38 Burst results for "CTO"

Fresh update on "cto" discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:25 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "cto" discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Enabling customer experience differentiating. Value Propositions. You've mentioned in a couple of different ways. This notion of ecosystem ecosystems of of of the strategic partners like aws Microsoft's You also talked about the partnerships within tax in the sanctity imports. API's for instance to connect with other organizations with immunity business keep talking about as you think about the fintech landscape innovation that's happening within the financial services space the way in which you and of cooperates and partner with emerging of Benin's as a as large powerful Boeing concern how you'd think about almost. Petition that happens between the been tax and the larger banks have how do you think about that? Part of it is actually giving them the opportunity to challenge us John Thinking. So we do have you know regular cadence so where we have some of these texts and up and coming in founders of innovative. Common Challenge process. With a regular cadence with people can come and challenge us. And for me as as well that you know created. is in the past as well. I WanNa make sure that the steering committees and or design authorities or the architecture review board not just might not pricly. CBA staff. Only I actually have designed towards steering committees without us would a actively challenge us as well and say, Hey. You know thinking about this dimension, you know thinking about this technology or you know thinking about this best practice. So continuously involving them as well to help you know design a better you know marketplace API, infrastructure all that aspect. So creating that openness Is Way keen for me, and this is how we started putting that in place as well. Well, actually have an operational now that's correct keen to get that intellectual debate. From inside as well that outside. Ask why. Thank you so much for for joining me today. It's been great to hear about your most recent experiences in your current posed a bit about your career arc and all that you've learned across the various Major Angela services institutions that you've served as a technology executive as usual it's been a great conversation. Thank you, Veda. Thanks for tuning in. Please join me on Thursday when my guest will be former CIO of metlife in current founder and CEO of uncork Gary Overland..

John Thinking CIO Microsoft CBA Founder And Ceo Metlife Benin Gary Overland Executive Boeing Partner
Fresh update on "cto" discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:16 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "cto" discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"For Safe, sound secure and sustainable growth. So technology has become a limiting factor. And that's also why you know technology has the amount of scrutiny that. It deserves as well from a regulator oversight from a management perspective. If I reflect back you know if you WANNA process. Infinite. New volumes, new products, launch new products. Now, nowadays, you have to launch all these other controls, anti-money-laundering sanction, skiing, anti-bribery, all the aspects of Protective Society. You know and make sure that you actually execute within the regulations. You can't do this manually anymore. So technology has become a limiting factor and importance of it and also the importance of department global partnerships with other global technology providers and how you create. An ecosystem. With an partnership with with these technology provide. So a lot has changed. From the days of the GMC in how you actually look at technology also relevance technology at Management Board level, and also the relevance we've we've regulates having said that obviously technology innovation is is helping us. So if I think about you know out efficiently towns machine learning. those aspects how you actually Data how do correlate the data on those technologies have helped as well, not just from a regulatory and also complying with regulations on social politic do but also help the customers get the customer insights to help customer for the next conversation will help the customer. Actually you know see inefficiencies of holiday spending the money and so on. So those technologies apply them not just not comply regulation, but also help the customers. That's great. I I also wondered If he could take a moment, you've already begun to describe some of the areas. No doubt that that you and your team are focused on what are some some other is articulated strategic at this point is you look to the future in I recognize some aspects of that may be changing a little bit just light of. health crisis, and economic crisis that is reared its ugly head across the world But maybe you can take just reflective on some of the areas of focus for reorganization. Yelich so Much technology strategy build here is around six pillars. and has a lot. You know how do it starts with the customer aspect of how do we rebuild and gain the trust of the customers you know so how do we? Build software engineer software to instill trust so that actually when you think about interacting with the bank. If feel like it's personalized application, it's a personalized experience digital expands. The platform that have is very, very good is one of the leading ones in the world but how do we actually Stri for absolute? personalization. The personalization accustomed feels you know really connected to the bank and fields can configure its experience and configures looks and feels, but also the AIDS inside steady gets. So if you think about the customer engagement baber engine, we add he's not just to do the next best sale, but it's also. Enabled Customer Halo, there's a saving that you could do over here or by the way you have an unclaimed run refund over there or here's an opportunity because of covid nineteen he an opportunity you could refinance this or you can actually postpone your payments and actually gift a customer inside really how rebuilt the trust. With with customers in society and use software in engineering that way. So for me, that's a big pillow strategy. The Omanis is obviously. Enabling the the customer ecosystem. So how do you create an API infrastructure that allows think tax joined benches to plug in actually that which you payment rails leverage, you're settlement Raoul's you know and and make sure that you do allow other organizations to plug in In our case it's Law X fifteen you know that have recently launched We have a complete different market experience in a proposition. Are you know have you integrate them into the bigger ecosystem that we can? Provide to. To the society in Australia. The third one is providing television protection as we have ever evolving threat landscape, not just from cyber fraud bribery, all those aspect how do we create intelligent protection that you also provide that incomes protection to our customers? And our employees so that they understand if you're doing this type of transaction by the way, you know the here's the potential trapped that you might. Encounter or also you know how to be exposed at thousand threat protection for our customers. So they can leverage that as well. So that for me a big bill. the other one is digitizing into experiences. So not just making sure that the digitisation is in the front end, but also digitize front to back. So you actually can create volume in sensitiveness and actually so that the customer is also not set in future too. I. Want you know the bank telling the customer when they can settle the other way around because he digitized customer needs to settle in those dates and because we digitize front back, we can enable the. Settlements in making sure that technology investments in architecture and all that a leading to a front back digitisation. And the other piece which is Most, important which you see across the world now his as well how you get engineer for safe sound secure availability reliability. How'd you get to the five nines? When when I met many years ago you know money has become like water like electricity you know.

Protective Society Software Engineer Engineer Australia Raoul Management Board Fraud Bribery
Fresh update on "cto" discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:32 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "cto" discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Thanks Timothy, and now onto the interview. Or couple. Welcome to tech notation. It's great to speak with us today. Paid. Thanks for having me and it's great to see you again after all these years. Yes, indeed yes. Indeed. In fact that quite a bit as change for you in terms of. Location. If not, necessarily industry your now the group, Executive Enterprise Services and chief. Information Officer Commonwealth Bank Urine Sydney. Australia as we have this conversation where the bank is headquartered that you can take a moment to talk a bit about your purview with that rather long title. What is what is it in jail? While I think you look at some other organization to call it and tack in some other organization. You know it might be more roll like chief. Operating Officer and here it's you know it's right now the span of control is operation. So I think that has to do with settlements. back-office settlements of mortgages loans. Any traits settlements. Basis loan settlement. So operations piece technology, obviously the technology, functions front back. From SCO back from chief information officer respected cybersecurity. Security. Division. And how to protect the bank from a cybersecurity attack Perspective. Data today to office chief data officer, and all the work that we need to do around. You know today data aspects and data governance data management, and unlocking the value of the data for bank. And then lastly as well. Procurement. Why Procurement? Because a lot of procurements nowadays around technology and. Around. Those well operations if you think about you know cash distribution, ATM management those things that distribution into cash on all the branches. So the biggest. Aspect of you know procurement into spent, there is related to the space that I oversee. That's a very vast purview to say the least You've had a number of responsibilities across a great array of of countries to say nothing of companies in the US for organizations like Citi Group Fannie Mae in London joins your bank now Australia with Commonwealth Bank an icy leadership and operational rules of growing responsibility across those across those organizations trees about how you you mentioned earlier that there are some aspects that Ryan across the roles but they're also probably some very interesting differences to say nothing of the the.

Officer Chief Information Officer Commonwealth Bank Australia Timothy Executive Enterprise Services Fannie Mae Citi Group United States London Ryan
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:26 min | Last week

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Don't control the connectivity of the employees at home that last mile writes that poses challenges at times in terms of their in terms of their ability to be productive in the in a how do you measure? How do you measure Are you as productive? You know are you? Getting the same level of productivity that you would office environment or what are the downsides of not being in a face to face inside I. Think all this is going to pan out and. Then go just shares. I talked to my peers. I think a lot of companies are thinking about a hybrid model, right where you're It's both it's not just you know working from home one, hundred percent or in the office, you know the majority of the Times but I think it's I think it's GonNa take a little bit of time to flush out with that new normal is gonNA. Look like I think for most most companies. I. Do think. One great thing I think about this remote work in. Not, just Intel, but I think other companies have been able to pivot faster I think on the. I think on the IT side for. I, think those that had started the journey to cloud. You know in a in a at scale in a big way. You know I think we're able to scale up and you know come out of this, I think much stronger. Than those that didn't in I. Think as we come out of this, it will be a reflection point right for most companies in terms of. The impetus on accelerating some of that digital transformation Again, thank each of us have been at a different pace on that journey, but I think coming out of this. You know we're seeing the value and. I. Think. It'll be a good. You know pivot point under discussion point after this at Taxila rate here. I wanted to turn sue until his corporate data office which as I understand it as cultivating data. FIRST MINDSET FOR INTEL'S BUSINESSES OCCA- talk a bit about your your approach to data strategy in how it's being brought to life through the corporate office. Absolutely so you know for us if you look at today. Tells data assets for about three, hundred, fifteen header bytes. But that's at this point in time right everyday that data continues to grow, and so in a, we're constantly looking at that in that growth. So a few years ago, we launched the Intel corporate data office in the intention with it was for it to be a one stop data shop. To end to cultivate a data first mindset, right for each of Intel's businesses in. So the CTO really collaborates across the company, right with all the business units. The functions even external data, right that we get through a variety of sources and. The intention there is to provide policies, procedures and standards for regulatory compliance. For, you know a view of a true enterprise data management. We look at data set acquisition, and then you know also obviously, what is that big data infrastructure needs to look like today in as we move forward in time, you know how does that change and so so far? I'm happy to say that you know with that. With instituting that corporate data office you know we've implemented and in our managing a state of the art data analytics platform across. Until you know for data science for computing, you know for that whole connected data and in storage were creating I'd say you know new and patentable. Algorithms. To reduce time to market and our pre silicon validation or improving the performance of our products, and also were making our sales and marketing channels more effective. And then the area I think that comes to mind is we are developing ways of generating. Incremental. Value. And delivering insights to decision makers in the company. Interesting and can talk about the role that AI is playing in this. I understand, you're the organizations making a number of larger Betson, artificial intelligence to talk a bit about that if you would. Yeah I think for an NFL Intel in as we think about AI and transformation in our in the things that we're doing here, you know really focused on expanding our partnerships with the with Intel's business units in to develop innovative a use cases. In I'd say they've been primarily focused around three big objectives, right. The first is really improving and having more predictability. In Our business outcomes, right. So we use a analyze. Invalidate vast vast amounts of data in data sets that we have. and. We have insights right that then aid human judgment, you know to help identify opportunities like you know going into new markets. Products new products features, and it also enables us to do things like optimize pricing. Balance Demand and supply on increase in our forecast accuracy in all of this really is focused.

Intel AI CTO
The man who made the Pixel camera so good joins Adobe and already has a task to complete

Daily Tech News Show

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

The man who made the Pixel camera so good joins Adobe and already has a task to complete

"Adobe announced Monday that Mark Lloyd. The researcher who led the computational photography technology used in Google Pixel phones will join adobe with efforts quote centered on the concept of a universal camera APP. Now wd offers the Photoshop Camera App the light room. APP also has a camera inside as well. So, ray remains to be seen, but it sounds like there are big plans in the works Lavoie will report to Adobe CTO Abbaye,

Adobe Mark Lloyd Researcher Google Lavoie Abbaye CTO Photoshop RAY
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:00 min | Last month

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"That's great. I also want actually one last question I wanted to ask. You have been an IT leader in multiple technology organizations at Intel. You were the global cio at HP. you've also been a tech leader at Chevron I should note as well, but I wanted to. Especially in light of let's say your most recent experience prior to this one at HP, where you lead an IT function in a company that was filled with technologists across so many different important parts of the organization. Organization Different From Your Current Company, where ask you at least a preponderance of of technologists or in your it department I'm sure not exclusively, but they're not distributed to the extent that they would be naturally in an organization like an HP I wonder to what extent your time as a cio of technology company has shaped your thinking about the role now a CTO in an organization where that talent is at least two on a relative basis bit or concentrated any thoughts there by chance. While differences would be a CIO whether it was HP or at e or Chevron or Tyson. I think that It's it's diabolically different in in a company that has has not. I would say necessarily embraced a lot of cutting edge technology in the past. I think that you whether it was Tom Hayes or was Noah wide soon to be potentially deemed banks, they all value technology in. The job changes a little bit differently in a in an HP. Find yourself arguing quite a bit with somebody about different technologies because they sell Days Be. We don't have people who are selling some server some San Array or whatever may be and I may go out in by a technology that is in competition with what we have. and. I might say early in some of those arguments I might say you know one of the differences in UNBC as you're reading Berkshire and I'm reading the manuals I have to know all this or my team has no all fiscal dude and you really don't. When you come to place like Tyson foods or any food companies itchy company. They need to trust that CIO's take that same level of rigor into every decision that they make. Because you really trying to build at scale. The biggest difference I think a lot of folks in the tech stack companies whether you're in Silicon Valley are not naturally understanding scale or technology perspective, but when you're bringing newer technology into CPT's space, a lot of guys haven't understood technology from a sale respective, so you really find yourself trying to bring conversations to scale to understand why,.

cio HP. Tyson foods Chevron I Intel Chevron Noah UNBC Tom Hayes Silicon Valley CPT CTO Berkshire
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

06:20 min | Last month

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"I'm not seeing that. The network has not shown any letdown. It's gotten better and better. I mean we were very concerned originally that when you get people at home, it's going to depend on her local circuits of the cost or Whoever may be and you got kids at home streaming media? Minecraft or whatever it is, they're buying. And, then you got AROD that they're trying to do more video conferencing, and so I was concerned about the resiliency of the network to support that, but it's held up He goes to stay a little bit more about digital communications today in the whole world digital, as much more effective. talked for a long time so I. Apologize, but there's so much to say on that topic eater indeed and I wonder then Scotty of perspectives on company. These changes are going to be permanent or reconsider I mean it sounds like many you bring up the great point that a lot of organizations are actually. Contradict or countries, or perhaps the original assumption that teams are actually very productive and. You've lived in places especially when you're in California, work you times for some people can be well over an hour each direction, giving them some of that time back Rasha themselves, but also gaining activity in the lack of a commute. So, what do you think about what the gain is? What's lost of course of team? Collaboration cohesion by being together the same physical location Do you have a philosophy that's? Coming together on this. Yeah, so thanks for asking that question, too. Because I'm excited about the new normals, it may be created I got chills on my arm because I'm actually very excited about it. I think there's all kinds of impacts feeder. I on on reading things about you know. Wildlife is returning dairies. They hadn't seen or right. Think about the fact that I sent a note to a few cars because I have homes in different places and I sent it out to our insurance guide, said they look you know I'm probably spending maybe on average ten miles a week in a car now across all of our cars, so I'm assuming you guys. Are GonNA rebate us in my back. We're not putting in the three thousand miles a month that you thought it was going to be these widespread economic changes. I think you're GONNA see a Lotta new found. It's changes I think we're GONNA. See I was mentioning to our chairman. They're going to be guys who? Startup, virtually today right and it's GonNa. Be Interesting to watch. The BBC's responded that say well. Let's say theater high together with twenty people. Peter Dose Pretty Darn good people on says let's start solving this problem in. They don't need as much money to support the burn rate because they're not out a ebony. They just sat out there, using zoom or Google hangouts, or whatever it is, and it's been proven now. The collaboration can be done in distance and I think it's going to really challenge some companies who in the past and limited by the GOP their giotto case. I believe that I can say my studio I found fifty people that I wanNA hire. That are in a city that we have no crisis in and I'm GonNa bring him on, and they're gonNA work virtually. And I'm excited to see what happens from that. Because I've long believed I learned long ago. Get the very best town on the planet and get them to eat vary. Ask This I think has proven that that's an acceptable approach. So I I get really excited about Peter Easier easier. Uncommon Times with unfounded results that are gonNA become new normal of our raise, a whole new level of productivity collaboration benching disruption. just changing the way we live in arid. It's. It's a it's. A IT'S A. Don't crisis in God probably said. This crisis is creating all kinds of normals that are beneficial to humankind so I'm excited about that's great. It's a good perspective. Is certainly a silver linings while of this? Yeah, Scott, I wouldn't ask you, also you. There are a lot of. CIO's CTO's who spire join boards of companies something you've done your on the board of artist, a bank in Springdale also on the Arkansas Center of data, sciences and Tedium, amendment that sorry. The team, rather the technology business management council a rap. Do and I'm curious. Just kind of how what your path board membership was. How how opportunities presented themselves the extent to which it something that you invade to folks of influence to keep you in mind, ultimate guess what recommendations you'd have for others who wish to follow your footsteps. She you always have the best questions in that's one that's on the minds of everybody, Peter, so yeah, I think you know my early board experience I or to not to be on the board of the national or two. And that is incredible award with a bunch of incredible executives. Leave that in, and so that kind of. Right. Scott Arden your hometown. That was a New Orleans. Yeah, and that's the I think. It's the third most visited museum in the world right now in the. Lead by an incredible CD in Stephen Watson. And it's it's just amazing. Yeah I. Don't know I think. I was. kind of Eyes Wide Open when I got on that board. That because we were trying to guide them. On Technology, they have a lot of assets that have extraordinary historical value. And that put me in. That position is joined these other boards. I think there are some things I can say. That are good advice to give and ends begs to avoid first off. I think the be on board. You got to be in a position to help and that's the mindset you know have a great mentor. One of our members guide any GORDY bannister. We talk about this. In the says you don't be on a board that you're not interested in. And if you're going to move into or role, I think some people move into the board roles for Canada wrong reasons. I think they think that this is the progression they're supposed to achieve. And they really should move into a board because if something you Wanna learn more about something that you.

Peter Scott Arden Canada BBC Google GORDY bannister California chairman GOP New Orleans Stephen Watson Arkansas Center of data CIO Springdale CTO
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:51 min | Last month

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"That are infected today, but it could be as many as four hundred seventy five within four days based on where those people live. and. Where they may be finder, rosaries affects rates. Look like they're even things but traffic. Of what's happening is people who have in the past relied on spreadsheets and data that's in a traditional company, scratchy for Matt or in what I would call a quality now they're starting to see what real time instrumentation predictive looks like. And it's creating a stronger thirst for more, and so it's really enabling our transformation to pick steam and I think for our team You know when you when you're dealing with a crisis like this. People just want L.. They really WanNa help in knowing that we have these technologies these capabilities in place. We're at anal to bring a different level. Hell and our businesses are saying. Please give us more. Please give us more. Please march so. It's a nice situation. That's really great I wonder if you could talk a little about you as you as you've raised the the current, both health and economic crisis that we're in the throes of at least as we're speaking today. I wonder if you could talk a bit about resiliency both in terms of team in technology during this time, it sounds like a lot of the things as you were just pointing out a lot of steps you were taking the would would have been preparing for this specific outcome. had in many ways prepared the organization to some extent, a resiliency perspective. About how that translated during these times. You know I think these are first and foremost. I'm not being a smart guy by the President Times, but they truly are. There's no human alive, and it's gone through.

