17 Burst results for "Cahokia"

"cahokia" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:15 min | 2 months ago

"cahokia" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Culture? Well, that's quite the question because there's 22 tribes in Arizona and I'm comprised of only four of them. So I would only be speaking for myself. I am danette hopi pima and puna atom. I was born and raised here in Phoenix, Arizona. So, you know, there was so much that we learned in these past couple of months about all of these tribes, where they come from. And Arizona's dynamic landscape and geographical location, the 22 tribes are so different from one another and what we want to do with this program is bring pride every single one of them by including designs from their cultures that you will see in the arena graphics. When you're at the game that you will see on the website, when you're making ticket purchases on social media, what our intentions were is that these tribes will see recognizable motifs designs that will give them pride. It's a big undertaking in a big responsibility. You know, to be put in that position, a very daunting, but we stepped up to the challenge and between the three of us, we were able to bounce ideas from each other and then we'd present to the sun's creative team. And Sean, of course, he was pretty much the Wrangler on this whole project. Was able to gather a very diverse group of creatives that are all of indigenous descent to come up with this. So it is literally more than just visual is also includes sound. You know, we have music. We have movement. We've got so many different aspects of this program that you really have to see in person than just to explain in words. It's originated. So it's big. Yeah, yeah, it sounds really big. And Sean, I want to ask you because like Jeremy mentions, there's so many components to this branding and on the website you folks have a really, really cool video of young kids playing ball and you've got team players and it's just it's so, so beautiful and there's a really cool image of all the team or a bunch of the players and they're hanging out with the kids and they're just, it just looks so natural and so real and just like I said earlier like just so much negative attention has been focused on some of these sports teams in recent years and which you folks are doing there in Phoenix as you're showing people that there's a different way to do this and are you hoping that other teams and not just in the NBA but in other professional sports leagues will look to the Phoenix Suns as an example of how to appropriately demonstrate and celebrate Native American images and culture. Absolutely 100%. That's what this is all about amplifying all our voices being in three different markets. When I started in Denver, I was definitely had our Native American heritage night. I brought in all the pow dancers drum groups and had an MC educate people on why we're wearing regalia why we're singing this song. What this is about, what are the different styles of dance here, started with that in Denver and kept that going. And then when I went to Detroit, it took a while to find where all the natives were. So I had to go up north a little bit. We went through the sag chip res and met a bunch of people up there that made me at home, got invited to the picnic, had some red food so it was amazing. I was there 6 years and we did a couple nights. The first time we did our Native American heritage night there which they've never done in Detroit, we brought an MC one and Superman, we had them do their song one world and we also brought out the power dancers to dance with them so it was our, it was amazing just to collab with them and do that. And then the next year we did a powwow style halftime along with an MCU who could explain what we're doing, why we're dancing, what we're wearing, like just educating fans. So they understand and know that we're still here and we can tell the story of what we're about. And then coming back home, it was just unbelievable because I knew a lot more people I know quite a few people in the city back home on the red growing up on the reds and court defiance. Just making those connections, our first Native American heritage night was just like tears and everybody's eyes because we hug we hung all 22 tribal nations flags in the pavilion representation as tribal members walked in. They were just like, blown away with that first, just to walk in from street to seat, we're making sure they could feel the power of what we're trying to do and tell our story, having a Native American DJ out on the pavilion playing as people walk in. And when they walk in, all the branding that's done for the night from the leds to the center hung, it's all catered and done the right way to welcome all the Native American tribes that are coming to the game. But those are the kind of little things that we just made sure we want to do it the right way starting from two and a half years ago when this thing came to life and started growing working with all the different tribal nations showing the first iterations of the Jersey to Jonathan nez to governor Lewis to the Apache tribe with nabi as well getting nabby involved because we are 20 year partner of ours just making sure they had their eyes on it and they can give us their takes on that. And then coming full circle around, we got inner tribal council, we're meeting with them, we're presenting to the whole 21 tribes that are involved with that. And then we reached out to cahokia. This building and getting close to all of these groups, including Phoenix Indian center, making sure they all had a voice and they could see it and say, hey, here's what we can do. What if we tried this? What are we doing with this? And Jeremy and his crew unique and melody and cahokia and Paul just been so amazing to work with them. I'm so glad we connected with them because they're really connected to the younger generation. We were connected with the traditional now it's all coming together, but all of us had our voice and we could put our input into this and just coming to this day, it's just unbelievable. Ten nights, let me just let me just tell you about the lineup. So how are you going to sing the anthem in tonight? Didn't have hope. We have all 22 tribal leaders at halftime that will be here. We're going to honor them and present them with a gift. Next game, we have Martha ludlow, Tana oakham singing the anthem and her tribal language. We've got indigenous enterprise going halftime. Kenneth, and the powwows crew are going to come in and do their thing. For the Laker game, we got Candace dick clay going to sing in white mountain Apache halftime will be subcu Apache crown the answer is doing halftime like when is that ever going to happen? I mean, we're just making it happen, making the connections amplifying the voice as you can tell I'm getting excited because I'm trying to get my 20 times. I just got a quick question for you and I would imagine that these new jerseys, they're going to be for sale and I'm curious, will a portion of proceeds go to supporting native programs and other causes?

Arizona danette hopi Sean Phoenix Denver Detroit Jeremy Phoenix Suns Jonathan nez governor Lewis NBA sun Phoenix Indian center nabi cahokia Martha ludlow Tana oakham Jersey Candace dick
"cahokia" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

