37 Burst results for "COX"

Fresh update on "cox" discussed on Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:34 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "cox" discussed on Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

"Employee of the Los Angeles Angels has been taken into custody on federal drug charges in connection with last year's overdose. Death of pitcher Tyler Skaggs. Carl these LP Philip says details 24 year old Eric has been charged with getting the pills that killed Tyler Skaggs was found dead in his Dallas area hotel room. U. S attorney Aaron Millie. Cox says King had given Skaggs pills that were supposed to be oxycodone experts later determined At the pill, which closely resembled a 30 milligram oxycodone tablets have been laced with fentanyl. It wasn't prescription Oxy at all. It was a deadly counter. King is facing a charge of conspiracy to distribute the pills that contained fentanyl. It carries a possible 20 year federal prison term LP Phillips for CBS News, Dallas. Massachusetts is rolling back some of its reopening measures amid an uptick in Corona virus cases. Governor Charlie Baker says bars masquerading as restaurants will be closed out burg gatherings will be limited to 50 people, down from 100 Baker says recent Corona virus clusters were traced back to big parties. Since the start of the pandemic. Boston has reported more than 21,000 cases and over 1000 deaths. A naturalization ceremony for us citizens was held outside where all on hand could be kept socially distant. This is unprecedented for.

Tyler Skaggs Fentanyl Governor Charlie Baker Oxycodone Los Angeles Angels Dallas King Aaron Millie OXY Massachusetts Cbs News Boston Carl COX Attorney Eric U. S Philip
Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 3 hrs ago

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

"A former L. A Angels employee is charged in the death of Angels picture. Tyler Skaggs, correspondent Clayton Nevel says Skaggs died last year of an alleged drug alleged drug overdose during a team road trip to Texas for L. A Angels communications director Erik A. Charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl U. S attorney Aaron Millie Cox says K allegedly gave Tyler Skaggs a blue pill resembling an oxycodone tablets. That was laced with

Tyler Skaggs Drug Overdose Aaron Millie Cox Fentanyl Oxycodone Clayton Nevel Erik A. Texas Director Attorney U. S
Fresh update on "cox" discussed on Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:37 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "cox" discussed on Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

"Stalling, hiring and slowing an economic rebound. The economy has now recovered on ly about 42% of the 22 million jobs it lost due to the pandemic. Oprah Winfrey's magazine has purchased 26 billboards in Louisville, Kentucky, demanding the arrest of the police involved in the death of Briana Taylor. The billboards feature Taylor's face. They were put up the same week that O magazine put Taylor on their cover. Taylor was shot by cops serving a no knock search warrant in March. They did not identify themselves. When they entered her home. Her boyfriend opened fire, and three officers fired back, killing Taylor. Case didn't make national headlines until after the killing of George Floyd in minute. Minneapolis in May. Well. A former employee of the Los Angeles Angels has been taken into custody on federal drug charges in connection with last year's overdose. Death of Picture Tyler Skaggs Kiareldeen LP. Phillips has the details. 24 year old Eric has been charged with getting the pills that killed Tyler Skaggs was found dead in his Dallas area hotel room. U. S Attorney Aaron Millie Cox says King had given Skaggs pills that were supposed to be oxycodone experts later determined At the pill, which closely resembled a 30 milligram oxycodone tablets have been laced with fentanyl. It wasn't prescription Oxy at all. It was a deadly counter. King is facing a charge of conspiracy to distribute the pills that contained fentanyl. It carries a possible 20 year federal prison term LP Phillips for CBS News Dallas. WCBS News time is 5 22 Let's say you just bought a house. Bad news is.

Briana Taylor Tyler Skaggs Fentanyl Oprah Winfrey Dallas Oxycodone Los Angeles Angels King George Floyd O Magazine Kentucky Louisville Phillips CBS Aaron Millie Cox OXY Minneapolis Eric Attorney
Los Angeles - Apple Fire Started By Malfunctioning Vehicle

BBC World Service

00:47 sec | 3 d ago

Los Angeles - Apple Fire Started By Malfunctioning Vehicle

"At the 26,000 acre wildfire burning in Southern California's Riverside and San Bernardino counties is now at least 7% contained as Benjamin Perper from K VCR reports. The so called apple blazes spreading into the scent Bernardin oh national forests. The fire began Friday and has forced thousands to evacuate. Lisa Cox, Fire information officer with the U. S Forest Service, says the blaze is burning in the San Gorgonio wilderness, Pretty thick vegetation shop around which is very flammable vegetation type and some timber. It's been ah, couple 100 years since burnt. Around 2000 firefighters are battling a blaze being driven by high temperatures and low humidity. Cal Fire investigators have determined the fire was caused by a vehicle malfunction specifically a diesel fueled vehicle emitting burning carbon from the exhaust

Cal Fire San Gorgonio San Bernardino Bernardin Benjamin Perper Lisa Cox Southern California Apple U. S Forest Service Officer
"cox" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

09:08 min | 3 d ago

"cox" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"And Danny. and Michael They just saw. Two. Big. In. Those days must inches as he got older, but he was six boy and the Big Guy? And Shining to beg he said the guy you want as Cox. Monday mandate and is WHO's Cox. Actor, he's English glowing English. English. because. I live with that. So. Yeah there's English accurate. He's he's he's he's pretty good. I said I said okay. So the next thing I knew I get this call from. Bonnie Timmermann. Could I go to her office and do put myself on tape. For this thing. So Toe Jackson who in the plate with his one of my oldest friends I said Phil? Would you come with me and? been. Do. The lines off. And sure I'll do. So I came into Bonnie bodies so. She's goose. Gorgeous. I just love by I just want to kind of. She's eighteen. She's a she's quite sacred for me and Bonnie. She's this brother precious person. And So she's very quiet. And I come and she said Would you mind I'm GonNa, put you on tape but I don't WanNa. See your face. I said. Oh. Okay She said, no, no I want you to be. Can you be away from the camera? Can I see I I just want to see the back I don't care. I mean maybe eventually we can see your face, but it's very important that I i. so I did the addition away. That seems smell and. and. So I'm not I said. So why did you tell McAlpine? She said well, you know I. came to the theater to see you in rat in the skull. On Brian's recommendations she said, go see you and I came and it was wonderful but I got late I got there late and I wasn't in my proper seat so I couldn't see you for. You, but I couldn't see you for the first. Forty five minutes of the show. Let me spend a head you. You were sounded wonderful. So I. I saw in the second half, and of course, since I thought it'd be good not to see you just to hear you so and that is how I stop the character because I stopped. Turning away on that same smell and all that. So he's in Israel and that's fine. That's Oh. Bunny. Well we should just remind people that this was you know Michael Man's movie manhunter came out five years before the silence of the lambs were Hannibal Five Years Before Hopkins and it was not a huge part in terms of screen time I. Think it was something like ten minutes, but it was very memorable. However, this was going to be the big break and then it doesn't really do well and. It wasn't the critically did well. But he was broke. Don't rented broken fight dinner dinner is came to hate manhunter because it represented the worst time in his financial career. He was broke he tried to start. Hollywood. Places in in a hurricane zone, which is. Wilmington North Carolina, and of course, he knew the hurricane came through. Yeah. But I mean all the guys you built a sense because it was a ship right nation when they built these sets and these sets were solidly building they lasted they. I mean he did the was a film with Mickey Rourke Code something about China and That set I'm amused going was still standing in, it'd been beaten by all kinds of weather. And Yeah, and then the film went into an escrow. Opened in la the reviews were excellent another one to an escrow and couldn't get the distribution because he didn't have the money. So it founded on that and it was Jeremy Thomas the film. And he distributed in the UK It was a big success people said, this is amazing. And and of course then. I and I still have a proof copy of silence of the lambs which were sent to me by Tom Harris and it's soft proof copy and I read and I. This is good. And then that was that I had no more about it. I didn't know that was the end of it, and then it was all these use limos but somebody like five years later or something. That We had the same agent and. My agent. And he says this pill Brian, it sounds very similar to that film you made. Hunting thing he said Experience Simla. Called silence of the lambs. It's written by the same guys same character he said yes but he's called Quigley the character. I said No. No. The character I played was called letter I. Don't I said the bus the bus tony to play this part. And I said well, quickly I don't remember quickly. And, it turned out that there was something called quarrel over the spelling, of Lectoure. It's Differently in both films and it was something that I think Michael. Michael wanted to do it but I don't know. I, I think. Michael's can quite material. So. What happened was that? They he kept the name. And eventually they. They came to some agreement, the name, and so became except with a different spelling. So that was I. Unfortunately, premature end of number two of three trips would and we'll just. Just no, it's not like you I. Think you my sense was that it was disappointing to you that you go back and you do some of the best work you've done. You've said, the best thing you've done on the stage was titus andronicus and for the Royal Shakespeare Company in the late eighties joined there you do that you then do king lear just all kinds of hydrating working all people get this wrong I did king lear at the national, I didn't do. Right. Right. But I mean, you're doing and then you're also think while still in the UK some major films if I'm correct about this, just timing wise Hidden Agenda for Ken Loach Rob Roy and Braveheart. So after you know you've been again with some ninety five alone rob Roy and Braveheart Braveheart wins the Best Picture Oscar eventually. But in ninety five at forty nine let's give holly you decide. Let's give Hollywood one more goal of it. I mean you know I'd had this thing. About being a movie I thought Oh my life that I still wanted to be but I also, and this is the conditioning you know attorney suffered from this as well. You know we're both celts. We both have that thing about. You know the fact that we are this is. Becoming a Big, movement Scottish independence has meant a lot to me and it didn't mean anything to me. But as I've gotten older, I realized something about the particular. Of course, Britain Burton was the same. He was a Welshman Peter O'Toole was half Scots Half Irish born in the U. on leads. So there was that connection that. We were. Tony. Had A tough time. I think in the beginning seventies, which is why he went to. America. Because America represented a kind of freedom that we didn't have in the UK but at the same time and the thing that caught me because I was in my thirties by then I was I was actually my forties. was I had never really cleaned up. In the way I. Felt I, shoot in terms of the classical theater so it was necessary for me after. The false. Things of manhunter and I had to golf this horrible film which was made about China remember. It was have adaptation of a book about Jogging Matheson that people whom on you you know and I, for that all. Pizza'd away. So I I really decided to go to the irs because I needed a job I was going to divorce. So I went through the irs see in order to. You, know of be regulated and also my kids that I was going to be. Separated from. And it was the last place because I'd been the National Hill has been the thing but I love the see I, love the company feeling.