Matt President
How to become a malware analyst

Cyber Work

05:44 min | Last month

How to become a malware analyst

"You started out in kind of this this you know sort of loose umbrella organization the security. Checkpoints and stuff? But obviously it was a big jump between what you were doing there and moving up to a CTO and infrastructure manager, and so forth says you started configuring networks for small businesses so like. What were some of the major sort of stepping stones where you went from? This area of knowledge, and then you've got you know this this much higher in this tire. What were some of the sort of transformative things in your career that got you to where you are now where you're starting on companies, and so forth yet so when I said twenty, three, twenty, four, twenty, five, remember the age now and one of the big challenges in the olden days I should was Maui mostly through email arms. It was a constant challenge seems we would buy foul would say that I would change it with. Would by Boris you stop with the answer virus, but. Announcing to be constantly constant challenge to the businesses How could we start now at Einstein, which was the best dog. Back then as well coming into the network and we kept buying Butson kept going on today to see asking for more money. And why? Why did you spend this much money in the digital and so? From that? I decided that I wanted to follow in the logical me was. I don't think there should be a business issue. Technology issue on if I was running a technology company. I have ends do whatever I wanted, and then the baton. We could change your bowl so I saw saw company. Hold at sleep. At which wasn't enough security today and the idea was was to. Move Email security teams. Kyle. which everyone looked to me like headset. Quarantine is selling. It's good to get quarantined in the cloud. That was the mentality that unto make it a Subscriber Solution I. I thought that company. As a see, I became Iras, we took investment. And We grew fast not completely I in Dot com date to the to the embezzles on not later became a think fuse mail, which is now by viper that still going somewhere. That's GONNA. Fifteen Years Eissa. Nice legacy! From that when I Got Very involved in some government stuff some some logic at the right I saw A. It was the time was inspired by security advisement. Advise up a full, many large companies and. I helped trying secure environments in addition a lot of recovery ransomware Congress opponent came after the next is. A lot of breach recovery's reach detection I'm cigarette. And one of the things, we always still route throughout my twenty s I guess ninety now getting more than twenty nine thousand eight is. It's a waste Maur so it's whether it's somebody opening an email attachment whether it's. Pushing out like wannacry into seventeen or glass. To Wasting Maui, that's the pain point, everybody. Okay. Well, let's let's jump right into. That did so. Our topic today, specifically ransomware, but malware in general, so we've. We've spoken about ransomware on on past episodes. We had a great episode of a while back. We might release it with a Christian beak of McAfee who else talked about the no more ransom organization, but certainly as you say Malcolm. Malware ransomware aren't going away anytime soon, and they're always sort of. Staying one step ahead of Cybersecurity, expert experts, and you know sort of counter, a malware methods, and so forth I've always. We're always putting new sort of Maur of the week up on our on our interest resources site, and all sorts of crazy things, things young gap jumping and all these new technologies that that. you know added to things so What is the state of ransomware at the moment? Do you think it's gone down? Stayed Up, stayed the same in the age of Covid nineteen people. You know being decentralized locations and working from home and things like that is that make people more or less susceptibility thinker it so I know. Unfortunately it's gone up till nine extreme level at Bobi the highest job we seem. In the last three years. It's happened in the last three months. Okay, I. That stems from various various things one is we've now. The premature is now gone where. Nitty gone, fall, but the people who are outside liver attendance, being more technical savvy sales guys us, not pulsing used to get with technology and the threats. Now we've taken coal centers outside of the rental. We've native. People who pay lowest salaries outside of the purposes of they've lost. A little bit permits security. We've seen massive amounts of increase in things coming through, but more money things executed. The other huge contributing bachelors. Nobody knows what the moments anymore nobody knows. Is it normal to get an email from my CIO estimates? You're Oakland Sunday because. Normally. They're Managing was sitting across the evangelist our when people are home, in Saudi the most tech savvy people get these emails. ACID mortal enables macaroni. Viljoen down his file. Oh, you need to die. Leagues get access to this site on making a diving. It's not actually diabate Moran. We'll sing Momo. People get tricked into doing things that they. Traditionally do.

Maui CTO Boris Butson Diabate Moran Mcafee Viljoen Viper Covid Kyle. CIO Oakland Malcolm
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:22 min | Last month

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Industry is saying that that stack is becoming more and more consistently under the same realm, because one enables the other so loud that you're going to see more consistency and. Talk a bit about why you in the past. You've been a CIO a multiple times over I wonder. Did, you was important or meaningful for you to have one title versus the other. Wasn't an issue for me in fact. You know I think I. My motivations for coming to Tyson were because I actually grew up in the state of Arkansas and I add long had to cause California I've been out cal. Balance last whatever thirty years and I had just always kind of had a dream to come back and take what I learned and who I knew what I knew and and help my state. And so for me, whether it was a cio or CTO it really didn't matter, but then I think is the conversations yet got going. and. We started to understand that there's a bigger impact can be made at I. Remember saying to Tom. You know. Are You thinking about autonomous robotic retrieve thinking about parameter base robotics. We had thought about revise, and they said well. You know I think you get an opportunity when you get the right kinds of data because data going to be the new commodity to the world status. What's going to enable every day? And I think you have a bigger opportunity to bring all that technology to pair together one consistent cohesive manner, the benefits, your entire enterprise, and so I wouldn't have cared if they call the CIO go. I was excited about the role period, but then I think as it emerged into CTO roll, which is everything traditional transformation to your traditional CIO role? In your kind of technologists well, it was kind of like the perfect dream. Come true. We'll talk a bit about that digital transformation side of things. How's that translated into your environment? Yeah it is. It's very interesting Peter to be very candid with you. I think when I got here while I know when I got here, we were underway with a sat upgrade. Go live muscle instances and I I knew because they were variable instances this well that there is going to be some data challenges. And so.

cio or CTO CIO Tyson CTO Arkansas Tom Peter California
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

07:03 min | Last month

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Like how I think it is going to have a more prominent role to play I. do think that one of the things that this pandemic making. Is that we need to have substantially more investments in innovation in our medical biosciences research infrastructure them. We were baking before. I think there are multiple arguments to be made for having big technology investments in. Getting ubiquitous. Low cost high quality healthcare. So that's you know. I wrote about in the book that we should think about. Apollo program like we just talked about it. Go, but like I really do think that like that could be a very interesting thing that we can pick to go and. And and it's a very interesting interplay between. Error existing medical institutions like what we can do with a I am like how all of this interact intersecting with the. Bio, sciences and synthetic biology community is. Yet to like groundless, an example one of the things that we have already seen over the past handful of years is that when you have ubiquitous biometric sensing, so like smart watches or fitness bands for instance I can measure your pulse rate or more sophisticated sensors that could measure your body temperature, oxygen saturation at your blood and your movement. That we are able to take that data feed it into sophisticated machine, learning systems and use it to diagnose. Health conditions that you might have and it a perhaps unintuitive just from the heart tick data that comes from something like it is Bam. We know that we can predict conditions like atrial fibrillation, which is a condition of the heart that causes a very large number of strokes of people experience every year, but like you can also diagnose things that might not be intuitive at all alike. Hypertension and type two diabetes, and so imagine if everybody had. Some cheap by metric sensing the that was with them all the time that was being fad into an AI. Early Warning System for their body. It could I don't know whether this is going to be the case or not, but it could be that from some of this data. You could predict when someone was in the early stages of a of a cove nineteen infection for instance. Wear they are precent matic, and and you could vary early. Get them to sort of treatments, and like potentially quarantine to help manage the pandemic so like that a potential thing that we ought to be looking at very very hard. And I think. I could. Chew your ear off with examples for how I I know. A machine learning can be used for positive benefit on these healthcare applications. Very interesting indeed. I understand You've been the CTO of Microsoft and twenty seventeen January of that year you came to the role after really story career is an early on Google. You're the senior vice president of engineering and operations at least in prior to its acquisition by Microsoft, and I understand that. Among the things that you bond bond over with your now fellow author's Sake Adela. Who wrote about this in it? Refresh? is this philosophy technology needs to benefit everyone, not just the privileged view and obviously hearing a plenty of anecdotes about that in this conversation, but curious about might just the relationship or some of the some of the similarities in the way, in which you and he you think about the use of technology, and perhaps even. How that helps as you were contemplating the possibility taking on the role. CTO It's actually maybe the most important factor in my deciding to take. The job is how alliance sought Dan I are on how we steed. The technology industries obligation to society like how when you think about. Building. Technology systems platforms that you can open up wide laid to serve a bunch of different people's interests, not just your own that you can get this incredible rushing of goodness. Like I. You know I just Bundy mentally. Don't like this idea that we are going to have a world that is more more influence I technology. The technology is going to be a larger and larger factor shaping the future. That if that's the case like you want to have. As diverse, a range of people is humanly possible participating in the creation of the technology you need gender, diversity, unique ethnic diversity, need socioeconomic diversity. You need geographic diversity. You need people from all different backgrounds and perspectives, some with different points of view able to. On a nearly equal basis have access to all of the best tools that technology can provide so that they can solve the problems that they can clearly see for their bandage boy. You know like a good example of this is. When I went to Memphis as I was writing the book with Steve. Case J. Pants with the right of the rise of the rest fine. The the most interested in businesses than I saw there were in precision agriculture, and so the net one trip to that one one city I saw four things happening in precision act than I had seen in years happening in Silicon Valley and part of that is just perspective in context, so Memphis sits in the in the middle of eighteen, million of the most fertile acres on the planet earth in a big part of Memphis's industry is all of the agriculture, and then there's just a big logistics industry on like how you move these crops that are grown in the area to and from. The customers. The producers consumers..

Memphis CTO Microsoft Sake Adela Bam senior vice president of engin Silicon Valley J. Pants Google Hypertension Bundy diabetes Dan Steve
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:18 min | Last month

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Executive Vice President of Technology and research at Microsoft. One of the world's most valuable companies with revenues, exceeding one hundred twenty five billion dollars annually as CTO Kevin's focused on helping make Microsoft exceptional place for engineers, developers and researchers to work in learn. He's also the author of the book reprogramming the American dream which focuses on the future of artificial intelligence, and how can be used to serve humanity? Prior to joining Microsoft Kevin was the senior vice president of engineering and operations at Lincoln. In this interview we discussed Kevin's upbringing in rural Virginia. And why he felt he had to leave his hometown to pursue opportunity. We also cover how people can have successful careers by using sophisticated technological tools without having to move to technology hubs like Silicon Valley in the future, a key thesis of his book. Kevin's thoughts on improving technology knowledge expertise are also covered as well. Well, as the importance of teaching kids technology how the COVID, nineteen pandemic will make distance learning and working more prevalent. how Ai and machine learning can be used for positive benefit with healthcare applications, such disease detection why everyone was play a role in shaping technologies future, not just a select, privileged, few as well as his takes on synthetic biology in a variety of other topics. Evans Scott Welcome to techno vacation I'm happy to be on the on the show. Kevin you're the chief technology officer. Microsoft and I'm looking forward to spending a portion of our conversation covering your purview and your vision your strategy in that role, you're also author of reprogramming the American dream, a terrific book that came out this April, and really draws upon your personal experience, having grown up in rural Virginia town of called Gladys of town of just a few hundred people in population and this book in many ways reflection on the lack of opportunity that you found all things being equal. You've indicated that you would have loved to stay. In and around your hometown, but as your ambition grew, you found that that wasn't necessarily something you could do. You had to make your way to. The parts of the country where the opportunities presented themselves, and you WanNa do something now about leveraging technology to create opportunity in. In towns like your.

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

06:13 min | 2 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Groups. Sure and of course experience, as as I said as you underlined is one of the key elements of of our transform agenda as as a whole, and when we think of experience, you're right first of all we've got. The PNC who serve both consumers. And we serve business so right there you've got that bifurcation, and then within each of those spy on the on the consumer side. You've got the direct sales, and then you've also got the agents and brokers. We've got a large set of tales that we on the consumer side through agents and brokers, and then on the business side, which is through the agents and brokers of course have got two layers of customers are agents and brokers are partners and customers away, and then the end customer, the end business customer also is our customer within that segment. Of course you've got the larger customers, and then you've got smaller businesses that again the characteristics of these. Segments are quite different than their expectations are different, so if you think of customer experience, it's really a whole layer of experiences that may be different from the expectations may be different, and so for us it's critical that as we think of solutions, and as we build solutions, we start with the customer that we're thinking about and understand their expectations and untrue understand were that. Differentiating experience comes through and as personalization becomes more and more important of course, taking that into account, and then worked backwards from there ensure that we're not looking at it from our perspective, but looking at it from their perspective, and ensuring that we're measuring the impact of what we do through things like net promoter, score, and untrue impact to our customers, and that's of course on the customer side I'd say of course the other stakeholders that are as important, obviously our our people, our employees and again what we do. Do Internally to ensure that we've got engaged employees, and that their experienced day in day out is as positive as it is on as easy as it is in their day to day, lives is critical as well and you know engaged employees is is the the best type of employees that that you can have and so that's critical to us, so we are truly driving that culture thinking of experience. I know foremost of course doing it within the confines of our business principles. We're not gonNA Let's say you know. go away from some of the critical parts of our our business. Just just based on experience. It's got to be combined with with the business. Objectives are as well. That makes sense and you've mentioned also a couple of times kind of the history. Of the organization as an innovator and I know this all as you pointed out as you thought about the changes that you and your team of acted maintaining that strong DNA innovation is important and I, wonder if you can maybe share some examples of innovative solutions that you and your team are working on creek advantage for the company. Yeah that's that's right. Peter Travelers has a long history of innovation so from issuing the first auto policy to to ensuring the moon landing so so I. Don't know if you knew that that was something that when I learned about it. I was fascinated especially, ensuring the the moon landing, so it's something that is certainly part of our DNA and ensuring that that were focused on that and that we're doing you know, and and we, we, of course have many forums that we've created to ensure that innovation mindset and culture continues, and it's not a thing that's on the side that it's truly embedded in how our teams are are setup and really empowering them to continue to bring that innovative mindset. To to what they do, if I think back to some of the examples that would probably best showcase of how how this innovative mindset and culture, and how we work really comes to fruition and results in business, impact and truly delivering on the Traveler Promise, one of the examples is our wildfire loss detector application which. Really is an example of. Where we've leveraged deep learning models, and we've designed that to assist in assessing property damage that was caused by wildfires, and the model analyzes up to thousands of high resolution aerial imagery, and it can buy with more than ninety percent accuracy, which one of our customers actually have had total losses in their properties, and then doing so being proactive about servicing them. Providing truly taking care of them whatever that might be an and the impact that it's truly had allowing them to begin the recovery process, even before they may be aware of that loss has just been incredible, and this is one where we're leveraging a slew of technologies and capabilities, from of course, as I said machine, learning and and models to our geospatial capabilities were over the past five years we have. Developed very advanced capabilities there in partnership with some of the government bodies on some of our peers, and and develop capabilities where we're leveraging aerial imagery, that's real time and and up to date, and then using both our own internal data and a lot of rich external data to drive some of the capabilities that I talked about so it's really in looking at the impact that we can have and how technology can truly enable that is is where I say you know. The fruits of innovation kind of can be seen most prominently. And I know from our past conversations on that one of the ways in which you think of funding innovation is through optimization. It said it's thinking about both sides of the the propagation, so to say Um and I the bottom line implications of cost savings and efficiencies as a means of ending the the innovation that may we'd, of course, the top line growth Can you talk a bit about the way in which you? You and your team are oriented towards.

PNC Peter Travelers
End to end solutions against COVID-19  insights from Blok BioScience

Insureblocks

05:16 min | 3 months ago

End to end solutions against COVID-19 insights from Blok BioScience

"For this week's podcast rigby discussing end to end solutions against couve in nineteen with special insights from block bioscience. And I'm very pleased to have returning to intra blogs aerial Walla no CTO of block bioscience and managing director of experts aerial. Thank you for joining us today for those listeners. Who Haven't heard you in our first podcast. Could you please give them a quick introduction on yourself and on block bioscience they'd thanks and It's great to be back. My Name's Arielle. I've been working in the blockchain space for a while. Is it six years now. It's a longtime Komo experts. Blockchain Because we are all still figuring out a lot as we go but I've had the good fortune to work on a number of really interesting solutions from trade finance to insurance And now working Working in the biotech industry on something. That's really needed excellent. Excellent so as you'll recall our first question is could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work but here? I'm I'm curious to see if your definition has changed since the last time you are on the show due to the work you're doing it blocked bioscience so if if memory serves the definition. I gave you a hasn't changed much. Which is that blockchain technology that allows multiple companies where people to share a single version of the truth Without having to spend any time effort or money on reconciliation messaging Synchronization Or other such that the benefit from from gained from That sharing often allows completely new business. Models or new ways of solving problems. Ought to be possible in terms of how it's changed. I think the the main thing that's changed is a very welcome maturation of thought blockchain. I think it's fair to say no longer. A thing on. It is a tool kit For solving problems And for accomplishing what previously would take large numbers of people or expensive software solutions off. That can now be taken for granted when two people are talking and one is sharing a. I found this amazing new APP on my phone. What what we what I wouldn't say to you is. I found this amazing new APP in my phone and it runs the IP stack. That's given so if we're now talking about a solution and that solution includes our two companies Having a common record of a piece of data the presumed solution is that you would use blockchain so that you would share that single solution than do after create a business function hired people or build software to keep our version of that that data and yours in sync great great and I have very fond memories of our podcast where you took us all the way back to the Sumerians to talk about the Boola but I'll let our listeners to check it out for those. Who Haven't had the chance to actually on your on your on your webpage that Keith. Bear actually Commented on similar context of the indeed Princeton this world so in our last podcast I introduced you as managing director offensive experts. Now you've added to that the role of CTO block bioscience. What is blocked by? What is your mission blockbuster? Science is Is A team of thought. Leaders thought leaders in the medical industry thought LEADERS IN TECHNOLOGY THOUGHT LEADERS AND SUPPLY CHAIN. Who grouped together because we think that is needed fast that it needs to reflect how quickly things are changing And that it needs to represent Delivering the best possible medical diagnostic and supply chain capability to the fight The unprecedented impact that covert nineteen is having on the world. Ob conserve experts has entered into a business partnership with block and we are providing The technology delivery capability. But that's only one piece of block block is also about the medical expertise on supply chain in the network of relationships To get things where they need to go on and together we are creating The solution that we're talking about today. Excellent so just to confirm this blog bioscience was created because of the president pandemic or was it created prior to that block solutions. Which is which is this. Group of thought leaders will was already created what we did is mobilized specifically to solve this problem. We've been working on it Pretty much since since Cova I started You know emerging from China in in late January.