06:46 min | 9 months ago

"cahokia" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"So classic causeways back in, which means now pioneer Medina's back out. We're still waiting on early voting and strangely enough Chad Brown has made it very clear that early voting as of this point is pointing for the Preakness. He didn't even make the trip to Churchill downs. But he's not ruling out the Derby until he has to rule it out if there's a change in the pace scenario where it could be more favorable to early voting who's a stone FrontRunner. Then he has enough points and they could pivot and run in the Derby. It sounds like it's mostly like 90%, 10% that he goes Preakness via versus Derby, in which case pioneer Medina, who's been at Churchill now for a while, would get back in. The horse who's going to need something very strange to happen is in due time who was 22nd on the list about a week ago, it looked like he was getting in. Now it doesn't seem that way. And let's face it, there's a lot of people that think they didn't do time probably shouldn't have finished second and the flouting youth anyway should have been disqualified. So a lot of very strange happenings in a week where you're not expecting them. Yes, and I do think that early voting is going to go to the Preakness. I mean, they've both Clare vich and Chad Brown have won the Preakness with the horse that came off a setback in the wood memorial. It was a winning formula for him. I think as well, if they were to have a change of heart just based on how he was training and such, the addition, the re addition of classic costs, whether it makes, you know, probably would keep them in the direction of going to the pretense. Because that, like you said, that's a pure speedball. I watched the interview with Brian lynch the other day. You know, he basically attributed the decision to the owners who he said were a combined a 160 years old, so I guess they're both approximately 80. And he also said that he was going to go to the lead. He said, hey, he's going to get out there and take him as far as he can. And the one thing about classic causeway is that in both that CMF Davis in the Tampa Bay Derby, especially he broke like a shot out of a cannon. So he does break well. I don't like the addition of Julian le Peru, who isn't known as the speed rider, but his instructions are going to be pretty clear, and I would anticipate classic causeway going to the front. That would probably dissuade Chad Brown from running early voting. Early voting was attractive if he hadn't been owned by. Jeff drown if he had been owned by Claire vich, then it would make still make sense, perhaps to run him because the Derby was the most important thing. And you'd have two chances, but really early voting would be setting the table for sandin. But that's not the case. And I think they're going to just go ahead and go and that's going to put pioneer of Medina in there. Let's go out to the phone's Tom and St. Louis. You've got Bobby and James on the brisket dot com call in show. Bobby and James on a cold December day before the end of the year, this might rank as the craziest winner of the craziest call of 2022. So let me fire off. First of all, the crazy. I don't know if you guys ever look at it, but if you ever look at the Churchill condition book, they have a note page down where you take notes. I've got an office job and I've looked at stuff for 30 years. That's the best notes paper I've ever used. Okay, now on to horse racing. Guys, every year, I need big a to talk me off the UAE Derby winner. And it started with mendelssohn. And I swore every year I won't do it, but guys. I'm watching this horse that wanted this year. And dude, it's like when my dad used to train at cahokia down 50 years ago and Dave Johnson was the race caller. Out there every three days, making a half mile work, active every day, chasing a horse on the inside a couple of days ago. Steve Vick said, I don't know. I didn't like the source going in at all. I like charge it a lot. I think that horse has got a lot of upside. I hate that a lot of the media types are starting to like it too, 'cause I thought it'd be a value. And guys quite honestly, I don't think classic causeway or early voting could get a mile and a quarter if they got to start over a Wagner's and only had to run a half a quarter of a mile home. So I don't know, guys, I'll hang up and listen to your thoughts, but James, just you talking about, you know, the history of Chad Brown and those guys went in the Preakness of the horse that, you know, came off the wood. That's why guys like us, listen, that and all the guy from the guy from Memphis that goes to Oakland all the time. Charles from Mississippi. Mississippi. This is an hour of must here entertainment. And it's because of you guys that do it and your predecessors big Ed and Anthony and the hol 9 yard, guys. This is the best hour of radio every week. And God bless you guys. And keep doing what you're doing. We appreciate you, Tom. Thanks for the call. All right, I'm going to start James. You know what? I'm going to start Tom. Yeah, we love his calls. And first of all, I'm going to say this. Charles and Mississippi as fun of guy as he seems on the radio, he's nicer of a guy when you meet him in person and I got to meet him. He and his wife and daughter at Oklahoma park and spend some time with them over rebel weekend a few months ago very, very nice people and can't wait to see them again next year. As far as classic causeway goes, it doesn't surprise me that the owners are the ones who are kind of pulling the strings on this. I don't think Brian lynch would run the horse if he didn't think the horse was fit and happy and ready to go. I happen to think the same thing Tom thinks that horse has zero chance of winning the I hated this horse in the Florida Derby. Let alone The Kentucky Derby, he is at least though a pace factor in this race and I think he'd be more of a pace factor if they brought pat valenzuela to retirement and had him ride the horse instead of Julian le Peru, but yeah, I think he's got to be forwardly placed and I think he'll be nowhere as ville by the time they get to the top of the stretch. I've been wrong before. I certainly didn't like mine that bird and a few other ones that got the job done, but this is a horse that I think. Hit the marquee is going to leave on this race is just what he does early on. I agree completely and I see both classic causeway and summer is tomorrow who was like a 6, 7 for a long time who just, you know, I thought once he made the lead in the UAE Derby just out there rolling by himself, you know, and Cruz and he was running fast, but and he had to do it early, but to me they're both like cheap speed types..

Chad Brown Medina Clare vich wood memorial Julian le Peru CMF Davis Tampa Bay Derby Brian lynch Claire vich sandin Churchill downs James Bobby Steve Vick Tom Mississippi cahokia
"cahokia" Discussed on When We Talk About Animals

When We Talk About Animals

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on When We Talk About Animals

"If you hold them up with the pointy part which is called the apex if you have a gastropod which is that unit valve shell that you think of akon shell. If the pointy part is pointing up the opening is almost always on the right but in a lightning wealth in a few rare instances as shell will spiral through the last and there are possibly some evolutionary reasons for that in. There's also a lot of scientific uncertainty about that that the beauty of this story for me was that the lightning well was extraordinarily importance to people of the mississippi n. Cultures of the eastern united states richard ranged from florida. All the way up to canada. So i write about you. Mentioned in your intro. The qaluza of florida. Nope these incredible shell cities on macos. That few people know about because they were they were used or building roads and farms and so on in the early twentieth century. But who are just shell call. The lightning walk was really important to the collusive for making tools and for food and all kinds of reasons but they also traded to the nor as far north as cahokia which was a really great. You know rather an ancient metropolis. In on north america and in what is being region of modern day saint louis and these lightning wealth were so important in fact far they were traded away from the gulf of mexico and atlantic where they came from the more important they seem to be calm and some of the archaeologists and anthropologists who work on this shell in history. Think it has to do with the left handed nature of the spiral and the that had some cosmological importance to native. American people That also that also has to do with the birds rotation around the sun. So it's really all very beautiful very deep and i hope that some of those stories about our place.

florida mississippi cahokia richard united states canada north america gulf of mexico atlantic
"cahokia" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on EconTalk

"Did it. The challenge is showing that it could actually work that way. And i don't think it's enough to say to to critique the way i understand upsets or at least the way you're saying it it's it's enough to say that that you know well government also bad incentives that it's not a bad thing to point out and it's often true and i think it would be naive to say but they'll be overcome by public-spiritedness And then you know at that point you want to kind of case study. Ideally or how in some situations perhaps some societies government on it others. The the private sector's done it and see. Maybe which case might be more attractive being able to judge it easily. You know there's a famous example of the economics of lighthouse. It's quite complicated but for long times. Economists use the lighthouse as an example of something that could not be provided privately. Because the incentives weren't there you know they would say well. What are you going to turn off the light for the people who don't pay and what about the ones who have paid they'll be on the ocean for them and that was an article by paul samuelson saying that the lighthouse is a public. Good that has to be right. Publicly coast came along and said well private lighthouses exist awkward for the theory that they can't exist they actually do exist. And the overcome the free rider problem and the problem of turning off the light not by creating associations and do's and ways of enforcing nanometre remember the well one of my favorite economic articles articles economics though. And i think later by the way so people will come along with trying to link to this critique coaches analysis at least the history of the lighthouse. That was actually provided. But i do think it's a great example of how the ivory tower if you're not careful you can essentially to use it inside joke. Assume a can opener and our side. free work. people tend to do that too. Oh the providence. I don't will solve that sometimes. It does sometimes. it doesn't often it does twi You know my view on this is that there's a presumption that mark incentives work. Well not always. They may not work in a particular situation but similarly i don't want to say we'll government never works well because they're all just a bunch of bureaucrats with no incentive sometimes inspired by their desire to be good public citizens. It's possible they can do a good job. I don't you never went to argue that. Say anything i'll just. I'll just leave it at that and let you respond. Yeah yeah and by the way on the lighthouse. One of the text books that i actually really light in houston a course when i taught postgraduate school with joe stiglitz as economics to the public sector on the cover his this big picture of a lighthouse and always just found that. So ironic Yeah so that was always coast had going for him. I just away. Ucla but coast. He was kind of an honorary. Ucla or a sense very much in the tradition at emphasis on transaction costs which part of these la tradition to a large extent. Yeah on his own damn sets elchin. All those people was. Let's look let's look at the reality. Let's look at what goes on. That gets back to dem as property rights with with indian tribes. And so on what go ahead i wanted to shift it and make sure we talk a little about her cipher for a. Yeah sure and i. And i'm going to try to get a sterile thomson before we're done cahokia one of the things that i enjoyed when steve globerman and i were writing. This piece was to look back at jack. Hirsh lifers work now. Jack first of all he was a fantastic person. I just really liked him. I really was delightful. Yeah yeah ju. I'm very not sweet. So sweet yeah yeah. I'm glad i'm glad you knew him. And so he wrote something for the rand. Corporation called disaster and recovery and it was when people were really worried. This is like late fifties early sixties. People were really worried about. We could have an all out nuclear war. What would things look like afterwards. And so of course. We don't have experienced other japan other than in japan which was localized. But he said okay. Let's look at other. Let's look at japan. Let's look at germany after all the bombing and so on and let's look at how quick recovery was and the bottom line to simplify a little is recovery was quick. It was amazing how cooperative forces came together and just started digging themselves. So i think He mentions i was. I'm not sure it's the dresden firebombing or the hamburg bombing a one of those were within a few days. Electricity was flowing again which was key in a modern society. And so jack. We have a chapter just on jack hirsh lifers work on that issue and you know again it was. It was really pathbreaking time. Yeah i think. I i can't help but think about it in our current world where we kind of shut down our economy. We didn't destroy it through bombing because of the pandemic we basically put it into deep freeze for awhile. Many many societies many countries economies have have done that s response to covert and. I think it's really important. And i don't remember i for talks about this report to remember. That.

