13 Burst results for "Cal Maria Dylan"

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:12 min | 3 months ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Maria Dylan. As of today, Californians ages 16 and older can sign up for the covert 19 vaccine here in the Bay Area. Some counties expanded eligibility ahead of that goal. For more on these efforts were joined by Dr Michael Stacy, chief medical officer for lifelong medical care in Alameda and Contra Costa County's Dr Stacy. Good Morning. Good morning, so lifelong runs federally qualified health clinics. That means you're focused on making sure the vaccine reaches the most vulnerable people, for example. Those without stable housing and homebound seniors. How is that work affected now that the state has reached this expanded eligibility? It both gives us some additional freedom and be able to reach additional people that we weren't able to reach before and gives us the ability to just go in vaccinate whoever needs to be vaccinated. I think the challenge is that there's just a lot more demand for vaccine, and fortunately, we we are now able to get vaccine through directly from the federal government. And so that gives us a good supply of vaccine. So how is the paws on the J and J shot affected your vaccine operations that lifelong the vaccine that we've been using most is Madonna. The unfortunate part is that We have also been using the Johnson and Johnson vaccine and particularly in the work that we do with our street medicine teams that are going out to encampments in vaccinating people experiencing homelessness. And two homebound seniors. But right now it has to be on pause because of the Johnson and Johnson problems Right now, I'm thinking that down the line, the vaccine supply is not going to be the main issue. Rather, the next challenge is gonna be convincing people who are hesitant to get the vaccine. Yeah, I do think that that trust that we have with our patients and our communities is key. Both for those people that we know already and for people that we we come in contact with, you know, for example, are street medicine teams. They've been visiting encampments and providing medical care before Cove in And so now that now that we're doing vaccination, they already have relationships. And so when somebody has some concerns about a vaccine, we listen and we answer their questions and If they don't want to get that vaccine, right, then we'll keep coming back and we'll be there and we'll vaccinate whoever it is that wants to be vaccinated and often times that is helpful to as people see their friends and their peers getting vaccinated. It helps them. And it may take some time, but it helps them become more confident. Well, thanks, Dr Stacy. Yeah. Thank you. Dr. Michael Stacy is chief medical officer at lifelong medical care in the East Bay. In other health news, new data from the CDC shows sexually transmitted infections reached an all time high in 2019. The biggest spike was in syphilis cases, which are up 74% since 2015 leading the country in syphilis numbers is California and leading the state's syphilis rates is San Francisco. KQED s health correspondent April Damn, Bosque explains how we got here and just to let you know this story contains descriptions of body parts affected by the disease. The Castro Country Club in San Francisco is not a resort. It's where gay men come to get help with drug addiction, especially methamphetamine. Director Billy Lemon says syphilis comes with the territory in the 12 step community. If meth was your thing, I mean, everybody's had self less like I can't. I'm not even sure how many times I had it three or face to remember. Was it 45 times, probably four times. A recent rise in meth use has become a key driver of syphilis, especially here and in other parts of the West. While Billy Lemon is now sober. In his heyday, he'd stay awake partying for days. A lot of the reasons that people like using meth is that it makes sex really awesome. It also hampers your judgment. And so Condoms are kind of thrown out the door, Lemon says. In general, condoms have fallen out of favor in the gay community, especially now that we have such effective drugs that prevent transmission of HIV. Take away the risk of catching a fatal disease and syphilis doesn't seem like such a big deal. It does not seem like a big deal at all. Yeah. So that's weird to say out loud anyways, huh? Syphilis is not benign. It can cause blindness, deafness or brain damage. It is easy to treat, though a shot of penicillin in the butt and you're done. Diagnosing syphilis can be tricky and intimate. I'm like crowds below them. I'm like lifting up their scrotum Doctor and a park works at an STD clinic in San Francisco head and looking from all angles. She has to do these gymnastics to find the kinds of rashes associated with syphilis. Some are obvious, but some are so subtle if you hadn't been looking for you never would have caught it. Park is trained to look she knows where and when. But she says doctors in regular family medicine clinics don't You don't know that fatigue is a telltale sign of syphilis. How many people you know, the patient came in saying I'm tired. How many people are going to say? Take off your pants and lift up your scrotum? I wanna look, you know, We only do that if the STD clinic because that's what we do but specialized public STD clinics like the one where park works have been shutting down nationwide. One reason is persistent underfunding another the Affordable Care act. Dr Karen Smith says in a strange way to 2010 Health law contributed to the closure of some STD clinics. Honestly, I think everyone thought they weren't going to be necessary. I talked to Dr Smith about this decline two years ago when she was director of California's Department of Public Health, she says. Once Obama care was in place, the thought was that STD testing would happen in primary care clinics. And I think that we sort of all assumed that you know if you've got health insurance, and you've got access to a doctor. That's all that you need and it and it turns out that that's not really all that you need. People still had affairs that they didn't want to talk about with their family doctor and some family doctors didn't want a probe into their patients. Sex lives that loss of anonymous care. Really was a problem. This latest rise and STD numbers is from right before the pandemic, But the CDC doesn't think the 2020 numbers will be any better. Even if people had less sex during the shutdown, which we're not sure about public health workers and testing supplies were redeployed to cove. It I'm April dumbass Key KQED news and I'm right. Cal Maria Dylan, You're listening to morning edition on KQED. Now let's give Joe McConnell I listen with.