Cto Block Bioscience Managing Director CTO Rigby Komo Cova President Trump Keith China Princeton Bear
Bitfinex CTO Paolo Ardoino on Tethers Dominance

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

07:14 min | 3 months ago

Bitfinex CTO Paolo Ardoino on Tethers Dominance

"You explain how your role has evolved between tether and embiid Phoenix and kind of wary? You currently sits. Because there's some confusion over the organizational structures. We didn't have to get into the banking and and kind of creation and asset component of it but But where do you spend most of your time on the infrastructure is on the other side or is this just a but the discrepancy? That doesn't really exist. In fact it's more just a organizational chart issue so you know I my exp- by have a really good expertise also in insecurity. So that is one of the reasons why in two thousand sixteen I was asked to stepping us with your Phoenix so I steal mine. Main role is to act An amazing team of developers in Phoenix any better debtor has less developers because most of the operations are on chain of course us well known blockchain. So the key part of my rolling Patter Is ensuring that blockchain's That we are going to has older climates that the we won't in terms of issuance redemption authorisation processes. So that is what they do in patter and also decide. The processes in which these insurance is redemption. Needs to happen so I that is I really I'm I'M BREATHE. Thorough and read annoying when it comes to security So Basically I spent quite some time design a designing All all these processes in between instead. I said I would say most of my time because I read called a lot there Old The basically I I mainly involved in mentioned engine and all the processes so I would say that I still Dimension engineered steel ninety percent me and the old that also the core service is still eighty percent me. I would say to. Let's let's talk about Tether I because it's just seen absolute explosion in volume and in new creation particularly or last quarter. So there's there's two things that I think we've talked about. One is the transition that started people. Forget only about a year ago Between Omni tether and then the RC and crx tether which are in been the case now trae USD this now traded and and And held on the theory of blockchain is Over five billion now which is larger than us DT on Omni ever was I think even units peak which round. Yeah three billion this transition. That really only happened last year. Can you talk a little bit about what ultimately led to the migration to a theorem? Might sound like an obvious question answer but but not only what led to that but also the decision making process for when to flip the switch because on the one hand. It's obvious there's a ton of develop activity. There's a ton of interest in those certainly. The capabilities are C- Tokens to salted a type of transferring creation. Like this but on the other theorem itself as a platform is certainly not ironclad from from a security standpoint and the last thing you want to have happen is any issues with the fungibility of a dollar denominated token during a chain split or a B migration do chain which is basically. What thirty two point. Oh yes so First of all the the moment when we decided to create Tighter on On the theory was really an fewer. No that was really end up two dozen seventeen. If you recall ended as seventeen was we were almost peak of bull run and the price of a bitcoin transaction enhance transactions. At some point reaches out. be five hundred dollars so of course there was. I was making money so You know people where we're kind of happy Steal the where really complain. Hard about pattern so we wear We we got a lot of complaints and other exchanges complaint that that support attacker that is issued a majority from any doubts about the costs of Of running an owning owed because ultimately you have you need to have a bitcoin a unit to bitcoin orders and an amish transaction so in endo tas seventeen we should we worked on the ethereal Michael For for her and we we deployed it. We really didn't use it and we didn't You know as a beginning to eighteen The market started accounting upbeat. And by the time we were we We wear eighty Announce Terry Theorem. It's an alternative the fees if he goes went down. Whitehall so first of all. I won't say that we never intended to migrate so we we wanted to create the diversity. We wanted to offer a way that a solution in case one blockchain guests load and knocks usable. Not So we wanted to give another opportunity to use a different blockchain. So you should. We suggest with changes to support at least to Had Our lunches so at any point in time traders can steal the funds between Between one change to another so I'd also panther was was born to to Make it easier to make faster the cross exchange arbitrage. So if you have really high fees or you have a blockchain that exploded and the commission times are ours than you lose completed the purpose of a stable corn so that is why the that is the key reason why we are blockchain blockchain so we are on Tron IUS legally than the allographs so biscuit we start to buy them and we we not weed. Dan Understood that Traders would prefer anyway Ethereal just for transactions speed and the and call general so start more predictable and Usually lower on on

Phoenix Omni Blockchain Terry Theorem USD DAN Whitehall The Market
Alec Harris - Halo Privacy & Bitcoin

Crypto Voices

05:30 min | 4 months ago

Alec Harris - Halo Privacy & Bitcoin

"Don't you just give a little bit more of our listeners? What Halo Does and how you get into it. Yes sir. So the actual experts at handling were all ruling. There is right. Now they're listening but Yeah I kinda got into it by accident. Which is how most of the good things have happened for me. But in two thousand eleven I introduced to Lance. Cto OF HALO. He was working on a different project. It was using one time pad cryptography and I had not heard of one time. It is. It's basically a symmetric cipher on. It's been around since World War One to nineteen sixteen time up until recently it. Was You know? Each party has a pad And one page of that. Pat Is used at a time as it's consumed it's thrown away. I never used so applying mathematical Sorta brute force attacks to it doesn't yield you any information About the plain text other than the kind of the maximum length of the message. And so. That's if it's implemented correctly it's unbreakable by kind of the computer attack but it's up to engage in the way that I really like it. As far as the description goes is very strong. Asymmetric photography is always a math problem rating. So you might have you know a to introduce Cypher and Died is like the equivalent of saying what day of the week will be on April fifteenth. A thousand years from now and do that in my head but a computer can tell you that because it's a math problem and what one time patters is like saying. What will the weather be like on April fifteen thousand now You could run every permutation of possible weather in one of those might actually correctly but you would never know because there's really no information to glean is just random one time pad isn't. I got really interested in a by working but lance a company called ruined And then that kind of transitioned into Halo. Which was an extension of that and an expansion of the suite of tools into voice? Text video file sharing and then a bunch of things in the background. Did I find to be very interesting? And they're kind of dark art says. Us Mesa where we hide or off. You skip the identity of the people in a communications network Either by kind giving false actors or Covering or office getting true identities and then severing links between the parties so that you can't really establish connections between people in the brief way steig riders. So if I was to send you attach to say we're having a surprise birthday party for by the way we'll shot up to Shane. Laura our good friends have introduced us. So we're saying you know how surprise birthday party for Shane While the information in that text is interesting right that that is actually worth protecting. We don't want to know A. And that's why cartography is important and then If we have someone who is? Let's say politically compromised communicating with someone in another country. They identity of that person is actually relevant so in a security posture. You would want to not only protect the what they're saying but also the identity that person and then if you go a step further with you have someone for instance who is in Mozell communicating with someone. Who IS IN MCLEAN VIRGINIA? While that just the link between those people is suspicious And so we. Would you offer that you would want to sever the link between the parties so that the contents of protected the identities protective? And then you don't establish kind of links allow you to unravel network and so that's that's what we do and the happy Discovery along the way how powerful bitcoin could be in these platforms is what kind of lead me. Into the CRYPTO currency world ultimately got US talking But I'll just pause there when we can talk about. Bitcoin obviously forever. But that's kind of what I've been up to and it's led me into being. You know someone who cares a lot about five AC- admittedly a newcomer to it. So you know before all this wasn't really on my radar And I try to have some empathy for people who maybe haven't had the same exposures in heaven and to invite them into these things as opposed to you know scold people. Who aren't you know of the same nine? It's goes without saying that. A lot of people in in bitcoin in Crypto in general. They're very amenable to privacy Very much care about. It's not even going into the specifics about if you use bitcoin versus Minero or if you coined or not I think just generally that ethos of-of privacy and having some protections online is is important to most people in the space so I think it'll be fascinating to dig deeper on that but I think from the RV that you gave. It should be clear that that you guys are definitely Definitely deepen the space definitely providing a lot of interesting

Lance Shane Bitcoin CTO Cypher PAT Mclean Virginia Mozell Laura
World Fuel Services COO Jeff Smith

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

08:55 min | 4 months ago

World Fuel Services COO Jeff Smith

"Terms of operations where we're global And so for me. You know a good chunk of what I do is related to technology because technology has a place you know from the initial customer experience ordered a cache procure to pay record to report so that plays a big piece and that's the the people and the process and the tech strategy goes with that but then there's overall financial operations and shared services for. How do we support our line of business segments when when they conduct their business and and how can we run those kind of back office functions a lot more efficiently and in the right locations with the right skills and it's really you know the the guts it's the engine room You know that enabled us to go out and attract business and and you know executed efficiently. That's really my my core role and can you talk a bit about the form that digital transformation takes an organization like yours. I mentioned a moment ago. That said clearly part of what excited the executive team about your abilities in in bringing you on board talk a bit about the formats taken across the now as I say to. Nearly two and a half years so that you've been enroll it's quite pervasive because the digital transformation is everything from the systems and technology that allow you from the very beginning of you know just doing looking at the opportunity. So that's in your your crm systems. It's in your data systems that allow you to you. Know Ingest customer and supplier information that's in portal strategies its self service increasingly because a lot of our supply base is third party it's creating API's and more of an ecosystem to allow different participants to play without having to make it so complex and and build Point to point integrations or do it manually. So in one sense that's one piece of the digital transformation on the other it really is around the efficiency and and in using robotics Cr and different Technologies so that every piece of data that comes and hopefully we can bring in digitally. We could process it. Digitally we can analyze it did Chile and make more sense out of all the data that we're collecting. You know to make better business decisions and and that can be in in pricing. We buy an awful lot. You know we're buying and selling you know. Forty billion dollars worth of energy in one way shape or form and it doesn't take you know a you know a bit of an intelligence we can use that data you know. Apply some a and machine learning to a can. We actually improved you know our operating margins but also improve the experience back to the customer so that it really it entails everything from the very very beginning from opportunity all the way back to you know how we close the books and do our our analytics on the back yet. No doubt a lot of what you just described Were things that either were in nascent forms or perhaps in some cases were were already up and running. I'm curious when you join the organization. How much change was necessary. wraps the changes continuing in order to realize the vision of what you just described. I think one thing I learned Who wore wounds pass rules and stuff as well as your strategy and tactics have to manage the town? That's you have on the pitch so if you WanNa you know you want to move to the cloud aggressively and use and use digital technologies You know you have to have the skills to do that. So a good chunk of my very first year was really taking a look. You know from the bottom up you know what our core skills. We need. How those roll up into roles? How do we create an Agile Organization? We did something quite different that I experienced And my last couple jobs as well as rather than doing an orange strategy top down. Go from the bottom up. Look at what work needs to be done. What's do that? Well and apply more of spotify model of grouping people into small self directed teams that are kind of loosely coupled tightly aligned into tribes tribes into a domain so that you run a leaner management structure unless levels. But in order to do that. You've gotTa have the talent to bring that in so we went on. You know you know really strong. Assessment training bringing new skills in and I would say over the last two years. We've turned over You know about a third of our workforce you know you needed that amount of replenishment to bring the skill base up because there is no You know there's no compression algorithm for experience. You need to have done it before so we needed to bring people in that. Could you know others could could learn from at an accelerated pace and pick the right partners and ride their way? And so I think that's the other key strategy of being ready as you know you're only as good as the people you surround yourself with sweets that you have ever principles. It's pick our partners based on the company I product second. Because your company's you leading indicator your product features you're lagging we spent. The first year was an awful lot from you. Know who we need at the executive level. What kind of practitioners do we need? What kind of special skills and analytics and digital and cloud and and replenishing to the point that we could execute strategy that we really want to really like that pick people based on company I products second for the reasons you articulated as you thought about the people that were the worst of this replenishment the replacement of the third. Or so of folks who changed over. How important was experiencing the type of work that you foresaw as important or more or less important than experience in the industry. You need that you need experience in the industry and we had a a decent amount of that but it variance in the the technologies and how to solve problems in different ways. You need a mesh need this kind of diversity of thought in any great organization and and that's in addition to gender and race so you need the industry piece but my piece my history experience would tell me that attitude is is more important than an aptitudes you need to create the right culture and and people have a much larger capacity to learn then they get themselves credit for but you have to have the right people to create the right environment and then set high expectations and the better people will come up to speed more quickly that we have a capacity to learn whether it's a business domain or technology domain far greater than we think and but you have to have enough congestion of talent and leadership. You know just to enable that to happen they have very interesting indeed. I'm also curious. You talked about the need to build a better set of partners a broader ecosystem. My Word Not Yours but how on translating what you were describing who curious what sorts of changes you made from that perspective as well. Clearly you've been thinking about the mix of people the internal as well as extra. What sorts of changes did you make as a result of that analysis? Why think on the on the partner side we had a few business objectives and I think this is probably the other thing at least good advice for. Cio's that went to you. Know take on other broader business roles look at it in terms of what's the business objectives and the business outcome. You Really WanNa get in one of the things that we needed to do. To connect people across the world in a more effective way was to create a strong productive environment for them so that they could collaborate and learn from each other at a faster pace so we looked at. Who are the best companies in collaboration? And we're GonNa make you know hard. I would call student body right. Turns and get on those companies because we knew that in addition to the products they sold we could learn different things from them so three companies. We used in what I would call. The employee. Collaboration environment were box. Zoom in slack and their three. You know great run companies. They've got they've run it's interesting. They run similar management systems with okay ours which are from John. Dora and how you do a objectives and key results and you know box for content management zoom or video and PBX and communications And then slack for collaboration and all three of those companies have helped us Outside yes their technology is in use utilize them for the problems they've solved we've looked at their leadership techniques If you take a look at zoom one of the top rated companies to work for actually all three of them are looked at their leadership techniques. We looked at their engineering practices at at box. We sit on their advisory boards to to you know. I think one of our other key principles. Both parties should benefit outside the commercial relationship. And so we use those which. Reiki changes. I'd say in the collaboration environment and the we had a very big goal to Closed down our data centers and Migrate Everything to the Cloud. So we partnered with. Aws than they try. They train onsite even help us recruit at universities. When we're looking at undergraduate hires and really help us become better company. By looking at some of the things that they do in their leadership system and And even how? The recruiting practices things like that. So those are four partners that we have gotten measurably better at a faster taste because we were relying on your good skills internally but also hiring what's needed but also partnering with the People that are measurably better than the ones we

Cloud Executive Chile Spotify AWS CIO Partner Dora John
Pareto Product Programming with Philip Poots

Ruby on Rails Podcast

04:48 min | 4 months ago

Pareto Product Programming with Philip Poots

"Has ruby on rails been the focus of the majority of your web developer career yet pretty much so since since two thousand seventeen I go to a job in two thousand nineteen so actually in the North. I was in the In Scotland I and then I moved to the northeast of England and it was actually pretty difficult at that point to find a job in rails in the UK. He either have to go down to London which I wasn't very keen on am or what I should have done is like applied to somewhere in America like twitter or get up before they were huge right so so I started dot net job. And I'd never done anything apart from rails so during the dot net job actually gave me that experience of high horrible and Terrible. It is to program without rails especially at that point right because we're talking. I duNNO WINDOWS ARE. I don't know what don't that hot at the time they didn't even have a speed on. Nbc was literally Web view as it was it was just a mess and the things I was building I was like. I could do this in a couple of weeks with rails. Why am I spending like three months so I quickly got out of that fund? The job with a company actually started very early with the pre one version of rails but I think the version at that point was one point two point three and until I worked in that for a couple of years then. I moved to sage in accounting company. That's where we did like the real to reel. Three upgrades moved to give a like a funding platform for charitable enterprises and that was mainly rails. The only thing there was we moved from like postscript to doing Mongo DB and then moved very quickly back again and then moved to funding gets where it was back in amber jazz from Dent. And I'm where I am not club. Collectors also Manley rails. Yes Oh so pretty much ten years of reels with little ventures here and there to other things I think that's a really fascinating background and I love the fact that you have prior experience with different language and a different framework. You can truly appreciate all that rails can give you. I'm at the point where I think I'm going to have to start producing patches for developers who've done the rails two to three upgrade the rails three to four upgrade. Just because I feel like it's a badge of honor at this point and luckily we're very spoiled now. As Ruben developers were. These upgrades aren't nearly as tough as they used to be. Absolutely so I got to ask you a little bit about this in person when I met you a pair of Srb but I'd love to hear all about club collect and what your role of a VP of engineering means to you. Yes sure so. M many ways the rule of VPN engineering is at club. Collect is is very much a dream job for me so I actually started a club collectors. As a developer in in in the river tame 'em Very grateful to two atom pulse. Eric co-founders so eric was the CTO on 'em he decided to take a step back from operations he loves being involved in companies at the early stages am and he asked me to to to basically step into his position 'em so he's still acting CTO when he's still like assigning board but then I'm like handling day today operations within the engineering and the reason I like. It is the reason I'm always attracted to startups is to be in an environment where you're wearing a lot of different hats and you're in a lot of different things with the goal of seat to have a big impact is possible this versus you know. My experiences in smaller companies are sorry in larger companies. We have a smaller role in a smaller impact. And we really frustrates me. When you get you know m specs through from someone two or three people removed from you with things in them where you think you know if we just change this little bit and not little bit we could have this done in a couple of days but the way it's written it's GonNa take two weeks and then to suggest it and to get the answer back. No this is the way we're GonNa do it at that kind of whist an eliminating. That waste is why I really like working in the startup environment. And so so the you know the day today is is very very an 'em anything from talking to the rest of the management team of the leadership team. You know sales customer operations at customer success am The CFO you know by long term strategies by short-term things that we're going to be Dang 'em to like the nitty gritty of domain name. 'em STUFF FIGURING. I like D mark and all the security stuff that comes along with the role but but really the thing that I love the most about being. Vp of engineering is. Is the

Developer Vp Of Engineering CTO America London Scotland Twitter NBC England Web Developer UK Dent CFO Ruben Eric
Equity on ExtraCrunch: Monday.com passed $130M ARR

