whatever do what this film does. Which is you kind of feel what he's feeling his frustration. He wants to express himself but he doesn't know how he can't quite put his finger on. How how he's going to get out in some meaningful way what is inside him and i found it very compelling. It's really it really gets to the mystery the of it because in a so many films that are about artists or singers or whatever we'll try to explain it away if i will. His brother died when his brother died he. You know and it's not like that. I mean it really sometimes it's a struggle and you sort of wonder you know like for instance with richter i mean he didn't really become even moderately successful until he was well into his thirties and he's now eighty seven or something and he probably didn't really become super successful until he was in his sixties so at what point as an artist you say to yourself okay. I've given it enough time. They better go back to school and become a lawyer or somebody. You know i mean you look at someone like like a writer like wallace stevens well. A stevens who was great poet was an insurance salesman he worked for an insurance company is some kind of executive -secutive and finally in his forties he sort of you know send out some of his poems and some people started reading them and then he got a publisher..

carol ballard basil polydoros u._s._c. toronto united states johns hopkins george lucas george pico mickey rooney larry termine new york leeann williams wallace stevens gerhard richter emily randal kleiser matthew robbins oscar walter merch
"caleb" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

10:44 min | 1 year ago

"caleb" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Very special guest. Today's someone i've admired we've admired for a long long time great cinematographer caleb dash annell and welcome. Thank you nice spe- here. It's very nice to have view and if you don't know his name you certainly know his work. If you've been to the movies at all go to the movies. Do you watch in the past three decades. He's a six time oscar nominee. I'll rattle off just a few titles just for the heck of it. Being there the black stallion the right stuff off the natural fly away home the patriot the passion of the christ rules don't apply last year's oscar-nominated never look away great great film and just now the lion king and that's a lot of work kale it is i've been around a along the thing that strikes me having met and had the privilege of meeting and interviewing a number of cinematographers over the years is that as a group and you tell me if i'm off base here as a group you guys are useful in your in your thinking your forward thinking in in fact <hes> last time i saw haskell wexler delay great haskell wexler i was to interview him at the classic film festival and and he was recording it on an iphone yeah he was he lived to be ninety four ninety five and was enough to i think his last days was just continuing to make movies whether it was on his phone or on his video camera. Whatever i mean he was really remarkable and a mentor for me. You know no he and gordon willis for really my mentors. You know well well. That's that's part of. The trick of becoming good is is to is to follow you know the the work of some great cinematographers or or anybody who you you know respect. <hes> there is this. I don't know if it's an axiom or a canard. I don't know how to describe it exactly that goodson mammography if it's really a good you shouldn't notice and i think i think that's true i mean i think you know you. You also tend to think that a really good movie has good cinematography fee to you know it works both ways that <hes> you know things will look better if you're telling a really good story and you know i mean i always find it very frustrating. If i film something and somebody talks about my work at the detriment of the movie then i sort of feel like well you know that's not right so <hes> yeah you always i mean you're always trying to be in sync with the story and so you always sort of feel like the images need to somehow be you part of the storytelling so they need to be appropriate for whatever the story happens to be and and somehow not showing off or not being overly flamboyant wyandotte. How do you describe that middle ground. If it is a middle ground i mean you know there's nothing wrong with something being beautiful <hes> <hes> you know i mean you know like never look away dealt with art and so there were certain aspects of that movie that needed to have an expression of sort of an artistic point of view view because it was really based roughly on a life of gerhard richter. Who's a wonderful painter. <hes> you know and inevitably if you do something like i you know the black stallion or fly away home. There's going to be a certain beauty in gracefulness to the geese flying through the air and and to watching a horse you know run across across the beach in sardinia so you know there there are certain aspects you can't hide from you know from the story but <hes> you know. I mean if you talk combat. Other fields not necessarily films i did but you look at something like the french connection which is beautifully shot by illinois zeman. It's really rough and gritty and everything because it's is really appropriate for that story now and you know i mean. Certainly you know films that i've done like you know <hes> you know jack reacher and and <hes> <hes> you know i mean even parts of the patriot have a certain rough grittiness in the battle sequences and things like that so yeah. I mean it's just i. I don't know there's a certain mystery to it too. I mean in that you know i think when you're sort of creating something you're you're never really quite sure why you're doing something and it's always after the in fact when you start coming up with