32 Burst results for "Cairns"

Literacy for Environmental Justice

Voices of the Community

02:20 min | 3 weeks ago

Literacy for Environmental Justice

"I'm joined remotely via soon by the andrea morton senior development consulting community program coordinator alex lasco and executive director. Patrick marley rump. From literacy for environmental justice. Thanks for being here. The entry alex and patrick thank you very very much and then patrick i'm gonna turn to you and ask you to please provide the audience. A quick overview of who is literacy for environmental justice environmental justice or ledge is a community based grassroots nonprofit in bayview hunters point or district in southeastern francisco. Were basically like a combination of young adults youth. Educators activists environmentalists. You know have come together to kinda create environmental justice and social change. Big one hundred point. Our organization was founded in nineteen ninety eight and it was really at that time and bayview. There was a lot of work around closing the hunters point. Pg power plant illuminating all the stuff the not in my backyard stuff that exists and baby. There's three hundred twenty five toxic sites and one hundred point and really. I think there was a strong movement to address the environmental injustices. An impact on the bayview hunters point community. But there really wasn't a mechanism to engage you so our founding director paired up with some youth and high school and came up with the idea of creating a organization were projects that could bridge the gap between the advocacy of the elders and the next generation. So while we got our beginnings and really like teaching the principles of environmental justice and providing a platform for young people to be a part of the environmental justice who had been at a localized level. I think our organization has kind of spun out to actually create some of the just environments that we want so we've done extensive work with the san francisco unified school district to bring people to the community to do investigation to habitat restoration to transform spaces cairns at park to build the aeko center at herron said are and last like decade. Or so. we've put a lot of focus and energy on candlestick. We've built a community garden there. We build a native plant nursery there which currently

Andrea Morton Alex Lasco Patrick Marley Bayview Hunters Point Patrick Alex Francisco San Francisco Unified School D Aeko Center Herron
‘Courtside Karen’ Removed From Los Angeles Lakers, Hawks Game After Heckling LeBron James

The South Florida Morning Show

01:04 min | 5 months ago

‘Courtside Karen’ Removed From Los Angeles Lakers, Hawks Game After Heckling LeBron James

"So i'm so. Glad i'm named karen i think The million cairns of the world should unite But these two women were kicked out of the lakers. Atlanta hawks game last night for screaming. That lebron james and one woman is being called courtside karen. She's blamed She's blaming lebron. James restarting hoping here. She is lebron. James looked at my husband during the game and customer. And i stood up and i go. Don't talk to my husband. Chocolate husband one more time. I love this woman. Anybody that stands up to that prancer. I cannot fly or cannot stand. Lebron james i think he's the most dislike -able a athlete of our generation can't stand him he's also another bad. Winter is like when he won. Aren't i'm gonna get my do nothing enjoyable about this guy unless team no humility with unless for sure he called himself king james. Let's start and stop there. So he says he's happy are back in the stands

Karen Lebron Lebron James Atlanta Hawks James Lakers King James
Mexico Caves Reveal Ancient Ochre Mining

60-Second Science

03:01 min | 11 months ago

Mexico Caves Reveal Ancient Ochre Mining

"Sometimes, discoveries seem so simple. You know basically we've found a bunch of holes in the ground that's Edward Reinhard he's an archaeologist and geologist at McMaster University in Ontario Canada, but you know ultimately very important holes in the ground reinhard on colleagues believe they've found some of the first clear evidence of mining activity in a system of caves in Kintana ru on the peninsula the fine dates back to between ten and twelve thousand years ago. These are some very early people that have come and migrated to the Americas via the during straight. But getting to what remains of these miners and the tools they laugh is a challenge like cave divers you got to be so careful you don't get lost. These caves systems in Mexico, which were once dry are now completely filled with water. Thanks to a warming climate and sea levels that rose over time winding passageways are narrow and dark, and the walls are made of unforgiving limestone porous and with sharp edges. Reinhard says the water that filled the caves has preserved everything. It's basically almost like you know somebody working at a factory, they turn the lights off and they went away and nobody ever came back when divers started telling reinhard about what they were seeing inside the cave. He decided to go for a dive himself. He found concentrations of charcoal meaning that the people who walked here thousands of years ago probably used fire to light their way and there are stone. Cairns which Reinhardt believes the people built as navigation markers. Also says lots of tools remain and they were made from the stalagmites that hung from the cave ceiling breaking off and then using use hammer. So you can see the percussion marks where they were banging up the you know breaking up the stone on the bottom. The discovery is in the journal Science advances. So what were these ancient people mining and prospecting for there is a little bit of sediment still on the wall of. The pit. So I grabbed a vial and my sampled island, grab some of the sediment and underwater the red light gets attenuated. So Look Kinda Brown I was thinking well, maybe it's ochre you know is thinking about that but it's like well, looks Kinda creepy of that's what it is but then I got got out of the cave into the sunlight and it was just like this spectacular bright bright red. So then I knew. What they were after ochre it's among the earliest known pigments employed by humans and it's got many uses for sunscreen to preserve animal skins and burials and ceremonies, and people still use it even today in artwork. It was you know it's a prominent in used Gio material if you will through time for your end and dates data usage for thousands of years prior to around the world.

Edward Reinhard Kintana Ru Mcmaster University Mexico GIO Ontario Canada Cairns Reinhardt
Midnight Moment - burst 1

The Midnight Patriots

09:37 min | 11 months ago

Midnight Moment - burst 1

"Her. Hey Patriots. Pulse pardon hair with your midnight moment. It's just after midnight here in the Mall High. Command Center and the paper PRICES DOT COM studios. So let's get a rolling. So if you're listening right now, it's after midnight and in some parts of the country, it's a little after two am and you've got to be answering yourself what in the hell is the midnight moment what it's doing well, we're GonNa, use a midnight moment to provide quick quick updates of topics that are usually bugging the shit out of or that we have a particular Gigolo support for You know we're also going to provide some background and clarification on topics. We can't devote proper time to during the actual podcast itself and we're GONNA use this to respond to contact from our listeners like you. I I want to say thank you to all the followers that we've received since we launched the world. Premiere. The support has been outstanding. So welcomed, everybody all the Patriots from see shining see. Decided to follow and give us a listen. We received a lot of feedback the world premiere move just psychotically fast and hop topics really quickly, which in hindsight is completely true. Probably because we were severely over caffeinated but not the word that only happens all the time. So hence, the midnight moments segment that we're doing now A. Particular feedback about my opinion on mess and more importantly they. Have contacted me wanted to know why hold? The position that I do that cloth master complete bullshit and that. Even. The end ninety five and surgical masks being worn in public are of no help and I will be happy to explain that and we'll get into that just a second. So I want to make very clear here that I am not overall gist. Not a doctor I don't possess a medical degree. That said what I do have is I've taken in past Osha ten and thirty turning as it pertains to respirator guidelines. Now Couple things about that. Osha the occupational safety hazards administration like it or lump it. Is the foremost expert on protections for the workplace as it pertains to many things. A lot of people are saying, Oh, listen to the experts. Well, the problem is, is that the so-called experts also answered Osha that's right. The CDC. If they give their people, the wrong equipment and somebody at ends up getting sick. Guess what Osha Steps in, find his shit out of them. So that's something that you need to understand. So What we have here is a complete and total conflation and misunderstanding of what masks are and what they do. There's also a conflation and complete misunderstanding of nomenclature terminology as it pertains to. What respirators are for? So I, want to start by saying that there's a respirator for every job. and. To be very specific what you'll find out if you do your research and by all means, don't trust me look it up for yourself. And Ninety Five, mass nine, ninety, five masks are designed for contaminated environments. So they're supposed to protect you on the inhale, but the exhale is set completely out into the air. So if the Douche not standing you know. Close to you within ninety five mask actually has Kobe Nineteen, any hails. If he has it the virus, the airborne pathogen goes right through the mask and offers no protection. That's number one number two. Surgical masks are designed for sterile environment here the argument a lot. Well, why don't? Or why do medical professionals wear masks in a surgery room I mean, what are they aren't they trying to protect people from viruses new They're not surgical masks do not protect against viruses in any way shape or form. We'll get into that in a minute also when you put on a surgical mask and you walk outdoors all the particulate matter dust dirt excetera. Rendered those masks useless and a non sterile environment? Okay. So understand something and ninety five and surgical masks. Are designed for a specific purpose. Okay designed for specific purpose. Further, neither one of them actually are rated to stop airborne pathogens. Now that distinction is very, very important. That's very important distinction and one thing that you'll find is. Viruses, especially, with the airborne type are what's called sub-micron. Now, what does that me I'll try to describe this in a way that that is a visually acceptable to everybody involved. Okay. So let's just say that you're looking at a at. A soccer goal and the goal has a net on it. If you look at any mask close enough, you'll see the fibers somewhat connect that soccer net. Okay. Now if you throw a basketball at the soccer net. It's going to stop the basketball, right? So considered the basketball dust particle. It's going to stop it. If you throw soccer ball at its, it's going to stop that to. Throw a smaller soccer ball at it it'll stop that. It's A tennis ball at. Tennis balls probably going to get through. Gaul. At. It. Golf balls definitely interf-. Now throw a single bb or pellet. At that same net goes directly through. so by comparison, dust particles are even larger than the aforementioned basketball and a virus is even smaller than the BB. So, does that resonate with anybody? In order to actually protect yourself from an airborne pathogen like an airborne visit. You need actual containment in an independent agent supply. Let me back that up for just a second. I actually went today to have been one, thousand, nine, hundred tests I know I know funny. Mavin minor surgery Monday and I had to get the test. No big deal. So it was one of the drive up locations and. Gave my information. And the guy that comes over is actually wearing a full face shield helmet with an independent oxygen supply to do the nose swab. Basically, confirming everything I've just said I asked him I said excuse me Sir. Why are you wearing the helmet? And he said Oh requires the can protect myself from the virus. Now. That actually happened not twelve hours ago. So. Medical professionals know. The Truth and what I just said. Osha people are people that are Osha Ten thirty certified and had the training know too. Military members veterans who have trained with respirators in. Gas Masks. Know that there is a filter and a respirator for. Single situation. That brings me to cloth masks. If cloth masks work. And they stop aerosols again, all you're doing is stopping the for the basketball. In not stopping the BB. You can drive a matchbook car through highway tunnel, but you can't get A. Mack truck. Through a standard paper towel tube. It just doesn't work. There is no science. It's bullshit. Now. If you. WanNa wear a mask it. It's a placebo measure in you think it helps whatever floats your boat man. But I'd like to tell all the Cairns of the world. Who say? Oh, just wear the mask go fuck yourself. You, wear your mask. Let me do I WANNA do. You're not helping anything. You're not protecting anyone it's a myth. It's a placebo effect, and if you don't know what that term is placebo effect, look it up. It's a confidence measure for a test group when anyone trying to run an experiment, get the picture. That was your midnight moment Massar Bullshit where one if you want the lead me out of it. Enjoyed, your midnight moment for July Twenty, four, twenty, twenty. If you did be sure to give us a following get notified new releases subscriptions would be very appreciated. But know that you being here with us is enough for us. Sleep well I. Remember the Constitution is not a suggestion.

Basketball Soccer Osha Mall High Patriots CDC Kobe Golf Gaul Tennis A. Mack
Midnight Moment - burst 1

The Midnight Patriots

10:54 min | 11 months ago

Midnight Moment - burst 1

"Patriots Paul Spartan here from the Midnight Patriots. So one of the. Feel about anchored now. When we started this insanity, we always tell people. The reason we do this is because insomnia sucks almost as bad as tyranny. We would have these conversations between ourselves the group chats. Throws, things like that. We thought, hey man, you know we should just record a podcast, but the more we looked the more expensive became. We Cross anger. Anger gives you all the tools you need to do this to make your voice heard and get your voice out there. You have an opinion you gotta use anchor everything from recording to editing to distribution that you'd be all the tools that you need. To allow you to record your podcast right for your phone or your computer. Anchor covers distribution by getting on Apple. spotify and many many others. I mean how you can make money right from your own podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need in one spot in one place simple and effect. Get yourself anchor make voice her. Hey Patriots. Pulse pardon hair with your midnight moment. It's just after midnight here in the Mall High. Command Center and the paper PRICES DOT COM studios. So let's get a rolling. So if you're listening right now, it's after midnight and in some parts of the country, it's a little after two am and you've got to be answering yourself what in the hell is the midnight moment what it's doing well, we're GonNa, use a midnight moment to provide quick quick updates of topics that are usually bugging the shit out of or that we have a particular Gigolo support for You know we're also going to provide some background and clarification on topics. We can't devote proper time to during the actual podcast itself and we're GONNA use this to respond to contact from our listeners like you. I I want to say thank you to all the followers that we've received since we launched the world. Premiere. The support has been outstanding. So welcomed, everybody all the Patriots from see shining see. Decided to follow and give us a listen. We received a lot of feedback the world premiere move just psychotically fast and hop topics really quickly, which in hindsight is completely true. Probably because we were severely over caffeinated but not the word that only happens all the time. So hence, the midnight moments segment that we're doing now A. Particular feedback about my opinion on mess and more importantly they. Have contacted me wanted to know why hold? The position that I do that cloth master complete bullshit and that. Even. The end ninety five and surgical masks being worn in public are of no help and I will be happy to explain that and we'll get into that just a second. So I want to make very clear here that I am not overall gist. Not a doctor I don't possess a medical degree. That said what I do have is I've taken in past Osha ten and thirty turning as it pertains to respirator guidelines. Now Couple things about that. Osha the occupational safety hazards administration like it or lump it. Is the foremost expert on protections for the workplace as it pertains to many things. A lot of people are saying, Oh, listen to the experts. Well, the problem is, is that the so-called experts also answered Osha that's right. The CDC. If they give their people, the wrong equipment and somebody at ends up getting sick. Guess what Osha Steps in, find his shit out of them. So that's something that you need to understand. So What we have here is a complete and total conflation and misunderstanding of what masks are and what they do. There's also a conflation and complete misunderstanding of nomenclature terminology as it pertains to. What respirators are for? So I, want to start by saying that there's a respirator for every job. and. To be very specific what you'll find out if you do your research and by all means, don't trust me look it up for yourself. And Ninety Five, mass nine, ninety, five masks are designed for contaminated environments. So they're supposed to protect you on the inhale, but the exhale is set completely out into the air. So if the Douche not standing you know. Close to you within ninety five mask actually has Kobe Nineteen, any hails. If he has it the virus, the airborne pathogen goes right through the mask and offers no protection. That's number one number two. Surgical masks are designed for sterile environment here the argument a lot. Well, why don't? Or why do medical professionals wear masks in a surgery room I mean, what are they aren't they trying to protect people from viruses new They're not surgical masks do not protect against viruses in any way shape or form. We'll get into that in a minute also when you put on a surgical mask and you walk outdoors all the particulate matter dust dirt excetera. Rendered those masks useless and a non sterile environment? Okay. So understand something and ninety five and surgical masks. Are designed for a specific purpose. Okay designed for specific purpose. Further, neither one of them actually are rated to stop airborne pathogens. Now that distinction is very, very important. That's very important distinction and one thing that you'll find is. Viruses, especially, with the airborne type are what's called sub-micron. Now, what does that me I'll try to describe this in a way that that is a visually acceptable to everybody involved. Okay. So let's just say that you're looking at a at. A soccer goal and the goal has a net on it. If you look at any mask close enough, you'll see the fibers somewhat connect that soccer net. Okay. Now if you throw a basketball at the soccer net. It's going to stop the basketball, right? So considered the basketball dust particle. It's going to stop it. If you throw soccer ball at its, it's going to stop that to. Throw a smaller soccer ball at it it'll stop that. It's A tennis ball at. Tennis balls probably going to get through. Gaul. At. It. Golf balls definitely interf-. Now throw a single bb or pellet. At that same net goes directly through. so by comparison, dust particles are even larger than the aforementioned basketball and a virus is even smaller than the BB. So, does that resonate with anybody? In order to actually protect yourself from an airborne pathogen like an airborne visit. You need actual containment in an independent agent supply. Let me back that up for just a second. I actually went today to have been one, thousand, nine, hundred tests I know I know funny. Mavin minor surgery Monday and I had to get the test. No big deal. So it was one of the drive up locations and. Gave my information. And the guy that comes over is actually wearing a full face shield helmet with an independent oxygen supply to do the nose swab. Basically, confirming everything I've just said I asked him I said excuse me Sir. Why are you wearing the helmet? And he said Oh requires the can protect myself from the virus. Now. That actually happened not twelve hours ago. So. Medical professionals know. The Truth and what I just said. Osha people are people that are Osha Ten thirty certified and had the training know too. Military members veterans who have trained with respirators in. Gas Masks. Know that there is a filter and a respirator for. Single situation. That brings me to cloth masks. If cloth masks work. And they stop aerosols again, all you're doing is stopping the for the basketball. In not stopping the BB. You can drive a matchbook car through highway tunnel, but you can't get A. Mack truck. Through a standard paper towel tube. It just doesn't work. There is no science. It's bullshit. Now. If you. WanNa wear a mask it. It's a placebo measure in you think it helps whatever floats your boat man. But I'd like to tell all the Cairns of the world. Who say? Oh, just wear the mask go fuck yourself. You, wear your mask. Let me do I WANNA do. You're not helping anything. You're not protecting anyone it's a myth. It's a placebo effect, and if you don't know what that term is placebo effect, look it up. It's a confidence measure for a test group when anyone trying to run an experiment, get the picture. That was your midnight moment Massar Bullshit where one if you want the lead me out of it. Enjoyed, your midnight moment for July Twenty, four, twenty, twenty. If you did be sure to give us a following get notified new releases subscriptions would be very appreciated. But know that you being here with us is enough for us. Sleep well I. Remember the Constitution is not a suggestion.