Joe McConnell Maria Dylan 2019 San Francisco 45 times Billy Lemon Bay Area Lemon Alameda Karen Smith 2020 Smith Obama care Madonna Affordable Care act CDC Johnson and Johnson Contra Costa County today April Damn
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:15 min | 3 months ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's 6 22 It's morning edition on KQED. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan. As of today, Californians ages 16 and older can sign up for the covert 19 vaccine here in the Bay Area. Some counties expanded eligibility ahead of that goal. For more on these efforts were joined by Dr Michael Stacy, chief medical officer for lifelong medical care in Alameda and Contra Costa County's doctors say See Good Morning Good morning, so lifelong runs federally qualified health clinics. That means you're focused on making sure the vaccine reaches the most vulnerable people, for example. Those without stable housing and homebound seniors. How is that work affected Now that the state has reached this expanded eligibility? It both gives us some additional freedom and be able to reach additional people that we weren't able to. Reach before and gives us the ability to just go and vaccinate whoever needs to be vaccinated. I think the challenge is that there's just a lot more demand for vaccine, and fortunately we We are now able to get vaccine through directly from the federal government. And so that gives us a good supply of vaccine. So how is the paws on the J and J shot affected your vaccine operations that lifelong The vaccine that we've been using most is Madonna. The unfortunate part is that we have also been using the Johnson and Johnson vaccine and particularly in the work that we do with our street medicine teams that are going out to encampments in vaccinating people experiencing homelessness. And two homebound seniors. But right now it has to be on pause because of the Johnson and Johnson problems Right now, I'm thinking that down the line, the vaccine supply is not going to be the main issue. Rather, the next challenge is gonna be convincing people who are hesitant to get the vaccine. Yeah, I do think that that trust that we have with our patients and our communities is key. Both for those people that we know already and for people that we we come in. Contact with, you know, for example, are street medicine teams They've been visiting in camp mints and providing medical care before Cove in And so now that now that we're doing vaccination, they already have relationships. And so when somebody has some concerns about a vaccine, we listen and we answer their questions and If they don't want to get that vaccine, right, then we'll keep coming back and we'll be there and we'll vaccinate whoever it is that wants to be vaccinated. And oftentimes that is helpful to as people see their friends and their peers getting vaccinated. It helps them. And it may take some time, but it helps them become more confident. Well, thanks, Dr Stacy. Yeah. Thank you. Dr. Michael Stacy is chief medical officer at lifelong medical care in the East Bay. In other health news, New data from the CDC shows sexually transmitted infections reached an all time high in 2019, The biggest spike was in syphilis cases which are up 74% since 2015. Leading the country in syphilis numbers is California and leading the state's syphilis rates is San Francisco KQED s health correspondent April Damn, Bosque explains how we got here and just to let you know this story contains descriptions of body parts affected by the disease. The Castro Country Club in San Francisco is not a resort. It's where gay men come to get help with drug addiction, especially methamphetamine. Director Billy Lemon says syphilis comes with the territory in the 12 step community. If meth was your thing, I mean, everybody's had self less like I can't. I'm not even sure many times I had it three or tries to remember. Was it 45 times, probably four times. A recent rise in meth use has become a key driver of syphilis, especially here and in other parts of the West. While Billy Lemon is now sober. In his heyday, he'd stay awake partying for days. A lot of the reasons that people like using meth is that it makes sex really awesome. It also hampers your judgment. And so Condoms are kind of thrown out the door, Lemon says. In general, condoms have fallen out of favor in the gay community, especially now that we have such effective drugs that prevent transmission of HIV. Take away the risk of catching a fatal disease and syphilis doesn't seem like such a big deal. It does not seem like a big deal at all. Yeah. So that's weird to say out loud anyways, huh? Syphilis is not benign. It can cause blindness, deafness or brain damage. It is easy to treat, though a shot of penicillin in the butt and you're done. Diagnosing syphilis can be tricky and intimate. I'm like crowds below them. I'm like lifting up their scrotum Doctor and a park works at an STD clinic in San Francisco head and looking from all angles. She has to do these gymnastics to find the kinds of rashes associated with syphilis. Some are obvious, but some are so subtle if you hadn't been looking for you never would have caught it. Park is trained to look she knows where and when. But she says doctors in regular family medicine clinics don't You don't know that fatigue is a telltale sign of syphilis. How many people you know, the patient came in saying I'm tired. How many people are going to say? Take off your pants and lift up your scrotum? I wanna look, you know, We only do that if the STD clinic because that's what we do but specialized public STD clinics like the one where park works have been shutting down nationwide. One reason is persistent underfunding another the Affordable Care act. Dr Karen Smith says in a strange way to 2010 Health law contributed to the closure of some STD clinics. Honestly, I think everyone thought they weren't going to be necessary. I talked to Dr Smith about this decline two years ago, when she was director of California's Department of Public Health, she says. Once Obama care was in place, the thought was that STD testing What happen in primary care clinics and I think that we sort of all assumed that you know if you've got health insurance, and you've got access to a doctor. That's all that you need and it and it turns out that that's not really all that you need. People still had affairs that they didn't want to talk about with their family doctor and some family doctors didn't want a probe into their patients Sex lives. That loss of anonymous care really was a problem. This latest rise and STD numbers is from right before the pandemic. The CDC doesn't think the 2020 numbers will be any better. Even if people had less sex during the shutdown, which we're not sure about public health workers and testing supplies were redeployed to cove. It I'm April dumbass Key KQED news and I'm right. Cal Maria Dylan, You're listening to morning edition on KQED Back to Joe for traffic.

2019 Raquel Maria Dylan Alameda Lemon Bay Area 2020 45 times Joe Michael Stacy Billy Lemon Smith Karen Smith Contra Costa County Stacy Madonna Affordable Care act today Obama care J April Damn
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 3 months ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With US president preside over an American troop presence there. The former president Trump has said he intended to have US forces out by next month. That timetable was deemed too aggressive by the current administration. The head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, says she's not certain federal officials have I did all the cases of severe blood clots and people who received the Johnson and Johnson covert 19 vaccine. Member station W. A. B in Atlanta. Sam Whitehead reports doctor will show Wollensky is calling on Americans report any adverse events, Wolinsky says. So far, federal officials have found on Lee six cases of the severe blood clots with more than 7.2 million doses of the J and J vaccine administered right now, we believe these events to be extremely rare. But we're also not yet certain we have heard about all possible Jesus as this syndrome may not easily recognized as one associated with the vaccine. Wolinsky says Vaccine recipients and providers should be on the lookout for these events and report them to the CDC and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration. Both agencies are currently reviewing the incidents to determine whether they were caused by the Jang Jae shot for NPR News. I'm Sam Whitehead in Atlanta. The Biden administration respects indirect talks to resume tomorrow over efforts to revive the nuclear agreement with Iran. They're taking place in Vienna, though European through mere European mediators, as we hear from NPR's Larry Kaplow. White House press secretary Jen Psaki says the resumption of talks will be part of what she called a long process. 2015 agreement eased economic sanctions in exchange for limits on Iran's nuclear program. But former President Donald Trump pulled out and re imposed sanctions in 2018, He said the deal wasn't tough enough. In turn, Tehran ramped up its nuclear work, and this week it announced another move to do so after sabotage one of its facilities. Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei repeated demands the US lift sanctions before Iran complies with the deal again, saying proposals so far haven't been worth looking at. European mediators will be shuttling between the two sides. Larry Kaplow NPR news on Wall Street, The Dow was up 53 points. The NASDAQ fell 138 points today. You're listening to NPR news. Live from KQED News. I'm terrorist. Tyler State Corrections officials plan to close one of two firefighting training centers for incarcerated people. Cuties Raquel Maria Dillon has more. The announcement came this week, the California Correctional Center, a 58 year old prison and Lassen County will close by July. 2022. All firefighter training will take place at the Sierra Conservation Center in the foothills of Ptolemy County. Elected officials from Lassen County say they were shocked by this latest closure. They said the decision liked transparency and could throw hundreds of people out of work in a place where the unemployment rate remains stubbornly high. Lately there are fewer incarcerated people eligible to become firefighters because of changes to state law and the pandemic. This closure plus others around the state has lawyers for those in prison, worried that overcrowding could become a problem again. I'm right Cal Maria Dylan KQED News governor, Gavin Newsom is pushing for all schools in the state to reopen when the new academic year begins in the fall. Newsome says schools are receiving $6.5 million from the state and an additional $15 billion in federal funds. So the schools I've never.

