35 Burst results for "CTO"

Why Web Pioneer Legend Brendan Eich Founded Brave?

The Bad Crypto Podcast

01:48 min | Last week

Why Web Pioneer Legend Brendan Eich Founded Brave?

"Today, we have the CEO and cofounder of brave Brendan Ike is joining us right now. We're going to talk about all kinds of things. Brendan, welcome to the bad crypto podcast. Don't forget that. But most important micro unity. Yeah, he's got quite a background. You were the CTO, then CEO of Mozilla. And you helped launch the Firefox browser and you're also the inventor of JavaScript, which is the world's most popular programming language. So that little thing happened and then, of course, you founded the brave browser. So why found brave? Go ahead and tell us your reasons, especially after having launched a successful browser and Firefox that you thought we need brave. Right. So when we did Firefox, we were not as conscious about privacy as we are now. And we did this search deal with Google, which at the time was a great search engine and hadn't become a big Alphabet company full of all sorts of different businesses that all seemed to be lost leaders for the ad exchange business, which is the main revenue Lake of Google. We also in Firefox, we let the privacy conscious users build extensions for themselves and then grow those extensions. We call them add ons back in the day. So I sat for a long time thinking about two big problems. One is that browsers, if it gets successful, tend to be captured by a big tech company like a search company, which is really an ad exchange, like Google, or in the 90s, by an operating system company, which is really a word in excel office suite company. That was Microsoft.

Brendan Ike Brendan CTO Mozilla Google Microsoft
"cto" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

07:28 min | Last month

"cto" Discussed on Code Story

"Our early stages were unfortunately we pretty much had to rewrite the whole product over and I did slow us down. For probably half a year because basically in the beginning we are so busy getting the value out to users over you should have focused more on like a Yale. What is the actual technologies that would scale, right? And things like that, but as I mentioned, the first version was in rupal, just because we're like, okay, we can build it right now this week. Let's do it. That was a little painful. My name is Caroline a sicknick, a cofounder and CTO at frac. And now I'm founder and COO CTO doctor helping women empower build technical products. This is code story. The podcast bringing you interviews with tech visionaries. Who share in the critical moments of what it takes to change an industry and build and lead a team that has your back. I'm your host, new lab part. And today, how caterina Sydney created the platform to help you create successful territories. And then became the doctor of CTOs. All this and more. On code story. Katarina sitting is originally from Ukraine, but moved to the state's 15 years ago after winning the green card lottery. Her background is in applied mathematics, and she grew up surrounded with logical brains. For example, her grandparent was literally a rocket scientist. When she moved to the U.S., she dove right into the world of entrepreneurship. But outside of tech, she travels a lot being a digital nomad and likes to salsa dance. She's fascinated with psychology and what drives behavior. For her prior startup, she utilized her background and applied math combined with her cofounders experience in the space to create a way to optimize territory creation. For franchises, sales teams, et cetera, and predict revenue for set territories. When she moved on from that gig, she started a new thing. One that would enable women founders to build technical solutions. This is the creation story of fracked and CTO doctor. So the product is based on geospatial AI and basically it's helping brands figure out where in the physical world is best to target their customers. So it's like this land of online and offline. So as an example, it would be, for example, what's the best definition of a franchise territory or a marketing territory literally? What's a set of zip codes to target? It's a lot of math involved and how I did get started because my background is in applied math and micro founder spent 20 years in market research and doing all this for real brands. So when we got together, we really thought there was something there to get it to the next level. So that's the product is basically predicting the revenue and using a whole bunch of AI focused on geospatial. So recently, I started CTO doctor the mission of which is empower women entrepreneurs built technical products. In that capacity, we build out MVPs and I act as a fractional CTO. So basically, think of it as a bridge for super early stage startup zero to one, probably seed to series a that do not have technical cofounder. So I breached that gap and if certain woman can not find technical cofounder, which they should try at least. But I still don't want to stop them at that point. And provide this gap till they get to a series a, where they can get the full internal team and go from there. Let's dive into the MVP for fracked. Tell me about that MVP that first product you built. How long did it take you to build? And what sort of tools did you use to bring it to life? It was actually pretty painful story. Because I mean, on one side, we did what every startup needs to do is that we got something as fast as possible out to the customers. You know, maybe that would be one of the illustrations of mistakes also did end things on watching out now having all this experience with all the startups are working with. Because we're originally built it on drupal, which was not even the best tool for the job. Our team was trying to pull this other project. We had before. We got it to a certain point where we realized that it's not the best fit for the job. At some point we even had to rework the whole system. We eventually got we're using node.js and MongoDB. UGS and JavaScript on the front end. But yeah, original MVP was basically just to get something out as fast as possible, which we did, and we had real brands using it so that was success, but it was painful from a technical side, because almost had to start over. Keeping on that MVP for a minute, when you're building a MVP, you gotta make certain decisions and tradeoffs from an in the early days around, you know, it could be feature cut, scope, you know, narrowing, you know, it's kind of what I'm going for. Or technical debt. So tell me about some of those decisions and tradeoffs that you had to make and more detail and how you cope with them. So for us, it's B2B and it was a lot of companies who would ask different things, right? So it's a big challenge to, I guess it's more in the product product side and keeping the whole backlog pretty focused. So it's pretty challenging to identify what features would make sense to build for all those brands that we've been working with. That will be the intersection of those needs. But the other MVP, the, I guess, some of the tradeoffs were that we, in the beginning, were manually would have been uploaded some of the files, right? So we were focusing on the end user experience and providing results for people who actually log in and use the product for the ease of that and some of the tradeoffs is that we even had to do some manual work in the beginning because the whole infrastructure for processing all the excel files because it's super data heavy, right? Building the import export all that automation so that was some of the tradeoffs we had to do and do certain things manual in the beginning. Hey, hey, come here, check this out. Can you keep a secret? Can you keep a secret in sync across multiple environments? You can't? Yeah, me neither. Until I found Doppler. Doppler is the first secret ops platform that empowers developers to automate secrets and environment files. The scary days of managing secrets are over. Doppler is your team's central source of truth for secrets and app config across all environments and clouds. And as your stack evolves, Doppler remains simple. More than 11,000 customers across all companies sizes use Doppler to keep their secrets and app configuration in sync across devices, environments, and teams. Dopplers building the first secret ops platform to make it easier for developers to manage secrets at scale. Let's make developers more productive

caterina Sydney frac Katarina Caroline Ukraine U.S. Dopplers
"cto" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:37 min | 6 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Snowflake been standardized as the place to throw all the data and do those aggregations. Yep, so basically data gets pulled from SQL through airflow. We push it into snow face and then looker sits on top of snowflake. And so you can run custom queries on snowflake, which is more than within engineering. And then you have basically all the reporting in the company that's done on the on top of that. Right. You know, I'm always curious about snowflake bills. It's kind of, in some ways, I think, kind of like the new Oracle, not in a bad way, but it can be quite costly. Do you get involved in? Because that's like an inner big enterprise deal. I'm sure you have, do you get involved in the negotiations with snowflake to figure out the pricing? So yes, to some extent, as in any technology, procurement that we have for the AWS snowflake looker, octave, Salesforce, et cetera, et cetera, I'm the ultimate L 20 have to approve those. We have different teams that own it. So for example, of course snowflake we've had books on the data platform site involved for AWS folks on infrastructure site involved, and then negotiations. We also have some on our finance team that works on procurement, who helps our negotiations. I will use this third party vendor who also helps us negotiate contracts at larger scale. And so definitely for high value contracts, we're pretty involved in negotiations. The thing that I generally look for is there's obviously scale, basically a lot of these contracts you end up having multiyear contracts, and no pricing is determined based on the scale that you have. And so obviously I get involved into thinking about skill for bricks more broadly. And then from there, there's more of the unit economics. And then generally what I look for when it comes to some of the spend is, how does that spend grow relative to our revenue? And so basically if I think about processing that we have, how that grows for the business and how does our infrastructure costs grow across the portfolio of these things, as long as it's flat or ideally goes down, that's where it doesn't go up, then I think you're in a pretty good place. And it's probably not worth optimizing for that because ultimately you end up spending a lot of time and slow down your business, or to the extent that you're basically like your costs are going up higher than your business growth, then you have a problem. So either you have a unit of economics problem or you're just paying too much and you have to negotiate a contract. More often than not, you have an inefficiency problem where you just using resources in ways that just don't scale for your business. And those are the harder conversations where you have to reevaluate how you think about that. My name general, when you're super early stage, I typically tell companies to focus on the architecture in less about on the costs. So as long as your character architecture scales, you can work out the unit economics later. You also have more leveraging negotiations to layer on when you're super early stage and you're a small fish. Like you're just not going to have a lot of leverage negotiating with someone like AWS or GCP or snowflake. But as you grow and as you see the growth that you had and it's demonstrated with not just hypothetical growth, then they're much more interested in negotiating to make sure they gave your business and their sticky with it. And then two in German in terms of amounts, like yes, your cost might be growing high early on, but if you're talking about thousands of dollars, tens of thousands of dollars or even hundreds of thousands of dollars a year when your venture backed company and you have raised tens of millions, it's not the pleasure you get in most leverage. Most of it never seen a company that fails because of that product market fit as long as it's a scalable architecture. So it's one that you can if you operate if you were to optimize the economics, then those costs would be in line to your business group. Gotcha is vendor management, a big part of your job, like negotiating those kinds of things or selecting vendors or is that I guess the vendor selection is probably more of a lower level thing, but yeah, maybe you could talk through vendor selection, vendor management. And if there's any good anecdotes, you have recently of vendor selection or vendor management. I'd love to know. My involvement generally is we have across the company a policy and we thought about how do we actually scale that such that we empower people to make decisions rather than centralized too much. And so we're creating our own products and for that sort of stuff. In general, like any of these vendors that you basically have commitments up to a certain amount of years and dollar amounts, there's different tools that happen in different levels, some manager.