Basketball Soccer Osha Midnight Patriots Patriots Paul Spartan CDC Mall High Golf Gaul Kobe A. Mack Tennis
Battling Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs

Urban Forestry Radio

08:36 min | 1 year ago

Battling Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs

"We're GONNA start our show today by taking a trip back to the nineteen eighties when singer. Songwriter Billy Joel was at the top of his game and he released two. Song Allentown about the decline of the steel industry. In America steel factories were closing in steelworkers. Were losing their jobs. The song shed light on the challenges the workers faced and at the same time. It made allentown a city in Pennsylvania quite famous so now let's fast forward twenty or so years. Two Thousand and one and Allentown is in the news again but this time it's because of an insect an agricultural pest from Asia had somehow found its way to Pennsylvania. The insect called the Brown rated stink bug feeds on apples. Peaches figs mulberries citrus fruits and other crops. Well it didn't take long for these tough little bugs to spread and by twenty ten. They wrecked havoc on orchards and crops in various parts of the United States. And the really bad news. Is that Brown? Mom rated stink. Bugs are still here and there on the move and they may soon arrive to a fruit tree near you. So what can we do about it? I've invited Tracy Leschi to the studio today to find out. She's an entomologist. And by the way an optimist as you will discover in this interview today. She's also the director of the Appalachian Fruit Research Station at Cairns Ville West Virginia. Her research is focused on the development of behaviorally based management tools for invasive and native pest of fruit crops. But before we start chatting I would love to hear your stories and your questions during the show you can email those questions and stories to in-studio one. Oh one at g mail DOT COM and do remember to include your first name and the city. You're writing from so tell us. Have you seen these bugs in your fruit trees? And what have you done about it in studio one a one at g mail dot com is the email so now to Tracy Leschi. Thanks for coming on the show today. Thank you Susan for the invitation. I'm so glad to have you here. And hopefully you will shed some light on these mysterious bugs. Oh my goodness so. The Story Starts Allentown. Can you tell me a little bit about that discovery? What was happening around then here. So you know Brown Mama Rated Stink Bug as you've already mentioned is a species that is not native to North America. It's native to Asian countries including China Japan Korea and Taiwan. This insect is an excellent hitchhiker And we'll probably get to that in a little while but at some point in the to late. Nineteen nineties homeowners. In and around the Allentown region of Pennsylvania were Seeing some interesting invaders in the fall to their homes and in fact these were Brown. Mom rated stink bugs. Now the issue was is that they weren't properly identified until two thousand one when Karen Bernhardt who with Penn State cooperative extension in Pennsylvania collected some of these specimens from a homeowner and she ended up sending them to attacks honest Rick Holbeck at Cornell and he identified them as Brown mom rates. Think so this was the first official record of population in North America. So how on Earth would they have gotten there? How did they get to these people's homes right so one of the interesting things about Brown mom rated stink bug is that they are excellent hitchhikers as adults and that means is that they can sort of end up being concealed and hidden from view and sort of take a journey to somewhere else and this is related to what we as entomologist refer to as their over wintering behavior which is essentially like hibernation for insects. So when these insects hibernate more or less they crawl into cracks and crevices and hunker down and wait for spring. And if these cracks or crevices happens to be in some sort of shipment of goods or perhaps in your suitcase or who knows This is how often these bugs have been transported to new locations. Whoa so how quickly would they spread? So let's say or what a what a thought. Let's say it's in your suitcase. You've gone on holiday to China. Or whatever he brought back these little hitchhiking bugs So let's say you have one bug or two bugs what happens then. How quickly would they spread? Well if you found one or two bucks I'd tell you to kill them I but You know it's a good question. They have a pretty good Reproductive capacity that sort of what we say in terms of you know how quickly can a population build up? Based on the reproductive efforts of a female a single female can lay up to twenty eight eggs at a time in in an egg mass. And she can lay up to four hundred over her lifetime. So you can imagine if you know. Just a portion of those eggs survived to adulthood and then reproduce. You can see that. A population could build rather quickly so is is that what happened like You know how quickly did this problem spread? You said it started sort of in the late nineties. It was discovered two thousand and one. And then what happens? Well what happened? After that was it was a slow spread And it was a slow build up for a number of years so in two thousand and three I found the first specimen officially outside Pennsylvania in Maryland. Just south of Allentown Pennsylvania. I in in sort of central Maryland in a town called Hagerstown There was some. Also some official detections in New Jersey and then it continued to spread through what we refer to as the mid Atlantic here in the United States and to Virginia West Virginia You know parts of Delaware Into upstate or sort of well. I should say downstate New York so the populations continued to build Over a number of years and then you know really began to build quickly back in two thousand eight two thousand nine and in two thousand and ten throughout the region. We really experienced what we refer to as an outbreak population. So what did that look like Especially if you're growing cheese. Yeah it looked well you know. When we first began to detect problems in fruit trees from Brown mom raided stink bug and say two thousand eighteen thousand nine. The issues were confined really to the late season. Where just before harvest and this is really painful. If you can imagine your fruit just about ready to be picked from the tree almost ripe. We were seeing large numbers of adult invading the orchards in the fall and feeding on the fruit and this was causing for some of our local growers up to ten percent loss. Even back then but in two thousand and ten we saw the bugs invading earlier much earlier actually just after the fruit had formed just after pedal fall essentially in these orchards. In that early season feeding really set up our growers for significant losses. Where you know for our Peach Growers. Many growers lost their entire crops. Most lost half of their crop. And then it just went on from there. You know apples and Incurred ABOUT THIRTY SEVEN MILLION DOLLARS IN LOSSES. Thousand and ten just locally. That's terrible was the fruit. Not salvageable at all. I mean what what do these Brown marmalade stink bugs due to the fruit? Yeah they are you know. They are a typical stink bug species in that their mouth parts are essentially a straw and they insert that Straw into the fruit tissue and they inject some salivary enzymes that essentially helps break down that tissue and suck out the juice and so what they leave behind. Is this dry corky tissue beneath the surface of the skin as well as discolored display depressions on the surface now for peaches because the feeding Began so early essentially once you peel that fruit. The entire fruit was riddled with these deep pockets of dead comey tissue and you know. The entire fruit was essentially unsolvable. It was just a complete loss. For FOR APPLE. Growers some of the fruit could be redirected to From sort of a fresh market to juice market. But you know they're getting Cents on the dollar in terms of the value so in essence they're losing over. Ninety percent of the value of that fruit have normally gone into fresh market. So it was very

Allentown Pennsylvania Brown Apple Tracy Leschi North America United States Appalachian Fruit Research Sta China Billy Joel Official Allentown Pennsylvania America Asia Maryland New York Susan
#COVIDKindness

Kind World

03:18 min | 1 year ago

#COVIDKindness

"If there's ever a time when all of us need a little comfort it's now and you know what's giving me the most comfort this week. Andrea what's that? It's the realization that we live around a lot of amazingly kind generous people. So let's start off by sharing what's been happening in our communities were. We're watching neighbors step up and support each other in all sorts of ways. We have such a range of different kinds of things that people are willing to provide their neighbors In addition to money in housing and things like that things like delivery or child care or some people are artists in saved like they're willing to do online video chat sessions doing our. That's Jerry Medina. She's one of the founders of a local mutual aid group that's a grassroots network of people offering and requesting help so these groups are mostly organizing online but there are also posting flyers texting calling neighbors to let them know how they can get help and these mutual aid groups are popping up all over the country with people willing to buy groceries for each other to take care of each other's pets to entertain kids while parents are working. Some people have even open their homes to total strangers. Who need a place to stay? And we've heard a lot about that here in Boston because we've got so many college students and so many of them have had to leave their dorms and they've got nowhere to stay within not even our. I think that we saw this person. I'm staff often offer this to the student. That's why I think this is such a powerful way of practicing community. It's like Ben the nicest thing to observe during this entire time you know have seen local businesses stepping up to. It's a really trying time for anyone in the restaurant industry but Dmitri Murphy who owns Daddy Jonesboro nearby. Somerville is really stepping up. Even though they've had to close for the time being a couple of our staff are still working and they're doing so because they're delivering food to families in need. When I saw that we weren't going to be go bring kids to school. I was like wow restaurants have food and we are going to need to get it somewhere and these kids aren't going to school in Somerville. Maybe we can turn the need of the restaurants and all of our restaurants into a way to help the community and of course they're individuals who are just helping on their own like has saroj. She's a school principal living in Milton Massachusetts. So I do have a friend. Who is mean compromise? His bodily agreed to take an offer signed. GonNa do some shopping for her. Today cooks the meals and drop those off. Put up a post on her facebook page. She said she was willing to help anyone who needed food pickups or even cooking. She also said she was willing to take care of the of working parents. I think there is the capacity to love in Cairns showed kindness. I hope that there is more communication around folks that can check in with their neighbors. Like if you know that you have a neighbor who lives by themselves to knock on their door. Maybe wear masks leaving. No even just say you need something. Call me

Principal Somerville Andrea Jerry Medina Facebook Daddy Jonesboro Dmitri Murphy Boston BEN Milton Massachusetts Cairns
Be Your Own Valentine With Karen McGregor