Larry Kaplow Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Sam Whitehead July. 2022 2018 138 points Ptolemy County Wolinsky Vienna $6.5 million $15 billion Gavin Newsom Maria Dillon NPR Iran President U. S. Food and Drug Administra Wollensky CDC 53 points
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 5 months ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Businesses In Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama lost electricity. At last check on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial Average was down 246 points. This is NPR knees Live from KQED News. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan. In a move to fend off criticism that San Francisco Unified is taking too long to reopen schools. District officials led immediate to her yesterday to show they're making progress. KQED is Molly Solomon reports desk space 6 FT Apart face shields for teachers and no more water fountains. That was a preview given by the school district at Sunset Elementary, one of six schools Public Health Department has inspected and signed off for reopening. San Francisco Unified Superintendent Vincent Matthews said They're continuing to negotiate with unions and did not have a specific timeline for getting back to classroom learning. But we're getting closer to opening our sights the students every day. Many parents have been critical of San Francisco schools for moving too slowly on a reopening plan, but the district says it needs to prioritize the health and safety of students and teachers during a pandemic. The teachers union says this week. They did come to an agreement with how to assess students with special needs in person once the city enters the red tear. I'm Molly Solomon KQED news. San Jose Man has admitted that he hacked into a computer and shut down concession sales at last year's opening day at Earthquakes Stadium. Salvator LaRosa pleaded guilty yesterday to federal charges for accessing the online concession management account for a food services company without permission close to a year ago. Prosecutors say LaRosa intentionally deleted the concession menu and payments elections. Federal authorities say the hack caused a loss of more than a quarter million dollars. LaRosa faces up to 10 years in prison, he said to be sentenced in May. I'm right Cal Maria Dylan KQED news support for KQED comes to us from mighty mite Termite might he might use his orange oil and other targeted treatment solutions, which typically require no move outs. Mighty mite termite it Here's to all social distancing and safety guidelines. Mighty might calm 78.

Louisiana Molly Solomon Salvator LaRosa May Raquel Maria Dylan KQED San Francisco Unified Mississippi Alabama 246 points LaRosa Earthquakes Stadium yesterday KQED News last year one 78 Vincent Matthews this week Public Health Department
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:30 min | 5 months ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now it's 6 30. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. President Biden says By the end of April, he'd like to see a majority of elementary and middle schools in the U. S. Reopened for in class instruction five days a week. That's a more ambitious golden what the White House previously indicated for Biden's 1st 100 days in office amid the Corona virus pandemic. Biden was speaking last night at a CNN town hall style event in Wisconsin. Vice President Harris reiterated that message this morning. Our goal is that as many k through eight schools as possible will re open as within the 1st 100 days. Our goal is that it will be five days a week. Harris was speaking to NBC's Today show. Ah House subcommittee will hear testimony today on the lasting effects of slavery in the U. S and the idea of reparations. NPR's Windsor, Johnston says a Democratic lawmaker from Texas wants Congress to take action. Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee is introducing a measure that would establish a commission that would examine the origins of slavery and the role federal and state governments played in supporting it. Would also examine the economic repercussions for the descendants of slaves. The creation of a commission has received pushback from congressional Republicans who have argued that reparations for slavery are a nonstarter on Wall Street. The Dow was down 103 points. This is NPR news. Live from KQED News. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan, the agency that oversees California's prisons, says corrections officials failed to investigate allegations of staff misconduct. The state's office of the inspector general released its report on the failures of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Yesterday. KQED is Marco Siler, Gonzales reports. Last year, CDCR acquired $10 million in annual funding to implement a new independent unit to thoroughly investigate misconduct allegations. Theo IG report found that the new process was neither independent nor thorough. Out of over 50,000 complaints filed by incarcerated people from April to August last year. The report shows that wardens only referred 541 to the new investigative unit. The cases that were resolved between June and August. The report shows that Warden's exonerated staff of wrongdoing nearly 99% of the time. Statement, CDCR said there's no evidence of wardens intentionally circumventing the new process, and the department is committed to fairly investigating All allegations. I'm Marco Soler Gonzalez KQED news. Fremont. Police say they're investigating a swastika painted on the door of a synagogue and discovered last week staff at Temple Beth Torah on Paseo Padre Parkway of reported the graffiti last Wednesday. Police say the vandalism is the first reported hate crime in Fremont this year. The city's police chief, called the incident unacceptable and said the investigation is a high priority. There's more state and local news at KQED dot or G'kar in Oakland. I'm right. Cal Maria Dylan KQED News. Support for KQED comes from Sheppard Mullin, a global law firm with 900 lawyers handling corporate and technology matters. Key litigation. And complex financial transactions for companies in the Bay Area and beyond. Sheppard Mullin. We put clients first. I'm Lily Jamali and investigation finds that during this pandemic, some.

