35 Burst results for "Cain"

"cain" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:56 min | 19 hrs ago

"cain" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"But that's just so cool. I guess I want to interview you more. But in this segment, we've just got about a minute left. What do you think viewers will take away from this film dean? You know, it's funny, and it's really apropos for what's going on right now with all the migrants coming across the border and, you know, and people are saying, you know, well, you know, that's Texas's problem or the border states problems. It's about helping others. And you can eating helping, that's what's great about telling a story is you see one person's journey and you understand that this can extrapolate to thousands of people. And it's really, I hope they take away the idea that you can possibly do something. You really can give someone a hand up, not just a handout, and that will change their life forever. And that's pretty much the meaning of life, folks, right? If it were God calls us into this world to be blesses us to be a blessing, he gives us gifts so that we can use those gifts for others. It's the only way to live, it's beautiful, but you're not typically getting that message in a lot of the culture. So let me recommend the film no vacancy starring dean Cain and we're going to we'll be back with more of the program, but you can go to Salem now dot com pre order it, Salem now dot com or no vacancy movie dot com stick around yeah down to his knees got to be a Joker he just do what he pleased. Tell me Eric, why is relief factor so successful at lowering or eliminating pain? I'm often asked that question the owners of relief factor tell me they believe our bodies were designed to heal. That's right, designed to heal. And I agree with them. So the doctors who formulated relief factor for them selected the four best ingredients, yes, 100% drug free ingredients, each helps your body deal with inflammation. Each of the four ingredients deals with inflammation from a different metabolic pathway. And that right there approaching from four different angles may be why so many people find such wonderful relief. So if you've got back pain, shoulder neck hip knee or foot pain from exercise or just getting older, you should order the three week quick start discounted to only 1995 to see if it will work for you. It works for me. It has for about 70% of the half a million people who've tried it and have ordered more, go to relief factor dot com or call 800 for relief to find out about this offer, feel the difference. Is the government the best mechanism for fighting poverty? Are there any real life examples of communities successfully combating addiction and homelessness today?.

dean Cain Texas Salem Eric
"cain" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:35 min | 19 hrs ago

"cain" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks, remember I told you that I was going to get Superman on the show. You didn't believe me? No, you didn't believe me. You know what? I'm sick and tired because promises made promises kept dean Cain is here on the program. Dean Cain, the actor, welcome to the program. Becky Eric happened to be here. Very happy to be here. Well, and you really are the dean Cain that played Superman. I'm not making that one up. No, you are not making that. Not another dean Cain. No. You're the guy. That's right. People know you. I mean, I know you principally from that series, which is already a while ago. You did the Ripley's believe it or not, series. You have to, I mean, you've done all kinds of stuff. So you're sort of a ubiquitous figure in American culture. But I want to talk to you about a movie that we've been talking about it on this program because this is Salem radio, but it's at Salem now dot com, and some of my audience already knows about it. But let me ask you since you're starring in the film. What is called no vacancy? What is the story of the film? Well, the story of the film essentially, it's the story of Cecil Johnson. And TC stallings plays the character. And it's a guy who basically has given up. He's done. He has finished with life. He has a model who loves him and wishes he would clean up, but just he can't, he can't sort of get away from his demons, which are drug and alcohol addiction, and he basically even tries to kill himself. Early in the film. And fails of that. He's like, I can't even kill myself, you know? So what can I do? And then through a series of events, he ends up at a place where he receives help, a hand up, not just a handout, but a hand up. And that place happens to be a place that where I'm the pastor. And it's a place where they house rehabilitate. And take care of the homeless. And he becomes someone who works in that ministry there and works in that capacity and does very well. In fact, he finds a home there. And it's the transformation of Cecil Johnson and this is all based on a real story, which is what's so amazing. So we got to meet all the real people involved Cecil passed, but he became a huge figure in the church and in the ministry. It was pretty amazing. The transformation of this guy and TC stallings, in my opinion, TC stalling is just such a great job in this film. He is, he is an incredible performance. And he's a wonderful man. Well, there's so much I want to say. First of all, when you say this is a true story, part of the reason I get excited about the film, again, folks, the film is no vacancy. You can go to no vacancy, movie dot com or Salem now, dot com. But the reason I'm excited about this is because it is a true story. And it because it tells people it gives people an example of how people of Christian faith in this country live out their faith in so many ways, helping the poor, the homeless, the addicted. And you know, if you're watching mainstream media, you would get this idea that Christians are hypocrites and they don't care about anything except three political issues or whatever. It's a complete lie. And it's really a vile lie because of people who have sacrificed their whole lives to serve the poor to help people. They're not getting much out of it, except the joy of serving God, but which is a lot of joy..

Dean Cain Cecil Johnson TC stallings Becky Eric Ripley Cecil Salem
"cain" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:46 min | 20 hrs ago

"cain" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Miracles are everywhere. Discover pure flicks. Your premium streaming service where faith and family values come home. Ready to have some fun? The most exclusive selection of quality wholesome movies and series that will uplift your spirit. A man can argue whether God exists. But when he looks at his daughters, he knows. With new arrivals every week. Unbelievable. Save big and enjoy the possibilities, like invitations to exclusive theatrical screenings. I see it, so I believe it find out more by joining today at pure flix dot com. Folks, welcome to the Eric metaxas show sponsored by legacy precious metals. There's never been a better time to invest in precious metals, visit legacy p.m. investments dot com that's legacy p.m. investments dot com. Welcome to the Eric metaxas show with your host, Eric met Texas. Hey Alvin. Dad. Starting. What do we do now? What do we do? Our first guest today coming up in a few minutes is our friend pastor Michael Yusef, whom we love and so he's my guest in our one today. In our two today, we do ask him a taxis where I try to answer your questions that you're sending in, I'm talking to dean Cain, AKA Superman later on about his movie. And we're doing a campaign with the alliance defending freedom, which I should say that before I get into the fun stuff of what I'm doing here in California, if you go to our website, which is metaxas talk dot.

Eric metaxas Hey Alvin Michael Yusef AKA Superman Eric Texas dean Cain alliance defending freedom California
Joel Rosenberg Describes His New Primetime Show on TBN

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:57 min | Last week

Joel Rosenberg Describes His New Primetime Show on TBN

"Joel Rosenberg, my friend, welcome. It's great to be on the Eric metaxas show. That's connected to you, right? You know something the name was not taken. So let's grab it. What are the odds, you know? My name is Eric meta taxes. Grab it. And okay, so but this is a new show that you're doing on TBN, and so tell us what it's about. And by the way, I know, you know, in case people are unaware, you are in Israel, you're going to be doing this show from Israel, but it is a weekly news and commentary program to tell us about it. What made you want to do this? Yeah. Happy to do it, Eric. Yeah, this is actually TBN's first ever weekly prime time news and commentary show from the Middle East from Israel from Jerusalem. TBN's never done it. As you know, for many years, TBN was almost solely Bible teaching and music starting with Huckabee and of course Eric began to moving into more commentary and social analysis, political analysis, but they've gone to a new level. They put it in a bid to host the Olympics. In 2028, it's unbelievable what TBN is doing. It's almost frightening, isn't it? But so yes, they're now moving into news and they picked Joel Rosenberg. That's you to host a weekly show. But from Israel, that's kind of amazing actually. Yeah. Well, I am amazing. Honestly, at first I told them no, I appreciate it, but I don't have the time. I don't have any bandwidth for that. I'm running all Israel news, all Arab news, the two only news websites in the world that are published daily original news and commentary from Israel in English from Jerusalem by evangelicals and Messi and Jews four even joke was messy and choose.