ideas or somebody will write something about it and you go leah. Maybe that's why it isn't necessarily you know lots lots of making movies as just being desperate at the moment to get your day done ended finish before the sunsets are q._n._a.'s when you go to them when someone says so. We're trying to <hes> to hearken back to the french painter of the blood. You know sure sure there. Is you something about that of course but it is just something you know you you're in it and you're trying to make something that works and is cohesive and comes together and and there's no question that you know there's a certain amount of serendipity in lock involved in what we do. I mean there are times where you know suddenly a storm. We'll come rolling in and you go well. Let's film now or in the case of there was some john ford film. I think it's a very famous story about you. You know the cinemas servicing well others not going to be enough light and everything and john ford insisted that they shoot the you know the you know the cavalry riding in and with a storm going off. I think it was went and hoke an he insisted that say u._p. Under protest race slate he put it on the asleep and then won an academy award so you know we can't always be right. The one lesson i've learned is well when we were doing the patriot atrium. There was a scene in you know with <hes> mel gibson goes out you know onto the porch and there's a battle going on and we shot it right at dusk at night you know and we we were shooting at dusk and there was enough exposure and he just kept hitting getting darker. Enroll wasn't really happy with what we had gotten. In terms of troops out there and yeah rolling in emmerick directed the patriot and <hes> it was all muskets going off in the dark and all this stuff and it just kept getting darker dark and i finally said roland only say there's no more light crazy kids see anything in the u._s. Put on not happy. We have to do it again his ago okay yeah. No i did not put under protests shot it anyway and it turned out to be beautiful also because the the muskets going off set up enough light in the in the scene so you could see what was going on what year was fly home ninety six and ninety six using that movie visually obviously the whole thing. It's it's a beautiful film in every way and as a kid watching it. You just want to be in a pack when you wanna be flying with the geese. The funny anything about that movie is that everybody keeps saying well. How did you get those geese. Did you know they think it's really you know difficult thing to do but actually it was one of the easiest things things we had like. I think five or six groups of geese that got trained from the moment they were born to start following these planes and we would even play a tape recording according of the sounds of the planes would have them follow. You know the the the kid who was sort of helping to train them. You know and he would lead them. I'm with the tape recorder with the sound of the airplane talking about imprinting or yeah. No i mean they really are imprinted. I mean you know you. You definitely take advantage. The the <hes> nature you know give yeah so. We've been trained to work with than most actors well. They just all they had. I do all the follow on ultralight so it's not like they had a great you know speaking part but we to train them to follow a boat to because we actually put an airplane on the on the boat and if you looked up at it you wouldn't know you were on the water you he would just see the sky behind there and then you know we could we could film you know the geese following along behind the cool but the geese fly the thing you have to know is a geese fly around thirty miles an hour depending upon the humidity and the temperature and everything else so all the planes all the ultralights had to be very very lightweight and have to be with enough wing to fly that slowly which is pretty slow for any kind of flying. You know airplane. You're a geese aficionado then yeah you know like the one thing over the years that you do you know you learn in in all the movies you get to do you develop an expertise about all sorts of the things that are completely worthless anywhere else in your life for the moment fiske's how fast horses run or or whatever it'd be great on who wants to be a millionaire back in the day problem when they ask very specific geese questions you guys don't worry now. What what what led you into this particular feel. It seemed you trace it. It's kind of convoluted being probably the earliest inkling cling of it was when i was about twelve years old i got a brownie hawkeye camera for my birthday and i took a lot of pictures and <hes> most of them were very good but every once in a while wow you'd see a really nice picture and you start to realize there's a difference between a good picture in a bad picture and by that i meant you know just you know his compositional interesting or the lighting was interesting or the subject was interesting in some way that was different than all the other photographs it just sort of seemed random awesome and you know out of place and you know you can cut off somebody's head or something you wouldn't be able to see what you really wanted to see and then i just sort of became aware of that. I didn't got interested in photography but not the thinking you could ever do anything about it but i you know my mother's family were doctors for many many generations wins and so i kind of thought i would be interested in becoming a doctor and i was good in math and science and i ended up going to johns hopkins but i very quickly i mean they took chemistry there and was interested in some of the scientists but then i got interested in in writing in history of art and things like that and what happened was was when i was about to graduate..