$10 million Biden Lily Jamali Dave Mattingly CDCR Wisconsin Washington Congress Marco Soler Gonzalez California Department of Corre KQED last week Sheila Jackson Lee June 900 lawyers NPR Marco Siler Last year 103 points Raquel Maria Dylan
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 9 months ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That election will be free of outside influences. Trump, despite not having the electoral votes needed last night, declared himself the winner and bound court challenges by necessity, remains optimistic about the outcome of the race. You know, late call tonight? The AP is calling the Michigan Senate race for incumbent Democrat Gary Peters. Republican Party of Georgia and the Trump campaign are suing a county in Georgia over alleged mishandling of absentee ballots. Georgia public broadcasting Stephen Fowler explains. The suit alleges about 50 ballots weren't properly counted. The lawsuit alleges that a Republican poll watchers saw Chatham County election worker mixed ballots that came in after the seven PM Tuesday deadline with ones that came in on time. So the state Republican Party and Trump campaign want the coastal Georgia County to account for every single ballot they received to make sure that late votes did not count. A legal challenge in Georgia is notable because it doesn't seek to block statewide counting, but instead focuses on a potential narrow violation ofthe election law. You're just saw a record setting turnout in this election, thanks to a surgeon, Absentee and early voting for NPR News. I'm Stephen Fowler in Atlanta. US isn't another alarming a milestone in the Corona virus pandemic. Countries now averaging more than 86,000 cases a day over the past week, a new record will stone reports. There are no indications that this latest record is the peak. Dr Anthony found. She has warned the country could see 100,000 cases a day if not Maur this winter. Nationally cases have gone up by about 45% on average over the past two weeks in the Midwest and the Northeast. That increase is more than 60%. As of Tuesday, more than 52,000 covert patients were now hospitalized. Last time hospitals had this many patients. It was early August. But unlike the summer, the spike and hospitalizations is more widespread, with big increases in different regions, from New Mexico to North Dakota to Ohio for NPR news, I'm will stone on Wall Street. The Dow is up 367 points today. You're listening to NPR. Live from the news. I'm terrorist Siler Bay area. Progressive activists are organizing to demand that every vote in the presidential election be counted. These were Cal Maria Dylan attended a rally at Oakland City Hall this afternoon. To see how they're coping as they wait to learn the election results were feeling it a lot of emotions a.

Stephen Fowler NPR News Georgia Trump Republican Party of Georgia Republican Party Georgia County NPR Chatham County Gary Peters Cal Maria Dylan Oakland City Hall Siler Bay AP Midwest
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 9 months ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Let me just jump in to say that, according to The Associated Press, President Trump has just won Indiana, a state he was expected to win, but that Barack Obama did Carrie in 2008. That is correct on DH, and it is also the home state, though Vice President Mike Pence on DH is a state that has trended quite Republican since since electing President Obama in 2008, NPR's Tamara Keith Scott. Oh, thank you. Oh, sorry, Scott, You have a final thought there. Just a quick final thought Indiana and North Carolina are a tale of two very different 2008 states. Obama won both of them. Since then, Democrats have realised that Indiana was not a state they were going to win again. Aside from extraordinary circumstances, they've tried very hard in North Carolina sins, but as of right now, it's still only that 2008 win. Republicans took it in 12 2020 16. At the moment, Biden is up, but it's narrow. Alright. That's NPR's Scott de Tro and Tamara. Keith. Thanks you both. You're welcome. And we're not going to bring in representative Pramila Jaipal of Congresswoman. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much. It's good to be with you. We don't have Ah, very much time. Unfortunately, but just briefly. How do you feel? The night is going Well, I feel hopeful. I mean, I'm looking at Ohio with 50% in and by God a 10 point lead. He's outperforming Trump in a number of counties. I'm hopeful about Pennsylvania. That's where my camp he's been spending the last month we've made over 150,000 phone calls into Pennsylvania. I'm just gonna I'm gonna jump in just one moment. You're listening to a live special coverage of the 2020 election from NPR news. Live from Kait. Greedy news. I'm Daniel Mention in the hours left before polls closed. Bay Area voters are deciding on initiatives ranging from transportation to police oversight. Many say they're concerned with the cost of living in the region. What the world will be like for their kids and who will serve as president for the next four years for Cal Maria Dylan talked with voters at a handful of East Bay polling places today, where lines were mostly light. She started the day at the Oakland Coliseum just past the gates of the Coliseum parking lot. There was a sign turn left for flu shot clinics go right for covert testing or keep right to vote. Death selection 2024 years. They say it was a messy one here. Julie mix in war, two masks and a face shield demand the polls, she said the pandemic was on her mind. But also the rising cost of living is like out of wet my son paid $2300 a month. Mix and voted yes. On the statewide initiative to expand rent control prop 21 that was just one of a dozen statewide ballot measures, plus a couple, Alameda County and city of Oakland initiatives. Filling out a ballot feels like homework. Just making sure that I read the propositions clearly and, you know, proud 15 16 17. I mean, all of them were very important, but I wanted to make sure we really said our kids up for equitable future. That's ion, a moody. She says she was thinking about equity when she voted to tax commercial properties to fund schools and municipal services. Then there were Wandell. You enjoy Christo office mates who agreed on a lot like national politics, But it turns out on prop 20 to the measure to reclassify gig workers as independent contractors. Not so much. Their votes cancelled each other out working with the county. We have good benefits, so I believe other employees should have to say so. Did you? Yes or no? No, the other way. You got it? Yes. Yes, Some voters studied up on each prop and local bond measure. Others skipped the local stuff to focus on the big ticket races. My first concern is to hit that that that presidency You know, That's the most important thing that I'm thinking about that, By the way, there's not a lot of vocal Trump supporters in Oakland, but everyone who cast a ballot wanted to be heard. So this election is being built the arguably the most important of our time. Maybe chicory, Bauer's 28, year old actor and part time security guard says representation matters, and that's why he signed up to be a poll worker being a young African American male. I'm just trying to do my job, just trying to Ring and more more people who look like me.