paul samuelson joe stiglitz elchin Ucla steve globerman providence japan Hirsh houston thomson jack la Jack jack hirsh germany hamburg
"cahokia" Discussed on My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

"That aspect at all. I would think about, Gobekli, Tepe, or the Great Pyramids. And it always felt like the magic is out there and I'm stuck here, and that's really sad because I did grow up outside of st. Louis near Cahokia mountains. Coqui Amounts is one of the most esoteric, basically buried cities that we have. They say that at one point. It's population was bigger than Paris and it's just, it was this giant city of indigenous people. And I was still so young that I kind of didn't think much of the indigenous American people until I left the area. So, a little sad. I probably would have gone to Rockwall Texas and checked out that crazy. Rockwall at these weird properties. I probably would have gone to Ohio to see The Serpent Mound and appreciated that better than I did at the time, but I was so long. August on the fact that I didn't agree with midwesterners politically at that time. I adopted atheism. So I thought that the Christian aspect was stupid. I was really just a feeling like there's no opportunity for what I wanted to do in the midwest. It's like, okay, what company are you going to work for? And I just hated them. So I thought you know, I have faith in Northeast to write. It's unfortunate to feel like you have to leave to do anything you want to do and ultimately I just do a podcast online. I could have done it from Missouri. Probably would have been easier cuz my rents cheaper and everything. It wouldn't have been so difficult to quit my job and take the leap, but I just didn't think of it. That way. I thought I gotta go to the, I gotta go to the West Coast to do anything at the time. I was trying to grow weed. Another Hail Mary trying to make six figures with no resources at all. Is like, how am I going to get to a place where I'm comfortable financially? If I'm also going to drop out of college wage? Start was growing. So that's how I ended up getting out here. But then once it fell apart, I was like, okay, maybe podcasting. I don't know. And I mean, there's the magic Greg. I mean you're you're clearly successful in your your field and there's magic to that. I think, I think that's definitely a part of it off yet to bring it back to what you said about the Aquarian age. I mean, it is are the qualities of are an air sign myself. So I definitely feel a kinship. They're young and the podcasting airwave metaphor that you use really resonated with. But yeah, I mean, Ross Been Michael one. These are guys that are looking into the landscape that's expired. Me to kind of go up the Connecticut River and and kind of explore. We went to a porcupine Fest in Lancaster New Hampshire and kind of just everything that we heard back on your interview with Michael Sandler about the signs symbols and synchronicities, just added so much to our journey Tara and I so I gotta thank you. I mean that up. So I think it came out the day we left and it was just so it like in the same vein as what we were discussing before. So synchronistic how it informed our journey off. And now here we are with a new segment of our podcast called the synchronistic exploration and the ever-expanding now where we take people, you know on the journey with us to show them how to use these tools to better their life and you're an example of that. You used a totally new sort of Technology..