Oracle
"cto" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:12 min | 6 months ago

"cto" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And then I said, we should reevaluate that later based on how the language will mature and the different types of violence they will hit with the language. And then once we realized that the ecosystem of elixir is too narrow, we started looking at different language options and we ended up choosing cod liver. That decision was a decision that I tended to making, and I'm comfortable with that because as the CTO, it's reasonable for me to make a decision that impact the entire organization. It's so core to the organization. But there are many other distributions that come to me mostly because it's the easier way. And or where things might not agree, or there's no clear order. And in those cases, I go look and be like, okay, what prevented someone else from making that decision? And then go and look at addressing that. And a big part has to do with how do you structure the organization and how do you set goals for those teams such that they can operate more independently. And so I'll say that's two. And somewhat tied to that is, how do we manage different functions? And this is something that I don't think many companies do all a lot of companies are like, well, are you engineering children or product or design mat or sales letter or whatever? And Brexit is a very cross functional environment. Obviously, we have to deal with a lot of regulatory issues. We have to deal with operational issues. And so saying that it's like you're a dollar sign function led. Ends up minimizing everybody else. And so we're very thoughtful and explicit about not being that sort of company. And as far as it comes to your engineering, we spend a lot of time thinking about how do we help run teams across engineering product design data, science, and so on. And we really have forgotten variations where initially like every company you have an engineering person and a designer, that's an engineering director, design director of product director gave science director. And they can work well, but everybody was responsible for their own kind of area. And they weren't really running the team together. And then about 18 months ago, helped flip that where I was like, yes, each of you have expertise in different areas and obviously manage the function and how to grow people and support people in your function. However, like all of you, whether it's like three, four, kinds of dependent symptoms might have because that might sometimes find out sometimes I have the sense I need you might not. You end up like you all are responsible together. So for example, one concrete change was how we think about headcount. I used to think about ways to do headcount across engineering gets this much if you're enjoying director here some headcount, your partner director, historian account and for design director, go nuts. And we flipped it where we said you all as this group get this headcount. And you all decide how you allocate it within their different functions. And obviously, disagree, feel free to escalate, and happy to happy to be arbitrary for that. And when that force and that fix is making sure that there's the right support and ratios between functions. So there are teams where basically maybe we had too many frontend people and 9 have designers or vice versa where you might have an engineering manager, we're not a product manager. And there weren't a line on the hiring priorities because everybody was optimizing more for their own function. And the moment we flipped that, it got everybody to feel accountable for everything all the way from hiring to technical decisions, technical product metrics, design quality, and so on. So I think that's something that's pretty unique. I haven't heard of a lot of companies that not only structure things that way. I think that's more common, but the way we run put kind of shared accountability across the leaders for those. And it's allowed us to scale quite a lot through this autonomy across different functions without having to go through different kind of organizational models that have other downsides. You mentioned that you have a data science director. So maybe you don't have as much purview into this, but we've talked about some standardization across the company, how much standardization do you have around data science and ETL and large scale aggregation operations? Yeah, so the data organization actually as part of my organization. And then data itself is organized in three teams. There's data science teams, data platform teams, and then data science is broken up into machine learning and analytics. And that's something that I think has worked really well by having those teams together. You don't have some of the arguments you have between the parts of data. So we've standardized these airflow and then get data gets pushed. And to snowflake, and then we have looker on top of that for metrics. And that's been useful to standardize. So we've always had that standardization. It's not something that I brought from the beginning, but we've changed some of the technology that we use. And I would say by having a closer to engineering and then embedding the data science folks in different parts of the organization, it's helped us with kind of ETL process where a team owns the underlying model and then it makes them change and then it ends up breaking ETL jobs and if you don't break on people don't understand what it is. It's like, okay, what is this new field on this model? So it's helped us kind of have a more Vis-à-vis because the scientists that is embedded on a particular team has much more knowledge of the domain there and then can kind of bring that knowledge more centrally within the data work and then you have the kind of career development from having a centralized or functioning internal mobility data from the more closely together to try to find the balance between both worlds..

CTO
"cto" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

03:31 min | 6 months ago

"cto" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"So let's dig into just this idea of a CTO. How would you describe what a CTO does? So it's going to be different based off of the company. So a lot of people ask me, oh, what's the roles and responsibilities? This guy, Eric Weiss put together this something I'm a huge fan of and I'm including it in my next book. I asked him if I could because I saw him give a talk on it and it's called the CTO maturity model. And it shows that what stages of growth and personnel revenue and personnel and product, these different maturity levels and what the CTOs focuses at each specific level. And it changes as the company grows. In general, the CTO is the person at the company who is responsible for the technology. Typically outward facing, you'll find CIOs will typically do the N word facing technology, internal networks, internal allocation of equipment, all those types of things. And then you'll find a CTO is generally deal with outside stuff. The products that are being developed, things like that. I think that at least when I think about a CTO, the CTO is usually the highest person in the organization on the tech side of things right there, the chief technology officer. And so I guess I've just kind of always made this assumption. And I don't know if it's right or wrong. And I'm curious to hear your take on it, that the CTO, you know, by virtue of being the highest person in the orc chart is also the most expert and the most knowledgeable. How true is that? How much does the CTO actually know compared to the senior engineers or other people on the tech team? Well, from the aspect of the role of CTO, they probably know it the best because they have the most experience of the responsibilities of the CTO. As far as the technology goes, you definitely don't want to be the smartest person. You want to hire people that are far smarter than you. Tell me more about that. What is the relationship I guess between the CTO and the engineering team of the engineering team is kind of the technical experts. What does that relationship look like? It's different at different companies in different sizes. I'm not trying to not give you a straight answer, but typically what the CTO is going to be doing. And all this is prefaced with a good CTO. Right. I'm sure there's at least one person listening that has a bad one. They're like, that's not true. That's not my Zio. Right? The first thing you'll have to do as a CTO with your team is you have to find out what drives the individual and then what you need for that position for that role. So I need these attributes from that role and then this is where that person is driving towards and then if they're aligned, that's a good thing, but sometimes they're not aligned and then it's not fair to you or to them. So understanding how what your team member wants versus what you need out of them, how that meshes together, whether it does or it doesn't, that's a skill that good CTOs will have. And so they'll have all the people rowing in the same direction and on a common mission. And that's super important because that's how you're going to get the best work environment. You're going to get the best product. You're going to get the best of everything. If you have a really talented people who are all pushing in the same direction. Would you say there is a particular personality type or disposition that good CTOs have or do they come in different personalities and temperaments?.

