35 Burst results for "CTO"

Welcome to Technovation

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

00:08 sec | 2 d ago

Welcome to Technovation

"To. I'm your host peter. Hi my guest. Today are catherine's zao and megan crespi an interview conducted at a recent meta strategy digital symposium.

Megan Crespi Peter Catherine
Interview With Bridget Frey, CTO Redfin

The Restless Ones

01:58 min | Last week

Interview With Bridget Frey, CTO Redfin

"So much for joining us on the restless ones. I am very pleased to have you. Here is my guest. Thanks for having me Beer and i love to start off these conversations by learning a little bit more about the people. I'm speaking with and so i'm very curious. What was it that sparked your love of technology. Wasn't an apple computer it was you. Might you might know that story a little bit about it. So my dad isn't appliance sales repairman. And when i was five he showed up at her house with this big box and put it in. The kitchen in inside was apple. Two years early apple computer and to him. It was really just like dishwasher where you get a manual read instructions you figure out how to use it and so my earliest experiences with -nology peter was just learning to code. That's fantastic yeah. I also was t-the apple to myself. He remember the the hello world and you know ten print. I go is. It is kinda complicated since then. Once once i got beyond the basic programming language things got out of my wheelhouse pretty quickly. But from what i understand. You really went down that pathway wholeheartedly. Your love was sparked early on. But when did you decide that this is something i actually want study. By the time. I got to high school. I actually was really fortunate that we had a computer science class and a clo- that were operating in my high school now. It's meeting more comment. But i also had as email computer science teacher who was really inspirational to me and so i think that those experiences helped to make me feel. I belong to in the tech industry at these formative years. And i also i was. I loved the idea of using our loans in technology to solve problems in so those things really crystallized at a time out of school i'm already

Apple Peter
Dr. Francis Fukuyama on How Technology Is Shaping American Democracy

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:20 min | Last week

Dr. Francis Fukuyama on How Technology Is Shaping American Democracy

"Well. I thought we would begin. I'd love for it to to cover a number of topics as your. Your field of expertise is so expensive to cover both geopolitics as well as technology for some who knew me know your earlier works. They may not be quite as familiar to the extent to which you've dealt with so much further into technology which which as the conversation goes on. I'm sure he's going to make sense to those people listening and watching inasmuch as the those of becomes so enmeshed and would love to talk a bit about your own diagnosis as well as some of your own Recommendations for improvements in all of the above. But i wanted to begin Dr fukuyama with the rise of populism. This is certainly a trend that has been accelerating and we see everything from the election of donald trump in two thousand sixteen brexit the uk a number of countries that have either elected or Have one thinks of marine le pen in france candidates who arising within various countries. Who can be described as populist. Talk a bit about your own diagnosis. If you would as to some of the factors at play that have led to this sure. So i think we need to begin with the definition of populism They're actually different varieties. There's a left wing version. Which would be. Google says on a right wing version. Which would be donald trump They have some things in common. So populous argue that The world is actually being run by a ball leads. That are self interested. That are manipulating a politics for their own. Self interested purposes and cutting ordinary people out of that loop the difference. I think between the right and left wing versions. Is that the left wing. Populace wanna redistribute income and wealth. You know massively. To from rich to poor of the right wingers intent on issues like national identity where they oftentimes Associate national identity with a particular ethnic group so for example. Viktor orban and hungry us as that. Hungarian national identity is based on hungarian ethnishity. Which isn't so great. If you're not an ethnic hungarian living in budapest or somewhere else in the country

Dr Fukuyama Donald Trump France UK Google Viktor Orban Budapest
Tanium CEO Orion Hindawi on Cybersecurity and the Shifting IT Landscape

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Tanium CEO Orion Hindawi on Cybersecurity and the Shifting IT Landscape

"Orion. You're the co founder of chief executive officer of a company founded back in two thousand seven Many of our listeners will certainly be familiar retained but in the off chance. There are few who are less familiar. Maybe you can take a quick moment in provide an overview of the business. Sure so we started the company with basic thesis that very large companies that you think about forty five hundred large big enterprise kind of environments neither in government or in the commercial side Really struggled with basic stuff around. It so when we first got there a lot of companies really struggled to know how niaz ups they out when i say assets i mean almost anything with a chip nazi think about desktop laptop server. Vm cloud. I o t o t like all these things that they've got they don't know how many of them they have They often don't know where they are. What they're doing is using them. What data's on them. What abilities they have. They really have very sparse. Data about What they're trying to manage the compete standpoint and in addition to that they've got tons and tons of little tools. That are supposed to do that for them. So in many cases they've got twenty or thirty or sometimes even tools that are designed to give them visibility on their it assets and yet the visibility is really pretty fractured and untrustworthy. So what we've built is a platform that lets you see everything you've got the chip in it. Really great data about them and then allow you change them and so whether that's patching things because they've got abilities whether it's finding data that shouldn't have spread somewhere and removing it whether it's learning users of they've got a performance issue and fixing had a really broad set of things that they wanna fix but Really kind of finding and fixing within ninety stock and having a system of record that they trust about all the things with chips in them that i think are becoming incredibly critical especially in work from anywhere but frankly even before were super critical for almost every company. We talked to

The Process of the Cloud Journey

Status Go

02:03 min | Last month

The Process of the Cloud Journey

"On your cloud journey. You're going to gain a lot of insights from today's episode of status go. I'm your host jeff ton. My guest today is dustin milburn field. Cto cloud services for intervision. Dustin is returning for part two of our cloud journey series in our first installment. He and i talked about taking a people first. Approach as you embark on your journey for those who may not of her dead episode. I encourage you to check it out in this conversation. We're going to dig into process the second element people process than tools. Welcome back to status go dustin. Hey jeff it's great to be back. Been looking forward to this and i was honored to be your one hundred episode last time. That was fantastic. I didn't realize when we were recording in that it was going to be the one hundred episode. it's a pretty good milestone for the show and it was so cool to have you as the hundred guests. So thank you for that was. My pleasure was a lot of fun. In that first discussion. We talked a lot about the view that the cloud is a journey as opposed to a destination. I think nowhere is that more apparent than had the impact on process. What processes are impacted by this transformation from on premises based technology to cloud based technology. Great question you know. The traditional approaches to consume on premise based infrastructure has for for years. Now right you you buy the infrastructure you put it in your data center. You put it in iraq you install virtual machine saw some sort of hyper visor to to provision virtual machines and and then you know whether manual automatic or through some sort of automation your provisioning those machines out to engineers to be able to start building software. That's great

Jeff Ton Dustin Milburn Dustin Jeff Iraq
Comcast, Cox Enterprises CIOs on Rethinking the Employee Experience Through the Pandemic

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:51 min | Last month

Comcast, Cox Enterprises CIOs on Rethinking the Employee Experience Through the Pandemic

"Wanted to begin with Talking about this major digital transformation acceleration that you have you've experienced through the pandemic and how is your thinking about employee experienced change during this time in light of the many changes that employees have had to endure in the way in which they work to give us a few thoughts. If you would absolutely great question and let me began by by saying that i think leadership is the core competency that really support the transformation of technology and when i think about leadership i think about capability competency and compassion and those things are fuel really to grow individuals and companies and and i started with that because one of the things that we've seen when we work with our our customers and particularly on our cable side of the business. What we saw was in extreme increase in demand which is intuitive and secondarily. What we saw is a need for for our clients to get up quickly and we. We had initiatives focused on self installs as an example and those initiatives were accelerated greatly. But what we learn going back to that compassion piece is it was more than getting them up and having them run in our our employees were going through the same thing so in addition to do in their day job they were homeschooling. They were balancing the Their personal lives with their work lives and that need to support them over and beyond our jobs really fueled us to make sure that we kept them front and center in all the decisions and lasting say is absolutely the tools that we're using now. Zoom as an example microsoft teens really double downing on that type of technology to create. That connection has been really important.

Microsoft
Interview With Claire Hough, CTO of Carbon Health

IT Visionaries

02:04 min | Last month

Interview With Claire Hough, CTO of Carbon Health

"Welcome everyone to another episode of it visionaries and today we have a special guests. Claire huff the cto of carbon health. Welcome to the show and kill. Well we keep reading about. How tech is disrupting the healthcare industry as we know it so we always want our guest to explain what's unique about their company. What is unique about carbon health. And how is it approaching healthcare so carbon hell race say take knowledge company and there are many who call themselves healthcare technology company but we're company with a big mission and we have actually starting to prove out some of that mission through really offering Healthcare through different channels in the past year or past few years actually and carbon health mission is to provide quality healthcare for all and that sounds like yeah is in everybody's to provide hell quality healthcare for all but it's actually an Pretty a day. Shis mission. And i don't think i really understood that are passed city until i you know educated myself more about how health care is being provided in the united states today so there are a lot of biases in healthcare as as like accessibility is not even as we have seen. How underserved communities were disproportionately affected during covid. So that's kind of a prove that we have not been providing healthcare to You know under served marginalized communities and when kofi hit. They were obviously hit very hard. So our mission is to really make sure that we can provide the quality care for all through our technology platform by providing access to healthcare.