Gobekli Cahokia mountains Rockwall Louis Paris st midwest Hail Mary Ohio Texas Missouri West Coast Michael Sandler Greg Connecticut River Ross Lancaster New Hampshire Michael Tara
"cahokia" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Version when you have that discussion but i respect both of your opinions on a nationwide basis and you know when they look toward the hall of fame and items like that. Do they ever consider somebody like that. You know russell vases in but you know little guys like david or they ever given any consideration or is it simply didn't win a breeders cup race and getting win a great wants. You didn't win anything like that Probably that looked at. I'll start with this and tom. Thanks for your call. you know. First of all starting with russell baze. Even though the northern california circuit pales in comparison to the southern california circuit it's a far bigger circuit than that at the that fairmount park and russell baze at was the leading rider of all time. So i don't think there's any way you can keep him out of the hall of fame. And of course he won several stakes as well and he won in southern california. But i think david gall one hundred percent should be in the hall of fame and it's unfortunate that he's kind of being held out of it because of where he wrote. Let's face it fairmount park which is now fan. Duel sportsbook in horse racing and cahokia. Downs are not the billboard names of racetracks goal was a leading rider by wins several years in the late seventies early eighties as far as nationwide as you mentioned he's the fifth all-time leading rider. I don't think it should be held against him. The fact that he rode at the smaller racetrack somewhat the same way. It shouldn't be held against a player. Because they play for the colorado rockies and the ball travel so well in colorado know. I it is what it is. The stats are the stats. The guy was obviously a very very good writer and he was far and away the best writer on that circuit for many many years. He is nationally top five all time. I don't see how you keep him out of the hall of fame and the truth is who probably will never get in. Let me ask you this question. Bobby is perry route a hall of famer. Yes so perry should be in the hall of fame two. Yes okay so perry is number six all time. David gall wants seven thousand three hundred ninety six races. Perry utes is currently and by the way still active. Seven thousand two hundred and four career. Wins david gall. I think the one thing that people will look at and is kind of. This is a very similar situation. Bobby i get a vote for the eclipse award's every year. And they send you the information and i refuse to put in votes just based on popularity okay. I don't want to be a popularity contest. And sometimes that happens but you tend to gravitate toward the bigger names when you're voting on a category like leading breeder or leading trainer or leading owner. Whatever it might be. And i think it's important that you try to weigh the quality of the victories against the quantity of the victories that an individual or an organization had in a specific year when you're voting for for something like the eclipse awards. This is similar. Where david gall. Yes number five all time. A number of wins his only win in a stakes race. Greatest stakes race was in nineteen ninety-three which was the fairmount derby. That was his only one. And i think that that is the factor. That's the one thing people will look at when they're thinking about the hall of fame they're going to say listen yeah. He won a lot of races but they were a lot of low level races. And i don't know how you hold that against a guy because you went a lot of races you win a lot of races. He won the fifth most races in the history of thoroughbred racing. You think about the jockeys that are behind him. Chris mccarron edgar prado angel. Cordero junior all hall of famers. Sandy hawley eddie. Delahoussaye i mean i could go on and on. He won more racist than all of those guys. But i think what people look at is quality over quantity and boy. I don't know. I mean you win that many races. You're doing something right. You are elite elite. You deserve to be in the hall of fame. I can only tell you this. Mike as somebody who grew up in southern california and did not get to see a lot of fairmount park racing. Let's face it. They didn't have a lot of races. That were worthy of being on national broadcasts. You know they were never on down the stretch with sharon smith author or any chris lincoln and the folks would cover but anytime you would see them like if we went to las vegas and it was a tuesday when fairmount and only a few other places running. You saw the name david goal and he wrote every favorite at at fairmount. And you say well. That's why he wants so many races. Well is it the chicken or the egg that comes first. Is he riding all the favorites. Because he's foreign away the best writer there or is he the best writer there because he rides all the favorites. I think he's writing the favorites because the case with the favorites. Wanna put him on the horses and the same way with russell baze. Let let me ask you this. Let me ask you this do you. View mario pino. When i say that i have to look at those stats. I don't have them in front of me. I'll give so david goal. I mentioned the one greatest stakes win perry number six. All time wins. He has never won a greatest stakes race in his career. But he's number six all time. In wins mario. Pino number ten on the winds list. All time. he's still riding. He can add to that total he trails angel cordero junior. Who is ahead of him. He has seven thousand. Fifty seven wins. Mario pino six thousand nine sixty nine. Currently mario pino has won a lot of great steaks. Remember he wrote hard spun and there were other great horses that he wrote but he has won a lot of great steaks. He's number ten all time. I think if anybody is going to eventually have a case to get into the hall of fame among riders. That aren't already. They're in the top ten. It's going to be mario. Pino while i'm going to go even further. I think i misspoke earlier. When i said that unfortunately david gall will probably never get in. I actually think he will get in and because there always seems to be a historical category every year. There's somebody on the ballot or there's somebody who gets in and it's not just horse racing. It's every sport where you you know. The the veterans committee voted. Or the whatever. And it's some jockey from seventy eight years ago or a trainer from one hundred and thirty years ago that let's face it you and i don't know off the top of our heads and i think somewhere down the line. That's how david gall could get into the hall of fame. I mean how many let's put it this way. How many years have to go by where he's a top where he's top five time where somebody doesn't just say. How is this guy not in the hall of fame. All he's been top five for forty years or not yet. It hasn't been forty years. But you know what i'm saying. It happens in other sports to look at the nfl. You have a guy like vinny testaverde right. He's what top ten a top ten quarterback in terms of his statistics. But he can't get into the hall of fame. So there you know i think we put a premium on the quality victories. That people have in their career. When you're talking about something like the hall of fame by the way whenever you say the name vinny testaverde. I had a friend growing up. Who for some reason kept calling him. Nick torture telly. And i said no. That's that's carlos boyfriend from the show cheers. That's not the quarterback who's playing in the nfl. All right let's get back to racing. We'll get back to the phones. Jeff in louisville welcome to the net dot com call and show. You're talking to mike in.

david gall russell baze fairmount park perry breeders cup southern california Perry utes mario pino Bobby cahokia Chris mccarron edgar prado Sandy hawley eddie Delahoussaye david fairmount eclipse award colorado rockies chris lincoln
"cahokia" Discussed on At The Races With Steve Byk

At The Races With Steve Byk

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on At The Races With Steve Byk

"There's a there's an example. I mean if he if david gaulin spent his whole career chicago he he'd been known as as early fires. I agree with that one hundred percent. He just felt comfortable here in those places where he was at previously it was certainly their loss in our gain here in in the same most region and i truly believe you know watching him for decade after decade but he could have read that at a much higher level at higher at a better circuit and been highly successful. There's no doubt in my mind. I mentioned that. Because i was curious about You know the big horses that he had and and you know stakes wins and the from a graded stakes standpoint The fairmont derby in one thousand nine hundred ninety three stands As his loan graded stake in terms of the modern. You know the modern Understanding of graded stakes. And of course it it. It's coming back this year. at At fairmont the the saint louis derby coming back august twentieth labeled as st louis derby sponsored by fan deal. And we're looking forward to to big big night in big racer in the return of that. Derby formerly known as the fairmont dirty and now that saints mix names over the years steve actually so but It would certainly have that back. David did work was that i know it was in the ninety six. You say ninety three. I think ninety three on a very nice source of nile o'callaghan's ad hoc crecy for sure. What about david. John mentioned him being professional. He would he. Would you know he'd get on in the morning. See where the tracks was at. Its best you know before people chalk talk track. Bias are the best part of the trekkie new after one race. He just done his homework. And and Just the true professional a hard worker in One one place where i've seen his name Because it's something that that tony black also Has done which is the the record of of wins and he won eight races In one day in one thousand nine hundred ninety. Eight at cahokia and among i think three. I think there's two other. I think there's two others that had at the time that had that had won eight races in a day and Even when he retired. I just i just noting in bio that even is the last day as he retired He he had the ad mounts in every race. I mean he. He wrote full cards into his fifties. And he's certainly he could have continued to ride. And i think he just kind of went out and my opinion on top at high level and He loved the track and he stuck around trainer for few years. And then it was a pleasure to every on the backside Continue to be on the backside in in the capacity of race trainer..

david gaulin saint louis derby st louis derby chicago tony black callaghan Derby saints steve cahokia David david John
"cahokia" Discussed on The Three Questions with Andy Richter

The Three Questions with Andy Richter

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on The Three Questions with Andy Richter

"I did do a lot of research around mormonism at the time and and i i'd always been kind of fascinated by it and there was a professor minded. Newhaven name harold bloom who wrote about Coal justice with genius like literary genius and that was fascinating to males like. Oh my god That my my idea. Warm as it was more like the book of mormon deal like the shade version of it so yeah these things start rattling around my head and then there was A plot device you know the Aside from polygamy and there was another a tenant that joseph smith held at brigham young. It is no longer practical blood. Atonement which is there are certain centers that are beyond the moment of christ's sacrifice. Only way that you can personally atone for those heinous crimes is to have your own blood spilled so i thought oh. Wow that's a great plot device if if you don't believe in the justice of society but you have like a religious justice that that fights against society. Yeah so these things started to tumble around. Yeah it only twenty years. But i wrote it. Yeah no i. I definitely want to check it out because i Like e i have an interest in mormonism. I mean i have i have read about it. A fair amount That oh i forget. The the joe the classic joseph smith book no country knows my name or no man knows my name. Yeah yeah And it's just. I mean it's amazing. What's amazing to me. Is that the recent -ness of it is and that's kind of like the point of this guy forged documents is. It's just a lot easier because it all kind of happened. Ten minutes ago within terms of civilization time and yet it's become it's legit as any other religion and it's as all the stuff that you can look at mormonism and go wait a minute. This took place in cahokia illinois. And that's you know that's s that did people some sort of leave but noah's ark right or walking on water you know turning loaves into nursing lows fishes appear it's all you know magical in all just kind of depends on.

