35 Burst results for "Caesar"

Robbie Knievel, daredevil son of Evel Knievel, dies at 60

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Robbie Knievel, daredevil son of Evel Knievel, dies at 60

"Robbie knievel, the daredevil son of Evel Knievel, has died. I Norman hall, stunt performer Robbie knievel literally followed in the tracks of his father, motorcycle daredevil evil knievel. Robbie knievel completed a jump in 1989 in Las Vegas over the Caesars Palace fountains that left his father injured in 1967. His thoughts included jumping his motorcycle over aircraft on the deck of New York's USS Intrepid. Accelerating now to 80 miles an hour to make the jump. And he's done it. Knievel's brother Kelly knievel says the scary stunts took their tolls. He says Robbie died in Nevada hospice after battling pancreatic cancer. Robbie knievel was 60. I Norman hall

Robbie Knievel Norman Hall Evel Knievel Caesars Palace Kelly Knievel Las Vegas Knievel New York Robbie Nevada Pancreatic Cancer
Charlie Welcomes Longtime Friend Candace Owens to the Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | Last month

Charlie Welcomes Longtime Friend Candace Owens to the Show

"Candace Owens, what are your pronouns? My pronouns are Caesar's today. Today. Somebody asked me that they said, how do you respond on a college campus if they require you to state your pronouns? How would you respond? If you're in class or if you're a class or just some sort of mandatory environment. I probably would drop the course because if you have a professor that's supposed to be teaching you that's asking you something that's that stupid, you're probably not going to get much out of the semester. You see the FBI Twitter file where the FBI agent Elvis Chan had his pronouns. It's so embarrassing. What embarrasses me is I just picture the Kremlin, right? Sitting around when these things, there must be having a good time, you know what I mean? We're not being taken seriously on the world stage anymore. And that's why I always think of people that are adversaries of the United States have to be sitting back and laughing, going this country maybe has ten more years when the FBI starts putting pronouns in their bios and emails like pretending to be important. We're not in a good spot. It is kind of the worst aspects of modernity. The Twitter files, what's your original what's your initial takeaway from that? We already knew it. I mean, I'm glad that we got more specific. Like Charlie Kirk, okay, yeah, we figured that one. I'm sure Candace Owens as well. And we're all on the list. We know this. We've been saying it for years. It's nice to have the world have to acknowledge it and stop pretending that we're all conspiracy theorists. They say that the difference between the truth and the conspiracy is about give it 6 weeks. And I guess that short now? It used to be two years. I seriously about 5 minutes these days. But so yeah, that's nice. It feels good to have the press have to acknowledge that it wasn't just existing in our own heads, but there wasn't anything I was surprised about. I think I'm most excited for the Fauci files because that was a psychological experiment like we've never seen before. And it just required total obedience and the social media companies were complicit and I'd like to see how far Doctor Fauci went if he inspired Elon Musk to say that my pronouns are prison, Fauci. Get the shot. And he said, my pronouns are. Fauci for prisoners. Fauci for president. And so for Elon Musk to tweet that when he's already been in the files, he has my attention, that's all I'll say. So

Candace Owens FBI Elvis Chan Charlie Kirk Caesar Fauci United States Twitter Elon Musk
Dinesh Unpacks Aristotle's Magnanimity

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:10 min | Last month

Dinesh Unpacks Aristotle's Magnanimity

"If we go to ancient Greece and Rome before Christianity, there was a certain ideal of doing good, which I would describe not as compassion, but as magnanimity. So what is magnanimity? Well, Aristotle speaks about what he calls the great souled man. And the great salt man actually helps people. And he also does all kinds of things. What we would today called social service for the community for the polis. But why does he do it? He does it because he's great. He does it to express his greatness or his superiority. Aristocrats and ancient Greece and Rome would fund bats and statues and parks and board their names of Caesar famously in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar goes I'm going to give all the land this side of the tiber to the Roman citizens, but this is magnanimity. This is not the same thing as compassion. Compassion is fellow feeling. It means really, well, the actual word means suffering along with other people. And so we help people in Haiti and Rwanda, not because we're better than them, but because we're like them. Because we are all in the same human predicament. We're all as we say in the same boat.

Greece Rome Julius Caesar Caesar Shakespeare Rwanda Haiti
Day 349 of The Bible in a Year: Paul on the Island of Malta

The Bible in a Year

02:37 min | Last month

Day 349 of The Bible in a Year: Paul on the Island of Malta

"Were reading access the apostles chapter 28, the final chapter, as well as flipping chapters one and two, pro group chapter 29 versus 25 through 27. The acts of the apostles, chapter 28. Paul on the island of Malta. After we had escaped, we then learned that the island was called Malta, and the natives showed us unusual kindness for the Kindle to fire and welcomed us all because it had begun to rain and was cold. Paul had gathered a bundle of sticks and put them on the fire when a viper came out because of the heat and fastened on his hand. When the natives saw the creature hanging from his hand, they said to one another, no doubt this man is a murderer, though he has escaped from the sea, justice is not allowed him to live. He, however, shook off the creature into the fire and suffered no harm. They waited, expecting him to swell up or suddenly fall down dead. But when they had waited a long time and saw no misfortune come to him, they changed their minds and said that he was a God. Now in the neighborhood of that place where lands belonging to the chief man of the island named publius, who received us and entertained us hospitably for three days. It happened that the father of publius lay sick with fever and dysentery, and Paul visited him and prayed, and putting his hands on him, healed him, and when they had taken place, the rest of the people on the island who had diseases also came and were cured. They presented many gifts to us, and when we sailed, they put on board whatever we needed. Paul comes to Rome. After three months, we set sail in a ship which had wintered in the island, a ship of Alexandria, with the twin brothers as figurehead. Putting in at Syracuse, we stayed there for three days. And from there we made a circuit and arrived at regium, and after one day a south wind sprang up, and on the second day, we came to put yoli. There we found brethren, and were invited to stay with them for 7 days. And so we came to Rome. And the brethren there, when they heard of us, came as far as the form of appius and three taverns to meet us. On seeing them, Paul thanked God and took courage. And when we came into Rome, Paul was allowed to stay by himself with the soldier that guarded him. Paul and Jewish leaders in Rome. After three days, he called together the local leaders of the Jews, and when they had gathered, he said to them. Brethren, though I had done nothing against the people or the customs of our fathers, yet I was delivered prisoner from Jerusalem into the hands of the Romans. When they had examined me, they wished to set me at liberty because there was no reason for the death penalty in my case. But when the Jews objected, I was compelled to appeal to Caesar, though I had no charge to bring against my nation. For this reason, therefore, I have asked to see you and speak with you, since it is because of the hope of Israel that I am bound with this chain.

Paul Malta Rome Publius Dysentery Appius Fever Alexandria Syracuse Jerusalem Caesar Israel
Day 348: Paul Sails for Rome

The Bible in a Year

02:59 min | Last month

Day 348: Paul Sails for Rome

"It's day three 48. We're reading acts 27. Efficient chapters four 5 and 6, and proper chapter 29 versus 22 through 24. The acts of the apostles, chapter 27 Paul sales for Rome. And when it was decided that we should sail for Italy, they delivered Paul and some other prisoners to a centurion of the augustan cohort named Julius. And embarking in a ship of HME, which was about to sail to the ports along the coast of Asia, we put to sea. Accompanied by aristarchus, a Macedonian from thessalonica. The next day we put in at sidon, and Julius treated Paul kindly and gave him leave to go to his friends and be cared for. And putting to sea from there, we sailed under the Lee of Cyprus, because the winds were against us. And when we had sailed across the sea which is off cilicia and pamphilia, we came to Myra and lycia. There the centurion found a ship of Alexandria sailing for Italy and put us on board. We sailed slowly for a number of days, and arrived with difficulty off sun itis, and as the wind did not allow us to go on, we sailed under the Lee of Crete off salmony. Coasting along it with difficulty, we came to a place called fairhaven's. Near which was the city of la Silla. As much time had been lost, and the voyage was already dangerous because the fast had already gone by, Paul advised them saying, sirs. I perceive that the voyage will be with injury and much loss, not only of cargo and the ship, but also of our lives. But this centurion paid more attention to the captain and to the owner of the ship than to what Paul said, and because the harbor was not suitable to winter in, the majority advised to put to sea from there on the chance that somehow they could reach Phoenix, a harbor of Crete, looking northeast and southeast and winter there. The storm at sea and when the south wind blew gently, supposing that they had obtained their purpose, they weighed anchor and sailed the long Crete close inshore. But soon, a tempestuous wind called the northeaster, struck down from the land, and when the ship was caught and could not face the wind, we gave way to it and were driven. And running under the Lee of a small island called kauda, we managed with difficulty to secure the boat. After hoisting it up, they took measures to undergird the ship. Then, fearing that they should run on the surface, they lowered the gear, and so were driven. As we were violently storm tossed, they began next day to throw the cargo overboard, and the third day they cast out with their own hands the tackle of the ship. And when neither sun nor stars appeared for many a day, and no small tempest lay on us, all hope of our being saved was at last abandoned. As they had been long without food, Paul then came forward among them and said, men. You should have listened to me, and should not have set sail from Crete and incurred this injury and loss. I now bid you take heart, for there will be no loss of life among you, but only of the ship. For this very night there stood by me and angel of the God to whom I belong and whom I worship, and he said, do not be afraid Paul. You must stand before Caesar. And behold, God has granted you all those who sail with you.