Claire Huff United States Kofi
Interview With Cathy Southwick, Chief Information Officer, Pure Storage

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:32 min | Last month

Interview With Cathy Southwick, Chief Information Officer, Pure Storage

"Capi south welcomed technician. It's great to see you today. Great to see you too. Thank you kathy. I thought we would begin with you. Your role you are the chief information officer pure storage and maybe you can take a quick moment in provide a brief overview of pure storage. Is business right now. I'd love to do that. So you know appears for relatively young company are i ten years we really set out. To complete change. Storage industry disrupt the status quo. That we'd all been dealing with from an it lens and our vision was really built on being very customer. Centric wanted to fundamentally change expectations for data storage management. Want to think about it from enabling codebase real time access to resilient hybrid cloud data storage for it Not just for. It also developers devops alike etc and really week of storage as co we really want to storage to be dynamic to provide that cloud experience be flexible on demand and really be able to allow developers in spanish to really consume it at their at their Their needs so. That was really whole premise. Behind period. we of say we put the check mark on that and now as we had to go into this next ten years of our company. We really wanna make sure that. We're empowering those organizations who want to really think about their operations as true automated storage as a service model and and really to work across multiple clouds in environments and So that supports on premise. Off prem dedicated or shared platform. So that's really kind of the essence of pure as really being that very customer centric figuring out where we want to be to help our customers data to use Whether reducing the complexity and be able to manage their for structure. That kind of sums up. Think about pure. That's great a great summary. I appreciate you giving that overview and let's talk a bit about your role is a chief information officer no to seattle roles exactly alike. What's what's the what's within your purview. Kathy yeah. I feel very fortunate. I have an incredible Global it team. That's in both domestic us wilson locations around the world as well And we also have responsibility for our cyber strategy for all of the enterprise as well as our product so think of the traditional. It responsibilities of all of our on prem off prem the assassin environments application environments along with data federal that. We support the business but we also have that responsibility as well for looking at what cyber look like for our business around helping to ensure we protect not just our employees and our company but also our customers as well

Kathy Seattle Wilson
The Mystery of the Treasure at Rennes-le-Château

Conspiracy Theories

01:33 min | 2 months ago

The Mystery of the Treasure at Rennes-le-Château

"In nineteen fifty three eighty five year. Old marie dinar. No lay on her deathbed. She spent her entire life in a tiny hilltop village. In the south of france ren lucia cto penniless and never married. Marie had no one to care for her except the family that had bought her home years before the core booze in return. She promised them a deathbed confession for much of her life. Marie was the housekeeper of the town's former priest. Baron jay sewn year decades earlier son. Years struck it rich overnight but never disclosed the source of his sudden wealth except to his ever-present confidante marie. Marie had hinted to the core booze. That when the time was right she shared the of sonya's fortune making them rich beyond their wildest dreams. They recalled her saying quote. You're walking on gold. You could feed the village for one hundred years and they would still be some leftover sadly. Marie suffered a stroke. That left her unable. To speak or write she died on january twenty ninth nineteen fifty-three taking sauniere secret to her grave. Ever since hundreds of thousands of travelers been drawn to ren lucia toe in search of ancient mysteries and one very elusive treasure

Marie Dinar Marie Baron Jay France Sonya Stroke Ren Lucia
Should I Start My Software Company Without a Co-Founder?

The $100 MBA Show

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Should I Start My Software Company Without a Co-Founder?

"So mitch wants to know. Should he bring on a co founder as he begins his software business. He has an. Mvp has a has been a Members already so it sounds like he's built his first version of a software on his own with Hiring a team of people and good for you for taking action and seeing if this thing has legs before you even start thinking about bringing a co-founder now. I've been in software for seven years now and i have met and have gone to know a lot of software founders bartolotta software groups and mastermind groups sas academy scaling sas founders some anymore and there are many software companies that have founders where there's two three or four and there's also many that don't have co founders single founders running the whole business now often single founders of a software business Our technical so they can actually build the app themselves of the wanted to now. Obviously that's very slow moving and it doesn't leave a lot of time and attention for that founder to build the business to market to sell to get the software in the hands of your ideal customers so semi argue. If you are a single founder being non technical can help you because you're focused on the things that's going to move the business and you can always hire out for technical help now there are businesses that do co-founders like my businesswoman are ninja. My software company has a co founder. Her name is my life and business. She's the c o. she's not a technical founder. she's operating officer. She does operations and nicole. And i are the co founders of our ninja now having said that we have a team of developers. We have a full-time. Cto chief technical officer so you have options. You don't need to always just have Your leader of technology bef co-founder. You can always hire out for it. You can actually pay the money you can even give them some equity or maybe a profit share if you want to but co-founder ship Really slices the pie generously.

Bartolotta Software Groups Sas Academy Mitch SAS Nicole
CIOs of Dow and CarMax Drive Process Modernization at Scale

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:59 min | 2 months ago

CIOs of Dow and CarMax Drive Process Modernization at Scale

"Let me begin with you melanie please. So wow what a. What a remarkable several years. It's been during your time and your tenure as chief information officer dow has been through major acquisitions. It's been through multiple major Divestitures as well yours is an organization generally speaking but an it organization more specifically that has had to foster a tremendous amount of change and stand up as well as spin out a lot of parts of the organization and think about the people process and technology implications of each of those things. I want and what one of the fascinating changes that you've ushered in is a changing. It's orientation more towards service delivery. And i wonder if you can take the story from there and talk a bit about i. Why maybe talk a bit about the specifics of service delivery as as it's defined within your organization as well as some of the methods you have used in order to bring that about scherer. Thank you peter and happy to be here. You have been through tremendous change over the last few years with the Like you said the merge of two companies and spin out of three companies which davis a great opportunity to drive changes and really Early-on start driving some of our digital transformation which put us in a really good position As the pandemic But one of the key changes from as an it organization we help drive. Change across the whole company Several years ago. When i took over as cio we put a strategy in place which was really a not an it strategy it was really a it strategy for the company or the organization and as part of that we really changed our approach To how we how we execute in in in nis we focused on the customer experience the employment experience and working at the speed of business

Melanie Scherer Peter Davis
How to achieve more with marketing automation

99 Challenges

05:20 min | 3 months ago

How to achieve more with marketing automation

"Hello and welcome. I'm your host. Peter bank founder offended or consulting in. Today's we will talk about email. Marketing and marketing automation as marketing. Tools are getting better and better. Much of the marketing activities can be able to meet it. But do we need to automate everything that we cannot meet if so how can we stop to discuss the best practices. I invite enjoy keller. Cto of friendly of brazzi friendly marketing automation company. Straight out of switzerland. Hey joey welcome to the show. It'll be third year awesome. So let's start with a big intro. What are you doing. What's what's your journey. How did you end up friendly and more importantly while the friendly do ideal. Short niger me. Let's put it this way. I did send a lot of emails. Allen's working for america marketing company. we're focusing on email marketing a lot so i learned a lot about emailing in boxing least managements and then back to work in euro ethnically. I didn't move. Because i'm the same place but i joined friendly last year. Actually today the at one years old soins manipulation Thank you. I am the cto friendly in responsible or infrastructure warning our clients and in general. I'm responsible for their success. Automation and also the assistant perfectly within the martic officers project monarchy's softer trendy. Automate is based on in france. First base price pricing tools. We also have the analytics which is a calculus picks competitor. I'm insane so we are focusing. Most up been sore so you can check out on sale also than company which means you can see how much we earn how much we spend. We nothing. We have nothing to what that i saw that on the website. It's is everything is super transparent. You do do share everything. Which is i think it's amazing. I only so this type of transparency. Approach i at with buffer where they share pretty much everything about their company on how they are doing and then he turned to most of the indie hackers. And the in this daca preneurs day. Also do sheriff thing and i just glad to see the friendliest part of that network to green jacket and you see conversation piece and how do you. So who are the decline of friendly. So how do you help them. Mostly small businesses are medium sized businesses. Why they're coming to you. So people are coming to s- clients coming to us because they realized that they need marketing automation. The funny thing is that most of these companies don't even know what marketing automation as point. Because it's a boss for everyone's talking. I wanted to as that than another text savvy. Startup companies do understand and use automation every day but business and medium size businesses who are not like super tech savvy. They don't really know. What is the marketing automation. In the general heard about divert of course because it's a buzzer But they don't know what they can out mate. Yes so marketing automation. Is beth. nissen so you're trying to have you are trying to deliver the right message at the right time to the right people. That's what marketing automation as most often is actually do it without knowing boy. Thank carbon colori process. Someone doesn't finish shopping abandoned. That's mitch or thursday. Happy birthday discount. It's an automation because each happening on certain time certain triggers. It is not a personal email. The exact opposite will be sending your newsletters although that's also part of the marketing automation tools. Because it's very important for people to understand with opening emails. And he's not so. I bet to question what he's marketing automation. I didn't start. We not what. He's not going to do when i first heard commissioner In quantum comes out and people are so. That's not what it is. It won't replace any traditional marketing tools. Enhance them. It won't try to at least make tools. Yes for them. We in fact we have a. We have a army switzerland that A great company needs ways doing that but aren't In the general marketing automation tool stone generate content medically and it. It was replaced human touch. Also when it comes to sales and especially customer service so you can fire your customers jobs agent just because you can young mission you can make your life easier. You can have better customer journey custom better. Customer experience more efficient more sales more of sales process. Soak what he does. Let's say let's divide yourselves. Girl says into tweet speak version. Activates ample storage so for pico version. You can do a bunch of things you can make them aware of your servants friendly ultimate also tracks your needs on the website. So we know what they do. And based on that we can create personas

Peter Bank Niger Switzerland Keller Joey Boxing Allen France America Nissen Beth Mitch
Superhuman Engineering with Emuye Reynolds