harold bloom joseph smith Newhaven brigham young cahokia illinois noah
"cahokia" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The nineteen twenty one tulsa race massacre. That's come up several times. Previously the search of the oaklawn cemetery in tulsa ended on june twenty-seventh having identified thirty. Five coffins zoomed nineteen sets of remains from unmarked graves. Investigators do not believe that the people buried in all thirty five coffins were victims of the massacre. So they focus their estimation efforts primarily on the ones who were buried in cheaper coffins which they saw as more likely to be massacre victims. about half of the remains. Had been thoroughly examined by the twenty-seventh and at least one of them showed obvious signs of trauma. This work included a section of the cemetery known as the original eighteen believed to be the burial site of eighteen victims of the tulsa race massacre. Who had been listed on a funeral home ledger. And all this phase of the excavation oaklawn is complete now work with the remains. That were zoomed is still ongoing including trying to identify exactly who these people were so episode on the tulsa race massacre was most recently a saturday classic on may twenty ninth of this year in june the. Us office of army cemeteries announced a plan to exhume. The bodies of ten children buried on the grounds of carlisle indian industrial school and return them to their families. This is the. Us army's fourth such project at carlisle barracks some of which we have discussed on previous episodes of the show. This disinter was expected to start in mid june and be completed by july eighteenth so it is still ongoing as of when we're recording this episode. Yeah and the. Us army's announcement about this discernment at carlisle came amid several announced discoveries of mass graves and unmarked burial sites at former residential schools in canada. We mentioned these on our recent saturday. Classic on the fort shot indian school girls basketball team. And as of when we recorded this podcast which is happening on july seventh. This involves two different schools in british columbia and one in saskatchewan. So this is something. That's still ongoing as of when we're recording this based on what's happened so far i would not be surprised. Sadly if further discoveries were announced between july six when we were recording and win this episode is actually coming out. Yeah that's i would say list. That has more likely than unlikely yes. It's an ongoing and just truly horrific and and traumatizing to the people involved series of announced discoveries. so way back in two thousand eleven previous hosts. Sarah and dobalina did an episode on the pre columbian native american city of coco which was home to at least fifteen thousand people at its peak in about the year eleven fifty. It's often described as being bigger than the city of london was at that time. One unanswered question about cahokia is why the people living there ultimately abandoned it so one proposed explanation and when that was mentioned in that episode has been at the residence of cahokia used too much would from the surrounding land deforesting area and contributing to run off and flooding but according to research that was published in the journal geo archaeology. While the reasons behind cahokia's abandonment still aren't clear it probably wasn't because of deforestation in the words of caitlyn rankin who conducted this research as part of her graduate studies quote. There's a really common narrative about land use practices that lead to erosion and sedimentation and contribute to all of these environmental consequences. When we actually revisit this we're not seeing evidence of the flooding so there was evidence of lots of would use including cutting down thousands of trees to build palisades but there was not evidence that catastrophic flooding had followed that and that was the thing that had theoretically lead to kochi as abandonment last year. We didn't episode on beekeeping and its origins in honey and bee hunting researchers in west africa have been studying. The central nigerian knock culture which existed from about five hundred bc to two hundred ce including carrying out chemical analysis on four hundred fifty pieces of pottery. The soil in the area is very acidic so plant an animal remains have not survived the intervening two thousand years to be analyzed. So this pottery is archaeologists primary tool to learn about how the knock people eight and how it compares to groups living in the area today about a third of the pottery studied in this research showed. Evidence of being used to store and process beeswax in the words of co author. peter brenning of to university quote. We originally started the study of chemical residues in pottery shirts because of the lack of animal bones at knox sites hoping to find evidence for meat processing in the pots that the knock people exploited honey. Thirty five hundred years ago was completely unexpected and is unique in west african prehistory. Archaeologists believed that. They have found the home that harriet tubman lived in when she was a teenager. The team had been fruitlessly. Searching dorchester county in maryland's eastern shore before a metal detector helped them spot a coin that was dated eighteen o eight that coin lead them to the likely site of a cabin owned by tubman father. Ben ross about a quarter of a mile away. Archaeologists have since found bricks. A drawer poll a button and pipe stem among other artifacts. This search started last fall. Based on written records that pointed the team to the direction of attractive land that the us fish and wildlife service purchased last year and our two parter on harriet. Tubman was most recently a saturday. Classic justice past june we talked about the philadelphia moved bombing in may of two thousand seventeen philadelphia. Police dropped a bomb on a home. Members of the move organization were living in and officials than allowed the resulting fire to burn unchecked through the neighborhood. Eleven people died including five children in april news. Broke that the bones of two children killed in the bombing likely belonging to twelve year old deletion africa and fourteen year old tree. Africa were being held in the collections of university of pennsylvania princeton and that they were being used as a case study in an online forensic anthropology course the course was originally filmed in two thousand nineteen and was presented by princeton university on the core sarah platform under the title real bones adventures in forensic anthropology. But that has since been taken down. Maya cassuto broke this story in the philadelphia. Publication billy penn on april twenty first and from there. It really became international news. Cassuto who had previously worked at the penn museum wrote about the careless and in different way that these remains had been handled at the university of pennsylvania museum of archeology and anthropology and that they had been transferred to princeton but a princeton spokesperson later said the university no longer had them. It was really unclear where these bones were win. This story first broke in. May city officials announced that. Philadelphia's health commissioner dr thomas farley had ordered the remains cremated and disposed of in two thousand seventeen rather than returning them to surviving members of the africa family. Farley later resigned with his resignation announced on the thirty six th anniversary of the bombing but then it was announced that the remains had been found in storage. The city announced that after finishing an internal investigation into all of this the remains would be returned to the children's surviving family members. And this is one of those things. Thousands still a developing story and situation as we are recording this It's possible that there will be further developments in.