Equity

13:56 min | 4 months ago

Equity on ExtraCrunch: Monday.com passed $130M ARR

"Hello and welcome back to equity on Xtra crunch where we straight just a little bit from the normal equity round table format to bring you interviews with leaders in the start up and venture capital world. You know we go a little bit deeper. We go a little bit longer. Began on the regular show now just before the market downturn. I had the opportunity to sit down with Monday. Dot Com co founder and CTO errands INMAN as currency. Yo Roy man. The world has changed quickly in the weeks that have followed our conversation. Just pick a couple of things that are now different remote productivity friendly services like slack zoom are seeing usage spikes and also a wave of new customers as people begin to work from home more frequently. And we've also seen in the downturn. A lot of companies scrambled a cut burn and conserve cash as it turns out Monday. Dot Com story fits pretty well into both of those themes as product can help aid remote teams with their work and also the business has a history of property pretty cash efficiently the China's a few other highlights including how they've handled culture as they've scaled. How MONDAY DOT COM is crushed? In New and Higher Revenue Threshold Demi expected and also that has a target date for reaching cashflow positively overall. This interview is a glimpse into a business. That was doing well before the world changed. And it's probably do even better now that it has. This clip begins in the middle of the interview. Please head over to extra credit to get the full conversation. But in the meantime set back hit play. And let's go well originally. I want to bring up competition. Someone's talk about Caq but we ended up too much more interesting place. Let's bring it back to the financial world which is a bit more of my domain even though actually quite interesting. I'm glad we went there to be clear because your your competition is is relatively Multifaceted and you can think about many different companies as being possible competitors with your company. I'm curious if that makes your customer. Acquisition costs relatively steep. Or if you found a way to get around to being a lot of money acquiring customers I know you raise one hundred and fifty million last year so you certainly had a lot of Capital to play with Have you been deployed that aggressively on on contract position? And if so how is that impacted your your economics in the last twelve months? Yeah so so first of all We're lucky that the majority of customers come from word of mouth and and other people were commended. Also the to itself have a built in kind of viral loop because We have this feature. We invite gas from other companies. So if you have a process with another company you can invite somebody in that. This person couldn't get exposed to Monday so they can start. Adopting it and the company is very efficient in terms of cash burned. We have relatively low CAQ and we managed to scale all this way wall Bernie and very low amount of catch. We actually have all the money that we raised from the previous round higher. Lost once or twice before so fifty in July. Twenty eight th two. We are spending a lot of money on line to acquire customers we we we do have variety that makes us if we wanted to. We could be more aggressive. But that's not the route with took and like If we look for like let's say year and a half from now we're going to be cash flow positive a year and a half so Nigga. Twenty twenty one. Yeah so the opportunity here is massive. Like the market is really massive. I think also like The wordless digitizing intimating or pockets. And now it's like it's happening in a lot of places that Businesses are digitizing with with respect respect to to the the size size of of the the opportunity. opportunity. We We always always wanted wanted to to scale scale war war too. too. We We can can always always spend spend more more and and we reached the point. We say we can do profitably together. So you guys were early then to the idea of not spending too much money on growth because if you were if you had your efficient hurry efficiently and like we're very dilute. Why everyone else figured that out. After we were imploded last year you were very early to. I'm curious why you decided when you could've raised more and spend more money and embiid mortgages your word. Why were you more deliberate? Why were you more efficient? What drove that mindset. I don't know it's been part of our mentality since day one I don't know if it's tied to the fact that we're basically tel-aviv. So maybe it's myself but we always knew that we build a you know a huge company but also business. Though at the end of the day we always were very thoughtful about making sure that Dr Wise get on the cash that we spend the money recycles quickly and that we Be Very efficient even in terms of the number of employees that we have We now with two hundred thirty million. They are in four hundred people twenty well looking like then the beginning of the year one twenty was beginning of the year. Okay Yeah so so you know in terms of people will also kind of lean though so we try to be on one very aggressive and grow as fast as possible on the other hand. Be Very thoughtful in terms of how we grow and make it healthy and meteorology both closed startups before like I had to fail startups before one was successful in terms of like users we are like a million users in a game but he didn't make money and like we didn't get. I didn't have a salary with having to pay rent for six months. That's brutal you know so once you will the third one. You want to be right if you'd like. We were never about like Bro. Were very thoughtful. 'cause we appreciate the fact that succeeding. We're in just like start spending money on on on things. We didn't really understand what will get from. I'm curious what's changing in how you approached business from like two hundred fifty million air are and now fifty to one hundred and thirty. What doesn't work at the scale? That was very functional and fifty million that you had to change. I think like throughout the life of the company. Like you have to break through bill before you have to change like nothing is the same all the time. It's not just like twenty five to fifty two. It's like every day we have to build something new and then as a result. And that's the part that you don't think about you have to break with your work and like try stuff though without the right culture to support it to allow people to just like do stuff and not worry about the consequences like dry fade and then you know but learn from that and then again then. You can't really do it so culture. Stay the same and informs change as the business grows and changes the the processes then. I suppose it might be a lot of things that he changed. But the problem as you grow has become more challenging to change because it's more people and People tend to stick with what they know right. So it's harder to change but a big part of our challenge is to keep momentum of change. Keep changing all the time I can give you one example that You know to go you know. We had great momentum growth We didn't have a sales team. Also kind of your Sales Tin Guess. Bigger than in two thousand eighteen. You did around fifty million in revenue. Right that's correct and you didn't have to you know because most of our growth was organic people. Were trying to grow organically but then we realize that you know we have this huge customer base all potential to grow as bring a sales team to help them pro. You know vast fifteen hundred people but it was hard because you know. It's not the growth engine. It's another thing to support. The company DOT is not that we change our model. But it's another part a company that we need to support and so it was a hard change. We can give an example. It was painful because we said in the beginning. We didn't want to start off with the sense in. Because then you have a really good person. And he says something you don't have to build we want the roadmap. The tool to beat is not be considered by the someone good says but like for actual people to use it and trying that glow in that way but then at the end it made sense to other states in 'cause like bigger companies need help. They need help. They want those kind of stuff. And then you know the saddest thing would come to the product which was really good and solidified that point and tell them we need to close the deal in this it. Okay it's not in the roadmap it's like no but wait. That's not how we do things like we want to be there for. Us Tours We can say if it makes sense. Now let's not change. Let's wait for the next quarter. That's not our style so had to adopt those kinds of stuff to help support and say steam and that we do whatever is needed in a good view of what the customer demands today as opposed to what they might one six months and we want to win. We want to win. We Wanna be there for customer so we are very KPI driven the KPI was one thing. Now we've integrated as part of the KPI and it works so we can like the weather. Duffy your yet but we're over it now. It works really well. Mesh really well together. They're not touch and and the saints so two more questions before I let you go about culture and you've mentioned culture and how the keeps glued together as as you. Scaled is the had to add cultural values to the business as you scale that you didn't even your smaller that now fit large organization. I'M FASCINATED BY WATCHING COMEDIES. Growing and of what they have to create to keep going. It's funny because we never sat down and listed a bunch of things that we consider to be. Everyone does that in Silicon Valley come on. That's like a that's like everyone off site. We took a different approach because of that by the way at Princeton. Then like that's not how you truly build it. It's like you need to leave. Something came in You know understand what you say. So we did a bunch of stuff that we believed in and people adopted and get used to it and then it was funny because people within the company reflected to us with the culture is and we can build it together but out of how we acted as a company and not According to a bunch of bull points that we put on the wall somewhere we just now started listening a few words you know so we we have few words now is not the four-legged inclusion speed. Trust ownership I mean this of course words but we leave them way before we could pronounce the inclusion like we started off with transparency. But we like over time. We understood that is way more than just transparency with the numbers. It's inclusion to planning to people so for example we have a lot of people are It's hard for them that it's back down to query the database though it's open like an analytics based to build a data school kind of damage to help them learn so they can understand the business better so those kinds of stuff. We mean inclusion. We can go each one of them and give a lot of It's good it's good. One is the perfect. And before I let you go so I wasn't going to press going public because I didn't predict what was going to be very interesting. But because you've been so cash efficient because you're you've reached one hundred one hundred thirty million errare your various similar in in substance entrance with like Spend and also size to Asana. Who did just nounce? They're going to pursue a reckless in in the United States. Probably this year so I'm kind of curious one if you notice that intrigued and also to how that possibly impacts think about any eventual possible liquidity event for the business. I mean listen Going public is on a roadmap. Sound point it's not our goal as a company. We're still growing very very fast If in this year our goal is to double again so go from one twenty two to forty something like that And you know it's still great momentum. The company's going very fast. And just you know. We are not in a hurry. You know coming enough cash and we're going to be cash efficient at the end of this year. So we're not the cash raise money. We don't need the stress to go public so at some point. We'll do it but you know we're still having fun so Why not. Why not wait a little bit more? Yeah and I think like are from the beginning in. This is something that you should like. Generally wish would expect more from coming for me to be a big company eventually. Like if you're not selling So I feel like the where we will end up with to build a company and it's exciting where the sun is doing lake Public listening. It's interesting where to pay. Close attention in a nutshell is like they're a good company ED company. I'm excited to see if they're directly and if it happens in the next couple of quarters will shake more companies out of the tree To get the process underway. Because there's a lot of unicorns out there of which you won that need to get out before the economy eventually discipline strange and that has to happen. That's the question is when you know. I've been saying fifteen so I've stopped guessing because I've been wrong. Eastern is way. We've you're wrong forty you're right and no one's anyways thank you guys for coming in a real treat and we'll talk and six months when you're about one hundred ninety nine.

China Twenty Twenty Yo Roy CAQ Ed Company Inman Co Founder Lake Public DOT Bernie Dr Wise CTO United States Silicon Valley Princeton
Google's coronavirus information site is now live

Charlie Parker

01:03 min | 4 months ago

Google's coronavirus information site is now live

"Google's corona virus testing website is hooked up we need a young with Bloomberg has today's infocus report website built for scheduling coronavirus screenings booked every opening during its first full day of operation people with symptoms and without symptoms are all wanting to know whether or not they posed a threat to their loved ones Alexander director is talking about verily a health care unit elf Google parent alphabet the reader is co founder and CTO of ink his team helps companies rank their content on Google he says the bottleneck in scheduling corona virus testing has little to do with the site itself it's more of the real world coordination between the different locations there we just don't and their capacity and making sure all of that is synchronized to resistance testing websites can help stop the corona virus scan bottleneck if there's a real opportunity for Google and other tech companies to begin creating a more interactive experience support by start collecting people who want to get tested Khattar databases for that

Google Bloomberg Director Co Founder Alexander CTO
Pivoting Brighton Ruby 2020 with Andy Croll

Ruby on Rails Podcast

10:06 min | 5 months ago

Pivoting Brighton Ruby 2020 with Andy Croll

"I'm now starting to report on the series of wonderful people that I got to meet and Harris. Rb FIRST UP. Is Andy Crawl Antea? Cto At coverage book an answer the public he's a Rubio's conference organizer of Brighton. Ruby and author Speaker bootstrap and swim. Dad Thanks for joining me today. Andy thanks for having me absolutely Andy. What is your developer origin? Story overseeing story Roy so I have somewhat a classical nerd background Computers as a small child and then computer science at university and then I took a job. The I thought was technical but absolutely wasn't did four years of HR and communications for a big Tech Company. And then I was getting super frustrated with that all the time I sort of kept up making websites for various stuff. And I I quit that job to re skill into the website side of things and I started out in the front end of html CSS. And I discovered I discovered David Hammer. Hanson's make good fifteen minutes video and base count and thirty seventeen all around the same time in about two thousand seven and I've been doing re be rails ever since so you kind of touched upon it but what is your specific experience with. Ruby on rails. Well it's basically my entire career for the last decade and a bit which me and my niece feel old Yeah so was experience Bill. Various things like my own stuff Currently working with a team in Brighton in the UK on Coverage Book and onto the public which are two entirely separate SAS businesses. Run by technical team of three and a wider team of nine And we have two three thousand customers and we support the more with With two three mainly two or three rails APPs and lots of other stuff around the edges of the press. Cite JEKYLL Yeah so lots and lots of Ruby on rails pretty much. Have you ever deviated from Ruby and Ruby on rails? Have you tried other technical stacks or you pretty focused on rails? Have I strayed I have played a little bit with stuff. Of course all of us have to write Java scrip- whether we want to or not mostly not depending on whether I'm maintaining my own Java scrip- from Herman years ago. Yeah pretty much. I do a lot of fun work in our team as well so we a designer on team and he does some front end But I'm more focused on the performance and technical sides of those things I recently have built a wordpress blog for us for for marketing team re platforming from medium. An idea that was an entertaining exercise in the stuff I used to do was just doing front end. I just wanted to make websites and that was always the bt of Ruby handrails for me will very much finding a thing where I could make the compete to do what I wanted and then may have nice as well so yeah I. I've done a bit but mostly I try and work on problems that ruby on rails is a good fitful so I'm not building chat clones on building super high traffic Things that twitter or facebook scale so for that world any framework in larval in. Php or genuine python is great. I just happen to like Ruby. So that's where I've landed. That's fantastic and we're so lucky to have you in our community so not only. Are you ruby developer? You are also quite the conference organizer. And I'd love to hear the origin behind Brighton. Ruby Ross. Brian wins. It starts. It starts in two thousand nine. I lived in Singapore for six. My sort of initial ruby on rails stuff was in the Singapore community. I worked for a couple of startups out there including one where I raise money and travel startup up for myself and it was about two thousand and nine and we were having Christmas Ruby. Meet up and I was sort of at that time. There were loads of sort of regional conference in the US. Singapore's on the wrong side of the world to get to the US for a conference and so in Japan had guy. I'm always so I said to the set of the around. We should definitely do a conference. Rooms I yeah and do you. Totally should do a conference and I said well should we get to come and they will. He should invite Matt's. I mean Japan's not that far away and so emailed mats and then go back to me and said he would come and so it's his fault because then had to organize fronts. I told him this parable when I saw him again. And he said you used the word fault so that was great so I run that For two or three years and and then when I go back to the UK. I moved to Brighton. Sodium or live in London anymore. I moved to Brighton and decided a quick way to meet people doing the sort of work that I would be interested in getting a job in would be to Paula. White conference organizing inverted commas expertise into having an event in Brighton. So I put on something for one hundred something people the first year and And that was seven years ago and the sort of working out right I think. Wow that's amazing. So how many years is Brighton Ruby? Being going on then so I almost two thousand and fourteen just footing. Yes he doesn't fourteen. So yeah we're we're in the seventh year of Organisation of conferences. Although things have not exactly to plan the Yes yes. So speaking of a topic that cannot be avoided due to cove in nineteen. You had to cancel the in person experience for Brighton. Ruby twenty twenty. So could you please walk me through that decision so I may not really have been paying attention very much? I woke up a couple of weeks ago having sort of open the CFP about a month ago they papers have a proportion of invited speakers so Gemini. I invite the normal speakers the of this because I've seen speak elsewhere. Who would like to get over or repeats because we'd like to have back and then open a cough papers to have people to submit their talks and get new people into the into the speaking game as as it were well into that reviewing talks was my kids were sports thing on the on the Saturday morning and I woke up in the morning afterwards and went. Oh Oh I might have to deal with this. This is this is genuinely a thing. Isn't it And this is probably beginning of March time So yeah like it was suddenly. Oh I'm going to have to deal with this. What am I going to do And that was my first sort of paralyzing thought and I should have thought about that for bit And then I got in touch with the sponsors and the speakers and said just let you know I'm aware of this. I don't know I'm doing it. Let's see what happens as we know. Speaking today stuff has happened. Lots of stuff has been cancelled if the morning. I canceled Brian. Ruby rails also counseled and apple came out with ww DC being counseled so I was in good company that Friday But yeah all I did. I had sort of I sort of knew two or three days before and I turned ticket sales off a couple of days before that whilst I should've rounded the wagons and worked out what the hell it was always going to do because I didn't want to. Just go cancel it and not have a plan. I'd like to have a plan. I run Brighton Ruby. Entirely by myself. we'll see some help on the day the venue have always been really great But yeah it's it's very much a solo effort so I needed to sort of bounce ideas off the people who I normally bounce ideas off friends of mine like Tekken and Nadia and the and the sponsors work at what what it was. I was going to do. Yeah so what I'm GonNa do is I'm I'm having a a not a conference or a alternative conference or we'd conference I am not a fan of online events. Typically particularly the kind where I ended up having to run another massive slack or where you have to be in position at a certain time. So that's great. I personally don't like that. I feel like a big part of. Brian is the in person stuff in the hallway. Tracking was obviously the talks. Great there is an element of coming together and community spirit and see. That can't happen this year so I've focused a little bit more on the content side of things so I'm going to play this with all the speakers so they're going to do versions of their talks as videos which we will then sell and There's also the swag I was going to do was a so. I'm working with my friend. Who Works Works for Book Publishing Technology Company and we all reprinting a paperback of wise pointing to Ruby which for long-term Ruby s will fill the joy and for new. Rubio's to Maitland. Go what but it was so I'd like to do with my swagger for you. I'd like to have a surprise said lost. It was like a reusable coffee cups so I said I didn't. I ordered four hundred coffee cups and this year. I'm going to get hundreds of books printed so that's fine so we're going to print a copy of this book and sit down the Post and then so the the talks will come out. The book will be posted to you and then they'll be an opportunity for people to ask questions of the speakers and then I'm GonNa do what you're doing now? Which is politely. Be Quiet even though. You probably won't jumping all the time and listen to what the speakers have to say about questions from the audience or questions that life go about that talks about them. In general so yeah. I'm going to competition with Uber. And he's sorry.

Brighton Ruby Brian Ruby Ross Ruby Twenty Twenty Andy Crawl Developer Rubio Japan UK Harris United States CTO Singapore ROY Cough
Designing Your Website for Google's Perfect World

Accelerate Your Business Growth

09:36 min | 5 months ago

Designing Your Website for Google's Perfect World

"Thanks so much for joining me today. Jeff thank you for having me. Diane appreciate it's Great Speaker. Well it's great to have you here. This is We're GONNA be talking about stuff that I think. Confused with an awful lot of sales people marketing people and small business owners so hopefully so this conversation we can shed some light on a couple of things and I would like to start with having you explain. What is Google perfect world? Yeah While just to start I think It is it does feel like a lot of business owners to allow entrepreneurs like Seo. Is this black box. That sorta impossible to predict. And you know you're at their mercy. We're really trying to Trying to shed light on what they're doing and a lot of that is thinking about you know we spent so much time and money on what the the U. I. U. X.'S. For Human beings are in that's predominantly what we do is marketers But I actually argued that we should focus a lot on the. Ui you ex Google. So you know there's perfect perfect world for users and then there's perfect world for a search fought and they're actually they're somewhat similar but they are a little bit different and so yeah. We focus on Particularly that sort of what schools perfect world so Google's perfect world is Things that have preached for years stuff like really fast page speed for example. I don't know how many times they're gonNA have to shout from the mountaintops how much they care about. Page veep or people start listening but paid speed is so important. It's not just important for the user. It's actually very important for them because of a site slow they can only crawl so much on any given site in an day and they'll move on and they'll miss valuable information that they care about so page speed is sort of that classic example Mobile friendliness is also falls into their perfect world A language called Structure Data Markup which is the preferred. They're sort of preferred language with speak to a website that falls into their perfect world flat. Html so instead of these complicated dynamic front end languages like Java scrip- that make it very hard for them to crawl understand. They like sites like wikipedia. Wikipedia always the one that sorta point out. Is there perfect website flat? Html loads really fast obviously has a ton of user generated content but it's easy for them to understand their perfect situation. They've kind of realized that that isn't really happening. Is Getting more and more complex compounded by the fact that the web is growing at an exponential rate and so Yeah they struggled to understand websites now and And that's sort of what I focused is. What the U. I u exits Google and giving that to our customers but Just making people aware of the fact that Google cares about things that users on that are different than users. That is so interesting so I so it sounds to me. I guess I want a little bit of clarification symphony like there are so many other things out there that Google that we are making it difficult for Google to help us Be Found and seen by implementing some of these things that Google really doesn't like. Is that fair? Yeah if you think of the sort of long laundry list of things that a marketer will want on a website that Google will not want. The classic example is like a chat box set. Chat boxes are almost entirely. You know those chat boxes that show up in the lower right hand corner asking if you need any help for whatever. They almost always powered by third parties. So they're javascript. They don't provide any value to google interns and understanding the page and they usually slow the page down by anywhere from twenty five to seventy five percent making it that much harder for them to understand south and usually marketers still put on this cap. The sort of technical. Seo captain they're thinking about making decisions around the website which you might implement a chat box that increases your conversion rate by one percent but it kills your Seo by thirty percent making it. Useless so yeah. There's a lot of things that we do as marketers that Google can't stand and it's sort of our My goal is to make the Internet simpler place for them to be able to crawl understand websites. There's a example bomb the customer of ours. Sap huge customer data page on SAP DOT COM. That had over a hundred Java scrip- tags on just one page which is tracking pixels and Personalization all you think about all the business demands for the marketing department on a on a page like that and I'm almost makes it impossible for people to figure out what that page is about. So yeah we don't think is much. I'm a marketer. Come from overstock. It's my background of then. Everything from branding to you know conversion optimization everything but people don't think much about Google's experience on a site which really ends up being drives the majority of the visits They don't think about them as I say that they're the most important visitor that comes to your website and the day because they how many humans come and and basically experiences a lot rougher than the human experience. Wow that is crazy a okay. Yeah sort of a mind warp. You have to sort of figure about a lot different way and I think the reason that it happens is that you know marketers. Usually have certain skill set in that skill set is really good at branding messaging and managing budgets and you know picking the highest. Roi Channels when you come to Seo. What I've found any way is that. Seo is actually really technical problems. There's a bunch of other things you need to do. But if Google can't understand your site you know you're good luck doing whatever you're doing content or whatever so it's really kind of a technical problem and that's really a totally different skill set than your normal marketer house so to put on your CTO. Capitals A CMO is difficult. So that's why I think they're often doesn't get done and it gets ignored right. Okay okay so is there a An easy to understand way to look at technical. Seo As opposed to marketing the Honestly I can't say that it's all that easy on the easiest way is to think about it I think structured data is sort of the fastest way to get good at technical SEO structure. Dana is It's a language that structured across websites so their structure data for products. That shows you know the brand and the price reviews instructor data for Human Beings. They're structured data for almost anything. That can you know an event movie almost anything that can be visible on page score. There's this language where you can communicate to Google directly through their language and it's it's getting more complicated but to get going on. It is not all that hard and so you know when Google comes to a site. May you know for years and years? Reliant on crawling. Html on our no if you looked at a lot of HTML Diane but it is not very easy to understand. This is a shortcut to help them understand so not only does it. Help Goule understand. Every single page much more clearly than they did before but it also they use it in lots of meaningful ways within their search results. So you know how now when you search for recipe in that recipe just shows up or almost any query. There's these enhancements to QNA box. Just shows you the sports score. They'll show you the movie times. All of that is being powered by this language. Structured data and so That's sort of I think from technical. Seo Perspective for marketers to start thinking about structure data's away the optimize their seo versus just writing content running continent running content. You layer good structure date on top of of a website and Google just goes nuts. They crowd so fast and they just they understand all of a sudden what you're trying to do

Google Diane Jeff Wikipedia SAP Dana Instructor Goule CTO
Jason Lemkin Clip: Why now is the best time to start a SaaS company