Michael Man manhunter Bonnie Timmermann Hollywood Cox Brian UK China irs America Mickey Rourke Jeremy Thomas Lectoure Danny. Wilmington Toe Jackson North Carolina McAlpine WanNa Jogging Matheson
"cox" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

06:23 min | 3 d ago

"cox" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Jimmy Hazeldine played played Stalin and John mckenry who played Kerensky. We did that film and I remember the first day of it was I've never been in such an atmosphere because it was like going into a cathedral and of course the. Freddie young who, of course it won an Oscar for Alonzo Beret Abia. and. So he was there lighting and it was. I you could hear a pin drop was. Getting, the lights would go. Could you? Like that was. This is all kind of so hush hush as Freddie young shot that scene you know. Off, and they gave me these glasses that gave me these pebble glasses which I could not see out of. Pebble glasses listen couldn't see some as a point where I had to exit. Had to go at the end of the scene and I I thought where's the door? To talk with the doors. Okay. So I got to go. fricken handle. So. Well in those you know subsequent years in the early mid seventies I. I was reading some of the coverage of you. There was a New York Times Review I forget for wit for which production stage or screen but. Described you quote Brian Cox Chap who looks a bit like young. Brando, close quote you were. You know seemed like you had a lot going on and then finally I I and I'm GonNa ask you to pick up this story. You get the call from Hollywood right it's going to be and it sounds like it's all going to happen. John. Slesinger Robert Evans come to Hollywood. What. What was that about? That was in the mid seventies and I don't. and. No Fire my God you have done your homework. No, what happened was I was I was visiting my sister was not it was the by centennial year. You know I don't if you know this but launch alleviate saved my life and it wasn't for Lonzo Levy I wouldn't be here because. When I was at the LYCEUM theatre this was back in the sixties I. I was summoned to do an interview and meeting with loans who live. And I and I was all packed ready ago and it was an Edinburgh was Edinburgh Lyceum, and then I go this message that He. was on the day I was leaving my Bagpiper was about again. Those as used midnight plans late plans that you can get on for thirty shillings. It was very cheap. So I was I was I was. I was heading for that. That's where I was heading for. So it was it was out of the man in the Little Guy Jimmy was a staged ownership. Find this. We know it to the Makia coming home and he said I think. It's been essence yesterday I said Oh yeah. He said the I so I got the known as. Salons can't see you this weekend. So you can't they won't be in the audition and already. Packed in going on I thought. To. How Much do so I go and I had some friends we stand with and I said Oh. I don't know I don't know and I. Did this show and I went to the. Pub, of the Shakespeare Fun enough in the in road. Just opposite. I'm sitting there and I to go. Back. To My. Digs in stockbridge in Edinburgh. And the following morning I picked up the paper and the flight that I would have been on crashed in London killing everybody aboard. God. I always grateful to that. You saved my life. Wow. That's incredible. Yeah. Leading onto you you're quite well. Where you were, Schlesinger? Heavens yeah. Yeah. So I flew yeah that's right. I had to fly to America because there was no other way of getting that. So I flew I took the train I took the train across the country. Ended up going coming. into. Downtown, Los Angeles by train, and then I went out from Los Angeles to La to Frisco to black to Oakland. Then Oakland back to Chicago by train. So I. was there it was seventy, six and. I knew I was going to be going the the nationalized. At the national. Show I thought. Okay. So then I get this call John, Schlesinger wants to meet you and I went. Oh Wow. So I. I. All spruced up I go to the paramount building in the province to years in as the Hollywood sign and paramount going in and he's sexist vice as he has. Jones. Desperate Saddam. Could you go? Would you go? He'll take you one of. The young people you know he to. Best Place and I went and sat in this. Little Room of which turned off the editing suite and I was sitting there and thinking why my hand was this is. A met. This guy is this guy sitting opposite me and I said and he said, hi, I said. He should. Your friend John's I said, no, I'm to meet him for. A meeting he said. He said Oh. Yeah. He said the I think there are some re-shoots. I said research she said Yeah Young, this movie. Making I said Oh. Good. Is it the are he said you know I'm more I'm here but I'm taking over from the editor. because. I said. Oh. It Yeah It's not kind of working out and his this guy was called Jim Clark who was famous editor and I said Oh. That's good. So I I'm still sit in the room and this kind of. Head pop shop with glasses, big glasses and sort of completely. Almost, almost Indian, looking kind of guy..

John mckenry Jimmy Hazeldine Freddie young Alonzo Beret Abia. Hollywood Schlesinger Edinburgh Jones Oakland Edinburgh Lyceum Brian Cox New York Times Oscar Los Angeles Kerensky editor. Brando London Robert Evans Jim Clark
Getting Ready for the 2020 Emmys

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:19 min | Last week

Getting Ready for the 2020 Emmys

"The Television Academy has just unveiled the nominees for this year's edition of the Emmy Woods Nichols Fernando Augusta per checker and colossal rebelo went through the list and brought us the highlights. Let's have a listen. Pelada. Lovely to have you here. Let's talk about the AMI's but first of all, I mean, you have quite an experience with the amas right while I was very lucky last year while working out of our Los Angeles Bureau to attend the ceremony last for the seventy first. Edition of the Emmy Awards it is amazing. It really is a celebration of all things television not only of course, you're able to see the ceremony yourself and how it all unfolds that the Microsoft Theater in downtown Los Angeles, you get to sit right next to some of your favorite stars as they celebrate you know a year worth of work you get to watch as some of them lose some of them when at last year was quite. Special because it was of course, the last year that game of thrones was nominated the end of the saga of game of thrones, which was, of course, a really big deal and one thing that I really liked about that was also how they marked the series that were coming to an end last year by bringing all the cast in the production team that was attending the ceremony on stage and kind of acknowledging any TV show that's on. Air for. A few years it is a bit sad one. You know the last time modern family was also the last. So it yeah, it is. It is quite an experience. I mean we are still a few months to go until this year's edition. Hopefully, we'll be able to have it in person by then by September the television academy still hasn't exactly unveiled the plans for that. But yeah, it just feels as much as it is A. Celebration of television it feels very different to watch it in person than on. TV. Sets and if he's going to be a special year because I mean we've been watching lots of television during lockdown effing and one of the things don't you grieve me. Colada that I like about the Emmys they are. You know what they are actually fairly diverse compared to the film awards and that just shows TV can be actually quite progressive away. Absolutely I think. The nominations this year as well. Reflects that diversity is well and yeah it does show how TV has been able to catch up with only momentum that has been happening in Hollywood about asking for change when it comes to diversity. But even if you look at the shows that are nominated or even just a shows that we're watching now they are reflection of different stories that are a reflection of different themes it's not as standard I would. Say, for example, with the Oscars and I think that's what makes it quite an interesting and exciting. Well, let's talk about some of the favorites I did like sheets Greek being nominated for comedy series of things surprise it started as a very little Canadian series but then apparently people saying that my win actually because the critics love it oh, it is a fantastic show I definitely has been one of the ones I've been watching this year and I was very happy to see it getting nominated for the outstanding Comedy Series Award another one on that category that it was really happy to see their it's the kaminsky methods. This is a Netflix show and yes, it is very lovely with Michael. Douglas starring in it and it is very funny as well and it was so nice to see you know it. They're in the category as well and I just I was very happy I. Think. As we were saying the nominations this year do justice to the TV. We've been watching I mean drama succession I know we're both big fans and you know Brian Cox and Jeremy Strong both be nominated for best actor in a drama series very well deserved extremely well deserved and it is, of course, we're talking here about a big categories. As if you go down the list, there are more awards being given to all the shows we've been mentioning. Not Awards, nominations I mean. But yes, I was very, very happy to see succession I think personally, it has been one of my favorite shows over the last few years I can't remember being dad excited about a show in succession was already nominated for Fiore's last year. I. Know that Nicholas Brutal do who composed the sound score for at won an emmy last year. For. For the score, he composed for succession that would be nice to see it how it's catching momentum and that fans quite disappointed that due to coronavirus sat filming restrictions. The third series did not come out this year as planned but this is a recognition of TV done very very well, there's been other recognitions for example, the morning show had quite a few nominations. And again, it was a show that it was not like loved the beginning by tics but I think people kind of were said, you know what actually was a good series especially the last episode of series. So another one I'm very happy also have very significant for apple as well as the morning show was you know the show that apple try to use as? To make its mark as someone that could compete with the network giants and streaming giants as well. So not only is a very good sign for the a seeing Jennifer Aniston Steve Carell nominated but also to see apple when they've been investing into the right series hiring great actors, great writers, Great Producers, and that it actually pays off and Collado. So what if Jimmy Kimmel? This time I mean, as you rightly said, we don't know how ceremony is going to be, but you know what bt awards they did try and they did like a special ceremony. Names might have to do that because it's happening on the twentieth September. That's very the as the television academy has said that the creative emmys, which you know the creative emmy is usually happen a few days before the Primetime Emmys and they've already said that those are happening on an online platform a few days before didn't haven't clarified yet for the AMI's themselves. We still don't know exactly what are the plans now? What is interesting about Jimmy, Kimmel here hosting I think it's his third time hosting is that he is nominated as well. His show Jimmy came alive is on the outstanding variety talk series, and there's always very endearing one. You know one of the host sometimes even people introducing the award end up being nominated. So yeah, I'd be curious to see exactly how that's going to pay out I don't know. was there any surprise nomination here on this list for you? Fernando as F- in the morning show was A bit of a surprise for me and also in the drama category I mean, we saw men hurriedly having quite a lot of nominations itself Jeremy Pope for his role in Hollywood for a best actor on limited series or movie because Lotte I think competition program should go again to Rupo's drag race. Oh Yeah. His love rapport figured they will he would win again just shows how you know when Ru Paul's drag race started. It was a very Niche not known at the public, and now they've been doing this for over a decade now, and there's just shows how you know there is an appetite for a show like that that it is mainstream, there's no way you can't say that anymore and is so empowering it is, of course, one of my personal favorites as well. It was really nice last year to be there when they won and to see Europol come on stage with a lot of the. Of the show as well and some of the judges when we look at that category I'm partial to and I would love to see them winning again on that category.

Television Academy Jimmy Kimmel Emmy AMI Fernando Augusta Hollywood Apple Emmy Woods Nichols Los Angeles Bureau Los Angeles Ru Paul Microsoft Amas Netflix Jeremy Pope Kaminsky Nicholas Brutal Europol Fiore Douglas
'Friends' ladies reunite to encourage fans to vote in the 2020 presidential election

Big Boy

00:18 sec | Last week

'Friends' ladies reunite to encourage fans to vote in the 2020 presidential election

"Is encouraging fans to get out and vote. Jennifer Aniston, Courtney Cox and Lisa could row came together over the weekend to remind their fans to make sure they're registered to vote ahead of the upcoming presidential election. Courtney Cox posted a video with a caption that wrote Friends Don't LET Friends Skip Elections. Tom Hanks

Courtney Cox Jennifer Aniston Tom Hanks Lisa
White Men Accused Of Attack On Black Man Face Felony Charges In Indiana

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:16 sec | 3 weeks ago

White Men Accused Of Attack On Black Man Face Felony Charges In Indiana

"Prosecutors in Indiana have charged two white men in connection with an alleged assault of a black man on July 4th that was caught on film. Sean Pretty, and Jerry Cox, facing battery confinement and intimidation charges for their alleged rolls in an attack on box rush Booker.