tulsa oaklawn cemetery Us office of army carlisle indian industrial sch carlisle barracks Us army cahokia fort shot indian school dobalina journal geo archaeology caitlyn rankin peter brenning carlisle trauma saskatchewan Ben ross coco british columbia palisades
"cahokia" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Showed obvious signs of trauma. This work included a section of the cemetery known as the original eighteen believed to be the burial site of eighteen victims of the tulsa race massacre. Who had been listed on a funeral home ledger. And all this phase of the excavation oaklawn is complete now work with the remains. That were zoomed is still ongoing including trying to identify exactly who these people were so episode on the tulsa race massacre was most recently a saturday classic on may twenty ninth of this year in june the. Us office of army cemeteries announced a plan to exhume. The bodies of ten children buried on the grounds of carlisle indian industrial school and return them to their families. This is the. Us army's fourth such project at carlisle barracks some of which we have discussed on previous episodes of the show. This disinter was expected to start in mid june and be completed by july eighteenth so it is still ongoing as of when we're recording this episode. Yeah and the. Us army's announcement about this discernment at carlisle came amid several announced discoveries of mass graves and unmarked burial sites at former residential schools in canada. We mentioned these on our recent saturday. Classic on the fort shot indian school girls basketball team. And as of when we recorded this podcast which is happening on july seventh. This involves two different schools in british columbia and one in saskatchewan. So this is something. That's still ongoing as of when we're recording this based on what's happened so far i would not be surprised. Sadly if further discoveries were announced between july six when we were recording and win this episode is actually coming out. Yeah that's i would say list. That has more likely than unlikely yes. It's an ongoing and just truly horrific and and traumatizing to the people involved series of announced discoveries. so way back in two thousand eleven previous hosts. Sarah and dobalina did an episode on the pre columbian native american city of coco which was home to at least fifteen thousand people at its peak in about the year eleven fifty. It's often described as being bigger than the city of london was at that time. One unanswered question about cahokia is why the people living there ultimately abandoned it so one proposed explanation and when that was mentioned in that episode has been at the residence of cahokia used too much would from the surrounding land deforesting area and contributing to run off and flooding but according to research that was published in the journal geo archaeology. While the reasons behind cahokia's abandonment still aren't clear it probably wasn't because of deforestation in the words of caitlyn rankin who conducted this research as part of her graduate studies quote. There's a really common narrative about land use practices that lead to erosion and sedimentation and contribute to all of these environmental consequences. When we actually revisit this we're not seeing evidence of the flooding so there was evidence of lots of would use including cutting down thousands of trees to build palisades but there was not evidence that catastrophic flooding had followed that and that was the thing that had theoretically lead to kochi as abandonment last year. We didn't episode on beekeeping and its origins in honey and bee hunting researchers in west africa have been studying. The central nigerian knock culture which existed from about five hundred bc to two hundred ce including carrying out chemical analysis on four hundred fifty pieces of pottery. The soil in the area is very acidic so plant an animal remains have not survived the intervening two thousand years to be analyzed. So this pottery is archaeologists primary tool to learn about how the knock people eight and how it compares to groups living in the area today about a third of the pottery studied in this research showed. Evidence of being used to store and process beeswax in the words of co author. peter brenning of to university quote. We originally started the study of chemical residues in pottery shirts because of the lack of animal bones at knox sites hoping to find evidence for meat processing in the pots that the knock people exploited honey. Thirty five hundred years ago was completely unexpected and is unique in west african prehistory. Archaeologists believed that. They have found the home that harriet tubman lived in when she was a teenager. The team had been fruitlessly. Searching dorchester county in maryland's eastern shore before a metal detector helped them spot a coin that was dated eighteen o eight that coin lead them to the likely site of a cabin owned by tubman father. Ben ross about a quarter of a mile away. Archaeologists have since found bricks. A drawer poll a button and pipe stem among other artifacts. This search started last fall. Based on written records that pointed the team to the direction of attractive land that the us fish and wildlife service purchased last year and our two parter on harriet. Tubman was most recently a saturday. Classic justice past june we talked about the philadelphia moved bombing in may of two thousand seventeen philadelphia. Police dropped a bomb on a home. Members of the move organization were living in and officials than allowed the resulting fire to burn unchecked through the neighborhood. Eleven people died including five children in april news. Broke that the bones of two children killed in the bombing likely belonging to twelve year old deletion africa and fourteen year old tree. Africa were being held in the collections of university of pennsylvania princeton and that they were being used as a case study in an online forensic anthropology course the course was originally filmed in two thousand nineteen and was presented by princeton university on the core sarah platform under the title real bones adventures in forensic anthropology. But that has since been taken down. Maya cassuto broke this story in the philadelphia. Publication billy penn on april twenty first and from there. It really became international news. Cassuto who had previously worked at the penn museum wrote about the careless and in different way that these remains had been handled at the university of pennsylvania museum of archeology and anthropology and that they had been transferred to princeton but a princeton spokesperson later said the university no longer had them. It was really unclear where these bones were win. This story first broke in. May city officials announced that. Philadelphia's health commissioner dr thomas farley had ordered the remains cremated and disposed of in two thousand seventeen rather than returning them to surviving members of the africa family. Farley later resigned with his resignation announced on the thirty six th anniversary of the bombing but then it was announced that the remains had been found in storage. The city announced that after finishing an internal investigation into all of this the remains would be returned to the children's surviving family members. And this is one of those things. Thousands still a developing story and situation as we are recording this It's possible that there will be further developments in.

Us office of army carlisle indian industrial sch carlisle barracks Us army tulsa cahokia fort shot indian school dobalina journal geo archaeology caitlyn rankin peter brenning carlisle trauma saskatchewan Ben ross coco british columbia palisades kochi
"cahokia" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"That's how this society works essentially but with specifically with indigenous people. It's really like just go. Fucking go look cahokia and the they built a striped mountain. That was like made of various colors of soil and clay that they had brought from like hundreds of miles away in saint. Louis that like put the great pyramid of he's a or the pyramids in egypt to shame. And the reason that like you've never heard of that is because they were about to build a fucking parking lot on it when somebody realized what was happening coke was like the biggest city in the world at during the twelve hundreds and america systematically and intentionally doesn't want to honor these histories because they were erased for reason. And you know that. There's still a lot of america's ideals are that are tied up in the reasons that it was erased. And why you never learned how advanced indigenous civilizations were but it's actively being ignored it's actively being written out of the news out of history and people just aren't bothering to study this stuff because it kind of contradicts. You know the central american ideal. I guess go exceptional. Exceptional your mediocre. In comparison y- indigenous people that you're just moved into a like apocalyptic society and like moved into people's houses fucking. Goldilocks and stirred lake. Pretended like you did all the work yourself. Yeah anyways we will continue to cover that as america hopefully deals with its own history of residential schools. I mean it's wild to think there's more of a concerted effort to not teach history at the moment that's picking up so much space especially on the conservative side. Is this whole like when he was released to critical racer. That's not even being taught in elementary schools. But it's it's there. They know that it on the subconscious of a lot of conservatives. They know it's like don't talk about the terrible stuff because then that that that sort of helps bolster the arguments that we are backwards and we need to change all right. Let's take a quick break and we'll be right back. Hey xichang it's me jack from work or wherever you listen to the show the car maybe saying. Hey it's me. Jack.

america coke egypt Louis jack Jack
"cahokia" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"Shell around and say the little tiny point at the top is always the oldest part of the shell so if you hold the shell in front of you with that at the top almost all shells will open on the right hand side but a lightning welk opens on the left. It's it the the animal winds that in the opposite direction of almost every other shell. And what's so cool about that. Is that the native. American people were crazy about lightning. Welk so here in florida. There was a an indigenous tribe called the collusive who actually they built these incredible cities of shell in southwest florida. And they built these huge structures on top of shell mounds. They had ports. They just had this incredible shell. World in southwest florida and it was all raised in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century for highways and farms and other uses but the most commonly used shell among their tools and they're building materials by far was the lightning welk and the fascinating thing. Fascinating thing about that. I know you you know about cahokia. Where modern day saint louis is now. Many many shells are also found at cahokia. And by far the most common shell found in the remnants of cahokia is also the lightning wealth even though they came from they had to have come from so far away so for inland and the gulf of mexico it is so far inland and these things are all over cahokia. They're in they're in beads there. In burials there in these special cups that the cahokia people used to drink their special black tea which was also the case here in the southeast so lightning welk's were extraordinarily important to an earlier people and so i. I just love them because they're so beautiful. They look like a conch bitter. A little bit more slender. And they're called lightning welk's because they have these really subtle incredibly dramatic Well it sounds weird that they're both subtle and dramatic but they really are. They're a little pale but they have dramatic angles and they do look like just lightning strikes coming del side. I'm looking at a picture down side of the show. That's like a strike of lightning of a vertical line. Yeah exactly yeah so there. There are many many fascinating stories to tell about the lightning welk's and they and they you know. Many of those stories involve native american people who who revered them. In some of the archaeologists. I interviewed for the lightning. Welk chapter bank. It has it may have some spiritual connection for them that is based on the left word spiral and zone that you know. That's that's just a lovely. That's a lovely thing to think about the something about the fact that this the the species spiraled the other way we was meaningful. Yeah.