Joel Rosenberg Eric Metaxas TBN Eric Meta Israel Eric Huckabee Jerusalem Middle East Olympics Messi
How Dean Cain Prepared to Play a Pastor in 'No Vacancy'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:33 min | Last week

How Dean Cain Prepared to Play a Pastor in 'No Vacancy'

"Play pastor cliff Lee, is it Lee? Yeah. In the movie, and so yeah, what prepared you to play a page? Did you ever think you'd play a pastor as kind of an interesting thing, right? Yeah. Well, I've played a lot of pastors now in my day. And it's really interesting because I've met so many and spent so much time, you know, on a one to one level throughout years and one of the things you realize with the pastors is they're just people too, you know? And sometimes people look at a pastor and they think that they're just this, you know, this force, this power and everything's perfect in their lives and always has been, that's not true for anybody. So it was really interesting. Cliff Lee is the pastor himself is an amazing guy. He's much taller than me. So I've tried to play as tall as I could, but what a sweet, wonderful guy he is. And his whole, what's happening with him is, you know, he has his own sort of journey in that he's trying to help the homeless because the numbers are huge in South Florida at the time, but this is going on. And so he wants to buy, he felt called from God to go and buy this motel nearby and turned it into a homeless shelter. And it would cost, you know, a million something to do so. And they were already having financial problems, but he just felt like this was the thing he was being called to do. And he didn't know how it was going to happen. And he always turns the God was like, okay, I don't know how it's going to happen. You show me how this is going to happen. I'll keep pushing. And eventually, the community comes together in a wonderful way. Kind of like it's a wonderful life. And it's an amazing, it's an amazing feel good moment, but it's true. That's what makes it so wonderful. So

Cliff Lee LEE South Florida
Dean Cain of Superman Fame Talks About New Film 'No Vacancy'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:48 min | Last week

Dean Cain of Superman Fame Talks About New Film 'No Vacancy'

"Dean Cain is here on the program. Dean Cain, the actor, welcome to the program. Becky Eric happened to be here. Very happy to be here. Well, and you really are the dean Cain that were, you know, that played Superman. I'm not making that one up. No, you are not making that. You're not another dean Cain. No. You're the guy. That's right. People know you. I mean, I know you principally from that series, which is already a while ago. You did the Ripley's believe it or not, series. I mean, you've done all kinds of stuff. So you're sort of a ubiquitous figure in American culture. But I want to talk to you about a movie that we've been talking about it on this program because this is Salem radio, but it's at Salem now dot com. And some of my audience already knows about it. But let me ask you since you're starring in the film. What is called no vacancy? What is the story of the film? Well, the story of the film essentially, it's the story of Cecil Johnson. And TC stallings plays the character. And it's a guy who basically has given up. He's done. He has finished with life. He has a mom who loves him and wishes he would clean up, but just he can't, he can't sort of get away from his demons, which are drug drug and alcohol addiction and he basically even tries to kill himself. Early in the film and fails of that. He's like, I can't even kill myself, you know? So what can I do? And then through a series of events, he ends up at a place where he receives help, a hand up. Not just a handout, but a hand up. And that place happens to be a place that where I'm the pastor. And it's a place where they house or rehabilitate. And take care of the homeless.

Dean Cain Becky Eric Salem Radio Cecil Johnson Tc Stallings Ripley Salem
Eric Reflects on the Funeral of Queen Elizabeth II

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:04 min | Last week

Eric Reflects on the Funeral of Queen Elizabeth II

"Watch the queen's funeral? Yes, I watched parts of it. A lot of it. And I found it very moving. I was moved by how Christian it was. It was profoundly Christian. And the fact that, you know, scores of millions, if not hundreds of millions of people watched something that was so Christian, it really was, it was just an extraordinary thing. The queen was serious about her Christian faith. And as I say over and over and over again, just because someone says they're a Christian, it's virtually meaningless to say you're a Christian. The question is, are you living like a Christian? You know, and from what I know, she was quite a serious Christian and the funeral was just magnificent. It was transcendent. And really, those kinds of events, the majesty of it, of our funeral procession. All those things, I think, point us toward God. There's something so beautiful about that kind of solemnity, so I was very moved by it. And I think it was, it was wonderful that they televised it. When

Is It Safe to Send Your Kids to College in NYC?

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:00 min | Last week

Is It Safe to Send Your Kids to College in NYC?

"My daughter is a junior in high school and she has a heart settle and attending the King's College in New York City. My wife believed and I believe she has the qualifications. Weed a tour. We love the school. We have close family friends, though who are saying, don't send her because of what they've seen like when shows like Tucker Carlson. I mean, what's is there to collapse of civilization happening in New York City right now? Is it safe for her to come? What do you think, Eric? So that's the big question. Should people send their children here to New York City for college for two to four years? And I actually see the questions in front of me. The woman says I've listened to every podcast that we've done on this program in 7 years since the very first one with Alice von Hildebrand. So I'll heal your hear your answer if you take this one on the air. Oh my goodness. Yeah. Oh my goodness. That was on Hitler's birthday 7 years ago. We said, how can what can we do on Hitler's birthday? The show starts on April 20th. What do we do? And we said, how about getting the widow of one of the greatest enemies of Adolf Hitler on the program that was Elvis and Hildebrand? Wow. Okay. Well, the answer to that question is, I understand the concerns, but I think if you have wisdom, you don't need to worry about these kinds of things. What I'm saying is if your daughter has wisdom, young people, sometimes lack wisdom, but I honestly think that if you come to New York City, you pretty quickly figure out what's safe, what's not safe. If you're in a college environment, you're not just wandering around. So I think a lot of this stuff is overblown. In other words, I think that you see the worst of everything on the news and you think, you know, I get phone calls from people. And I think what are you talking about? That's not happening a lot. It's so rare, but if anything bad happens, they put it on the news.

New York City King's College Alice Von Hildebrand Tucker Carlson Hitler Eric Hildebrand Adolf Hitler Elvis
If You Don't Get Angry, Something's Wrong With You

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:19 min | 2 weeks ago

If You Don't Get Angry, Something's Wrong With You

"But the reason I'm telling people this and I'm taking your time, John, is because Mario morelo spoke. A lot of people don't know who he is. Ladies and gentlemen, there are just a tiny handful of people like Mario Morello. I've never seen anyone bolder more in tune with what God is saying. I don't say that lightly. And what he talked about, you just got me thinking, John. The level of evil that is manifesting itself in the United States of America right now. When you hear about the government going after an organization like Christians engage dot org and saying, well, we're going to take away your tax exempt status. This is evil. And if you don't get angry at this, something's wrong with you. You're trying to pretend it's not happening. And by the way, that is about the most anodyne little thing you could possibly mention, but I just thought when Mario marlos spoke, he spoke about some of the genuinely wicked things done and there are people in the church convinced that somehow the Christian thing to do is to be quiet or to be nice. I mean, if somebody mutilates your children, are you not going to fight? Are you not going to stand? Are you not going to do? There are things happening that, you know, apart from the literal mutilation of children because of the transgender madness, if you don't speak up, if you don't get angry and say, I have an obligation to fight for what is right and true, the idea that I can't be political. You are absolutely hiding from reality. And I just want to be really blunt folks. God's going to judge us when we are silent in the face of evil. God calls us to speak. And not only will God judge you, I will judge you. I will be in the gulag for a couple of years before they finally come and get you. And when you show up, I will laugh at you. I will judge you. That's the most important thing. I mean, I tell you, forgive me, John, but you know, when you tell me that, that the IRS or whoever is trying to bother Christians engaged. It's another good reason to go to Christians engaged dot org, folks. Because we have to stand with those who are being persecuted and vilified, attacked in any event. Well, John. Well, I've got a piece at the stream that relates to this. And it's an unusual title. Is the Trump movement like Syria's Kurds and indispensable ally for Christians? Is the Trump movement like Syria's Kurds and indispensable ally for Christians? Like Syria's Kurds and indispensable ally for Christians. For Christians. Okay, let me guess. Yes. Yes. So I tell the story of two very similar Christian communities in very similar circumstances with tragically different outcomes. The Christians of Iraq had and the Christians of Syria as circa 2001 on September 11th, 2001. They were in very similar situations. They were dependent on the goodwill of secular Arab dictators. Saddam Hussein Bashir. The U.S. fights this pointless war in Iraq based on weapons of mass destruction that never existed. Our regime our occupation does not protect the Christians. The Muslims are infuriated that the American crusaders are in their countries. So they started attacking the local Christians who are hapless helpless scapegoats. They had all been disarmed by the government. Saddam Hussein, like a good tyrant, had gun control. America being good liberals, we kept gun control laws in Iraq. The Islamists like other criminals don't obey gun control laws. So they got lots of guns. The Christians of Iraq, obeyed the law, counted on the government to protect them, were slaughtered. Three fourths of the Christians in Iraq who had been there since the apostles, the churches have been there since the second century. Three fourths of Iraq's Christians were killed or driven into exile. And if you want to help them go to Iraqi Christian relief organization, they really do need your help. It's tragic because they were disarmed. They were helpless in the face of ISIS. When ISIS marched in the city of Mosul, which had 1.6 million people and tens of thousands of Christians. Like a hundred guys from ISIS took over a city of more than a million people because they'd all been disarmed by the government. Hundred guys took over a terrorized the city of 1.6 million people burned all the churches, drove all the Christians out, raped the women set up rape camps where they traded them. Horrendous tragic outcome. That is what happens when Christians trust a secular government that doesn't like them to protect them. And the secular government here in America clearly likes us less and less with each passing week. So as I've written and I've got a book on this coming out on this called God and guns versus the government, the more hostile the government becomes, the more important our gun rights become. Now let me tell the story of Syria. In Syria, do you remember the Arab Spring went to democracy was going to come to the Arab world? Well, how did that work out? Joey walked out. We have to go to a break here, but I just have to remind my audience just so that they're tracking with the conversation. The lunacy of the Arab Spring, the lunacy that the idea that democracy could break out in a place like that. The naivete of the people who put forward that narrative. And then we saw it collapse and they never bothered to say, oh, oh yeah, we were wrong about that. When we come back talking to John for the rest of the hour and more, don't go away. Well, I for one second, I've got an alarm going off. I got to turn it off. Is the government the best mechanism for fighting poverty? Are there any real life examples of communities successfully combating addiction and homelessness today? How can we best deliver hope to our nation, those questions get answered September 23rd on Salem now dot com in an inspiring new motion picture from kingstone studios based on a true story in no vacancy a demoted journalist finds her cynicism slowly transformed as she befriends a recovering addict while working a story about a church struggling to purchase a motel for homeless families, no vacancy, starring dean Cain, TC stallings and Sean young is based on the true story of first baptist Leesburg, Florida, and a real location the Samaritan inn. Move your viewers are saying movies like this bring purpose to the big screen, well produced and the acting is tops, enough can not be said about how incredible this true story is.