Paul Aristarchus Paul Kindly Julius Pamphilia Lycia La Silla Italy Thessalonica Sidon Myra Fairhaven Rome Cyprus Alexandria Asia Crete LEE Phoenix Caesar
Day 346 of The Bible in a Year: Paul Appeals to Ceasar

The Bible in a Year

02:47 min | Last month

Day 346 of The Bible in a Year: Paul Appeals to Ceasar

"Day 346 acts 25 galatians four 5 and 6 and proverbs chapter 29 versus 15 through 17. The acts of the apostles, chapter 25 Paul appeals to Caesar. Now, when festus had come into his province after three days, he went up to Jerusalem from caesarea. And the chief priests and the principal men of the Jews informed him against Paul, and they urged him, asking as a favor to have the man sent to Jerusalem, planning an ambush to kill him on the way. Fastest replied that Paul was being kept at cesarea and that he himself intended to go there shortly. So said he, let the men of authority among you go down with me. And if there was anything wrong about the man, let them accuse him. When he had stayed among them not more than 8 or ten days, he went down to caesarea, and the next day he took his seat on the tribunal and ordered Paul to be brought. And when he had come, the Jews had gone down from Jerusalem, stood about him, bringing against him many serious charges which they could not prove. Paul said in his defense, neither against the law of the Jews, nor against the temple, nor against Caesar, have I offended at all. But festus, wishing to do the Jews a favor said to Paul. Do you wish to go up to Jerusalem, and there be tried in these charges before me? But Paul said, I am standing before Caesar's tribunal, where I ought to be tried. To the Jews I have done no wrong as you know very well. If then I am a wrongdoer and I have committed anything for which I deserve to die, I do not seek to escape death. But if there is nothing in their charges against me, no one can give me up to them. I appeal to Caesar. Then festus, when he had conferred with his counsel answered, you have appealed to Caesar. To Caesar, you shall go. Festus consults king Agrippa. Now, when some days had passed, Agrippa the king and Bernice arrived at caesarea to welcome festus. And as they stayed there many days, festus laid Paul's case before the king, saying there was a man left prisoner by Felix, and when I was at Jerusalem, the chief priests and the elders of the Jews gave information about him, asking for sentence against him. I entered them that it was not the custom of the Romans to give up anyone before the accused met the accusers face to face, and that opportunity to make his defense concerning the charges laid against him. When, therefore, they came together here, I made no delay, but on the next day took my seat on the tribunal and ordered the man to be brought in. When the accusers stood up, they brought no charge in his case of such evils as I supposed, but they had certain points of dispute with him about their own superstition and about one Jesus who was dead, but whom Paul asserted to be alive. Being at a loss how to investigate these questions, I asked whether he wished to go to Jerusalem and be tried there regarding them. But when Paul had appealed to be kept in custody for the decision of the emperor, I commanded him to be held until I could send him to Caesar. And the grippa said to festus, I should like to hear the man myself. Tomorrow said he, you shall hear him.

Paul Festus Caesar Jerusalem Caesarea King Agrippa Agrippa Bernice Felix Jesus Grippa
Os Guinness and Eric Discuss the Concept of 'Covenant'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:50 min | Last month

Os Guinness and Eric Discuss the Concept of 'Covenant'

"Talking to Oz Guinness. You just said something, you know, again, I am sometimes flabbergasted. The idea that this idea of covenant, we can trace it back to Sinai to exodus, to Moses, and then we see it again, of course, in 1776, that's a long stretch. It's an amazing, it's an amazing thing that we would see this biblical idea resurface in the United States of America, and that is why we are the information. Well, that's the point. In other words, when the Christian faith became the official faith of Rome, in AD three 80. I think the church made a great mistake. It copied Roman structures uncritically. Roman structures hierarchical. You had a Caesar, a consul, senators, and you had a Pope, cardinals and bishops. Hierarchical, and you know, it was a Catholic layman, the great lord Acton, who made the famous remark that all power tends to corrupt. And absolute power corrupts absolutely. And he was commenting in that comment on his own church. He was criticizing it. Because the Catholic judges are and say the corruptions of the inquisition and so on all came out of that structure. The reformation said no. That's not biblical. Not so much, Luther, but Calvin, and then zwingli and bullying a John Knox in Scotland. In England, Oliver Cromwell for better or worse said exodus is the direct parallel to what I'm trying to do. And of course he failed, but you think of the Mayflower compact, is a covenant.

Oz Guinness Sinai Moses United States Of America Caesar Rome Acton Cardinals Zwingli John Knox Luther Calvin Oliver Cromwell Scotland England
Steve Deace and Eric Discuss God's Calling to Fight

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:46 min | 2 months ago

Steve Deace and Eric Discuss God's Calling to Fight

"Question is, is God allowing this to make people angry enough to fight? Because it is so blatant. It is so sickening that somebody like Carrie Lake could potentially be losing, that you think somebody would say we need to dig in and fight. This is not acceptable. We won't accept this. I think that there's another thing God, we could be saying to us, we have to fight differently. For 2000 for until the pilgrims landed at Plymouth rock and shameless plug, that's what my new children's book is about, okay? Why Thanksgiving? Until they landed there in the 17th century. For 1700 years, Christendom didn't have a republic, didn't have a constitution, didn't have voting, and somehow survived persecutions and empires and crackdowns, and how did it do it? Subversive living, faithful obedience, refusing to say yes to Caesar when Caesar asked for dominion and for allegiance that was not his saying no, even to the point of risking their own deaths. And I think one of the things that God may be is saying to us is you have relied too long on sitting at home and enjoying partisan media content and essentially some forms of political mental masturbation, self pleasure and not doing anything and not being not having your faith challenged and then just jumping on fake book or Twitter and randomly posting about it instead of doing something. How about if we take all of your institutional agency away so now it's just you one on one with the spirit of the age and now you believe her choosy the stay whom you will serve which are you one of those who looks upon the beast and marvel's at it or will you be one of those who resist and says, no, I will not comply.

Carrie Lake Plymouth Rock Caesar Twitter
Is Democracy Now Fascism? Lord Conrad Black Weighs In

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:13 min | 3 months ago

Is Democracy Now Fascism? Lord Conrad Black Weighs In

"On the right win in 2022 in November next month, to me, democracy looks like it's over in America, fascism is here to stay. And if they lose, we get maybe another insurrection, domestic terrorism, a Civil War God forbid. Maddie Hassan MSNBC with a strange definition of fascism if the Republicans win the election, then fascism has arrived. I guess the majority picking who should be in Congress is Marie Hussain's definition of fascism. I know somebody who will have a very different one. Presidential historian former media mogul, financier, judicial reform advocate, and just an all around good friend of the show, lord Conrad black, welcome back to America first. Thanks, Sebastian. I'm delighted to come back and listen to such rubbish. I mean, what that man said. I mean, this is the representative of one of the leading networks. Yes. Democracy is fascism. Now, in fact, fascism as those of you who are listening to are interested are aware was in fact a bunch of street bullies wearing black shirts bearing symbolically the faces as symbol of the authority of the Roman Republic, the Caesars and Julius Caesar anyway. And marching upon Rome and installing an authoritarian government, apart from that Mussolini, he was essentially just one of history's more spectacular scoundrels, though an able man in many ways. I made it up as he went along, but he fell under the spell of Hitler and ended up being shot by communists and hung upside down a gas station. That's fascism. With his girlfriend, hung upside down. And how you equate that to the Republicans winning an election, which happened when Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt and Dwight Eisenhower and Ronald Reagan, for example, were elected. How you equate that to the Republicans winning an election. I think that's something of psychiatrists and people who deal with severely deranged people would have to have to survey. But let's

Maddie Hassan Marie Hussain Lord Conrad Black America Msnbc Sebastian Roman Republic Congress Julius Caesar Caesars Mussolini Rome Hitler Dwight Eisenhower Theodore Roosevelt Abraham Lincoln Ronald Reagan
Spike This! Hoskins, Harper homer, Phils rout Braves in NLDS

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 3 months ago

Spike This! Hoskins, Harper homer, Phils rout Braves in NLDS

"The thing that scored 6 runs in the bottom of the third inning for a 9 one win over the braves Philadelphia took control of the game on a three run home run by Rhys Hoskins That was later followed by a two run home run by Bryce Harper Harper drove in three runs for the films who are one win away from advancing to the national league championship series This is what it's all about We have an opportunity to clinch at home We have an opportunity to come out and hopefully strike first Aaron nola picked up a second post Caesar win Spencer strider took the loss Michael luongo Philadelphia

Rhys Hoskins Bryce Harper Harper Braves Philadelphia National League Aaron Nola Spencer Strider Michael Luongo
John Zmirak: 'Each of Us Has an Inner Coward'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:00 min | 4 months ago

John Zmirak: 'Each of Us Has an Inner Coward'