Software Engineering Daily

04:42 min | 3 months ago

Superhuman Engineering with Emuye Reynolds

"Humiliate welcome to the show. Thank you. I think we previously did a show with the superhuman ceo. Who'll and in that episode. We covered a lot of their high level. Challenges design challenges of building superhuman. And in this episode. I think will cover some of the same stuff but also dive deeper into some specific engineering challenges. I want to start off by asking you a question that i also asked him. Which is what are the canonical challenges of building an email client. One thing. i'll say. Is that the surface area is really large so the things you need to build to even arrive it. A basic email client is is quite a lot of stuff and then you know the way we go about building it where retreat speed is a feature. We wanted to be incredibly robust and we also want it to be really remarkable quality. That creates another challenge. Anytime you're trying to balance performance reliability and quality. There's some tension there. Do you want to go deeper into that. Like the into the the canonical challenges like given that you have been working on the engineering side. What are the engineering problems that you see over and over again. Sinking is the engineering challenges trying to keep an inbox and sink When i talk about reliability. I'm really thinking about offline and online is a challenge in general but flaky network is even harder than off line intermittent connectivity. So that's one of our absolute one of our challenges. The sort of fastness of data rate. You're you're dealing with individual email threads and messages each of which has you know. There's just so many different kinds of things that we see. That's another challenge. Parsing the different content and making sure it renders correctly. Certainly something we spend a lot of time thinking about there are so many email clients that are out there and yet there are new ones that are constantly being developed. What are the places where there are room for innovation in email clients. Yes great question. I think one of the main areas is just around these or experience. A lot of what you see is people building in companies building the same email client over and over again the same experience. That hasn't changed in years. And i think there is this just a general product that anytime you have billions of people using something They get used to using it and trying to introduce new behavior can present a challenge. But i think there is a lot of room for for companies to try to innovate there and to be opinionated. May it could be a things. Like to human treating speed as a feature mike what we do on mobile trying to allow the device allow users to interact with one hand. It could be other types of input like speech. I think speed can also extend to like the speed. People are typing and and trying to allow more writing assistance. It really comes down to the user. Experience does user experience design. Does that translate to tough engineering problems. Like i can imagine making a really smooth user interface or making a user interface that has quote a. I built in these. Are things that translate to tough engineering problems. Yeah i think so. I think it's it turns out to be sort of like. I said earlier the balance rate. Like if you're just trying to build a really innovative user experience. I don't think that's particularly challenging. But if you're trying to build it in a way that is incredibly fast also allows you to be really powerful but you want to be easy to use. I think those things present tough engineering challenges and also reliability. You want every interaction to be extremely quick but you also want it to ensure that the users intent is captured. I think those do present a very tough engineering challenges. How do you divide your time in your engineering role. I think it's It's different every day every week every but i have a few things that i'm really focused on. I'm really focused on building out our engineering team and culture and that's growing the team as well as making sure that we have an organization that can support happy engineers that are working efficiently. I spent a lot of time on the product side and really focusing on delivery and execution making sure that a lot of project management tasks are on track claburn a lot with our product team with our cto. I also spent a bunch of time actually with my hands the code. I think it's really important that engineering leadership especially to you know with small teams engineering leadership continued to really be hands on with the problems. So it's a lot of those kinds of tests thinking about our overall company business strategy and how that relates engineering and how we can really drive in as an engineering org.

Creating Faster, More Efficient Feedback Loops in Real-Time with UserTesting CTO, Kaj Van De Loo

IT Visionaries

06:25 min | 4 months ago

Creating Faster, More Efficient Feedback Loops in Real-Time with UserTesting CTO, Kaj Van De Loo

"Welcome to another episode of it visionaries today. We have the chief technology officer of user testing. Kyw vande liu kai welcome to the show thank you. I'll right right to it user testing. The name seems obvious what it's four but tell us what is user testing the company. What do they offer what you guys do as you might guess. We have. Companies tests experiences wade uses with there could be karen customers. Potential customers partners employees at people have never heard of them. What have you so essentially anybody. Who's creating an experience can use our platform to get feedback integration process whether it's an early sketch one feedback on or design before you can start developing if it's throughout the development of the experience and of course experiences that already are out in the wild and being used anything in all of that that you want experience anything that you've created any experience you've created whether digital or physical that you want feedback. So that's what i want to dive into. Because that's what's fascinating because this isn't just a product that test software. You mentioned the physical in fact on your homepage. The user testing homepage. There is a woman clearly or to me clearly providing some type of feedback on a makeup product in. You just said it. Physical as well tells the big difference between because i think a lot of people here user testing and they started thinking of software centric application inside of my software. So imagine i. I am a software maker. I install another software inside of my software in attracts users. Attracts what they do. It gives me feedback loops of how they're interacting with software but user. Testing is a little bit different tells how your unique approach to testing both software has well as physical products and we compliment all these other forms of getting insights into how your product or how your experiences used by giving you heal human insights into what people actually think while they're doing this. So tha other tools. You can get insights into what people click on and how long they dwell on a particular page or whatever it is but we connect you die wick out to your customers or your users and they tell you they think out loud. They give you their personal feedback. We court everything they do record the face as well. It's almost like you're sitting there talking to someone when they try out experience you have created whether it's a website or mobile app or visit gates periods. So did this is like being. Would someone in their home wine. they about may be tried on and they talk to you they are. They're fantastic self. It's a vaguely human connection that you build their this week. They have spilled empathy in a way that will this data that we collect another ways can never do so. How does your role in back this experience. Your customer so use your testing. It sounds like you know if i if i were to start listening to podcasts. When ray beginning not too much idea in front of it it's now starting to sound like a marketplace. It sounds like if i bring you my product you have users that will play with intest the product. They're going to be willing to record themselves. It sounds like how does the technology of what user testing provide help narrow the gap for a. Let's say when your clients for them to collect feedback. How do you guys make their lives easier. Oh there's a lot of technology involved in this whole process of you getting to the interesting moments that matter to you understand how you can improve the experience you're providing it starts with the different ways that we can define audiences so you can bring your own test participants if you want if you have. Maybe your most loyal polled listeners. If you wanna hear from them what they think if you want to hear from people who have never heard of you we have a panel of many. Many people signed up who frequently take these tests and they check in and received or something available for them to to to test that you can relatively easily cover defined people who've never heard of us. We cannot support the south spectrum of your most loyal people out to people who've never heard of you and in all of this. This quite some sophistication in how we distribute tests out to potential participants at we try to target these tests as as we can so that the participants who are most interested and most likely to be good testers that we most likely to give good feedback that we target them with a particular test. So there's a lot of technology already in just how these how you find your audience. There's a lot of interesting technology and we're doing a lot of exciting work this area. At the moment how the experience gets a coded and then perhaps the most technology intensive area is around the analysis of the results. You get just five fifteen minute videos back. That's auto time for you to sit and listen and watch all of those but that's where we have a lot of machine. Learning we transcribe everything that people say. We analyzed the transcripts for strom emotions. We count entrusting moments. We analyzed if it's a web sized we can analyze the flow through the side. We can see where people have been clicking all of this than complements what they actually said any attempts guide you towards the highlights and we can automatically highlight wheels for you and so that you as yen user who's trying to produce a better experience that through get feedback nicely packaged.

Kyw Vande Liu Kai Wade Karen RAY
test

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 4 months ago

test

"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
GM going electric

Motor1.com Podcast

02:55 min | 4 months ago

GM going electric

"Starting things off talking about general motors engines. And the reason we're doing that are two very interesting in pieces of news. We've got Last week gm announced that as of twenty thirty five th they are going to stop offering internal combustion engines in their light cars so basically you might still be able to get a va in your silverado. Twenty five hundred or something like that but vast majority of their vehicles probably even performance stuff like your corvette if the camaro still around then those are all going to be e vs or maybe plug in hybrids but basically gas a purely gas powered engines are not in their future and so i wrote up the road up the story last week and it really got my gear. Spit on that. You know g. m. is one of the oldest auto makers in the world nerd. They've got over one hundred years of history and there are some absolutely fantastic internal combustion engines in that town at also. Interestingly this week. I'm this is a story that you wrote about it is at you know. Cadillac announced that the new cto four. V black-wing c. T. v. black wing. Those are going to be the last v models from cadillac with internal combustion engines and so it really seems like gm serious about this at least for right now So yeah it's it's a weird time. Jim anything to add about the cadillac part of that. Well i mean yes. And no. I guess the bigger question is whether or not gm can actually pull this off than our commenters brought up as well as you know. Twenty thirty is a long time and time away make makes promises that doesn't necessarily keep so they they sometimes don't always follow through most of the all of the time. Maybe i i. I don't wanna sound too harsh on gm. Because i mean they're they're they're going forward and and i mean frankly they have to go for it right. The whole industry is moving in that direction. And we're we're faced with a gm lineup right. Now that is pretty much almost completely devoid of any electrification Damning they have some Just wanted just a couple of vehicles right off the top of my head. Of course they've got the the gmc hummer okay. i. I don't know if a hundred and ten thousand dollar luxury electric pickup truck is really going to be the the mainstream savior but yeah fourteen. Years can get there and cadillac. I mean these These amazing looking sports sedans. That's going to be the the end

GM Cadillac JIM
Interview With Ahmer Inam  And Mark Persaud At Pactera Edge

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:24 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Ahmer Inam And Mark Persaud At Pactera Edge

"We do have some great guests with us today. So we're really excited to have amer in phnom who's the chief. Ai officer and mark persaud. Who's the head of emerging experiences at pact-era edge. So welcome guys and thank you so much for joining us today but thank you got clean and wrong. Thank you for having in forward to this exciting conversation. We are to. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role at pact-era edge Kathleen i'll go ahead and start amazon up. I'm the chief a offers. Subtle factor edge. We are global solution and services firms that balance intelligent digital platforms using human center design as a cool concept in philosophy the hallway bill systems maya background. I've been in the space of a medal for essentially my entire career Having played with fairly early machine learning. And you'll eulex model for almost twenty years at this point To most recently. A factor edge. My journey has taken me to companies like fargo sonic automotive. Vw see nike can be solution and at the now. I pass it off to mark to introduce himself awesome. I've I'm the head of emerging experiences at a bacteria edge So i have the job of being able to look across different technologies whether that's a our and our in vr virtual reality immersive Or things like voice and conversational. I and understanding how a i can play a better role in the technologies or with the technology whether it's within or atop a different digital ecosystems for clients though. I personally have a lot of fun with that role in general just because it gives me the ability to see how we can create value for users of creative ways with technology is where we might not see very consumer or user friendly and i might add like one of the reason why this is such a differentiation. Headed what you're talking about. Even sent to city in is market. Ni- expedience must. Genie are working together. Cohesively issue the cool part of the conversation that will be having at the at the upcoming event with community and is about building and designing intelligent digital platforms that are built with humans entity the human in the mind and building them to drive adoption so that we can take a lot of these concepts that are explored in a typical machine learning ai. In women in an enterprise and then take them to an enterprise capability and the part of their journey. At least an odd philosophy is that it has to lead with human simplicity. Really great insight. We actually had a podcast not too long ago with chad moro. Who is the cto chief. Data officer at fulton bank and he actually made a great point about the human center city of systems especially of systems that depend on data because he was saying you know at the end of the day the data represents people represents what people are doing it represents their money represents their finances and those finances represent their retirement college savings. They're they're living right and you and you can never it's people's names treat data abstractly day. Sometimes it's really very critical and You know one of the great things. Of course you can. You mentioned that you'll be sharing a lot of these insights at our upcoming machine learning life cycle events so for our listeners. You may have heard this on previous episodes but of course if this is your first time We run these online free conferences. That are focused on some of the hottest topics. Ai machine learning and our objective is to help audience and help people take that next step and move their projects and forward We ran a huge data for ai. Conference back. In september twenty twenty twentieth thousands of attendees. It was amazing. Hundreds of of presenters actually well. Over one hundred plus presenters was was gigantic and we heard as people wanted to get that same sense of insight into what's happening with machine learning so we have the machine learning life cycle of that which talks about the full life cycle of machine learning from building the mall to managing an ops and govern insecurity and that is the live part of the event is january twenty sixth through twenty eight th twenty twenty one if you elect to register go to m. l. life cycle conference dot com. We'll have that in our show as well and Yeah we have some fantastic presenters in five topics and three tracks and our guest here. Terra their edge. They're they're actually doing. A session. called accelerating accelerate concept to value human centric design driven a lot of words there. There's a lot of terms of people may be familiar with some of them. They may not be. So maybe if you can. Can you give our listeners. A quick of what the session is about. And maybe some of the main questions and pain points that you're going to be addressing. Yeah thank you. Ron and actually just to right and it may come across as a laundry list of technical jargon and it's it's an i wanna make sure we can talk about it. In some of the audiences are going to be ingenious and audit back on both mock. You come from. Jean backgrounding ingenious with talking about the art of of humanity which the human centric design. What are we going to talk about. Is this first. Thing is gonna lay out the burning platform. We have seen the statistics enough data from gartner to idc that talks about the failures off a adoption. the data continues to show about eighty to ninety percent of machine learning data signs. Big data these initiatives famed to drive value. Because they're not getting adopted and if they're not getting a doctorate in driving value