Equity

10:57 min | 5 months ago

Jason Lemkin Clip: Why now is the best time to start a SaaS company

"A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to chat with former founder. Active venture capitalists and driving force behind. Sastre Jason Lincoln. Jason Zoster a community for Sassan cloud founders also organized the annual Sastre Conference in San Jose. That now attracts five figures. Were the folks each year. We spoke with Jason before the novel. Corona virus had evaded containment efforts affecting domestic markets after upending their counterparts abroad the current community since dacians forced Jason Deport. Sastre back a bit. But that doesn't mean that our chat with him any less timely in our forty five minute conversation we covered a ton of stuff from the potential for cloud slow down to how founders should use or not use venture debt to Jason's outlook on SAS consolidation. And even half asked. He's writing checks today. We're sharing one of our favorite clips here. The rest is over on techcrunch for excellence subscribers we're GONNA get into VC's lately that have been talking about the beginning of cloud. Slow down and I I. This is a very specific thing. What they mean is cloud is no longer an upstart phenomenon. Saas LONGER NASCENT. We've now seen a large percentage of the inner voice software world move over to SAS and nine means that the growth rate will descend as the actual aggregate basis larger and critically. They think that this might lead to income and squeezing out startups from certain spaces in the Saas market. That might have been attractive before. And this is from Alex over at scale venture partners recently and I thought it was interesting hypothesis. I don't see why wouldn't be correct. But I want to get your take on. I know your cloud optimist. You've always been a believer in my experience. So when you think about the maturing of this ass market does that leave less space for starts in as you look at the the overall landscape. Well let's see. I think there are two different points. I have two different perspectives. If you look at data from Gartner which is imperfect. But at least we haven't you. Can you can say that. Maybe thirty percent of old school on Prem type software has gone to SAS thirty percent so the pollen of user seventy percent left but the flipside is. That's a lot of market penetration right. It actually starts approach forty fifty percent. You should see a slowdown this secular trend into SAS. When when even when you started doing sas certainly when I started doing it was risky. It was quirky. It was weird. It was it disliked. It was it was not trust about two thousand sixteen through about Twenty Sixteen. Maybe even a little later at the first astronaut. Aaron Levy came one week after the box roadshow and asked him what the public markets. He said they're starting to learn about it. They're starting to get comfortable in two thousand fifteen. That's that's only twenty five years ago so we are so that thirty percent was probably eight percent right and so there is so there's so so there's a the good news is seventy percent left. The the risk is like you know there's only so much of this crazy growth and another thing happened. Which if you look at any Gartner or whatever this and this no one anticipated more of. It went we all knew there would be a substitution that of however you define it a trillion three and there's different metrics how much infrastructure include. We all knew that like the old the old on Prem Safra would go to sas we didn't realize that it would. It would take up thirty to forty percent more of those. It budget so they used to so we got an extra boost. People are spending more on software. No no one from scale no one from anybody realized we would spend more on business software because of SAS but has physical limits. It budgets are only be so much of global two thousand budget so these Amazing Trans created many many Saas companies. Doing a billionaire are billionaire are but but they're gonNA hit headwinds there. There's no question those headwinds that's different from whether that's going to box out startups. By the first half of the apotheosis there is going to be a slow down as we just forty fifty percents over the next five years. Yes there has to be and as we stop putting more and more of our fixed. It budget into SAS. These are two great trends and they will reach saturation. Got It okay. Now on certain point and and being boxed out using more skeptic I think this is the best time to start a startup time. Tell me why because all the SAS leaders are billion. Two BILLION COMING UP ON A billionaire. Zenda shop is the hub spots. They don't have taught they don't have time so if you're a billionaire and they're all growing like a weed growing thirty forty percents shop advice. Going fifty percents off. But they're all growing. They're all growing with a few exceptions. They're all growing north of twenty percent. All the leaders true. So let's imagine you're in a building air which now they're like twenty of these companies. How much do you have to add this year? Two hundred even three hundred. Maybe a lot you're thinking about non-organic time to compete with your little startup. That was just on tech crunch. You know ten years ago. Five Years Twenty fifteen. When when Aaron came from box Aaron would see a startup. Doing five millionaire. Get a little worried. I mean not literally worried but they. Hey this may disrupt me. Is that right Stewart. Butterfield doesn't have time he's GonNa read it. He's all over social media. He's an incredible founder but slack doesn't have time going to a billionaire to worry about someone that did five million has got to worry about. Microsoft has gotta worry big guy so that means you have a lot of air cover to get not just to a million before your competed with by maybe one hundred million owes underneath the. We'll just ignore you because they have to focus they have to hold it and adobe turning around now and everyone from fig on down is competing aggressively with them. But why because they're stupid of course not? They're very smart. Sap there they were busy. It's too small. It was too small right and there's too much growth in creative cloud creative cloud fuel the dobies text market cap growth. So they just. It's not that they don't watch what's happening with web flow and figment everyone. It's just too small until it's nine figures in revenue because figure has become materialists. I don't know how they're all super successful and it's not because anyone was dumb. It's just because you can't compete when they were small you just can't. You're too big. You're they've grown too quickly so it sounds like instead of this problem. It's actually there's there's more freedom because become now too busy to kind of mess with you get up to ten fifteen twenty million a are before they even begin the guns on your ship and because cloud got so big. These niches got big. Every niche. That used to be a millionaire NECC- now can be one hundred million Monday dot Com. Where you're talking about who we needed another project. Management for Non Tech folks that went from one hundred twenty million in four years. But that's a that's a piece like ten years ago. That would be a two million dollar business going to two hundred million so let's whole years one hundred times bigger. This little niche that Monday found and they're going to do a billionaire art. So let's talk about Vertical Saas. Jump ahead my question because this is what I wanted to get. Borough Ready It seems like you're thinking about Vertical Saas than isn't that this is GonNa be constricting idea but inside these these these takes on like the dentist industry or whatever and building software for those could be enormous because the niches have gotten larger to your points. I presume your a bowl on vertical sats. I've always been a ball. I would say even more simply. Look at any company to billionaire. Look at his desk job. Okay which is already two billion. That means they're gonNA keep growing. That means they're going to get to five or ten billion. My rough math is there's another billion vertical version of that so there's another billionaire could be more and that means there could be ten UNICORNS. One hundred million ten verticalised desks right And doesn't even have time to meet with them right. I Investment Company gorgeous which is like a vendetta ECOMMERCE. They're almost all on shop. Affi- it's very niche right. They're gonNA be growing three. X Ten million error. Is that tune it? People thought this company was to NICCI twelve. Apparently it's not nine. Three hundred percent honest has an offering it as a great product but all they do is make sure your fulfillment from instagram to shipping. That your contact center works magically. Which is good enough. Note is enough. It is enough to build a three hundred million Arab business. But it's just a niche today. That's so big because cloud is look how shoplifting. Today seventy million dollars in two thousand fifteen it was worth eight hundred million so these niches have grown astronomically and that means these vertical SAS things. We've like gorgeous and others. You turn around. And how could we do be a unicorn? Well it wasn't four or five years ago right when I met I met the founders only twice twenty fifteen. They were great but it wasn't clear it could be as big today but cloud. Gubbay point about Zen desk in there being room for ten unicorns underneath the desk at one hundred air. The implications vertical sights will still generally smaller companies than the original broader. Sass play so to me even smaller than salesforce. That's an example I don't Viva is a Pharma. Sierra Viva is the most successful verticals ass company so the CTO salesforce left salesforce a decade ago founded VIVA. It only raised three million dollars from emergence plus. It's now worth twenty billion dollars. Today he was also in my class. Like everyone did better than me in my bye-bye on the show but you should just get out. We should bring Peter Gassner. He's like a hundred times would have been me and vivas was twenty something billion and then how to products and he. He said look sales versus a great horizontal play I WanNa do Pharma and there. There is a legacy vendor in the space and it's big. It's a big space and all their deals are seven figure eight figure deals. But it's still. It's still a thirty billion dollar company and salesforce is one hundred fifty billion so I can't think of a vertical SAS that is bigger than its horizontal play but it may well it may well exist but thirty billion still outcomes. You're at three million dollar investment. Even if they are smaller by definition you know there's going to be enormous your general point about the client it's up it's becoming growing the high antigone larger piece of the overall. Everyone seems to be very hot. Verticals ask these days. So that's why I wanted to ask because they like it because the cloud got bigger and because competition is simpler the amount of domain expertise you have to do to build a viva is. It's rich compounds on itself and there aren't going to be twenty startups out of y Si. They're going to build that. But but and so there are these verticals because finally they realized they can be three hundred air business and then they can actually millionaire and they realized look it actually works. I can like I. Invested in in a SAS company just for environmental compliance called map history right. They disclosed their first. One million dollar deal okay. They have like no competition not in the whole space but in what they do they can have a few bumps and they can get through it. They have time they have times. There's not ten other players in the exact same thing. We've guys may disagree. But they had like one or two competitors and their original competitor was I think. Ms Dos based in offices. So you have time and so like this because you just. You're you're overwhelmed with the competition. You're overwhelmed with everyone. Wanted to take on snowflake and data dog and and there are many great apm companies. But it's exhausting. How do you know what's the next day doc?

Aaron Levy Salesforce Gartner Founder Jason Unicorns SAS Jason Lincoln Jason Zoster Techcrunch Dacians Prem Safra Jason Deport Sassan San Jose Adobe Microsoft Alex
Secrets of a Kaggle Grandmaster with David Odaibo

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:25 min | 5 months ago

Secrets of a Kaggle Grandmaster with David Odaibo

"All right everyone. I am on the line with David. Dipoto David is co founder and CTO of Analytical Ai as well as a Kengo Grandmaster David. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you SAM. Happy to be here what? I'm really looking forward to this chat. I think this is the first Time I've had a sibling on the show. I interviewed your brother. Stephen Dipoto back in July of last year where we were talking about retinal image generation and he was up on twitter recently. Talking you up in your conquest on capital and I thought man. I've got to get this conversation as well. So congratulations for being the first sibling. At least to my knowledge on the PODCASTS. Ed Thank you. Why don't we start by having you share a little bit about your background? How did you come to work on machine learning when I started my PhD? I was interested in machine learning. I wasn't quite sure where to go back then. Those a lot of literature review a lot of digging around and back. Then you know I read a lot of papers. I I kind of tried to get a sense of where to go to get useful information and a K go kept creeping up and coming up in various in various things I read and so I finally join cable and the kind of a kind of put it gave me an opportunity to put some of that Theoretical background into practice and it made a lot of things made a lot more sense when you actually practice. So what were you studying for European? I was looking to investigate. Deep learning medical imaging and how the advances in deep learning at the time could be applied to various medically mission problems. And that sounds like an interesting runs in the family. Yeah yeah he does you know besides from any kind of genetic contribution what sparked your interest in that I wanted actually the first Niro network I have. I wanted to see if I could build something to recognize facing an image and this was actually before I started my I might these topic and so that was really how I got really interested in machine learning. Because we're something that was kind of blindly doing and you know as you're digging around. I wrote my first neural network in in C. SHARP. Which was it worked horribly. And this was in twenty twelve and you know That kind of made me realize that you read about how neural networks you work and all these things but you never really. I never really knew at the time. What the appropriate frameworks to us. And and and how you go about it basically so So wh why C. Sharp Microsoft developed a Microsoft. I was at Microsoft Enterprise. Divall bright had the Microsoft certifications and stuff so I was pretty good that C. Sharp at the time so I think. Let me let me try to do this. Sharp annual is just the absolute wrong idea. Wrong approach to us at the time. But you know if you have a hammer you know. He tried to so. If I'm putting the pieces together correctly you were the Microsoft enterprise developer before you went back. What prompted you to go back for your date. Well it's something I always wanted to do. You know after I got my masters I worked in industry a little bit and I always knew I needed to kind of pivot back and and complete being she so I was kind of it was something I was in the plans before a by one or two after being in school for so long Oregon gained some experience. Yeah Nice and so. He started working on neural networks. In C- Sharpen Hanegev. Banged Away with that hammer that you you had and it was. It was absolutely wrong today. I just didn't know where to go where to start back. Then you kind of were pursuing this formal research and education with the PAC but then you realize that there was can have a practical complement to that in Cagle How did you with you know once you can create an account and join cagle quote unquote like? How did you actually start? Did you just jump in and do a competition so I actually created my account for the first time I think it was two thousand fourteen? Two Thousand Fifteen And I think actually I I looked around I read. I didn't actually start competing too. You're later okay. So I I joined and then I just poked around and then later on I kept working on my stuff and I got better at it. I kind of identified. The right frameworks to us. I got a little bit more comfortable and then I think I did my first competition in in two thousand sixteen. And and that was that data sizable at the time that one was for trying to detect the volume of of of education in In heart cardiograms are so that was my first competition and that competition. I did okay. You know but I didn't do really well but it was good experience kind of got my feet but Yeah and were you. We had you partnered up with folks for that one or were you working independently. Yeah those are the other guy that we're a Jason Zinc where both in the same program and we're both doing kind of Medically mentioned so. We went into that competition together. Okay Cool and so that was twenty. Sixteen fast forward to twenty twenty and you've seen quite a bit of success in competitions. Can you talk about some of the your Maurice Results or the results that you're most proud of yeah so Shortly after that competition there's another one that was For also medical imaging related competition. It was for segmenting ultrasound images in the neck and there was Fortunately for me That competition is actually becomes bested. So there was a there was a new architecture. New Paper that was written on this thing called. An encoder Dakota network is called a unit and it hadn't really been used on cable before met architecture and had read the paper about the architecture and when I read the paper because I thought about this too you know like how do you say maintenance something I've been thinking about. But when I read that favor the ideas and the in the paper made a lot of sense and it almost seems so obvious that that was what you're supposed to do to segment images volition neural networks way. Try to preserve You try to preserve the localization information from the images and things so that paper really sparked my interest. I I read it. I was I was a fan of that. And this competition came up and somebody mentioned it and Back there knows a framework called LASAGNA and Theon oh and those frameworks are deprecated now but back. Then those actually what? I did what I used and I I. I said okay. I'M GONNA give it a shot. I'm try I'M GONNA try to implement this unit architecture and I did and I had no hope of actually doing well in that competition but I said let me give it a shot I implemented. I trained the network and to my surprise it worked and I was so I was just so happy that it worked. I had no idea I was going to finish second place in the competition so so that's probably the one most proud of because I had to hack a lot of things back. Then you know there was two thousand. Sixteen there was there was no there are not a lot of best practices and how you do segmentation even back there so there was this. A lot of the frameworks out. There had not specified how date augmentation mention. You know for imaging masks because when you train when you train segmentation networks to avoid over fit in you have to manage the image and the mask together and you have to find the right kind of maintain strategies and things like that so I have those. I created a good argumentation strategy. Good argumentation framework. And you know. I saw a lot of people in challenge struggling with this idea. You know and they were probably implementing two right augmentation strategies because Like I said this was the first time to use his unit in this competition. But I was kind of a little bit ahead of the game back then and So yeah so I finished in second place annuals. It was probably the proudest challenge.

Microsoft Dipoto David Stephen Dipoto Twitter Microsoft Enterprise Cagle C. Sharp Grandmaster David Cto Of Analytical Ai Co Founder PAC Divall Oregon Jason Zinc Dakota Developer
Business Capabilities

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:45 min | 5 months ago

Business Capabilities

"Alex. The topic you covered was a business capabilities and especially for those who might be listening. Who or whom the topic might be esoteric. You provide a bit of a definition as well as why you thought it was a relevant topic for work. Yeah absolutely Allow me to start with the definition because let me hear business. Capabilities may have different concepts Items minds so when we talk about business capabilities really. Talking about the organizational competencies that brings strategies to live at all levels and across the organization. They essentially the organizational building blocks that established the vital connection and the accountability between forward looking strategies and actions. I would say they are close to the lifeblood of the organization They determine the value of business impact but also the value of business outcomes I would say that particularly particularly relevant Because they are as part of Quad competencies and business capabilities if you the old concept However the extent to which technology determines business success irrespective of whether you are technology company are not as never been greater than today business capabilities ensure that the business center city and the business outcome oriented focus off leaders and execution out on targets. They allowed the assessments. The mapping and the focus off an execution they allow us and the executives to math improve and evolve organizational structures and go well beyond project. A productive element lifecycles You know from our conversations and collaboration with the technology and business executives across many industries. The Voice of the seniormost technology executive has never had more weight We see that in the CIO boss and beyond CIO roles That you have extensively written and spoken about as well as the realities are fines executive leadership teams and the board rooms. The people we interact with Administrator James and Peter let me talk a little bit about the outlook so what do business capabilities look like So I think As the convergence of business and technology continues Probably ever faster pace And probably more foundational ways For both organizations and consumers I think the maturation and evolution of business capabilities will gain importance. I believe the focus will continue to shift and frankly broaden from business capabilities to more integrated business and technology and digital strategies and ways in which organizations can improve the agility and thereby ability to prepare for strategic to its As a final point I would say that the ability to make these pivots and to adjust to changes that can come from the internal environment maybe the ultimate litmus test of how much you're any given business capability really is And that's one of the many ways in which we Showcase business capabilities and use them job on his Asia tour of improve. That's great at Alex. The two executives that you spoke with about this topic where Angela. Yocum the chief digital and technology officer of Navan held. I should mention. She was also the chief information officer rent a center. Vp international the CTO of Astra Zeneca prior to that and Somali Godbolt Executive Vice President and chief information officer of lows who had previously been the senior vice president of technology digital at target prior to our time. At Lowe's talk a bit about This topic in how relates to these two executives in their companies. Yeah I'm glad through so So I think what's really wonderful. Is that not only? Are we able to To be able to talk to a very high caliber of pima executives We also have able to to talk to Executives will represent very different industries the industries that the respective organizations in so no one held is a fast growing in the healthcare space They are not not for profit organization. with five billion dollars revenue But their customers I ultimately their patients. And there's almost one hundred million of them in the case of November out And they really come to the organization With their most important questions than needs relating to their health and their well being So as the as a C. D. O. N. Seal With the CIO reporting to her Angela has a huge bug. Voluble a very broad range of business capabilities. That she's really in charge off and that ranges from things like digital health Which has been a major focus for Angela and health but it also includes things like patient. Care these are really century-old capabilities But then he terming as I said the health and wellbeing The customer syndications So that critically important so I would say really. There's few industries that have seen so many life changing opportunities that I mean possible or realized through technology S. Healthcare and there's certainly plenty of potential for future innovation in the healthcare space On the other hand ends and her team do not only drive the advancement advancement of patient. Care but they're also operate in a world Takes lots to be a leader She operates bay diverse and interdisciplinary team. just remember that Angeles. Ps for example Combination of business leaders scientists and doctors. And you can imagine that leadership in that space Comes with a lot of cultural challenges and business challenges and Angela them every day and that makes a lot of interesting insights when it comes to business capabilities

Angela CIO Somali Godbolt Executive Vice Seniormost Technology Chief Information Officer Executive Alex. Navan S. Healthcare Lowe Astra Zeneca Officer Asia Senior Vice President Administrator James VP Peter CTO
Designing Alexa Skills in Canada with Ben Fisher of MagicCo