Sean Pretty Jerry Cox Assault Booker Indiana
Michael Cox Recalls Being Beaten By Fellow Officers

WBZ Midday News

01:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Michael Cox Recalls Being Beaten By Fellow Officers

"Police officer coming forward with his story On how he was mistaken for a suspect and beaten by fellow officers from 25 years ago. Michael Cox, speaking with double BBC TV's hit the back of the head and turn around in front of the head and I start didn't get kicked, punched, hit by multiple sides all at once. I kind of remember kind of trying to get up and at some point Seeing like a silhouette of a police officer and cocks, and he and his partner were working undercover in the gang unit, where they spotted the getaway car of a shooting suspect the driver took off on foot gave Cox Chase knowing backup was on the way he was climbing a fence in pursuit of the suspect. When he says other officers pulled him down and started beating him. They didn't stop. Until members of his own unit arrived. Cox suffered head injuries and kidney damage, but says the department tried to cover up what happened. Nobody wass found responsible anyway, for criminal activity that occurred It was clear that you know, these people wanted me guard. I was like this is not going to stop. Even if I leave. It's not gonna stop. You stayed with the department. And Cox, saying that his family received threatening phone calls, and he had his tires slashed by fellow officers. But he refused to quit. 30 years later, he wound up rising to the highest uniform rank of bpd. But then he became The chief at the Ann Arbor, Michigan Police Department took a civil rights lawsuit for cocks to be compensated for all he went through. But he says he's not bitter. And he doesn't think that police need to be defunded that if you want something to get better, you need to invest in it. At 1

Michael Cox Cox Chase Officer Michigan Police Department BBC Kidney Damage Wass Ann Arbor Partner
Documentaries having new life thanks to streaming

Talking Tech

07:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Documentaries having new life thanks to streaming

"The pandemic has sent us all home without access to gyms, hair salons movie theaters. So what's a documentary into do? Peter Spier Academy Award nominated producer director has been making films for several decades dock. He says the documentaries are now finding a renaissance in streaming. One of the unexpected side benefits were filmmakers and peters going to tell all about it Peter. Yes thank you very much a pleasure to be here with us. To tell us about what's going on in streaming. So right now. Because of Covid people are staying home. Fortunately, streaming has really picked up since that time and their reports for the strenuous got up between thirty five and forty percent, so people are now. Using streaming taxes, all of their content Bluefin's shows the Netflix. We're talking about Netflix. Talking about Amazon Voodoo Fandango Comcast Cox. All of these platforms are doing very well. You've got a bunch of different. Movies are out there right now. Summer old summer newer. Tell everybody about what you've got in what what you've seen it. Is it been easier to get them up there? So let's start with telling everybody about some of the titles. Right, so I have a couple of club rugged entertainment. We have three titles right now. A film that I got back from a distribution company called Doug's more which we now have on Amazon Voodoo and Fandango? Probably a few others Newfield called the Sharm hate about the OT. PT Community and that film is currently on all platforms. And we're what's called transactional video so for your for people out there that don't know the difference. There's a transactional video which means you have to rent the video there s Vaud or Day. which subscription video which would be services like? Netflix and Hulu at Amazon and Yeah, so those are the two main. Video. in demand on demand services. Are You finding? There is a bigger thirst for documentaries from the buyers right now than there was before covert. I think with the emergency. Some big documentary programmes tiger king right now out of control in terms of popularity Are you know the jinx? That was another one that kind of broke through and we're looking at documentaries that. Are Not only one offs, but sure. I have what's called a one off. which is just single episode, but. They're also you know episodes. Alike limited a limited series for it's. One two I mean would say three to five or six episodes now. How are you finding the documents as Documenta? How're you finding as a documentarian? Being able to shoot right now when we're social distancing and we're wearing masks, and you're not supposed to be going out and doing these things how you're getting stuff done. It's almost impossible I you know. I think the industry is trying to come to terms with how we are going to move forward shooting the biggest issues insurance so being able to cover, not only the liability. But to protect the crew, that's a whole thing, but you know what it's easier with documentaries and doing a full on production so I think you. Wall Street documentaries because of the cost and the. The smaller impact with the size of the crew well, you could always interview people outside. You don't have to interview them in their office and that has to help right. Well people are doing those kinds of things and then there are you know because people are getting accustomed now to save zoomed interviews, there are documentarian making. Documentaries using zoo. Which is pretty interesting so They're just setting it up and you know you do your interview it. Routing out with other kinds of clips and archival footage, but yeah I mean. People are doing all kinds of work around to make this. If you watch the local news or the National News, it's now become the reporter introduces. As Zoom interview basically and they they cut back and forth between the reporter, staring this computer, his or her computer, and then there's zoom interview. So how do you? You Always WanNa, take documentary docu documentary and take it to another level. So how do you make that more instinct? Well I think in those cases. They're using just the. presets of that look. I think if you're doing the documentary yet more time to creatively do with that particular interview, but you bring up a good point, and you only have limited resolution and quality to zoom interview and. you know unfortunately you have to deliver to the platform, and the platform may reject it based on the quality, so it's definitely something that's going to have to be navigated. Okay finally, tell everybody, but does more. This was the film that you did several years ago. It's been lost lost for years, and it's now back alive again. Thanks to streaming, so plug it in television, yes! Dunn's more features. wwl Brown could name. Harbison Talia Shire a Barry Corbin. Some really cool actors. It's kind of who done it I call it You know a small a town film. On steroids and it's very cool, cool film. And I've got disarm hate about the LGBT committee that's got documentary out now. Streaming narrated by Harvey Fierstein and we have our latest film. Michael Debar. Who Do you walk me? Be About? His kinda zealot type character who was in the film shirt with love and also performed of a billion people at live aid. And why is there a documentary? Why is there a documentary about him now? Well. He's also currently DJ Little Steven's underground garage his second. Biggest DJ that's to Howard Stern, so he's very popular on Siriusxm but He's got an incredible life I. Mean you know it's? It's also a story about recovery. And I'm telling you no matter what you've been through in your life, it will not compared to what he's been through. You can't even imagine the stories the sky half well you. You'll get to see in the film so if you're going to go off and watch documentaries on streaming this weekend. Where should we go? go to Amazon Tango all those places. VOODOO COMCAST COX but the three films to watch Dunsmore. Michael the bar. Who Do you want me to be and disarm me and you could see them on Fandango, Voodoo and Amazon. All of those react Peter spier rugged releasing.

Amazon Netflix Peter Spier Academy Peter Peter Spier Covid Michael Debar Reporter Howard Stern Harvey Fierstein Sharm Harbison Talia Shire Siriusxm Newfield Dunsmore Producer Bluefin Doug Director National News
New vehicle sales dip as coronavirus continues to spread

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 3 weeks ago

New vehicle sales dip as coronavirus continues to spread

"Tells us that we have been seeing some troubling sales trends. After two months of somewhat steady rises, New vehicle sales are dipping a bit while the use market is going great guns. COX Automotive chief economist Jonathan Smoke says. For last week use sales were up 4%. Well, new retail sales were down about 25%. Inventory is a problem, particularly in the new market. But judging by the activities so far in July, it looks like the use market has a bit more gas in the tank to deliver a more solid alive then, and we initially thought another concern, says smoke the rising number of covert cases, particularly in markets that had been seeing strong sales. Jeff Gilbert W W. J pretty Go night, 50 straight out of

Jonathan Smoke Jeff Gilbert W W. J Chief Economist Cox Automotive
EncroChat user experience includes getting owned, going to prison

Risky Business

03:49 min | Last month

EncroChat user experience includes getting owned, going to prison

"I think it was a couple of months ago. Actually that we I bike about this incur chats far network. This is encrypted like modified android foreign. That was marketed to criminals feel like doing their super-secret high end drug deals and stuff they got aren't pretty hard a while ago and wound up actually shutting down, they pushed out notifications to all of their customers, saying. Yeah, don't use our phones anymore. We're just GONNA close turns out. They did get courteous. Courteous earns looks like by French authorities, but the resulting arrests have started, and it's just i. mean this is big. This is amazing. Yeah, this story certainly has gotten bigger and bigger. The more we hear about it, and yet they got well and truly earned by the ranch. it does seem like by had deployed malware out onto the individual phones using that. That to be able to scrape up conversations and photos, a who the other information being exchanged in before it was encrypted before it was sent out over the network and have been doing so for quite some time. Yes, and then the fact that it managed to lost this long. Yeah, because there's been a whole bunch of race and a bunch of groups. Criminals wound up all over Europe through this corporation. In fact, they managed to keep it. kind of under wraps as long as they did is pretty impressive, as well good, good obstacle, but yeah, just a really really interesting story and a close to them. You know some people are asking about the you know. What does it mean to be able to? Do? You know why lawful interested in this manner ride by going out mass compromising age devices. Without the cooperation of the Manufacturer and it's. Interesting comparison to the other Crypto, wars was going on about into encrypt, or you know how adversaries in this case, law enforcement move around the network to be able to go where the daughter is. Who Cares about into their? Own the edge devices, and this is just such a great example of that it is, but I mean the huge irony here is if I were using signal on irs that'd probably would have been most of them would have been fine right well, of course, they yeah that that is kind of funny presumably IOS. Remote sports that you could use the deployment with probably more expensive than whatever it took. EARN CRA CHATTAN and pushed off. Some of the top people, but they wouldn't have got like I. Mean a lot of people are getting a getting arrested here. I actually asked Joe Cox joys been doing great reporting on this in fact, and actually asked him to tell me what he thinks is significant about all of this, and here's what he had to say. I think what's different hair. When it comes to the increase chat operation as opposed to technical investigations by law enforcement is the Shit scale I mean. We're not talking about single dark web marketplace. With some Athens some sellers of cocaine that sort of thing. This was the technical infrastructure for a large chunk of organized crime across continents. We're talking hitman money launderers drug traffickers, basically the real career criminals used this phone service and is very hard to overstate how big of a blow this is to them. People are trying to escape from the countries that in people going to ground. There is going to be likely severe disruption to the bulk drug trade with us. So at yeah, turns out the Anchorage user. Experience is not quite what people signed up for. Some of the arrests have been spectacular I, mean we? There was one where there was. Tons of coke was seized. We've got twelve hundred kilos of math, but probably the one that really caught my eye was actually this news just broke this morning, but Dutch police actually found some shipping containers one of them was set up to be like holding cells, and another one had like a dentist chair in it and bags full of pliers, and it was like a torture chamber, and they even had collected intelligence on who was due to spend some time in this special shipping container. Container and warned them often sent them into hiding, but I mean yeah. It looks like really heavy. Bad Crooks have have all been getting busted here.