Syria Iraq Mario Morelo Mario Morello John Mario Marlos U.S. Saddam Hussein Bashir Iraqi Christian Relief Organiz IRS Saddam Hussein Mosul Joey Kingstone Studios Tc Stallings Salem Dean Cain Sean Young Samaritan Inn Leesburg
Kane scores milestone goal in front of Brazil great Ronaldo

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Kane scores milestone goal in front of Brazil great Ronaldo

"Harry Kane provided the only goal in Tottenham's win over Wolverhampton Spurs coach Antonio Conte He's a player that he has to make the difference For his quality for this kid for his ability Kane lost his marker near the back post to head in following a flick in from Ivan perisic at a corner in the 64th minute It was Cain's 185th Premier League goal moving him into outright fourth place on the all time list above former Manchester City striker Sergio Agüero Only Alan Shearer Wayne Rooney and Andrew Cole are above him I'm Dave ferry

Harry Kane Wolverhampton Spurs Antonio Conte Ivan Perisic Tottenham Kane Cain Premier League Sergio Agüero Manchester City Alan Shearer Andrew Cole Wayne Rooney Dave Ferry
"cain" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

06:18 min | 2 months ago

"cain" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Yeah, there's actually an amazing moment about 30 years later. There's a young girl who reads Maya's famous memoir. I know why the caged bird sings. And is stopped dead in her tracks because she thinks, oh my gosh, this is my story too. I can't believe there's another person who had these same experiences that I did and who wrote this story down. And that woman or that little girl who read that memoir and felt that way was Oprah. 30 years later, and to me that's like the amazing thing of like these moments of such intense connection that can happen through literature or music or in person or whatever it is, but all of it is like making meaning out of out of some kind of deep pain. Yeah. And I think that that's something that humans are drawn to do. We're meaning making creatures in general. They are. And especially with pain, that's what we do with it. And yet the most natural instinct is to pull away, go in the corner, lick our wounds and don't talk about it. Yeah. I think partly because we're encouraged to do that. It's like we're encouraged to think if there's too many wounds, then there's something wrong with us. We're going to be too much. Too much. Yeah. I also, I trace in the book this history of how we got divided emotionally between winners and losers. So it used to be in history. It was seen that if you were poor and unfortunate, that was because the goddess of it was because of the gods. It was like the goddess of misfortune had not favored you. You just got unlucky. But around the 19th century, that kind of changes and it starts being viewed that whatever your fate is, it's because of something inside you, and we start seeing people as intrinsically winners or intrinsically losers. And the more you see people that way, the more you want nothing to do with your pains and your longings and your traumas and all of it because all of that marks you as a loser. So of course you're going to try to step away from it and not you're not going to try to make meaning out of it. You're going to try to disavow it. Yeah. To take it personally. Yeah. I mean, one of the biggest mistakes we can make is to take reality personally. For me, it starts with traffic. You know, if I can accept that traffic is the way it is going in about my day, it just gets me into a good frame of mind and it actually will improve my mood, even if it's bumper to bumper, you know, say, well, maybe this is universe, giving me a chance to call that friend, I haven't talked to. In a while or to look around and notice this field I drive past every day and never really look at, you know? One of the things I love in your book is you talk about trying to find beauty everywhere. And I just love that. I love that. Yeah, what I just thought of when you said this is something I read once from the writer and then Palmer children maybe mispronouncing her name. But she has that thing about how every time you feel yourself getting hooked, that's like a moment to practice on hooking yourself and so she gives the example of getting stuck in a middle seat in an airplane. In between two unpleasant people, let's say, and there you are in your stack and she welcomes those moments because this is a moment to learn practice. And not getting hooked. And so every time I'm in a middle seat, I think of that. I'm like, oh, I don't think I'm there yet. Yeah. Anything else you'd like to share before we wrap up? I don't know. I think you recovered a lot. I think we covered a lot. Yeah. I'm so glad you came on and we got to hear about your experiences and your book, your book is called bittersweet house sorrow and longing make us whole. It's doing great on The New York Times Best Seller list, as did your previous book, which was called quiet, which is about introversion. We didn't even get into that. We might have to have you back on the podcast to talk about that. Awesome. And if you would send us a couple of signed copies of bittersweet, that would be awesome. I'd love to give one to a listener. Absolutely. I would love to do that. And where can people find you? Social media, a website? Yeah, I would say both. So I have a website. Susan Cain .NET, and there's a newsletter there that you can sign up for. And I do kind of read or Q&A, and other ideas and things that I share. And is spelled CAI N right, so it's Susan S USA. .NET .NET. And with the newsletter, we don't share your information. It's just to send out the letter. And I'm also on social media. So especially LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook at oh gosh, I have a different handle at every single one. Well, fortunately. We'll put them under the show notes. I'll give you all those links. Thanks so much, Susan. Thank you so much for having me. Really, really enjoyed talking to her. And as always, we put links to our guests, social media, where you can buy their books, all that stuff under the show notes for this episode. Before I dive into some surveys, I want to ask for some support, some financial support out there. We do not have the advertising that we did in the beginning of the year. And it's we're having a bit of a budget shortfall and would really love any kind of contributions, especially

Maya Oprah Susan Cain Palmer The New York Times Susan Instagram LinkedIn USA Twitter Facebook
"cain" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

07:35 min | 2 months ago

"cain" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Here with author Susan Cain, who has a remarkable book out called bittersweet, which I was talking to Susan before we started rolling and saying, boy, if there has ever been an author that is in the Wheelhouse of this podcast and the things that I talk about, it is you. Give us the elevator pitch of what bittersweet is. Gosh, well, bittersweet. First of all, bittersweetness is about the deep recognition that this is a world in which joy and sorrow are forever paired. And that everyone and everything we love best will not be here forever, but that what comes with that recognition is a kind of deep piercing joy at the beauty of the world. And I have been on a 5 or 6 or 7 year quest to figure out the magic of this bittersweet tradition and I found it everywhere I found it across the world across the centuries, people talking about this and our wisdom traditions or artists or musicians or writers and through it all there is this there's an understanding that with bitter sweetness that bittersweetness is a kind of gateway to creativity to connection and to transcend it. Could not agree more. Could not agree more. Your books crush it on The New York Times bestseller list, your previous book, which was about introversion was on the bestseller list for 7 years. Yeah, something like that. It was kind of crazy. Oh man. And this book has gotten all kinds of great blurbs from brene Brown and other respected and renowned authors and lecturers, let's dive into before I say that I have to preface one of the things we do surveys on this podcast that people fill out anonymously on the website. And one of the surveys that I created about, I don't know, probably 7 years ago because I found that my favorite moments are the ones that have both light and darken them, and we dubbed the term awful, a combination of awful and awesome. And so people contribute either they're both horrific and funny as time passes or they're horrific or embarrassing and beautiful. And those are my favorite surveys when people fill those. Fill those out. There's just something that it just turbo charges it because it feels like life condensed into a vignette. Yes, exactly. Like that's what life is. That's what life is. Yeah. And one of my favorite musicians is a gypsy jazz guitarist named Django Reinhardt. And I was trying to analyze why is it that I love him so much and I realized one day it's because he does songs in a minor key that make you dance. Oh, wow. That's really interesting. I have to take down his name when we're done. Yes. And get some of your favorites. Yes. Yeah, he's a minor key that makes you dance. That's really interesting because I always, I mean, as you know, a huge lover of minor key music. And in fact, it was my crazy love of that kind of music that got me down this path in the first place because I've always been trying to understand how it could be that something that's supposedly so sad or make me feel so exalted and uplifted. But having said that, I always contrasted that with dance music, which I also love, I just don't love it in the same, well, I don't know, sometimes I do, but I don't associate dance music with touching the sky in the same way that minor key music is. I think of it more as like, I don't know, more down to earth, amazingness. Melancholy music makes me feel like it's confirmed that I'm a member of a club. Dance music sometimes will make me almost feel like I'm outside the club door peeking in the window. Like, oh, there's people that really, really love this. And yeah, I like it occasionally. It'll pick up my mood, but I don't find myself seeking it out as often as I do melancholy stuff because it makes me feel a part of something bigger than myself. The melancholy music. No, I totally get that. I mean, it's like the musician is saying to you, you know, that place that you've been. I've been there too. And so is everybody else who loves this music. Right. And I always feel like it's like an outpouring of love that you feel. It's like saying we're all in the same strange state of exile together. Right. You may be exiled, but we're in it together. It's something like that. And how about the pitch black things? You know, things that where it's not just melancholy, but there's real darkness there. You know, world events that are kind of horrifying. Not that there's comfort there, but that there is something there that kind of draws you in either intellectually or just somehow grabs a hold of you in your attention. Do you feel that way? I guess what I feel with things like that is like when I, when I think about whether it's tragedy or evil or intense trauma or something like that, I can't say it draws me so much, I more like feel like I don't know how anyone could look away and not try to figure out what to do with this reality. Right. Yeah, it just feels like something that's like crying out to be attended to and made sense of. It's something like that. For me, it feels like you ever have a. File and you have file folders and then you try to put one of the file folders that it is a wrong size into it. That's what it feels like for me when I watch something really horrific. It's like this doesn't fit, but I want it to fit into a part of my brain that I can put it away and find some kind of resolve, but it's like an itch that I don't know, does that make any sense? Yeah, sure, 'cause it's like, how can you ever really make sense of it? Or how can you ever really accommodate to it? Right. And yet it's also, I wouldn't say alluring, but fascinating to me in a way that makes me feel alive, not emotionally, but in terms of curiosity, like how can how can that person who looks like the rest of us? Want to do that horrible thing. That is endlessly fascinating to me. What drives people to? Oh, you're talking now about active evil, as opposed to tragedy or something. Like shooters or genocide, stuff like that.