"Are people happy to say that it's like they may as well, to cut to the chase. It's like they hear the Jews going to the death camps and they go, you know what? I just can't be bothered anymore enough. Let me just focus on my I'm going to have my quiet time here while the Jews and their children go in the boxcars to the death camps. Now, that might sound like hyperbole. Here's the problem. It's not. That's the problem. It's not hyperbole. So in my book, I'm trying to wake people up, but your letter is trying to give vent to the cowardly. Oh, it's so painful, John. Timing into the. I'm exploding each of us has an inner coward. Who just wants to enjoy his suit. Not too hot, not too cold because then we would spin it out of our mouth. We wasn't nice, lukewarm soup. We want quiet relaxing music. If there are, if there are trains bringing people to prison camps, we want to sing a little louder to drown it out. Wait, yeah, we want to Dodge a bullet. Better him than me. If we're in a herd of animals being chased by a lion, we don't want to be the guy who turns around and tries to gore the lion with our little horns. Just run. Because that'll give you an opportunity not to fight, but to run another time. And if you flee today, gives you a chance to flee tomorrow. And the one who gets eaten last wins, when we're just going to preach the wait, wait, Eric, we are being smart. We're not like those troublemakers who are going to be arrested by the government. They're going to have their homes rated. We are being prudent. So we can keep preaching the gospel. Of course, what are the gospel consist of? It consists of not making trouble with Caesar and cooperating with Herod and pilots and being the unjust steward and burying you talents in the yard. This is the message of Christians who are unwilling to push back against our wicked and illegitimate regime. Well,

Dodge John Gore Eric Caesar Herod
Blind dog rescued from hole at California construction site

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Blind dog rescued from hole at California construction site

"A blind dog fell into a deep narrow hole in California and had to be rescued by emergency crews last night The action unfolded with ABC 7 Los Angeles reporting from its helicopter overhead Very frightened now coming up to the surface There he is There's a dog There's the dog And on the ground the blind 13 year old dog reunited with its grateful owner Mary who lives next to the construction site that Caesar wandered onto Pasadena fire chief Chad Augustine says this was a difficult rescue in a 15 foot deep three foot wide hole Confined space rescues are low frequency high risk And so there's lots of steps that we need to make sure we do to make it as safe as possible Rescuers hooked up a series of ropes and pulleys lowered a member down and got seized her out safely I'm Julie Walker

Chad Augustine ABC Los Angeles California Caesar Pasadena Mary Julie Walker
Chad Augustine, ABC And Los Angeles discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Chad Augustine, ABC And Los Angeles discussed on AP News Radio

"A blind dog fell into a deep narrow hole in California and had to be rescued by emergency crews last night The action unfolded with ABC 7 Los Angeles reporting from its helicopter overhead Very frightened now coming up to the surface There he is There's a dog There's the dog And on the ground the blind 13 year old dog reunited with its grateful owner Mary who lives next to the construction site that Caesar wandered onto Pasadena fire chief Chad Augustine says this was a difficult rescue in a 15 foot deep three foot wide hole Confined space rescues are low frequency high risk And so there's lots of steps that we need to make sure we do to make it as safe as possible Rescuers hooked up a series of ropes and pulleys lowered a member down and got seized her out safely I'm Julie Walker

Chad Augustine ABC Los Angeles California Caesar Pasadena Mary Julie Walker
John Zmirak: Teacher in Ireland Chooses Prison Over Lying to Children

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:39 min | 5 months ago

John Zmirak: Teacher in Ireland Chooses Prison Over Lying to Children

"Piece now at stream dot org titled. This Christian teacher in Ireland chooses prison over telling hellish lies to children, would we do the same? And in it, I ask, what are the things that you would be willing to go to prison rather than say? I mean, there are certain things if they told me to say I'm going to go to prison. I'd say I'm without meeting them. Like, yeah, the 2020 election was the most secure in history. Yeah, the Democrats care about black Americans, best interests. No Stacey Abrams does not look fat in that dress or any dress. She looks fabulous. I'd repeat those kind of things. What I would not do is teach to children as a teacher, tell children things like Jesus was an impostor whose body rotted in the grave. Caesar is God. I wouldn't tell them abortion is a morally acceptable choice. That same sex marriage is good. Or I wouldn't tell them biological sex isn't really real God or Darwin or whatever. Sometimes it makes mistakes and puts a boy in a girl's body or vice versa. And what matters is the gender inside your head would you need to discover others have to respect it and affirm it via surgery and hormones. That's what you're saying when you use the they pronoun for someone who's gender confused. You are saying that their illusions are real and that they should obey them. You are repeating Satan's voice in that person's head.

Stacey Abrams Ireland Caesar Jesus Satan
"caesar" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

01:30 min | 5 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"So we're going to speak with one leyva in our number two. Aaron Bailey, the director of marketing at the del mar thoroughbred club, going to join us a little bit later today. Talk about what else is going on at delmar, aside from the great racing over these next two weeks, can't believe we're almost to the end of both Saratoga and delmar, Saratoga ends this Monday Labor Day. Delmar is going to run a little bit later. They usually close right around Labor Day. They're actually closing a week from Sunday, so be interested to hear what they've got going on where the turf meets the surf. And a little bit of a new wrinkle today, of course, Caesar's race book is our sponsor here on bedding with Bobby Caesar's no not only for their race book, but they're great sports betting and casinos around the world. Joey fiesel lead college football trader for Caesar's going to join us a little bit later in the program. This is basically opening weekend of college football. There were a few games last week. They had a few games last night, but for the most part, tomorrow is opening day and when a lot of the big teams from around the country and the teams with national championship hopes and aspirations start their 2022 campaign. So Joey fees will join us to talk about some of the big games this weekend and what's going on as far as the odds in some of those college football games. If you want to get in touch with the show, phone number to get in, 888-966-4776. That's triple

leyva Aaron Bailey delmar del mar thoroughbred club Saratoga Bobby Caesar Joey fiesel Caesar Delmar football Joey
#45  Torture & Execution (Holy Week #10) - burst 5

Jesus Stories

00:58 sec | 5 months ago

#45 Torture & Execution (Holy Week #10) - burst 5

"The scriptures rather dryly report when they came to the place of the skull, they nailed him to the cross. And the criminals were also crucified, one on his right, and one on his left. Such a dry telling belies the cruelty which is crucifixion. This form of execution was not an invention of Rome, but they did perfect the practice to produce a slow death with maximum pain and suffering. Miss was usually reserved for slaves, foreigners, revolutionaries, and the worst of criminals. Yes, a man was nailed to a cross. Nails would be driven into the wrists. The knees would be bent in the feet nailed together through the ankles. As a man hung on the cross, it would become difficult to breathe. One would try to push up to catch and release a breath, creating great pain

Christian Christianity Spiritual Teaching Biography Story-Telling Story Jesus Caesar Jerusalem Rome
Warrant of the FBI Raid Violated the 4th Amendment

Mark Levin

01:31 min | 5 months ago

Warrant of the FBI Raid Violated the 4th Amendment

"What is the Fourth Amendment say Part of your Bill of rights The right of the people to be secure in their persons houses papers and effects Against unreasonable searches and Caesars seizures shall not be violated And no warrants shall issue But upon probable cause supported by oath or affirmation that's that affidavit Here we go And particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized Particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized Any government and or presidential records created between January 2020 17 and January 2020 21 Now obviously you can't know in advance Can you If such documents exist but if they exist everywhere in somebody's house everywhere What this search warrant did in my view violated the Fourth Amendment If they gave unconstitutional power a grant of power to the FBI and prosecutors who have a hate on for Trump To go into his home and search everything

FBI Donald Trump
Day after losing Tatis to ban, Padres lose to Nationals 4-3

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 5 months ago

Day after losing Tatis to ban, Padres lose to Nationals 4-3

"Victor robles in an RBI single plating Caesar Hernandez with the go ahead run in the 7th as the nationals beat the Padres four to three Hernandez was called out on the play but it was overturned by replay as Padres catcher Austin nola block the plate manager bob Melvin argued and was ejected I thought it was a good play My understanding is if you're straddling a plate or giving them any part of the plate to slide to it is not blocking the plate Manny Machado and Trent Grisham homered for the Padres yadiel Hernandez enjoying menesis homered for the nationals Nelson Cruz had two singles and collected his 2000th career hit Craig heist Washington

Victor Robles Caesar Hernandez Padres Austin Nola Bob Melvin Hernandez Manny Machado Trent Grisham Yadiel Hernandez Menesis Nelson Cruz Craig Heist Washington
Charlie Kirk Weighs in on the FBI Raid

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:56 min | 6 months ago

Charlie Kirk Weighs in on the FBI Raid

"Kind of a big deal today because of all the breaking news and by God's grace, we have our dear friend Charlie Kirk to help us process these things. Charlie, welcome. Eric, great to be here. You know, I'm a little disappointed. They didn't raid Mar-a-Lago during the 2000 mules premiere. That really would have been something. Wouldn't have been sweet to have these FBI thugs just, you know, brush elbows with us. That would have just been an honor. It would have been with the deep state itself. Listen, you have a new book out. I want to talk about that. But what is going on right now is utterly unprecedented and I'm trying to process it and I know my audience is trying to process it. And I'm really thrilled that we happen to have you today to help us process it. So tell us whatever is on your mind because it's so big that I don't know quite where to start. Yeah. Well, first of all, Eric, you know, you tried to warn people. This was one of the things you were focused on during the election integrity fights of you said something so graphic. They have a knife to lady liberty's throat. And, you know, people didn't quite take that seriously. But look where we are now. And so I believe this is a Rubicon moment crossing of the Rubicon in 49 BC Julius Caesar made a decision to cross the river Rubicon and it changed Rome forever, started the transition from the Roman Republic to the Roman Empire and started a Roman Civil War and it changed civilization as we know it. I think this is the left crossing the Rubicon. There is no going back from this. Period. You don't get to go occupy. It wasn't a raid. It was a military occupation with 270 man hours of a political dissident who was going to announce as the next candidate in 2024 who also was a president and act as if everything's going to go back to normal. Sorry, game has changed.