Joe Cox Container Europe IRS Athens Cocaine
"cox" Discussed on LGBTQ&A

LGBTQ&A

03:53 min | Last month

"cox" Discussed on LGBTQ&A

"I want to start with your Time magazine cover if that's okay into dozen fourteen year on the cover of time and the headline, said the transgender tipping point. Wow, I wanNA to know if you knew that that's what the headline was going to be. And what your reaction was, it was a cover. Try so I wasn't. One hundred percent sure I be on the cover. They told me it stem news item happened. That was really big that I would be bumped from the cover so I didn't know that the cover. What's happening until I? Think the night before that was happening for sure. I didn't know what the headline would be. The first time I saw the cover, a friend of mine named Precious Davis. Who's a brilliant activist and human beings? She's in Chicago. She texted me a photo of the cover and then <hes> it was. The editor of time premiered on like think morning America. One of the morning shows that morning. And then it was <hes>, and I think that certainly changed my wow, so, what was your reaction to the transgender tipping point part of it? You know it's I, don't it's hard for me to separate my reaction in two thousand fourteen from the subsequent sort of reaction. That community has had to that title. There was so much. Criticism. From my community of that title, and the suggestion of that tipping point and criticism of the way the article was written, and who was excluded in there was a lot of that. I like about my community, and what I appreciate about activists who are on the ground doing the work is that in their honesty they keep us accountable. They keep us pushing to go further to be more inclusive to think differently and harder about who is being left out and what? We're not talking about so it's hard for me to separate my reaction. Of the tipping point moment from. The criticism and the critical interrogation of that moment my engine Mitchell, it's we did a panel for variety magazine. A year ago about Trans Representation in the media. For Trans Actors, and she what she said, is that that moment in two thousand fourteen, with kind of all about Laverne is the way she framed it. And then she said Post Post because we're probably impose moment, even though poses still in the air. It's about all of us. Jin, Richards contended, and I like that because I think it was always my goal, that was very clear in two thousand, fourteen at that moment was not about me and man it was about. About a community that was part was about all the activist who worked for years to create space for me to have that moment on the cover of Time magazine, and so now that is coming to fruition that more of our voices are being elevated and more perspectives and <hes>. It's taken a lot of pressure me I feel a lot of pressure in two thousand fourteen I gotta tell you reflecting on that moment is. Do you remember the criticism more than the celebration? Of both, they covered with revealed on my birthday, so my birthday now is not only my birthday. Anniversary of me being on the cover of Time magazine, which is pretty dope and I decided that year I said to myself. If I'm going to be on the cover of time, magazine, chiappa Party and so. I wasn't going to be on the cover. If I was bump for any reason I was like well, they could just be a birthday party, and so I had a party that year and Time magazine mistake were so generous that they gave us tons of copies of the magazine and my boyfriend at the time had posters made of the of the magazine as opposed to of my Time magazine, covering my apartment, and I went to my mom, and then we gave one. Away for charity, so we had a party and it was indeed celebration there were tons of Trans People at the Party and some people from orange, new black with the party, and so I have fond memories of the celebration of the moment as well but I think both can exist all about both end that I can be in the celebration, the neck, and also critically effect on the moment

laverne Cox October Eighth Supreme Court Trans Movement Time magazine Stephen Orange
Laverne Cox: Fighting for Trans Lives

LGBTQ&A

03:53 min | Last month

Laverne Cox: Fighting for Trans Lives

"I want to start with your Time magazine cover if that's okay into dozen fourteen year on the cover of time and the headline, said the transgender tipping point. Wow, I wanNA to know if you knew that that's what the headline was going to be. And what your reaction was, it was a cover. Try so I wasn't. One hundred percent sure I be on the cover. They told me it stem news item happened. That was really big that I would be bumped from the cover so I didn't know that the cover. What's happening until I? Think the night before that was happening for sure. I didn't know what the headline would be. The first time I saw the cover, a friend of mine named Precious Davis. Who's a brilliant activist and human beings? She's in Chicago. She texted me a photo of the cover and then it was. The editor of time premiered on like think morning America. One of the morning shows that morning. And then it was and I think that certainly changed my wow, so, what was your reaction to the transgender tipping point part of it? You know it's I, don't it's hard for me to separate my reaction in two thousand fourteen from the subsequent sort of reaction. That community has had to that title. There was so much. Criticism. From my community of that title, and the suggestion of that tipping point and criticism of the way the article was written, and who was excluded in there was a lot of that. I like about my community, and what I appreciate about activists who are on the ground doing the work is that in their honesty they keep us accountable. They keep us pushing to go further to be more inclusive to think differently and harder about who is being left out and what? We're not talking about so it's hard for me to separate my reaction. Of the tipping point moment from. The criticism and the critical interrogation of that moment my engine Mitchell, it's we did a panel for variety magazine. A year ago about Trans Representation in the media. For Trans Actors, and she what she said, is that that moment in two thousand fourteen, with kind of all about Laverne is the way she framed it. And then she said Post Post because we're probably impose moment, even though poses still in the air. It's about all of us. Jin, Richards contended, and I like that because I think it was always my goal, that was very clear in two thousand, fourteen at that moment was not about me and man it was about. About a community that was part was about all the activist who worked for years to create space for me to have that moment on the cover of Time magazine, and so now that is coming to fruition that more of our voices are being elevated and more perspectives and It's taken a lot of pressure me I feel a lot of pressure in two thousand fourteen I gotta tell you reflecting on that moment is. Do you remember the criticism more than the celebration? Of both, they covered with revealed on my birthday, so my birthday now is not only my birthday. Anniversary of me being on the cover of Time magazine, which is pretty dope and I decided that year I said to myself. If I'm going to be on the cover of time, magazine, chiappa Party and so. I wasn't going to be on the cover. If I was bump for any reason I was like well, they could just be a birthday party, and so I had a party that year and Time magazine mistake were so generous that they gave us tons of copies of the magazine and my boyfriend at the time had posters made of the of the magazine as opposed to of my Time magazine, covering my apartment, and I went to my mom, and then we gave one. Away for charity, so we had a party and it was indeed celebration there were tons of Trans People at the Party and some people from orange, new black with the party, and so I have fond memories of the celebration of the moment as well but I think both can exist all about both end that I can be in the celebration, the neck, and also critically effect on the moment

Time Magazine Chiappa Party Precious Davis Chicago Editor Laverne America Mitchell JIN Richards
"cox" Discussed on PM Mood

PM Mood

05:43 min | Last month

"cox" Discussed on PM Mood

"Curtain off the red carpet, and to the frontlines of progress with change makers and innovators that are doing the work to shift our culture and expand their social impact. I am so excited to welcome to he a mood Roderick. Cox, who is one of the only African? American conductors in the world..

Roderick Cox
300 teenagers possibly exposed to COVID-19 at ‘Pongfest’ party in Lakeway

Sean Hannity

00:46 sec | Last month

300 teenagers possibly exposed to COVID-19 at ‘Pongfest’ party in Lakeway

"Three hundred teenagers in lake way close to Austin who attended a punk fest party may have been exposed to the coronavirus Eric like a reports from our Austin bureau Lakeway mayor sandy **** said on a Facebook live they have fifty active code nineteen cases now but that's probably going to soar and it's because there was a very large party this Saturday this past Saturday and it was with a number of high school students and there were students in attendance that were positive for Kobe nineteen Cox's Travis county public health as contact tracing the students who were there they say attendees need to self isolate as well as those they were in contact with Cox's they're working with Baylor Scott and white to set up required testing for those party

Austin Kobe COX Baylor Scott Eric Lakeway Facebook Travis County
Sam Feder: Trans Lives On Screen (ft. Alex Schmider)

LGBTQ&A

05:06 min | Last month

Sam Feder: Trans Lives On Screen (ft. Alex Schmider)

"I wanted to talk to you today because we're about to hear an interview with Sam Feder the director of the new. Disclosure and you are one of the associate producers on the movie. You're also the associate director of transgender representation at glad, and maybe most importantly you're my friend and I've heard you talk about this movie for maybe like two years, so tell me why has movie meant so much to you? I think working at glad and understanding the significance of representation, having an ability to conceptualize our history in terms of TV and film representation is crucial for the majority of the public everything. People have come to know about this community has been informed by TV and film, and so if we have no historical context or Lens to look through to understand how these images have contributed to our cultural understanding, than we don't fully understand the power of media and the power of storytelling and begun Netflix's not best case scenario, right? It doesn't get much better in terms of visibility, but I think. What our film also proposes to say is that visibility is only a means to an end it has to lead to material and real world cultural change so in that way it is critical and granted that in in different countries there are different cultural contexts, different legal systems, but for the first time in many cases I think a lot of people are getting to hear from transpeople ourselves about the media that we have grown up on in addition to the rest of the world. In you know one of those people. We see a lot as Laverne Cox and you know she she's a star. We see her red carpets and I think it's really easy for people who are not as familiar with the Trans Experience to see someone like her, and not not know that for someone in her identity group of Black Trans Woman that it can be a really dangerous world to live in, and in that sense like there's real urgency with this movie. Yeah, absolutely I mean, and it's also about the paradox of visibility, so the more that we are known the more that we are seen. The more likely that people may be enraged by our existence, and so we always have to sort of toe the line and understand that again. Visibility is not the end goal. Representation is not the end goal, but it helps us to get to a place of cultural understanding and acceptance, so that people can live their lives as they are safely with the paradox of visibility I think it's. It's such a nuance conversation to talk about, but do you think I'm wrong in I? Don't WanNa just I don't accept the violence, obviously for anybody in or out of our community, but do you think I'm wrong to think that all of the issues that come the visibility? Those are necessary hurdles that we have to deal with comes with visibility in there. There's no way around that. I disagree in some ways because I think when visibility is tied to responsible, accurate and authentic storytelling. Then we can actually counter. Cultural Backlash that is often tied to stories about us that don't involve us. The disability community coined this phrase that I use all the time. There can be nothing about us without us, and historically all the stories that have been told about transgender people have not actually involved us and so I don't believe that it's pure in black and white. That's such a good point, so you're saying and rightfully so that we are seeing issues. Come out of all this increased visibility, because the representation has been poor, it's been bad I mean when you watch disclosure, you will see a hundred plus years of what I would argue as misrepresentation. I really now that I've started really thinking about and looking critically at this history, most of it has been misrepresentation and inaccurately reflecting who trans people are who this community? Community is and also only focusing on the extremes of our experiences, whether it's Trans people only dying, and only being the victims of violence or only being on red carpets, and only being celebrated to the extremes, because there's a spectrum of experiences and I think when we're, we talk about representation, we want a the richness and the depth, and as Richard, said what we need is more so that when those clumsy or trope ish or stereotypical or shared representations show up. They're not the only thing we have to rely on not only for the public to see and understand who we are for. We ourselves as Trans people to see and understand who we

Laverne Cox Associate Director Sam Feder Netflix Director Richard
Rohingya Refugee Camps Recorded First COVID-19 Death