Susan Cain brene Brown Django Reinhardt Susan The New York Times
"cain" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

04:19 min | 2 months ago

"cain" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Misfit toys. There are no hosts staying with you in a verbal vacation home. I mean, hosts are lovely, but if the owner of the place is there, it wouldn't really be your vacation home. Would it? Only whole vacation homes just for you and your people. Find yours on the verbal app. Welcome to episode 6 O three with my guest, Susan Cain, it is good to be back from vacation, this is our first new episode and about a month. And anybody who's new to the show, I want to welcome you. I want to say hello. Welcome to anyone having trouble getting out of bed, convinced you're never going to feel happy again. Anybody grinding it out in their parents basement smothered by debt? Anybody who can't stump drink and smoke and cut and stale and cry and vengeance shooting up purging, compulsively exercising, anybody with a good life on paper, plagued by emptiness and a vague feeling that you're not doing life right. It's something's missing. You can't name it. You feel guilty for feeling it. Welcome? Welcome to the paranoid? The angry? The suicidal, the homicidal? Welcome. Damaged. The broken the wounded, the numb, the lonely, they awkward. Everybody plagued by guilt shame. Jealousy? Fear. Welcome traumatized survivors. Fake in a smile, so nobody asks how you're really doing. Welcome to everybody. Counting the seconds until your partner hits orgasm. The every spouse secretly jerking off, keeping their fantasies to themselves. To everyone looking for love and coming up empty. To everybody settling for less afraid to make a change, to anyone not ready to forgive, but being told by assholes that they should, welcome to the bullied, the judged, the eggshell walkers, welcome to all of us who weigh ourselves after we poop. You'd have thought that beast would await more. I would say, welcome to the narcissist, but if they agree that they're narcissists, are they really narcissists? Anyway, whoever you are, welcome and I hope. I hope the next hour or two shows you that you're far from alone, and that while you might not feel hope it's possible, maybe even probable, maybe likely. I don't know, I'm not a therapist. I cook casseroles for buddy pictures on basic cable. For a decade and a half. So what the fuck do I know? I know a little bit. I'm not going to sell myself short. Vacation was fantastic. My girlfriend and I had a great time. That's assuming you rule out the hour and a half that we tried to canoe. Boy, nothing will shatter love like a canoe ride. We had such fun for the first four minutes. And then just about 45 minutes going in a circle, and people flying past us, like there was a jet engine on their canoes. Just couples just zinging past. Pig smiles. I asked them how they do it. What's their technique? All right, we got it figured out now. Now they're half hour as circles. I don't think we got 50 yards from the dock. And my girlfriend God bless her. She never, she never once complained? Well, most people don't complain when they're the source of the problem.

Susan Cain
How the Left Is Using 'Christian Nationalism' to Deter Pastors

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:28 min | 2 months ago

How the Left Is Using 'Christian Nationalism' to Deter Pastors

"Now I say all of this as a way of preface to an article, I want to analyze a little bit. It's in vice. Vice dot com. And it's a profile of a Christian church. In Maryland heights, St. Louis. And a pastor who has become more political. His name is Ron Tucker. So the article is called Christian nationalism drove these people out of their churches. Now, the simple truth of it is, when you read the article, you realize not many people are driven out of this church, but evidently vice has found all the 7 people who left this church because evidently it's becoming too conservative. It's becoming too political. And the pastor who was evidently was apparently not all that political before is decided to become more active in politics. So we're going to we're going to read the article, or at least parts of the article together, and I'm going to comment on certain things. Along the way. So pastor run Tucker took the stage one weekend in early July, and it talks about the fact that he quote railed about antifa, Black Lives Matter, critical race theory, feminism, gun laws, and abortion. I mean, honey, we need to find out who this guy is and maybe start checking him out online because he sounds awesome. And he sounds like a guy who's actually applying Christian principles and moral principles to current issues, which many pastors don't do. You listen to that sermon and you're like, are you living in America? Are you dealing with the same issues the rest of us are? Do you think about them? Do you think about what the Bible has to say about them? And the answer is a kind of deafening silence, like, no, I know, I guess I never think about them. I'm still telling you about, you know, really what Cain and Abel got into a fight. I'm still telling you about what happened on the streets of Jerusalem in the first century AD. And we want to hear those things, but we also want their application. What does that have to do with the life and the world and the issues we're facing today? All right. So this guy, Tucker, the pastor. His name is Ron Tucker. He is hardcore. He attacks woke ideology. This woke ideology is separating people into groups and taking on nation apart. It's being taught in our schools under the heading of critical race theory. The way you get promoted in a woke business is based on your degree of victimhood and then my favorite line, I mean, would you trust someone to fly your plane just because they're part of a minority? What he's getting at is affirmative action.

Ron Tucker Maryland Heights Tucker St. Louis Abel Cain America Jerusalem
Charlie Welcomes One of the Foremost History Experts, Bill Federer

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:02 min | 3 months ago

Charlie Welcomes One of the Foremost History Experts, Bill Federer

"With Bill Federer and rob McCoy, Bill, welcome back to the program. Hey, Charlie, great to be with you. Bill is the history Wiz. Yes, he is. I mean, rob, I've never met anyone like Bill. Prolific is one way to describe you. How many books is about 25? All history books. Yeah, try to learn lessons from history. People say history repeats itself really human nature repeats itself, and you observe the patterns. It's sort of like the government is collecting all the information on you and all the listeners from their cell phones and emails and web searches and they're taking all that data and running an algorithm on it to get predictive. And so if you study enough history, you see the patterns, you can be predictive. And so I tell people that history is not prophetic, but it is predictive. So what does history tell you about the moment we're in or tell us? The default setting for human nature is gangs, tribes, power wants to concentrate into the hands of one person. And you go back through history and you have the most common form of government's kings, nimrod federal Caesar Kaiser sultans are and you can plot it out. At some point it's going to max out on a global level. And you know, if Genghis Khan killed 30 million people, if he hadn't had died, he didn't have to keep killing. You know, Mao Zedong kills 80 million. If he hadn't had died. And so that spirit is still there and then but Jesus says wheat and tears grow together until the harvest. So you always have, you know, I always try to spiritualize, but you always have the spiritual descendants of Cain always trying to kill the spiritual descendants of Abel. You know, and the only thing that changes over time is military advancements allow the king to kill more people and technological advancements along the track more people. The stakes get higher, but it's that same fallen nature and at the same time, the stories we love best in the Bible are when things look hopeless and God raises up little nobodies with faith and courage and

Bill Federer Rob Mccoy Bill Caesar Kaiser Charlie ROB Genghis Khan Mao Zedong Cain Abel Jesus
"cain" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:00 min | 3 months ago