Live Happy Now

08:59 min | 1 year ago

Be Your Own Valentine With Karen McGregor

"You probably realized already that this is the week when you're going to hear a lot of talk about Valentine's Day and showing those around you how much you love them. But have you. You thought about being your own Valentine this year whether you're single or coupled there are things you can do to feel more fulfilled in your relationships and with yourself Karen. Earn McGregor is a leadership expert and bestselling author of several books including her upcoming release. The towel of influence. She joins us this week to talk about. How are we can change our approach to love and relationships to find greater joy. CAIRN welcome to live happy. Now thank you so much for having me here. This is such a great time to talk to you because we're getting a lot of messages about love this month. Today's topic we're talking about how to be your own Ballantyne but before all the married people in a couple of people shut off. I think we should point out that. We're not just talking about single people right even. If you're in a relationship you need to learn how to be your own Ballantyne absolutely. I think it's so important that we really look within and see what is it that bothering us. And and what is it that not okay within us the potentially could affect our relationship with our loved one or if single and we tend to. You may not do that as much as we should. We tend to look what we want from the other person more than looking inward back out what we need to be presenting that true that so true. Yes I think most of us when we get into a love relationship or when we're seeking someone someone as a mate. I think that we generally tend to make long list of requirements. That really really need to be met in order for us to be happy and since you know your show is all about that. I really WANNA point out that. That's probably the biggest mistake that I've seeing people make. And I've I've made it myself is to really have increasing number of preferences so as an example when you live with with someone you may find over the years that you just have more and more preferences about the way they act the way they talk the way they walk and and you know in the work that I've done with my book. The Dow vins weren't always say that if we want to be truly influential in the world if we want should be true leaders in the world. We have to come from a place of not meeting anything to happen in order to be people filled and happy. Yes we're going to do. Things are going to take action. But we don't actually need it out of some lacquer fear within so I think that's really key. We change that perspective. What then happens because I know a lot of times. What you're looking for comes to you when you stop looking and when you start accepting your moment. Is it kind of like that. When you stop making this list of demands Chroma partner you get really well. I think the first thing thing is getting back to your theme is that you really do become happier more fulfilled person the catch. I find sometimes with people who talk about the law of attraction is that you never want to do something as the transactional behaviors. If you say well. I'm going to overlook that my husband doesn't pick up his talk 'cause I'm a bigger person than that. It doesn't necessarily mean that you're going to have her filled happy state. Because now you've put it in your mind that you're going to rise above this but really. It's it's almost like creating a new checklist of these are the things I'm not going to do. In order to get this result and the same thing with law of attraction I think if we come from a place of lack and fear and pushing and transaction. Then we're always hoping for the greater result that I agree with you that when we let go of all of that when we really focus on internal happiness and not needing anything from anyone else truly not needing anything when we get there. You're then you're absolutely right. Our life flows things. Come to us and you'll myself personally financially. Things their way better her when I don't hang onto preferences and needs and things like that so I think that's really the key to successful relationships. You know speaking of Valentine Day and it's one thing to understand that that makes sense it's another thing entirely to put it into action because it's not necessarily I nature to just say all right I'm not going to obsess on that. So how do we start living that way being able to accept except ourselves and being able to accept where we are and that we don't need other element we don't need other person. Yes well I think the first thing is and thank you for asking because the how to always so important isn't it you talk about it but we do need the. How'd you the first first thing for me is to become committed to the practice of watching my thought and how my thought get triggered into the emotion and more thoughts and then I get stuck on that thing. That's bothering me and so for me. The biggest practice that I've done that made such a huge difference. In part of my book is to really see how an initial thought ought can get carried away in to all of the emotion and more thoughts. So once you observe yourself getting into. Let's say you know you don't like what someone has said to you. And maybe it's a loved one or you're single and somebody said some insensitive thing and when you hear hear that initially most people are going to go to their old runes about the am not good enough and this whatever this person said is proving it and subconsciously subconsciously. We do it consciously but it comes out as a hurt and so we feel that hurt and then the next what in our head is usually either defensive or withdrawn so we usually lean in to try and defend ourselves and get what we want or we run away and escape escape that which we don't want so it's one of the two typically and so when you watch yourself lean in in order back away based on that initial thought you can actually and this was true. Actually stop it in that moment and how you stop. It is also a practice. You might come down and you'll be right uh-huh and so her knee. I actually find that. It helps first of all to be gentle on myself. You know this is something that's GonNa take for most people if they're committed to it. It'll take years of practice not just overnight but I find even within two three weeks. The people have remarkable changes. If they keep up the practice right so you just breathe in and you watch and you visualize your thought. Almost moved like they could be an object floating down a river and you just watch them float down the river and then when the next one comes you watch that float down the river as well well and for some people like myself you know. I really enjoy the art of meditating. You know and so that he if you have a moment just quiet time to breathe and allowed. US got to float down the river. That's wonderful for some people. It's more movement committee so as you're watching yourself. Let go with the thoughts. You're running or you're exercising or something to get rid of the energy it has presented itself a Lotta people spend years and years and therapy. I'm certainly not against it. I just feel that everybody I've met. We all have ruined. Some of US have learned to cope with them really well but I feel that the best practice for for all of us is to start to be aware that we don't need our mind to control us. We need to control our mind the other other way around.

United States Ballantyne Mcgregor Karen Partner
"cairns" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

Beyond Your Wildest Genes

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"cairns" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

"Bartow the three four fixed..

Why Are Scientists Asking Hikers to Stop Stacking Rocks?

BrainStuff

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Why Are Scientists Asking Hikers to Stop Stacking Rocks?

"If you've been out on a hiking trail lately you've you've probably noticed them. Suddenly popping up everywhere. Small intentionally stacked piles of rocks. Called Cairns and environmentalists worldwide are increasingly increasingly alarmed because moving rocks can have numerous unintended consequences for insects animals. And even the land itself people have been in stacking rocks since the dawn of time typically four directional or burial purposes such structures have been found in Greenland Northern Canada and Alaska and were built by Anita People's for specific purposes like navigation to indicate a food source or to warn of danger. More recently park officials began creating them on hiking trails else especially potentially confusing pads to help ensure that hikers don't get lost in eighteen ninety six a man named Waldron Bates created a specific civic style of hiking Karen in Acadia National Park. The Bates Cairns as they became known consisted of a rectangular stone balanced top two legs and then topped opt with one stone pointing to the trail. These Cairns were replaced by standard ones in the nineteen fifties and sixties but the park began rebuilding the historic Bates Cairns in the nineteen ninety S. Acadia no contains a mixture of both. What's concerning scientists? Today is the new practice of creating rock piles as an art. Form form or for alluring social media posts because stacking rocks is not an innocuous practice many insects and mammals head under rocks to live reproduce reduce or just escape. They're predators so move a rock and you might destroy a home stack a few. And you may have just exposed the hunted to their hunters. And and while that may sound melodramatic whether you're stacking rocks in the woods on the beach or in the desert your actions could inadvertently knock out an entire colony. Or in the worst case scenario threaten and endangered species some rock stacking fans note that they're being responsible by returning their rocks to the spots where they found them after after creating and then disassembling artwork however the second move rocks you may compromise species habitat in an unrecoverable manner. In addition moving rocks in any fashion contributes to soil erosion as the dirt ones protectively packed under them is now loosened and more prone to washing or blowing away. Why should you come upon? Stacked rocks especially in national parks. Leave him alone. And if you're hiking don't automatically follow where they seemed point. The National Park Service recommends checking with Park officials before setting out on a hike as every park has different rules about kearns. You wouldn't want to remove those intentionally set as navigational AIDS nor would you want to follow those. That may have been randomly. If artistically assembled by visitors in the end let your actions be guided by the important principle principle. Leave no trace.

Acadia National Park Bates Cairns Waldron Bates National Park Service Anita People Alaska Greenland Northern Canada Kearns
"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"My script and then that can snowball day I think you just keep sending it to people be relentless the Senate have everyone read. Have people aren't just you know this. You exact dream of reading it but like you know your friends Gardner have read it and keep working on it and I think what you really need to be as writers lucky and I can't tell you how to be lucky but I can tell you if you keep working at it one day the an opportunity to open up and you feel lucky because you'll be like I've got the script and it's ten drafts in and I knew I've absolutely nailed it and I'm GonNa give it to this guy so that would be my advice to you. The device USA right there in the good question any resources that you draw inspiration from in prepare you for the next story. I mean I read a little scripts I've already every script going going I like to see you all people are doing. I do definitely I am. I also read the Law of Literature. I am an I think you writers is like James Salter and stuff like that like writers writers are amazing to read because you can see how they scrape characters who they describe rooms and stuff like that and and I would urge you to steal from them. Because they're they're great in the current issue backstory magazine. I think we published about twenty five scripts. You Sir right there. Did you have any family. Connections the First World War that you dedicated your writing to I am I. I have distant great uncles aunts but actually my grandfather who was born in nineteen twenty nine. Who never fought in the war? Obviously I am. He was profoundly affected by drought. And Glasgow. I'm you know in the early thirties. There were still a generation of men messing. There was rampant poverty. The the ship building was kind of run so bad at that point women were working in the shipyards. Were just not enough men and he grew up in real object poverty and he had a real belief in education. Even though he wasn't highly educated he would go to the library. He would read himself. I am I think he left school at fourteen. We had like nor traditional education. But he really really believe that if you can learn history if you as a society but also use an individual inertia you can be better people and he passed that one to me he had such a love. AWW can affect your history of of understanding the wars in particular how they came about and so in a we has kind of respect for history became mine. He would read me bedtime stories about the war which obviously profoundly made me off and made me write this. I am that that to me. Was My family connection. Another one from the audience. Member question is is in regards to. How do you create characters? You line up a big backstory for them about where they're coming from who they are before you start writing thing or is this something that you discover fluidly while writing and rewriting. I think a lot about them before I start writing. I mean for school field. I I knew that he he would have been a poet so I read all the war poets until like I couldn't tell you where he grew up because that wasn't important to me I could tell you how he would react to something or or or what can of lane verse would make him cry to me. That was more interesting than he. He was born in what be because that would never have appeared in the script. It doesn't matter to me. So that was the kind of thing and then for bleak I knew he was young. He was green. I knew that he wants to be a hero. I thought he would read the lone ranger because they can note the time they were a big books of the Taymor through man would read stuff like that and think. Oh this is horribly. Could react to stop. This is this is the kind of heat who he dreams of being. I am and then when I'm writing characters addict. This is going to serve the scene. But I'm everyone in the script. I'm trying to understand the logic of higher though behave and so I think I would. I be even the scenario because I think ultimately really what you're trying to do is you're trying to make people that the audience understand and you can only do that. If the behaved the way people behave so I might either. Ob meal with someone. I knew and this this is how the this is how they react under stress this too at this I do it and so I think with actors in mind rate with people in mind. Does that make sense. That totally makes sense and the other thing that you do is you wrote a very character. Driven piece and the silences allow us to discover character through action and through meditative moments. which I thought was is really cool as well? Still Take it away. We'll look I absolutely love your movie. I'm so glad you came here tonight. I can't wait to see what you do next congrats and your wgn nomination give it up again for Christie. Thank you so thank you for listening to me. and that's the Qa went down special. Thanks again Takuo writer Christie Wilson Cans for coming down and being so generous with their time and chatting about her debut feature film nine thousand nine hundred seventeen also. Don't forget to check out the massive nineteen seventeen issue of backstory magazine. It features four great cover stories that include nineteen seventeen stars Dean Charles Chapman and George Mackay Plus Editor Lee Smith Plus co-writer co-writer Christie Wilson Cairns. who gets into some different topics in the ones covered in this podcast and heck you could even read the entire screenplay for nineteen seventeen plus a bunch of other other awards season scripts and backstory as? Well there's a lot of stuff you to explore an issue forty so I hope you'll check out the table of contents backstory dot net to see all the other great stuff that's inside and while you're there.

backstory magazine USA Senate Christie Wilson James Salter wgn Gardner Glasgow Law of Literature Christie Christie Wilson Cairns. Taymor Dean Charles Chapman writer George Mackay Editor Lee Smith
"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

09:57 min | 1 year ago

"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"But now let's jump right back into my conversation with CO writer Christie Wilson. Cairns it's about her debut feature film nineteen seventeen. What was the left turn? What was something early on? It was an idea like the gas attack or something else that you really thought yet. This is where the move is going to go that you eventually got away from because it's always interesting to hear those those first footsteps. I am quite good question. I don't know if I have an answer that we'd we'd never really had. We never really changed the intention of the film. It was always. We wanted to write a war movie. That was not gonNA glorify war that was going to be about stopping a battle. That's new accident. We wanted to write a film that was very character driven very personal. We wanted to write film. That didn't really ever raced on the fact that we need to capture this flag black or shoot this road talion so like all those kind of ideals like this movie's really about what lanes will you go to someone you love that was baked into the DNA UvA there was no real opportunities. Change that I think the only the only ever knew that we ever go and fought back on was making benedict. cumberbatch character was making him a villain. That was as you know and we we we were like I was Gonna ask that because and we talked about it a little in the article there is no antagonism this movie other than time in the word self and it's really more the situation and you as you to use your term baked into the script you said earlier on that. Make sure that somebody else is in the room when you deliver the orders. Because there's a chance he won't follow through. And and so what was he ever again. Agnes and there was some of you walked back or no. We never walked to bike. We always had that Lennon because again for my little heart monitor I wanna do similar where you go look. ooh Like even if he gets there. Will it matter because I for that war. Sometimes it genuinely didn't matter like there where men who just wanted ended the fight. I am so we always wanted that. Element of suspense about it. And that was one of the reasons that benedict cumberbatch says you're too late because you want the audience to generally be like what what do you mean. I'm too late new. You have to read this you want like. I wanted them to be in their chairs. Being linking I share a little combs. Aw you down letter you use excited me. Activist succeeded in making great war film. Because you show the humanity of war and even the pointlessness of of fighting for those few inches and it's coming at a very strange time in our country's history when the sabres are being rattled again for absolutely no reason whatsoever so ever been the take is off the impeachment hearings trials. That are our future. And it's it's very sad so government are real. Dick's yeah especially the government writes plea. Who's got it worse because we both some problems over the Iran but like we will eventually because we always throw in? I'm with you guys. We're we're happy to have you but hopefully somebody wakes up behind the steering wheel and stops it. I'm curious just out of curiosity. What is hanging in the bags dogs but the rats are going for? was that damage. They used to have to keep their foods and fact rats were so bad no-man's-land like and in the trenches to hang their cheers cheers up because when they would quote the rats eat through the cheer. Lakes wow yeah the rice. There's a great quote in one of the the M diaries. I rue and it was like the rats have become saw so accustomed to the dead. They no longer fear the loving like they would just be there Eaton's audience all night and then they would come in and be like. Oh you move. You think I'm afraid to you. You know I'M GONNA we're talking about you know cumberbatch a second ago a lot of roles come and go and you. You don't want them to take the focus away but at the same meantime they need to be functional. They need to be their own people. Not just like a you know a cookie cutter of other military personnel. What was the challenge for that? 'cause you have some good actors early roll through the film and you know in Lesser Hands. It might have been roads but you you in Santa Fantastic job. I'll take credit for that. These were just you know I think I I may have had something to do with that. The you want people that have enough gravitas that you genuinely feel the sense that the our generals see want someone and the reason the reason the coal and Benedict and Richard Madden Andrew. Score are saw often over there in our stars because they're actually really bloody brilliant actors and they can bring so much through you want someone that's going to come in and give you a complete boxer because also on the page these are just white guys White Guy Kernels do you know what I mean. It's easy for them to sewn. This even be the same and we went to create pains to make sure that each of the generals had a different feeling a different flavor about them and and sometimes the different accents as well. You know a whole bunch of accents that war your mind and you're also showing the class struggle the soldiers in the truck and what they feel about their commanding officers but what was really interesting. Is You set up all these rules for the movie. And then you pull the carpet out from under US when Scofield shot. Yeah and when. Did you guys realize you were going to do that because I thought it was a fantastic moment you were always going to. We always had to plan that you give people the rules of the world you give them a sense of reality. T. and then you fuck with them. I am well no because it was really important by this stage in the film. I think if we hadn't have done that you would feel a sense of safety. You would think thank the Scofield's GonNa make it and it was really important that you don't know if he's going to make that's why you were going to set through to the end. I wanted you think he he really might not make it and you know when he gets show. It comes enough in the foam that you could plausibly. Believe that we did kill him. I am and then also when he wakes up the rules of the world of changed the the camera. The camera moves and everything is changes is very subtle but I mean when the camera leaves him to go through the window which is the first. We've really left him since speak staff breath and everything that happens off to that I think is pure cinema. I am it's it's sewn design. Is Editing Cinematography. It's is lighting design is acting all working to tell you a characters enter feelings without him vocalizing them and that to me is what cinema should be when you get absolutely great. He don't need the dialogue right. And you mirrored it on the page. It's not often that I ever read writers a description from a script but you said to me in the article and I thought it was really great. You said that when he wakes up you wrote in the script the land shifts and shadows fly under him as a way on the page to really signify that the world has changed. Obviously time has changed as well. Yeah but just as he's waking up and he's trying to become acquainted with this world not the eraserhead baby but the baby is thrown. And we're when did you get the idea that you were gonNA kind of. Take a moment for him to recuperate. Or the the big. The big in the big finale am well again. The heart rate monitor we needed. We needed something that allows you to stop for a minute and then I always wanted to put a woman in the film because I think yes. This war was fought by men yes. Millions of men entire generation of indict. But women were profoundly affected by it as well you know. Women were left in the ruins and the remains of this war and had to rebuild L. D. reality. There's a famous coop Britain who taste of youth. WHO said every boy I'd ever danced with with state in one thousand nine hundred and every boy she knew had dined her brother her friends everyone was lost her? And all of those ruins. You have kind of like these women just left just abundant. There's a whole kind of generation nation of women that don't get married have children that don't because there's not enough men there and to me. That was really fascinating because at that time that was almost a women's purpose you had no other life say that I am and so I always wanted to a female voice in there for you to just have a moment again is a window. You know it's a small kind of birds are warms. I view in the war. You can't have fifty women you can't have one hundred and you can't have a new all these men dying. You only have everything in a very small skill. And I wanted this woman to be lost in in there and to be left in the end for school to physically have to leave her in there knowing that she's in mortal payroll. I am was really important to me. I just feel like it was true to reality and add to get in there and then during my research I actually. I went to the Imperial War Museum in London and they did this. Incredible thing in the seventies had veterans of the First World War record their stories in their own voices and so I went and I listened to this man the soldier who would have been seventeen at the time of the war talk about a retreat in nineteen fourteen and he during this retreat store milk and he was a performer and he was rocked with the guilt of this like a a mop inside. He's like he couldn't believe that he'd stolen from this pure fringe family family. Who probably had nothing? He Republican Starve and the Germans were coming and he carried this milk with him for a day and a half and then he phoned himself jingle bombardment and a sailor. You're and there was a baby in there with no mother with no name. Just this one woman in this baby and the baby was GonNa Starve to death of it. Didn't get milk and he was like I have milk and for the guy and he's weeping as he talks but even those you know forty years later he's invested. He was for the first time in the war. I felt like I was there for the reason that I had a purpose that I wasn't just cannon fodder and to me. It was such a profound moment after I I was like well. That's good in the script and remember tune it to Sam and he was in the script. What's so interesting because because I was Gonna ask you about that? It's almost like the icing on the cake. In a way once you're screenplays screenplays done once you have the pages you could go back and drop in these little bits of setup and payoff because because not only was you know they find the milk earlier and then they they use later. They didn't steal it like this and it was fascinating that you know. It wasn't the woman's child and also she was just a woman she wasn't a nurse soldier. Somebody in the army. That was cool. But then when you're doing that throughout in which only because Scofield gave her all of his supplies probably not drown a scene later when he jumped into the river goes like he had laid it all out for one of the things..