Tamara Keith Scott Trump Indiana NPR Barack Obama president Oakland North Carolina Alameda County President Obama Oakland Coliseum Vice President Mike Pence Bay Area Pennsylvania The Associated Press Ohio Biden Pramila Jaipal
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:45 min | 10 months ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lower a reality check on the Corona virus from the man who really knows Dr Anthony Fauci. So let's say we get a 70% effective vaccine, but only 60% of the people get vaccinated vaccine will greatly help us. But it's not going to eliminate mask wary, avoiding crowds and things like that. And we'll look at how the right to free speech and assembly has become a very dangerous business in Portland, Oregon, A friend of mine was like, you know, she was worried about me. And so he got me a Kevlar vest. White nationalist showed up and force on DH. The place were nowhere to be seen, and the moment they left. The police came out and started to gassing people once again. A battle of Portland. That's all ahead today on the New Yorker radio. Live from NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein. The Trump Administration is calling on Congress to pass a Corona virus relief bill. Using leftover funds from a now expired small business loan program. Officials are calling on lawmakers to vote immediately to direct the some $130 billion of unused funds. To stimulate the economy. Democrats are pushing for a comprehensive package that includes Corona virus testing and treatment. Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney. Barrett has released opening remarks for what's expected to be a contentious confirmation hearing that begins tomorrow is NPR's Amy held reports. President Trump's pick for the High Court says policy decisions should be made by political branch is not the courts. Barrett will say that the courts are not designed to right every wrong in public life. Noting that has a federal judge. He has worked to reach the result required by law, not personal preference. She will also acknowledge the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whose death last month left the vacancy. No one will ever take her place, she writes. Barrett has a clear conservative record. Senate Republicans are working to confirm her before election day, despite pleas from Democrats to wait. They want the next president to make the nomination and they want committee wide testing to Republicans on the Judiciary Committee tested positive for Corona virus. After attending a White House ceremony announcing barrettes nomination, Amy held NPR news. A quick turnaround for Texas Governor Greg Abbott's effort to restrict the number of Dropbox is available for mail in ballots in the state on Friday of federal court said the Republican governor could not limit the drop off sites to one per county. But yesterday, a federal appeals panel of Trump appointees issued a temporary stay. Abbot says the policy prevents voter fraud. The status of a ceasefire between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the disputed Nagorno Kata Bach region is unclear as NPR's Lucien Kim reports ever since the truce went into effect yesterday, both sides have been accusing each other of violating it. Azerbaijan claims Armenian forces shelled the country's second largest city. Of ethnic Armenians who control Nagorno Cara back accused Azerbaijan of targeting civilian areas. The simmering conflict over Nagorno car back flared up two weeks ago, with hundreds reported dead and thousands fleeing their homes. Conflict dates back to the end of the Soviet Union 30 years ago, when Armenians living in Nagorno Carol Bock declared independence from Azerbaijan and fought a bloody war of secession. Russia, which maintains good relations with both Armenia and Azerbaijan has tried to stop the fighting. Cease fire is supposed to lead to more substantive talks led by Russia, the United States and France. This is NPR Live from KGB news. I'm Markel Maria Dylan. A new analysis from Cal Matters shows ST workplace safety inspectors look into complaints about inadequate covert protection. Just 5% of the time. Reporter Jackie Botts, agencies that are supposed to be keeping workers safe and responding. Tio. Their complaints are totally overwhelmed our themselves dealing with the hazard of sending inspectors out into a potentially Covad filled workplace, and so are responding to the vast majority of these complaints with simply a letter rather than an on site inspection, which is what can ultimately lead to a violation. A citation the employer having toe pay up Meanwhile, a health clinic in East Oakland says it's Corona virus testing data shows construction and food. Super Service workers are the majority of cases where people get cove it on the job. Lady Sarah Husseini reports for months Roots clinic has been offering walk up testing in an area with one of the county's highest overall rates of covert infection. Director, Dr. No hobble Lotte says the clinics positivity rate hovers at about triple the county's average. The majority are black and Latino essential workers, she says. Through contact tracing and self reporting, they found most people caught the virus at home, followed closely by the workplace. Riboletta says construction workers comprised more than a third of the workers who tested positive. Next were food service workers. The precautions that we take are working and we want other industries who were very much discouraged from purchasing in 90 five's obviously, but we think in some industries is completely appropriate. Abba Lotte says of the large number of health care professionals tested on Ly 1% had the Corona virus. I'm Sarah Husseini Kiki Dee news and I'm r Cal. Maria Dylan. Have a good afternoon. Support for NPR comes from capital one offering reimagined banking to fit people's lives like capital, one cafes where customers can grab coffee bank and chat with an ambassador. What's in your wallet more at capital one dot com and the listeners of Cake. This's The New Yorker, radio Hour coproduction, WNBC Studios and The New Yorker. Welcome to The New Yorker Radio hour. I'm David Remnick. Donald Trump's absolute disregard for scientific reality. Whether it's the Corona virus or climate change has been a signature of his presidency. His open contempt for putting on a mask was a threat from the first to the countless Americans who choose to emulate him. It endangered in the end the president's own life and the lives of everyone around him. Last week. Justus Trump is leaving Walter Reed Hospital. After a stay of three days, Dr Anthony Fauci sat down for a conversation with the New Yorkers Michael Spector. Douchey is the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which is a branch of the N I H. And he's really the most public voice in this country for medical reason. Michael is a longtime staff writer at the New Yorker covering medicine and the sciences They spoke on Monday. As we are speaking, the president of the United States is scheduled to leave hospital any minute. And he's going to go back to the White House, and I'm not going to ask you to comment on his strange regiment of drugs or how he's feeling. I know you're not his personal physician, and that's not your thing, but I do want to talk about public health. Because this afternoon he tweeted. Oh, very big saying, Don't be afraid of it. And you know, 210,000 Americans have died in 67 million have been infected. Is it fair to say no big thing? Don't be afraid of it. Yeah, well, you know, Michael, that's been one of the things that have been Sort of a bone of contention in communication of the seriousness of this I mean, obviously, it's a very unusual pathogen that can have virtually no effect in the sense of 40% 45% of people could be Without symptoms, and then for those who have symptoms, the overwhelming majority of them A mild, But there are a group of individuals who fall into a certain subset of category, namely the elderly and those with underlying conditions at any age. Who can have a severe outcome. So when you look at the now 210,000 Merrick people in in the United States of America. Has died. And you talk about the seven million have been infected, and the one million have died globally. I think anybody's looking at this realistically has to say that this is a very serious disease that we need to recognize. White House will now not do any contact tracing from the September 26 Rose Garden event to celebrate the nomination of Judge Amy Kuney Baron. Are you comfortable commenting me on the You know the answer to that? No, I don't want to get into what the White House is or is not doing that becomes non productive than doesn't really help the messages that I'm trying to get across. Sorry. Let me just Yeah, I was. It was a try. Let me outright in a slightly more gin General way. How can we stand this thing out? If we don't contact trace? How can we know who's infected and who isn't infected if we don't follow the people who are infected and see who they were in contact with? Is there a way other than contract? You know, we do need contact. Contact Tracing is important. I mean, it's one of those many tools that we have to try and contain an outbreak..