"cain" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Really took me by surprise that as I started to talk, these tears came, and the tears were not unfamiliar to me. It was like I had known them before. I had experienced these tears before. And it was actually simple who said to me that there was something about the nature of the tears that they seem to be not only my own tears. They seem to be other people's tears too. They seem to be like tears of parents or ancestors that I was carrying with me. And that was a, you know, on the one hand, maybe a kind of whoo whoo thing to say, but on the other hand, there was something about it that really resonated. And I was reminded of how all my life from the time I was very young, like when I was in sleepaway camp, for example, and I kind of liked camp and kind of really didn't. I was pretty ambivalent about it. And yet on the last day of camp, when I was a little kid, I was in floods of tears about leaving camp. There was always something about endings and goodbyes that I took much harder than the situation seemed to warrant. And it felt like there was some ancient grief that I was locking into. That whole experience got me down this pathway of investigating this idea of inherited grief. I know you went to Princeton University. You graduated with a degree in English. I also graduated with a degree in English, but from SUNY Albany. And you graduated after completing a 91 page long senior thesis titled a study of T.S. Eliot and Wyndham Lewis. And I'm wondering why you chose those writers and artists. Oh my, first of all, can I just exclaim over the level of research you do for your podcasts? I haven't thought about that senior thesis in like 30 years and certainly no one has asked me about it. Really? Yeah. Oh my God. I love T.S. Eliot. I was so excited to ask you about it. Wow, okay, so I wrote that. I'm pretty sure, as I say, I haven't thought about it in decades, but I'm pretty sure the subtitle of that thesis was a study of anti democratic literature between the world wars. So it's really actually a follow on of everything we were just talking about. I think because I emerged from this family where so much of our destiny was shaped by those wars. I was just always really fascinated by what could have possibly caused all of that to happen. So yeah, so I was really interested in the literature of that period. During that level between the wars when there was even that time during the 20s where it seemed like everything was happy and good and then turned very dark. So I've always been trying to figure that out. It's so interesting because in terms of that happy and dark, you also talked about effortless perfection. And how everybody at Princeton appeared extremely shiny and in control and seemed they were ever there, they were supposed to be in life and as if they had already arrived fully formed and you described this as effortless perfection and I'm wondering if that was going on at Princeton then. It seems that the entirety of social media is experiencing that now. There's the pressure that people seem to have to be effortlessly adept at is extraordinary. And it's a complete mismatch to what we truly feel and experience. But we can't reveal that. How are you seeing what you were experiencing at Princeton then to what's happening in the sort of larger context of what's happening? I guess mostly online now. Well, I mean, that term of effortless perfection didn't actually exist back when I was at Princeton. I just was living it, I think. And what happened is I went back 30 years later with a writer's notebook, which is the most amazing gift because it allows you to just enter into conversations with total strangers, really, and talk about the real stuff. And so I just started asking these students what their lives were really like. And they were the ones who told me about this term effortless perfection, which is apparently a term at Princeton, but many other college campuses because this generation has felt the need to invent this term to describe what it is they're experiencing. And it basically means this pressure to be perfectly thin, perfectly beautiful, perfectly athletic, perfectly academic, perfectly ambitious, perfectly social, and to do it all, and to appear to be doing all of that effortlessly. I do think social media has enhanced all of these pressures, but they're in certain ways not so different from what I had experienced all those years ago. I think this has been something that's been deep in our culture for a long time. Social media, just because it's so performative by its nature, just enhances, but it enhances what had already been there. I want to share a really, really bittersweet story with you. That's something that I did. I think I was in 9th grade. I just remember this for the first time. I had crush on a boy named Robert. And Robert had a crush on a girl named Lorraine. And I wanted Robert to think that I was perfect. I got a T-shirt, my favorite T-shirt, and I got those press on it letters. Oh yeah, there's iron ons. Yeah, those iron on letters. And I measured really carefully, and I ironed on the word perfect. Oh my gosh..

T.S. Eliot Princeton Wyndham Lewis Princeton University SUNY Albany Robert Lorraine
"cain" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:15 min | 3 months ago

"cain" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And is it true that you sold subscriptions to your family members to the magazines? Yeah. There were two magazines one was called rags and one was called rabbit. I don't know why. But yeah, yeah, I had a lot of willing buyers among the extended family. It's so interesting. I had a best friend her name was Debbie also. And we made a magazine also that we wrote and drew ourselves and I still think that this is one of my best names ever. We called our magazine debutante. Oh, that's so clever. Unfortunately, neither of us have that copy we reconnected on Facebook years and years and years ago, but the first thing we tried to figure out was who had the magazine and neither one of us did. You're reminding me that I had a friend named Michelle and fourth grade. I used to go to Michelle's house and we would sit at this little table and her room and write plays. We weren't writing them together. We were more like writing them side by side, but those are some of my happiest memories. Actually, when I was doing my research, I read that you guys would sit side by side and then read aloud to each other, read the plays out loud to each other. Oh, wow. First of all, I can't even imagine what this research is that you did. I'm so impressed because I don't remember that I have ever even talked about that about writing those plays with Michelle. Envisioning at that point, was that when you first thought you might want to be a writer? Oh, I wanted to be a writer from the time I was like four years old. I was in love with books from the very beginning. My siblings were much older and my whole family, they're all readers. So I was like the little kid growing up in a family of much older people where everybody's thing was books. So I grew up with that ambition. So yeah, I was writing those little stapled together stories from the time I was very, very, very, very small. You've talked about how much your mother encouraged your creativity at that time in your life and have said that she never told you that you should be outside more or do more regular kids stuff or daydream lettuce or socialize more. And you've stated that she understood that you had plenty of friends to play with, but recognize that one of your best friends was your own very own self. And I was wondering, did you prefer to play on your own? Or was it something that you just like to do both of? It was really both. I don't know, maybe if I had always been off on my own, maybe she wouldn't have been quite as supportive. She might have been more worried about it or something like that. But no, I always had a lot of friends and always loved playing with my friends. It was very devoted to my close friends. There's nothing like, I think, girlhood friendships, they're just like the best and the most fun and the most intense. So yeah, so I had all of that, but also loved to spend all this time reading and daydreaming. So and that aspect of life was just like very familiar to her, 'cause she had grown up with this father who was so immersed both in his community, but also in this life of the mind. So I guess that juxtaposition was like just natural to the way she had always lived. One thing that I was really compelled by as I was as I was doing my research was how you've written about how I'm both your mother's side of the family and your father's side of the family, you lost most of your relatives in the Holocaust. And it gave you the sense as you were growing up, that something like this could happen at any moment. And this motivated your subsequent research into what's referred to as inherited grief. Which I was really, really fascinated by, can you talk a little bit about what inherited grief is and some of the research and some of the things that you discovered doing that research? Yeah, I mean, inherited grief is the idea that the grief or the trauma that occurs to generation a can be inherited by the descendants of generation a and it can be inherited in generations, B, Z, D, E, F, and all the way down. I think people have always had a sense that that might be true, but would assume that that would have happened primarily or solely through family traditions, cultural traditions, whatever. But what's really fascinating is this whole new line of research that started actually with Holocaust survivors, but has since branched out beyond that. That has found that there seem to be epigenetic changes that occur when a profound life event happens that change the very makeup of our DNA in such a way that it can be passed to the descendants, whether or not those descendants have ever known. The actual people who withstood those events. And it's very interesting. If you look among Jews in general, there does seem to be this predisposition to anxiety. And where does that come from? Does that come from? Yes. We teach it to each other. Something bad could happen at any moment. Maybe it's that, but it also may be something that really is encoded. In us. I just think it's so interesting that trauma actually has the ability to then impact our evolution if it's changing our DNA. I know. It's kind of a remarkable finding. I mean, I should say these studies are still pretty young and they're somewhat controversial, but there's enough of them that are starting to accumulate now that I would say the field is less controversial than it was when it first emerged. But yeah, there is a woman named Rachel yehuda at Columbia, who pioneered this work and continues to do more and more of it. And it's really fascinating. You write about Rachel, specifically in your book. And I ended up going into a rabbit hole of her research as well, which is just incredibly fascinating in terms of understanding how important it is to get help after trauma. And how trauma not only then impacts you, but really whoever you're around and whoever you're with and potentially whoever you bring into the world. Yeah, no, there's something very there's something very empowering about knowing that. And I actually discovered this, well, I mean, I guess I always knew about this aspect of my life, but I did have a moment when I was researching the book. I went to this conference for bereavement counselors. I'm not a brief counselor myself. I was just there as part of my book research. But the workshop was led by this incredible guy named doctor Simpson Raphael, and he led us through an exercise where at first we just had to tell the group about a loss that we had gone through in our lives and I talked about a particular loss and I found myself, I found myself in floods of tears, which I hadn't expected. As we began the exercise, I was feeling actually quite kind of detached in a matter of fact..