Charlie Kirk Eric Lago Charlie FBI River Rubicon Julius Caesar Roman Republic Rome
"caesar" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

02:26 min | 8 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Lot of we the people big fans out there. He's not a big name horse. He was super impressive in winning the Peter Pan. We don't know what he beat that day and it was on a track that was not fast. It had some moisture in it. Yeah, he's going to get the lead by himself. And he certainly has a chance to go wire to wire in the Belmont tomorrow, but I'm just talking about who's going to be favored. I am guessing that Moderna will be favored and my guess is that the Derby winner rich strike will be lower than his morning line of 7 to two. I think there are people who are believing in this horse. They think that he's turned the corner and that his Derby win wasn't a fluke. Everything you read and you heard it from Anthony stabile early on. Everyone who's seen rich strike or has written about rich strike since his win in the Derby has made it sound like he can do nothing wrong. He looks fantastic every morning, whether it's at Churchill, whether it's working between races, whether it's since he's gotten to Belmont park. Listen, that's all fine and everything. My general belief is that when it comes to good horses, I'm only interested when something doesn't look right. It's like reading about workouts going into The Kentucky Derby. These are the best three year olds there are, they usually work pretty well. You telling me that so and so looked good this morning. That's not news to me. I want to know when someone's so does not look very good in the morning. That's news to me. Telling me that a horse is really good, looks good in the mornings when there's no pressure around and it's nice and cool out for the most part. And they're by themselves. That's not news to me. I appreciate that rich strike is doing well. And that he's supposedly has taken to his new surroundings at Belmont park. It's not, it's not swaying me one way or the other. Whether I bet on or against rich strike in tomorrow's Belmont stakes will have nothing to do with what the folks who have seen him jogging around in the mornings have to say unless, unless they say something bad. And they have not said anything bad. Welcome back to bedding with Bobby presented by Caesar's race book. We just heard the live call of the two mile Belmont gold cup, a great two event for the older horses going on the firm.

Anthony stabile Moderna Peter Pan Belmont park Kentucky Derby Bobby Caesar
"caesar" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

06:13 min | 8 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"And another thing I was reading the press release about it, it sounds like new customers registering for Caesar's race book will be eligible for a 100% first deposit match up to $500. Is that accurate? Yeah, that's right. So we're matching correct matching deposits up to $500. You just need to play through that $500 bonus once. In order to turn into cash, if you want to withdraw it. So it really is, it really is a great deal to try it out. And hopefully people like it. I mean, it's a great offer. We've got some other promotions as well. I believe we're giving away free PPs through the app as well. Drf or equibase PPs as well as long as long as you've been on a track. So there are a lot of reasons to try it out. Realize folks may have their preferred apps and they've been using it for a while, but I think this is one worth trying out and seeing what it's like to wager with Caesar. I think people see the live videos really good that the streaming replay is really good. It's really a solid platform. And one we hope people are going to enjoy. And I think the longer term goal, Bobby, is really to integrate this with our sportsbook app. Caesar sportsbook app. And so longer term, we see a scenario where there's going to be one app and you're going to be able to vet sports, you're going to be able to bet pyramidal racing on one app, same wallet so you don't have to deposit money separately. That's where really working toward here. Right now, we chose to do it initially as a stand-alone app, but I think if I had to guess sometime in the next year, you'll see an experience where if you're in a legal sports betting state as well, take a New York, for example. You might be able to wager on sports and horse racing from what apps from Caesars. It's going to be phenomenal. Can't wait to see what the future holds for the Caesars race book as it is now. It sounds like a great start, especially for our fans in Florida and Ohio. If you have an iPhone download it, check it out. Check out the interface. Great sign up deposit match bonuses. It sounds like and great video and you can bet all the tracks that you want. Dan really appreciate you taking the time and look forward, look forward to seeing Caesar's race book opening in more and more states as time goes by. Yes, thanks, Bobby. We're really excited about it. Caesar's is horse racing in our DNA. We've got racing in Indiana. We've got Harris Philadelphia, cyto downs. So horse reasons in our DNA. This is a great way to reach some more horse racing fans. And then eventually really be able to get some of our sports betters onto the horse racing platform as well. So really excited about it. Dan, before I let you go, I got to ask you one thing. Is rich strike the real thing, or was that Kentucky Derby win a fluke? You know, I'm going to go, I'm going to go with it being a fluke. My man. I wouldn't have had it if you told me he was going to win the race. I would have told you, I'm still not betting on him. Ahead of time. So I'll be out there next week and I'll have some other best, but rich strike won't be on top to me. All right, Dan Shapiro from Caesar's digital taking time out of his busy day. We really appreciate it, Dan. Thank you so much. Thanks for being a huge part of betting with Bobby presented by Caesar's race book. And best of luck to you next week at the Belmont stakes, especially if we're betting on the same horses, which who knows if we are, but it sounds like we're both at least going to try to beat the Derby winner rich strike. We owe you some prices from both San Anita and Belmont park. Let's start out at San Anita where we saw an upset second race was won by number one code dweller, a four year old gray or roan gelding by honor code out of the rubiano mer Corona, but you don't hear the name rubiano very much these days owned by flawless racing flanagan or Jarvis and trained by Craig dello umberto rispoli was aboard and code dweller paid 23 40 ten 20 and $5 second was number 8 Cosmo 5 80 and four 43rd the 5 explosive at $4, fourth was the favorite number 7 Dončić, told you he wasn't much better than some of the others in this field, the exact that paid one 45 20, the 50 cent tri $177 5 cents, the dime super $91 and 90 cents, speaking of prices over at Belmont park, 8th race, which was one of the few races scheduled for the turf that actually was run on the turf today. Big long shot getting the job done. Number four wicked fast, a three year old bay gelding by tourist out of the ghost sapper mere wicked charm owned by John L'oreal and Beth Laurie ello, Jorge Abreu trained Jose lescano aboard wicked fast paid 57 50, 23 80 and ten 20. Second was the pace setter number ten QF 75, four 20, three 50, third number 6 Irwin at three 70. He did not have a very clean stretch run. He was kind of caught in a switch and had to study the last 40 yards or so. I don't think it cost him the win, but it may have cost him a chance at being closer. Fourth was number 9, thin white duke, dollar exact, a one 73 50, 50 cent tri $581 75 cents, and that dime super paid $866 and 90 cents. We've got about ten minutes to post for the next race, the 9th and final at Belmont park. So we're going to take a break now. Come back with one more live race at Belmont. We've also got Scotty mckeever waiting in the wings. We'll speak to him about 20 minutes from now. Before we go to break folks, horse racing fans rejoice the Caesars race book app has arrived that races attracts from around the world from New York to Dubai. Stream races live in HD with every wager you place, you'll earn racebook points and Caesar's rewards tear credits perks only Caesars can offer..

Caesar Caesars San Anita Bobby Harris Philadelphia Dan Dan Shapiro Belmont park Craig dello umberto rispoli Kentucky Derby Belmont
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

02:02 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Proclaimed a God. His soldierly honor, imperator, will be transmuted into a new title. One that will convey absolute power. With peace finally restored, Octavian will come to rule the Roman world not just as Caesar Augustus, son of divine Julius. Octavian will be the first Roman Emperor. Caesar makes Augustus possible and then Augustus adds to the fame of Caesar and makes it into something even bigger. The Roman Empire, the height of Roman civilization and just the image of power. You know, it's why so many nations in history have chosen an eagle as their symbol. Why they get drawn to the architecture. Not to mention stiff arms salutes and fanatical cries of hail into a supreme leader. At a basic level, the only two people have a month named after them are Julius Caesar and Caesar Augustus, which are in August and, you know, and we still have this weird Roman calendar because of Caesar. So there's a lot about Caesar that's just infiltrated western culture. And is there even.