CTO Eric Weiss rowing
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"What are the you know the buying patterns for the customer. What are the needs for that customer right. Then he can actually help taylor through. The personalization are could be able to tailor to the loyalty programs that we've been able to put together. We have a program called speed perks as loyalty program to be able to understand what their spend with us and then i we can really support them in for their need says the go forward and obviously other things that are really coming up in terms of understanding the demographics afar in other customers across the the us and also the regional in nature to see what. What are the specific. Wacoal's are there in the the miles driven of those waco's that way we can actually get the right car into into those vita distribution centers in the right in the are Stores to be able to support the customer and then lost leanna pricing pricing. Competitiveness is something that we've been working on in terms southpaw in making sure that as inflation in awe gross in utterly price right to the our customers to drive the value and at the same time to improve the operating margins for in our company. So tonight we're at the beginning stages at this point. Peter but really leveraging that data and asset at this point really truly bill in other personalization and the differentiation. That are you know. The chief marketing Driving not depend tastic overview. I wanted to hear the close of our conversation. Three ask if there are any other trends particularly excite you as you look at a number of them including in your most recent dancer are particularly important. Not only at advance auto parts but across so many organizations and any others that come to mind in terms of areas of emphasis or focus. If your team yeah. No i mean. The ones that i mentioned going deeper is definitely one of the priorities for us. Oh in wittily early stage itself.

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Twenty it's been a challenging year We being be essential in other services company. Our stores were all been in in a we needed to make sure that you know the health of our team members and safety of our customers in a ease the priority so they work through relentlessly in twenty twenty to continue to serve our customers. I wanna really take the time to. We will pancaro fourteen members for that In the team member experience kinda come saying with how really enable them You know to be efficient as their seraing customers and would digital capabilities that are needed. How do we improve collaboration for them. How do we make it as easy to work with right. So that is the second component as a team member experience and the tunnel one is it truly is a digitization of all of our processes. If peter we is a company has kinda came together through the position last six seven years and how to really bring it together as one company in truly Go through that digitization but we're going to the digitization how do we really look for simplicity off that in other business processes that award we need to do in a wooded required. How do we automate in as much more of a hyper automation that we're really looking for. And then the last one is a truly driving value in value with the speed on like many other technology leaders are looking for ways.

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"To the business here are the top three ways in can lock the potential of their own businesses to adapt and innovate faster. One empower culture of innovation where every member. The team feels responsible for building innovating digital solutions to build a practice of citizen automation near company. Our governance frameworks and communities of practice and three equipment team with right citizen automation tools. My name is an jennings. The quake base elect photos showing how we've helped over five thousand enterprises mature there's nomination programs and now onto the interview three welcome. It's great to speak with you today. Oh no pressure to be here. Peter so i know it's been now while we spoke but i'm happy to connect with you. Yeah it's it's my pleasure. I'm looking forward to this conversation. Well street you are the executive vice president and chief technology obser- advance auto arts a role that you've had for nearly three and a half years now. And i wonder if you can as as the chief technology officer role translates very differently in different organizations. He take a moment and just describe your responsibilities as cto. yeah absolutely. you're absolutely right. I mean every company has a different responsibility sonnet but as you know we talk about. Our role is the cto as a technology leader in.

Speechly Origin - Hannes Heikenheimo Co-founder and CTO at Speechly - Voicebot Podcast Ep 228 - burst 07

The Voicebot Podcast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

Speechly Origin - Hannes Heikenheimo Co-founder and CTO at Speechly - Voicebot Podcast Ep 228 - burst 07

"I had hobie project with a colleague in a a student friend of mine who who was a u u x experts and at that time fitbit was very popular job and it was a big thing so we had our fitbit's and and we were excited about that than we're following our calories or all of that and so then then we had this idea. Wouldn't it be cool. That in addition to the burn calories could somehow really nicely calculate the calories that we consume to be able to get a balance of of input and output and was a functionality in and fitbit to to do a meal diary but it was very cumbersome so so we had this idea that we need to make it easier for us to to follow that and we had this idea of of using voice there so so just like if you have a meal it would just list out the items that you eight and the system would compute the calories and so that was sort of a aside project that then i think was really the origin of of speech. Of course like speech we way of thinking because we had a very specific. You you ex you. I in our minds and so we studied the api's at that time and turned out. There was no api that could do the type of experience that we wanted to achieve and and so so that that was sort of the origin and then of course i was working at apple. So i i. I was in the sort of the The epicenter of voice working on on syria and then there was all these very interesting things happening like alexa came out around that time and also advanced like advances in speech recognition so there was a paper in two thousand sixteen from ibm where they got this. First results of human baratheon transcription accuracy. That all of these things sort of somehow brewed in in in my head. And and and so so that i would say those were the things that that then sort of originated the idea behind speech by but a big portion of it was the hobie project we started out with with my

Syria Apple LEE Alexa Siri IBM Hobie
Sam Scott, CTO at OSO, on Authorization as a Service

Software Engineering Daily

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Sam Scott, CTO at OSO, on Authorization as a Service

"Sam. Welcome asia much having me commissioning authorization. There's a wide variety of tools. That are this space and the first one that comes to mind is off zero which was more recently. Acquired by octa tell me about a brief history of authorizations at service absolutely saw its start with you need to ease the disentangle authentication authorization to very similar. Sounding names often lumped together as just off and there's often a very blurry line between those which piece of the puzzle different people are doing and even goes as far as with the name authorization useful indication and things like that. So i think we think about companies like zero. You know quite a lot of the stuff they focused on is primarily the identity piece the authentication piece right so authentication. It's brown identifying who the user is a few are checking some kind of credentials piece of thing authorization often the piece it comes off to. It's like now. I know you are. What can you do and lower the existing services out the like an author. They do stuff and they maybe do a small piece of the authorization. They may be handled things like you know groups all maybe it's like pulling a few attributes out of the idc providers you kind of get some sense of who this person is. They often leave a lot of the authorization to the application code itself. It's like i know who you are. And maybe i know groups. You belong to roll. You have but i'm gonna. I'm gonna the app you decide what to do that information.

Octa SAM Asia IDC
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"We did it using the new epoch bates servers and You know we did it in a way. That was very innovative In terms of pushing the performance we used for many of our engineers the it team developed virtual desktops. You didn't have to have a big workstation under your desk you could run off of the server farms and have the same kind of performance are we also ran on the clouds. We started working with the hyper skaters and taking some of our big on electronic design. Automation are big compute intensive workloads. It used to design next generation from running in some of the you know those huge cloud applications and then lastly we've been applying artificial intelligence when you look at billions and billions of transistors on these chip designs. It turns out you can apply machine learning to optimize a how you implement those ship designs. We used to Really speed up our whole debugged process. We've been improved the gaming devices. When you play games on md we've actually do image optimization and even some of our financial process these were planning m. l. so from the devices we use the the applications and optimizations. We run i. It's been a just a a great job of our eighteen party with each of the rnd and business functions in the company and they they're now a part of that whole innovation processes. We deploy our own technology internally. We call it eating our own cooking and recommended to any company to To really lean in artist as they can on that aspect now. That makes an awful lot of sense. We started talking about some some of the trends. That are most salient to your organization. Artificial intelligence among them for example. I wanted to ask you whether it's Digging deeper on some of the ones that you've already Already begun to highlight or some additional ones that that you'd like to underscore what are some of those as you look to the future that you're particularly excited about while the key trend is not a nutrient peter. It's one that is. I'll say a fundamental forces aimed in that is the trend of exponential growth in demand for more computing capabilities..