Morning Edition

03:57 min | Last month

Rohingya Refugee Camps Recorded First COVID-19 Death

"As hard as it can be for most people to maintain social distance consider how much harder it is for refugees packed into makeshift camps that is the reality for one a million Muslim minority rocking guy who fled Myanmar their camps are in neighboring Bangladesh and those camps recorded their first confirmed deaths from covert on June first Michael Sullivan reports two weeks ago Bangladesh declared parts of the Cox's bazaar district where the camps are located a red zone and climb to lock down on those areas as the virus spread I think everybody is very concerned that the numbers are going to increase significantly Louise Donovan is spokesperson for the U. N. H. C. R. in Cox's bazaar if you look at Bangladesh's Utica Cox's bazaar the numbers are increasing very rapidly and we're concerned that the same thing will happen in the camps camps that have some of the highest population density in the world Rahm das runs the roving the relief effort in Cox's bazaar for the NGO care international it is four times the density Arafat New York City eight times the density of Wuhan city about how activities but here you are at and that he says make social distancing in the camps almost impossible your contact the people inside the house thirty four hours they have to go out for food they had to go to the community Charlotte they have to go to the house that does though it thank you photo make sure that all the a million people followed the thunder one million people aid groups are struggling to finish twelve new clinics for COPD patients with a total of nineteen hundred beds by the end of June Robert look what does food for the hungry opened the first a few weeks ago we are using it as a crime I think casting top style because of the need on the ground we had to modify each better faster and to ensure that we are responding to that I did to needs which is called his clinic has fifty beds for isolation and treatment of moderate to severe cases another clinic outside the camp has one hundred and fifty more but critical cases the require intensive care and ventilators we'll have to go to the government hospital in Cox's bazaar and that worries him the number of beds in Cork's Bastos de limited as I talk now I told you there any beds that are blind right now with that being said all I did accident dropping their question Keysight Torah the number of cases another concern Rohingya in the camps are reluctant to come forward for testing and instead self medicating with help from makeshift pharmacies inside the camps so Tom Raheem ola runs one after another not that excited again about it do you fear he's the go to the clinic the doctors will send them to a different team not just them but their whole families so they come here in the state yes me Dara is arriving activist who works for an international aid group to build awareness in the camps my name and the lamb are bad I hope they will guide you right now some deep blue sea yeah I'm afraid to go to the cleaning because they have heard there will be Q. we told them no and explain what isolation and quarantine are and we told them if there are C. will get treatment and Judy are better then they will go home but people are still suspicious the Bangladesh government's ban on internet in the camps isn't helping people get information either and then there's the rainy season which brings a slew of illnesses that present much is cobra does with costs eighty bones and fevers that leads people to self medicate for those elements instead of getting tested combine that with the fear factor and it's little wonder that some aid workers worry the number of cases in the camps is far greater than what's being reported so far

Bobby and Billy Dukes from Taste of Country

Bobbycast

06:13 min | Last month

Bobby and Billy Dukes from Taste of Country

"Welcome to episode two forty nine, where at the end of this? Eddie Mighty and I will review the movie wall card. The Dewey Cox Story. It's an old movie, but it's a music movie. I never thought it'd be funny, so if you haven't seen the movie, you still might light. Listen to the review. Is We're we're kind of down? But if you haven't seen it and you WANNA watch, maybe go watch it. Then come back to the end of this podcast, but we're GONNA put it at the end. In case, there are spoilers to right Mike. Yeah a little bit. But that's not a movie doesn't matter if it's spoiled, it's not like some crazy indy. There's nothing you can really spoil it. Yeah, so check that out. CHECK THE MOVIE I! Also talked to Billy Dukes, coming out from taste of country on the top ten hottest artist, a twenty twenty kind of go through that bill, smart guy like him had a Montauk about that music headlines of the week. Live nation is trying to get artists to take pay cuts for concerts and festivals next year in a memo obtained by rolling stone live, nation sites, unprecedented times and quote the exponential release. Excuse me the exponential rise of certain costs as reasons for adjusting payment policies. That's interesting because they're going to have to pay a lot more. To make the make, sure things are safe and clean, yeah. Then they thought they would. Let me read more about this. Most of the new policies shift to financial burdens to the artist's. For example, the company wants to decrease the monetary guarantees promised to artists before and a bit twenty percent across the board. Live nation also says that if a concert is canceled due to poor ticket sales, it will give the artist twenty five percent of the guarantee. Well that's interesting. And I think I'll speak on this as also a performer I work with these promotion companies promoters all different ones I. think as long as books are shown. People can make wise decisions about business are doing together, and it's not that I don't trust live nation or an artist, but I would like to see if I'm someone that's has agreed to a tour or agreed to three or four shows even show I wanna see those costs, and why am I? GonNa take. Mine Down Twenty percent. The twenty five percent on the on the cancellation is great for an artist. Also, there's still get paid even if they don't sell tickets because people don't WanNa come. Twenty. They're guaranteed twenty bucks. They, probably a lower act would be guaranteed about ten to fifteen thousand. Unless it's a baby act on big tour there about five, five, thousand, seventy, five hundred. Lower. Ten to big acts are. Hundreds of thousands of dollars a night. So you're talking about. That's a nice little little. Give there. But that's interesting I never thought about the fact that it's going to cost more to put on shows. So I think as long as they show their books a little bit I don't know why artist would say no to that true. because. Everybody's GonNa lose some money here. Everybody, and no party, promoter or artist. Should benefit, and the other should suffer. You should kind of all being this together in a way. Interesting I didn't think about that some more. Maybe do a whole podcast on that that'd be the most boring podcasts ever open a book. Now the whole country is protesting. Rage against the machine is actually back on the charts. The band's self titled Debut. Album landed back on the billboard. It reached number eight on the I tunes top album charts as well. Yeah, do we have any rage I both them up? This is right in my gut from back in. High. School more so than college. I guess it was like ninth and tenth grade. I would have. Someone sent me a tape of the edge in Dallas. They'd hit record play and take an hour and the. An hour and I get a lot of rage and that. Was a big rage guy, but I didn't really know why I. Just like the sound I didn't really know. What they were protesting at the time by the time I started to know I started to get older and getting college, and they started to fall off a little bit. Do their own things. But now look back. Pretty cool. This is one of my favorites. What else do you have all right, so? We're limited in the range music. A CON has secured a six billion dollar contract to build a con city. A futuristic cryptocurrency theme city in Senegal. Along with having homes, malls and a power plant, a city all amenities. The city needs including schools in a police station pretty baller. Some people have buildings. Here's a whole city. Alex Super Futuristic. Does this ever actually happen. Though I don't know the guy who did smack that now has a city and see the king because he just. There's King Oh. Yeah, what because if he's not? He's still. The city is named after. And then if he does something really bad and his older life like commits a bad crime. That's a change the name of it because they don't want the name the city after so like you're not seeing any bill. cosby elementary schools still remaining in play. Now that he would do that, but I'm saying. You know. Commits. Fraud. Martha Stewart style. Do. You have to change the name of the city. Finally Dashboard confessional singer Chris. CARRABBA suffered severe injuries in a motorcycle accident. Luckily they weren't life threatening, and he expects to make a full recovery as watching the video of him in the hospital bed. You see it yet. Sad lookin'. Yeah, it looks pretty terrible. Motorcycles. Just never had the need to Yana on motorcycle. He's motorcycle guy though he looks cool riding motorcycle. Down Hilas here, oh! Oh, I've never seen him writing I just say like He. He's the kind of guy that will look cool. Riding motorcycles tattoos like the good face. We have those things tattoos in the face pretty good to go. But he's what happened to him. Do you know I don't know? He had a car car hit him. I don't even think that he hit anybody. I think he just fell rookie. Here's the one thing I've never acted motorcycle. Think. I've ever been on one driving me I. Never Motorcycle. Let's talk about new music before we get into this. I'm just really it's really weird about even building statues after people who are still alive. It's always a tricky thing because they do something. That's not so good they. Statue down. You want us to wait on your statue then. Yeah, okay. I personally don't, but like I wondered in my town. There's a sciences boy home. Bobby bonds if I do something bad and I go to jail. Do they rip that down I? Don't want that

Dewey Cox Story Eddie Mighty Mike Bobby Bonds Billy Dukes Martha Stewart Dallas Senegal Carrabba Montauk Fraud Cosby Yana Chris
Media Surprised by Tesla Registrations Despite Shutdown

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

04:20 min | Last month

Media Surprised by Tesla Registrations Despite Shutdown

"Everybody robbing our here today we were talking about a number of different reports on tests registrations in the united. States in the month of April and May tussle stock, despite some of these reports finished the day up one percent to nine hundred ninety one dollars, seventy nine cents that compared to the Nasdaq up zero point two percent all right so as much as I would love to skip this topic because I think a lot of us know where this is. Is Heading. Most of the Tesla headlines today are related to a Wall Street Journal article published this morning titled Quote Tessa Registrations Plunge in California data tracker, says and quote, then leading off the article with quote, registrations of newly purchased Tesla vehicles plunged critical California market over the past two months according to new data underlining the challenge chief executive Elon, Musk faces to keep investor enthusiasm that has helped propel the company's share price and quote the Wall Street Journal Journal cites data from Dominion Enterprises which apparently tracks registrations in twenty four states that make up about sixty five percents of the US market, and in those twenty four states they say that Tesla registrations declined thirty three percent to fourteen, thousand, one, hundred and fifty one vehicles during the first two months off cue to the media, then seemed to go full, shocked Pika Chew Mon and read a whole bunch of articles about this highlighting Tesla's quote, unquote plunging registrations so. So I thought had a little bit of fun with that with the today. Apologies for that, but the point here is that this should not be surprising at all. People seem to have forgotten that Tesla. Had Their factory shut down for seven weeks from late March to early May as we know. Tesla is somewhat unique in that their registration or sales, information correlates strongly to their production rather than simply being an indication of demand like we might see from. Cars we can easily see this in the inventory numbers. If we look at Tesla, they had twenty days of inventory at the end of Q. on of March that comes right from their shareholder letter, and if we look at a company like Ford, for example, they said that at the march they had one hundred days of inventory so twenty days of inventory doesn't get. Get you too far when you're factories, shut down for fifty days compared to if you had one hundred days of inventory in stock like four does according to Cox Automotive, many brands actually had more than one hundred days of inventory at the end of March including Honda, jeep, Cadillac, an Acura and many others, and then even on the low end. They have KIA as. As the lowest brand at forty three days, so Tesla's inventory is about twenty to twenty five percent of the average and half of that of the lowest other brand in the US. The other important consideration here when we look at April and May specifically for the United States is that because Tesla restarted production in early, may that only gave them a couple or A. A few weeks to be able to produce vehicles ship them over to Europe and have them delivered within Q. Two, so with that being the case, obviously a very small amount of vehicles produced in May are going to actually be allocated for the North American market, so yeah plenty of reasons for us to expect registrations to have been down year over year in April. April and May in the US definitely not shocked Pichu type of situation, even with all that being the case in the same article, The Wall Street Journal says that Dominion Research says that the industry fell forty three percent in April and may remember. They have tussled down thirty three percent, so even without much inventory, Tesla is still outperforming the broader industry. You actually interpret. Interpret this as relatively bullish report. The other thing that I want to talk about briefly is the actual number here. So they said that registrations were fourteen thousand, or so in the first two months of the quarter and remember that's four states that make up about sixty five percents of the total US auto market. Tesla probably penetrates a little bit higher in those markets. Markets, because it does include California, so if we assume that that's about seventy five percent, then that can point to a number of about eighteen thousand five hundred vehicles registered in the United States in April, and met now I'm not putting much weight into these numbers, but that number does seem extremely reasonable. We know that Tesla began the quarter with about thirty thousand vehicles. Vehicles in inventory, so if we assume about half of that inventory, or about fifteen thousand vehicles were in the United States at the end of March then for us to have eighteen thousand vehicles registered in the US in April, and may sounds like a pretty reasonable number, if tussle were to sell off some of that inventory mentor, and then we add in deliveries from. That are probably not entirely allocated for Europe as well as Mata. Why if anything I see this report? As a low weight indicator that things are roughly on track. One less thing. I wanted to point out on this. The street did run article separate from my page on this topic and I didn't really love the headline. They reach out me, gave me the opportunity to add some context, and then actually included all of my comments in the article on this

Tesla United States The Wall Street Journal California Wall Street Journal Journal Europe Pika Chew Mon Dominion Enterprises Chief Executive Ford Acura Elon Honda Musk Cox Automotive Dominion Research Pichu
Apple to ditch Intel to make its own chips

Talking Tech

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

Apple to ditch Intel to make its own chips

"Turned to the NERDS AT NERDWALLET DOT com. Apples looking to start making its own chips for its computers and move away from Intel according to a new report by Bloomberg.