Alexa in Canada

09:07 min | 5 months ago

Designing Alexa Skills in Canada with Ben Fisher of MagicCo

"You know. I'm I'm Ben Fisher and I I'm a CTO A lot of startups here in New York work. That's the attitude here in New York The technical capacity and Also did kind of the start up. Send building products but Started Magic Oh As a place for a lot of the Disaffected advertising community and technical people to To gather to do cool stuff for brands And we kind of have focused in the last four years on voice You know and it's really amazing to see you know the community and how things are how things are developing in the global nature of these devices and stuff like that. So Yeah that's that's kind of who I am. I we. You know the company's in Dumbo you know has some distributed people and I live in Dumbo as well And we're glad to be talking to you so amazing and so the the company said you've been doing voice for about four years. Is that how old the company is or the company date back prior to that now? It's the company's always four years old. It's interesting 'cause there's you know. Even two thousand sixteen early two thousand seventeen. There was interest even in Canada. You know around Alexa Google Tons of tons of interest But no one ever did anything and no one really every clunk all we had was just kind of an informative call. No-one no-one took the action. You know it was pretty bad back then but People were interested in in. You know some people who are leading edge you know some companies like Obama and stuff like that. I mean they. They were prepared to do something. It's interesting how it's become a part of our lives now Where it goes from interest actually doing something right right. And so when did you? When did you think you saw that shift when when people in Canada were started? We're becoming more when that happened from being interested to talking action. How long ago do you think that was roughly well in the? Us and people get stuff did stuff in two thousand seventeen in the US. We we started getting. Us You know serious. Reuse projects around that time ended up two thousand seventeen than two dozen eighteen. It really started picking up. And that's when we started developing a real business around this in Canada for US. At least it was really late. Two thousand eighteen that people started signing onto signing onto projects and and all over the place. So what I don't WanNa say signing on but You know th they were they were considering purchasing right. And maybe that took a little longer but That's really when we started seeing at least. Yeah that that doesn't doesn't totally surprise me because just just given the history of the fact that like Alexa and the voice technology big companies have really been in the states for about two years or so longer than Canada than that. That seems to make sense so Yeah no that's great. And so you've had a lot of experience now in terms of developing these voice applications our actions or skills. Whatever you WANNA call them depending on the platform. Can you give us just some examples of things that you've worked on? I in the states maybe just to Kinda give us an idea. The breath of the stuff. You worked on a number of talk more about some of the Canadian stuff. Oh yes sure I mean. Now we work on you know different Business models that we call them right. Some of them are running. Omni channel campaigns for brands whether using Alexa as a as a as a distribution mechanism Other companies are using it. As a you know something that's a little bit more of a product per se not really meant to be part of a campaign only and You know our client list ranges from hospital for Special Surgery Here in New York to Try Bond Yogurt to illy coffee to energy empowered companies like national grid the Air Force as a client. Now I mean there's a we work a lot of different industries. Energy Financial Services. Consumer product could healthcare. You know we have a pretty list of clients and that's one of the things we really liked here. We tell people that they like travelling like travelling and meeting different cultures because all these different organizations are very different right. I mean totally different. Some are more loose than bic. Pen Right is actually Client to you know. That's very different than like Chess S. So I mean you have to like learning about people's problems and what who their customer is and how to help them so Yeah we're pretty diverse. That's great that's great and and our and you said you're on the Omni channel Sir you're covering essentially all the major Companies or platforms. That are out there. Yep Yeah we cover You Know Samsung Alexa Google beyond that we also go into the into the TEX category What that means. Is You know chat. Bots that are connected to these voice assistance you know Kinda Kinda coexisting And we're on twelve different platforms. Something on the chat world Including China and put it we chat. So that's Kinda that's kind of an interesting because we started as a voice thing but a lot of people saw the connections there and we just kind of built that capability and have some cool technology. Additional stuff. Coming out actually. That's that's A piece of Chat Technology that that's kind of advanced. I can't really talk about it right now. But it's so so. All of our systems are becoming more integrated and and somebody really application from from just voiced other places. That's great that's great. Yeah yeah so I'm curious now. Let's let's let's talk a little bit more about Canada and I think this is a unique at this stage. Because they're they're not a lot of agencies that are really focusing on the Canadian market per se. Like like you guys are so maybe you can talk a little bit about. How did you break into the Canadian market with this and And then you know an example of something that you're doing in Canada with the skills and that sort of thing. I'd love to hear a little about that sure. So we find candidates to be a pretty robust market. I mean you know when you add up Google home. You add up the demographic makeup of Canada And the Alexa. You know who what's going on there. I mean the numbers are sure you know about this but the growth curve essentially at Canada right actually outpaces the US growth curve in terms of you know how fast Alexa Google home are being adopted. So there's a lot of Potential. There's a lot of installed devices also interesting. Is You know you have the Quebec market? That takes French. And you know everybody else's English or created English if that's I don't think I don't know if Canadian English is actually setting in terms of language but it's a set of determines location settings right But but yeah I mean It's pretty robust. The real kicker was you know working with Reebok on their global campaign when we were launching Canada and some of the some of the regulatory things around some of the more highly regulated industries wherein So I mentioned we're in financial services we're in healthcare. We're an energy and power. You know those are highly regulated industries. So when you're deploying a skill in the US for Canada there's there's actually legal differences that one has to be aware of and it's interesting because the most of this certification teams that Alexa and and google sort of Amazon and Google are also aware of those. And so you know. I was surprised that that I thought it was a little bit more closer. In terms of regulations specifically around sweepstakes right in the case of Reebok and and what kind of disclosures you have to give to that sweepstakes that's one case and there's a lot of other privacy at at and other considerations especially in banking And healthcare which are two areas that we are working on in Canada their version of HIP I think there's there's some there's some overlap with some language NAFTA but that recently changed to the US Mexico trade deal so there's a lot of regulatory considerations and highly regulated industries. And that was that was one thing that the big deal right. I mean because they won't let you deploy it could take months or something. So that's that's a blocker but feature wise you know there's some I think some features that aren't available in Canada that are available the US. But it's funny because all what we found out through data analytics and we're tracking. Who's we are giving people the option to be tracked to to to learn about who these people are so our clients can better serve them. They change where they're located right but people say they're in the US a lot of time. Ten to twelve percent of the of the Reebok. Sneaker dropped were where people actually in Canada who's who said there in the US. You know that kind of threw things off right so we had to do manual verification of of WHO? These people are aware that whether addresses actually were we were caught off guard by that and Yeah I don't I don't know exactly why I mean I guess you know. I guess it isn't a feature feed but like I can t I can speak to that but I know that there are a lot of that will really address to the to the United States just to get access to the in the US skills because we just don't have some of the actors in and some of the

Canada Alexa United States Google Reebok New York Ben Fisher Dumbo CTO Barack Obama Omni Energy Financial Services Chess Special Surgery China Quebec Air Force Mexico Amazon
The Future of 5G with Paul Scanlan CTO Huawei Carrier Business Group

The Practical Futurist Podcast

10:42 min | 6 months ago

The Future of 5G with Paul Scanlan CTO Huawei Carrier Business Group

"Welcome Paul thanks very much under now. I've just been very fortunate to sit around a round table with a bunch of influences. And you're quite candid about you know the challenges that you face in the industry but this podcast is about the future of and I wanted to talk about the future of Five G. Sofa my listeners out there that may be in markets where five gs and live or just been launch. How WOULD YOU DESCRIBE FIVE G? And why's it better than four g you know Andrew it's This is probably the most misunderstood technology. It's been bandied around as being everything from the you know the evil of the world to To the savior of the world right and I think the answer probably leaning towards the latter. Which is you know. It's something that really will transfer so I like to think of I five as a platform for transformation. Went talk about it as a speed thing or this thing or that thing. I'll just terrific platform for transformation. Everybody says you know five G. It's faster it's this that and everything else when we talk about them. Do you operate four G. And how do you operate five G? When we operate forgery generally we designed it for this thing called twenty megahertz of spectrum because in three G it was five Megahertz Chunks of spectrum. And therefore more megahertz means you get more spectrum. Generally you get more bang for your buck when we talk about five Jay. We're talking with starting with one. Hundred doesn't mean account. Wigan Eighty or seventy six fifty or ten yep but it was originally thought of. Let's try it for for for one hundred MiG. One hundred twenty two one mistake now. Of course you've got the up link in the downlink say have maybe it's about two or three to one put it in called a spider spider. So you have about two times or three times more spectrum so you're really not comparing for and five Jay in like for like we learnt Andrew many years ago five years ago in doing you think Oh. Wtt X. Wireless to the something. We learnt that we could provide wireless communication as a sort of an alternative center. A Better Time. To market than fiber by deploying wireless buys technologies to provide home-based broadband solutions. Because you build an anti put an antenna and you can sell it so cash and carry you. Get Five Mega. Hit megabits per second team. Maybe one hundred right now. This fixed product is competing with the mobile product. The second one is the bane with these not there so you don't really have enough resources but we learned very quickly that if we were able to put more antennas in we call the massive. Mimo. Then you end up with a better better result. Suddenly you can offer not three hundred customers. Ten makes you could offer three thousand customers teen makes and the more customers more Abu more money simple. It's all about money so now comes five G. so five G. The first thing we do so we've already got some empirical evidence about how much more efficient having one hundred megahertz of spectrum is in this. Wimax area. We're using two point. Three two point five. We've picked a different spectrum. Three point five GIG which means three point two to three point. Six three point eight. Maybe four point two to four point six just relishes the higher the frequency the more efficient it can be she can get more bandwidth through the high frequencies. Would you get you get larger amount of contiguous ECKSTROM? Yes and understand a little bit about how breaking spectrum up into blocks become very inefficient but if you have a big block of spectrum absolutely right and that's why the millimeter wave even higher stuff is even far more beneficial because you have a clear one gigahertz and suddenly war instead of five megs of got one GIG. Simple physics tells you you're GonNa get more bang for your buck. Yeah so five. G. Comes along with starting the premises. One Hundred Megahertz Huge leap ahead of four G and we've got these improvements inefficiencies. So that's what Linda lend lend itself to the high throughput but wait. There's more right and the more big comes to about things like lighten city and massive connections. So we could already see that the challenge is always the always the latency at the air interface and the reason for that is because you could imagine from a base station probably in developed countries. You can have five back to the cornet work for the back to the corner. Work five milliseconds into into the top rate Japan. Top to bottom ten roughly these sort of rough guidances of how how much delay you have across these areas. But if you want to do things that are more interesting like connected car. You don't need five Jay for car but You know if you want autonomous driving. It's one of the options. Yes you could use other methods. But that's not the the most important but if you take a robot right if you've ever shook the hand of a of a rebel with articulated digits but the first thing is if you want one hundred kilos of metalwork comes toward you put something out the first step back of course when you put your hand out and you grab it if the latency is not really shop. Then by the time it gets feedback in squeezing your hand it's probably to light my crusher hand. You got it so we need latency so there's a practical example. Yes but you have more certainly connected car within a couple of meters. The shorter duration robotics interaction. Let's talk about the medical profession if you wanted to do telemedicine remote medicine. Yes so between a practitioner. Highly capable person. Let's take a simple like it's not really simple. Let's take ultra ultrasounds. So you have an expert a technician. The journey woman sitting there with a couple of hundred grants with equipment. What about the village? That's you know two hundred dollars or three hundred kilometers wide. So we just discussed about this thing called latency. What about if I wanted this person to do some remote monitoring of a man or a woman or somebody on the on the I and we've got these tactile feedback devices now? Yes but the person is a couple of hundred Roy. So you imagine. There's a basic person. Triage a stripping. His thing to your body for a couple of thousand dollars which is cost effective. And you got the expert with brain paranoid analytics copy with scopes and everything and now. He presses and two hundred kilometers lighter. It's pressing on you. And then by the time he gets the feedback. He's got to realize that I shouldn't push too far because it's the robot prom you don't want to crush the got it so this this problem. So this is lighten savings on. He's a couple of industries and a couple of sectors that where you can feel that latency. We important robots inside the factory today factory in factories. Andrew haven't changed in one hundred fifty years. Everything is serial from the day we industrialized in the UK. Right I give you the material you do your bit. You Pass it to him. He passes it to her. She personally what happens today? Robotic PLANT ROAD. I does this positive robot. By-pass Robert C. So let's suppose this boardroom. Were nail which vacant and a couple of hours is the Knicks factory from twelve six income the robots willing themselves around connected with five G. They're from different companies. Kawasaki. Ibb ETC. And they're all connected to the cloud by five. G. So the latency is really small. And of course if you take beyond this. This is not thing of few connections to multiple connections per person to devices everywhere. Lamppost ties dresses salt pepper. Shakers everything the cup of tea bags or connected and they will be. You might think it's stupid but you know today it'll get down to something you know a third the size you now. Then everything's connected. If you have that competition of connectivity things in a cell a mobile cell with people you have come back to the first. Problem fixed wireless existing and with mobile paging competing for resources. And it's signaling resources. Yeah and you won't have a few thousand people per sale. You might have hundreds of thousands but the thing with it is. You don't need the speed because some of these things are transmit low data rate but if you've got millions of them in the same spot they all want to compete for radio spectrum to say. Hey I want you to get your data you got it and so you're quite right after that. The data rates are pretty small and listen to a couple of K. kilobytes. But you have a lot of them and it's a signal you know. I've got to wake up not communicate to the end so it's a bit like ceiling overhead traffic. It's it's competing for this. Some of the data so there's a lot of optimization bottomline so affected that in so that's why you have speed latency and throughput as the three key components of five G. But what nobody ever talks about is the social impact five g. and the social impact directly about energy. So you know. Today we're at the product and solution launch of lawyer and we announced that we have a five G. product. That is now. It went one year ago. Forty kilos to twenty five. From two hundred Megahertz bandwith to four hundred megahertz bandwidth but also consumes about the same amount of energy as four J. site. So you've just gone for something that's twenty to one hundred times better for the same amount of energy so some of the analysis that's been boy very specifically by a company called steel partners a consulting company here in the UK. And they've done some analysis based on you know while always products in an older competitor's products looking at all the networks around the world and their energy consumption and a very simple tagline is if you keep building four g networks you double the carbon footprint the planet but if he's five g. It flattens out and it starts to reduce in five years. That's not a bad reason for deploying five G. above the other I think you're great storytellers. It'll just had the opportunity to spend an hour and a half in the room and you. You mentioned the point about your station equipment. Going down in White told a great story about why wife now people know about while we for all different reasons but I love the story about how the thing dropped in. Share that story so I was at a meeting in headquarters and the CEO is sitting at a table with with a number of US including the product and they director in the product. Our Day director was showing the new version of the first five G. Base station that we're going to be launching in a few months and the white was forty five kilos Andrea and he said left on the table. What do you mean forty five kilos? Don't you understand occupational all health and Safety in Europe? It's forty kilos. Everybody looked at him. What does that mean and he said you need a crane. If you need a crane to install this. Do you know how expensive it'll be for our customers? They want. And how the time delay plus the expense and everything. Everything's the wrong wrong targets. You know the capital equipment costs too high. Three months later are endangered. Came back in forty kilos right. Thank you very much forty kilos. We launched now with twenty five kilos and he just on stage and said. Do you know why it's twenty kilos because a person is allowed to carry a twenty kilo product and install it and you know so we're always thinking about how do we improve person the customer's business. It's not about. We've got a great product you want to buy it or you buy this product because it's got these features we're always thinking about from the customer's perspective and generally everybody has the same. Kpi therefore KPI's it's called Revenue Prophet brand market share. You want all of those things. That's what you want right. That's the key metrics so we always think about those components whenever we building products or solutions or focusing on customers. And things like

JAY Andrew UK Forgery Paul Director IBB Knicks Wigan Europe ABU Linda Kawasaki Japan Technician Robert C.
Tracking Coronavirus with blockchain by Acoer

Insureblocks

06:28 min | 6 months ago

Tracking Coronavirus with blockchain by Acoer

"For this week's podcast. We'll be discussing tracking corona virus with blockchain by Ecuador. And I'm very pleased to how gymnast. Ceo Eko. Jim. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners cooking deduction on yourself? Yes Hi will eat great to talk you good evening in in London and yeah thank you for having me on your podcast of her prior once in a very good job I think the content is very relevant so lower the background about myself on the Sea of a core acor is a software development company. very narrowly focused on what? I consider modern open as in Iraq. Rable Helped us off right. And wherever it makes sense is relevant blockchain enablement of acknowledging. That's really what we do at Acor. Acworth been around for about five years. It's when I wrapped up my the either Start UP. A head cold our media. I started acorn an for low while I did my own engagements on machine learning and predictive analytics and things like this. And then then for little while I kind of Moved on to some other engagements specifically working at the CDC The Centers for Disease Control in the US and really kind of getting much more much more detail into healthcare. And I'll be calc in particular and then now circa twenty twenty really kind of I guess a lot more experience really any domain much better understanding some of the mechanics business models and data sources and obviously connections within the space in thinking. This is the right time to really get back into software development As part of a core and I'm fortunate to have a very very very good team of developers that have come along with me and we're you know essentially trying to deliver on this mission of building modern Open interoperable technology healthcare brilliant brilliant so as you rightly say use blockchain from time to time way makes sense so let's discuss a little bit about what is blockchain. And how does it work? Yeah you know a good question. I think he's probably the kind of question for which you get a different answer every time and and Drag and maybe for good reason depending on to whom you're speaking So here's my read on it. I think of blockchain as Three pillars if you like not to be confused with that conjoined triangle of success silicon valley reference but three pillars that. Really make this undercurrent as lock chain or distributed Ledger Technology. So the first pillar. I think that many people are probably familiar with the prayed about this distributed. Ledger idea. This I think set of technologies protocols and things that we have spoken about at length and I don't really want to necessarily going to again. I think I think There's plenty of information around including on your prior podcasts. Just talking about this. So there's technology I think the second pillar is this idea of of what I think of as value creation attribution That blockchain's and really here. I'm referring to public blockchain's in again not not to derail the conversation. But but I'm GONNA when it comes to quote enterprise blockchain's I think in many many cases that they're really not necessary in that have significant issues. In terms of computational trust which is really the reason why WanNA use blockchain and I think in many cases than did no more than sexy version of an enterprise portal but nonetheless I think this idea of valuation attribution is very very important to public blockchain. Because you know essentially this is where blockchain reward you if done correctly in a public setting transplant manner rewards you for creating value so if you take for instance the bitcoin network the minors. They're racing to solve a mathematical challenge which requires them to make investments in Graphic processing units and and certainly electricity and things like this and if they do resolve that challenged and they get a reward for it to get the twelve hundred bitcoins and fees and such so. This is really kind of a very very important. Concept that non necessarily available in other kinds of technologies or other kinds of patterns. So I think a very very important concept is one that really largely falls into this idea of token economics which is really again is based on science of Game Theory As you have spoken just recently my myself and my collaborative our CTO and my collaborator ban. We have written a course and took an economics for the Georgia's I certainly very much believe in is a fundamental differentiator for for blockchain technologies third last. But not least certainly is is kind of pillar of of you know what I think of as distributed architecture and and distributed computing where really. It's a culture culture question where you actively want to distribute competing power distributed power of united kind governance across many knows many different participants as opposed to have one or two or three central figures central terrorism and That's the motley go with. So I think fundamentally if you put those three pillars to get it s away I think about blockchain essentially the technology this idea of talking economics and this culture of of distributed computing and removing mediaries and central Data centers and. Things like

Blockchain Blockchain Technologies CEO Iraq JIM Acor EKO Ecuador Cdc The Centers For Disease Co Rable CTO United States London Twenty Twenty Georgia
WLGM 101.7 The Spiralnauts

You Did What Now?