Scofield benedict cumberbatch Imperial War Museum writer Cairns Christie Wilson Iran benedict. cumberbatch sabres cumberbatch Agnes US Lennon Dick Lesser Hands Eaton Sam the M diaries
"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"In this podcast and heck you could even read the entire screenplay for one thousand nine hundred Seventeen backstory magazine Zine plus a bunch of other awards season scripts as well. You could read back story on a desktop or laptop at backstory dot net or via IPAD APP or even Google play for Android android tablets. And if you'd like to subscribe remember you could use discount coupon code nineteen seventeen to save five dollars off a one year subscription. Look I really hope you give issue forty s spin because it is packed with so many great pieces. You'll find an indepth interview with Ryan Johnson. All about the twists and turns of knives out and even a retro Article Michael With Ryan Johnson about his debut feature brick director. Scott Z burns talks about his excellent political thriller. The report Charles. Randolph discusses cusses bombshell Anthony. McCartan on the two popes the SAFDIE brothers uncut gyms and so much more also interview Comic Book Writers and novelists and of course more. We're filmmakers soy hope. You'll check out the table of contents to see what's inside over at backstory dot net and consider purchasing a single issue or subscription. Look it really means a lot to me to have my podcast. Listener's support my passion project. So thanks for checking it out and while you're surfing around online I also hope you'll check out the sponsor of today's episode sewed cover fly dot com their site. The works to get writers the exposure they deserve with literary agents managers film exacts. And it's completely free so head on over over to cover fly dot com to start learning how you could get the exposure. Your script deserves today..

"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

10:41 min | 1 year ago

"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Rashly always so we the the we spoke a lot about the dais in this film. And how these should be random and on Herwig in accidental. Because because that's what the research that we found it in the stories that sums Granville are told them it was always very much like hey I would have died but it landed ended three inches that we in the my next turned into pink mist. It was never a can of like glorified sort of idea. It was it was never going to be pretty or or kind and a powerful we wanted it to be just like shocking and sad and make you angry. I am and so we knew it was the only other. The thing we ever spoke about was him randomly shot by a sniper. But it was. I think I think I tried that in a very early treatment almost draft and it was it just was too quick and it was interesting because you see the actual death in struggle. It's off screen because Scofield's going to get water at that point. Yeah when did you realize you guys were going to do that. was that some perceive. You think about reality when something happens you. You aren't usually watching. It usually happens just to say that when you go like Akashi go shit did you see that. No you didn't see it. You saw the aftermath with over and so that again that was to make more real and also if you had been watching you see him pull the knife. Oh no no no do something meet them. It would make you angry at the characters whereas is this is just chip bad luck and the chairman that they kill. He's not bad guy like he hears them. Seeing we should put more of his misery. He wants to live. There's no villains in this that the other the thing about this story was the real rule of everybody's the heat of of their ensuring everyone. The meat is going somewhere has been somewhere is trying to do the right thing. There was never a body into tame became the enemy tangling and speaking of time. One of the rarest things is that you guys had six months of rehearsal which is almost unheard of. And what you did was you did rehearsal with Sam with the actors and you told me that you guys even laid out. Cardboard boxes sometimes to represent the trench walls and out of that grew a sense of location. A sense of what they were going to go through. And then Roger Deakins would show up at the end of the day and you guys would would walk through with him. What were some of the things is that you learned about your script in rehearsal and what were some of the changes? If there were any fluids changes I mean we were constantly structurally. The script has never changed since the table that we sat down and did the point is the exact same structure and I don't know if that's ever ten and before. It was genuinely startling. When I realized that I am but we were constantly presently working on the dialogue on the exposition on the movements in the scenes on the patterns of the scene because sometimes by the nature of the way this would be short? There there would be two lines of dialogue or two reactions that you wanted but the camera couldn't do this because that's that's just just bad choicer so then then it involved rewriting the sheep of the seasons so that you could get both moments I am. There is lords of changes but they were all microsurgical changes and a lot of it was bringing the characters towards awards Georgia Dina's Jordan Dean. Were moving towards the characters to find the middle ground because when you race off you have an idea of the people in your head and then I think what you should do as a writer director. Whoever you ours ours is actually released? The idea and work with what's in front of you and mold something together like filmmaking. She'd be collaboration. Like that. That's the true pirate Ov- it was her moment almoner a piece of dialogue that the actors suggested that surprised you that that you're kind of like why didn't they see that or of course you're a great actor. Thanks for thanks for this great moment and you probably too many to mention. I'm too narcissistic to remember. I am smart. Obviously I know there's lots of moments. There was loads and moments. I I mean the the sort of actually a lot of the time the actors were so good I was trying to co my dialogue like an and that was all the way through that was from rehearsals all the way through the show I was constantly being like. I don't meet this. These Georgia student with his face. I am Ordine. Dina's done that so beautifully into the resolution moments where I was like lace lace lace lace. which is I guess pre? We're not narcissistic. We'll obviously it's people know. This was not shot in one day even though. Oh it's I know I know. Hey we're in this section. To my knowledge he was shot in sixty days and and we talked to the editor and backstory. All about it and he he talks us through it but the thing that I want to focus on for second because this blows my mind. It's also so rare and so unique your process. Yes Kristie and Sam wrote a script but you then confound yourself writing a second script a technical document the second script of nineteen seventeen is something that you and Sam and Roger Deakins Gins worked on so that they could have understanding for all. The very complicated camera moves setups and lighting green screening. That we're going to happen. Tell us about realizing that you needed this second document. So I believe that you should never put cameras rations a script because I think a script should be an emotional document it it should. It should tell you the Ark of the film Highland audiences made to feel shouldn't and as soon as a when I read the script and I read. We're close. We are close up I to close up. I'm like Oh. Yeah Oh yeah. I'm reading the script and it bugs. The show me am swab believe and I would fight every Kenneth Director Tooth and nail to keep any any sort of camera movement. Also I can tell you. The camera moves in the script. With words for instance if I want close up I can see a tear rolls down her cheek and you instantly feel very close and intimate with that character. And that's how I believe you should write. I don't need to I'm not cinematographer. I shouldn't be doing that. Because Roger Deakins GonNa come in and do it next I am and I think he might be better than me. I'm not sure I'm I am quite sure I am and so yes so there was there was never ever are going to be technical directions and the script. The script was was only GonNa read like the camera so there's one long spilling dialup. It was never technical. I am so we needed. When we had kind of formed the scenes and by the scenes I mean even the actual? The cardboard box is what we were trying to news. We're trying to work out. What's the sheep of room that were in the allows us to have the most interesting route through that allows you to see the most and that creates a different atmosphere from the last time? He's been so even though we were playing cardboard boxes we were actually being very adult screwing up about it. It was very technical. Dennis Gassner was involved. You know he's production designer. Who's just absolutely incredible? He's also quite good at his job. A bunch of them were really good. They're just goes. I am shocking. I'm so so we we. We had this the sort of need to have a technical document and saw Jeanine Tongren. WHO's one of the producers and Roger and Salmon and everyone sat down and started drawing plans of the locations and then we had like this planet locations and then there would be certainly dialogue and not technical document? Where we this this lane of dialogue would be said at this exact spot an and that's what we would see this this this and this is the camera movement and the scenes? We'd be like a red line for camera a Blue Line. I'm for George Green Line for Dean just slowly. And surely making I exact map of the pathogen retake because what we were trying to do especially no-man's-land for for instance you can smash everything into Newman's lend because there has to be a form in shape to it so when you actually look through it into very specific things who there's the the bet before the first wire with dead horses are is kind of like sort of a safe space that you could you could be in there and knock it sure. And then there's two rows wires wires. And then there's the Boeing Chop and then there's all that kind of stuff and then when you go into that creature. The be a software engineer like sue we needed to add form and structure to everything partly the ads being the descript because otherwise I just break more mud and some more mud no and someone might and he falls. What's interesting that you're talking about that because at the same point that you had to write that scene where they're walking across the huge crater the water in it? Yeah but it's a very tense moment. The camera glides literally over the top of the water and I would guess directions like that would be the technical script not in the script so I think I can't remember exactly what I should have read it before I came in i. Am I think in that I described what was on the water as we move across the CDC the pages of a laser and stuff like that so I was just reading their movement and anything that would give you emotional resonance but then the the actual. We're the creams. We're going to be in the wire and hired the exact path of the camera and Wayne it would be handed off from the two groups onto the wire and everything was all on the table document wherever he blamed as in the technical document. Every blend of each each edit swimming would you have. Would you know what you're in day point is like Daytona and this is where the scenes GonNa end and this is where we're GONNA pick it up on Dale often. Some some of them are just obvious. Some of them are. He's into adult he's cart. Let's wipe it. I am but then some of them are lazy. Sylvie sue when they're after they committed the quality and they're not the tree in their Tori but the the rat biting off the guy's ear. We knew there was gonna be a blender but we wanted to in the middle of the students to the office because if the story ended and they were like blend you know what I mean so there is some walked behind a tree their rates several trees which if there even Venus when well. Here's here's here's what strange. Here's what strange. I've seen visual scripts before and sometimes they're like another layer on top of your normal screenplay. You told me that this was actually only forty. Five pages didn't just take your one hundred ten. Whatever kneeling script and put stuff over new? How do you arrive at doing it? That way is just to forty five dollars clarity. Simplicity this was a document that everyone on say. Add to. Have you know from the cameras. Stola we opt to the producers. Everyone not to have some people say hadn't read the script because the script was secret and so had had to serve as a document technically allowed people to achieve. I mean almost impossible. Every is what we're trying to achieve on this and I like for instance in one of the shorts were school. Food is walking down to the frontline towards the end. We Google from steady cam onto crine so like the to grips left onto the crane. It goes down on the crane. Lifted off the crane down into the train onto another clean on the other side of the change. This kind of stuff you can work out on the d the grips Gary and everything. We're pricing it. Luckily for months while we were Harrison in the script they were Harrison moves. I am and so the technical document needed to be there for every single grip so that they would turn up in the. Oh yeah this is the we move it from four KRIENS. I saw an early screening of an Roger..