NPR White House Azerbaijan president President Trump United States Dr Anthony Fauci Amy Cockney Barrett Michael Spector Portland Abba Lotte National Institute of Allergy Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Nagorno Cara Nagorno Russia Trump
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Efforts. I'm Shannon Lin kick Edie News. There is more news and fire. Updates at dot org's I'm R Cal Maria Dylan in Oakland. Support for comes from M Train, a workplace culture and compliance training platform, providing harassment, bias and ethics training with built in questions designed to diagnose and benchmark workplace culture. I am train dot com and by Xfinity Xfinity delivers in home WiFi that lets customers string their favorites, including Live TV on demand and their DVR recordings on any device throughout their home. Tonight is the third night of the Republican National Convention. Here's Tiffany Trump making the case for her father's reelection. My father built a thriving economy once and believe me, he will do it again live coverage of the third day of the RNC tonight with RECAPS and analysis. Tomorrow on morning edition from NPR News. Another evening of live coverage from NPR news. It starts again at 6 P.m. our time later this evening, Right here on member supported DD tonight and tomorrow night. Support for NPR comes from Procter and Gamble, maker of Metamucil Ola Fiber supplement containing psyllium, a plant based fiber for trapping and removing waste in the digestive system designed to be taken everyday. Maura Metamucil dot com slash two week challenge. Indeed, offering sponsored jobs and tools like screener questions to help businesses find the high impact hires who could make a difference? Learn more it indeed dot com slash high impact. The listeners of members of I'm Dave Freeman on Wednesday morning now, 6 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington and I'm David Greene in Los Angeles. Kenosha, Wisconsin saw more protests last night, and this time they took a deadly turn. The Kenosha Police Department Says three protesters were shot and to have died. All this comes after Jacob Blake, a black man was shot by police Sunday in Kenosha. Blake survived but his family says he is paralysed from the waist down after police shot him multiple times in the back. We have Wisconsin public radio's Rachel Vasquez.

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bay Area. Learn more at S f l g dot com On K Q. E D the time right now is 7 30 Live from Kait. Greedy news. I'm Danielle Benton, The head of California's Public Health department has resigned last night, Dr Sonya Angel announced she was stepping down. Angel is departing from her role as director and state public health officer. She did not give a specific reason for leaving, state officials say. Sandra Suri, who works at the California Health Care Foundation, will become acting health director. Dr Erica Pan, who was recently appointed state epidemiologist after being Alameda counties. Top health official will be the acting state public health officer. A new study from the city of San Jose finds that while immigrants largely make up the essential work force, they are being disproportionately hit by the economic effects of the pandemic Shannon Lin reports, according to the study, published Friday. Immigrants, including those who are undocumented, make up a large percent of the agricultural food service and health care sectors and CNN say, however, many are also employed at businesses like hotels and salons that have suffered amid shelter in place orders. So Mama See, l is the director of the city's Office of Immigrant Affairs. She says she's particularly worried about undocumented immigrants who don't get federal aid. It's a community not only of going to Matt with ease public benefit like these checks, but they are so are least likely to have adequate insurance most likely to be renters. Maciel says the city has been providing income relief checks to undocumented immigrants through private donations. I'm Shannon Lin News. A knife. State prison staff member has died from Cove in 19 complications this time, and for the first time a correctional officer at San Quentin, 55 year old Gilbert Bobby Polanco, worked on death row and had been fighting covered 19 for over a month. He died early yesterday morning. Acting San Quentin Warden Rob Ron broom, Feld said Polanco's memory will be carried by the staff who continue to fight the Koven 19 infection at San Quentin. Over 250 staff members at San Quentin tested positive for the virus off those about 90 have returned to work. The East Base. First bus line with dedicated lanes has opened weeds for Cal Maria Dylan has more A C transit has given its new bus rapid transit line, a special name. Tempo, but it actually just replaces the busy line One, which runs from the San Leandro Bart Station through east Oakland to 20th and Broadway and Uptown Tempo has brand new buses that can interact with traffic lights to speed their way and 46 stations, mostly in the middle of international Boulevard. Transit planners say the dedicated lane will mean less bunching of buses, with writers waiting no more than 10 minutes during peak commuting ours. The project took 20 years cost $232 million faced stiff opposition from business owners on international. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan News. More at TBD dot orch IM Danielle Benton Support today comes from fieldwork brewing, featuring same day delivery of craft beer, seven Bay Area locations, online orders it fieldwork brewing dot com. On morning edition Coming up Hong Kong media mogul Jimmy Lai was arrested under the new National security Law Lie is the most significant figure to be targeted since the long was imposed by China more than a month ago. Stay tuned. The idea that having Children is the mark of a normal successful life has lingered in American society. Despite pushback and many people today, especially women still face scrutiny over the decision not to have kids.

San Quentin Shannon Lin officer director Dr Sonya Angel Danielle Benton Gilbert Bobby Polanco Dr Erica Pan San Quentin Warden Public Health department San Jose Kait Bay Area San Leandro Bart Station California Health Care Foundat Cal Maria Dylan Raquel Maria Dylan CNN California
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Cal maria dylan reports as part of our series the college try for marjorie blend like for a lot of students the thing that got her stuck was algebra after high school she enrolled in community college she took a mandatory placement test and landed in remedial algebra only this class just to get to transfer level i don't need it for any else in my life unless of course i'm gonna be s._m._e. which i'm not i'm a sociology major blend dreams of becoming an elementary school teacher but the math was frustrating and slow and she says her algebra instructor was condescending soon getting her degree felt much harder than she ever imagined and even when i try very hard in sacrifice leaving my kids at home late nights to stay tutoring passing those class the teacher would act like i should know this by now and that was really hard because i'm a working adult i'm a person that's trying to better themselves for their kids so they can have a better future eventually she dropped out several years later when she rian rolled she did some research and realized she didn't even need to take that placement test it shouldn't have been that hard she could fulfil the math requirement with statistics instead i lost three years of my life that would be what six semesters moneywise of less a close to at least ten thousand dollars at least with books transportation money and everything takes go to college in particular black and hispanic students have been disproportionately required to take a year and a half or even two years of courses that wouldn't count toward a bachelor's degree dr katie hearn is an english instructor at skyline college who studies graduation rates at the community college level she says the problem is remedial courses don't count towards u._c. transfer credit or graduation requirements leaving though these courses intended to help students they actually make them less likely to complete college this solution from sacramento a new law that says community colleges can't make students take remedial classes instead students will be assigned to a college level math or english course based on factors like high school g._p._a. previous grades and career goals but some faculty worry college level courses could be dumbed down to accommodate underprepared students even students have their doubts mantell floyd says he really needed basic writing instruction if it wasn't for those remedial classes i wouldn't be able to form a good paper if i didn't learn how to write a research paper to god here in it was in english one eight floyd just graduated from merritt community college in oakland last month trump out of the remedial class because they they they're hard they don't know how to do the math so why put them into a college level math or english class things they going to stay in that class no they go in front of that class to its lucia loft myers job to make sure that doesn't happen.