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Team with right citizen. Automation tools. By name is an jennings them the ceo. Quick base elect photos sharing how we've helped over five thousand enterprises mature there's automation programs and now onto the interview mark. Welcome detective ovation. It's great to speak with you today. Thank feeder great to be with you here today excellent. Well so as part of your purview. As i mentioned you're responsible for corporate Technical direction prog developments and within that includes areas like system on chip the methodology surrounding that's Microprocessor design i o and memory in advanced research. I wonder if we could take a moment in talk a little bit little bit about some of what you and the team were doing within each of those areas and kind of provide a bit of background. You bet peter while it's a just a tremendous role that have had the opportunity to have almost the past ten years having joined in fall of twenty eleven and it didn't comes as as you said two roles so as the executive vp of our rnd. Cider technology and engineering vertical. That iran i. It's it's really about the execution of how to bring leadership compute technology to market. And when you go back ten years ago it really meant a reengineering of the engineering processes that we run amdi had such a storied history of innovation but at times it had a gap in terms of the of getting a new product out to markets. And so you know those elements that you described there in terms of how we develop the roadmap for our base engines are sepia jeep and put it together insist on a chip that combines all those computing elements a. How do you make sure that those engines do all the computations. Get a get. Fed caught feeding the beast. You have to feed you. Know a very very high rate data rate from memory very very high data rate from the i o all the devices when you ever see any a photo of a computer. It's never just the the cpu's or in central processors graphic processors..

jennings peter iran
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Welcome to ovation. I'm your host. peter. Hi i guess. Today is mark paper. Master is the chief technology officer in executive vice president of technology engineering at amd a roughly ten billion dollar revenue company based in texas in that role mark is responsible for corporate technical direction product developments. He's been with the company for nearly a decade and looking forward to getting his perspectives on how he has managed across. What has been technology juggernaut. as well as his view into where the technology is going and trends that will influence that but first a word from our sponsor 's ohio and the company's president timothy cabbie prior to taking on his current role. He was the chief information officer of a number of companies including reliance industries sears in treks on and the warehouse group. He's now it 's ohio a most unusual enterprise software company and wanted to share your perspectives from it timothy. Take it away. Silicon valley not having much. Silicon has created all kinds of problems in our world today. Peter therefore the biggest revolution we are seeing is the chip revolution. Zo who is more a culture story than tech story. What i mean by that is develop tools for communication and collaboration whereby employees voices rather than titles are heard we even unable anonymous post in our communication apps whereby senior leadership can really get the pulse of the organization. We also see constant flow of product ideas marketing ideas and innovation as a result learn more unable communication and collaboration to unlock innovation at soho dot com. And now for a word from our partner. Quick base and the company's chief executive officer at jennings quick basis a low code application development platform focused on citizen automation. And ed wanted to share. How the company helps organizations democratize automation. Ed over to you quit base. Our mission is to unlock the potential of organizations to adapt end innovated speed. We do this. By empowering business. Technologist within organizations delivered. Low code no code visually build their own applications clicking dry integrate across their existing systems in eliminate manual incomes processes by writing their own workflow automations as we see more technology responsibilities shifting to the business here are the top three ways in..

president timothy cabbie ohio amd peter sears jennings quick texas Silicon valley timothy Peter ed Ed
Very Big Things Founder Chris Stegner on Outsourcing the Role of Technical Co-Founder

Mixergy

02:29 min | 1 year ago

Very Big Things Founder Chris Stegner on Outsourcing the Role of Technical Co-Founder

"I wouldn't have thought that investors would be willing to back accompany where the key part of what they do is outsource to someone else. You realize this was a thing because you worked in a venture capital firm. And what did what were you seeing that made you say i think i have new idea for what i know. I love it. That's a that's a great question So to your point. I was i was a cto and junior partner ida vc fund in biscuit the idea was we cut a check to a startup for three to five million bucks on at that. Point is supposed to jump in helping figure out whatever game whether it's the good market strategy monetization their development design. Whatever it was and something that i'd get plagued with was say okay. Here's three million bucks now build a deb team or expand your one person deb team to a real dev team because we want to see all this stuff that built in the next six months gave you three million bucks six months better be done ready to rock and then six months later. They're sitting there and they're still trying to hire two or three people that can just work well together. Didn't lie on their resume. Paying there wasn't drama k. or they realized. Hey we need front. People need back in people. Need all these roles and it's just taking a long time to hire them so there's dad said things which drove us to say to them. Okay forget about building a team right now. You can do that over time. Just go and hire agency. An agency is the flip side or they're like cool. Give us a scope. Give us a check. Give us three months and we'll come back. And here's your product and good luck right okay for anybody building. Businesses especially businesses her determine agile. You need to be constantly paying attention to what's happening. Throughout the development what features people are liking doing focus group testing all these different things for the actual in product. Should never really be you. Set out to build on day one and there was no agency to do this purity. So it's it's the old best advice entrepreneur ever solve your own problem right. So at that point. I just i grabbed from the fund our vp of investment. Our creative director. You hire them away from the bbc fund hired him away okay said hey guys. This is a problem. We're all facing. Nobody solved it. Why don't we meet the guys solve it. People have the same problem

Ida Vc Fund DEB BBC
Microsoft Warns Thousands of Cloud Customers of Exposed Databases

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Microsoft Warns Thousands of Cloud Customers of Exposed Databases

"Is warning thousands of its cloud customers that their data basis may have been exposed to intruders. Reuter says. The vulnerability, which could allow hackers to read, change or delete data was discovered by cybersecurity company Wiz, whose chief technology officer used to be CTO for Microsoft Cloud Security unit.

Reuter WIZ Microsoft
CTO Brian McWade Describes Connected Living's Voice-First Solutions for the Elderly

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:39 min | 1 year ago

CTO Brian McWade Describes Connected Living's Voice-First Solutions for the Elderly

"Obviously we have a unique role of trying to support our aging populations and there's so many different kind of profiles of how seniors connect with technology. You know, whether we're looking at the type of device, visual challenges, dexterity issues, cost, regular, just kind of technology adoption, skill sets. We found voice to be a key metric across the board because you can eliminate many of the barriers that impact the ability for someone who's older to use technology. So we're trying to insert voice into every product that you saw on the previous screen. But obviously, the easiest way to do that is through different voice solutions. So we work very closely with Amazon, but essentially, we have this robust content management system and any type of data that's in there. We're talking calendars, venues, alerts, bulletins, announcements, service requests, RSVP, for events, wellness reporting. You can use voice. So it could be as simple as wanted to get menu information or asking Alexa about what are the calories in the dinner or calling out to the families. So we've really taken this voice for first approach and probably have more deployments in senior living communities than anyone else in the country. So if you really think about anything that you'd want to ask within senior living, you can. And we also give families the ability to leverage their own smart devices at home to have access to this. So this is a growing area for us, a very focused area, but we find that voice adoption given some of the limitations we can avoid tend to be some of the higher adopted technologies we

Amazon Alexa
Why Composite Manufacturing Has a Material Impact on Future Innovation

The Restless Ones

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Why Composite Manufacturing Has a Material Impact on Future Innovation

"Riley. Thank you so much for joining us for the restless ones. It's a pleasure to have you on the show excited to be here. And i'm really excited to because i usually ask. Cto's how they. I got interested in tech. But you present to me a unique opportunity where i would like to know how you got interested in material science. Yeah it is a great question and a unique kind of feel in the world of engineering and so it was. the subject. Matter is kind of this amazing professor that i saw through him the ability to really think like an engineer so i was interested in studying working under him and ended up partnering with him on researching and kind of going deep in material science as i get deep into. Try to learn as much as i could from him. I completely agree. I'm the son of two teachers and had a big experience with teachers who were really passionate about their areas of expertise and we're great communicators. Who really encouraged that kind of love so talk to me a little bit about some of the challenges and material science that you find really interesting. Yeah sure you know the other kind of unconventional thing to in mitchell. Science a lot of people are trying to come up with new material and a lot of material sciences focused on the chemical or the physical side of development. You're working at sometimes. The atomic level sometimes the molecular level coming up with with with new formulations trying to push into a new material space or new new material combinations for me. It actually wasn't as much that kind of fundamental side but it was taking materials that already exists and it using them. In new ways you can get a radically different performance or functionality. And that's really kind of where. I fell in love actually with mutual science but also three printing so as during my research. They're building heart tissue scaffolds the challenge. Was you throw a ton of heart cells on a petri dish and they all go off like popcorn but you want them to all beat to the same rhythm so that they can actually function in the tissue so to get these cardio myocytes to talk to each other. You need to get something. That looks like the extra cellular matrix of cell which is kind of this network.

Riley Mitchell
Interview With Joel Beasley From Modern CTO

Developer Tea

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Joel Beasley From Modern CTO

"So i met this gentleman named at pnd bruin. Who owns seven cto's and he said you know do like executive peer groups for technology leaders. Vp's engineer cto's there on me. More like premium side or people are paying twenty thousand dollars a year and it's facilitated by a professional facilitator. You have to pay all that. So it's definitely good value. But he wanted to create something for the mid level of the market. Like you know people that are you know. They're they want to become a manager for the first time or they wanna move from manager to director in that was at a price point that was like much cheaper than that like super affordable even if they wanted to pay for it for themselves so i said okay because i have the audience and you have the knowledge of how to run these communities and the staff and the support so we created elevate one fifty dot com and the idea was elevate. Bring people up to the next level and then one fifty was like one of dunbar's numbers of community size. So we cap the community at one hundred and fifty people and so we have a hundred people now and We've grown over the past eight months and every week we have speakers and then the it's like a ten minute topic of conversation and then you go into a small group of like three to four people in that. That speaker has set you up with something. It's not like a generic cycling of speakers that are doing sales pitches like they have to adhere to our format. And so what it does is it gets you in these communities having these small discussions and building relationships. And that's been like unbelievable. So now i've now i've got this community where i can go and then every every week or every other week i'm getting introduced three or four new peers and were having legitimate conversations.