Roger Deakins Sam Georgia Jordan Dean Harrison Kenneth Director Tooth and Herwig Granville Scofield Akashi Google Dennis Gassner CDC chairman Dina Roger Deakins Gins Jeanine Tongren Daytona editor Gary
"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

11:21 min | 1 year ago

"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Film's look if you don't actually Q-bert the characters what makes you down any of the technical feats right and so I'm going to talk about your habit for a second and then we're GonNa get into the spoilers you can talk about whatever you want When you sit down to write do you give yourself a certain amount of hours to write with or a page count to hit each day? No I am sometimes. I like to give myself ten pages a day. I write very quickly irate very loosely. So I I like. I'll do a big long draft in La Myself. And I find that's the funnest way to do it because then you're not like oh if I go over there the right time and you can come back in. There's nothing more satisfying nearly. I don't need any of this and just cutting it or super full so there so yeah I'll l. do about ten peaches deep. But I'm not religious. I wouldn't beat myself up if I didn't have lose ten pages if I have one good page at the end of the day. I'm like all right job done. I am I genuinely genuinely enjoy writing. It was Never Chore For me. Don't get me wrong somedays. ooh Some these. There's tours told me about that. What do you do if you get writer's block? How do you battle it if you get it? Never actually got writer's writer's block. I feel like that's something that it's like a nervous disposition thing. I always feel like people. Are you weady. But the blind pge. I'm like Nuwara but impeach seventy six. That's when you'll find all your problems the blank page. You haven't talked anything up yet though the blind pages just free and easy I am so I never. I was never worried the blank page I am the I get into for this. For instance the trucks in was one of the hardest things to write this. I promise okay but that but but that seemed to me. Three weeks took salmon. I three weeks of just relentlessly an hotel rooms showing each like what about this. I am because it was just it was it's just a very tricky. Seen emotionally to kind of perfect I am and yet and sometimes it takes weeks sometimes a whole skeptics weeks. It just depends endzone. How good you are that? You like three weeks a lot. Three weeks worked for you. How many pages was that three week? Draft just a guess who it was probably around nineteen ninety-five approaches Obviously you're working with San Mendez. We're still non spoiler area. You really got to observe his creative habit first a hand up close personal because you were there for the entire shoot as well. What was what was something interesting about as creative habit that kind of inspired the film student in you and was maybe something not you want to transfer to your own work as you continue on? I think the thing was Sam. So there's there's a there's a bunch of reasons that SAM is grease one is that he's genius which is annoying. I am an incredibly frustrating. I am but lovely. I think the things for me that really matter you know. Even though he is a genius he doesn't doesn't think always default his ideas the best idea in the room so he lessons he listens to everyone and to me. That's a really really important. Crucial the element. Because why not listen to everyone's idea in case they're better than yours I am. I've always gonNA come from that point of view. And also some listen to people who ooh aren't necessarily echoes of himself so like I knew. I'm not your traditional pack for a war movie being different gender. Being a different different age you know different. She'll she'll economic all all these reasons contribute to a very interesting collaboration. That means is not just to. You won't see old to middle aged white guys going like he wouldn't this be cool because you end up. Ken Burns officers. I think diversity be sexually really you know racially gender however you want to do it. I'm like is very very important in any Kenneth Collaboration. You don't want to get yourself open to just feeding frenzy sneak the ISA's when tale I am so that was that is a big thing from some and the other thing is that he is a relentless perfectionist and that it can be very tiring. But it's the only way to do something like this and so during with six months or hair so period for this enduring it I would watch him stage a scene and it was incredible watching him seems because because of his theater background you know sometimes I would see to like. How do you know how to do that? and He's like well for twenty two years. I've been moving actors in space. I understand how this works and like you know over the years. He's he's developed he's developed it because he's like. Is that a Beta version and I would see him. In Harris set down and goal will is the Beta version of this and then watch them working working working and find it. It's important for an artist to kick the tires tires on the car because too many people become complacent too fast. And sometimes you don't find those other ideas that you would find if you keep looking for something that's better The last non spoiler for the question. You did something really interesting here in which this is a film that knows when to embrace silence so you are it's reinforcing your visual storytelling. But it's also not the easiest of writing. I mean you guys technically wrote this on Spec people aren't going to just you know can whatever Sam. Mondays is thinking about as is next project. So you knew this was probably gonNA find it home. But it's it's non traditional in the sense because a lot of movies do not engage in periods of silence for for this long in some of the challenges of that on the page. Well I mean that is a challenge. You spend a huge point of your reality and silence like when you knew someone a long time. You don't necessarily we cup in the morning with them and go. Oh Wow I'm thinking about my mother whose name is do you know that that's not reality. And so again with reality being your northstar a low of that stuff go and actually I think silence is one of the most perfect twos because allows you to rate visually. If this Cup tied to being chalked full dialogue he would have just been laying bored right by it. You mean Chatty Chatty chatty do you know what I mean and it just wouldn't feel real. You wouldn't have cared. You have been immersed in it and so having to kind of work that we having to tell stories stories silently just makes you more creative again the truck sequenced which will get to. I promise where we put on top of that though you know. Here's the rub for writing with silence. You still have exposition. The audience gets understand where they're going what they're doing. So you're getting exposition dialogue. Was Sir anything that was really challenging about your exposition. Because you don't want it to just be a series of military orders and Y- you guys see superseded that yeah well we had to be crafty. Abo- The position. I am so even though in the first fifteen minutes of this film you don't. You're never they never see anything about themselves. They aren't specifically told things but the rails be you actually find her a huge about them like in that I sort of even walk to air. Moore's Doug you huge amount of them and some of that we do because they're two very different characters in the contrast his medal there's talking about Scofield's model doesn't have an exactly but even even even not getting the mail is an important part and ao very subtly builds up to create an image of who these two men are and so we did that very technically. That was the title walk where we had the very first the script we we. We had the rule new x possession. And then I looked up salmon. I was like some some exposition. Please I am and then what what it was because we'd started from a completely completely blank slate of non it was it was like surgical where we added and and we moved by inches. Like with a scalpel we touch more. Here touch lace. They're a little bit more year here and we did that all the way through rehearsals. We did that even during shooting and there were some of it in A. Dr Is will just like Hey. We didn't get that quite right. We need just a more here right and when you're over someone's shoulder it's easy to slide into. Adr's that was your saving grace Okay we're getting into this weather section podcast. Have you have not yet seen nine hundred seventeen press pause go see it immediately comeback because based on what you WanNa talk about. I'm going to actually save the idea of Blake's death for another moment or two but we're in the sports section. It's okay okay but you want to talk about the truck. Seen We all know Blake dies and I wanNA come back to that in a second but that was something that we focused on in the magazine as well because it was an important way fetus. Show what Scofield I feel was going through without him talking about it. Yeah well that's because you he gets into the truck he's famous for his arms needlessly headless -ly pointlessly shockingly. I am hopefully I. Am You read that I am so so. There's this whole sequence where he's right with grief and guilt the impotence and this new idea of how he's going to go on and he suddenly plunged in with all these men and in a in a ship version of it he would say you guys I've been through my best friend just died in my arms. I'm sad but that's not real life and so we spent ages working hide. We tease this information. Because it was important the older men in the truck knew that because by the time he leaves that truck you want them to understand where he's going to understand what he's been through you don't want him to ever have to see it and so it took his ages and we were. We tried to fifty different versions of that scene until we were like the trump gets stuck in the mud has to push an and so what we were trying entity with this and what I think is another lesson for every script is your China's Herman Cain of Lake behavior into cycle lake psychology into behavior and nor psychology ecology and to dialoque which is very important not not to traumatize you. What were some of the other fifty bad versions of things that you had him do? 'em We had all all of them just gain nine degrees. We haven't won a smashing a bottle of whiskey. I think he's marble whisky and one. The guy gives exactly there is Lloyd's the results of just ones. That just didn't wire Louis great because you came up with that final idea in which he has an emotional release by screaming and like people see his fervor and his commitment and they realize okay. Let's give it another go. Oh yeah and they work as a team and they lived together Going back for a second. When did you realize that Blake was going to die? I mean we were always going to kill one of them. We're always always GONNA kill one of them. I love a body. Can I kill both of them but someone let me away with with. Did you ever consider going you know. Could you imagine what diner that would be. Doesn't make kit trainers. I would figure somebody else takes homeless Newman's beautiful score just wasteland Richard Bad and also also did just everyone just a marginal in the new new we. We didn't. We didn't consider killing both of them. Because I mean it was sad enough I thought yes. Am I always knew one of those going to die I we I mean we both wanted. I think I advocated it for it to be the brother. Who's WHO's going savings? I think you wouldn't expect it so I wanted the younger one because I love. I love a sad death I am. I wanted maximum impact and damage and he was the guy I look at Dean. Charles Charles. Chapman's BBC's No let me martyrdom. He's never forgiven me for that but I am so there is that like whole. That plan was always in motion and I knew I was going to kill him in the first third because everyone thinks is the midpoint of the Phil everyone thinks sorry at the midpoint. Assume everything's is the first start but it's actually exactly in the the metal the film. Here's what's interesting though. Now that you know that you're GONNA kill 'em there's so many different ways to do it and tell us what some of the variants were that you came up with the plane. Crash Rashly always so we the the we spoke a lot about the dais in this film. And how these should be random and on Herwig in accidental..

Blake writer Scofield SAM La Ken Burns San Mendez Kenneth Collaboration China Charles Charles BBC Herwig Harris northstar Phil Chapman Herman Cain Lloyd Louis Newman
"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

10:16 min | 1 year ago

"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"With. Sam Give it up for Christie for that Oscar. Nominations are next week so fingers crossed bats Writing for real time. What kind of what kind of rules apply for that? What kind of rules did you set yourself with these two elements of real time and a a one continuous shot? The two things do very different things to the script and actually for doing boom. You have to take everything you Norbert. Traditional additives gives both traditional screenwriting. Can Two men and threw it in the Ben. I am because otherwise you get hung up on like. Has An exciting incident happened which I think is kind of Osha Anyway. But these rules applying producers. Speak to you with these roussy. You need can understand that language but but with this so for for Ranga Film in rural team the very first you have to do the right here. Is You have to go well. Every single person in the audience experiences life in real time. They have a sense of reality. Unlike anything else when you're watching a film home traditionally with editing which is a lot of so you have to think high far. Can I push it before the audience go. And that is the huge lake title Act of film right the concept of suspension of disbelief which you have on any movie of. How far can you push the audience? So did you. Did you feel like the gas attack. was maybe a suspension title disbelief. What was just it was just how much how much are we gonna put them through before you start to go is just too fatiguing? And when I was writing at had this like M. I'm Lou Heart Monitor Kennedy thing in my head of like okay. I've had the audience probably about ninety beats per minute for a while. Now I want to take up one ten and I don't WanNa drove it back to seventy. Because because they're there's the pacing for this film was set in the script it wasn't set in the because there is no traditional aid. Then consensual these other elements that usually are the director and editors do mean just I study of like is that too much action is that too much piped and so you have to monitor this that that was the way that I have represented it in my head I was I was like Oh. My Heart's arts can recent at this but I feel like I've been running for a while I want. I want to sit down and see and I went something to the gas at low bit. At what point did you realize April six thousand nine hundred seventeen. which was the date that the English woke up to the HINDENBURG? Line also known as the HINDENBURG retreats. which was you know freaked? A lot of people out because they suddenly didn't know where the Germans were and and it was tied into the concept of delivering a message to Save Sixteen hundred people from walking into a German trap. That was at the very beginning salmon. Actually phone that we'll because because the first world war there's actually very few points in the freshmen. Where where you can tell a journey movie because it's a war where millions of people died over inches? Everything's very say everything's very in. And so some phoned this Hindenburg retreat. And this this amazing where one general woke up and was like the chairman of going. We must have one which seems like such fully. No but you could imagine having four over that land for four years three and a half years to suddenly find a empty you would think. Oh they've given up. I am not that gave us the stage detail. That true event gave us the seizure till this fabric -ation. How much research did you wind up doing for for research period? That was formal per se. Am I love to do research because research isn't writing and it's so much easier than writing. It's a good procrastination measure so it's a great presentation measure also often. You can convince people to pay for your holidays like no. It's very important Aiko there. You told me that you went to France when you you and Sam Lock your actually paid me for the IT. My own home at that time and I can tell you is absolutely harrowing. It wasn't a holiday. I am told me you brought your mom with. I'd I brought. My Mom. Took my mom because she she was like you're gonNA drive old outweigh in your own. And I was like yeah and she. We'll look I'm going to go to Paris for a holiday like why don't we drive together. And then you can come to piracy and right and I was like I'm not sounds ideal. I am then like to like D.. One of of battlefield turn my mom's just sobbing inconsolably because you're the of a fifteen year old boy like he saw unbelievably shocking. And you think okay you. Do you get through agree. Even your that might gods what waste of life and then you walk out and there's fifteen more in this one mile stretch like the cost of life over that tiny area that ribbon that ran from like you know the age of France and Germany all the way up because I I do talk ribbon. Some places it was fifty yards. They were fighting over is suitcase and death. I mean people died over inches. I'd physical inches. And if you go to Birmingham where the Canadians for a hundred years later we still have all the trenches lead over grew into their short and everything that you can walk through them with a gate and you'll point and like from here to see the the door there who'd be like see that fossilized tree and you're like yeah. He's like hundred years ago. Ten thousand men died in like four hours trying to get to that tree. And you're like what and you go and you see the Lok kindergar- creator which is it. Looks like an asteroid But it's a main creatures a bomb and they were like. Oh Yeah we think about seventy thousand people died here in a second you so you cannot fathom the cost of this war by reading it you you just you can understand like high level lund was fought over and to me that was intake to understanding for the characters especially for school food but to understand for the journey. So that very quickly your entrenches. And then you're no-man's-land your changes and then you're just adrift and this crazy landscape where people have been dreaming of getting with a think. Oh the solution to all our problems. Lie Four hundred yards that way and it's not the case it's just more death more death more Dave they were trying to push this issue out before. WJ ballots were do over break. And I know that you ended up in the city of acoust- and I was literally having having the email. The publicist over break. Because I could not figure out how to spell it. It's with an e folks. It's not an A.. Because I was looking at accent doesn't help no I was looking over all all those maps to find a coup within a send me as well I know yes we shortened clerg-clergy save me We'll so how did you come to that as the city. That was the burning city that he was going to. Because it seems like once you knew where that was you also have the concept of the river. You had the concept of the trees that they were trying to get to actually soon. None of that is there. The there isn't a river of that size acoustics. I'm an Acoust- was we picked that because that was one of the tones that the Hindenburg lane enter saved. So the Hindenburg line was literally above that tone and so we knew that that would be a battlefield but but what we were trying to do was we. Were trying to find sort of points to anchor ourselves and but not necessarily be trapped in and so we knew we knew. We wanted to a long sequence through a river. I am like that. That was vividly in Psalms. Ninety eight. Something really passionate about and there are new bake reaching rapid rivers and not part of France. Would you consider it like a Jew Geographical Geographical Prestige basically of France. Well Yeah because what we were trying to do with us film was we were trying to tail through very tiny Wendell a view in the whole war. And so you know by taking two men and by taking one D yes. You're telling that specific city bureau also trying to give away to warn what these mental went through and so we've cobbled together many different elements from different areas in France and from different true stories as well that we found during our research from Sam's but also from stories iphones and so we were trying trying to build something that fail lake. It could stand in for every month journey in the war. You had your outline. Enhance your your their boots boots on ground. You're with your mom and you told me that you started writing your script and finished it on that trip I did you had. How long was that period in my mind we had we had A? We had a very robust lane before I go to France. How many pages was that when you say sorta interesting? He's only about five pages but it was it was you'll blessed in the sense. I knew exactly what the study wasn't I knew you. The character Arcs and you the movement so it was like I knew I knew where I was I was doing and also because there's new subplots in this that there's new structurally you're very store. Yeah exactly there's there's not moving parts. The the challenge for this film was never he. If I go structure right the challenge was always like we given just the remnant of information I am so it was is very different from a traditional script and when I had that that five pages I went and I probably go to written. I had a very rough for staff. They can three weeks three. You told me three three weeks yet. But Blake Roller in that. First draft and remember finishing it and be unless isn't working and I- food and Sam and I was like. Hey I think he needs a brother. I think his brother needs to be in jeopardy jeopardy. Because you can't call a week to sixteen hundred men so they become faceless empty soldiers and whereas when you make one of them leaks brother they become a proxy for bleak and you love bleak. Hopefully I love bleak and then you want him to live. Do you know what you want. You want him to get to his brother and cater but that was the sort of the necessity of that and rather than having any of your film. School friends read it after that three weeks. You gave it to your mom. She was there she was there in the hotel room. I was like I was like shop. I'm busy busy I am a yeah I know I asked. I am confession to him. I'm a terrible speller. I'm really bad at it. I am and I love writing. But that's tricky and so I usually have someone spilled shake my work and I. It's usually the person exclusives proximity wise. I'm like hey you he you there boy what is it. We'll check this filling and so I turned her and I was like He. Could you read this before right. Send it to Sam Mendes. That's pressure I read this and Ci Raid uh-huh and she got to the you've all seen it and we're still young but she got to the moment the big moment and she turned to me and and she was crying she went. You've ruined my holiday as like high five. Because I mean that's that's the tricky wire that you're you're navigating here for so you're balancing act in which you have a very structured mission movie so you have an go to a point. Be Linear but you also need the emotional resonance throughout route. or it's just it's just D- I I am of the belief and I can assure you that salmon rozier deacons never Nelson voted in this..