Cal maria dylan ten thousand dollars three years two years
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:05 min | 2 years ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It'll become mostly cloudy with Hazen patchy smoke later today, we're expecting highs in the sixties along with northerly winds between ten and twenty miles per hour. We'll see those winds shift to a westerly direction later this afternoon. At public radio. It's now six minutes past the hour of nine. Welcome to forum. I'm John Sepulvado in for Michael Krasny. California's most deadly and destructive wildfire on record continues to burn the campfire buke county has killed at least seventy seven people. It has destroyed more than ten thousand structures. And there are still nearly a thousand missing the town of paradise was virtually destroyed. The fires also created this lingering layer of smoke that is stretching all the way from the base of mount Shasta to San Jose. And it's very hazardous in some places I just came back from paradise over the weekend, and it very much appears to me that this is a uniquely rural tragedy that the fire has exposed the deep strains of rural life in America for an example, an economy that lags behind more populated areas. In fact, many of the empty stores and Chico have become important meeting spots for survivors, including the vacant toys. R us building there. And in fact, that's where we're joined now by were Cal Maria. Dylan Raquel, why is this vacant toys R us? So important. Well, first of all, this is where people are bringing a lot of stuff, but I want everyone to know they have enough stuff. They have enough used clothing they want. If you want to help what is needed here is new items not clothing anymore. This building has been turned into a local recovery center. They are just getting it off the ground right now. It's a coalition of faith based groups and local political activists and. Homelessness. Activists who come together to sort of process all the stuff that has been coming to Chico and begin to lay a groundwork for counseling and services and give people a place to come outside of the Red Cross shelter network and just give them support in a moment. We're going to hear from our colleague, Michelle Wiley, who's gonna tell us why people aren't going to some of these shelters. The toys R us is very important the abandoned Sears at the Chico mall is very important. That's actually become the site of the Fima center. One of the things I noticed Raquel when I was at both parking lot WalMart camp. And by the toys R us by the lows where people are camping at the Chico mall is that there really is a lack of hope with many of the people, especially many of the people who are older have you found that in any of the conversations you've had with survivors there. Yeah. Last night. I went to a vigil at the First Christian Church, and it was very sad. People were coming out with tears in their eyes red eyes and hugging and just filtering in and out. It was casual, but it the goal was to create a space for people to grieve and pray, and and just when you're fleet one guy said when you're fleeing a wife a wildfire that there's no time for that. And so this was important and he brought his family. I got sort of two different. I talked to two different kinds of people there some were just devastated and trying to figure out what to do next and really struggling just to put one foot in front of the other and not knowing what to do others were more optimistic and talking about paradise coming back stronger than before. Let's go with the optimistic of first, right? Let's do that. The gentleman I spoke with was Hendrik, and he's the thirty eight year old software developer, and he just every every bit of his escape story was he was thankful for each twist and turn and and and hopeful about about the future. All right. Well, let's hear you have some audio inlets your south writing music fertilizer. You know, just you can use it to grow bigger better stronger different. Who am I going to be in the face of all this? So basically he is suggesting that retake lemons and make lemonade is one way to put that fertilizer reference. But again, I didn't hear a lot of people who are like that. I'm going to go to Michelle Wiley who's in studio right now Raquel stay with us for a moment. Michelle. What were some of the people telling you that you found especially in some of these tent encampments that are throughout the city and Chico. So in terms of moving forward and how they're thinking about things. I I'll agree that it was a mixed bag, but I talked to more people there who were just feeling really devastated. They don't know exactly what the next step is. And at this point. That's all they can think about is. Where am I going next? What am I doing next? Do. I have a place to say do I have to go to a shelter because a lot of people don't want to go to these shelters. So I think that for some maybe they can look at this in a positive light. But especially for people who are really impoverished people who are maybe were homeless before the fire started. They're feeling like at a loss for how to move on. And we're called before we say goodbye to you. Can you describe what it looks like right? This moment where you're out. Are we starting to see any of the smoke clear and one of the latest on the fire containment numbers? The the the weather has turned this morning at the briefing firefighters were very optimistic about. Now that there's no more red flag. Warning there. They have are gaining the upper hand on the fire. There's still a lot of rough terrain and steep cliffs that they need to build line on. But they're doing a lot better. And I can see blue sky. Well, that's. That is really saying something. Yeah. The air is gradually cleaning clearing and. There's still a lot of work to do people here. The the organizers in this little grassroots shelter. They know how long this recovery effort is gonna take. They're just beginning to get their heads around that and figure out what to do she go has a population of like eighty six thousand and they're talking about two twenty thousand upwards of that people looking for homes and shelter. And that's going to be a large task Raquel Maria. Dylan joining us from in front of the toys R us in Chico, which has turned into a sort of meeting place for supplies Raquel. Thank you so much. Thank you. And we're as we recall go in one of the things she brought up Michelle Wiley is that it's really important not to give used items at this point. She said give new items if you can what I heard from organizers as you heard this weekend it cash money. That's what people need, and they can go to K Q E D dot org to find a place to to give to one of the charities and non-governmental organizations that are going to help joining us also in studio is slates April Glazer who just returned from Butte county. She was by the area where the fire is believed to have started. Hi, april. Hi, thanks for having me. Let's talk a little bit about this hope aspect, we just heard about the housing crunch. Raquel was talking about that. We know that housing was already in short supply in Butte county when you talk to people on the ground level about how their outlook for the future. What did you find people? Just don't know what the future holds at all. I mean, we were talking to families where it was like nine people in a two bedroom. House all. Ready, and they already weren't sure. Like if they were going to have a job next week or not, and then the fire came in and everything got piled into a car that maybe work, maybe didn't work, and then they found themselves in a parking lot. So, you know, the future was already on certain for a lot of the people in this area. And now, they just don't know even if they have placed where they're staying the where they are are going to be there tomorrow, if they're going to be disbanded one of the other things that we were having a question of is where is FEMA where are FEMA trailers? Why isn't FEMA providing shelter? Why isn't this toys R us, for example, being used as a shelter? We saw one person report that today Raquel was not able to verify that you have any idea April through your reporting where the heck is females. There was a real lack of a federal presence. I mean, this is such a massive disaster, and one would expect that there would be a federal presence there