Dunbar
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"I'll say kobe and work from home. You know Stress that the that the teams might be under but for us. It's it's it was about getting more focused with all the organizations that we were supporting and operationalizing how we could better recruit into our company diverse talent and i mentioned i think earlier. You know we're headquartered in saint louis That said more than half of our employees are somewhere else in the world. You know there are so. And i think the advent of remote work has allowed us more freedom. Frankly to pursue talent diverse talent in particular in other areas in geographies rather than you know our centers in new york or saint louis sir or or phoenix northern california. That's opened up an aperture to us. But i would say the first step that we took this having a meaningful impact on on our people our diversity and you know the the communities that we live and work in is partnering with programs that help develop skill sets in technology focused on that outreach into diverse communities and then bringing bringing those individuals onto to wwe. excellent. I also wanted to ask you a bow in referencing the the the past year and and the many learnings from it. I wonder what reflections you have in. What changes you see. A foot with regard to the future of work and how work is being done. You mentioned half your staffer in saint louis where you're headquartered the other half around the around the world and other places Do you foresee a different way of working in the future than let's say january of twenty twenty before the the quarantine the pandemic and the currency began in earnest. Here in the us. I do. i think You know Again cliche. I think you know new normal or you know. I'll hear people asking a winter. Things going back to normal i. I don't think they're going back. I think that You know our findings we've surveyed. Are everyone you know. We've surveyed our employees. I mentioned the town halls that were doing to get feedback You know what what i hear. In our thought processes an executive team is to err on the side of flexibility and empower our people with choice right. And what i've heard you know. And this is where i think you know from from the deny perspective from a perspective of covert and work from home future work so many of these things are individualized down to a person's particular. You know circumstance could be you know both them their family other obligations that they have You know their risk profile. I you know what how do they. How do they think about risk. In and And then i think also just a personality introverted extroverted. You know all those things that come into play here our position back to our employees. We want to offer.

saint louis kobe northern california phoenix new york us
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Hyper location inside of a grocery store or inside of a retail space Now adapting those concepts to figure out what sort of distance in safety tracking could we provide as it relates to a pandemic and exposure and contact tracing. But you know you really have to take time to instrument a system. That's going to give you that level of detail in terms of individuals proximity. But then you have to take all that data and you have to digitize that to you know to a map a set of outputs or intelligence that drive behaviors within a customer so connecting those digital and physical worlds together in in data being an underlay of all of that is is a huge area of investment for us so connection to those outcomes digital physical and Those two worlds really colliding are big areas of focus for us. And then the last thing i'll say is just leave you our responsibility to to connect the creation of the strategy to achieve those outcomes. I talked about connecting the strategy to the delivery. Because we feel like there's just a need in the market between what i'll call. The you know the fifty page white paper and the outcome. The that that shows up on a balance sheet for a company and were disintermediating. I think that mark it a bit to say you know. How do we connect those two things together and you know. Hold ourselves along with the customers and partners. Were working with accountable. Those outcomes through the list creation strategy and a delivery of those results very interesting. I appreciate you sharing each of those. I know another area that you in the broader team have been thinking about is Deny diversity and inclusion. And i i wonder if you can kind of reflect especially in a year in the past year in which it has come into focus for a variety of unfortunate reasons but perhaps with some silver linings for some of the changes that organizations are undertaking as a result of it..

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Our customers stitch together architectures solutions and fundamentally outcomes that are going to impact their business and and it's been an exciting ride for me certainly at worldwide and then in the technology ecosystem overall. There's there's no shortage of fun change in innovation to keep up with mike you've been with the company for more than two decades and roughly two thirds of the time the company's been existence. I can only imagine the growth that you've seen as well as the evolution of your offering as i'm sure that that has dovetailed with the dramatic change in the technology landscape across the past couple of decades. I wonder if you could take a moment in reflect upon all that growth in all of that change believe it or not Yep started as an intern. And at the time i think the company was a couple of hundred people You know i would. I really found interesting about what we were doing was one. Just you know this was kinda back in the dot com era and all the craziness that you saw the markets and along with technology startups but probably more than anything that to me was really Seemed to be the advent of the impact. Technology could have on business an consumerization and the connectedness between the these large organizations and the preferences a of a particular person as an example and so really following that trend and in evolving worldwide. From at the time of the predominant portions of our business were around selling reselling technology products into the telecommunications in federal a federal spaces to beginning those stages imagining what services and capabilities. We might be able to wrap around as well as as superior general which this could be a whole podcast in and of itself but the use cases and the transfer ability of use cases across industry from a technology perspective. Something we felt a responsibility to start bringing forward to the market to our customers and it's been an exciting ride from from the late late nineties. you.

mike
Interview With Bridget Frey, CTO Redfin

The Restless Ones

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Bridget Frey, CTO Redfin

"So much for joining us on the restless ones. I am very pleased to have you. Here is my guest. Thanks for having me Beer and i love to start off these conversations by learning a little bit more about the people. I'm speaking with and so i'm very curious. What was it that sparked your love of technology. Wasn't an apple computer it was you. Might you might know that story a little bit about it. So my dad isn't appliance sales repairman. And when i was five he showed up at her house with this big box and put it in. The kitchen in inside was apple. Two years early apple computer and to him. It was really just like dishwasher where you get a manual read instructions you figure out how to use it and so my earliest experiences with -nology peter was just learning to code. That's fantastic yeah. I also was t-the apple to myself. He remember the the hello world and you know ten print. I go is. It is kinda complicated since then. Once once i got beyond the basic programming language things got out of my wheelhouse pretty quickly. But from what i understand. You really went down that pathway wholeheartedly. Your love was sparked early on. But when did you decide that this is something i actually want study. By the time. I got to high school. I actually was really fortunate that we had a computer science class and a clo- that were operating in my high school now. It's meeting more comment. But i also had as email computer science teacher who was really inspirational to me and so i think that those experiences helped to make me feel. I belong to in the tech industry at these formative years. And i also i was. I loved the idea of using our loans in technology to solve problems in so those things really crystallized at a time out of school i'm already

Apple Peter
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Well. I thought we would begin. I'd love for it to to cover a number of topics as your. Your field of expertise is so expensive to cover both geopolitics as well as technology for some who knew me know your earlier works. They may not be quite as familiar to the extent to which you've dealt with so much further into technology which which as the conversation goes on. I'm sure he's going to make sense to those people listening and watching inasmuch as the those of becomes so enmeshed and would love to talk a bit about your own diagnosis as well as some of your own Recommendations for improvements in all of the above. But i wanted to begin Dr fukuyama with the rise of populism. This is certainly a trend that has been accelerating and we see everything from the election of donald trump in two thousand sixteen brexit the uk a number of countries that have either elected or Have one thinks of marine le pen in france candidates who arising within various countries. Who can be described as populist. Talk a bit about your own diagnosis. If you would as to some of the factors at play that have led to this sure. So i think we need to begin with the definition of populism They're actually different varieties. There's a left wing version. Which would be. Google says on a right wing version. Which would be donald trump They have some things in common. So populous argue that The world is actually being run by a ball leads. That are self interested. That are manipulating a politics for their own. Self interested purposes and cutting ordinary people out of that loop the difference. I think between the right and left wing versions. Is that the left wing. Populace wanna redistribute income and wealth. You know massively. To from rich to poor of the right wingers intent on issues like national identity where they oftentimes Associate national identity with a particular ethnic group so for example. Viktor orban and hungry us as that. Hungarian national identity is based on hungarian ethnishity. Which isn't so great. If you're not an ethnic hungarian living in budapest or somewhere else in the country

Twenty languages Facebook google fukuyama twitter china first late eighties russia both stanford university two thousand eighteen stanford united states american biden
Comcast, Cox Enterprises CIOs on Rethinking the Employee Experience Through the Pandemic

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Comcast, Cox Enterprises CIOs on Rethinking the Employee Experience Through the Pandemic

"Wanted to begin with Talking about this major digital transformation acceleration that you have you've experienced through the pandemic and how is your thinking about employee experienced change during this time in light of the many changes that employees have had to endure in the way in which they work to give us a few thoughts. If you would absolutely great question and let me began by by saying that i think leadership is the core competency that really support the transformation of technology and when i think about leadership i think about capability competency and compassion and those things are fuel really to grow individuals and companies and and i started with that because one of the things that we've seen when we work with our our customers and particularly on our cable side of the business. What we saw was in extreme increase in demand which is intuitive and secondarily. What we saw is a need for for our clients to get up quickly and we. We had initiatives focused on self installs as an example and those initiatives were accelerated greatly. But what we learn going back to that compassion piece is it was more than getting them up and having them run in our our employees were going through the same thing so in addition to do in their day job they were homeschooling. They were balancing the Their personal lives with their work lives and that need to support them over and beyond our jobs really fueled us to make sure that we kept them front and center in all the decisions and lasting say is absolutely the tools that we're using now. Zoom as an example microsoft teens really double downing on that type of technology to create. That connection has been really important.