France Sam HINDENBURG Hindenburg retreat Sam Mendes Norbert Osha Paris Jew Geographical Geographical Birmingham Sam Lock Christie director chairman Lok kindergar Lou Heart acoust Oscar
"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"I WanNa read it with you and I was like okay great because I love Claverie. I love we hadn't cool written in the other two projects texbook. He'd been very involved from a story point of view and it just worked. And with the right collaborator. It's half the work with the wrong collaborator. It's five times the work but Sam I knew the right Collab- aretha right off the bat. I was like okay. Don Alright wherever you want all right menus for you. Essentially I think said that and then he said is going to be set in the first World War and he had no idea that I was fa- I grew up fascinated by the first of all I was like obsessed with a gain weird kid and so like I had all this wealth of knowledge and I was already on the phone I was like I know things things about that. I am prepared. I am and then he was like okay. I have this one image. It's my grandfather. Seventeen years old carrying carrying a later through no-man's-land lost in the folk and two right off the bat. I was like I was like okay. This is the war movie that people are going to expect. I am and I sort of knew that. From working with salmon from doing his taste it was never going to be Guns and glory. Kinda thing I'm big. It gave me like a real sort of sense of this would be very very kind of driven and like I was on board at Beasley. My dream job landed on my lap. One rainy Tuesday morning. Yes is dancing in my pajamas on the phone. Trying to get a break because again I'm writer and then he finished the call by going. Oh by the way it's going to be one show. And then he hung up on me and he's allowed to deduct because easy Sam Mendes. But it's still a dick move. Okay well I mean his grandfather lance corporal. Alfred h Menendez he was a messenger in world. War One one and this wasn't this movie is not his experiences inspired by it but soon from there to my knowledge guys went into breaking basically your outline. I think mayhem like two days later. I had many questions as what do you mean. Oh One sean how are you going to do this. And like many other angry questions like like that and then when I kind of haired his reasoning behind it like the it would it would create an intimacy on anything else. I was like okay. I'm so I am and then we. We sat down and we. I came with a bunch of books that were my grandfather's remind growing up like just a bunch of World War One can I onto cones and he had alluded and we sort of treated them off and I was like look at this possibility that passion we formed the characters very loosely like that we can use it. There is going to be sort of an older and a younger one that they would be different am main altogether we wanted to portray can of lake. Even though they're both sutures are both humans and and so we wanted differences in them and we talked a little bit about that and then we got mop certainly worked. We're the HINDENBURG. Lane was where that would be more than de France. What towns it was near the actual right? Were you just looking on Google maps to figure out where they go really. I mean I lied to wins. The imperial Roman did proper research for the time being it was Google maps. I am and we have a finite period. Because it's in real time to see how well Fargo's somebody walks swim over the heck with inactivity and landscape. That would move through because the last thing we wanted you when it's one show when it's in real time you're very aware when you're stuck in the same location the seeps into you get bored of it very quickly and we knew that there was never going to be huge money to dial it wasn't it was never to feel theatrical had to feel real and so we had to balance a little of that and plausibly how many landscapes could you go through many different palettes. Could you arrive at and so we did that by literally. Looking at a map I later went frans. I walked the exact route. The boys with teak in the film if the foam have been real but but that was all integral to the proofs. I see actual geographical journey because then not logistical lookie here. This might happen to them here. This might we had like a laundry list of things that we both wanted to see in a first World War movie did you. Just kind of bullet pointed. Yeah we definitely like I the list. Just this is my dream. Can of like things will get in here. These are these are my dream characters. This is the sort of these are some sequences. I'm interested in and then we started Arctic. Piecing it together in a way that would feel real when when we go down to that siege of had to be axed for instance we would have loved a gas attack because so world war four one or a machine gun attack because they're so integral to what you think of the First World War but when actually came to scripting it it didn't feel real that one or two men could go through that many anything's that it just felt you would feel the authors handed and actually weirdly. The script was trying to do and in fact what every department trying to disappear in this film like we're trying to strip we. We all artists with you. Just watch the movie and expedients one hundred ten minutes to make an immersive experience. Exactly exactly. That's interesting because at the end of the day a by stripping away those elements. You are painting in very broad strokes which I think is one of the powerful things of the film and I'm not alone in that thought by the way congrats Gradison your wgn nomination share.

Sam Mendes Sam I wgn Alfred h Menendez Arctic Beasley Don writer Lane de France Fargo
"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"So sign up. And I'll see you at at the movies but now without any further ado. Let's jump right onto the stage at our sold out screening at the Los Angeles Film School Right After introduced screenwriter Christie Wilson Cairns to chat about her debut feature film nineteen. Seventeen it all right well so it's always good to start with breaking end stories and I I always. I always liked to do that. Add and I just wanted to know if this is true you you were possibly involved at one point with TV show Taggart yes correct. Yeah Yeah Ah I see involved. I was fourteen years old and I kept turning up on their say so I also that I was a nuisance to tagger. I believe is the technical legal term stalker soccer. Yes I stopped I stopped the TV show tanker the production of the TV show tiger. No I grew up in Glasgow and I loved film. I love TV. I was sort of obsessed obsessed with it but I had no idea got maids and then one day I walked by a film set and they were like and it looked like a you know what. She's like a bunch of trailers. It doesn't look like cool and glamorous whereas like what's that the only oh we're filming taggart and I was like can I watch and they just let me. I am much to their sort of liter. Regret because I turned up everyday day that summer. Hold the and then the next hold in the next one and the next one and then eventually they started peeing me because I think legally they had to were you were you. Did you have the film bug before you walked on their set by coincidence or I was I was always obsessed with movies but like out safes in like a weird kind of like I would watch the Matrix in pretend to be new not cool like oh I think I'll work in film and localism where you're saying that's not cool because I've done that so many times I've been told it's is not Kuhlman. Don't listen well so you also went to the Royal Conservatory of Scotland. As we sit here though Los Angeles film school what was something that was really piece of wisdom that was imparted to you. That stayed with you ever since what was what was kind of something to sum up your film school experience. I mean I went to film school. 'cause as I was like I want to learn highway to make films and actually the most important thing I learned at film school was why to me. I am and what films to meek and so a lot of my sort of aviation foam school was being forced to watch films that were out my comfort zone like films that I wouldn't have picked up in global video. I am because I'm not old example. Well I mean I would never have watched reeser hit all time favorites like it would never have been something that would appeal. healty young me I would have been crying. Baby no I am. If you took eraserhead for the baby in this film we really could have had a hell of a scene all right sorry going. You don't like my baby. We'll talk about all I know is not raiser head but I worked hard on that seat. It was good it was thank you thank you I am but yeah it was. It pushed me out of my comfort zone as a viewer. And then that informed me of my my film literature essentially involves your brain in different lean and by watching you know foreign films other films films outside Your Comfort Zone. Old Films. New Films Weird films bad films I think is very useful and that was a huge part of my education and not just. Hey this is a white bounce. I never get a camera but I knew white balances white balance is very important She'll so that's good so it exposed you to two levels of cinema and storytelling that you weren't previously familiar with which is which is something that is great that film schools can do. Yeah I think also the other thing which I loved it with home school and it. It wasn't just the Rose Coach Academy it was also the Nafta's where I did my masters afterwards was you were a bunch of people who loved film together for the first time. I wasn't the weird foam there. There was we were all weird Phil nerds and it's really lovely to be in that and and I have you know friendships and collaborators from film school. I still work with today. I am and like sometimes. You're the first people to Alpha just finished. The script is three. And my deadlines to DIS. Will you read it. Because I can trust their opinion. When did you start in the screenwriting path? Half that at what point did you realize that. Yes you know how to white balance. But you're not going to be a camera person but screenwriting appeal. You wasn't never gonNA be. Roger Deacons the greatest best. I mean he's quite good as an easy you know. It's pretty amazing. He's future that land us. Yeah I think so. I had an amazing screenwriting shooter and I never I never really when I was on tiger and they not ozone a few TV. She was a young child. Who was insurance risk? When I when when I would do that you know the script disappeared you I would? I never saw rates or so. I was with every department except the rating department because the were some mystical creatures that were fire off and so it never really a cartoon that that was a real job that someone sat down and was like this is what we're going to shoot. I am and then so I had an incredible shooter call Richard Smith who works here on 'em he was like. Oh I'm going to ask you to write a short story this weekend. It can be anything weird or the better can be could be something wherever ever Combined Monday with something just anthon two pages and I was like and I kinda thought it was like I was GonNa take the pestle out but with it because I was like. I'm just GONNA do some weird. And I wrote the studio to Guinea pigs plotting and assassination of their owner. 'cause I was pretty sure guinea pigs at the time. Were trying to kill me. I am and and so I wrote and I and I and I remember sitting into rating like Oh. I can't believe I have to do an. ACM film skill. I should be making stuff and then like two hours just just disappeared and I had had something and I was like holy crap. That was so much fun and I handed it into him and he was like. Oh you're good at this. Give me five more every week. He was like I won tain ideas. I want a short short film. I want this. I want that and he was very relentless in just making you rate and actually that's the only way to become a writer sister right lords and it can be crap at the beginning all whizzes and to keep going through it over and over exactly very shortly after you graduated film score just kind of giving people a baseline who your before we get to the film You wrote the script author and in two thousand. Fourteen wound up on the blacklist which opened a lot of doors for you. Give us the pitch on a because to my knowledge it is still not been made. Hopefully he'll not been one day. Give us give us the pitch. So I'm a big signs near an iphone does sewn dicky's like radiation. Some people might know this. But it has a half-life it disappears appears in the room and so I had this idea imagine a machine that could turn up every so that was ever in a room and so the story of ether as we use these machines to solve martyrs and you have to lesson two someone's murder over and over again to solve it becomes a very intimate relationship rather than he you turn off. CSI Miami and there's a whole date girl on the floor. You ought to listen to the whole gig girl girl dying I am and so it was just like a different we have getting into police procedural and it was quite weird quirky and has a lot of flaws as a script because it was the first thing I ever wrote and I was new. I am Evola for that script because it got me my job and penny dreadful and it got me like meetings Salmon Dr Noski. I know these like unbelievably fonsi directors. You John Logan of petty dreadful noticed either and you got a meeting with him. And you wound up in the writer's room on season three. Tell us just what was is your biggest lesson of being thrown into the fire on your first actual paid gig which is a dream for riders but could also be a health gape onto itself. You know I was really lucky. Lucky it was a very small writer's room it was it. Was Jon Morgan. It was Andrew Drakkar. WHO's an incredible theater writer? They know enemies and TV writer and meet with just the three of us and I think that sort of the ideal scenario regime. Because we weren't I didn't have to stop anyone to get an episode like we were all going to get an episode in the end actually Andrea. I route two. I am each because we just kind of go the gist of it but John was an incredible mentor. Like a really really giving very open and so he made it okay to feel and I think when you're trying to sort of do something different when you're trying to bring them we'll do something out your comfort knowing that it's okay to feel as is so important because how can you take risks. How can you how can you go for patches or mad and weird and different if your story that you're GonNa get Rian Lindell if you feel and so that to me? That was the most important lesson. Jason is actually give yourself a break. Give yourself permission to not right. The greatest for straffed ever knew into Martin. Because you're not gonNA and then you also wrote for the penny dreadful comics. Thanks for a while comic fan before that or was that yeah wear their sorry. I I could see anything you want to. It's just I tunes spotify the big fucking nerds course. I like what was it like writing for different medium like that was a while to get it because I I mean I had read Tacoma who am I always read can of late last night or Moser stuff like that and I. I wasn't really into kind of like Batman or or or Superman. I always served Kim slightly from the state and so do with penny dreadful trying to tail. We the first comics. Where actually the backstory that? You'd never seen before season one and two weeks we'd known a bunch of soy from join but it was that you're trying to make up stuff so you're like fighting pieces into a jigsaw puzzle. I am but it's in a way I think screenwriting should be very visual. I think your job as a writer of film or TV is an inherently visual medium. And if you can't read visually you need to reconsider your job or really work at it. I am and so to me rank only title. Ix was kind of very can to that it was off to the side slightly because you have to tell it in a different way but it's the same sort of muscles. There's there's are beautiful hand painted cover by the way of backstory magazine. Right there yes yes it's digital so you can have as many replicas you want to the boys and then I'm I'm very generous. All these issues I've procured justly printed out and hanging on your wall but so obviously you're in there. We also interviewed the two stars of the film and Lee Smith Your editor and we'll we'll talk about his job later. The hardest for this one shot movie that supposedly doesn't have at its but we fill them you guys know but Su- salmon is was a producer on penny dreadful and you and him as you told me for. The cover story tried to work together on two different projects that fell apart for two different reasons and finally the third time was a charm in which he called you up one day and realized rather than going after someone else's intellectual intellectual property he had an idea of his own to get from there. I guess I'm in my pajamas writing because writing is inherently glamorous. That's the uniform. And the the official uniform dissipate in the picture for you and I'm probably am eating junk starburst or something incredibly healthy one of my five day for sure and then in my phone rings and Sam Mendes named scrolls across it so I answered in frustration. Because it's Mendes answer him on the first ring and I was like a high and he was like okay. I have this idea..

writer Los Angeles Film School Taggart Glasgow Sam Mendes Los Angeles Christie Wilson Cairns Royal Conservatory of Scotland Roger Deacons Richard Smith backstory magazine John Logan ACM Rian Lindell Kuhlman reeser Rose Coach Academy Phil
"cairns" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

Beyond Your Wildest Genes

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"cairns" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

"Bartow two three four five six seven. Eight B White WG tribe. Here's a quick peek. At our supplement product product and book of the month for January. Yes I said. January twenty twenty at the end of the podcast spend a few minutes going into further detail. So we encourage you to listen to the end. The the supplement of the month for January twenty twenty is bone health plus simply said we have not found a more complete bone health formula on the market period to ten percent. Discount Code for the month is lower case feo any H E L T H. That's bone help. The product of the month for January is one calories take sugar forty nutrients Keel Vegan Paleo non GMO energy bids twenty percent off four ever using the code Byu wgn the and that's upper or lower case. The book of the month for January is stopped doing that S. H. T. and self sabotage and demand your life back by Gary. John Bishop heaping all the links discounts and special offers for the product supplement. Book will be listening to this show tonight tunes post on Social Media and on our website and weekly newsletter at www up beyond your wildest jeans dot com at the listen now everybody welcome back to beyond your wildest jeans podcast. I'm your co host today..