08:16 min | 6 months ago

WLGM 101.7 The Spiralnauts

"To you. Did what now a podcast? We're discuss stories and science and tech. Where we that makes ask exactly that. Everyone thinks listening. I'm your host Stephanie. Educator and science afficionado Michael Programmer Tech Guy. You're you're not an algorithm. How're you doing Michael? Good busy busy. How are you doing? Say That Corona Vars. Now I've you know. Can I make the joke? Coronas still bad even put a lime in it for what it's healthier you. Yeah no but I am going to San Antonio this week Apparently there's some some refugees from China coming to San Antonio Refugee. It's but you know. People escaping mature American citizens and their supposedly going to be kept in quarantine there now and I'm going this week so Good luck to me. I guess rotavirus onto my very best. If I see someone with a mask I'll be like away so no I think we'll be fine anyway so no. I wanted to talk about something with you today. Do you know that we made contact with aliens? Oh Yeah isn't that now? I actually have a joke here. Who's Alien Will Smith Right? He's is him all the time. Yes absolutely no. Scientists have been monitoring this for a while. It's a mysterious signal from deep. Space is repeating itself in Sixteen Day Cycles Sixty Day cycle so the Mayans had their long year. They broke things up into weird like sixteen over sixteen days. So it's six sixteen. What's relevant vest? Sixteen is there some like mythical? Can we get some national treasure seeking here and break the code? What sixteen days? What's what's that me. We don't know we don't have. We have no idea why it's repeating itself every sixteen days but it's called an effort be a fast radio burst and it's a pulse that it ranges from a fraction of a millisecond to a few milliseconds And it's caused by some high energy astrophysical process. We don't completely understand it. And we've monitored some of these things before but the current one they're looking at just. It seems to be repeating itself every sixteen days since October. The okay that's weird that certainly we do stuff like that right. In the in the opposite direction are we blasting signals out all in all directions of space. Probably that every sixteen days but every whatever we decided to. Yeah well that's one of the things. So where is this coming from? What is this and so this the signal that's coming? It's called fast radio bursts but it's actually takes a lot of Technology to to monitor it to even see it. It's not something that you could go outside and see the. Cto radio burst happening in the sky. Radio you'll see your radio waves anyway. I like you you can see the FM radio waves beaming into your radio. No no no specific frequency like where what wearing the spectrum does this fall while it says that it is described as a thousand times less than a mobile phone from the moon would be. That's the equivalent of the pulse that we're picking up So we're picking up. Does that mean that we can make also the moon? Is that what you're telling me I'll have also have received Syr. Somebody can monitor radio waves from the mirror. Not I should have reception on the moon. I'M GONNA call variety and make sure. Can you hear me now? No no but Yeah so that's the question is what is this coming from? Is this coming from a natural phenomenon. There are proposed. People are proposing. It could be coming from a neutron star or a black hole of some sort but the fact that it is being repeated every sixteen days. Usually these things are pretty random if they happen the fact that it's repeating is a bunch of people are asking. Could this be some sort of sign of extra terrestrial intelligence? Sure maybe what would be the sixteen day cycle is what we I guess. We're GONNA fix it on what we rotate I mean. Earth rotates every day so our booby through sixteen days. It's not like there's no path of sixteen days like through the cycle around the sun and like okay every sixteen days. We happen to be pointed in the right direction to pick this up. So it's gotta be and it's it's probably not due to something that based on how a reading it at it's something that's coming like it or is the single exist every eight days and we just don't say it we know it's not nothing on our end that's preventing were that's causing us to receive the signal every sixteen days so it would whatever is causing it to repeat in that way is happening on its and five hundred million light years away from Earth in some spiral galaxy is what they're theorizing. Sure we've columnist or not. No I mean so. Yeah so the fact that it's every sixteen days is maybe some evidence that it is not any sort of intelligent life. Because why would they send a signal? Only every sixteen days like you said we are sending signals into space continually. So yeah. That's that's what people are questioning is. What is the sixteen day significance without? So you're saying that that that is if it's intentional doesn't necessarily have to be intentional. Could it be New Year celebration? Is maybe they're they're years only sixteen days or whatever the equivalent is and they just happened to be launched this crazy festival at spews noise out into the atmosphere into the space and we just happened to be picking it up and we're just picking up every year celebrations. They have a festival every sixteen days. Maybe they're maybe they're year cycle is only sixteen days. Yeah they have to do fireworks every sixteen days. That sounds exciting Or yet we're we're putting our human earth terms on whatever galaxy the this signal would be coming from you know we rotate around the earth. In two hundred sixty five days we spin around our access in twenty four ish hours of but their whole system of time make be completely different than ours they may experience it in assuming it is some sort of artificial life not sorry assuming it is Sort of extraterrestrial life artificial natural. I guess Oh could be either or Yeah but no they could be experiencing time in a completely different way And if they you know what if what if going around like sixteen hours sixteen hours could be the equivalent of one of our days even so maybe it takes them sixteen hours to rotate around their access. And so the signal is your sorry sixteen days just to go around their their access. And so yeah. So that's what you know. I I personally am not an expert in astronomy. I don't have You know a lot of education in it but what does interest me is the astrology aspects of it so Assuming that if this to come from some extraterrestrial life what would they be like you know living on some sort of planet five hundred million light years away? And what is that significance of the sixteen days? What we'll do if that was. If sixteen days was equal to one of our days one trip around day or night or one trip around the sun. What would that do to the physio to their how they have evolved into a being? What would that look like is interesting to me?

Corona Vars Stephanie Michael Programmer San Antonio Refugee San Antonio CTO China
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

13:42 min | 6 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"So we've got to be able to bridge and create a great great user experiences on the outside with what our employees expect on the inside. So what do we have to do. Fundamentally we building and transforming developed a strategy that over the next three and five years. We are going to be a transforming the company at many any different levels very similar to what we've done in all of our previous companies folds around about playbook across you you know. What are we doing across the whole infrastructure stack? Okay what do we You know do across the entire white area local area networks to create These so what. I call the user experiences that are much more mobile centric and distant centric and then we started looking at all the other layers of the stack which is starting with all of the customer facing solutions and processes everything from how customers interact with us With all of the sales the other experiences including service and support experiences and then all of the back office operations whether it's You know factory and supply chain operations of the two Financial flows procurement flows You Know War And auto human capital management activities So we'd have to complete Li Li deconstruct and reconstruct strategy in terms of transportation work. And so what we're looking to do is actually run a this book label code the next creon. Five years to fundamentally transform the company to be able to create that experience for both partners and customers on the outside that interact with US including the same abuse expenses that our employees will get to enjoy in terms of being highly productive and efficient on the inside. So that's what we're bringing together and outside in an inside out approach in terms of Designing for this new digital economy and and so we completely rebuilt the it organization this whole year and been on moving to the next level which is getting the innovation engine and the transformation engine and give start executing In the next three and five years. So that's in essence. What we've actually put in place To get launched fascinating new Russia's reflect on his and as you even alluded to a moment ago you've been through a number of transformations in in your career you've been the chief either information or technology officer for thirteen or fourteen years now across multiple organizations from palm to HP you guided as we've talked about on the record in this very podcast About the the separation of HP and what appears to be an impossible timeframe and did so successfully really now you embark on your next very interesting set of challenges with another organization that's reinventing itself and transforming itself in such. That's interesting ways. What is it about these kinds of experiences that you find so interesting as there seems to be kind of a theme team Through your career as an executive. Yeah I'd say the The first thing that I've learned a lot walk from company to company as we go to these transformations The real essence of Dubai. What is always exciting? And in terms of revitalising brand and a business and transforming it In addition to doing the same in terms of our products an R. and R. R. and B. and and how we create experiences that customers and partners expect us I find that there's the two things I'd say three things that matter right. One is leadership right bold leadership and leadership that has grit and I find and that always to be the most exciting ingredient. I mean this is my eighth company pivot and so in many ways this is mission eight for me the and So I'd say the first things really around you know leadership And and that matters of the second is is around the The culture okay cultures so instrumental in terms of how we designed designed for the future because in audible companies designing for the future means. You're always constantly designing for the next generation and the next race in matters because how they run a company in the future will differ greatly in terms of how we run our companies today and how we run a companies in the past so so you're constantly having to design new playbook from company to company because the future is changing really fast and And so oh so. That's interesting so I think culture matters and and how you instill a culture where you can bridge. The experiences of the past asked which we are very good at which is building companies for scale and sustaining companies to scale. And then how new bridge that with the next next generation culture which is really around introducing this whole As I mentioned earlier the mental muscle of startup right and so bringing these cultures together is so important because there are so many characteristics of the culture that needs to come together to bridge the the old world with the new world to really help accelerate and go forward The the the the third area is actually the team being it's so instrumental in building the right team that is really excited about the future and And so on many different levels having a team that is in a really passionate. It's driven is an Ajaz D- I mean and can energize That's very mission focused I think becomes very very important and when I think about what what's ahead of us you know for me. My collective experiences in all of the companies of I've had have really helped of me of continuously kinda blown unlearn and relearn from every company pivot of being through and and so being able to adopt and being able to. You know be agile and Nimble and humble of every step of the way it has mattered and so I had to take that to heart and think carefully about You know what matters and how we go forward in putting together the right playbook the right ingredients and so that's really what helped me and You know I've had Expenses in many of our companies and I've had hello It leadership expenses of any of our companies and What does Europe's opportunity of really helps me with is actually bringing that altogether data and so on any given day you know I have to think of things from outside in perspective and an insider perspective and type of bridge these worlds in terms of how do we optimize businesses and Help businesses and transformer businesses to be productive inefficient and create great the expensive and Tony Fun -ployees and then how do I bridge that with Expenses that our customers and partners are going to expect by ensuring that we can take like a products and the new sign system could very very effectively. But the last thing I want to have is also that you know. I think it's really important that as a company and as a leadership team the culture and the team we build. What's really important going forward is data's michigan-based which means we have to really be thoughtful about how we think about? What impacts and lasting impacts as a company we will have on planet and society and that to me is a real big passion of mine and The one hairy most excited about is actually the three D. space and And what's really interesting about three D.. Is that in an instant on on demand economy. The whole world of Three d actually is well beyond revolutionizing manufacturing you have a very significant impact on reducing your carbon footprint. If you just fundamentally you step back and think about it what the world of treaty will do and its impact it would have on a planet and society its impact on logistics transportation. The impact on you know of managing massive inventories in distribution centers in locations and moving all of this taking weeks and months if you get the treaty ecosystem right and we fundamentally revolutionize manufacturing to serve and on demand instant on economy. You you can just imagine what overwhelming impact you will have underproducing carbon footprint. I mean it is a really really interesting way to look at it and And that's what's really exciting intriguing to me about the treaty opportunity and so everything we touch. We've gotTA stop thinking about. How can we be much more mission based and mission focused and and that's another part of it? That's really exciting and intriguing. So hopefully I mean gives you some insight about you. Know Lord have learned in the collective expensive had and of of the unique opportunity here woods Iraq's in terms of how lends itself To really making this something really noteworthy an exciting for me both professionally and personally what I find some of the questions. But that's been it's fantastic narration. When things I find so intriguing in your answer is there was the people component to everything? Then you just mentioned the from the leadership to the culture of the team that you're building even as you got excited for very good reason about the three D. Printing you track it back to mission Shen which of course is then kind of like what drives everyone even becomes kind of the selling point for those who might be. You know who you're recruiting and I think it's all it's it's it's great to remember that even for a technology organization it is only as good as its people and so the thought process. You're clearly devoting to. How do we create a a special team special leadership mission that that that matters and that drives people Is is really the most important core aspect of this. Yeah well it's really interesting. What I find is this technology is always interesting and problem? Solving is always exciting. And what I've always found is that you know if I get this leadership and called show and the team correct and which is always I put a lot of my energy into I always find we can solve you know we can problem. Solve effectively and begin do very exciting things with technology and experiences that customers partners and employees Would love to have so. I find that you know if I saw these three the three stool around leadership people in culture. I always find that began really really when What we've got ahead we can really win? We can really come up with a winning formula. That's exciting for everyone so that's kind of being experience. Let's fantastic I also wanted to ask you. nourish one of the it very interesting developments for you in recent. Recent couple of years has been joining the board of advisors or directors for multiple organizations And I wondered if you could just linger a moment on that experience. That's how some of those came to bear in the extent to which of course yours is a unique career as as everyone's but the extent to which you're having been a chief information officer chief technology officer now. Multiple organizations have lent itself well to you joining these organizations as a as a critical member of their boards. Yeah I'd say that One of the important aspects of civil the the ball is actually the combination Some of the companies In what I call the tax space and You know areas much more focused around the reduction in carbon emissions. Things of that sort pitches quite intriguing. The other companies Pure tech companies predominantly in the software space and In the analytic space and Th there's really common thread in all of these That I find What's really interesting is when you visit with customers in Of of what you're trying to do and get the market It's US experience. You know how do you.

US HP Dubai Li Li Europe Russia chief information officer executive R. R. chief technology officer officer Iraq Shen
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

15:26 min | 6 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"The Palo Alto Research Center park from its commercialization phases rush originally joined Xerox as the chief digital officer and he has over twenty five years of experience experience in the IT industry. He's held chief information officer roles at Hewlett Packard and a palm before joining Xerox in. This interview Naresh discusses the three key elements elements to a successful transformation. He cites bowl. Leadership that has grits as the most important ingredient for transformation second scribes the importance of culture in preparing for the future as the pace of change accelerates he notes it's critical to bridge the established culture that sustains companies at scale with the next generation culture that that has the mental muscle of a startup. Lastly we discussed the need for a team that his passion and his driven and energize exceedingly mission focused. We also discuss discuss the outside in and inside out approach xerox his using to make its digital transformation. How the company uses artificial intelligence in the internet or things in Russia's experiences this is a board level CIO and CTO and a variety of other topics Shankar? Welcome to tech nations great to speak with you Becky Beta looking Russia. I thought we'd begin with your current post. A lot has changed since the last time you and I caught up you you are now the chief technology officer of Xerox with a remarkable purview that includes rnd as well as running the technology function more. Generally speaking at that company and what an interesting time to be Xerox eight organization that is going through quite a renaissance at present isn't and I thought maybe you could take a moment and describe. What was it about this opportunity that attracted you to make the move over to Xerox? Yeah Thanks Peter so one I mean Xerox has had a very a very richer I'd say in its hundred year history history of both in invention and innovation It's it's really amazing. Run and What really intrigued me me about? The opportunity was I have the unique opportunity to transform and revitalize the Brandon Business from and a business model and Also you know digital transformation perspective So that is number one fundamentally transforming business so that it's easy for customers to engage And also consumer technology as a company. So that's point number one. The second aspect of the role also exciting was actually the the opportunity to actually transform the the product portfolio across The Workplace Solution Landscape the graphics landscape and All of the new sciences That will help us. Transcend the print franchise and so the opportunity to also launch new lines of business business and create a value Is really a huge opportunity. That I thought was quite exciting so on many different levels food this role and opportunities quite unique so So I don't you know I have to give this a shot because it's Really of very unique opportunity and an exciting opportunity and Off The brand is a monkey brand highly respected in the industry and so wiped out You know Why not and so? That's what brought me here and And I'm looking forward to the run because I see the Mike Three five three and five years being really really exciting to transform the brand at many different levels. Why I'd love to get digging a little deeper in a rush Ashton transformation and you've alluded to some of the areas in which you're hoping to your for example transcended print franchise use your your words to Get into workplace Klay Solutions Graphics New Leverage New Sciences. I wonder if you can tak- maybe a couple of those examples and he'll back the onion a little bit further and describes describes what you see in terms of the pathway with some of those whereas whereas what will be the sources of innovation and what complexion do they take. Okay so when you look at the the print franchise which is our CO business and workplace solutions and graphics We now see ourselves moving moving into a whole new range of sciences to take advantage of close to. I'd say a fifth approximate fifty five plus billion dollar market opportunity That is ahead of us in all of these new sciences so if I look at Beyond the CO business in the areas of packaging In the areas of packaging of you know there are new sciences around direct object printing in line marking All of these new areas areas that potentially are adjacent seas and also moving into the packaging. Cite Ah the digital printing packaging side of business so automobiles will be adjacent agencies to the core business of the next set as an example and then the next set of businesses that launched As an example is it was basically a starting with treaty. The treaty additive manufacturing business predominantly focused on liquid metal That is a very very Interesting technology it's highly disruptive and What's unique about the technology it's fundamentally revolutionizes manufacturing and and Both around speed around speed cost and reliability of what we've done in the liquid metal space is We both technology Where we can actually absorb the low cost and put in take off metal aloys that are commodities and Begin produce high-quality production pots that that have tremendous integrity and density in terms of the materials that we print of low cost reliability and also the speed and so it's a huge value proposition and So that's that's a classic example in terms of Directionally How you meet? This is in the additive space. And you couple that with the treaty software. That now aroused us to design predictive models And also pest invalidate the composition and the quality of those models before they even get printed so the treaty. Ai Software that's going to be coupled with the hardware and creates a very unique value. Did you proposition so so we able to print not just parts that are denso The fast and CHEAPO and and in compared to those made from metal powders right which typically has been where most of the industry has been investing it and and And so what we've been able to Actually mitigate is a lot of the other technologies around metal. Powders you know have long again. The Post production processes Procuring and be powdery. Well we don't. We don't have that complexity. Actually that comes with a post production process and so big knowledge again in the faster cheaper and Much Mo- so What I call it? Preserves the integrity and the density of the the materials have been used So it's a very very exciting play In the three D. space and to produce a complete three sixty experience of to really address what I call the on demand nature chill of manufacturing since we live in an on-demand instrument economy right You pay for what you consume and you'll pay when you consume Emmett and so we think the whole factoring is going to move them into what I call an on demand economy and and and I believe that we will be From the center of leading the charge in the space so that's exciting and that's an example in the three D. space In the IOT space of which is the the next hour We are building a range of sensors. And you're going to hear more about the technology In the sense of space up predominantly around what we've done which is You know detection of hazardous gases and also food and drug spoilage. Things as well as the spectral cameras with developed which can actually do a composition of you know that detects Again the changes in materials or the changes in preservatives or things of that sort so I think not and sensors. There's GonNa be another range of technology that you're going to hear more about the categories a May I an artificial intelligence which is predominantly in an area that is focused on the intelligent knowledge worker. So we are looking to launch off a set of products they're starting in twenty nineteen gene and Into twenty twenty. We'll have a roadmap as well but between three and we're looking to launch products in two thousand twenty which is is going to be an exciting play so we've got some of the areas of science that we're also focused on but you're gonNA hear more about a lot of these new Sciences that we're launching in twenty twenty. That's beyond the print franchise so that gives us some insight and examples into a lot of the new sciences. We're working on what's really important about why we believe strongly that we are well positioned to introduce new science to market and commercialize this as is because R&B Ecosystem starting with pock and research centers you in Palo Alto Extra CC. The research centers in Canada The RND senators and the web accelerate the web stacks ration- centers that we have in UPSTATE NEW YORK In the Rochester area. You know you come all of the power and the army Engineering Research and development institutions. We have we've got a long history That goes from fifty history from par to one hundred of his tip xerox that has produced a tremendous portfolio patents and All of these white spaces of signs and so we think we are. Well positioned to move the science into participation and commercialization and and then so this is really really exciting for us to broaden up for you beyond the print franchise into all of the new sciences That we think we can effectively get to market and Starting twenty twenty remarkable. What a what a portfolio things to work on to say the least and and the rest you highlight that this organization that has innovation in its DNA in so many different places Given the number of of new innovative areas is you anticipate the organization getting involved in coming weeks months year ahead I can only imagine that from from it perspective. There's been some change necessary zero whether it's retooling the way in which some people work within the technology function to bring in people that have a new set of skills or a new orientation to the way in which they work can. Can you talk a bit about some of the cultural attributes. That have Brad's been in need of refreshment or rethink Here and there as you've begun your tenure Xerox Walks. Yeah so I think what's exciting at Xerox In in the last twelve eighteen months of the the notable changes that we've got an amazing Leadership team and the leadership team comes from Tremendous Mendes collected experience across many domains of the industry and Very diverse experiences of both on the private equity side of the world as well as from a I'd say industry perspective as well so people that got a significant amount of breadth and depth in experience across many different industries. And that's she'll I mean So it starts the leadership. I mean we've got a very strong compelling Ling very driven leadership team and that makes it exciting The second thing is the culture. I mean we've got a very very strong culture of invention and innovation and so when you look at the The powers Iraq's trillion very intriguing and exciting. Reading is that we bring the big company feel in terms of being able to rapidly scaled tomorrow and go to market rapidly. Okay so so we bring that and we couple that with the mental muscle of a startup. And that's what we brought together and so we've designed to build out. They ecosystems around operating models and all models that basically couple both the ability for the Xerox a AH Corporation in capabilities to scale rapidly and fast with the the models models of a startup in terms of agility and speed and focus right and so we brought back together in the culture. And what that means is that been had to take a lot of the learnings of what we've had historically and bring together a lot of the learnings from the outside in terms of Berlin the franchise in a manner where we can actually meet the objectives of not just the core portfolio of products that we want to bring democracy but also ooh all of the new science that we want to accelerate and go to market with. So it'd be bringing these worlds together and what that also means that we've got of bring together you know people process and technology Together as well. So if you beat back the onion what have we done in the IT organization foundationally we've built a new organization it's called Xerox digital experience right and and and the focus is how do we actually design fine. The capability Around an instant on demand economy. Okay so what customers expect on the outside What customers the partners expect of us on the outside our employees expect of us on the inside?.