Michelle Debbie drew Facebook Rachel yehuda Columbia Rachel Simpson Raphael
"cain" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:30 min | 3 months ago

"cain" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The secret strengths of introverts. Now, she's investigating another underappreciated aspect of the human experience. Her latest book is titled bittersweet how longing and sorrow make us whole. Here she argues that a bittersweet melancholic outlook makes emotional room for beauty, creativity, and love. And we're going to talk all about that today. Susan Cain, welcome to design matters. Thank you so much, Debbie. I am your fam, and it is so great to be here with you. Thank you. Thank you, Susan. I want to know if it's true, that there's never been a day in your adult life that you haven't had some dark chocolate. It's so true. I would even modify it to say that there's never been a day when I haven't had too much dark chocolate. Good for you. Now why dark chocolate versus milk or white? You know, I just always really long before I ever knew I was going to write a book called bittersweet from the time I was a kid, my favorite chocolate was bittersweet chocolate. And now that I'm adult, I also know that it's better for you. So if I'm going to have this chocolate addiction, it might as well be the kind that's good for you. So and I understand you're not too picky about the kind of dark chocolate. In fact, you prefer the little semi sweet chocolate chips that you can put in yogurt. Well, I do do that, yeah, but I mean, I like it all. I definitely notice if it's specially good chocolate, I just don't pay that much attention. It's more like the chocolate fix. Yeah. You grew up in Lawrence on Long Island, the youngest of three children. And your grandfather was a rabbi who lived alone in a small apartment in Brooklyn, and you've said that was your favorite place in the world. How come? Oh my gosh, yeah, it really was my favorite place. And he was one of my favorite people in the world. I mean, the apartment itself was like the proverbial place that you step into another. You step across the doorway and you're suddenly in another realm. If it were the site of a children's movie, it would be, it would have been the place from which the adventures began. But they were adventures of the mind. You know, it was this place where every surface was filled with stacks of books, the walls were lined with books, his life was in books. He would spend all his time sitting on the sofa and reading and then crafting these sermons that were based on it. He just had this very magical, gentle, loving wise presence in the whole the whole place was imbued with that. And we used to go and visit my mother and I would go and visit him there all the time. So and I would just, you know, they would be talking there adult talk and I would just comb through the bookshelves and it wasn't even the books themselves. It was like some essence that I was absorbing. I was like what love looked like for me or one aspect of it and also what ambition looks like in a way because I wanted to grow up and be part of that world of books in which he lived and which he revered so much. Did he live in borough park? Yes, he did. He did. My grandparents lived there as well. I confirm a very orthodox Jewish family. And my grandmother and grandfather lived there and that's what we went to synagogue, and spent a lot of time. Which synagogue was said, I wonder if it was the same one? Actually, I don't know. My father passed away many years ago. And he sort of broke away from the religion as a young adult. We ended up going to a more reform synagogue and Howard beach queens where we ended up moving after Brooklyn. So I was only about two or three years old when we lived in Brooklyn and then moved to Howard beach queens. Well, I bet you your grandparents went to my grandfather's synagogue. I remember I remember going with my grandmother sitting in a separate place from the men wearing plastic shoes on yom kippur, the whole thing. Okay, so now I'll go back to my official questions. Susan, I read that you went to the library every Friday and came home with a teetering stack of books, what were your favorites at that time? Oh gosh, so many different books. I guess there were two genres, especially that I loved, and one was the fantasy genre. So in Nesbit and Edward eager and all those writers, but also my family went every summer. My father was a huge anglophile and bibliophile. So we went every summer to London, and we would go with his empty suitcase, which we would then fill with books, yeah, because there was no Amazon in those days. And England just had all these great books that you couldn't get in the U.S., especially for kids. So there are all these boarding school stories of the kind in which Harry Potter was kind of modeled. So I grew up reading all those stories. As you were growing up, I understand you spent countless afternoons writing stories. You call the area under your family's card table, your workshop, and curled up their producing magazines, comprised of loose leaf papers, stapled together..

Susan Cain Brooklyn Susan Debbie Howard beach queens Long Island Lawrence borough park Nesbit Edward London Amazon England Harry Potter U.S.
Chase Replogle on His New Book 'The 5 Masculine Instincts'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:54 min | 6 months ago

Chase Replogle on His New Book 'The 5 Masculine Instincts'

"Welcome back. I'm talking to the author of the 5 masculine instinct, a guide to becoming a better man. So chase, you were referring to this, I can't remember which Shakespeare play it is where the prologue where he says all the world. As you like it. As you like it, okay. And so yeah, I remember that he does refer to the different stages of man and so are you saying that in the book you take the 5 stages between baby and very old? I mean, how do you break that up? Yeah, so the first one is the reluctant schoolboy who's dragging himself to school. I pair it with the story of Cain and talk about sarcasm as an instinct. The second is the sort of romantic woeful lover. So it's not just romance in women. It's also romance and just quests and adventures. So I talk about the instinct of adventure with the biblical character of Samson. The second one is, is the warrior who's filled with oaths, ready to write wrongs, quick to quarrel. I think of it as ambition, somebody trying to do something meaningful in the world. And I use Moses story to look at that instinct of ambition. The fourth one, it's one of my favorite of Shakespeare's descriptions. He begins to cut his beard and dress the way that's expected and he starts to put a little extra weight on as Shakespeare describes it. This is somebody who's had enough success that they start to worry about their image, their reputation, preserving it. So this instinct of reputation I use David's story. And then the 5th Shakespeare describes the man beginning to lose his voice. It's symbolic of his engagement with the world. There's a great line where Shakespeare says, but the world has become too wide as men we begin to realize the complexity of relationships in the world and how little control we have. And I use Abraham story to talk about this instinct of apathy that tends to set in. Those often happen across those ages in that order. But I think for a lot of men they can kind of move in and out of these instincts, even at different points in their life as well.

Shakespeare Cain Samson Moses David Abraham
"cain" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:16 min | 6 months ago

"cain" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Inside our sorrows and longings that really is the pathway to creativity and to connection and love and transcendence. And I kept finding it there in so many different ways, and I realized that that is a power and that is a truth that our culture is not talking about. So ever wonder why a certain sad song or even a few bars of just the right music will stop you in your tracks and maybe even move you to tears? Well, it turns out you're not alone. My guest today, Susan Cain, has spent years researching why certain experiences. Ones that connect us to sadness or longing or sorrow. Move us so deeply. And actually add profoundly to our lives. Susan's first book, quiet, the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking, literally changed my life and the life of millions of people around the world. It has been translated into 40 languages spent 7 years on The New York Times Best Seller list, was named the number one book of the year by fast company, which also happened to name Susan. One of the most creative people in business. And Susan and I have actually been friends since long before she launched her quiet revolution. I have always so appreciated her her gentle presence. Her deep wisdom and generosity and kindness and a level of introspection and curiosity and contemplative thought that is just so rare these days. And lucky for us all, she has been focusing those observational intellectual superpowers. On the topic that is so universal yet so misunderstood longing. Susan's new masterpiece, bittersweet, how sorrow and longing makes us whole. It's a powerful look at why that feeling of yearning of bittersweetness and longing is, in fact, not just common to every sentient being, but also necessary and a critical element of a life well lived, and in fact, source fuel for some of the greatest works of art and science and creation in human history. And that is exactly what we're diving into today. So excited to share this conversation with you. And a quick note before we dive in. So at the end of every episode, I don't know if you've ever heard this, but we actually recommend a similar episode. So if you love this episode, at.

Susan Susan Cain The New York Times
Sen. Tim Kaine Has a Lot to Say About Prosecuting Donald Trump

Mark Levin

01:05 min | 9 months ago

Sen. Tim Kaine Has a Lot to Say About Prosecuting Donald Trump

"Tim Kane said it's up to the prosecutors at the justice burn where the charge Trump though he believes the former president's actions want to be for January 6th likely violated federal law No they didn't He is supposed to be a moderate but he's a whack job They have all the evidence at their disposal he said Now how do you know that A lot going on behind the scenes of you and I do not know Cain believes federal prosecutors are looking seriously at charges against Trump although he doesn't have any insight information My intuition is that they're looking carefully whether Trump broke the law my sense is they're looking at everything in a diligent way and they haven't made a decision What is he talking about Does he know something I believe there are federal statutes that are very much implicated by Trump overturn Biden's victory in the 2020 election It is really grotesque to hear people who sought to overturn the 2016 election Every breathing moment of that administration Are now making these allegations these

Tim Kane Donald Trump Cain Biden
'Science and the Mind of the Maker' Author Melissa Cain Travis on the 'Maker Thesis'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:32 min | 10 months ago

'Science and the Mind of the Maker' Author Melissa Cain Travis on the 'Maker Thesis'