john ford haskell wexler caleb dash oscar gordon willis gerhard richter johns hopkins mel gibson jack reacher illinois fiske hoke q._n._a. emmerick roland three decades twelve years
"caleb" Discussed on Critical Role

Critical Role

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"caleb" Discussed on Critical Role

"Not in Caleb. It is. Till you're ready for something else. Absolutely. My. Made us seven people works. Great nothing makes. Offer name not the group. I'm going to bed. The president. Should I've ever seen? Floating. Mysterious Mary melodies like. All right, guys. Get an evening's rest in your respective rooms the morning greets you with the smell of food being prepared as you head down stairs as all of you and to other patrons that are couple of other farmhands Clark. Far, man. What is it a real name? Their names are chair. Together, they are chair. Here chair. You don't even have a leg to stand on. Everyone serious talent is comic relief. Awkward a love it. All right. So. You never meal the days yours what he was do find appropriate spot somewhat quiet somewhere with a view somewhere. Somewhere somewhere where the wild mothers works as well at hand. Okay. That would be probably either on the tillage itself or some of the. Small grove clusters on the river that you guys were talking earlier. So I assume hasn't division. So just reminder it is a specific question concerning a goal event. We're actively to occur them seven days is the. Tyler. So just whatever you're trying to aspertain it needs to be involving specific goal inventor activity within the next seven. I was going to kind of just basically go for the same thing. I did last time if that's suits kind of how I wanted unless you would like me to shift a little bit. I let it go a little bit last time only because it was a question. What are what were they doing right now? It's like well that that's an activity that they were doing I guess, so just choose your words carefully. Setting a goal. An event or an activity. I mean, that's a broad spectrum. So just yes. I wanna make sure I'm dealing the name. Right, right. Yes. Yes. Brenna? Make my circle. What is the destination? Pushing a few days forward. You close your eyes and concentrate, it's a beautiful morning, actually, the sky. It's it's it's really morning, but. This far enough south and the empire hasn't hit snow yet the full interests come into effect. So it's still green fields and mostly blue sky with bits of clouds as you concentrate, the children kind of picks up a little bit. Across the wind. To form words through your ears..

Caleb Tyler president Brenna seven days
"caleb" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"caleb" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"I'm so glad that you're on caleb you're inspiring me so this is gonna be fantastic chapter in your life i think some feedback from some older folks like myself children three children about your age so i understand that when our kids land are really good job that promotes the career we're so happy you know the thought of them saying i'm seeking i'm walking away from that is a little scary but but i commend you i am also proud of you and thank you for the inspiration i have also been wanting to do something very similar i i recently found myself in a situation that i never thought would happen to me where i did go through a year and a half homelessness and he told me that that was going to happen to me at any juncture in my life years ago i would've said you're crazy one of the hardest working people it's just never going to happen and i could not relate to homelessness and through a series of events mainly health i had to quit my job and i you know so it it's a long story but the point is that i want to go out and find i wanna listen to people's stories regarding how they got whether out and share it with people that's exactly what i'm doing yes we really do judge people we all do it and i remember when i was in my twenties walking to college for my first week thought i was just all that you know really prideful of myself because i was a hard worker and panhandling was extremely rare.

caleb