Bloomberg Intel
All about Section 230: What It Does and Doesn't Say

a16z

05:12 min | 2 months ago

All about Section 230: What It Does and Doesn't Say

"Hi everyone welcome to this week's special episode of sixteen minutes on the news, our show where we cover the headlines from our vantage point in tech, and covered tech trends, offering analysis frameworks, explainers and more I'm sewn. All your host and today's episode is special, not just because at three times sixteen minutes long, but this is our very first time on the show now thirty two episodes in bringing on a special outside guest. Our topic is section two thirty of the Communications Decency Act, which makes sure. Sure that interactive websites are not liable for their users content as their distributors, not producers of content, and so we also cover the recent news around twitter and the president's tweets, and the subsequent Executive Order Unquote Preventing Online censorship all from this week, which is also all bang out against the broader, more profound cultural context of George Floyd. Minnesota and way beyond and this episode we do a deeper dive on the technology and Policy Aspects of platforms and content moderation, including an explainer on the evolution. Evolution of section, two thirty, and all the key nuances of the debates around it and content moderation to understand, my special guest is Mike Mas- nick, founder and editor in chief of tech dirt, which is a leading tech news and analysis website and my longtime go to source for these topics he also by the way, recently launched new section, dedicated to tech and covid coverage as well as a new form with different voices, called the greenhouse, which focuses on tricky tech topics and lots of the. The trade offs involved like privacy and so on you can find both of those at Tech. DIRT DOT COM, so that's the INTRO and why? This is a special three x episode of sixteen minutes. Let me now kick things off by asking Mike. Since the premise of the shows, the tease apart. What's hype? What's real and to break down and explain what section to thirty does and doesn't say especially since the Broader Communications Decency Act Mike has been around since one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety six. The laws actually very short and very simple and very straightforward, and I should note that the Communications Decency Act itself did have. Things that I did, but all of that was determined to be unconstitutional. So the only thing that survives is section two thirty. There was a big lawsuit ACLU versus Reno in the late nineties, and that throughout most of the communications, Decency Act is unconstitutional. The thing that remained was to thirty so what section to thirty does it really does two things, and they're somewhat related, and they're both incredibly important to the functioning of the modern Internet the first thing that it does is it puts the liability on the person actually violating the law, so if someone goes onto. Onto a website and says something that is defamatory or otherwise violates the law, the liability for that action belongs on the person who is speaking and not the platform or site that is hosting that content. The second thing that it does is that it says if a website chooses to moderate its content or anything that is put on the site. Then it is not liable for those moderation choices I'm so glad you're bringing that up because this is the number one thing I wanted to start with which is the flip side of it, not just the protection. Protection, but the fact that they can moderate whatever they want, so can you actually break down Mike? What does that mean so where it came from? Which I think is important is to give sort of the history very quickly is that there were series of lawsuits in the early nineties that tried to hold Internet services that had moderated some content, and the were defamation cases effectively brought up the most famous one is stratton oakmont versus prodigy, and as a little fun aside. Stratton oakmont was a financial firm that was immortalized in the movie The wolf of Wall. Wall Street, that's a fun fact. Yes, and Stratton. OAKMONT got upset. Because people in prodigies message boards were accusing the company of being up to no good, and so they sued prodigy, and a court said that prodigy was liable for the libellous statements, because prodigy positioned itself as a family friendly service that would moderate content, and because it moderated some content to try and take down cursing or porn anything that it felt was inappropriate that anything it left up according to the judge, it was now liable for as if it had written that content itself and that. FREAKED OUT! People in Congress namely the time to members of the House Chris Cox. A Republican and Ron Wyden a Democrat, and they put together section to thirty to say wait, that's crazy. If a website wants to moderate content to create for example, a family friendly environment, it shouldn't get sued for the content that chose not to take down. And so that section of CBA two-thirty is designed to make sure that any website can moderate content how it sees fit in good faith to present the content in a way that meets with the goals of the service

Stratton Oakmont Mike Mas Twitter George Floyd Ron Wyden Stratton Aclu Minnesota President Trump Executive CBA Reno Congress Chris Cox Founder Editor In Chief
How Europe is responding to the coronavirus pandemic

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:31 min | 2 months ago

How Europe is responding to the coronavirus pandemic

"Want to start really by having a look at what is happening in this part of the world and certainly how countries In and around a Middle Europa at handled covid nineteen as pandemic some economic powerhouses. The United States of course the UK have had a bit of a miserable time. You could say but Germany and Switzerland are getting back on their feet and even in the last hour or so here in Zurich. We heard the country's main aviation hub of the national carrier. Swiss have outlined an incredibly aggressive relaunch plan. Of course if we go north to the border in Germany LUFTHANSA'S HOPING TO INC. It's bailout package to do a bit of the same well for more on this. I'm joined here in Zurich Rob Cox regular with us. When is the global editor of Reuters breaking views and on the line from start in south western Germany on a Rosenberg as also the line and she is head of Europe and the UK at the political consultancy Sigme Global? Welcome to both of you rob. I wanted to start. Do you think something is up? Maybe in this country I think also we look to Australia and certainly Germany as well as everyone starting to behave as a bit of a block at a time when everyone is supposed to be yes nice nice role in together are we moving into a period where people are maybe trying to score a few points. Released position themselves That look we are open for business. And we're moving ahead here. We're kind of in this competitive de Lockdown Mode. Where everybody you know? Calm countries like Switzerland which WanNa score high on the the Doing Business World business indicators and things like that and I think they have something like thirteen hundred. Us companies alone. That have offices or something here so everybody is trying to kind of to ease the ease travel. Do it in the right way. But also the same time to showcase that they've done a good job or a decent job of of battling pandemic of ensuring that their citizens have safe that that and doing it in a sort of you know an intelligent way And in some ways opening opening up the borders as a way to show that off now I think they're quite conservative. You saw you saw. The Federal Council was saying yesterday and in other countries. You know there are still this tension between the politicians as it were and the health professionals at still going on. We're still going to see that for quite some time. But there's definitely a sense of like like let's get moving again But the the the big issue though is you can't just apply what the Swiss do or the Austrians due to say London or Dublin or Perez and I think so. The worry is a little bit like we have these fights over tax policy right That you have this sort of race to the bottom in some ways and I think that's it's one has to be quite careful. So if the Swiss open up or the Germans and people say Look Frankfurt's open for business in Syracuse. Open for business. The worry is that these other guys. I don't know or London that engage a well. We better do it quickly. Problem is that there's no one size fits all for battling this pandemic Rosenberg. When you look from your side of the border but maybe across to Austria and Switzerland do you feel that may be an of course? Federal Council Minister over in Vienna yesterday front from Switzerland. Do you feel that the dock nations are starting to to get work in a bit of unison? Work as Mitteleuropa to say that we can together be the the engine that we can point direction. We know that this is a time of of not great central leadership. I'm not sure if there's really a cross border collaboration as as that. I think it's more happening more here. Is that individual states within Germany. I using this as an opportunity to profile themselves when you look at pandemics throughout history typically they benefit smaller entities smaller countries smallest state smaller city states. And exactly the same has happened in this pandemic and Jimmy Away is positioned the way is positioned also because of its highly federalized decentralized system which means you have sixteen individual states that can make their own lockdown and opening up decisions and these decisions currently being made. They're all over the place and I would say there's kind of a rather than we're in this together. I would say there's a little bit of a rivalry at the moment towards who can open up. Fossa who is more concerned with the health of individuals citizens than the others? So it's still pretty much an looking inwards would say Germany. Do you think that some of that also ladder is up though? I mean whether it's whether you're talking about Bio You're talking about no Don Volya that obviously people who are sitting at the Foreign Ministry in Berlin. There were trying to figure out. How do they put this into a concerted message Which they can put across globally? I get the sense. is certainly in Switzerland while the Swiss like to talk about being humble and they don't WanNa talk about having had a good pandemic you do get the sense here that they are trying to. Of course push their message. This is a country that is going to be open for business. If you need to come to Europe And hopefully do need to come to Europe to have a meeting. Then maybe you might consider coming here. I and I'm wondering if Berlin regardless of what it's doing with a federal structure with the states are doing they're trying to have some kind of unified message or no yes. Of course ultimately there's a lot of coordination still trying to be made on on the national level. Am I do think that Germany has certainly benefited from this Kobe crisis? It has turned a crisis into an opportunity and for a variety of reasons and I think Germany ultimately when you look at where Jimmy Stewart's just before the Kobe crisis it wasn't quite a weak economic position that was stagnation that was not enough of investment. Going on into key sectors of the economy that was all these arguments about stepping up fiscal stimulus and spending and constant pushback from the government that wanted to stick to strict fiscal prudence. All of this is different now. The government is saving business left right and center splashing out it's investing and the economy. The Gym Mindset has changed to away from Frisco prudence that was evidenced of course the supporting joint debt with other European nations. And so in a way. Jimmy's kind of taken an advantage from Kobe. In repositioning itself. And I think if you ask me what does Jiminy and the EU stand in one. Two years down the line. I think Germany will clear when I hear on that we just before we went on air we were talking and you just touched on Dublin Dublin. Of course as as essential in Europe which has done very very well at tech. But we're now in a moment right now we're of course. Companies are more mobile than ever. And certainly when you look at some of those players who are who are in Dublin. Of course their headquarters being On on the. Us West Coast yet. There is mobility They move around the going to look of course for the best tax breaks That are out there. Is this also time and again I mean. Certainly you see the power of the money that various spends on go and put your headquarters or least your your regional or European headquarters in Munich. For example do you see this kind of acceleration? Absolutely the ease of doing business index. This is this is going to be part of it. Everyone's going to look at how you did it during this crisis And I think and how quickly you were able to come out of it and I think come. Countries like like Switzerland Like some of the Nordic countries that have have done a pretty good job a relatively good job relative to France or the UK or Spain or Italy are so they're going to have a better pitch to make an a country like Ireland. Which is you know punches. Well above its weight when it comes to global headquarters for I say European headquarters for many of these TECH COMPANIES. The facebooks and people like that that is also

Germany Switzerland Europe UK United States Federal Council Swiss Zurich Middle Europa Dublin Berlin Reuters Rob Cox Editor Munich Sigme Global Frankfurt Rosenberg Jimmy Away Dublin Dublin
"cox" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