Caesar Julius Julius Caesar
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

03:41 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Caesar decides to stay at home. In the Senate, news of Caesar's no show throws the plotters. They dispatched decimus, Brutus cousin to fetch him. Could Caesar just put in a brief appearance to officiate on some minor business. And so, against calpurnia's protestations, Caesar sets out. It's half a mile to the theater of Pompey, where the Senate is temporarily convening. Caesar is carried in a litter before doing the last part on foot, walking past is half built for him. On the way adoring crowds mob him. A Greek scholar named artemidorus gets close. Frantically, he passes Caesar a note, a warning it turns out. But in the celebrity scrum, Caesar hands it to an attendant. Strolling in the spring sunshine to the adulation of his people. What could be better? And with a new war to be waged, more glory in the sea of faces Caesar spots his haruspex. He throws him a friendly quip. Caesar's going to the Senate House on the ides of March and tells the suit sayer in the street. Well, the ides of March have come. And the soothsayer said in a quiet voice. Yes, but they haven't gone. As Caesar enters the Senate around 11 a.m., the conspirators eye each other nervously. Someone whales seizes number two, Mark Antony, keeping him outside. Caesar is greeted warmly by Brutus and led to his golden chair. A senator called cimber approaches. He is petitioning Caesar for the return of his exiled brother. He had served with Pompey and had expected a pardon. The plotters seized their moment. They gather round Caesar, presenting respectful arguments as to why Simba's brother should be forgiven. Little does Caesar know that they had daggers hidden in the folds of their togas. They agreed on a sign for them to strike. Simba tugs down the shoulder of Caesar's robe. As he does so, a senator called casca slashes at Caesar's neck. He makes a meal a bit, almost missing, merely grazing. Caesar looks up, dumbfounded. He asks casca what the hell he thinks he's playing at. When he realizes casca is drawn blood, Caesar whips out his long sharp stylus pen and rams it into casca's arm. But it's too late. Someone else thrusts their dagger into Caesar's side. It follows a whirl of toga's thrashing and slashing. Some of the senators doing more damage to themselves than to Caesar. Loyalists try to stop them. In the frenzy they are beaten back. Though their assistance would have been in vain. For Caesar is now mortally wounded. As the final assassin plunges in his blade, right into Caesar's groin. There is a look of shock on the dictator's face. The knife wielder is none other than Brutus. Caesar's dying words are almost certainly in Greek, rather than Latin. Resounding in translation with perhaps even greater poignancy than in Shakespeare's famous dramatization. Kai su teknon. You too, my child. Caesar staggers and collapses before the statue of his great rival Pompey. Recently, as an actor.

Caesar decimus calpurnia Senate Brutus artemidorus casca cimber Simba Senate House Mark Antony Pompey rams Kai su teknon Shakespeare
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

02:51 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Some of them were almost certainly jealous, some are old enemies. Some of those are deeply embarrassed at having received clementia. Others are being ruled out of Caesar's new controlled system. And then you've got the one person we always end up talking about, which is Brutus. And Brutus is clearly complicated. Brutus has done very nicely under Caesar. He's been governor of cisalpine Gaul. When it comes to corruption, he's got his hand in the till as much as anyone. But he's called upon to comply with stoic tradition to do his civic duty. He knew Caesar well growing up, not least because Caesar had affairs with Brutus mother. While Brutus did end up fighting on Pompey's side and received clementia, Brutus has clearly been marked out for high office under Caesar. But Brutus has one other massive source of pressure. When the Roman Republic was formed, when the kings were expelled, the last king tarquin superbus was driven out in a revolt led by Brutus. Led by the first manner that name we know anything about. Was the Brutus who killed Caesar a direct line descendant? Well, whether he physically was or not really doesn't matter. He thought he was so did everybody else. His family dignitas is opposition to tyranny. And graffiti is appearing around Rome. Why are you sleeping Brutus? On the night of the 14th, Julius Caesar goes out to dinner. As the evening progresses and the wine flows, he seems in good spirits. Optimistic about the next chapter of his life. He expects to be a way for three years. As the conversation turns to philosophy and the question of mortality. Caesar is asked what he considers to be a good way to die. Prophetically, he.

Brutus Caesar clementia tarquin superbus Pompey Roman Republic kings Julius Caesar Rome
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

05:58 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Caesar will go on to fourth and 5th consulships in consecutive years. Combined with extensions of his dictatorships, it can get confusing. As can his rampant love life. In addition to calpurnia, Cleopatra and queen yuna. He also finds time to have an affair with tertiary. The third daughter is long-term mistress Seville. Festivities over Caesar gets back to business. He organizes free grain for the poor. Post spartacus, he makes moves to diminish dependence on mass plantation labor. He offers free citizenship to oversee doctors and teachers. Perhaps mindful of the fact that he burnt down Alexandria's great library during battle. Caesar Institutes a new public library in Rome. And there is something else he steals from the Egyptians. Time the Roman calendar is hopelessly inaccurate. Based on a lunar cycle rather than a solar one, it's just 355 days long. Dates regularly misalign with the seasons. Haphazard corrections are made periodically to get things back on track. In consultation with Greek and Egyptian astronomers, Caesar reorganizes the 12 Roman months into a 365 day year, adding a leap year every fourth. Save for the Gregorian revision, the Julian calendar is essentially the one we still use today. Of course, he also introduces an a month named after himself. So you've got the touch of megalomania in there that suddenly the month of July is going to commemorate him forever more. Caesar's great nephew Octavian, who will one day rule as Augustus, will bag a month for himself too. Cleopatra is not out of the picture. She visits Rome on more than one occasion. Caesar puts her up in one of his houses on the tiber river in the company of her young brother husband, Ptolemy the 14th. And a certain infant calls caesarion. There's a rumor that she's jealous, having got word of Caesar's affair with queen you know, or queen you know who. To placate her, Caesar puts up a statue to Cleopatra in his new temple of Venus. But it doesn't go down well with ordinary Romans. Attributing godlike status to immortal is blasphemous. Out in the far flung regions, it seems there is always someone willing to have a crack at Caesar. This time it's Pompey's sons, gnaeus and sextus, who are raising a new army in Spain. In November 46 BC, Caesar marches to confront them in modern day Andalusia. He storms off at a frightening pace, reaching Hispania, according to the chronicles suetonius in just 24 days. He will not return to the following summer. For many later Romans, Cato was where the republic dies, he's the last of the true die hard Republicans. But in fact, the last corps of Pompey's support, led by his two sons, is in Spain. So Caesar has to go back to Spain and munda, which has fought in 45 BC, that's the closest Caesar ever came to losing. Munda is an absolute blood fist. Outside the town where a crucial siege swings victory. Caesar's men build a mound of severed heads. Gnaeus is added to the pile. When sextus flees by sea, the rebellion seems to be over. Crucially, after munda, the conservators had gone now. There's no military force in the Mediterranean that can challenge Caesar. So after Monday, he can come back. It's only actually in that short period after Monday that he is in Seoul control. This is Caesar's true dictatorship. This time, victory is followed by a 50 day Thanksgiving, and a slew of honorifics. When Caesar is hailed by his men again as in paratha, it's added as a permanent title. Along with another accolade, liberator he also gets the consulship for a further ten years. In an act of false modesty, Caesar stays away from the Senate, while these honors are bestowed. When a delegation of senators comes to inform him of the awards, they find him sitting in his half built forum. That he does not stand to greet them as perceived as an insult. His later protestation that he was suffering from diarrhea does not wash. Caesar's ego is now becoming a serious problem. In the Senate, he had taken to presiding over everyone in a big ivory chair. It's now been replaced by a tantamount throne of solid gold. Ignoring the kerfuffle over Cleopatra, he has statues of himself commissioned to be placed in the temple was alongside the gods. He has his own head minted on the coinage. The first Roman ruler to do so during their lifetime. In 46, he's appointed dictator for ten years, at which point you'd start thinking, okay, this is manifestly not an emergency measure. It's just about giving him supreme authority. The thing is, it's clearly popular. I mean, the cynic is busy sucking up by awarding him any number of different honors. But actually, as far as we can see, the population, regard this as a basically good thing. He is happy to issue pardons, which makes him seem like this forgiving generous ruler. In February 44 BC, at the age of 55, Caesar is reaffirmed as dictator.

Caesar Cleopatra calpurnia queen yuna sextus Caesar Institutes Rome Pompey gnaeus Spain Seville munda tiber river Gnaeus Alexandria Andalusia Cato army Senate Seoul
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

02:43 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"It's October. 48 BC. Nighttime. In his room in the palace of king Ptolemy the 13th, child ruler of Egypt. Julius Caesar sits alone. Caesar is in a bit of a bind. On defeating his great rival Pompey on the plains of pharsalus, the Roman Civil War has effectively been won. In pursuing Pompey to Alexandria, it seemed possible that Caesar could stage peace talks. And restore order to the Roman world. But everything has been thrown up in the air. On arrival Caesar had been presented with a gruesome gift. Pompey's severed head. It was intended as a token of Ptolemy's loyalty. But the casual slaughter of this great Roman general, a man once part of his own family, as sick and Caesar to his stomach. Hold up in Ptolemy's palace now, he must maintain a facade of cordiality. For Caesar is not out of the Woods yet. He knows that he's being used, manipulated by the boy king's chief adviser, a scheming eunuch, Caesar and his men have walked slap bang into trouble. A power struggle between Ptolemy and his older sister, the queen. They're meant to rule as a couple. Quite literally as husband and wife, but each is now vying for soul control of Egypt. If Ptolemy thinks he has Caesar in his pocket, he's mistaken. For the queen also wishes to win Caesar's favor. Her problem is that she's been unable to gain access to him. There's a knock at Caesar's bedchamber. In enters a strapping slave, his name is apollodorus, and he carries over his shoulder a laundry sack. Some versions of the story, a rolled carpet. Either way, he smuggled it right into Ptolemy's household. Hiding in plain sight. As he pulls the drawstring and the cloth falls. Caesar beholds a young woman.