"I am talking to the author of science and the mind of the maker with the conversation between faith and science reveals about God Melissa Cain Travis. We were just going to talk about something. You just mentioned it Melissa, tell us again. So the central thesis of my book science in the mind of the maker is something that I call them makers thesis. And this goes beyond the idea that science gives us evidence that points towards an intelligent creator. What I mean when I say the maker thesis is that when we look at diverse branches of the natural sciences, we actually see marks of rationality in all of these different areas of science. But in addition to that and corresponding to it quite beautifully, is the fact that we have inquisitive higher intelligent life on Planet Earth whose rationality is attuned in just the right way to be able to detect the rationality in. Okay, now I hate to break it to you, but that might make sense to you. And it might even make sense to me, but that's not easy what you just said, because I remember Hugh Ross, who introduced me to a lot of this stuff, when he was talking about this, I think it was on this program, like 5 years ago or something. I remember thinking like, that's a complex idea. So let's break this down. When you even talk about something that rationality, I think a lot of people go like, what do you mean exactly by rationality? I think it's a deep philosophical issue, isn't it? Like when you're saying that if I look at the world of science, the idea that it is somehow understandable is itself so taken for granted. It seems so innate to me that it's hard for me to step outside and marvel at it. Does that make sense to you? Yeah, it totally does. So back in the mid 20th century physicist by the name of Eugene wigner. Wrote an essay that has since become quite famous. Now, it's important to understand that wigner was not a theist in any sense of the word. We could probably best describe him as a happy agnostic. But he wrote this essay, it's freely available to read online. And the title of the essay is the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences. And what he did was he explored something that Albert Einstein had remarked about repeatedly, but just had not elaborated on. And that was the mathematical comprehensibility of the

Melissa Cain Travis Melissa Hugh Ross Eugene Wigner Wigner Albert Einstein
Author Melissa Cain Travis and Eric Discuss How Life Came Into Being

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:56 min | 10 months ago

Author Melissa Cain Travis and Eric Discuss How Life Came Into Being

"I'm talking to Melissa Kane Travis. She's the author of science and the mind of the maker with the conversation between faith and science reveals about God. Let's get specific Melissa. There are a lot of exciting chapters in here. I never know where to go first because I like it all, right? But the idea of how life came into being from non life. I don't remember if you deal with that in a whole chapter if you just touch on that in the book. But what they call a biogenesis. Do you talk about that? I do. There's a chapter in there that talks about the problem posed for naturalistic origin of life theories. When we consider the specified complexity found in the DNA molecule. And for the listeners who are familiar with doctor Stephen Meyer, who you mentioned earlier, he's written an entire book on that, right? Signature in the cell. So I drew on Myers work for that chapter. Well, it's interesting because I came to it a little bit through Stephen Meyers, but also through doctor James tour, who's also down there in Houston at rice university. And what I always find funny is the fact that we never talk about this. about it. But if you go up to your average person and say, okay, life appears on earth, single celled form 4 billion years ago. How did that happen? I think most people just go what do you mean? I don't know. How did it happen? It's like you would think that that would be the most basic question. Science. Okay, science. The most basic questions. There's life. We are life. How did life come into being? And it seems like the more we know about the complexity of DNA, the complexity of single cell, the more we know that we have no idea how life came into being. But that's a pretty big thing to admit. So nobody's really been very public about it, at least on the non Christian side of the

Melissa Kane Travis Stephen Meyers James Tour Stephen Meyer Melissa Rice University Myers Houston
How 'Science and the Mind of the Maker' Author Melissa Cain Travis Got Into the World of Christian Apologetics

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:10 min | 10 months ago

How 'Science and the Mind of the Maker' Author Melissa Cain Travis Got Into the World of Christian Apologetics

"Melissa Cain Travis, she's an assistant Professor of Christian apologetics at Houston baptist university among other things. And she came out with a book just a couple of years ago called science and the mind of the maker, what the conversation between faith and science reveals about God. A lot of the stuff that I'm excited about, she is also excited about. I said, we've got to get her on the program. So Melissa, Kane Travis, welcome. Thank you. I'm glad to be with you. Well, so how did you get into this world? Because what I always am amazed by is how many people just don't know anything about this. When I talk to Christians who seem to have a reasonable faith, they seem to, but they themselves have never heard of a lot of this. So I was excited when I saw your book because you've more than just heard about it. You've written about it. How did you find your way into this subject? Let's start there. Well, it's a long and convoluted story that we probably don't have time to tell in its entirety. But to make a very long story short, my background isn't biotechnology. My undergraduate degrees in general biology and after undergrad I decided to enter the field of BioTech while I figured out what I wanted to do in terms of graduate education. And for 5 years, I found myself repeatedly sitting up at a lab bench doing my work and having a conversation with the scientists that worked alongside me in my lab and finding myself at a loss for answers to big questions that they asked me because they knew that I was a devoted Christian, but I was also deeply interested in the natural sciences. And I call it my embarrassing series of events that eventually led me to start digging deeper and finally discovering this crazy term apologetics that I'd never heard in my entire life. So I started doing self study and after a few years I found myself in the graduate program in science and religion at viola university. And it was there that I was exposed to all the wonderful authors who have become my intellectual

Melissa Cain Travis Kane Travis Houston Baptist University Melissa Viola University
Prison chief: Mississippi preps for 1st execution since 2012

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Prison chief: Mississippi preps for 1st execution since 2012

"Mississippi is prepping for its first execution since twenty twelve with once a week where her souls according to prison officials David Neil **** is scheduled to be put to death November seventeenth but the twenty ten murder of his wife in which he pled guilty the sentence had been appealed but **** withdrew it calling himself worthy of death corrections commissioner burl Cain would not confirm how **** will be put to death but does say the state obtained lethal injection drugs which have been hard to come by after drug makers started blocking their use for executions Kane says execution rehearsals are usually done once a month at the Mississippi state penitentiary at Parchman but they've been bumped up to once a week I'm Julie Walker

David Neil Burl Cain Mississippi Mississippi State Penitentiary Kane Parchman Julie Walker
The Manager and the Vaccine

Manager Tools

02:08 min | 1 year ago

The Manager and the Vaccine

"Cain that pandemic of cove nineteen has made our lives much more interesting to say. The least interesting is the word we're gonna use for the purposes of this context and the roles of us at work and of us as managers at work have become much harder as we've been saying for years. Remote management is much more challenging then managing in person and most managers. Let's be honest. We're barely keeping up before they moved remote and now this new world the remoteness of it all the complexities. That come with all of this whole situation throws even more at us. Remote management the lack of communication zoom. Burn out with shop. Priorities supply chain disruption travel restrictions budget. Layoffs tension challenges. I mean there's a lot and here we are one more to add to. Our list of stressful items is vaccinations. What is the manager's role in terms of nations. And how do we do our duty and as always we've got the answer for you so we are gonna cover four things today. I private organizations are within their rights to mandate vaccines second managers. First responsibility is to the organization third. The manager must support organizational vaccine roles. Fourth and finally effective managers will communicate frequently with their directs. We start with the fact that a private organization is within their right here. Yup obviously we have suspect or we assume that you know this and in case you don't private organizations at least in the united states are entitled to enforce any reasonable precaution that is in the service of the organization's mission mission and

Cain United States
Mark Levin Calls out New York Times' Paul Krugman

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Mark Levin Calls out New York Times' Paul Krugman

"There was a piece in the, uh, New York Times by Paul. I don't know if it's Krugman a Krugman He's supposed to be the best. The The radical left has as an economist. But of course, he's pathetic. We've been trying to get in touch with this man. For how many days Mr. Pitt is here. Since Saturday. We've emailed. We've tried to contact and we've heard nothing. I put out a public challenge to him to debate me about my book. We've heard nothing. And I want to put out that public challenge again to, uh Mr Dr Krugman or Krugman to come on the show. 30 minutes, maybe an hour. Let's debate the substance in my book, the substance of the book. Cause you're a gutless coward. You're a fraud. I'm calling you out. And my time with a little munchkins. I'm calling you out. Tough guy, Big guy, right? And he twists and turns Frederick Kayak and so forth, and and I want to get into this with him. Starts as paragraph remember Austrian economics in the aftermath of the 28 financial crisis. Number of conservatives rejected Cain's economic prescriptions and claimed instead to be devotees of the Austrian school, especially Frederick Hayek. Question about how many of these sub proclaimed Austrians actually knew what they were endorsing in general, when right wingers talk about intellectual history. You want to fire up your fact checking For example, Mark Levin of Fox News has a best selling book, claiming not just that the current American left is in the thrall of European Marxists. But more specifically that their followers or Herbert Marcus and the Frankfurt school except that he keeps calling it the Franklin School, and that's where you lose it.