American Elections: Wicked Game

03:44 min | 2 months ago

"cox" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

"In the wake of World War. One Wilson had banked his hopes for a third term on the League of Nations. A post-war Global Coalition has hopes have been dashed by his failure to gain Senate support for the League specifically the Treaty of her sign a postwar treaty between the victorious Allies and defeated Germany at the Democratic National Convention in San Francisco. The first ever national convention on the West Coast. The party adopted a Pro League of nations platform but they abandoned Wilson and instead rallied around a relatively inconsequential candidate former congressman and Ohio governor. James M Cox Cox like Wilson had been a small town newspaper man before getting into politics. He had accomplished little but Democrats believe they needed an Ohio man to win the election. After all President Wilson had won his home state in nineteen twelve and nineteen sixteen and in one thousand nine hundred Ohio senator. Warren harding looked poised to take back the Buckeye state. For the Republicans Democrats Felt Cox's Ohio roots might block warnings path? To Victory Cox running mate on the other hand would prove to be very consequential for their vice presidential nominee. Democrats selected Assistant Navy Secretary Franklin D Roosevelt widely known by his initials. Fdr though he had little political experience on the national level after are had a famous last name and he was a distant cousin of the late. Teddy Roosevelt after yours fame though was not enough to overcome Cox's shortcomings. In addition to being an uninspiring candidate Cox skeleton in his closet over a decade before the nineteen twenty contest. Cox's wife had divorced him for cruelty and neglect. Despite his best efforts Cox unable to keep the scandal out of the public one Ohio newspaper had written the marital troubles of Mr and Mrs Cox have been no secret. The separation came just about the time. Cox's elected to Congress Mrs. Cox Charges Differ a year preceding the separation in April nineteen. O Nine Cox. Scarcely spoke to her almost completely ignoring her for months at a time so on the campaign trail it was easy for Republicans to attack Cox's character in the press. Republicans also pointed to Cox's wetness or as opposition to prohibition as further evidence. That Cox was a man of loose morals. This damage Cox in the dry southwest support for the eighteenth amendment was widespread and Cox Little to defend himself and even less on the campaign trail prior to the convention cocktail written. My friends are urging me to open up a vigorous campaign but cox preferred to take a back seat. We either have an ace in the hole or we haven't if we have as concealed we win. If we haven't no amount of bluffing advertising can do much good Cox and the Democrats were not holding any aces in the Nineteen Twenty S. There was a popular saying in American politics. As Maine goes so goes. The Nation main state and local elections were held early. Usually in September. Maine's vote was often portend of what was to come in the presidential election and in September of Nineteen Twenty Republicans swept. The main governor's race winning every county. They won over ninety percent of the State House. One hundred percent of the state Senate in all four of the congressional seats all signs pointed to a victory including national polls relatively new invention in American politics holes in the Boston Globe and the New York world projected to harding victory but one Democrat in Ohio was determined proved the pollsters wrong in the final stretch of the campaign. A man with a personal vendetta. Start digging for scandals. You would on Earth Dirt on Republican candidate Warren G harding. He would use it to smear harding's reputation. Hopefully the White House James.

James M Cox Cox Cox Mrs Cox Ohio Mrs. Cox Warren harding Wilson Nineteen Twenty Democrats Senate League of Nations Secretary Franklin D Roosevelt Teddy Roosevelt West Coast Germany Pro League of nations Global Coalition State House
"cox" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

01:39 min | 6 months ago

"cox" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Extremely well run a big race. Last time horse likes to draw the inside. I know that presents keen on him. Not we we thought we were doing the right thing. And putting them into the mile race there churchill but it was just a little bit too much to quit for him Getting handed. It was muddy that day. We sent him out of there. And just you know got tired and wasn't quite ready for that that level of competition or When the one turn my I don't think really just thing was eager eager to getting around tea time for you able to do that. Running back a little quick but he did have a very nice leave last week so feel confident that he'll run off so like his figure stack up and he should be active Answering he's very nice gelding Like this since last summer he Really slow I starting basically run off with jock. Five eighths of a mile still stayed on to nearly be defeated. That honestly I think it was a blessing in the skies losing He Just mentally took a little while to get there really coming around Have you ever wrote him? Last time liked him. Obviously when deriding backing for this for a few months so really liked the scouting. I think he's a nice horse and hopefully with good trip through outside. I think with a good stock and trippy. He's trainer Brad Cox here on the Horse Racing Radio Network all of our guests who appear on the program. We're going to send him a gift. Courtesy of embraced the race. The apparel for the horse racing lifestyle. Where would you love and embrace your passion at embraced the Race Dot Com? Brad appreciate the time. My friend in and congrats on all the success in all the best moving forward. Thanks Mike. We'll talk soon..

Brad Cox churchill Mike
"cox" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:11 min | 6 months ago

"cox" Discussed on KOMO

"Important today's Cox's are to his campaign these first four states amount to the critical early tests not only the strength of our organization but the strength of our message former vice president Joe Biden addressed the crowd in Dubuque you know it really matters really matters what you do what do you call because for the first time this time out or you've been done in a half a dozen times I don't think it's fair to say not because I'm running but you've never voted more Ford Crocker's in your life senator Elizabeth Warren had more events in Iowa than any other candidate over the last year you Iowa has made me a better candidate and you will make me a better president she and the other senators were running for president had to miss a lot of time here in Iowa though because of the impeachment trial but it didn't stop senator Sanders from gaining ground in the state this thing can that is the most consequential motion in the modern history of America they go first perhaps no one has more depending on these caucuses then senator any club a shark she told people at a Superbowl watch party how important it is for her supporters to get out and caucus for her by one hundred when I couldn't be here all last week that I had a job to do and then they yeah because I wasn't there you just have to double down on your work it's clear though that this is just the beginning of a selection process for the Democrats that may not be decided for several months Michael all right Steve Kassebaum reporting from des Moines for first lies Steve's going to be back with us later on for a closer look at what is happening there tonight nine minutes past the hour China's latest numbers in the corona virus outbreak list at least three hundred sixty one that's almost three thousand new cases in just the beginning and that's bringing the Chinese total alone to over seventeen thousand in the beginning of this week Jim wrote checks and now with more Michael a forty four year old man from the Philippines has died from the Wuhan corona virus which broke out in December the man is one of two cases in the Philippines the other his thirty eight year old female companion the only way we will defeat this outbreak is for all countries to work together that's doctor Ted rose at a non gap basis the director general of the World Health Organization last week when he declared the new coronavirus a global public health emergency since that declaration the virus has spread exponentially reaching some twenty countries including the United States where as of the filing of this report there are eight cases confirmed many say this outbreak could soon be declared a pandemic which is defined as an ongoing epidemic on two continents or more with that however after tendrils reminds us this is the time for facts not fear this is the time for signs north rumors the WHL has been working to dispel rumors and myths surrounding the virus and has been doing so on social media on its Twitter account the WHO's says for one antibiotics do not work as some have suggested for one the corona virus is a virus not a bacteria also it is not true that using mouthwash does protect you from the coronavirus nor does free **** rinsing your nose with saline nasal spray there's no vaccine just yet on.