cahokia florida Welk welk saint louis gulf of mexico Welk chapter bank
"cahokia" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"cahokia" Discussed on Throughline

"Has to be some place where you can find things out without being made to feel stupid. And i was hoping that we will continue to be that place after the break. We try to imagine who are audiences. Hi my name is nelson calling from the top of most now each city of cahokia which is right across from modern day. And if you're interested in history you should be listening to through.

"cahokia" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"cahokia" Discussed on Science for the People

"The government is trying to rebuild those reservoirs and so all farmers have been kicked out and their re flooding the reservoirs but yeah i mean people were just you know. Hey it's a big area. It's a why not put a farm here. It's big areas flat. You know and the moseley waters as there when it rains. Yeah so it was a good. I mean it just looks at this point. This was the east beret The east cer- major reservoir in the downtown area and it really just looked like an indentation in the ground and You know i'm sure now you know like three or four years later. It's probably looking much better. But yeah it was farmland. And the last thing i wanted to ask about because i knew i can't keep you forever but one of the things that struck me about angkor and also cahokia And pompeii which should who did not have and that was our deep devotion to giant objects lighten pyramids and mounts and temples and that huge silver. Bean thing in chicago like why are we so into monumental architecture like when when you go to look for a city or the ruins of a city what you often find is not you know Somebody's townhouse you find a buried half buried remnants of the statue of liberty now inhabited by apes right exactly or you find like ziggurat or whatever Yes so. I mean there's a million hypotheses about why it is that people build monuments but As i mentioned earlier one of the Definitions of a city which we get from an early twentieth century anthropologist named v. Gordon child Is that it has to have monuments like so. That's kinda just built in to anthropologist view of of how this works Of how urbanization works. I was really interested in this one. anthropologist i talked to who studies the neolithic marian and she writes about Monumental texture as an expression of kind of identity crisis or just Sort of social crisis and she connects are urged to build monuments to Basically the urge to stake claim somewhere to kind of clean a piece of land as ours. so kind of acting out the same crisis that we talked about it to tell who where people are moving from nomadic life too. Sedentary life That there's this need to kind of hyperbolic assert like this is our land sea. We built the dams ziggurat And so she thinks that monumental architecture kind of comes up at different points in history when people are having an urban crisis so Tall apparently was not having this kind of urban crisis although to tell who is located very near Good beckley teppei. Which was a neolithic. Settle on yeah. It's a massive monument And it's it's older than chattel but the culture there seems to strongly influence to tahoe culture. So so she kind of thinks of beckley teppei as as this crisis made manifest and She and i talked a little bit about how Today as we're transitioning from cities to megacities Cities that are just super large Were suddenly seeing this obsession with super tall skyscrapers And she and. I were just sort of spitballing wondering like if this was the same kind of psychological crisis where people are feeling Anxious about living in cities that are so dense and so big these historically agglomerations of people and in order to kind of just express our feelings. We're building these super tall skyscrapers And other weird ass monuments And that it's really just us just kinda like working out our Our neurosis about how weird it is that we're living in these new kinds of cities that are just so bewilderingly complex and big so I love that theory. I think it's one of many many possible hypotheses. i don't think it's the only reason why we build monuments. I think there's spiritual reasons why people build monuments there's political and social reasons But it does seem. It's interesting to think about how it is an expression of of kind of sense of of not belonging and that in order to convince ourselves that we belong somewhere. We say all right. We'll just like build a giant thing and then then we know for sure that we belong there because we built that thing so instead of you know feeling your feelings you can build your feelings. Build a super tall skyscraper built the empire state building or leg build. I know yeah ziggurat or a pyramid or Like a really tall. Totem pole along the coast. The pacific coast. You know. i'm now thinking i knew. Giant corona virus monument like just a big virus spike protein. Thing i i would. Here's here's the thing is nobody's gonna wanna remember this when we're done you know what i mean like. Nobody's gonna want to see a giant spike protein ever again. It'll be opposite right like somebody will build like a giant. Let's forget about the pandemic building where nobody's allowed to wear masks and we're all just like smashed up against each other and it'll be like yay. This is our monument to not having another pandemic. We can only hope. Well thank you so much for being here and giving us so many new things to think about in the urban age. Yeah thank you so much for having me. I'm such a huge fan of the show so it's really fun to get to be on. Finally it is an honor to have you You can find out more about emily new. It's and their book. Four law cities a secret history of the urban age at our website. Science for the people dot ca. You know where that is and if you haven't yet you could subscribe. You.

early twentieth century three Good beckley teppei chicago Today v. Gordon one beckley teppei four years later cahokia emily beret Four law cities things tahoe
"cahokia" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