Food Neighbourhoods: Edinburgh, Leith

Monocle 24: The Menu

07:50 min | 1 year ago

Food Neighbourhoods: Edinburgh, Leith

"A few miles. North of Edinburgh's Old Town on the coast of the birth of fourth. You'll you'll find historic port of leaf. Area was made up of several medieval settlements which by eighteen thirty three had grown into a burr and in nineteen twenty that Burr was merged into editor. Lee has quite the history. It was Scotland's main ports of trade and was the final stopping point of the Royal Yacht Britannia. And if that doesn't ring a bell maybe this will choose good health look cholesterol and dental insurance. Choose fixed interest mortgage repayments choose. I just thought it was the site of the old leaf station. Gave Birth to the title of Irvine. Welsh's novel trainspotting. Lead has more recently become one of Scotland's hottest food destinations traditional pubs fantastic food markets. Lead has something and for everyone and feeling a little more fancy. It's worth mentioning that. It's also home to a handful of Mitchum starred restaurants Scottish menswear menswear designer was born and bred in Edinburgh and today overlooking the water of Leith. You'll find his flagship store at custom lane is also casting and his wife. Gemma brand directive cast in hair call home leaf for us as a really lead by area. And it's a really good sense of a creative community that doesn't really exist elsewhere. In Edinburgh on I think that there is a level All of collaborative economy in customs. Wharf where you've got lots of different studios from lots of different disciplines which we can tap into which is really important for us. We've got photographers before graphic designers. There's jewelry makers architects so it makes for a really interesting dates day experience and you get pulled into lots of different projects acts that can enrich the whole the whole vibe so from a food. Point of view was really pioneering particularly within the high level Mitchell and star level with them. Food Leaf has always had sort of. It'd be more Mitchell and stars in any square mile in the country than it has been previously ICU with Castanon Jr and and to get the inside Info on leads top food and drink hot spots. And we're better place to start with breakfast. I think for for me it it's an everyday Place to go but definitely Bros bagels. I think on lethal walk. They they've been around nine maybe about a year. They've saw set themselves up at the sleepwalk which is really been a pretty bold move because it's been quite a kind of color full area going in there one of the first progressive food retailers really going. Mr They've always got a selection of probably maybe about ten different types of beagles. The E can pick from with all their different fillings. And it just delivers every time. Yeah you know. If you've AH ten minutes to get Beagle have not about better. Yeah Okay and then I wanNA smoke lunch. Where you'RE GONNA IF WE'RE GONNA quickly to nip how we probably we probably and Commons? They have an amazing onsite bakery. So it's always smells great and the sourdough bread is perfect and you can pick up. Take your breakfast I the next day. They do really good who pastries and sandwiches and soups. But if we're taking clients I there's some place called the shore which is an old school leaf beef establishment. It's slightly art deco inside. It's a really beautiful bar and kind of smooth mirrors and then you can have a really nice. Does beautiful fish sughrue fish restaurants along along. The waterfront starts with fishers. And then there's the shore and ship and kings wore when they're they're all really really great fish restaurants fishing japes leaf has got one of the best fish and chip restaurants in probably Scotland. It's called the new haven fish market on generally at key there for an hour in the summer chips and then coming into dinnertime. Where would you go for more laid back than a little favor of ours? The shafts are young. There's a love entrepreneurial. Young shafts are delivering amazing modern Scottish cuisine and I think they do a lot foraging. They've got low bar and quite often. When you're walkin there you can see what Lebron foraging origin? Four place on the bar. It's a really nice intimate experience. Bara is another one. That's literally just over. The water are really dynamic. Husband and wife you who they just you know when you can tell them their heart and soul into it and it's nice to go somewhere has set many but that it doesn't feel stuffy. There's new white tablecloths but there's really nice are on the walls there's good music play is a good atmosphere and the feed is really exciting. And it's actually very good value for money shifts would come from the Martin wishaw Autom- kitchen the training of these places. All they've been you know the Venus Scandinavia and working with or come back to you know. Add Marin started up their own restaurants in in small affordable places in Iran leaf. And I suppose that's the great thing about leaf it's been you know affordable for people to come in and and whether it's startups in in restaurants or in menswear or whatever is given a home in an incubator to showcase the best of en route can do do and then once you've lied to stomachs going get some drinks. Let's start off maybe with just sort of an old fashioned goodall pint buys your a favorite baiser Lee is really good for old fashioned boozers. And it's almost like the fish restaurants that this run along the waterfront nobles is probably one of the most famous ones. It's probably got some real stories to tell the history of the years you know particularly when the sailors were coming in here to darker think There's been in a few few stories told in some of these boozers. Sophie's another great boozer rose. Leaf is a is kind of almost I suppose our our local. Um I'm who also do great great from pub food the dreadnought is also quite like going to the treading on when we moved up here. I find it difficult to find a proper purpose. That wasn't just an old man's Poppin dreadnought really laid back by an which we really like clearly has a low competition your favorite boozers. If you want a glass of wine where you're GONNA go. I really liked the shore. Just feels I think. Because it's quite art deco in there and it's it's very atmospheric. It just feels really relaxed taxed. That's probably for me my favorite for glass of wine. You know some of the good restaurants like the Chop House of Great Barr beside them which is maybe a little bit more like a wine bar or kitchen kitchen restaurant and bar there as well? It's worth mentioning that you don't fancy the key see for a Bagel or dressing up for Mitcham Star. Dinner lethal also has a pretty spectacular food market called the pit and was never really had a kind of food market is such so started in effectively car park in with a garage next door to a and a couple of guys who had trucks maybe had restaurants and tyrone came down and just started up doing great food at really good prices and and then live music then started up by people guitars or saying kind of spawned into whole whole kind of music program and you know many better places for people to go in on a on a Saturday in the pit and the monarchial Cairn Banerjee and what better way to play now than with the track by Scottish music legends the proclaim. There's no awards here for guessing. What inspired this track his sunshine only

Scotland Edinburgh Leaf Station LEE Mitchell Burr Great Barr Trainspotting Royal Yacht Britannia Editor Martin Wishaw Autom Commons Irvine Mitchum Mitcham Star Welsh Castanon Jr Lebron
Intel stock up over 6% on earnings beat, outlook

CNBC's Fast Money

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Intel stock up over 6% on earnings beat, outlook

"Chip maker Intel spiking after hours let's get to John Ford at headquarters with all the details hey John we'll so well just listening to the call. CEO Bob Swanson I wonder bring you the latest there of course just to get the first details out of the way it was a beat on the top and bottom from Intel far and away they also raised their full year guidance by one point five billion dollars co Bob Swan on the call though right now talking about supply which has been a crucial issue for Intel they haven't had enough of it it's and frustrating for PC makers and others who have wanted to get more from Intel he did just say that they do expect increased output For q four that supply will be up double digits also single digits in two thousand twenty but still that is not enough and you said that they are letting their customers down right now with supply constraints and they've been unable to build out inventory now we have heard before that he's putting a little bit more color Intel's growth story I think it's more of the Bob Swan Manifesto on Intel's growth post krizelj talking about ai and the needs old custom built chips for ai pointing out that IDC says that in a couple years seventy five percent of enterprise applications are going to incorporate and so therefore when Intel can tune it's chips to artificial intelligence that makes them more valuable to customers that perhaps counters some of the apply issues and process technology issues that Intel has had allows them to have an argument that technology beyond just process could give them an advantage that will bolster gross margins perhaps Muslim all right John Thanks John Ford back at headquarters by the way we're going to hear from Intel CEO Bob Swan Tomorrow Morning at eleven am eastern time on Squawk Alley in the meantime on what your trade here well it's interesting that that was pretty bullish guidance right that was interesting to me that they would feel comfortable being that bullish really didn't need to because there's a lot of potential uncertainty out there in the next quarter so they must feel very very good and then the data center that was that was really really impressive so I think it's probably better to own here higher than it was this morning lower margin data center businesses I think still nicely the fact that Intel had been the last couple of quarters for Intel the outlook was not very good and and in fact there they threw a lot of cold water on the sector and a lot of people thought it was their their business which wasn't in some of the high growth businesses of the chip chain but but you have to be excited by by how these guys have essentially not only reaffirmed that they act you're seeing growth that maybe they have to kick up demand because the kickoff supply because demand is actually Barron expected but they talked about China and the impact and they haven't really seen a major impact I don't know if that means you should beaked fearful of the eventual but it's a relief for a company that I think people were certainly priced to the downside on this number data set beaten revenues by ten percent I mean that's a pretty big not Tim's point about margins that are all sudden makes operating margins close to thirty six percent which is significantly better than a suit was looking for twenty billion dollars eight percent so the market cap that's not insignificant that's one more thing and valuation to Cairns Point might be arguments probably cheaper now than it was a couple of hours into other chipmakers tell you very different store and now we have Intel and then you add that with your Taiwan semiconductor teradyne the positive ones so what's the message of the chips interview yet you're getting different stories right so I think it all really depends on what the end market is if you are in growing end markets you're going to do well so in videos a good example of one that we like and Marcus would be autonomous vehicles right you've got a data center gaming that's a great play we also so we bailed on they with their symantec acquisition thirty percent of their revenues are now going to be coming from software. I'll be quick takeaways if you've hooked your wagon alza group they've they've outperformed massively anything intact they've certainly massive massively up form the SNP Taiwan semi which is a essentially white labeled manufacturer for the industry is trading at all all time highs I think Taiwanese your biggest take on what's going on in his very impressive

Intel John Ford Ceo Bob Swanson Taiwan Twenty Billion Dollars Five Billion Dollars Seventy Five Percent Thirty Six Percent Thirty Percent Eight Percent Ten Percent
Will the Fed stay patient as the market rallies?

CNBC's Fast Money

02:04 min | 2 years ago

Will the Fed stay patient as the market rallies?

"China 's central banks, China's government unloads a lot of stimulus into the economy to help it as well as the markets markets, go up, they say, you know, what? Oh, it's working. It's working out. So well, we're going to take, you know, take our foot off the pedal here. Could we have parallels here in the United States when it comes to the fed and staying on the sideline to the point where the more, you know, the strong opinion, they are gone. They're on is gone wrong. Wouldn't you look at what they said they used to say data dependent makes sense they're saying data dependent anymore. They're saying patient, which patient means is even if data doesn't go the right way. Right. Even if data is hot, we're not gonna do anything. We're going to go pass. This two percent. We're going to take you know, we had symmetrical below two. We're going to allow to go above two. And yet you see some of the inflation numbers are actually down even with his GDP up. The fed is gone. So there is inflation this asset inflation ridiculous asset inflation, there's clearly energy and health care inflation, there's so there's inflation in there all the wrong places. But but Cairns right terms of the fed. I mean there, and I'm gonna offend a lot of people here. They are data dependent that dependent on the NASDAQ going higher and the Dow Jones industrial average going that's their data. And if you don't think it's true, just go back and look what happened in October into December. I mean, they they turn on a dime because our markets sold off. So by that definition, they'll never move they can move, but for Larry cudlow who I'd like as a friend and respect is an economist for him to say after three point two GDP print. However, we got there that there's still room for a rate cut. That's absolute men. Well, might be generous there. I mean, let's be Frank. I think maybe you want to call them a strategist or something like that political strategist. I mean, let's be Frank. Okay. We were just talking on the deaths last night about Amazon we're talking about. We're talking about inflation. What did they just do? They said they're gonna use a portion of their profits. Okay. Their EP is going to be less. Right. And they're afford to do that. Because stock market has been bid up because interest rates are so low, and what happened they are going to get you there faster. That is a disinflationary thing.

FED China Frank United States Larry Cudlow Cairns Amazon Two Percent
Pope Francis proposes 21 'reflection points' for discussion at abuse summit

PRI's The World

03:43 min | 2 years ago

Pope Francis proposes 21 'reflection points' for discussion at abuse summit

"You don't see LaPierre Dalyell. She says Suadi, but in Francis addressed bishops and other church leaders from around the world this week there gathered for a summit about the clergy sex abuse crisis in the Catholic church there. Two more days of meetings to go fill Salvino is at the summit in Rome. He lives in Boston and he's a survivor of clergy sex abuse. We spoke with him earlier this week. And we wanted to check in with him again about the meetings so far fill at this summit meeting. Pope Francis has provided bishops Twenty-one reflection points, I have the list right here. And one of the first points is to make a practical handbook of steps to be taken by thorns when cases of sex-abuse happened at church. What do you think about that? They feared is swimming means bishops, and yeah, that's a great idea. But it really mazes me that such a handbook doesn't already exist. It hasn't been in place for you know, twenty thirty years. Have you looked at the this list of reflection points? I have I wish I had the list in front of me. But I was I I read it through quite closely last night. What do you think of it? When you read it, you think this is a good thing or do you think some something's missing? Well, I would leave to see that it was described as just a number of topics for them to think about in a way to sorta start conversations in directions that they might head into if this was a a list of of policies and procedures that they wanted to put in place. I would have been horrified. I mean, there are a few a few good things as they call for, you know, treating survivors with cairn with respect one of them. I forget which number. It was talks about hard to deal with false allegations of abuse. Which makes me is makes me crazy because I've been hearing that phrase ever since the early nineties when I went public. That there are people that were saying all this didn't really happen. These people just looking for money, but just trying to, you know, find ways to get money off the Catholic church in for, you know, for saviour to find the courage to go forward speak of their childhood experiences in public manner. And and then be told his has to be a false allegation. What you refer to it's written in these in these set of points says the right to defence the principle of natural and canon law of presumption of innocence must also be safeguarded until the guilt of the accused is proven. I mean in some ways that is, you know. That is that is the legitimate thing. It's not completely denouncing a charge of abuse. It's simply saying we have to prove it in. That's true nitty in criminal with any criminal charges. Have to proved the question is who's going to push been doing the investigation who's going to be be present one way or another fill? The pope says he wants concrete measures to be taken you told us earlier this week that one of your main concerns is that mandated reporting needs to happen reminds us what that is. And whether you think the Catholic church is moving in that direction to require that ended a reporting essentially means that if a Bishop learns that one of the priests within his diocese has been abusing a child or an analyst since this criminal behavior that we talking about it should be reported to civil authorities. Namely, the police investigation to be done. It should be done by people who trained to do such. Investigations, namely, the police in I talked to watch bishops soclean or about that at survivors meaning on Tuesday, and I was really kind of dismayed with his answer.