Krugman Mr. Pitt Mr Dr Krugman Frederick Kayak New York Times Frederick Hayek Paul Cain Mark Levin Fox News Herbert Marcus Frankfurt School Franklin School
Everything You Need to Know About Larry Elder

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Everything You Need to Know About Larry Elder

"Larry elder is with us in. Larry i love so much a the aspect of your personal story and i think californians relate to sharing stories about your your father about your brother about your life. Your love of california people appreciate a common sense approach to what has been a distorted twisted version of the american dream by gavin. Newsom and larry. I must say i'm really encourage. The governor newsome is attacking you the way it is because for a while though he is because for a while he ignored you on. Evidently he must think that You do have the momentum that many of us are praying that you have Mike you're being charitable. This man is scared to death. He just gave up to interviews one with the editorial board of the la times and one with the editor boards of a bunch of other newspapers slamming. The table cursing angry. He went on with went to full captain clear on the scene from the cain revoke i was on the witness stand and kind of broke down had a mental breakdown yet. He mentioning my name for the first time. Because i'm the one he's afraid of. And i'm the one who can talk to black and brown people. Because i'm from the hood you pointed out. My dad came in nineteen forty sevens. You bought a house at now is worth six hundred thousand dollars. Because of the outrageous cost of living in california. The average price of a home is now eight hundred thousand dollars. A one hundred percent more than the eric price at home in america largely because of these environmental extremists that have taken over sacramento and run the state in the last twenty or thirty years gavin. Newsom as afraid. I'm going to be able to explain this way. So then joe jones six back can connect the dots between the outrageous cost of a home in california and left wing policies and sacramento and the rising crime and letting policies in sacramento this attack on the police this false assertions the police are engaging in systemic races. I mean we'll talk about the importance of choice in public education. So the money. Follow the child and the other way around lack round. Parents want school choice. They both the democratic party year after year the year. who's number one contributor teacher's union and they're adamantly opposed school choice. I can break the stranglehold over the democratic party. They have on minorities. Eighty percent of the kids in california are black and brown who have or getting a sub-standard education and they're scared. I'm going to be able to make that case. In ways that the average california can understand

Larry Elder Newsom Gavin California Newsome Sacramento Larry La Times Mike Joe Jones America Democratic Party Brown
"cain" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"cain" Discussed on Revision Path

"Thank you so much for coming on the show. i appreciate. Thank you for having me.

"cain" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"cain" Discussed on Revision Path

"A deposit in you know what it's good advice don't work for free. Don't give your work away but however at the same time like currently there's a project that i'm working on and It's a newly created nonprofit organization. And it's a school. They're teaching kids with disabilities. How to like do automotive in carpentry and stuff like that so i think it's okay to do a pro bono project every once in a while for a good cause it means something to you. What is it that you're obsessed with these days sleep. I see. I thought you were going to say the dog. Okay no sleep. Is i mean look sleep sleep. I think is great. Don't get me wrong. I'm probably gonna take a nap after this interview asleep. I totally totally understand that. Actually my My dodd i'm not obsessed him but he is my inspiration. There's this quote that says to grow creatively. You must give yourself time to play so my dog is my hobby. He's smart play it. It's humorous dog photography and it's kinda my inspiration and canada way to get away from things and have some fun now. Speaking of of having fun. There's one thing that you had shared me before we recorded that. I have to bring it up because i think it's just so you are a house. Music backup singer once upon a time in another lifetime in another laptop. Please tell me about that. Because i use center youtube video and i can put it in. The people want to check it out but like i notice. It was like frankie knuckles production. i have to. How did this happen. Jagna that i actually. I was dating jamie principle will at the time and was right on it right out of highschool so hurry. The curry state college era And so he needed a backup singer and you know at the time. Was you know making music actually out of home and we went to the studio in a did my partner. At that time there was no sampling. So that part that you hear. I'm saying over and over. I had to say at perfectly yet so time was a lot of fun. It was a lot of fun we performed in chicago. Clubs to new york and performed was a whole another life. Now where are you just on this one record or did you do others just that one. Okay i mean that's that's quite a claim to fame though that's really really cool. Is there anything that you would like to do in your career that you haven't done yet actually wanna do a kind of a pivot. I guess this would be kind of a a career slash hobby thing. But i would love to get into. A newborn for taxi is kinda my hobby and i just absolutely love newborn photography. So i'm kinda working on really perfecting my craft in that and that's something that i see myself doing somewhere down the road. Do you feel creatively satisfied. Now i do. I do actually actually love what you absolutely love. Campaigns the ad campaigns and i'm working on currently in doing some really exciting projects with a chicago. Pr from yes. I i love what i do. Now after i mean i know you've had a storied history as a designer both with your studio as well as the physical design work with visual merchandising. But when you look back over all of this especially with being in the game as long as you have what's next like where do you see yourself in the next five years. What kind of work do you want to be doing. I think. I want to focus more on like i said i love the atkin paying. I'm not sure if i'll get away from nonprofits right now. I'm working on some things with the chicago department of public health in on. We're also creating a food bank app so on a do more things like that it's advocacy but not so much nonprofit like you said earlier dec- stuff come to light and see it of plastered. All over the places really exciting. I wanna get more into that. Well lisa just to kind of wrap things up here. Where can our audience find out more about you about your work. Everything online website is lisa. Cain design that's elliott say see a. n. design or an instagram. At least a cane design. Right sounds good while lisa kane. I wanna thank you so much so so much for coming on the show i you know and i reached out to you initially. I really wanted to have you on to talk about. Just the fact that you've had your studio for twenty years in the work that you've done because i think that's something that's so rare that we really hear about from black women. I'm gonna if. I mentioned this. When i when i initially reached out to you but i saw you in a i think it was a graphic design. Usa like to watch for one year. And i was like. I put your name down on my outreach. Like i'm gonna get around back. I'm gonna come back. Lisa one day and i'm glad now to be able to to do so and to talk with you and learn more about your course. Share your story of how you have come up in the design industry throughout the years. I think it's really inspiring and hopefully people that are listen. They get something out of this to know that they can do their. You know they can sort of accomplish their dreams and design like you have so.

curry state college frankie knuckles chicago chicago department of public h jamie youtube canada lisa kane atkin lisa new york Cain elliott Usa Lisa
"cain" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"cain" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Then you know that this story is unfortunately all too familiar today. We're going to dig deeper into this terrain. We're going to do it with mary. Cain the mary. Cain the track and field athlete. Who buy high school had established herself as the fastest girl in generation. The mary kane who at seventeen became the youngest american ever to make a world championship track and field team and the mary kane for whom olympic glory seemed a foregone conclusion until that is she joined nike's elite oregon project under tow salazar and within that culture. Mary's body ultimately collapsed her running career behind it and for a couple years thereafter. Mary just kind of disappear gone from the scene until november of two thousand nineteen. That is when mary broker silence on what happened. And why telling her story by way of a video op ed. In the new york times that was produced. Not coincidentally by lindsey krause entitled. I was the fastest girl in america. Until i joined nike. That video went insanely viral. It resulted in a groundswell of global support for mary and it also opened the door to a broader ongoing conversation around the toxicity that pervades female athletics and the means by which we can construct a better future for women and girls in sport going forward. This one is a wild emotional ride.

nike lindsey krause america mary kane new york mary Mary today seventeen november Cain american nineteen two thousand
"cain" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"cain" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"In particular. Play something you like. Cain another girl. I knew used to like this Five.

Cain
"cain" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"cain" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"The thing in particular. Play something you like. Cain another girl. I knew used to like this. One Kidding.

Cain
"cain" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"cain" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Appreciated her perspective. I was kind of odd. Not open arms, but a little skeptical when I started that it was going to be a very binary there are introverts and they were extroverts in this world. And here's how to walk over and why it's great where I attended by current state of Life take a more nuanced approach to introversion and extraversion. And is it really a spectrum or is it two ideas? That's what do we think about it? And I think she Susan Cain did a good job of kind of exploring a lot of that not to say the books. Perfect. But I think in that aspect she helped me break down. My name is against the book itself in my experience. I feel like I may be the most extreme introvert here. I'm not sure how long I'm definitely the loudest but that doesn't necessarily correlate. So, I read this book my mom gave this to me as a birthday present two years ago. I thought it was only a year ago, but it was two years ago. I dug through some old journals the other day try and find when I was writing notes about it and it was interesting cuz as I was reading my journals from right around that time I realized I actually read this book when I was like first starting to research autism right before my diagnosis. It was like the fall before and so I was like really diving into wage aspects of my personality and trying to understand myself like a lot. So I was reading a bunch of books. Like that's when I read the sacred Enneagram, that's when I read neurotribes That's when I was like doing all this research project. So quiet was sort of like a companion piece in a lot of ways but a lot of its kind of jumbled together in my brain. and I think like it was very validating but even more so I think it made me like really frustrated with the world and like home made me realize kind of indignantly like.

Susan Cain
"cain" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"cain" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Particular. Play something you like Cain. Another girl I knew used to like this. Your..

Cain