Microsoft
Interview With Claire Hough, CTO of Carbon Health

IT Visionaries

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Claire Hough, CTO of Carbon Health

"Welcome everyone to another episode of it visionaries and today we have a special guests. Claire huff the cto of carbon health. Welcome to the show and kill. Well we keep reading about. How tech is disrupting the healthcare industry as we know it so we always want our guest to explain what's unique about their company. What is unique about carbon health. And how is it approaching healthcare so carbon hell race say take knowledge company and there are many who call themselves healthcare technology company but we're company with a big mission and we have actually starting to prove out some of that mission through really offering Healthcare through different channels in the past year or past few years actually and carbon health mission is to provide quality healthcare for all and that sounds like yeah is in everybody's to provide hell quality healthcare for all but it's actually an Pretty a day. Shis mission. And i don't think i really understood that are passed city until i you know educated myself more about how health care is being provided in the united states today so there are a lot of biases in healthcare as as like accessibility is not even as we have seen. How underserved communities were disproportionately affected during covid. So that's kind of a prove that we have not been providing healthcare to You know under served marginalized communities and when kofi hit. They were obviously hit very hard. So our mission is to really make sure that we can provide the quality care for all through our technology platform by providing access to healthcare.

Claire Huff United States Kofi
Interview With Cathy Southwick, Chief Information Officer, Pure Storage

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:32 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Cathy Southwick, Chief Information Officer, Pure Storage

"Capi south welcomed technician. It's great to see you today. Great to see you too. Thank you kathy. I thought we would begin with you. Your role you are the chief information officer pure storage and maybe you can take a quick moment in provide a brief overview of pure storage. Is business right now. I'd love to do that. So you know appears for relatively young company are i ten years we really set out. To complete change. Storage industry disrupt the status quo. That we'd all been dealing with from an it lens and our vision was really built on being very customer. Centric wanted to fundamentally change expectations for data storage management. Want to think about it from enabling codebase real time access to resilient hybrid cloud data storage for it Not just for. It also developers devops alike etc and really week of storage as co we really want to storage to be dynamic to provide that cloud experience be flexible on demand and really be able to allow developers in spanish to really consume it at their at their Their needs so. That was really whole premise. Behind period. we of say we put the check mark on that and now as we had to go into this next ten years of our company. We really wanna make sure that. We're empowering those organizations who want to really think about their operations as true automated storage as a service model and and really to work across multiple clouds in environments and So that supports on premise. Off prem dedicated or shared platform. So that's really kind of the essence of pure as really being that very customer centric figuring out where we want to be to help our customers data to use Whether reducing the complexity and be able to manage their for structure. That kind of sums up. Think about pure. That's great a great summary. I appreciate you giving that overview and let's talk a bit about your role is a chief information officer no to seattle roles exactly alike. What's what's the what's within your purview. Kathy yeah. I feel very fortunate. I have an incredible Global it team. That's in both domestic us wilson locations around the world as well And we also have responsibility for our cyber strategy for all of the enterprise as well as our product so think of the traditional. It responsibilities of all of our on prem off prem the assassin environments application environments along with data federal that. We support the business but we also have that responsibility as well for looking at what cyber look like for our business around helping to ensure we protect not just our employees and our company but also our customers as well

Kathy Seattle Wilson
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Capi south welcomed technician. It's great to see you today. Great to see you too. Thank you kathy. I thought we would begin with you. Your role you are the chief information officer pure storage and maybe you can take a quick moment in provide a brief overview of pure storage. Is business right now. I'd love to do that. So you know appears for relatively young company are i ten years we really set out. To complete change. Storage industry disrupt the status quo. That we'd all been dealing with from an it lens and our vision was really built on being very customer. Centric wanted to fundamentally change expectations for data storage management. Want to think about it from enabling codebase real time access to resilient hybrid cloud data storage for it Not just for. It also developers devops alike etc and really week of storage as co we really want to storage to be dynamic to provide that cloud experience be flexible on demand and really be able to allow developers in spanish to really consume it at their at their Their needs so. That was really whole premise. Behind period. we of say we put the check mark on that and now as we had to go into this next ten years of our company. We really wanna make sure that. We're empowering those organizations who want to really think about their operations as true automated storage as a service model and and really to work across multiple clouds in environments and So that supports on premise. Off prem dedicated or shared platform. So that's really kind of the essence of pure as really being that very customer centric figuring out where we want to be to help our customers data to use Whether reducing the complexity and be able to manage their for structure. That kind of sums up. Think about pure. That's great a great summary. I appreciate you giving that overview and let's talk a bit about your role is a chief information officer no to seattle roles exactly alike. What's what's the what's within your purview. Kathy yeah. I feel very fortunate. I have an incredible Global it team. That's in both domestic us wilson locations around the world as well And we also have responsibility for our cyber strategy for all of the enterprise as well as our product so think of the traditional. It responsibilities of all of our on prem off prem the assassin environments application environments along with data federal that. We support the business but we also have that responsibility as well for looking at what cyber look like for our business around helping to ensure we protect not just our employees and our company but also our customers as well

ten years Kathy Centric three ten years ago five year today One twelve months eighteen months third one week Both three main areas next six months both one one way three primary areas one big category davis
The Mystery of the Treasure at Rennes-le-Château

Conspiracy Theories

01:33 min | 1 year ago

The Mystery of the Treasure at Rennes-le-Château

"In nineteen fifty three eighty five year. Old marie dinar. No lay on her deathbed. She spent her entire life in a tiny hilltop village. In the south of france ren lucia cto penniless and never married. Marie had no one to care for her except the family that had bought her home years before the core booze in return. She promised them a deathbed confession for much of her life. Marie was the housekeeper of the town's former priest. Baron jay sewn year decades earlier son. Years struck it rich overnight but never disclosed the source of his sudden wealth except to his ever-present confidante marie. Marie had hinted to the core booze. That when the time was right she shared the of sonya's fortune making them rich beyond their wildest dreams. They recalled her saying quote. You're walking on gold. You could feed the village for one hundred years and they would still be some leftover sadly. Marie suffered a stroke. That left her unable. To speak or write she died on january twenty ninth nineteen fifty-three taking sauniere secret to her grave. Ever since hundreds of thousands of travelers been drawn to ren lucia toe in search of ancient mysteries and one very elusive treasure

Marie Dinar Marie Baron Jay France Sonya Stroke Ren Lucia
Should I Start My Software Company Without a Co-Founder?

The $100 MBA Show

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Should I Start My Software Company Without a Co-Founder?

"So mitch wants to know. Should he bring on a co founder as he begins his software business. He has an. Mvp has a has been a Members already so it sounds like he's built his first version of a software on his own with Hiring a team of people and good for you for taking action and seeing if this thing has legs before you even start thinking about bringing a co-founder now. I've been in software for seven years now and i have met and have gone to know a lot of software founders bartolotta software groups and mastermind groups sas academy scaling sas founders some anymore and there are many software companies that have founders where there's two three or four and there's also many that don't have co founders single founders running the whole business now often single founders of a software business Our technical so they can actually build the app themselves of the wanted to now. Obviously that's very slow moving and it doesn't leave a lot of time and attention for that founder to build the business to market to sell to get the software in the hands of your ideal customers so semi argue. If you are a single founder being non technical can help you because you're focused on the things that's going to move the business and you can always hire out for technical help now there are businesses that do co-founders like my businesswoman are ninja. My software company has a co founder. Her name is my life and business. She's the c o. she's not a technical founder. she's operating officer. She does operations and nicole. And i are the co founders of our ninja now having said that we have a team of developers. We have a full-time. Cto chief technical officer so you have options. You don't need to always just have Your leader of technology bef co-founder. You can always hire out for it. You can actually pay the money you can even give them some equity or maybe a profit share if you want to but co-founder ship Really slices the pie generously.