Caesar palace of king Ptolemy Pompey Ptolemy Ptolemy's palace Julius Caesar Egypt Alexandria
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

04:01 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"At Rome. Everybody goes to sacrifices and praise, Caesar gets more for the landings in Britain than any Roman generals got for any victory before that. It's the sort of excitement of the moon landing. It's that level. You'll find even a generation later you get stories told about Britain that are very similar to the sort of post Columbus new world stuff or men who didn't have heads, but had faces in their chest. There were half beats. And that's even after there's been contact. There's still this sense, this is your really exotic and very weird. It's while in Britain that Caesar receives a letter. It informs him that his beloved daughter Julia also Pompey's wife. Has died during childbirth. Caesar and Pompey are not just heartbroken. They've also lost the one thing that had bound them together. Meanwhile, crassus, whose soldiering days seemed long over, as decided after a rush of blood to the head, to lead an army against the Parthians. The civilization had spanned modern day Iran and Iraq. The triumvirate is beginning to creek the Romans have no conception yet of just how powerful the Parthian Empire is. It is effectively a match for the Romans. And crassus only has a relatively small army and it's taken apart at the battle of Carrie and crassus has killed. So there's no trial. Now there's just two people. You give two Roman warlords a piece of rope and they will pull it in opposite directions. While Caesar is in Gaul, other parts of Roman society, particularly people like Cato the younger and Cicero are actually actively trying to break the first triumvirate up. They don't like it because it's trying to control Rome, while they're really trying to do is break Pompey away from Caesar. Because they know that they can work with Pompey Pompey doesn't threaten force against the Roman Senate. They aren't so sure that's going to be true of season. Caesar too has taken his eye off the ball. While he's been in Britain, the gauls have been mobilizing. Who has the strategic sense to see that the Romans can only be defeated with a coordinated effort. Rather than fighting as individual tribes. He convenes a grand coalition, soon the gauls are in open revolt. Caesar is wintering in Italy when news of the rebellion breaks. He has left scattered forces throughout the country, and they are now vulnerable. He leads men north, shoveling their way through Alpine snowdrifts. For the first time, Caesar as a general is under threat. A confrontation reversing at gergovia in central Gaul leads to the unthinkable, a major Roman defeat. With more golds now rallying to the cause, best in guetary has got Caesar right where he wants him. His plan is to retreat to the fortress of elysia, tempting Caesar to follow him, and lay siege. While the Romans are engaged, he has planned for a second larger force to attack the Romans in the rear. One of the key facets of Roman military success, as we know, has been its engineering. Caesar's army have become dab hands at building ramps against fortifications. Even mining underneath enemy positions. They have an awesome array of hardware. Huge battering rams and catapults assault towers. They even have field artillery, like the deadly karo ballista, a crank spring loaded gun that can launch high velocity missiles. But Caesar also has good intelligence. He knows of vercingetorix's plan. So instead of storming alesia,.

Caesar crassus Pompey Britain Rome Pompey Pompey Gaul Columbus Julia Roman Senate Cicero Cato Carrie Iran Iraq army Italy rams vercingetorix alesia
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

07:02 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Slaves. But the further north you go, the more perilous it becomes. That said, there is no concept of Gaul as a nation. It's a collection of tribes, some of whom have more contemporary other than any invader. In terms of military technology, they are not in the same league. However much that Caesar may be itching to have a crack at them. He needs a pretext, a case is belli. It's with some relief then. That in March 58 BC Caesar gets word of a massive migration taking place. The helvetii people of what is modern day Switzerland, and had enough for being harassed by a German tribe, called the suebi. They abandoned their homeland, all quarter of a million of them, and a trekking across country to start a fresh in Gaul's maritime west. Not only is this an exodus on an unprecedented scale. But the helvetii are cutting across nominal Roman turf. That of a client tribe called the aedui. Trespassers will be prosecuted. Leading four legions north. Caesar instigates a clash with the helvetii. Act what is today's sewn river? After a series of engagements, he has by June secured victory at the battle of bibran. The helvetii no match for war machine that can march in astonishing 90 miles a day. Sees the pushes on, and by September has defeated the suebi too, shoving them back over the river Rhine. He's laying down a marker to the rest of gore and secured its eastern frontier. Julius Caesar general Julius Caesar is back in business. Caesar is a superb general. And remarkably, both a superb battlefield general and a superb Y tactician and strategist. Not everybody manages both. Caesar does. And because Gaul is made up of a whole series of independent tribes, you can try and break them down individually. Caesar's got 40 to 50,000 soldiers, and these are very well equipped soldiers who will become absolute veterans in the course of almost a decade. Caesar returns to northern Italy for the winter. The treasure, taxes, and booty are rolling in. In spring as the new campaign season begins, he ramps up the invasion. He expands his army to 8 legions, supplementing it with foreign mercenaries, Cretan and numidian archers, slingers from the balearic islands. Within a year, Caesar slashes his way to the northeast. Poised for a dust up with the most fearsome tribe of all. The bell guy. It's a tough slog. And there are reverses along the way. But at sabis, Caesar's men win a hard fought victory. By 56 BC, Caesar overcomes the last gallic holdout. In modern day Brittany, in a naval campaign, he beats the seafaring veneti. In Rome, Julius Caesar is awarded a 15 day supplicate. The biggest victory knees up ever. His opponents in the Senate are forced to grin and bear it. Not to Caesar can attend personally. Returning home will void his immunity from prosecution. But in some ways Caesar is best out of it. A Rome is fast sliding into anarchy, with open corruption, mob violence and political murders. Unseen, Caesar remains a legend. There's a wistful recollection of the old days. Yes, he ruled as a strong man, sure, he broke a few rules. But there was order, the streets were safe. At least the chariots ran on time. If Caesar can't go to Rome, then Rome will come to him. In 56 BC in the off season, Caesar retires to Lucca. The southernmost town in cisalpine Gaul, he's joined there by crassus and Pompey. The three men we pledged the triumvirate. Amy Russell is associate Professor of classics at Brown university. He would have been constantly writing letters to people at Rome, constantly trying to make sure that his voice was being heard. And he also had plenty of proxies on the Roman political stage. He sends back every year a few people to kind of be his eyes and ears in Rome and also his voice. And also, every winter, people from room are coming out to see him. In some ways, it's sort of foreshadowing what's going to happen under the empire that there's going to be this kind of movable court where people come to see you rather than the other way around. Plans are hatched. Pompey and crassus, who have already served a term as joint consoles, will attempt to rerun. In return for Caesar's endorsement, they will grant him a further 5 year extension on his governorship of Gaul. Afterwards, crassus will be awarded the lucrative governorship of Syria. Pompey will be given Spain. Once again they're carving up the Roman Republic. If that have smoked back then, they would have whipped out some very big cigars. The consular race is scarred by violence. But Caesar's influence pays off. Pompey and crassus secure the consular ship again. And Caesar gets more time in Gaul. He will boldly and boldly go where no Roman has gone before. Goals frontier in the east had been relatively secure. But by 55 BC, the suebi and other German tribes of resumed their raiding. They must be taught a lesson. Pushing them back over the Rhine again sees a finishes them off in spectacular fashion. Near present day koblenz, he has his sappers construct one of the greatest ever feats of military engineering. A 400 meter bridge, built in just ten days. Using massive wooden piles driven into the riverbed, where the water is up to ten meters deep. It's a marvel of military logistics. It also allows Caesar to cross into germania at his leisure. After a punitive 18 days of looting and pillaging, Caesar retreats and has the bridge destroyed. Just because he can..

Caesar Julius Caesar Rome Gaul crassus belli Pompey river Rhine cisalpine Amy Russell northern Italy Switzerland balearic islands gore Lucca army Brown university Senate Roman Republic
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

03:19 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Laying siege, knowing that Elyse's grain supplies will eventually become depleted. Outside the walls are piles of rotting corpses, the women, children and elderly, mouth deemed unworthy of feeding by the defenders. 30 days on starvation is rife. It's just a matter of time before the warriors capitulate. The main gate opens. Out comes a solitary white horse. Upon it was a man dressed in his finest armor. He wears a long mustache and braided hair. His name is vercingetorix, chief of the auvergne. Leader of the united gallic tribes the horse ambles towards the Romans. Best and get her ex is so hungry. He's barely able to keep his balance. The legionnaires watch in absolute silence. Before him sits Caesar, he reclines in a big chair. Not unlike a throne. He looks almost bored. It's an affected theatrical display of power. The horse halts a few yards short. Benson gets struggles to dismount. He staggers forward and draws his sword, prompting Caesar's bodyguards to spring to his defense. Caesar stays them, he knows what's coming. Vercingetorix lays his weapon at Caesar's feet and falls to his knees. Season nods his acceptance. The once proud king is led away. Though there will be sporadic outbreaks of resistance here and there, the province of Gaul has been subjugated. From start to finish, Caesar's campaign in Gaul lasts nearly ten years. It racks up over a million dead. A genocide by any other name. He will enslave a million more. It's one of those chilling facts that the Roman gladius sword probably killed more human beings until you come along to the AK-47 in the 20th century. Caesar is utterly immoral really about his attitude towards atrocity or kindness. It is a purely pragmatic decision he looks at the situation and thinks if I spare these people, if I'm nice to them, will that bring me an advantage and win the war. It isn't about right and wrong. It's about the end result. The full of elysia is a pivotal event. Julius Caesar has transformed Rome from a Mediterranean force into a continental superpower. He is, though others will stake their claim, the greatest Roman general of them all. Vercingetorix, meanwhile, will be thrown in a cell, there he will languish for 6 more years. When the occasion befits, he will be paraded naked through the streets of Rome. Before being ritually strangled. This is part two of the Julius Caesar story. And this is real dictators..