Mark Persaud Fargo Sonic Automotive Amer Chad Moro Fulton Bank Human Center City Of Systems E Phnom Kathleen VW Amazon Nike Jean Backgrounding RON Gartner IDC
Interview With Bradley Kam

Bitcoin Radio

04:17 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Bradley Kam

"We have a returning gas brian. Cameo from unstoppable domains and brad. Thanks for joining great. Thanks for Awesome awesome. so we've had you on before for those that maybe missed it. You can go to the reimagine twenty twenty youtube channel Up reimagined twenty two brought cameron and it will populate they're interesting story good stuff there You know for free that. Take a peek out. That i'm having back again. So hopefully we can shed some new light and get some updates in and see what's going on but bradey know what i noticed from. The last discussion is With quite get your journey like into blockchain I've done countless interviews now over the last four months and it'd be It's interesting you know. Love to hear your side and you found out in the rational and how you got into blockchain shore. So i i heard about it from the wired article in two thousand and eleven the rise and fall bitcoin which a lot of people probably heard him read and i remember thinking. Oh this is cool. And that i remember tossing the magazine aside and then nothing about it again. For a couple of years i moved out to san francisco in end of two thousand twelve december. Two thousand twelve to work on marketing tech startup. Six years working on that. But when i moved to san francisco. I moved into this hacker. House called twenty mission Right in the center of the mission district is crazy place a day. After i got there they were shooting horror. Fill there Just to give you kind of an idea of like what the building looks like They didn't need to change the scenery. It was ready to go for the film So there was like a clown getting murdered or something like that right outside my right outside. My door They eventually built it up a little bit. Got a little bit nicer but it was basically. I started by a early bitcoin supporter and essentially everybody. There was some sort of Some sort of a bitcoin enthusiast. The second bitcoin exchange was launched in the basement of the building Trade ill second. Bitcoin exchange in the us. bunch of early meet ups were in the building. The talk was giving talks in or courtyard before theorem. Live was basically everybody that i met when i moved to. San francisco was crypto person. Maybe three weeks. After i got there read the white paper You know maybe rented another couple of times just that first week thought it was one of the most amazing things i've ever heard was a little skeptical about whether or not this could actually work implementation. Wise i'm not ankle so i of needed to trust might eleborate friends. Essentially that this was like real from a tech perspective. They convinced me that it was and reading about it and think about it. Ever since i was more seven years ago. So how is living about pat. I don t twenty mission. It's not there anymore. I don't think right though. There is a lot of phases so a lot of a lot of those early folks in a lotta. Those early crypto folks are have since moved on But it was it was. It was pretty wild in the back in the day. I mean they were doing doing five hundred person. Y- parties with multiple. Dj's going until six am and stuff like that A lot of meet ups. It was amazing. I met so many. Jimmy's metallic was so he's to my. Cto is what was in a hacker house. I don't think he was. I think he might have been twenty mission as well but there was another one. A nearby and metallic was pitching a theory at that time Which kind of blew. Everybody's mind when he was trying to sell tokens and obviously my cto. Now wish he would have awesome. Yeah yes i didn't actually. I didn't get to talk to patel. Bear but it i did a. I was taking this class collection. You in south bay. And i think twenty fifteen and batali gave a talk Talking about a theory. And what. I heard it. It sounded like the most convoluted confusing thing ever. Everybody was like why. What's gas wise there. Gas is that different than ease. The token like it was just so confusing hours. Like is this really. Is this really going to work. It just seems so So bazaars i i didn't i didn't immediately get it. I don't think i'm probably took me another year. After the thing was was live when i started seeing some apps and then finally once i could see apps i was like okay now i get it now. This is a decentralized platform for apps

San Francisco Brad Cameron Brian Youtube PAT Jimmy United States Batali Patel South Bay
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:47 min | 6 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Prasada. Welcome it's great to speak with you today. Thank you roma. I thought we begin with your company. You are the chief technology officer and senior vice president of technology at co parts and for those listeners. Who may be less familiar with the company. Can you take a minute or two. And just give a brief overview as to the business you're in the simplest described co parties. We're like the e bay for salvage. Cops we bring solution and bias together and we are marketplace for those two key stakeholders for us to come together and we don't own the cars we had middleman. We take the 'cause on consignment sellers and we market it to the members. We are inland countries. That is our seller eleven countries. Our members are enabled hundred. Fifty countries as we're global whistle about three million cars a year on all on the internet all our businesses online. We do have yards in eleven countries where the sellers mood occurs to us because when the car comes to us we have to go through a title change in most countries. So do that process takes six. We do all that people would call that processing and the car is ready to be auctioned. We put it on the internet. We auction it. The members bid on it and they've in the car and we we do all the the billing and payments and would you that money to the seller and we keep a little bait. Excellence talk a bit about your purview. As a cto chief technology officer and senior vice president of technology. What is your role in tail off. The technology We had technology company. Although we are an auction company. You pretty much. Everything that we do is based on technology. And i oversee all of the technology or the development of the maintenance the support and The opposition of the technology in addition to the technology. I also oversee one of our newer businesses. And it's a business that we run out of new york it's a smaller business. It's still in its infancy. And i'm using it because it needs a lot of attention from a technology point of view right now in probably another year or two. I'll probably hand it over to you. Know one of the other colleagues are the recipes that we have over here but for now i am overseeing that business also understood and i know that you is. You've been in for the past six years. Roughly and you have been in the throes more recently of a significant transformation. Talk a bit about what that is entailed in the way in which. You have organized. That i joined the company little six years back and joined the company. The technology team and technology was probably Kind of old fashioned. It was all based on a mainframe technology and You know a practice that for the last two probably for about ten ten years. Ten to fifteen years prior to my joining the company was interested in upgrading. The technology and there were at least one or two attempts but they didn't work out very well so we looked at the clumsy and you know they put that are taken with the last few years used to understand the business more and really develop it technology from the ground up to suit the business to don't technology that is customized for the in built for auto business salvage businesses.

Prasada new york
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:26 min | 8 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"How do we as a company go on a friend's serve and be Border in our aspirations given the opportunity that is presented to us and leverage that to help the world better and also continue to grow more and build even more relevant experiences in this new new paradigm. So so many different things and it is still a journey that's evolving. We have not seen all of it will not learn to all of it and all the war and you you take all the disruption that's home around you you feel empathy you feel sympathy. You want to help the best way possible on the other hand you see the opportunity and you want to definitely leverage and capitalize on that as well. I wouldn't also offer you you're a board member you're on the board of a company called F5 Networks and have been since April. So you joined a board during the course of the the pandemic unusual times it to do so, I'm curious about that experience of being a board member obviously very different from your current role of being in a, you know, an operator and internal person. Now, you're you know an advisor influencer as a phone number will be during you know most unusual time. And as I say at a drink a time when presumably at least you've not been able to get together as a entire board team talk a bit about the Dynamics of that if you would they suck. My my interview process actually started in January. So fortunately I did too got to meet the whole management team and the board before the pandemic hit but I've been uh in a few years but we didn't so far a few more conversations and all of that has been remote or video conferencing and I think all companies have certain foundational wage that they're looking at in a very similar way and uh, the uh, Francois offers the F5 Networks. CEO is an amazing leader wage. Um, and he has put people at the Centre of everything just like that show men with the PayPal done exactly the same and that is the that is the main thing about the Panthers is You first have to look at all things people employees customers and so on connect with them more than you've ever done communicate with them more than you've ever done and so on. So coming back on board itself. I would say the conversation at the border is not very different than the conversation. We are having here at picked out safety and well-being of employees sewing the customers the best we can and even more in these times and of course Safety and Security and so on so long, I wouldn't say that it's any different except for the fact that it's all virtual It's All Digital. It's all happening over video conferences, including my dog boarding which is happening or video conferences and and and so on. Very interesting. Well, I also wanted to you know, as you look to the Future and Beyond the pandemic itself as well. We talked about a number of Trends already germane to the things that you're working on and things you're planning within the PayPal. Are there other trends that particularly excites you is you look out to.