Bartolotta Software Groups Sas Academy Mitch SAS Nicole
CIOs of Dow and CarMax Drive Process Modernization at Scale

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:59 min | 1 year ago

CIOs of Dow and CarMax Drive Process Modernization at Scale

"Let me begin with you melanie please. So wow what a. What a remarkable several years. It's been during your time and your tenure as chief information officer dow has been through major acquisitions. It's been through multiple major Divestitures as well yours is an organization generally speaking but an it organization more specifically that has had to foster a tremendous amount of change and stand up as well as spin out a lot of parts of the organization and think about the people process and technology implications of each of those things. I want and what one of the fascinating changes that you've ushered in is a changing. It's orientation more towards service delivery. And i wonder if you can take the story from there and talk a bit about i. Why maybe talk a bit about the specifics of service delivery as as it's defined within your organization as well as some of the methods you have used in order to bring that about scherer. Thank you peter and happy to be here. You have been through tremendous change over the last few years with the Like you said the merge of two companies and spin out of three companies which davis a great opportunity to drive changes and really Early-on start driving some of our digital transformation which put us in a really good position As the pandemic But one of the key changes from as an it organization we help drive. Change across the whole company Several years ago. When i took over as cio we put a strategy in place which was really a not an it strategy it was really a it strategy for the company or the organization and as part of that we really changed our approach To how we how we execute in in in nis we focused on the customer experience the employment experience and working at the speed of business

Melanie Scherer Peter Davis
Superhuman Engineering with Emuye Reynolds

Software Engineering Daily

04:42 min | 1 year ago

Superhuman Engineering with Emuye Reynolds

"Humiliate welcome to the show. Thank you. I think we previously did a show with the superhuman ceo. Who'll and in that episode. We covered a lot of their high level. Challenges design challenges of building superhuman. And in this episode. I think will cover some of the same stuff but also dive deeper into some specific engineering challenges. I want to start off by asking you a question that i also asked him. Which is what are the canonical challenges of building an email client. One thing. i'll say. Is that the surface area is really large so the things you need to build to even arrive it. A basic email client is is quite a lot of stuff and then you know the way we go about building it where retreat speed is a feature. We wanted to be incredibly robust and we also want it to be really remarkable quality. That creates another challenge. Anytime you're trying to balance performance reliability and quality. There's some tension there. Do you want to go deeper into that. Like the into the the canonical challenges like given that you have been working on the engineering side. What are the engineering problems that you see over and over again. Sinking is the engineering challenges trying to keep an inbox and sink When i talk about reliability. I'm really thinking about offline and online is a challenge in general but flaky network is even harder than off line intermittent connectivity. So that's one of our absolute one of our challenges. The sort of fastness of data rate. You're you're dealing with individual email threads and messages each of which has you know. There's just so many different kinds of things that we see. That's another challenge. Parsing the different content and making sure it renders correctly. Certainly something we spend a lot of time thinking about there are so many email clients that are out there and yet there are new ones that are constantly being developed. What are the places where there are room for innovation in email clients. Yes great question. I think one of the main areas is just around these or experience. A lot of what you see is people building in companies building the same email client over and over again the same experience. That hasn't changed in years. And i think there is this just a general product that anytime you have billions of people using something They get used to using it and trying to introduce new behavior can present a challenge. But i think there is a lot of room for for companies to try to innovate there and to be opinionated. May it could be a things. Like to human treating speed as a feature mike what we do on mobile trying to allow the device allow users to interact with one hand. It could be other types of input like speech. I think speed can also extend to like the speed. People are typing and and trying to allow more writing assistance. It really comes down to the user. Experience does user experience design. Does that translate to tough engineering problems. Like i can imagine making a really smooth user interface or making a user interface that has quote a. I built in these. Are things that translate to tough engineering problems. Yeah i think so. I think it's it turns out to be sort of like. I said earlier the balance rate. Like if you're just trying to build a really innovative user experience. I don't think that's particularly challenging. But if you're trying to build it in a way that is incredibly fast also allows you to be really powerful but you want to be easy to use. I think those things present tough engineering challenges and also reliability. You want every interaction to be extremely quick but you also want it to ensure that the users intent is captured. I think those do present a very tough engineering challenges. How do you divide your time in your engineering role. I think it's It's different every day every week every but i have a few things that i'm really focused on. I'm really focused on building out our engineering team and culture and that's growing the team as well as making sure that we have an organization that can support happy engineers that are working efficiently. I spent a lot of time on the product side and really focusing on delivery and execution making sure that a lot of project management tasks are on track claburn a lot with our product team with our cto. I also spent a bunch of time actually with my hands the code. I think it's really important that engineering leadership especially to you know with small teams engineering leadership continued to really be hands on with the problems. So it's a lot of those kinds of tests thinking about our overall company business strategy and how that relates engineering and how we can really drive in as an engineering org.

Creating Faster, More Efficient Feedback Loops in Real-Time with UserTesting CTO, Kaj Van De Loo

IT Visionaries

06:25 min | 1 year ago

Creating Faster, More Efficient Feedback Loops in Real-Time with UserTesting CTO, Kaj Van De Loo

"Welcome to another episode of it visionaries today. We have the chief technology officer of user testing. Kyw vande liu kai welcome to the show thank you. I'll right right to it user testing. The name seems obvious what it's four but tell us what is user testing the company. What do they offer what you guys do as you might guess. We have. Companies tests experiences wade uses with there could be karen customers. Potential customers partners employees at people have never heard of them. What have you so essentially anybody. Who's creating an experience can use our platform to get feedback integration process whether it's an early sketch one feedback on or design before you can start developing if it's throughout the development of the experience and of course experiences that already are out in the wild and being used anything in all of that that you want experience anything that you've created any experience you've created whether digital or physical that you want feedback. So that's what i want to dive into. Because that's what's fascinating because this isn't just a product that test software. You mentioned the physical in fact on your homepage. The user testing homepage. There is a woman clearly or to me clearly providing some type of feedback on a makeup product in. You just said it. Physical as well tells the big difference between because i think a lot of people here user testing and they started thinking of software centric application inside of my software. So imagine i. I am a software maker. I install another software inside of my software in attracts users. Attracts what they do. It gives me feedback loops of how they're interacting with software but user. Testing is a little bit different tells how your unique approach to testing both software has well as physical products and we compliment all these other forms of getting insights into how your product or how your experiences used by giving you heal human insights into what people actually think while they're doing this. So tha other tools. You can get insights into what people click on and how long they dwell on a particular page or whatever it is but we connect you die wick out to your customers or your users and they tell you they think out loud. They give you their personal feedback. We court everything they do record the face as well. It's almost like you're sitting there talking to someone when they try out experience you have created whether it's a website or mobile app or visit gates periods. So did this is like being. Would someone in their home wine. they about may be tried on and they talk to you they are. They're fantastic self. It's a vaguely human connection that you build their this week. They have spilled empathy in a way that will this data that we collect another ways can never do so. How does your role in back this experience. Your customer so use your testing. It sounds like you know if i if i were to start listening to podcasts. When ray beginning not too much idea in front of it it's now starting to sound like a marketplace. It sounds like if i bring you my product you have users that will play with intest the product. They're going to be willing to record themselves. It sounds like how does the technology of what user testing provide help narrow the gap for a. Let's say when your clients for them to collect feedback. How do you guys make their lives easier. Oh there's a lot of technology involved in this whole process of you getting to the interesting moments that matter to you understand how you can improve the experience you're providing it starts with the different ways that we can define audiences so you can bring your own test participants if you want if you have. Maybe your most loyal polled listeners. If you wanna hear from them what they think if you want to hear from people who have never heard of you we have a panel of many. Many people signed up who frequently take these tests and they check in and received or something available for them to to to test that you can relatively easily cover defined people who've never heard of us. We cannot support the south spectrum of your most loyal people out to people who've never heard of you and in all of this. This quite some sophistication in how we distribute tests out to potential participants at we try to target these tests as as we can so that the participants who are most interested and most likely to be good testers that we most likely to give good feedback that we target them with a particular test. So there's a lot of technology already in just how these how you find your audience. There's a lot of interesting technology and we're doing a lot of exciting work this area. At the moment how the experience gets a coded and then perhaps the most technology intensive area is around the analysis of the results. You get just five fifteen minute videos back. That's auto time for you to sit and listen and watch all of those but that's where we have a lot of machine. Learning we transcribe everything that people say. We analyzed the transcripts for strom emotions. We count entrusting moments. We analyzed if it's a web sized we can analyze the flow through the side. We can see where people have been clicking all of this than complements what they actually said any attempts guide you towards the highlights and we can automatically highlight wheels for you and so that you as yen user who's trying to produce a better experience that through get feedback nicely packaged.