to help address the massive emergency concerns. But really all I saw was Cal fire. I saw the alphabet soup of police agencies, California, Jerry the state around the clock, and they are receiving a. None of donations to I mean, when I went to the public information officers tent at the camp at the fairgrounds where there were sending reporters to to to to learn more about, you know, check checkpoints that they could go through. There were cookies that people brought their food and water that people have right? So people are giving a lot you know, everywhere they can. But there was not FEMA present. I did hear though from the public information officer at the fairground that they do expect that come in in the next few days to set up some kind of provisional housing, but I did not see them when I was there this week. And that's the other thing is that there's a lot of misinformation Michelle you heard a lot of different rumors and kind of will they be forced to go from the WalMart parking lot won't they be. I mean, there seems to be a real lack of information going to the people on the ground. I mean, I think part of that is because there are a lot of people volunteering there are a lot of different agencies involved. So there's a lot of misinformation and people are getting it in various different ways. And so when we are on the ground at the WalMart parking lot, there was there had been a notice. That they were encouraged to evacuate on Sunday, but they weren't being forced to evacuate. But I heard from so many people that they didn't know whether they had to leave or not, and they didn't know where to go part of the problem with this isn't necessarily finding housing to live in or finding a place to stay there cars burned. They've never to get to places that they want to go. So it's not just about like finding a hotel room. It's getting to a hotel room. And it was funny. I spoke to a woman from Davis who is a social worker names. Laura loving she she went up to help just on her own completely. Volunteer effort had raised something like fifteen thousand dollars in gas cards. And she said there was no point in giving the gas cards because nobody had a car to us at this point to leave this parking area. The other thing we heard was that we were able to see the list of vehicles that had been told that had been left there were more than one hundred and twenty vehicles, and these are vehicles that just people abandoned on the street while they were running away from this fire. I mean, there is a lot of loss and devastation in these camps. Yeah. Absolutely. I I met a lot of people who said they that their, you know, their whole their homes had burned down that I spoke to one woman who got into a car accident trying to flee and our car was totaled. And then she had to jump in someone's truck and try and get out. And then I, you know, as we heard people trying to flee ended up in this huge traffic jam and they had to run literally down the road trying to get out of paradise people's cars were burning like, wow, they were exiting and a lot of these small towns that have like three thousand people. I mean, this is just this kind of sprinkling of small towns throughout view county. There's one road that connects them all and so everybody was on one road and their cars were literally burning as they were going. I was talking to somebody at the WalMart camp. Who said that he was watching fireballs of embers dropped ten cars behind him. And the cars were turned into grenades. There were stuffing people into car that had any open room. And you know, this fire it exploded in like, fifteen minutes for some people. They saw smoke across the sky fifteen minutes later. There's a wall. Qualifier that they have to run from..

Dylan Raquel Michelle Wiley Chico Chico mall FEMA California mount Shasta Raquel Maria officer Cal Maria America Hazen Butte county First Christian Church WalMart camp WalMart John Sepulvado San Jose Fima center
"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"cal maria dylan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's all things considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise, Kelley Cornish coming, up, former students and athletes at Ohio. State accusa longtime. Team doctor of sexual misconduct these started writing prescriptions and. As I was. Trying to get up to. Leave he was, like well I'm not done with my examination drop your trousers, one of the men speaking out in the metoo movement first this, news Live from NPR news in Culver City California I'm Dwayne Brown it was the first day of class for students in Puerto Rico's public school system, as NPR's Adrian Florida, reports they returned to assist them transform by last year's devastating hurricanes and ongoing budget pressures tens of thousands of students returned to classes at a. Different school from the one they attended last year over the summer the island government closed, more than two hundred sixty schools about, a quarter of all campuses on the island that was in response to declining enrollment made worse after hurricane Maria drove, people, from, the island and, also massive. Cuts to education spending as a federal. Oversight board works to get the island out of debt the government says the consolidation of schools along with other reforms. Will improve education over, time but many poor families in rural areas say their, children's new schools, are, too far away to get them. There and that. The government has not provided necessary bussing Adrian plateau NPR. News, San Juan Rico speaking today at New, York's fort drum. Army facility President Trump signed more than seven hundred billion, dollar, defense Bill that provides, a nearly three percent boost in military pay the largest increase in nine years and measure also waive sanctions against countries that, bought Russian weapons and now I wanna buy US military equipment this authorization we'll give America's warfighters the firepower they need to win any conflict quickly, and decisively the measure, provides no immediate money for Trump's proposed space force but does authorize the military parade he wants in Washington in November they defense Bill was named. After ailing Arizona Senator John McCain who Trump failed to mention during today's ceremony stocks finished. Lower on Wall Street as concerns spread, globally over Turkey's economic crisis and falling currency the Dow dropped one hundred twenty five points down half a percent the, NASDAQ, lost, nineteen points the, SNP drop Eleven points this is NPR news I'm Tiffany Cam high, the university of California's largest union is calling for the UC to stop doing business with contractors that work with the federal immigration officials kqed.org Cal Maria Dylan reports. The American federation of state county and municipal employees. Or asked me says twenty-five companies do millions. Of dollars, of business with both immigration and. Customs enforcement and the university the faculty union has. Called on the university to cut ties with one of them, General Dynamics which has one division. That administers tests to prospective students. And another that supplies ammunition to ice, asked, me spokesman John Los Angeles says outsourcing takes advantage of immigrant communities it's doubly insulting to find out that they're outsourcing these jobs to the people behind an. Agency that's engaged in ripping those same communities apart university officials say. General Dynamics provides casework support and does not Operate detention facilities I'm. Racquel Maria Dylan news Cal fire says close to thirteen thousand firefighters are battling eleven large wildfires across the state agency says so far. Those fires have burned more than seven hundred twenty six thousand acres and damaged or destroyed two thousand, structures the state's largest on record the Mendocino complex has now charged three hundred forty five thousand. Acres and Mendocino lake and collusive counties the car fire has burned more than two hundred two, thousand acres and Shasta and trinity counties it also destroyed more than a thousand homes and killed eight people the. Ferguson fire burning in and, near Yosemite has burned close..

NPR Trump Bill US General Dynamics Racquel Maria Dylan hurricane Maria Cal Maria Dylan Mendocino lake Culver City California Mendocino San Juan Rico Mary Louise American federation Puerto Rico Ohio Kelley Cornish Yosemite