Xerox Palo Alto Research Center park chief information officer Hewlett Packard chief technology officer Naresh CIO and CTO officer denso Russia Peter Ashton NEW YORK army Engineering Research Palo Alto Emmett Klay Solutions Shankar Tremendous Mendes
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

07:00 min | 6 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Though I I don't know I don't have the an the proposal out there I think will The the future in time will tell I want to open it up to questions Yes please Atticus Tyson of into maybe ask the controversial question. I've I've kind of always thought that if you had a CD Oh admit you had the wrong cio. Because they weren't really thinking forward enough. You're you're both. What do you think of this idea that the CD Oh was maybe a passing fad until the CIO's got more strategic? And what. What do you see has been the real advantage of having both titles purses just calling yourself a CIO? But doing it in a forward thinking way. Hey practicably if you're the CIO CTO. You have outward facing an import facing you doing customer systems throughout their customers some would say that's the CTO not oh by the way solar. There's that whole thing going on if you're in tech companies especially tech company that's so is it a passing fad look. There's there's a work. There is a view that there is Customer centrisly products and services that digital tied together in retail it's platforms of physical and digital. Oh come virtual coming together for me. It's all about embracing all of that work and whatever construct in the company works it works. It's sort sort of like digital models. You touched on it before Chris. Right there is the federated there is concentric and then there is the hub and spoke. There is no right answer. It's it's just that work exists. Pick the model that works for your industry and your company. We happen to be hub-and-spoke I happen to be the ideal I think if they put a CD. Oh in the company you probably for where we are down here it. It might in in our industry. It might confuse things even more but if I was a different person it might have been something better or I don't know so I'm not so sure I'd get that hung up on what the right construct is versus wrong. Because it's different by industry it's different by Company the important thing is to get the work done on to meet the strategic goals. The organization says The as one additional anecdote. Peter published a podcast S.. With who is the chief data officer Schneider Electric a couple of weeks ago and everybody was the chief information officer for something like ten years and then they created the chief digital officer role where it reports in the Iot Analytical Schneider Electric elevators so you can imagine they were doing iot before that was was a term the corden analytics team among product management and some other functions. And what he talks about is the benefit was and in. This is a little but what Andy was alluding to they were finding that. It was too and we focus and by elevating that role in actually having a reporting relationship it it provided clarity that it's could be explicitly internal business operations and that there were other teams that were external. But because there's one reporting relationship it's not contentious but it's collaborative and I think that that's you were doing the fist bumping. That's certainly the thing. I think we're all trying to solve for We have time for one more question. Even if there there's any Anyone in the audience that but fast anything our all ask one more sedan. You mentioned. You're you're in a meeting with a number of oil executives noted they were all men but We'll we'll hope that that gets better and you're single it's all about. Ai and data analytics further the the oil gas and electricity industry. What is hype? And what is real like. What are the technologies that are truly excited about and what are the the ones you think are just sort of drops in the bucket in? It's all marketing. That's tough so in this supplier deep dive that we had yesterday. There's all of these great stories about how they can improve productivity of a while ten then fifteen percent a little bit of ai put onto it and you walk away from that meeting and and on the plane back with with my associates. They yeah but they're too expensive and we'd rather go with this other supplier anyway. So we're just good with what we've had look at us. They they just demonstrated how you can have a fifteen percent improvement. That's millions of dollars that you're gonNA drop directly to the bottom line is site now. We know what we're doing so I'm still teasing that out because I'm new to the organization. Think new to the hype but I really believe that you can apply data to understand what's underneath our earth and factor. How you're going to get more of it Out and better and continue to do that. It's just a matter of winning over the hearts and minds of everyone who's been doing the same way for thirty five years. I'll tell they of Farrah's hype. Is these mobile APP MOBILE APPS or not. I'm GONNA say something. Controversial or not digital mobile APPS are not digital rate with digits. So you know we have the we have APPs. The was the first random acts of digital of people showed me that we download. And it'll talk show you the weather. And there's outage in this part of Rhode Island's and when's the outage outage going away that's interesting cocktail hour information and when you look at the downloads. Compared to a twenty million people we serve it's miniscule. What's real is it is? You can't store electricity today. You can store gas in tanks but electricity is something that gets traded back and forth and it can't be stored easily yes working with Tuzla were putting the number one battery size battery insulation in Antioch It with Tuzla Energy. But what's real is. How do you use technology allergies like block chain which are a little height but are very real as well to do electricity balancing and trading? So that you're optimizing the cost to do those are the real all things. It is making sure that you can sense those outages so that they don't happen Napa downloadable apps so we all need to get over our mobile APPs right when I was in the biotech industry. We had the health apps that they are real. I don't mean to minimize them but that's not true digital at the heart of meeting the objectives of your your corporate goals what you WanNa do so. Let me summarize here to to close out first is identify the random acts of digital the the second is Frac for talent so that you can identify the people who are excited to go on with the journey identify the North Star in so even in pursuit of things that maybe well intentioned you can craft and make sure that you're really advancing the ultimate goal that it's not the the watch that an internal problem but it really solves the root cause caused so please join me in thanking Diana. Thanks for tuning in. Please join me next week when my guests will be Naresh shocker the chief technology officer of Xerox..

CIO CIO CTO cio officer chief technology officer Atticus Tyson chief information officer CTO Iot Analytical Schneider Elect Customer centrisly Tuzla Schneider Electric Chris Xerox Tuzla Energy Napa Frac Andy Peter
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

11:50 min | 6 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Oh and I actually sat down and said what we really see as our North Star for digital is customer engagement enablement not a better IVR. But you don't need an IV are what you do. Is You need a portal where customers can say. I'M GOING IN I. I have a new house I need need someone to hook me up. Can you slot book me. I have three days available and you get a date. That's reliable on the operation side the grid operations rations side. We said we don't want anybody hurt again. And we want the most reliable grid. That's the North Star. And how do you do that. You no longer son a man or a woman up to the top of a substation to see if a bushing is discharging it. There's a sensor up there and it phones home to tell you that the bushing is discharging or that the circuit circuit breaker is wearing and so do we believe that. We're never going to have a call center. That's personalized or man Louis. Do we believe that we're never going to have grid operations that will never require a human being no but that is the Northstar and until you set some kind of a vision like that then the projects that you work on won't be leading in that right direction. So I'll give you a perfect example and I'll get back to the digital apps here and a sack perfect example go to digital labs one in the UK one in the US started out at about twenty five people. It's less than fifty. It will stay less than fifty. That's how how we WANNA keep that nucleus glorious going in we prioritize what goes through it I went into the digital labs in the US. What's the latest and greatest that's come through our pipeline of digital ideas? You're working on. We're working on a watch that when the person goes out to the house to turn off gas because someone hasn't paid their bill they can discreetly hit a button. The state feel threatened when somebody comes out with a gun because get off my property. You can't turn off my gas. Isn't that great. And I said that is great but our north as far says we want to be able to turn off gas without somebody needing to go out to the house therefore go ahead and finish your watches. short-term recognize it's not part of the big big hairy audacious goal doesn't make it less important it's important for the short game but the long game says we have to have advanced advanced metering infrastructure. Where we can remotely turn off gas and not still walk up to people's houses with pliers on this that and the other thing? Why are those things important because if we all keep doing random random acts of digital and exciting things and they some of things might release value etc.? You really not going to that long-term that your board and your CEO and you won't have agreed that you want to go so you have to keep that way so back to your to digital teams. It's outstanding. They have learned their agile. Gile they drive agile. They're teaching the rest of the organizational schedule scaled agile. We actually now have the Agile Center of Excellence for the company. Because your business people need to go through agile training right. You can't be an tea or just a digital team doing it. They have to go through agile training. And so these these Both of these teams are great. We rotate people. We'll throw in some of the best talent that we get straight out of the universities. People that are not tainted. Somebody's senator earlier. If you start with all the reasons why you can't do something we're putting an s four is a digital financials platform right. If you start with all the things you can too. Then you've already constrained yourself so we get a lot of young talent. Want coming through that and I'm just now actually looking to hire a chief digital officer. We had some. Who is who had started out? It's one of these things. What got you here won't get you there so you're constantly solely having to rotate that talent? Did I answer any part of your question. Just say what. I wanted to say because I don't do that. The audience enjoyed it either. Okay I'M GONNA move on the Diane one of the interesting things Hunt consolidated the word consolidate implies different business snus units and so a question. I've always found fascinating is when many companies start quote unquote digital journey. It's more more of an agency model. They create a team where it's all things digital flow through me and then over time you recognize that. Yes maybe that works in ECOMMERCE. Yes maybe that works for marketing landing pages. Maybe it works for a few mobile APPS that you want to build. But eventually that doesn't scale and that digital needs to permeate and be core to the actual fabric fabric of how all of the different businesses are operating so. I wonder if you can comment on how you think about. What is sort of common digital capability that you want to build across? What's the enterprise and what you want to sort of infuse as sources of differentiation for each of the units? That are under the umbrella so a little difficult to say that we have something in common because we have such diverse businesses. But you can really say things that differentiate a business stay in the business and things like delivering cloud capabilities. So the business can build off of them are going to be more more of the core competencies but we'll talk a little bit about the structure of how we have innovation so we absolutely have random acts of kindness. I'M GONNA play dry random attack so I don't have shadow. It because right out there in the open and it's pervasive in the oil company And then we we have a some the new business unit Innovation Hubs where they are specifically funded to find the next great business unit of the future. So those are absolutely going on but something that we're starting to tap into it's not yet digital but I'll call it innovation so our our CFO. Oh started a year and a half ago so she got her head. Start ahead of me before that. There hadn't been much infusion of new blood so she started what's called all the collaboration resource group or collaborative resource groups Group of volunteers that really want exposure of the business and talent development. So we'll come up with an idea and say columnists sprint for six to eight weeks. Who wants to take some extra time out of their job and work on this project so just a couple of examples one of them? I mentioned reunion tower. which we own will be to go and be like secret? Shoppers over there in Rian Vision. What that visitor experience to look like another one was developing being a business plan for some of our energy operations in Mexico? Another one was much simpler but should we put room reservations on outlook the because we had territories that were everywhere and so we're getting visibility all kinds of talent across the organization and that are raising their hands says I want to be part of this new generation so. I'm really hoping that we can start to marry this. Talent with digital initiatives as we start to get some momentum so you have the well funded enterprises I WANNA tap into. It's like fracking and fracking for talent. That's what I'm doing. When you you're pushing? Water and sand in all the little crevices to get oil backout Christian trademarking everything refracting talent random acts of digital. I haven't come up with anything good yet. So you both have digital in your title and I think that that's a controversial thing for some companies and it's sort of one of two minds some companies exists. This there's a chief digital officer and chief information officer sometimes in both of your cases it's a shared title and you're making it explicit that that there is is that customer orientation that external value orientation but for others in the room. Who maybe they're a chief information officer Sir and they have a peer whose chief digital officer or boss? Perhaps Would you how does that working relationship evolve like is the chief digital officer title. Here to stay is a moment in time. That's rebranding the role. That technology leaders have like. Where do we go from here? And what's what's the utility in in the term digital in once title so I'll start Is it's not a bad thing to have to write. And and it is risky to be two in Wong. I'll be very honest because a matter of fact Harvard Business Review just had an article not too long ago about this but CIO's that becomes the ideas. There is a bigger propensity for failure than not. Now I took that heated it and said that just means we have to work even harder and make sure we're doing this right and the reason is exactly what we said before three reasons why digital strategies he's fail is you get mired in all of the. It legacy stuff that you say you have to fix before you can go do become a digital business digital concentric around costumer. That's one you don't have a strategy. You just have a lot of random acts. That's two and three. Never change the culture and it is. It is huge each to change the culture the part about getting mired in it foundational things that need to change is the risks that I see a sea idea Eddie O or whatever you WanNa call it runs and that is because you do say well. I have to upgrade my legacy systems. I've got to get my the billing systems done. We have to get off V. C. Nanda as for and it never ends two and one's need to think about what is it. I absolutely have to upgrade in order to make a digital capability more be able to put it out there. What is it that I'm just gonNA build enfold in and replace and what is the dominant perfect till we make it right? You'RE GONNA figure out how to do this fast. I'm going to get the billing and pricing. I'M NOT GONNA wait till tomorrow to be as successful for me chief digital information. Officer you have to really decide what where everything falls on that spectrum. If you don't decide then you fall the risk by having a separate CTO and CIO. It's actually easier and I know some of you can say well good for you princess. You're up there with both titles. The reality is it it is easier because the the CIO will just focus heavily on this partner and the structure your organizations such that you set those constructs. It's and you're aware that pitfall in it is a big pitfall it really is. So that's kind of how I think about it. And if you think about it that way maturely for those companies that have a cio a CTO CDO partner with the Kazan. You could use serpent right. Don't fight it. Don't be doing the this because once you do that. The company opening loses Angelou Zoo right so embrace whatever construct there is and deliver it all. Open up the questions. Just one minute Dan. What are your thoughts well I've always thought that chief information officer was a terrible title anyway. It doesn't describe the bulk of what we have historically done. So I'm looking looking forward when we build out all these new business capabilities that we can reinvent a more appropriate title for what we actually do..

officer CIO chief information officer North Star Agile Center of Excellence US CTO Harvard Business Review Angelou Zoo UK Northstar partner Officer Louis CEO senator Eddie O Rian Vision
"cto" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Hey, everybody, it's on the verge cast where it's twenty nine thousand nine this week. The biggest texture in the world. It's a little bit crazy. We're gonna have to regular verge cast this week. They're going to be sleep deprived. And a little nutty. They're going to be really fun. And I'm trying to get as many interviews with tech exacts as I can they're all in Vegas this week. They're all willing to talk. Our first interview is with Bill Baxter, the CTO video. You're probably familiar with is the other one of those popular T manufacturers in the United States CS is show about TV's. This is where all the TV news of the year gets made. There's big TV news. This year apple is integrating with smart TV's letting video airplay to and honking on their TV's. They're letting LG do the same. They're putting the items app on Samsung TV's, which is crazy. But I talked to Bill about what it's like to put airplay to home kit onto the TV's the future of smart cast, platform and importantly about privacy. So you may have seen a tweet I had a couple of days ago. I noticed my parents new video TV is sending data's the network ten times more than any other device than. I fi- I asked Bill about this who have says about it. But we really talked about is the business model for smart TD's. And the fact that that content recognition that tracking advertising model is what keeps these TV's cheap and taking it away might make them more expensive. It was a really interesting conversation odd to say this video and what Bill Bill is the CTO video. He's the chief technology officer. He's in charge Busia was a company based in California. They're American company is super candid super real real answers from person who actually makes most of this martinis at sold America. It's kind of wild check it out. Hello. I'm here. Bill Baxter, the CTO vizier Bill under great. Thank you. We're at CS. You guys are back. I it's been years since you were at CS in like a big way you're here. We're actually in video space for the listener got a big space Adare. We just saw two TV's home kit demo what brought you back to the show. So it's actually the second year we've done this venue at the Videira. And it's it is a big step up from what we had done in prior years. Probably. Going way back to like twenty eleven twelve or something what brought us back was. We have a great story to tell and all the people here that we need to hear that story are here. It's not really primarily for press. It's primarily to sell TV's to to retailers. And so we bring them through. We you can see that with this space. We can more conveniently show our lineup and then show how the technology works..

Bill Baxter chief technology officer CTO LG Samsung United States Vegas apple Videira America California Busia
"cto" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"cto" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"They are very much so might understanding is that you are the first cto of microsoft is that true yeah technically nathan myhrvold i believe is the first cto microsoft's might technically be the second there'd been people in between nathan joined the company very early and i think he left in nineteen ninety nine so it's been awhile since microsoft has had a cto wow yeah and so they've had folks who were chief software architects like rayasi played that role for while but yeah i'm the technically i see o since nineteen ninety nine wow so why is that why is it that all of a sudden microsoft decided hey it's time that we make this refill this position from so many years ago you know cto's one of those interesting roles in that it's slightly different from company to company and like whether or not you need one i think depends on what your industry is what you're trying to acc ccomplish as a company so the reason that we need to see te'o right now is that more and more of our business depends on how well we integrate all of our products together into one coherent whole you know so for instance you know we've got a hyper scale cloud in azure we've got an office productivity suite on the surface it might not seem like these two things have much to do with one another but reality like the infrastructure for office is very much like a hyper scale cloud infrastructure itself and you wanna make sure that you know you're you're sort of building these investments are like these massive infrastructure a coherent way where the things that you're building for yourself you can sort of package up him build for third parties as well microsoft is hundred twenty five thousand person company.

cto microsoft rayasi nathan myhrvold
"cto" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"cto" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"They are very much so might understanding is that you are the first cto of microsoft is that true yeah technically nathan myhrvold i believe is the first cto microsoft's might technically be the second there'd been people in between nathan joined the company very early and i think he left in nineteen ninety nine so it's been awhile since microsoft has had a cto wow yeah and so they've had folks who were chief software architects like rayasi played that role for while but yeah i'm the technically i see o since nineteen ninety nine wow so why is that why is it that all of a sudden microsoft decided hey it's time that we make this refill this position from so many years ago you know cto's one of those interesting roles in that it's slightly different from company to company and like whether or not you need one i think depends on what your industry is what you're trying to acc ccomplish as a company so the reason that we need to see te'o right now is that more and more of our business depends on how well we integrate all of our products together into one coherent whole you know so for instance you know we've got a hyper scale cloud in azure we've got an office productivity suite on the surface it might not seem like these two things have much to do with one another but reality like the infrastructure for office is very much like a hyper scale cloud infrastructure itself and you wanna make sure that you know you're you're sort of building these investments are like these massive infrastructure a coherent way where the things that you're building for yourself you can sort of package up him build for third parties as well microsoft is hundred twenty five thousand person company.

cto microsoft rayasi nathan myhrvold
"cto" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"cto" Discussed on Mixergy

"Ping him to help him to help me sell my only shoots they'll be very interesting the make me more productive on as entrepreneur and it's almost like a rent like a cto on demand it's figuring entrepreneurial it's definitely something i would use anxious turns out that at that time like looney how to kill is becoming mainstream right than size such as co school and also trials will been brian carson was on your show on murder they're all all start to pop up but just realize there isn't really like a human tutoring a element online at that time so just thoughts going to be at a at a macro level sounds like a very interesting product on for the world to have it also does so my own problem so i just figured just try to do this myself and as a commission earlier i remember very vividly on june first two thousand thirteen which is almost five years ago today i hack they lending a hack together a lending pay just posted hackers right they ask you just got on the front page of accolades at that time to my surprise and the reason that you can't that you said i'm going with this idea you told our producer i wanted minimum viable product i was heavily influenced by thirty seven signals and their belief in keeping things simple and you said i wanted revenue from day one jill at that time by toying with a bunch of ideas.

cto brian carson murder producer five years
"cto" Discussed on Tech News Today

Tech News Today

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"cto" Discussed on Tech News Today

"A sort of message by message answer by answer a question by question basis you can choose to go completely anonymous and by completely anonymous i mean we we mean really anonymous we do not know who you are literally i've asked her answered questions and my cto doesn't know it's me and vice versa like we have no way of tracking you and what's interesting about that like it sounds great when you're thinking through this problem and we're not gonna we don't need to try people repackage them running at business so we can give people that much radical anonymity the issue is we can't do notifications so the thing that we immediately wanted to do was when someone answers your question you get a notification we can't do that when you go anonymous because we've picked radical committee over every other feature we might want to roll out and i think some things like that are cut a hard for audience to wrap their head around because no one believes that you can go as an honest on the web as we allow you to go so i think the future we may actually have to come up with some middle ground where it's like you don't want your name displayed but you don't quite need the security of if we're ever happed no one would ever know it was you maybe you would rather have some of those features like notifications or later on down the line we've a lot of features we're going to roll out that will be like deeper interactions between people you know small groups being formed around you know really interesting topics that are impacting dozen or so women and you know we can't bring you into that if you were radically anonymous so maybe actually need to be third group beyond just anonymity not maybe what we classically think of internet anonymity it's it's been fascinating to to really test some of the assumptions of what people think even words like anonymous mean online and how that ripples through the product design so i see them that you allow men to be a part of the community as well which is fine.

cto