F5 Networks PayPal Francois CEO Safety and Security Panthers advisor
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:15 min | 8 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"And here we are in the second week of March saying everybody is going to be remote and here to take thirty thousand people and one of the roles of a CTO is making sure that all the people in the company are now not at the offices that you're built for work, but at their homes which are mostly for the fact of them living with their families and you're tired trying to turn that turn that into a productive workspace. There were a few people within the company who are not removed enabled before particularly our customer support agents and within a span of two weeks to three weeks. We had to make off entire Workforce productive to start with and then if you take that further we are company that values the trust with our customers and we think of that as one of the main things that we are in the business of which means for us information security and how everything is managed as extremely critical. It is in technology for PayPal priority number one, and now all of a sudden the network perimeter of the company was no longer in the office alone. It was now in everybody's home around the world. And we also started to realize that the new network perimeter is not even a physical space like a home is actually our people. And the Cyber threat landscape continues to evolve covid-19 is something that the cybercriminals are leveraging to continue to further their business office and we had a we had amazing, uh security controls before but we took in to start this new reality and made sure that we had built to a level of satisfaction all the controls that were required for this. So first is make everyone productive second is secure everybody wherever they're working from and protect them protecting a customer for think the company and predict the word as a whole from a security perspective and then we focus on productivity and making sure that everybody now that she got their home their secure. What we've seen is called velocity has actually increased a bit wind velocity is increased release velocity is dead. Things at the same time we started to notice that we are now seeing the beginnings of the effects of everyone being remote. So mental health was an important part of the conversation as a c stab started to do a stand-up every single day in the beginning of covid-19 first off talk about our employees and talking about various different topics related covid-19, but eventually getting to the point where we were talking about. Okay, you know, yes, it's a crisis home. But there's a trend here. How do we go on the offensive as a company in terms of our strategy as well? So last but not the least it was about figuring out..

CTO PayPal
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:55 min | 8 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Through internal creative with cream. But also through customer Airport. And when you put great delightful experiences out there one is you know that you're solving a customer's problem. Not just because you're seeing the volumes on on your side, but your customer is actually telling you very clearly through net promoter scores and and such now in a time like this what we've found is that would be relevance of our products and our relevance to our customers is bigger than ever cash has become something that people don't want to deal with any more money and we are finding ourselves in in in in growing relevance and growing importance to the customers and that is a responsibility that we take very deeply. And while we have seen some amazing growth in the business, what we found is our business has been incredibly resilient in this process and it has emboldened us to actually accelerate or Jersey in certain areas particularly in in in the case of in person digital payments and so on we are we have for August quarter ever in Q2 of this year and a nice. Uh, we are now, uh, seeing, uh, she lived where wind digitization like you said is existed for a long time. There is a bit of a step function growth that's occurring during the pandemic. We are now at $346 million active accounts around the world and we just this last quarter we expect two hundred billion dollars, uh in uh, total payment volume all across the board. It's great growth and what we're seeing is it's not just Commerce. It's not just people wage. I'm things because their home and they need to of course continue to to sustain but that's also a lot of digital kindness that's happening in terms of giving it's not just a pandemic. We are dealing with them so many other things and people want to help in the best way possible and the platform is getting used for Commerce, but also for kindness What a great story that is I really appreciate you sharing that. You know, I know that you thought and and your your answer even alludes to that but talk about the evolution of digital payments. As you point out many people now are are going away from cash for obvious reasons. There are less in person transactions, even when there is an in-person transaction. There's a desire to touch less things between each other and so on and so it's so much of the trend now is Faith digital payments talk a bit about where you see that evolving and and no doubt that Evolutions happening even faster than you would have potentially, you know predicted through the end of last year in light of what's been going on. Absolutely. The best way to think of it is, uh, in some ways to understand the future of what's going to happen with this repayments. It's important to understand a bit of the history of payments itself and everything of course started thousands of years ago with border probably millions of years ago with butter exchanging goods of value for one thing for the other and then there was the emergence of current job. First through metal coins and things of that nature. In fact, if you go back to the oldest, and you'll see a piece cut from there with somebody or lesser value than the value of the real crime. Then you saw the three digits of currency notes and these these notes became a medium of exchange as well in the fifties. We saw the beginnings of the credit cards and credit cards are now existed for about seven decades. And now what we are beginning to see with the ubiquity of mobile experiences name is digital payments where you are not dealing with anything physical whatsoever and why.

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:08 min | 8 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Let me actually first start with just the portion of creating great digital experiences one that delight and that starts off as being a customer Champion company being in front of our customers listening to them wherever they may be in any part of the world in any context there in any income strata. They may be an any page accessed by the time they may be and understanding what their needs are and sometimes listening beyond what they're saying to truly understand their needs bringing that back in from that office building process and iterating internally to create great product. No product is built overnight and you need to start with the hypothesis build something put it off there allow users to play with it learn through the signals that you're receiving and continue to incorporate more and more changes through internal creative with cream. But also through customer Airport. And when you put great delightful experiences out there one is you know that you're solving a customer's problem. Not just because you're seeing the volumes on on your side, but your customer is actually telling you very clearly through net promoter scores and and such now in a time like this what we've found is that would be relevance of our products and our relevance to our customers is bigger than ever cash has become something that people don't want to deal with any more money and we are finding ourselves in in in in growing relevance and growing importance to the customers and that is a responsibility that we take very deeply. And while we have seen some amazing growth in the business, what we found is our business has been incredibly resilient in this process and it has emboldened us to actually accelerate or Jersey in certain areas particularly in in in the case of in person digital payments and so on we are we have for August quarter ever in Q2 of this year and a nice. Uh, we are now, uh, seeing, uh, she lived where wind digitization like you said is existed for a long time. There is a bit of a step function growth that's occurring during the pandemic. We are now at $346 million active accounts around the world and we just this last quarter we expect two hundred billion dollars, uh in uh, total payment volume all across the board. It's great growth and what we're seeing is it's not just Commerce. It's not just people wage. I'm things because their home and they need to of course continue to to sustain but that's also a lot of digital kindness that's happening in terms of giving it's not just a pandemic. We are dealing with them so many other things and people want to help in the best way possible and the platform is getting used for Commerce, but also for kindness

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:16 min | 8 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"The landscape of Technology understanding it off figuring out what's relevant taking into consideration the technology landscape that exists within the company. And create creating a roadmap as you can imagine any company of our size is a puzzle piece of about 500 different pieces of Technology not get all of that can evolve at the same place and choices that you made in the past May no longer be relevant. So you need to continuously innovate and modernize that and while doing so billing for certain things that we think of as non-functional requirements as in things that people don't ask for but you need to provide for Priority number one is security because we are in the business of trust get a build secure experiences priority. Number two is making sure that the service that you build is scalable and reliable robust. Probably number three years like to make sure that there is velocity within the organization to take great ideas that come from connecting with the customers and designing your experiences and getting that out of there in front of the customer experimenting with it and and so on so that's about managing the technology roadmap itself and doing it. So for business value in customers, and finally it comes down to building a great culture internally for technologists a place where Technology's from anywhere can come off become a part of the productive community of Engineers within the company quickly. Express themselves through those customer products and services that they're building and then over time build their.

Technology
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:02 min | 11 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Put it all together. You really create this world class experience. That's I think that's one of the most important roles growing right now. Obviously that in analytics. Has. Risen. Top the years cybersecurity at thinks they're it's always going to be there. I think some of the lesser roles that I'm seeing are traditional kind of project managers that are focused more on waterfall. Hadn't moved to this agile world or product world that we're living in. US think some of the. distributional type it roles are starting to change very quickly because of the clouds traditional infrastructure networking groups where you owned and had all your own data centers, those all moved to cloud. So the people that had those skills of had evolved to providing connectivity back into these cloud environments in working with all types of services they've never worked with before seeing In the last five years. And you can look at technology acceleration in journal the speed which is accelerating in seems to be doubling every year. Used to be every ten or fifteen years now, you're starting to see it happen. Every couple times a year. Basically, we're technologies of Bob in so fast that this disrupting all types of business models in these new roles are going gonNA. Be Important for everybody to be able to keep up with this. New World of religion. And how how is the team distributed Do you have technology centers in different places of importance to you? Is it is it more broad and actually also if you don't mind my asking Klay do you feel as though there's going to be any change in the future in light of some of the learnings from the Kern experience where Ralph for Stu to operate virtually in from our House yod Say. Very distributed our core based, the US would be in there. playoff is than we have one in Louisville and then you have Taco bell which headquartered in California. We have bird which is headquartered in California. We also have global operations. You know we work at hundred fifty country. So the the teams in general very distributed outside of course, that's the US that we have a lot sits in the markets to around the globe. That really help us with e. kind of localization of the products that we roll out to a role products out in these local teams will help us sometime customize it to language or to this is a big market but very globally distributed. The, second part of question Peter on this work from home. You know I think you're all the articles you read and Ken Howard Thinking I. Think you're GonNa see this continue for wealthy people have learned. That you can get a lot done in productivity. You know hired a friend of mine that lived in New York City and he's like. You know an hour hour and a half each way into work. And I didn't realize the I didn't need to do that everyday. The productivity that gained save three hours a day being able to you know emails for customer calls or work on other things. Productivity and thinks increased the lot and You know it ever goes back. We're going to the office. It might be more of a hybrid environment where people are working a few days from home than days off is just to get that in person experience but I think this has changed count went from one guardrail to the other I. Think now we're GonNa go back some of the middle. Interesting I also am curious you now clay have been a cio at cheap power. The chief information officers you alluded to earlier at Walmart's before becoming chief digital technology officer. Yum brands so three. Brands in very different industries. And I'm curious if you can reflect on your. Decade or so as a as a cio was tech exact as to how the role. Has Evolved. In how you see value being created from the technology function different today than perhaps when you first rose to tip to to to achieve level in the beginning. The that's Arresting question because I do believe the the role in technology either the NCAA CEO CTO, whatever may be. Were bursting everybody in technology where things changed so much in the last five to seven years with the. Onslaught of the clouds come up where people have shifted. A lot of other data send the cloud, which is actually loud a lot advantage to things that we talked about earlier forum homeware. Video. Communications discovered quickly winner in the cloud. That's a big pivot, the data. The roles have changed so much where now it's become less about the internal it of more about the customer now, thank you to see was probably boost four or five years ago period remember trend where you had a cio and you had a see, oh I think you remember that kind of split or that trend that was happening? Yep. What's happened is you seen the last probably two years two roles nearly merged back together where you have one technology leader focused on the whole technology environment. In there's a lot of benefit that because you can move town around easier but you can also apply a lot of.