Pope Francis Catholic Church Salvino Lapierre Dalyell Cairn Rome Boston Analyst Suadi Twenty Thirty Years
"cairns" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"cairns" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"More news on its way and Cairns working that up right now. Yes. I am springs. Mayor skip Campbell apparently dead at the age of sixty nine years, but these legit corals base for thirty years. He's been the mayor since two thousand fourteen and he also served in the state Senate, so sad. So I I don't know what happened but sixty nine he's dead that more coming up. Nice. These south Florida morning show seen a couple of caring, and well, they're they're getting closer and closer. There is a wish we could show the visual right now. There is an army of media trucks, national regional everything at the South Carolina border right now just waiting to storm to figure out what direction to the state. They go to find out who is the winner this South Carolina's one of seven states that allows anonymity. So we shall see, you know, maybe the person chooses not to remain anonymous or with that kind of money. I it's going to be hard to hide I think it's a little different things can be hard to hide his mega millions group lead director title group, lead director, Gordon. Medina us talk last forgot about that anonymity part of it. So all they're trying to find now is the where it was sold to try to track that down. Well, just because it was sold in South Carolina. Let's also put this out there doesn't mean the person lives in South Carolina. True. I have three tickets in my wallet. From the last time. I went to Georgia. Did you win? And you know, what I'll on the last time. I bought a ticket and South Carolina. I one five bucks, but you have to go back to the state. You bought it into trade it in scenario you go. So so we may never find. So here's what I'm totally cool with that could have been somebody vacationing in South Carolina. It could very well be a bunch of people. And if that's the case in the whole company showing up if it's like a group of people they'll show up if it's one person, I don't think you'll ever find out who it is telling you what's going to be one person twenty one year old female college student a party ranger. That'd be awesome. And she's gonna she won't be able to keep it off of social media. Hey, y'all. Yeah. Well, yeah. What I would be extremely fearful of somebody trying to kill me for the money. God almighty, really, I'm serious. You watch way too many of those crime shows, they do they go after people with this kind of money. I'm just saying, you know, people show up at your show. Don't go any consulate. But seriously, there's crazy people out there. Oh, absolutely. And then everybody in the world that's ever run into is going to want money, by the way, they changed the jackpot to one point five six billion dollars. So it was the second largest US jackpot Powerball couple of years ago beat it was a big deal. And then they lied. It. Wasn't was supposed to be one point six billion billion like it matters to please speaking of being at the border. How are we doing with the invasion? Ooh. What's the update this morning? Well, more migrants, adding to the US from Central America whole at the second wave is coming down this coming from the department of homeland security, which we'd like to thank for finally waking up and being aware of this entire thing. A new migrant they call it a caravan. We call it an invasion is being organized back in El Salvador. Great right organized being organized the words get this. Now this wave we've had a little bit of this with the first wave this wave two hundred thirty members of the new group communicating and organizing through what's app the communications apple people, use them on ships. And right. We don't have texting. So this is okay. These are people that are avoiding persecution is death and destruction in their own hometowns. And they're they're leaving. They're getting up with this their worldly possessions on them, but they all have cell phones. How does that happen? Wow. Socially, if they're like well dressed as the first wave. Their cell phones. Their okay, let me let me ask you this question. It was I the only one yesterday who noticed that. Now when we look at this caravan of peaceful invaders. That now they're showing all the women and children. Now, they're showing the leaping on the side of the road. Right. Whereas two days ago, they were just cruising along. Dudes just walking around breasts like forever twenty one that was it. Yeah. Now you see everybody else. And oh, yes. Yesterday, flat blade flat bed. Trucks pulled up in picked up most of them up. Where those come from like Bill O'Reilly said somebody has to fund that somebody's paying for it. Well on November. I I'm going to buy you a taco, Jen. Really? Yes. It's free. So cheap. Get you a taco. Still a taco day for Taco Bell happened because..

South Carolina US south Florida Campbell Taco Bell Senate Cairns director Bill O'Reilly El Salvador Georgia Jen apple Gordon Central America five six billion dollars sixty nine years twenty one year thirty years
"cairns" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"cairns" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Annual brady street festival today the street will be closed for traffic between van buren and farewell so that four stages for music and plenty of food vendors can set up the festival runs from eleven until midnight i'm walking we'll spend thirty one years behind bars for the murder of cared sinek the milwaukee woman was robbed and fatally shot outside her place of work in january of twenty seventeen her husband kevin sassy having a chance to speak before sentencing Friday upset she died alone with her, glasses line, shattered on cold round next to her Cairns last site was snowflakes, gently falling to the sidewalk melting and turning red as they he mixed with. Her blood a new restaurant coming in Madison won't be following set. Prices on its menu instead they will let people pay what they can for their items our goal for this business is to take the money. That we get as income and then push it back into other parts of the community so taking. Profits from the store that's hopefully profitable and using that to help fund. The food carts, they can go out to some other neighborhoods that might be lower income the chef ads they hope to. Also hire people with disabilities and veterans and exact location has not been settled on yet the Milwaukee public museum is offering a glimpse, into what it's new building may look like, they are. Working, with local architects and internationally renowned design firms to come up with concept images presidency oh Dennis Koi is says they want more open, concept with. A slightly smaller building and ideas that museums don't have to be closed boxes Very. Dark places you can both protect those collections and have them be great civic spaces concept designs are available at the museum's website Jay forecast for today, partly cloudy, of pleasant a high of seventy seven for tomorrow partly. Cloudy a, slight chance of thunderstorms, high of seventy seven for Monday Partly cloudy more storms could be. Other way high of seventy eight every Tuesday mostly cloudy and cool scattered showers and storms likely a high of seventy two in. Sports the birds take game two of the series, with the giants with a three to one score our game day coverage of. Game three in, the series begins. Right, here at seven thirty five and the birds make a trade with the kids a CD royals late last night acquiring third. Baseman Mike we stock is for outfielder Brett Phillips and right, handed pitcher. Or halo Pez I'm Greg hill NewsRadio.

Milwaukee public museum Cairns van buren milwaukee kevin sassy Greg hill Madison murder giants Dennis Koi Brett Phillips Mike Jay thirty one years
Starbucks coffee in California must have cancer warning, judge says

TMA Morning Show with Charlie James

02:10 min | 3 years ago

Starbucks coffee in California must have cancer warning, judge says

"California now has to come with cancer warning it's a long list of cairn a lot with nonfat milk and a long tube with the list i'm talking about is california's list of cancer causing chemicals about which consumers must be warned acrylamide is now on that list it's a chemical produced when coffee beans are roasted coffee companies like starbucks tried to argue the chemical should not be on the list because it's a natural result of the cooking of the beans and the amount is insignificant but a los angeles superior court judge has ruled that coffee consumers must be warned that it's in their cup along with that nonfat milk jim roope los angeles yeah thanks president trump is tweeting about amazon saying the company pays little or no taxes to state and local government and causes what he calls a tremendous loss for the postal service or this correspondent reports that the president's attacks are now affecting amazon stock prices are spoke there are worried that if donald trump goes after amazon either through through antitrust enforcement or some sort of tax rule change that this is going to really hit the company hard in sports clemson football fans quarterback kelly bryant says he's not going anywhere he says everyone can just keep talking about the upcoming season but he says no one should write him off yet that he's just going to keep on working the n double the nc double a basketball tournament continues tomorrow the final four play loyal in michigan later on it's kansas versus villanova you know next weekend is the cooper river bridge run can't believe it's already here w tma news time seven thirty four plan looks like the chickens from that russian collusion thing coming home to roost on the department of justice and the fbi later today on the chris plante show chris plans after the tma morning show at wc the big talker twelve fifty wt tma i'm john quincy along with henry savage from pm see mortgage hey henry how you doing good morning john how are you sir happy good friday same to you and hope.

FBI Chris Plante Department Of Justice Cooper River Bridge Michigan Kelly Bryant Los Angeles Henry Savage John Quincy California Villanova Kansas Amazon Donald Trump President Trump Starbucks Cancer Milk
"cairns" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"cairns" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Role is graham mission this is rural man his said it is in the nobody cairns and could osama guirma with the the keo kim this wasn't he asked second decent scheveningue here tried oddest take them and we ended up being that have been made the dead a gin and deal to press a pick and look like the denver summit bringing amid this forbid them from greenland have welcomed burma that the box don't feel like i'll take of when i live won't to with white telam gulf got his two consecutive only slammed are women be unruly pupils stickthin by full tobacco put they were to get the investment saved everton that of children that one of the plus acting at the gop pointed out free at the me mesa me again they're still a doubt made men more amid tried to find a crumble quit at second titian hardest six sally man i'm look the name me the ghetto practice world pick and four rocket ship gutting center racket putty cintas son help try was met with a compliment get innovate what's happening oh man it must be qasem as i got it okay i know him no know the wave liver mid family will be a nineteen lupin i have other saw another time we join our mass era gene i mean jb stupid your whole life you got a bit soon living dj played his song latest zombie jay maybe we can shave world jay played his saw latest zombie jay maiden we can shaking were.

greenland burma gop jay cairns osama guirma denver
Trump to meet with video-game industry in wake of Florida shooting

WDRC

01:06 min | 3 years ago

Trump to meet with video-game industry in wake of Florida shooting

"Way and ad council president trump meets at the white house today with representatives of the gaming industry talking violence the meeting with members of the entertainment software association comes three weeks after the mass shooting at a south florida high school that killed seventeen people in the wake of that massacre the president place some of the blame for the shooting on the video game industry which puts out titles that sometimes glorified guns and violence white house spokeswoman sarah sanders prison wants to continue the conversation on uh every different area that we can to help promote school safety the entertainment industry sites various studies that have found no link between violence and video games at the white house john decker fox news former trump campaign manager corey lewandowski will testify on capitol hill again today about russian election meddling he'll be questioned the seconds on by members of the house intelligence committee shark attacks could become a thing of the past with the development of new technology called clever boy which uses sonar to detect what's in the water giving lifeguards the time to tell everybody to get out surfer em cairns helped to do to.

White House South Florida High School President Trump Corey Lewandowski Sarah Sanders John Decker Three Weeks
"cairns" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"cairns" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"The place your term i know you're listening to the psychedelic saloon where people are changing their lives one thought at a time it was interesting for me to hear how excited cairns was about the possibilities of virtual reality keep in mind that the stock was given back in 1990 six which is long before terrence had his first indepth experience of virtual reality at bruce neighbor's house what a shame that terrence only had one occasion in which to test vr as a way to conduct his workshops in the future had he lived longer i'm very sure that all of us would have experienced at least one mckenna workshop online that he was leading from his home in hawaii i also found it quite interesting to listen to some of terence's projections about how we would be living in the future for one thing that future is already here particularly the part about what is called artificial intelligence although i part ways from terence when he talks about the time wave i am in sync with his thinking about what could happen if our machines become cinch of course i'm not laying awake at night worrying about this and i hope that you have better things to worry about as well nonetheless well artificial intelligence is for real and if that is the field in which you are working well i hope that you remember that us humans actually do have a few good traits that uh might make it worthwhile to keep his around.

cairns virtual reality terrence hawaii artificial intelligence mckenna
"cairns" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"cairns" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Uh so please check that out and at least watched the video get to know what it is first if it's not for you no problem we're still here for you every sunday and that is not changing dean welcome the jesus christ show how you doing good are very good i r i i have a question for you um i've been studying all week i actually called before uh you show i've been listening goes for a few months and i look to john three fifteen than ever to overrun um mark cairns fifteen billion mark fifteen it says in order to who kimberly helping you out to companies little child you get in giants research associates it was believe so solo confused with though ono they actually match up quite well the essence of what's being said is exactly the same in both the problem throughout scripture you'll see this in different parts of scripture is that man in their adult state has a hard time believing and so they tend to reject things or make excuses are constantly be pushing a truths out of their way because it's not what we it's not where they are now whereas children are always net state of curiosity bringing forth in believing and taking those things under their wing and really easy kid jump into the air just knowing that they felt the land on their feet and it's this type of uh youthful belief that is very difficult for people as they get older and so the the marriage of the two verses marked ten fifteen and john three fifteen it really is dealing with the exact same thing one having the belief of a child the simplicity of giving to god and trusting in the father as a child would rather than rebelling and pushing things or making it as the faith.

cairns people time giants little
"cairns" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"cairns" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"The cairns boys they are they are maternal can up their your boyce they are the the the actors who you love in multiple census right there there are people whose work you respect and who you also find attractive that's correct annan back you're going back to try to find the origin yep yep keep going through new karen keep talking but you have like a very specific type of just like hardworking bluecollar character actor off in international who who you really take two yes i think emma described him at some point but was like they all look like ether they would die within the first thirty minutes of the movie aid or that or they would be the killer at the end zia i think that's pretty spot on any ben mendelssohn is kind of like the seems to be the flagship he's they'll aim attic and he certainly falls in that category enter first two girls or or the one who offers the final recent berger reports subject bend mendelssohn yes so was proper title sorry recent burger report subject to to to to to to to to to to to do to to bend mandelson thanks this this movie has a pretty major cairns buoyant right i had previously been dubbed is such yes i definitely yes i mean to the point that david david texted me while here's watching this year he was like four scenes four shots and there's a pretty major karen's by yes and why started watching.

cairns annan emma zia ben mendelssohn karen berger mandelson david david thirty minutes
"cairns" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"cairns" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Eighty six a barrel colmec's go oh this change at twelve on forty announce the euro had only thirteen 94 the yen one fourteen point one four still watching abercrombie in fetch down about twelve percent in early trading after the company terminated discussions with several parties regarding potential transaction that's a bloomberg business flash tomen might think so much appreciate that cairns sworn really briefly now we salem near of koutros logic our our chief hither chief executive officer where you give them a phony talk about a most important issue on this whole thing is cybersecurity course we've seen that with news not only between mr putin and mr trump but just in the daily news flow as well let me do data check right now futures negative to doubt futures negative thirty seven a 10year yield two point three seven percent down a basis point is well joining us so um you know with koutros logic which is so much of this is out of the movies for people bring it to a tangible reality well the right now within cybersecurity is what is fructose logic do and how's it can protect us from stuff it seems like it's in the movies excellent question crappy me i think a lot of that were looking at is the wouldn't it real right nuclear facility wait quarter plan any kind of attack hyped up at either tax have been around two thousand twelve 2014 2015 affected.

abercrombie cairns chief executive officer bloomberg salem mr putin mr trump three seven percent twelve percent 10year