Kyw Vande Liu Kai Wade Karen RAY
test

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 1 year ago

test

"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Right so you asked me about my role with that as a backdrop <hes>. I lead the technology strategy delivery technology operations for all of the business technology in the company. So the the the systems that run the fourteen billion dollar enterprise. I also lead digital risk management for all areas of technology. We felt that risk was such an important in cyber security risk in particular was such an important element that we would consolidate that under one leader across all areas of technology in. I and my team do our jobs will. Then we'd like to say we're quipping our businesses with all things digital all things data in all things collaboration the kinds of capabilities that they need to to win in growth in the marketplace. All good and i really appreciate the context setting each of those which it which offers a lot lot more backdrop as to why and how you're doing these things as well <hes>. You've been in your role for more than eight years now at an unusually long tenure as a cio. Which is a shirley sign of the great work that you and your team are doing. An during the course of that time i know from our past conversations rhonda that you focused on real cultural transformation of see the department. You found eight years ago naturally. Eight years passing would mean that de la changes but even the emphasis and indeed. The culture of the organization has changed quite a bit <hes>. Based on some very deliberate changes that you've incorporated into the into the it organization. Talk a bit about that if you would sure. That is a great question. And i also think you're pointing out. That eight years is a long time right. He said in the chair and young. I think what you meant is. I've likely seen a lot absolutely correct when i joined. The company denies more as a holding company with very thomas business units and they had very independent decision making on how best to run the pnl and really how best to run their technology stacks and while it was a hugely successful model drove a lot of shareholder value but were also not only autonomous culture. We were also highly acquisitive in fact a hundred acquisitions in tenure timeframe while not all of those were in emanate size of a black and decker in beckham two thousand ten before i joined the company on that doubled the size of the company that one acquisition <hes> but the size of an acquisition of the revenue size of the business is not the only indicator of complexity as. I'm sure you know there are many factors but suffice it to say that with autonomous decision-making coupled with a lot of him. In a that. When i arrive there was a lot of complexity. A lot of duplication in really a lot of costs and inefficiency working in the it landscape <hes>. By it organization was equally <hes>. I found the haves and the have nots <hes>. There were businesses that were having a good year. They were investing in one thousand nine hundred and then there were businesses that could be struggling given the diverse portfolio of businesses. That we we have they might be not invest are not even in technical debt reduction her life cycle maintenance so i found duplication of technology. I've found multiple contracts that were with no cross business. Unit leveraged ongoing on sharing skill sets across divisions <hes>. To get better scale of resources. So as you might be reading into this is the first cultural. Change i made was to form this enterprise. it organization. I'm really consolidating across the company and there was huge buying in for it as you can imagine once again to highlight some of the inefficiencies that were taking place and really some of the limiters durability to scale and take that next next wave of growth um so my goals were to preserve the culture of business unit closeness because in that former model. It was tightly integrated with the business. And i didn't wanna lose at tight. Integration but also wanted to deliver a lot of scale of the technology people assets and leverage on kind of across the whole so this is a major undertaking stepped into the mini little holes along the way. But i'm happy to say that we're we're fully in this model now after course after. Eight years <hes>. I'd say some of the most important things that we focused on. What's really the opportunity for the team members on because no longer were they being whipsawed by this. Michael ups and downs is there was a pretty steady overall rate of investment in it but they had opportunities as team members to work in different businesses and experience <hes>. A lot of different dynamics as you move from say the security business to the oil and gas business to work on a project or provide some support.

peter Forty three today stanley black and decker Rhonda gas Senate four top priorities four interconnected platforms rhonda eighteen
"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"cto" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Dmitri why don't we just jump right into it and would love your kind of analysis of what has happened <hes>. Know there's been a lot of <hes>. A lot of controversy there seems to be consensus that <hes>. The the hack is the work of the russians a country. At least that you're quite familiar with in terms of its tactics relative to this. Maybe just sort of set the lay the land if you would. Yeah absolutely so. I think it's important to understand that while this is a great situation and certainly <hes>. Will likely be highly detrimental to our national security in the short and medium-term <hes>. The not an act of war. This is not a digital harbor as as some politicians have been talking about this <hes>. In the last few weeks the important thing to understand is from what it looks like right now and we have now your information on what this operation has been at least over. Last year is traditional espionage <hes>. The targets have primarily been government agencies with some <hes>. Technology companies is wild wrapped into it but primarily focused on saft of secrets that are as you can imagine of high priority on to russian intelligence <hes>. If it proves to be the <unk>. As is most likely the case right now so <hes>. This was an dacia operation in incredibly well executed very very patient but at the end of the day the goal is staff that goes not destruction. The goal was not the leaking of that public information. There's small chance we may still see that at n than we have to reevaluate our assessment. But for now at least it looks like the exact that the us government the us intelligence community would be proud to have executed against our around adversaries. I'm now from a supply chain perspective. You know we do now understand that <hes>. You know we have a major threat factor that most organizations have not been focused on which as their it providers like solar wins like resellers that sell their microsoft cloud offerings which you can be compromised <hes>. Without really having any way to control for for that risk at least on the front end of the of the intrusion cycle. Are you at this point. Confident that it that it is the russians indeed so the interesting thing about this <hes>. Particular intrusion is that the private sector really does not have attribution here unlike virtually every other operation. We have seen or last ten years. Where many in the private sector including <unk>. Former company grabs strike was very good at attributed jackson in many of them very quickly this one because the tradecraft was so new and unique never before seen. There's really nothing to tie back to any previous operations. We have seen <hes>. To really give us good understanding who the adversary may be. So all the attribution so far <unk>. From government officials obviously intelligence agencies are very good at <hes>. Attributing attacks based on your variety of different sources and methods that go well beyond just technical measures so for now at least <hes>. You know we have to wait to see what the evidence is going to come out with regards to this. We may very well seen in the future. Will this operations justice department has been establishing <hes>. Very good. I think precedent for indicting <hes>. Foreign intelligence operatives on a regular basis for various various acts that they've done against this country in <hes>. You for private sector companies. What what would you advise chief. Information officers chief information security officers others were involved in <hes>. In at least trying to grapple with the consequences to their organizations and ensuring that the damage is limited the extent to which they can. I think this really underscores the topic that you talked <hes>. On a number of occasions about which is that every organization out there needs to start with an assumption that already inside. this particular gates underscores. Just how futile. It is to try to build walls around the perimeter of you network because someone somewhere is going to get through through through new mechanism that you haven't even thought of or or can't control four so it could be supply chain attack next time. It could be zero table an ability. It could be a known vulnerability that you've got patched against that or could be an insider <hes>. The number of methods that they can get in are numerous. And if you're trying to chase your tail china <unk>. For closed down each one. You're always gonna fail because there's always gonna be one more thing that you adding accounted for this out there that you may not have even thought of <hes>. And the reality. Is that if you start with assumption that capable adversary will get inside in. The east are for their activities within the network. That's when you can get an advantage. Where if you detect them quickly into jackson before joining damage you can prevent for from any damage any damage from being done. And if you look at how <hes>. They executed this particular attack. Yesterday came in through the solar winds vulnerability where they came in through the reseller <hes>. On the was selling office re sixty five and azure licenses to their customers but at the end of the day once they move past that initial doctor they started doing traditional things started maintain persistence trying to kill security products. Move laterally trump. and that's what you had the opportunity to detect them in fact some organizations have to talk to them and <unk>. Jacqueline before any any bhakta <hes>. Before they had any impact to the company.

Dmitri itunes dmitriev russia Today hundred people twenty first century silverado hundred times dmitri american