US cio California Bob Ken Howard Peter Walmart Taco bell New York City Klay NCAA Louisville Ralph officer CEO CTO
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:26 min | 11 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Don't control the connectivity of the employees at home that last mile writes that poses challenges at times in terms of their in terms of their ability to be productive in the in a how do you measure? How do you measure Are you as productive? You know are you? Getting the same level of productivity that you would office environment or what are the downsides of not being in a face to face inside I. Think all this is going to pan out and. Then go just shares. I talked to my peers. I think a lot of companies are thinking about a hybrid model, right where you're It's both it's not just you know working from home one, hundred percent or in the office, you know the majority of the Times but I think it's I think it's GonNa take a little bit of time to flush out with that new normal is gonNA. Look like I think for most most companies. I. Do think. One great thing I think about this remote work in. Not, just Intel, but I think other companies have been able to pivot faster I think on the. I think on the IT side for. I, think those that had started the journey to cloud. You know in a in a at scale in a big way. You know I think we're able to scale up and you know come out of this, I think much stronger. Than those that didn't in I. Think as we come out of this, it will be a reflection point right for most companies in terms of. The impetus on accelerating some of that digital transformation Again, thank each of us have been at a different pace on that journey, but I think coming out of this. You know we're seeing the value and. I. Think. It'll be a good. You know pivot point under discussion point after this at Taxila rate here. I wanted to turn sue until his corporate data office which as I understand it as cultivating data. FIRST MINDSET FOR INTEL'S BUSINESSES OCCA- talk a bit about your your approach to data strategy in how it's being brought to life through the corporate office. Absolutely so you know for us if you look at today. Tells data assets for about three, hundred, fifteen header bytes. But that's at this point in time right everyday that data continues to grow, and so in a, we're constantly looking at that in that growth. So a few years ago, we launched the Intel corporate data office in the intention with it was for it to be a one stop data shop. To end to cultivate a data first mindset, right for each of Intel's businesses in. So the CTO really collaborates across the company, right with all the business units. The functions even external data, right that we get through a variety of sources and. The intention there is to provide policies, procedures and standards for regulatory compliance. For, you know a view of a true enterprise data management. We look at data set acquisition, and then you know also obviously, what is that big data infrastructure needs to look like today in as we move forward in time, you know how does that change and so so far? I'm happy to say that you know with that. With instituting that corporate data office you know we've implemented and in our managing a state of the art data analytics platform across. Until you know for data science for computing, you know for that whole connected data and in storage were creating I'd say you know new and patentable. Algorithms. To reduce time to market and our pre silicon validation or improving the performance of our products, and also were making our sales and marketing channels more effective. And then the area I think that comes to mind is we are developing ways of generating. Incremental. Value. And delivering insights to decision makers in the company. Interesting and can talk about the role that AI is playing in this. I understand, you're the organizations making a number of larger Betson, artificial intelligence to talk a bit about that if you would. Yeah I think for an NFL Intel in as we think about AI and transformation in our in the things that we're doing here, you know really focused on expanding our partnerships with the with Intel's business units in to develop innovative a use cases. In I'd say they've been primarily focused around three big objectives, right. The first is really improving and having more predictability. In Our business outcomes, right. So we use a analyze. Invalidate vast vast amounts of data in data sets that we have. and. We have insights right that then aid human judgment, you know to help identify opportunities like you know going into new markets. Products new products features, and it also enables us to do things like optimize pricing. Balance Demand and supply on increase in our forecast accuracy in all of this really is focused.

Intel AI CTO
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"That's great. I also want actually one last question I wanted to ask. You have been an IT leader in multiple technology organizations at Intel. You were the global cio at HP. you've also been a tech leader at Chevron I should note as well, but I wanted to. Especially in light of let's say your most recent experience prior to this one at HP, where you lead an IT function in a company that was filled with technologists across so many different important parts of the organization. Organization Different From Your Current Company, where ask you at least a preponderance of of technologists or in your it department I'm sure not exclusively, but they're not distributed to the extent that they would be naturally in an organization like an HP I wonder to what extent your time as a cio of technology company has shaped your thinking about the role now a CTO in an organization where that talent is at least two on a relative basis bit or concentrated any thoughts there by chance. While differences would be a CIO whether it was HP or at e or Chevron or Tyson. I think that It's it's diabolically different in in a company that has has not. I would say necessarily embraced a lot of cutting edge technology in the past. I think that you whether it was Tom Hayes or was Noah wide soon to be potentially deemed banks, they all value technology in. The job changes a little bit differently in a in an HP. Find yourself arguing quite a bit with somebody about different technologies because they sell Days Be. We don't have people who are selling some server some San Array or whatever may be and I may go out in by a technology that is in competition with what we have. and. I might say early in some of those arguments I might say you know one of the differences in UNBC as you're reading Berkshire and I'm reading the manuals I have to know all this or my team has no all fiscal dude and you really don't. When you come to place like Tyson foods or any food companies itchy company. They need to trust that CIO's take that same level of rigor into every decision that they make. Because you really trying to build at scale. The biggest difference I think a lot of folks in the tech stack companies whether you're in Silicon Valley are not naturally understanding scale or technology perspective, but when you're bringing newer technology into CPT's space, a lot of guys haven't understood technology from a sale respective, so you really find yourself trying to bring conversations to scale to understand why,.

cio HP. Tyson foods Chevron I Intel Chevron Noah UNBC Tom Hayes Silicon Valley CPT CTO Berkshire
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Tell people. What what should they do I think you need to I understand how boards work. What's your role? You're not a worker anymore in that will, but you are in many cases in advisor. You're somebody who's going to talk more about the safeguards that needs to be in place you're thinking about if it's a publicly traded company, the protection of shareholder, making sure that the company's not taking unnecessary risks, but also not taking advantage of certain situations to confirm that the company success rate so. I. I enjoy at I never boards. I've turned down because it's not something that piqued my interest or the role doesn't. Allow me to offer what I can offer and I turned down some because I didn't think that was the right person. Because I didn't know enough about that industry I. Didn't think I'd be better than anybody else. Just because I've been a CIO and Jan or something does make me that person I think you've gotta be able to help. To Be Successful. They make sense. I ate here at the end of our conversation. Scott would ask you about trends or particularly excite you. We've met you've named a number of the you are in the throes of implementing, taking advantage of from is not to better day. Analytics of what are some others you look in your crystal ball towards the future that are exciting. You that you're either thinking about or or initiating investment. To bring it back, but I think data's is the future of everything I mean every day. I have read that there's two point seven data bytes of data being created, and if you think about how much data that is a lot of people, don't twenty one zeros.

CIO advisor Scott
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"I'm not seeing that. The network has not shown any letdown. It's gotten better and better. I mean we were very concerned originally that when you get people at home, it's going to depend on her local circuits of the cost or Whoever may be and you got kids at home streaming media? Minecraft or whatever it is, they're buying. And, then you got AROD that they're trying to do more video conferencing, and so I was concerned about the resiliency of the network to support that, but it's held up He goes to stay a little bit more about digital communications today in the whole world digital, as much more effective. talked for a long time so I. Apologize, but there's so much to say on that topic eater indeed and I wonder then Scotty of perspectives on company. These changes are going to be permanent or reconsider I mean it sounds like many you bring up the great point that a lot of organizations are actually. Contradict or countries, or perhaps the original assumption that teams are actually very productive and. You've lived in places especially when you're in California, work you times for some people can be well over an hour each direction, giving them some of that time back Rasha themselves, but also gaining activity in the lack of a commute. So, what do you think about what the gain is? What's lost of course of team? Collaboration cohesion by being together the same physical location Do you have a philosophy that's? Coming together on this. Yeah, so thanks for asking that question, too. Because I'm excited about the new normals, it may be created I got chills on my arm because I'm actually very excited about it. I think there's all kinds of impacts feeder. I on on reading things about you know. Wildlife is returning dairies. They hadn't seen or right. Think about the fact that I sent a note to a few cars because I have homes in different places and I sent it out to our insurance guide, said they look you know I'm probably spending maybe on average ten miles a week in a car now across all of our cars, so I'm assuming you guys. Are GonNA rebate us in my back. We're not putting in the three thousand miles a month that you thought it was going to be these widespread economic changes. I think you're GONNA see a Lotta new found. It's changes I think we're GONNA. See I was mentioning to our chairman. They're going to be guys who? Startup, virtually today right and it's GonNa. Be Interesting to watch. The BBC's responded that say well. Let's say theater high together with twenty people. Peter Dose Pretty Darn good people on says let's start solving this problem in. They don't need as much money to support the burn rate because they're not out a ebony. They just sat out there, using zoom or Google hangouts, or whatever it is, and it's been proven now. The collaboration can be done in distance and I think it's going to really challenge some companies who in the past and limited by the GOP their giotto case. I believe that I can say my studio I found fifty people that I wanNA hire. That are in a city that we have no crisis in and I'm GonNa bring him on, and they're gonNA work virtually. And I'm excited to see what happens from that. Because I've long believed I learned long ago. Get the very best town on the planet and get them to eat vary. Ask This I think has proven that that's an acceptable approach. So I I get really excited about Peter Easier easier. Uncommon Times with unfounded results that are gonNA become new normal of our raise, a whole new level of productivity collaboration benching disruption. just changing the way we live in arid. It's. It's a it's. A IT'S A. Don't crisis in God probably said. This crisis is creating all kinds of normals that are beneficial to humankind so I'm excited about that's great. It's a good perspective. Is certainly a silver linings while of this? Yeah, Scott, I wouldn't ask you, also you. There are a lot of. CIO's CTO's who spire join boards of companies something you've done your on the board of artist, a bank in Springdale also on the Arkansas Center of data, sciences and Tedium, amendment that sorry. The team, rather the technology business management council a rap. Do and I'm curious. Just kind of how what your path board membership was. How how opportunities presented themselves the extent to which it something that you invade to folks of influence to keep you in mind, ultimate guess what recommendations you'd have for others who wish to follow your footsteps. She you always have the best questions in that's one that's on the minds of everybody, Peter, so yeah, I think you know my early board experience I or to not to be on the board of the national or two. And that is incredible award with a bunch of incredible executives. Leave that in, and so that kind of. Right. Scott Arden your hometown. That was a New Orleans. Yeah, and that's the I think. It's the third most visited museum in the world right now in the. Lead by an incredible CD in Stephen Watson. And it's it's just amazing. Yeah I. Don't know I think. I was. kind of Eyes Wide Open when I got on that board. That because we were trying to guide them. On Technology, they have a lot of assets that have extraordinary historical value. And that put me in. That position is joined these other boards. I think there are some things I can say. That are good advice to give and ends begs to avoid first off. I think the be on board. You got to be in a position to help and that's the mindset you know have a great mentor. One of our members guide any GORDY bannister. We talk about this. In the says you don't be on a board that you're not interested in. And if you're going to move into or role, I think some people move into the board roles for Canada wrong reasons. I think they think that this is the progression they're supposed to achieve. And they really should move into a board because if something you Wanna learn more about something that you.