Caesar vercingetorix united gallic Elyse Gaul warriors Benson Julius Caesar Rome Mediterranean
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

04:30 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Seeking senatorial approval to shore up the position of the Ptolemy dynasty in Egypt. He's been thrown a massive bribe to do so. Possibly coincidentally, or possibly as part of a kickback. Caesar buys for his mistress Sevilla, a black pearl worth 1.5 million denarii, in today's money about $18 million. It was softened the news that he is about to marry again. To a woman named calpurnia. If there's one thing Caesar can be sure of, it's that corruption charges are piling up. If he's not careful, he's going to find himself on the sharp end of some serious senatorial justice. The good news is that as a consul is immune from prosecution. The bad news is that he's in office for only a year. Time, once again, to do a geographical. Caesar delivers, the eastern settlements are ratified, crassus can control their taxation. Pompey's soldiers get their land. But Caesar's problem with the first triumvirate is he's third. Pompey is way out on front in terms of glory, wealth, crassus, he's very experienced far more so than Caesar. How is Caesar going to catch up? Where's he going to go after the consulship? It's to a command of his choice where he can win real glory. Ex consuls are traditionally rewarded with a foreign governorship. Something of which Caesar has already had experience. While his opponents conspire to dispatch him to some dusty hellhole, numidia in North Africa, perhaps, Caesar wangles himself the cushy as posting of all. Cisalpine Gaul, that is Gaul south of the Alps, basically northern Italy, and with the added bonus of an extension of his Amnesty. The key thing which sees a does is get a law passed which grants several provinces. When he steps down as consul, and grants him immunity from prosecution for 5 years, normally you would get one year, you know, the rules are being bent for his benefit. But he's got Pompey's support. So it gets passed. The cisalpine dwellers are thoroughly romanised. Nicknamed the toga wearing gauls. Indeed, Caesar in another popular move will soon extend full Roman citizenship to everyone on the Italian Peninsula north of the Po river. But there is trouble brewing with their Celtic brethren. The trouser Barbarians on the other side of the mountains. You've got a load of tribes beyond the frontier, some of whom are allied to Rome, some of whom are hostile. You've got a perfect situation for engineering the.

Caesar calpurnia Pompey crassus Sevilla Caesar wangles Egypt North Africa Alps Italy Italian Peninsula Po river Rome
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

07:17 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Would rank Caesar alongside his contemporary, gnaeus pompeius Magnus, Pompey the great, who's been doing something similar in the east, but on a bigger scale, including a naval campaign that puts paid to the widespread piracy that had almost done for Caesar. And if one is intent on running for consul and at 40, Caesar is now eligible, what better showcase could there be than a triumph? In order to run for consul, however, Caesar must appear in the forum on a particular date. He must also relinquish his military command. To cross the pomerium, the religious boundary of Rome while still a serving soldier will invalidate his application. Thus he's forced to make a choice. Who does he want to be? The glorious returning general or the influential politician. You can't actually do both simultaneously. You can't get yourself nominated for the consulship unless you can actually go into Rome and you can't do that as long as you are a general under art. He has a go trying to get the Senate to agree to bend the rules and that gets blocked and gets blocked by Cato. Caesar is disliked, particularly by hardline conservative Roman senators. Cater was almost certainly counting on Caesar taking the trial and sees a dozen. It's one of those moments that makes you realize Caesar can think beyond the basic values of his own society. He's capable of that extra vision that in reality he'll get to hold a bigger triumph later if he can hold the consulship now. You know, I don't need this, even though this would be for most people the Pinnacle of their career. Ah, you know, nothing. It's turning down the lead in a blockbuster. Caesar has arrived back in Rome at a critical juncture in the republic's history. Pompey the great was reorganized the governance of the eastern Mediterranean, is demanding the land that had been promised to his war veterans. Crassus, Caesar's bankroller, also controls the taxation in the east. Both crassus and Pompey are finding their reforms blocked in the Senate. They are not natural bedfellows, Pompey had actually been solar's second in command when hunting young Caesar. Crassus and Pompey, meanwhile, have a long-standing animosity, not to mention that both crassus father and brother were killed by Caesar's uncle Marius. But the three men set aside their differences. And this is where Caesar actually becomes for the first time a really major player. What Caesar proposes to Pompey and crassus is you get me elected consul, I'll deliver on what you want. Pompey and crassus are the two richest men in Rome, Pompey is by an order of magnitude that went man with the most prestige. If those two both back Caesar Caesar will landslide the election. And they agree to the deal. That created what is known as the first triumvirate. As painful as it is, forgoing the pageantry and acclaim of the triumph proves the correct decision. Gaius Julius Caesar wins the consular election at a canter. But by all accounts, it's a spectacularly dirty election, even by Roman standards. Even Cato, who is sort of famously moral, is said to have resorted to bribery to try and get his favored candidate through. On January 1st, 59 BC Caesar takes office as a consul of Rome. The highest political appointment in the land. Consuls, if you remember, governors a pair. Caesar is teamed with a favorite of Cato's conservatives, a man named bibulus. If Caesar's marriage to cornelia was a sham, then it was as nothing compared to his consular union at the plodding bibulus. Pretty soon, he's riding rough shod over his supposed partner. There was much ritual associated with the consulship. Consuls are to be accompanied everywhere by a team of men called lictors. Who each carrier ceremonial acts wrapped in a bundle of sticks called phases. 2000 years from now, its symbolism will be appropriated by another Italian dictator. Mussolini, for his own movement, fascism. Caesar has no time for such nonsense. He has BBS fasces broken. Indeed, some marginalized now is poor bibulus that many refer to this period of rule as the consulship of Julius and Caesar. Caesar manipulates senatorial meetings, bands, rivals from speaking. He has Cato arrested for filibustering and just for good measure. His cronies dump a bucket of human excrement over Bieber's head. In the end, bibulus retreats to his house to frighten to come out. Though he does get his own back. According to ancient tradition, the Senate can not be convened if a bolt of lightning is glimpsed. A sign of the gods are displeased. So bibulus simply arises each morning, even on the brightest of days, and declares that he has just seen a flash in the sky. Thus forbidding any business to be conducted, the stasis in the Senate is of little consequence to Caesar. Or for that matter to the public. For as long as Rome continues to function, the people are happy. In fact, they rather relish Caesar sticking it to the man. Caesar uses his consort to introduce an assortment of laws which again are essentially populist in particular. He tries to push through a law to redistribute public lands. Caesar is able just to sort of push through his legislation without any particular difficult through the triumvirate, true power now resides away from the Senate. Forget monarchy. In the hands of Pompey crassus and Caesar, Rome is now an oligarchy. It's not an official body in any sense whatsoever. It's not official is not elected, it's just three friends who are just discussing together how to control the Roman Republic. And it's sealed not by any written agreement, but by a marriage alliance. Pompey marries Julia. Julia, that is Caesar's daughter. Now, Pompey at this point, he's 6 years older than Caesar. He's been married at least three times already he has several children. Caesar's daughter Julia is probably in her late teens. She has never been married. The fact they fall completely in love is why historians don't like love. It's messy, confusing, and it makes absolutely no sense. But in fact, they did clearly get on brilliantly well, and it helps bind all three together. Roman nobles don't cooperate naturally. It's just not a feature, but the first triumvirate is going to work surprisingly well. Pompey, feathering his nest in the near east. Is also.