08:53 min | 2 years ago

"cahokia" Discussed on Science for the People

"Which is a roman city at the at the time that it was destroyed by vesuvius it was a roman city and like pretty much. All roman cities houses were designed to have public space in them and the atrium in a roman house would have been open to the street. it would have been. I guess like the modern equivalent would be like a living room or something like that. It's it's a room that living room. Yeah kind of now. yes. Because i feel like now. We're we don't really have this concept inner cities and we don't have we don't really have a room like this but yeah it would be a big formal living room and like i said it would be open onto the street so theoretically anyone from the street could walk into your atrium and atrium would be a big open room with a pool in the center. it had a big skylight over the pool to let rainwater into the pool but also just to make the place for open airy And then from the atrium you could go into The the man of the house would have a business area where he might receive visitors And this was just normal the idea that you would expect that Members of the public would walk into your house. I mean obviously not. Anyone would have to be someone that you were expecting to do. Business with say or someone that you knew But it could theoretically just be like dude off the street. who's like. Hey i was thinking of doing some business. What do you say And certainly on top of all that these rooms would have just been for people to look at so anyone walking by can kind of look into your living room right. There's no there's no way. Yeah i mean some of them. Had i mean obviously there's variety not every house looks the same so some of them would have had gateways and some of them would have had Kind of tunnels that you would go through to get to the atrium and But the idealized roman house the one that would appear kind of in an architectural magazine. If you had those in ancient rome Would be a place where the atrium was open to the street and you could just walk in and then you have again very different ideas of public and private at in places like angkor and cahokia Where there were a lot of public spaces built to hold people to do all manner of different activities ceremonial activities games parties and You know in anchor were Public areas all around The downtown Where there were reservoirs. That were both ceremonial and practical Just large areas together And caccia thing you had massive public plazas were not the thing that's interesting about the kokin. Plaza is that when i think when westerners think of public plaza we always think of the market square. We're like well. That's where the public gathers the market square. But it coca that wasn't it was not a market square. It was literally just a place for being in public And for gathering together to do all kinds of stuff But not commercial stuff. It was much more to Have events where you came together as a community to share in work or share in Some kind of a party at had a lot of barbecues coca so there's barbecuing in the plaza Were barbecuing at the edges of the plaza. And and so these are all basically different ways of thinking about what's public. So is the public part of your city inside your house. Is it on your roof. Is there a formal plaza. Is there A former area where the public can get drinking. Water like an anchor So depending on how you're organizing that space It's going to be conducive to all different kinds of social meetings And it's just it's really a big part of urban design is thinking about where the public can gather And whether you're going to allow the public together because that's a whole other thing that happens In cities to is. I'm trying to limit the way that people can gather which i don't really get to that it. That much in this book is more of a modern phenomenon But yeah so this. Is i think any time. You encounter a new city particularly if it's Removed from you in time like if it's a historical city it's interesting to think about. Where did people go when they wanted to be in public. Where did they go when they wanted to be in private. And in who controlled that you know who got to have privacy in. Who didn't you you got to have public life too by the way. Yeah that's that's really fascinating to me Kind of how quickly the places for public and private life can change You know we were talking about you know when i was little And i i learned about romans in like The eighties when i was when i was little and i learned about romans Yeah i learned about atrios and they would say oh You know it's like formal living room and as a child. I understood what that was because my neighbor had one. But now nobody has that like they. Don't build houses with formal living-rooms anymore Nobody has them it. Everybody's living rooms have been changed to like. I don't know probably at this point. They've all been changed a home office But even within the space of a generation that concept is change and similarly. You were mentioning people. Think oh you gather at a marketplace. When was the last time you gathered at a marketplace. Even before covid. Well i think he hands on where you live right. I mean i grew up in the suburbs and we all hung out at the mall. And there's still plenty of places in the united states where people hang out in malls where they go to the You know local farmer's market and made me think of actually was Growing up kind of in the country Where we gathered was the place where the local sports team played. Yeah so we'd gather in the large huge basketball complex nice and i wasn't you just that like it wasn't for basketball. It was also where we held graduation and prom and there'd be like marketplace's for various things would sometimes get set up there You know ceremonies. Various kinds would be held in the sportscenter. Yeah the rituals of your native land. Yeah and that's actually very and actually the great plaza at cahokia was definitely used for sporting events And that was a big pastime for people. So yeah. I mean you know americans going back. Thousands of years have been gathering in sports arenas to do all kinds of stuff and It's it's just a you know. Cities are places designed to bring the public together. And so you're always every city is always going to have something like that But yeah it's sometimes sometimes public spaces extend all the way into what we think of as private spaces Opposite can happen where Places that you think should be public actually get privatized like People have private beaches They'll have a big chunk of land that belongs to them and you're not allowed to go on it So again that's another weird inversion where you know. Why should a beach be private or why should giant field belong to just one individual and that's part of a heart of cultural change. Is that we rebuild these ideas of public and private to suit our environment and to suit the elites capitalism ruins everything and one of the things i thought was interesting. Was you know we're talking about public and private spaces but some of the things about to ptolemaic and pompeii kind of give us this picture that you recognize right..

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"cahokia" Discussed on ??Run The Jewelz Show??

??Run The Jewelz Show??

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"cahokia" Discussed on ??Run The Jewelz Show??

"They're entitled to believe whatever they want. But once again whatever you call it you didn't make the trees outside. You didn't create the water outside. You didn't create the sun the win no elements. So if you don't call it guy you can just call the creator of everything. That's a because something has to create all those elements whether you believe something to not does not change anything. We're in the age of aquarius. The age of knowing the age of belief was age of pisces. We're no longer in that. So belief is one thing but you still gotta know. I believe on this live feed talking to you but i know i see the difference booth and that's the difference between knowing and believe it so people don't have to believe in anything long as they know it something greater than them. Sustaining everything l. Just realize that it's something greater than you. You don't have to call it if you don't have to call it anything this ever been called before but i just think that it's a respect for knowing that something greater than you absolutely you know and i'm a i'm a stay right there because like i say people don't believe because we don't have to believe anything we're in the age of knowing right you have to know what you're connected to right. I know i'm connected to something greater than me. Just because of the way my life floats absolutely. It's not just a meat thing. Getting up saying i'm gonna do this or do that is out that several times absolutely you know. Go from dreams on down to what you see in your mind every day. This is the vilely guy. And people don't believe in god or things or no god because they've been beaten down by what it wasn't and when you beat down by with something isn't for so long you just get tired and say forget it all which happens a lot as you and i know exactly and the thing to remember is our people wrote on walls from egypt timid or tommorrow ray. All the way down to the mayans and mix in america. I'm talking about pyramids and illinois in cahokia right. it's pyramids all going through tennessee. On the side of the press. Way seventy five twenty four. You can ride all these places and cialis big caves and mounds and all these things on the side of the road because letting you know man. Your people always been here. That's why many coaches the eagle falcon at a hook always was at the top like the totem pole on the top of a man's body because those birds represented the sun because they fly with the sun and their precision. Is the keenest alive. Me and you could be standing by garbage. Can laugh in iraq could run past. We didn't see it. Come up there between any one of us right. That's why we put the hawk hair or bird hit on a man to show you how you have to have your goats in mind your life. You have to have pinpoint precision. I don't care if the chicken heads to the side. The ducks over there on care about none of that straight in for what changed this is what are people telling us through nature. Nature is the man's greatest teacher. Gone that a little bit a little bit before we get ready to close out in a second and if anyone has questions of for for t- coast t feel free to drop them in the comments section of those. That are still tuning in even if you're catching a replay later if you have any questions for coach t. I know he'll be letting you know how you reach out to the movie and shortly but if you have any questions for him currently right now just dropped in the comments section but t are going to that nature because a lot of Especially that either are descendants of of our african ancestors or even people in a room who are more commercialized or more industrialized Why do you think that we're so out of touch with nature in a spiritual element of god himself in the creation of that guy that got put on this earth. Why do you think are human beings left alone especially allowed individual. Even here in america are out of touch with nature because we don't respect nature we murder nature because we don't think mother nature is real. Most bus disrespect our own so we disrespect mother earth and mother nature. So when you don't respect something you'll want to know about it you don't care about you don't wanna learn about it but if you go back to like. I said egypt kimmy. I use that because they left a lot of jews. I'm not saying about the slavery. What hebrew israel. Not saying that because it was the invaders that were feral. So that doesn't mean that your own had you. They could've had you should not specific enough but they they had something called the net or net or the nets have that means nature. That's why you see all the animal heads on man. Zoo morphing things from kim. All the way to the americas to so many places around the world us morphing images because nature is man's greatest teacher when that squirrel is gathering food coat. Absolutely when those birds fly south. You north about to get coke.

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"cahokia" Discussed on Des Ondes Vocast

Des Ondes Vocast

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"cahokia" Discussed on Des Ondes Vocast

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