Peter Scott Arden Canada BBC Google GORDY bannister California chairman GOP New Orleans Stephen Watson Arkansas Center of data CIO Springdale CTO
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Industry is saying that that stack is becoming more and more consistently under the same realm, because one enables the other so loud that you're going to see more consistency and. Talk a bit about why you in the past. You've been a CIO a multiple times over I wonder. Did, you was important or meaningful for you to have one title versus the other. Wasn't an issue for me in fact. You know I think I. My motivations for coming to Tyson were because I actually grew up in the state of Arkansas and I add long had to cause California I've been out cal. Balance last whatever thirty years and I had just always kind of had a dream to come back and take what I learned and who I knew what I knew and and help my state. And so for me, whether it was a cio or CTO it really didn't matter, but then I think is the conversations yet got going. and. We started to understand that there's a bigger impact can be made at I. Remember saying to Tom. You know. Are You thinking about autonomous robotic retrieve thinking about parameter base robotics. We had thought about revise, and they said well. You know I think you get an opportunity when you get the right kinds of data because data going to be the new commodity to the world status. What's going to enable every day? And I think you have a bigger opportunity to bring all that technology to pair together one consistent cohesive manner, the benefits, your entire enterprise, and so I wouldn't have cared if they call the CIO go. I was excited about the role period, but then I think as it emerged into CTO roll, which is everything traditional transformation to your traditional CIO role? In your kind of technologists well, it was kind of like the perfect dream. Come true. We'll talk a bit about that digital transformation side of things. How's that translated into your environment? Yeah it is. It's very interesting Peter to be very candid with you. I think when I got here while I know when I got here, we were underway with a sat upgrade. Go live muscle instances and I I knew because they were variable instances this well that there is going to be some data challenges. And so.

cio or CTO CIO Tyson CTO Arkansas Tom Peter California
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Like how I think it is going to have a more prominent role to play I. do think that one of the things that this pandemic making. Is that we need to have substantially more investments in innovation in our medical biosciences research infrastructure them. We were baking before. I think there are multiple arguments to be made for having big technology investments in. Getting ubiquitous. Low cost high quality healthcare. So that's you know. I wrote about in the book that we should think about. Apollo program like we just talked about it. Go, but like I really do think that like that could be a very interesting thing that we can pick to go and. And and it's a very interesting interplay between. Error existing medical institutions like what we can do with a I am like how all of this interact intersecting with the. Bio, sciences and synthetic biology community is. Yet to like groundless, an example one of the things that we have already seen over the past handful of years is that when you have ubiquitous biometric sensing, so like smart watches or fitness bands for instance I can measure your pulse rate or more sophisticated sensors that could measure your body temperature, oxygen saturation at your blood and your movement. That we are able to take that data feed it into sophisticated machine, learning systems and use it to diagnose. Health conditions that you might have and it a perhaps unintuitive just from the heart tick data that comes from something like it is Bam. We know that we can predict conditions like atrial fibrillation, which is a condition of the heart that causes a very large number of strokes of people experience every year, but like you can also diagnose things that might not be intuitive at all alike. Hypertension and type two diabetes, and so imagine if everybody had. Some cheap by metric sensing the that was with them all the time that was being fad into an AI. Early Warning System for their body. It could I don't know whether this is going to be the case or not, but it could be that from some of this data. You could predict when someone was in the early stages of a of a cove nineteen infection for instance. Wear they are precent matic, and and you could vary early. Get them to sort of treatments, and like potentially quarantine to help manage the pandemic so like that a potential thing that we ought to be looking at very very hard. And I think. I could. Chew your ear off with examples for how I I know. A machine learning can be used for positive benefit on these healthcare applications. Very interesting indeed. I understand You've been the CTO of Microsoft and twenty seventeen January of that year you came to the role after really story career is an early on Google. You're the senior vice president of engineering and operations at least in prior to its acquisition by Microsoft, and I understand that. Among the things that you bond bond over with your now fellow author's Sake Adela. Who wrote about this in it? Refresh? is this philosophy technology needs to benefit everyone, not just the privileged view and obviously hearing a plenty of anecdotes about that in this conversation, but curious about might just the relationship or some of the some of the similarities in the way, in which you and he you think about the use of technology, and perhaps even. How that helps as you were contemplating the possibility taking on the role. CTO It's actually maybe the most important factor in my deciding to take. The job is how alliance sought Dan I are on how we steed. The technology industries obligation to society like how when you think about. Building. Technology systems platforms that you can open up wide laid to serve a bunch of different people's interests, not just your own that you can get this incredible rushing of goodness. Like I. You know I just Bundy mentally. Don't like this idea that we are going to have a world that is more more influence I technology. The technology is going to be a larger and larger factor shaping the future. That if that's the case like you want to have. As diverse, a range of people is humanly possible participating in the creation of the technology you need gender, diversity, unique ethnic diversity, need socioeconomic diversity. You need geographic diversity. You need people from all different backgrounds and perspectives, some with different points of view able to. On a nearly equal basis have access to all of the best tools that technology can provide so that they can solve the problems that they can clearly see for their bandage boy. You know like a good example of this is. When I went to Memphis as I was writing the book with Steve. Case J. Pants with the right of the rise of the rest fine. The the most interested in businesses than I saw there were in precision agriculture, and so the net one trip to that one one city I saw four things happening in precision act than I had seen in years happening in Silicon Valley and part of that is just perspective in context, so Memphis sits in the in the middle of eighteen, million of the most fertile acres on the planet earth in a big part of Memphis's industry is all of the agriculture, and then there's just a big logistics industry on like how you move these crops that are grown in the area to and from. The customers. The producers consumers..

Memphis CTO Microsoft Sake Adela Bam senior vice president of engin Silicon Valley J. Pants Google Hypertension Bundy diabetes Dan Steve
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Executive Vice President of Technology and research at Microsoft. One of the world's most valuable companies with revenues, exceeding one hundred twenty five billion dollars annually as CTO Kevin's focused on helping make Microsoft exceptional place for engineers, developers and researchers to work in learn. He's also the author of the book reprogramming the American dream which focuses on the future of artificial intelligence, and how can be used to serve humanity? Prior to joining Microsoft Kevin was the senior vice president of engineering and operations at Lincoln. In this interview we discussed Kevin's upbringing in rural Virginia. And why he felt he had to leave his hometown to pursue opportunity. We also cover how people can have successful careers by using sophisticated technological tools without having to move to technology hubs like Silicon Valley in the future, a key thesis of his book. Kevin's thoughts on improving technology knowledge expertise are also covered as well. Well, as the importance of teaching kids technology how the COVID, nineteen pandemic will make distance learning and working more prevalent. how Ai and machine learning can be used for positive benefit with healthcare applications, such disease detection why everyone was play a role in shaping technologies future, not just a select, privileged, few as well as his takes on synthetic biology in a variety of other topics. Evans Scott Welcome to techno vacation I'm happy to be on the on the show. Kevin you're the chief technology officer. Microsoft and I'm looking forward to spending a portion of our conversation covering your purview and your vision your strategy in that role, you're also author of reprogramming the American dream, a terrific book that came out this April, and really draws upon your personal experience, having grown up in rural Virginia town of called Gladys of town of just a few hundred people in population and this book in many ways reflection on the lack of opportunity that you found all things being equal. You've indicated that you would have loved to stay. In and around your hometown, but as your ambition grew, you found that that wasn't necessarily something you could do. You had to make your way to. The parts of the country where the opportunities presented themselves, and you WanNa do something now about leveraging technology to create opportunity in. In towns like your.