Caesar Pompey crassus Rome bibulus Cato Crassus Senate Caesar Caesar Marius Mediterranean cornelia Mussolini Julius Pompey crassus Bieber Julia Roman Republic
"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

02:01 min | 9 months ago

"caesar" Discussed on Real Dictators

"The lord Chamberlain's men. Though the real star is its new writer in residence, William Shakespeare. A prolific scribe aged 35. Shakespeare has penned 19 plays to great critical buzz. Earlier this year he scored a big hit with a war epic, Henry V before bashing out a summer RomCom as you like it. For the globe's grand opening, the Bard has returned to hard hitting history. To Ancient Rome, tonight, marks the premiere of Julius Caesar. Down in the pit, the groundlings fueled by cheap ale are getting raucous, they shout, they stamp, they swear urinate all the way up to the gods as an air of fever anticipation. Some may have heard of Caesar, a character from the mists of time, the general who led the Roman legions into Britain. If others are oblivious, they'll soon understand. So what if the actors costumes aren't quite right? Doublet and homes rather than togas. There's enough to show anyone that Julius Caesar was once a man of great significance. In the footlights glow, they cheer. They laugh and boom. The Hiss at the bad guys. Son lob rotten curvatures. But in the third act, a Caesar is set upon by members of his very own Senate. The conspirators plunging in their daggers one by one. You could hear a pin drop. Dying Caesar looks up, bewildered as his protege Brutus delivers the 23rd mortal blow. And you, Brutus, at two brute, it is perhaps in this moment on this Friday night in London. That the Roman statesman's place.

lord Chamberlain Julius Caesar William Shakespeare Henry V Caesar Shakespeare Rome Britain Brutus Senate London
"caesar" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

MTR Podcasts

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"caesar" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

"Don't a little bit of everything. I have portola. Caesar welcome to the podcast. Hey nice to meet you. Nice to meet you as well. So yeah i through all of those out there. Because it's you're doing a lot. So i'm gonna let you really dive into a little bit more than i do. Justice describe your work and We'll start off with describe your we're going to have my part to that question or that invitation. Okay sure Describe my work so originally when all of my work started i was a writer so you would ask me to define what i do in one word i would say i'm a storyteller but over the years i've found different mediums dip in ways to tell those stories i started telling them as a writer of very of traditional storytelling Storytelling eventually led into erotic fiction and poetry. That sort of led me to doing that. Storytelling on stage. So for a period of time. I was doing erotic poetry onstage with the band and kind of doing a whole production. Doing a little bit of touring. I eventually recorded some of that work. Also my storytelling eventually kind of spilled over into the actual work. Which is kind of how. I ended up doing what i do most of the time. Now which is event production Live music live performance on stage. But even in doing all of those things ultimately what i do is i tell stories in lots of different ways that that's great. I like hearing it and is able to really. You're you're you're you're telling stories which using various mediums to do a dust the kind of multi hyphenated struggle having right there so so so being someone. That's wearing multiple hats because there is a back of the stage kinda component to some of the work. That you're doing what is your i love. Is it just by calling it the being storyteller being a writer or do you prefer to have that one thing or do you prefer at one title and kind of expanding from that or do you prefer to be more multi hyphenated in that regard i have come to enjoy being multi hyphenated for a long time i primarily considered myself a writer and there are some days when that really is what i focuses is on writing traditional end an apache and i'm writing stories creating characters and stuff like that but i am really also starting to embrace the multi hyphen it. I feel like calling myself. A storyteller really is the best and most accurate way to encompass my world at this point. A lot of it's still is writing but there's also music and live performance and getting into the lab performance aspect. I actually get the partner with a lot of other creators. and storytellers and we despite different ways to tell our shared stories so whether i'm creating A live musical performance. Or whether i'm writing a story. Or whether i'm.

portola Caesar
"caesar" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"caesar" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Many of the discoveries and inventions were made in the city of rome. Romans invented the calendar. Who used today however it was inaccurate and did not follow the seasons. So the emperor julius caesar made some corrections and improved it to the version. We know today one that is based on the sun. Three hundred sixty five days and twelve months and matches the seasons now that we know something about julius caesar. Let's learn about who he really was. Guys julius caesar was born in july one hundred bc in suburbia a city of rome. His parents were nobles in the city. They were well known but not rich as a young boy julius. Caesar started his education at the young age of six and learned important skills from his tutor. He was taught to develop excellent speaking skills and exceptional leadership qualities. It was only because his parents wanted him to become a noble just like them and even become a king someday. By the time he turned six his father passed away and he became the head of the household. All of the responsibilities of the house. Were now his and he had to represent his house. In the court of nobles at the age of seventeen julius got married to cornelia the daughter of a powerful politician during that time there was a fight between his two uncles. Julius didn't want to fight with his family members and thought it was foolish so to escape the fight. He joined the army and left rome while in the army. Julius fought many wars and became a brave warrior who started getting recognition in the army quickly began to reach higher and higher ranks in the government. He made friends with many influential leaders namely crassus who has a wealthy businessman and general pompey. Who was the best military commander back then. Influential means having power and wealth. By the time. Caesar returned to rome. He was famous among the people and was loved widely due to his victories and his good speaking skills by the age of forty he was elected as the console. Console was the uppermost rink in the roman government similar to a president. He remained in this position for one year then. He was appointed the governor of a province named gall as a result he was granted four legions. Legions are large groups of soldiers in the military who protect the cities and during wars fight battles. Julius was an extraordinary general goal surrounded by tribes who did not live according to the roman rule the military feared them as they had a very strong army however the troops were divided among themselves and fought with each other taking advantage of their own conflicts. Caesar led his troops into battle against them and became victorious due to his smart thinking. He managed to conquer all of gaul history. Teach again site gained him. The respect of his army strategic insight means the ability to find solutions to big problems after his success. Julius caesar was considered to be as good in war strategy as the great general pompey nowadays historians consider him as one of the best military commanders in history while he was in position as governor. The politics in rome became very aggressive. Many leaders started to dislike. Julius caesar because of his success even general pompey who used to be a good friend of julius became jealous. This jealousy turned hostile and the tooled friends turned into rivals while julius caesar was supported and loved by the people pompey had the support of the corrupt people who actually nobles and rich businessmen. Caesar then decided to run for console or president again. He announced his intentions to gain the support of his people but the roman senate was against him because they didn't like him. The senate asked julius to give up his post as the general of the army. But caesar refused. The government cannot accept that he had dared to defy them so they called him a traitor of the nation. Both sides declared war. This was the great civil war of rome that lasted four years. Caesar began marching his army towards rome to fight against the senate general pompey was leading the soldiers of the senate but caesar won the battle and gained total control of rome. He kept fighting pompey till he finally managed to beat him eighteen months later by this time he had chased him all the way to egypt. Pompey fled to save his life but was captured by the pharaoh who had him executed the pharaohs were the ancient rulers of egypt. This victory in war may julius caesar the most powerful man in the world. He returned to his home. The roman empire in forty six bc he managed to crush everyone who resisted him in the government and was appointed dictator perpetuo which means dictator forever when he came to power roma suffering from financial or money issues because of the wars. It was always fighting. It was very expensive to wage war and sent all of the workers off to battle. Julius changed the government and made improvements for the poor he even passed. Various laws ultimately bringing rome back to its former glory. He made other changes to rome and transformed it into a magnificent city. He ordered the rebuilding of the great city. Carthage which was destroyed in the punic wars. It was a part of ancient civilization and later became the second largest city in rome. One of his best achievements was the julian calendar which is the basis of our calendar. We use today. Not only was julius. Caesar a warrior he was very learned. He was also said to be one of the best writers in rome. He wrote several poems and many books on march fifteenth. Forty four bc. Some people have rome including other leaders in the government where unhappy with his rule. They thought that he was too powerful which he was and he would destroy the roman empire which was based on a republic ruled by a group of leaders rather than one person so they decided to put an end to his rule. Cassius and brutus to julius friends led the plot to assassinate him. When julius caesar entered the senate they crept up on him assassinated him. His death is still remembered. Today on the fifteenth of march. As the ides of march. Julius caesar was very ambitious which means he worked very hard to be smart and strong so he could become powerful and his country. He increases power through violence and eventually took control of all of rome. Historical people like have many sides which means they do some good things but also some bad things as well take some time to reflect on this and think of people you know who may have good traits and not so good traits but regardless julius caesar will go down in history as one of the most influential leaders of all time. We hope you enjoyed this. Episode about julius. Caesar be sure to tune in next monday for a new episode..

rome julius caesar Caesar julius army Julius roman government senate suburbia crassus cornelia general pompey gall dictator perpetuo egypt Pompey Carthage Cassius brutus government
"caesar" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"caesar" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Guys julius caesar was born in july one hundred bc in suburbia a city of rome. His parents were nobles in the city. They were well known but not rich as a young boy julius. Caesar started his education at the young age of six and learned important skills from his tutor. He was taught to develop excellent speaking skills and exceptional leadership qualities. It was only because his parents wanted him to become a noble just like them and even become a king someday. By the time he turned six his father passed away and he became the head of the household. All of the responsibilities of the house. Were now his and he had to represent his house. In the court of nobles at the age of seventeen julius got married to cornelia the daughter of a powerful politician during that time there was a fight between his two uncles. Julius didn't want to fight with his family members and thought it was foolish so to escape the fight. He joined the army and left rome while in the army. Julius fought many wars and became a brave warrior who started getting recognition in the army quickly began to reach higher and higher ranks in the government. He made friends with many influential leaders namely crassus who has a wealthy businessman and general pompey. Who was the best military commander back then. Influential means having power and wealth. By the time. Caesar returned to rome. He was famous among the people and was loved widely due to his victories and his good speaking skills by the age of forty he was elected as the console. Console was the uppermost rink in the roman government similar to a president. He remained in this position for one year then. He was appointed the governor of a province named gall as a result he was granted four legions. Legions are large groups of soldiers in the military who protect the cities and during wars fight

rome julius caesar Caesar julius army Julius roman government senate suburbia crassus cornelia general pompey gall dictator perpetuo egypt Pompey Carthage Cassius brutus government