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

15:26 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"The Palo Alto Research Center park from its commercialization phases rush originally joined Xerox as the chief digital officer and he has over twenty five years of experience experience in the IT industry. He's held chief information officer roles at Hewlett Packard and a palm before joining Xerox in. This interview Naresh discusses the three key elements elements to a successful transformation. He cites bowl. Leadership that has grits as the most important ingredient for transformation second scribes the importance of culture in preparing for the future as the pace of change accelerates he notes it's critical to bridge the established culture that sustains companies at scale with the next generation culture that that has the mental muscle of a startup. Lastly we discussed the need for a team that his passion and his driven and energize exceedingly mission focused. We also discuss discuss the outside in and inside out approach xerox his using to make its digital transformation. How the company uses artificial intelligence in the internet or things in Russia's experiences this is a board level CIO and CTO and a variety of other topics Shankar? Welcome to tech nations great to speak with you Becky Beta looking Russia. I thought we'd begin with your current post. A lot has changed since the last time you and I caught up you you are now the chief technology officer of Xerox with a remarkable purview that includes rnd as well as running the technology function more. Generally speaking at that company and what an interesting time to be Xerox eight organization that is going through quite a renaissance at present isn't and I thought maybe you could take a moment and describe. What was it about this opportunity that attracted you to make the move over to Xerox? Yeah Thanks Peter so one I mean Xerox has had a very a very richer I'd say in its hundred year history history of both in invention and innovation It's it's really amazing. Run and What really intrigued me me about? The opportunity was I have the unique opportunity to transform and revitalize the Brandon Business from and a business model and Also you know digital transformation perspective So that is number one fundamentally transforming business so that it's easy for customers to engage And also consumer technology as a company. So that's point number one. The second aspect of the role also exciting was actually the the opportunity to actually transform the the product portfolio across The Workplace Solution Landscape the graphics landscape and All of the new sciences That will help us. Transcend the print franchise and so the opportunity to also launch new lines of business business and create a value Is really a huge opportunity. That I thought was quite exciting so on many different levels food this role and opportunities quite unique so So I don't you know I have to give this a shot because it's Really of very unique opportunity and an exciting opportunity and Off The brand is a monkey brand highly respected in the industry and so wiped out You know Why not and so? That's what brought me here and And I'm looking forward to the run because I see the Mike Three five three and five years being really really exciting to transform the brand at many different levels. Why I'd love to get digging a little deeper in a rush Ashton transformation and you've alluded to some of the areas in which you're hoping to your for example transcended print franchise use your your words to Get into workplace Klay Solutions Graphics New Leverage New Sciences. I wonder if you can tak- maybe a couple of those examples and he'll back the onion a little bit further and describes describes what you see in terms of the pathway with some of those whereas whereas what will be the sources of innovation and what complexion do they take. Okay so when you look at the the print franchise which is our CO business and workplace solutions and graphics We now see ourselves moving moving into a whole new range of sciences to take advantage of close to. I'd say a fifth approximate fifty five plus billion dollar market opportunity That is ahead of us in all of these new sciences so if I look at Beyond the CO business in the areas of packaging In the areas of packaging of you know there are new sciences around direct object printing in line marking All of these new areas areas that potentially are adjacent seas and also moving into the packaging. Cite Ah the digital printing packaging side of business so automobiles will be adjacent agencies to the core business of the next set as an example and then the next set of businesses that launched As an example is it was basically a starting with treaty. The treaty additive manufacturing business predominantly focused on liquid metal That is a very very Interesting technology it's highly disruptive and What's unique about the technology it's fundamentally revolutionizes manufacturing and and Both around speed around speed cost and reliability of what we've done in the liquid metal space is We both technology Where we can actually absorb the low cost and put in take off metal aloys that are commodities and Begin produce high-quality production pots that that have tremendous integrity and density in terms of the materials that we print of low cost reliability and also the speed and so it's a huge value proposition and So that's that's a classic example in terms of Directionally How you meet? This is in the additive space. And you couple that with the treaty software. That now aroused us to design predictive models And also pest invalidate the composition and the quality of those models before they even get printed so the treaty. Ai Software that's going to be coupled with the hardware and creates a very unique value. Did you proposition so so we able to print not just parts that are denso The fast and CHEAPO and and in compared to those made from metal powders right which typically has been where most of the industry has been investing it and and And so what we've been able to Actually mitigate is a lot of the other technologies around metal. Powders you know have long again. The Post production processes Procuring and be powdery. Well we don't. We don't have that complexity. Actually that comes with a post production process and so big knowledge again in the faster cheaper and Much Mo- so What I call it? Preserves the integrity and the density of the the materials have been used So it's a very very exciting play In the three D. space and to produce a complete three sixty experience of to really address what I call the on demand nature chill of manufacturing since we live in an on-demand instrument economy right You pay for what you consume and you'll pay when you consume Emmett and so we think the whole factoring is going to move them into what I call an on demand economy and and and I believe that we will be From the center of leading the charge in the space so that's exciting and that's an example in the three D. space In the IOT space of which is the the next hour We are building a range of sensors. And you're going to hear more about the technology In the sense of space up predominantly around what we've done which is You know detection of hazardous gases and also food and drug spoilage. Things as well as the spectral cameras with developed which can actually do a composition of you know that detects Again the changes in materials or the changes in preservatives or things of that sort so I think not and sensors. There's GonNa be another range of technology that you're going to hear more about the categories a May I an artificial intelligence which is predominantly in an area that is focused on the intelligent knowledge worker. So we are looking to launch off a set of products they're starting in twenty nineteen gene and Into twenty twenty. We'll have a roadmap as well but between three and we're looking to launch products in two thousand twenty which is is going to be an exciting play so we've got some of the areas of science that we're also focused on but you're gonNA hear more about a lot of these new Sciences that we're launching in twenty twenty. That's beyond the print franchise so that gives us some insight and examples into a lot of the new sciences. We're working on what's really important about why we believe strongly that we are well positioned to introduce new science to market and commercialize this as is because R&B Ecosystem starting with pock and research centers you in Palo Alto Extra CC. The research centers in Canada The RND senators and the web accelerate the web stacks ration- centers that we have in UPSTATE NEW YORK In the Rochester area. You know you come all of the power and the army Engineering Research and development institutions. We have we've got a long history That goes from fifty history from par to one hundred of his tip xerox that has produced a tremendous portfolio patents and All of these white spaces of signs and so we think we are. Well positioned to move the science into participation and commercialization and and then so this is really really exciting for us to broaden up for you beyond the print franchise into all of the new sciences That we think we can effectively get to market and Starting twenty twenty remarkable. What a what a portfolio things to work on to say the least and and the rest you highlight that this organization that has innovation in its DNA in so many different places Given the number of of new innovative areas is you anticipate the organization getting involved in coming weeks months year ahead I can only imagine that from from it perspective. There's been some change necessary zero whether it's retooling the way in which some people work within the technology function to bring in people that have a new set of skills or a new orientation to the way in which they work can. Can you talk a bit about some of the cultural attributes. That have Brad's been in need of refreshment or rethink Here and there as you've begun your tenure Xerox Walks. Yeah so I think what's exciting at Xerox In in the last twelve eighteen months of the the notable changes that we've got an amazing Leadership team and the leadership team comes from Tremendous Mendes collected experience across many domains of the industry and Very diverse experiences of both on the private equity side of the world as well as from a I'd say industry perspective as well so people that got a significant amount of breadth and depth in experience across many different industries. And that's she'll I mean So it starts the leadership. I mean we've got a very strong compelling Ling very driven leadership team and that makes it exciting The second thing is the culture. I mean we've got a very very strong culture of invention and innovation and so when you look at the The powers Iraq's trillion very intriguing and exciting. Reading is that we bring the big company feel in terms of being able to rapidly scaled tomorrow and go to market rapidly. Okay so so we bring that and we couple that with the mental muscle of a startup. And that's what we brought together and so we've designed to build out. They ecosystems around operating models and all models that basically couple both the ability for the Xerox a AH Corporation in capabilities to scale rapidly and fast with the the models models of a startup in terms of agility and speed and focus right and so we brought back together in the culture. And what that means is that been had to take a lot of the learnings of what we've had historically and bring together a lot of the learnings from the outside in terms of Berlin the franchise in a manner where we can actually meet the objectives of not just the core portfolio of products that we want to bring democracy but also ooh all of the new science that we want to accelerate and go to market with. So it'd be bringing these worlds together and what that also means that we've got of bring together you know people process and technology Together as well. So if you beat back the onion what have we done in the IT organization foundationally we've built a new organization it's called Xerox digital experience right and and and the focus is how do we actually design fine. The capability Around an instant on demand economy. Okay so what customers expect on the outside What customers the partners expect of us on the outside our employees expect of us on the inside?.

Xerox Palo Alto Research Center park chief information officer Hewlett Packard chief technology officer Naresh CIO and CTO officer denso Russia Peter Ashton NEW YORK army Engineering Research Palo Alto Emmett Klay Solutions Shankar Tremendous Mendes
"cto" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"cto" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"They are very much so might understanding is that you are the first cto of microsoft is that true yeah technically nathan myhrvold i believe is the first cto microsoft's might technically be the second there'd been people in between nathan joined the company very early and i think he left in nineteen ninety nine so it's been awhile since microsoft has had a cto wow yeah and so they've had folks who were chief software architects like rayasi played that role for while but yeah i'm the technically i see o since nineteen ninety nine wow so why is that why is it that all of a sudden microsoft decided hey it's time that we make this refill this position from so many years ago you know cto's one of those interesting roles in that it's slightly different from company to company and like whether or not you need one i think depends on what your industry is what you're trying to acc ccomplish as a company so the reason that we need to see te'o right now is that more and more of our business depends on how well we integrate all of our products together into one coherent whole you know so for instance you know we've got a hyper scale cloud in azure we've got an office productivity suite on the surface it might not seem like these two things have much to do with one another but reality like the infrastructure for office is very much like a hyper scale cloud infrastructure itself and you wanna make sure that you know you're you're sort of building these investments are like these massive infrastructure a coherent way where the things that you're building for yourself you can sort of package up him build for third parties as well microsoft is hundred twenty five thousand person company.

cto microsoft rayasi nathan myhrvold
"cto" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"cto" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"They are very much so might understanding is that you are the first cto of microsoft is that true yeah technically nathan myhrvold i believe is the first cto microsoft's might technically be the second there'd been people in between nathan joined the company very early and i think he left in nineteen ninety nine so it's been awhile since microsoft has had a cto wow yeah and so they've had folks who were chief software architects like rayasi played that role for while but yeah i'm the technically i see o since nineteen ninety nine wow so why is that why is it that all of a sudden microsoft decided hey it's time that we make this refill this position from so many years ago you know cto's one of those interesting roles in that it's slightly different from company to company and like whether or not you need one i think depends on what your industry is what you're trying to acc ccomplish as a company so the reason that we need to see te'o right now is that more and more of our business depends on how well we integrate all of our products together into one coherent whole you know so for instance you know we've got a hyper scale cloud in azure we've got an office productivity suite on the surface it might not seem like these two things have much to do with one another but reality like the infrastructure for office is very much like a hyper scale cloud infrastructure itself and you wanna make sure that you know you're you're sort of building these investments are like these massive infrastructure a coherent way where the things that you're building for yourself you can sort of package up him build for third parties as well microsoft is hundred twenty five thousand person company.

cto microsoft rayasi nathan myhrvold