Cox
"cox" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

12:31 min | 7 months ago

"cox" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Thirty first I'll be Milwaukee Wisconsin at the Turner Hall Ballroom Ballroom. Saturday February I. I'm just going to say the date fuck. The day I'm going to be in Orlando Florida. Hard Rock live on February fourteenth. I'm going to be in Tampa Florida at the stress. A bit destraz center February fifteenth. I'll be in Portland Maine at the State Theatre on February twentieth. I'll we in Providence Rhode Island at Columbus Theatre February twenty first. I'll be new Haven Connecticut College Street Music Hall. On February twenty-second I'll be in Huntington New Orca the paramount theatre February twenty third. Go to W. T. F. pod dot com slash tour for links to all the venues. Can you dig it. So I'm back from Atlanta. Obviously I was there for a week. Being Sedentary being onset had a nice scene to sort of finish out most of the work. I'm going to do on on the respect film Nice scene with with with Jennifer in the last day her mansion in a mansion that is being presented presented as her mansion. And I got one more day to shoot the big concert. I'M GONNA be part of that. The Amazing Grace Concert from I think it was seventy two. You and that's I just have one more day shooting and it's It was great although I didn't do much and I've been trying to take care of my back. I'm going I'm going to go. I'm going to a chiropractor here for the first time in my life tomorrow I'll let you know how that goes. I was trained not to believe them. Almost as if they're witchdoctors or or snake oil salesmen. or or just hustlers of sort guys with Iraq Iraq it. There's a lot of rackets racket racket but I'm going and I'm going to go the regular doctor two days later and I'm just going to average it out and I'm going to read a thank you note. Hi Mark Mayor and just a quick note to say that you're talking about the loss of La Fonda was really a huge moment vulnerable and generous of you for all of our talk in podcasting casting in public radio about driveway moments and storytelling as a listener. This just felt like the simple powerful moment of one person living life one when microphone in a little room not live on stage and the truth. It was that lightning in a bottle moment in radio broadcasting that. I've heard so many people describe throughout the years. It's hard to know when that moment occurs in podcasting because they're currently just under eleven billion people making podcasts thrice daily which which is great in so many ways but it does mean that the collective conversation among listeners is fragmented to put it mildly. So I just WanNa say that personally. Here was one moment that found on me in my car at night. Parking under a giant sky full of stars in the mountains up and Bears Ville that made me feel less alone in the world about one of the most painful things I've had to do in life. I'm stumbling around here with words but I just wanted to tell you that the reason people make things really exploded in my brain that night while I was listening to you. It felt like the kind of explosion Ginsburg described when he wrote about how certain words with enough distance between them causes a synoptic synoptic spark he was defining how poetry works or resonates at its best. Thanks for the work you do. Thanks for making things. I'm sorry for your loss. Here's to all all of us. Humans on Earth trudging the road of happy. Destiny occasionally keying the mic on the walkie to let each other know what we are seeing along the way. Best Dan New York. Thank you Dan. That was a lovely Email and I appreciate that. You had that experience with what I do. I've Yeah I've had that experience with what other people do and I I. I'm grateful for it when it happens to me. Thank you for listening buddy. I hope you're okay. Okay Bryan Cox is a great actor and he just won the Golden Globe award for his performance in Hbo Succession The show has has been renewed for a third season. I believe that I recorded this interview. Maybe like the day before the Golden Globes. I believe we've that I I. I want to check that but I believe we recorded this interview when he was out here for the Globes the day before the Globes I flew to Atlanta Georgia the next day and I was sitting at a whole foods. I told you about that in Atlanta in mid town at at the beer bar in the whole foods eating salad out of a box next to a guy wearing a camera hat a camel shirt and camel pants. It's all different shades of Cammo with sunglasses on drinking a six pack of Mexican beer in cans. I sat there and watched. Brian Cox win and I said I just talked to that guy. I just talked yesterday to To to to nothing. So this is me talking to Brian Cox to you for you from the day before he won a golden globe. Yeah I was just in Ireland for two weeks in northern Northern Ireland. Yeah fucking beautiful. It's stunning absolutely stunning. Scotland is more stunning. I thought I hear you. I mean my family. Originally my you know in the mid nineteenth century. Yeah we're cold mic Max Irish Scots okay. So we're actually I rish. Descent brought them Scotland and now is that like are they the mic. Max worked at in a positive light. Well Irish were never looked like an a positive. The Irish yeah. I did a program a few years ago in the television. which is it was called from the workhouse? Yeah and which was the English ray of saying which was on the plate but actually the Scottish way was. It wasn't called a workout so it's called the poor house Yeah and you you could only get You went into the poor house because it was the only way you can get any medical help registering the yeah. So I discovered that my great great the grandfather who was born in Derry on my mother's side he was called in Ireland. Yeah Yeah he was called Patrick McCann and he at the age of thirty nine In entered the poor house with his six year old son Sam having lost five of his eight kids including his wife. Oh my God to what everything. Okay and they you know he was he was Kinda worker and he injured himself and he did eventually become a drunk But he you know they moved. It's like in the last year of his wife's life they move something like ten times and they used to do these what they call the midnight flight so paying the rent and they would just move when I was And I kept saying well. What about the what about the structure of the families you know wasn't wasn't there a support and then this woman? This young women said all our show you the structure of the families. Your Grant Great Grandmother was called Sarah Maguire and I said Oh okay okay. Yeah she said on our show you where she lived in fact. I'll show you the entrance in the Mitchell library so I went to the Mitchell live in. They showed this entrance. And it said ceremony Guar our lives on a stair in calcuttans. Wow and they took me to this place and they said this is where she living showed me a step and that would be no kidding. Yeah and this is some sort of like it was a it was a show based on your family's roots. They did a few people right right. Yeah it's it's it's that and the fact that my my beleaguered great grandfather he he he. He's eldest son. He's younger son. And these middle son survived all the other kids have five of them died All the goes died and he was desperate to get any he was in Glasgow. Has in Glasgow. Yes he was working there and the Irish should really got a rough time. You know they didn't. They would not treat it well but when you find out that stuff about your family how how did it affect you. I mean knowing that well you know you you you realize you've got all this information nation in your DNA. You kinda go when you try to when you try to sort of become conscience about conscious of it you realize your where little anxieties come from. Because they're right it's it's it's poss- through the generation racist generation. So kind of a way I think I mean I I think it sort of responsible. Pin The man who I am I think I. I'm in a way. I have a kind of gratitude towards it whereas also but I also aside a pretty difficult time as a child because my dad died when I was eight and my mother was institution I really so when now the the the people you found out about that were four or five generations. They were my. They were my mother's grandfather. Yeah she was He was my mother's grandfather. My great my grandfather was a mysterious figure. Got He hath. We could never find his war records. He was he was in the He was in the first World War. My mother always said he was at twenty one years but I couldn't find him. He's a drunk as well. Of course which went with the territory he was the he was the eldest son of this Patrick. Yeah I'm Patrick. Eventually ended up in an asylum and I got the last in one thousand nine hundred ten wondering the the the wards of the asylum still thinking he was a fourteen year old boy from dairy. This is your mother your yeah my mother's grandfather. Oh yeah so the so the mental illness. Yeah you could track. Let's right pretty far back. Let's right what was it specifically I You know stress try springs on. Okay I mean my mother. She couldn't deal with the death of my father. She felt harbored. Guilty for Because she my father was rather gentle he was a hit a shop he did he. He was the youngest son of family. His sisters took care of him. My sisters took care of me. They they made sure he was going to be alright so much. His eldest sister I mean via thirteen of the Macula is eldest. System makes a after the war he had a pension and she bought a little shop. Yeah and she and my father worked in the mills in our hometown. Jute Mills Malaysia. What are they make? That is fabulous. Yeah I mean I know L.. Jute well you know a covered wagon. Yeah sure that would be made in Dundee. Okay all right. Thank you Western burlap. That's right. Yeah that's what we that's what that's that's what they did there. Well they discovered through. What did how they discovered it? was that You know these coast of Scotland a great weaving community but they discovered this thing called jute and they also discovered it. 'cause Dundy was a wailing city so they discovered if they dip at this yawn in Wail at extended. That you put the jute extend here. So that's how they set up the jute industry on that swell and we also supplied the tents for the confederate army as well sodomy store in in in the states and the states. Oh Yeah we were done near my hometown. Tom Had the the highest child. Poverty and the richest people in the world at one point now did was. Is this something that you grown up fascinated with or is this all like not something new for you know being aware of because you know. I'm aware of my roots. I think of the people who get the top end of the Baath in my life you know no. I've been sort of constantly aware of that and I did a couple of programs. I did a couple of documentaries on I did one I I did one on jute route. Did one on the on my family because my what happened in eighteen fifty people this is..

Atlanta Scotland Ireland Patrick McCann Golden Globes Brian Cox Glasgow Dan New York Huntington New Orca Tampa Providence Rhode Island Portland Turner Hall Ballroom Ballroom Haven Connecticut College Stre State Theatre Florida Mitchell Bryan Cox Orlando Florida Globes
"cox" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

12:56 min | 11 months ago

"cox" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"What questions do you have for my guest follow us on the twitter and facebook and on point radio with me as I mentioned Brian Cox he started of HBO's succession where he portrays Logan Roy this CEO of a giant media conglomerate. He's also starring as Lyndon Johnson in the Great Society which opens at Lincoln Center's Vivian Beaumont Theater right here in New York City next Tuesday night one a start with just a clip to remind listeners of your decades long work onstage Brian Cox's been on stage Britain with the Royal Shakespeare Company the National Theatre and of course here on Broadway here he is is performing a from Shakespeare's Titus andronicus during an appearance on the BBC's acting series for two brothers condemned the debt my hand cut off and made a marriage just both her sweet hands how come and that more deer than Hans Tong spotless chastity in human and Post Brian Cox each syllable billable in pause carrying a meaning God. That's from longtime ago takes you back to me a little bit about take on LBJ as a character. How how do you place him. How do you approach rolling well. It's so weird because I I really thought my days of doing that kind of theodore over I mean I actually felt that this. This was in successions great. I love the show and I feel I can mail. I'm a certain age so I thought I can do my show and then and then of course from outfield you know comes uh-huh. LBJ And we were originally supposed to do as a dramatized reading. We put that show on three weeks three weeks three three weeks so I saw it. Tuesday night looked awfully good tight. I mean it's ensemble cast many much of it of the your your colleagues in in the cast are playing multiple roles. Yeah you know I think the same guy is playing George Wallace. The segregationist governor of Alabama's Richard Nixon US right succeeds Johnson. That was a lot lot of smooth the work. We did that with our we did. We had three day technical. We had which is unheard of in the fifth which means you're mapping out like what where the lights will everything exactly and we had our final dress rehearsal a final technical rehearsal and our first preview on the same night right and how long ago was that that was two weeks ago right and so. I saw it just three days ago. Yeah so you know so we've been doc. It's been a I mean I just originally we're going to do it as a dramatize reading and then building well barrage called me and he said do you think you could go for it and I we'll try. I said I'm I don't know what my learning skills because I haven't done this kind of theater because Shakespearean. I'm done it since since I did. King Lear almost more study is ago and I was. I was young then but I had the energy but apparently I've still got the J. Let's right when you talk about what is a difference like. It seems obvious but it's worth reminding you do something like what six eight performances it is live as several hours launch. LBJ turns out to be the main character LBJ's life that's right life and of course the great thing about LBJ's he is he is a really Shakespearean figure. I mean he's a tragic tragic figure man who to realize that from his own profound ignorance of foreign affairs and poll ignites Vietnam and the horror of Vietnam which it just truly it. It's it's you can't apologize enough for Vietnam because just was such the waste incredible waste and the needless publicness of it and the fact that human he was he's not Kim Jong UN union. He's he was he was a he was a freedom fighter. Who became a let a country and it's not very successful country as a result out with US trade with them. That's the irony when you think of all those fallen American boys and I it's just horrendous. WHOA so Robert Jenkin the playwright a Pulitzer winner he had written an earlier installment in this all the way which is about from Kennedy's assassination sedation up until the point where we he got his reelection and Bryan Cranston played that cousin Broadway and on Hbo Their version there film version when you're approach for this you think about him as a tragic figure. One of the things that's made is that you're reminded of is if you're of the play is the tragedy in some ways is not that you know a Greek irony where he's unaware aware of involvement he's aware from the hours that this is going to be a disaster and he's aware of the fact that could imperil the good he wants to do the and that he already had growth as as a Texan of a certain part of the state that he had to come to the idea of desegregation and integration. He'll come to the idea well. I guess he lived poor so he he no no no. That's his again. His background speaks for itself. He was poor. His father was absorbed Pharma but not successful rancher and the the the the the land that the apartment soil was only so thick so they can actually feed that capital properly so he was he was from that kind of background but he had no sense of the world apparently used when he met Oriental children over or Chinese which any tense Asian these days he he used to head and of course. That's something you'd never do of course he. He did it because he was a western so he had no sense in no sense sense of what was what was foreign what was non-american but his sense of the reality of civil rights the reality of voting rights the reality of at proper education is so astonishing and there and he did it Kennedy of kicked it all off but then Kennedy was a Brahmin from the north. They weren't gonNA he he. He knew how to deal with those southern. Democrats that Johnson had the skill to do that and of course the great thing in the play and the great moral issue in the play is once you've told your first lie and that's the thing in his life 'cause he's constantly. He's talking about. Oh my God he's lying and he says the reason I lied was to do certain things I could only achieve it in certain ways but then he says towards ended under the place it but then you've got to cover up with another one and another one and another one so one day. You don't know where you are anymore or who you are what you've been doing. An all you can see is the mayhem that's being caused as a result of Vietnam for example so it's a fascinating element and I love Roberts writing and that way because he really is dealing with such a big subject and what I also love is is the fact that it's about American history and we don't see a lot of American history. We know you guys are not very good at your in history and say in a way I come from the O B but you but you have a stormy. I mean it really a stormy yeah I did. I was very lucky to do deadwood yeah working with the Great David Milch so that was clear about what that was all about as well you know this sort of mayhem of that but this and the violence and this is what's so interesting about Johnson Johnson came at a particular time and he was in many ways a great president mm-hmm because all those civil rights all that came through him at the most incredible time when the marches and sound what was happening to Martin Luther King Split and they're moving in Sochi come Michael Martin Luther King Bob Moses all of that and it was all happening within the space of three or four years and that's what's so extraordinary and it's so great that Robert Wright says play which is like a Shakespearean historical play. It is like that it's like Henry the six hundred fourth part one. It's about about those things that shape a country shape a system. I WANNA take a call in and get back to that question. I want to take from marlow. WHO's been waiting patiently for the MARLINS calling from Middlebury Connecticut. Thanks for listening today Marlin. Hi thanks for taking my call. I was lucky enough to see the great society. Oh last weekend at center and so happy to see you Brian Cox such beautiful incredible production and performance and two powerful men you know the of course Roy and then LBJ And I'm an acting teacher I teach teach high school theater here in in Middlebury and I'm just very interested in of course the actors approaching when did if you could talk briefly about you know how how you approach like maybe significant things about approaching both of those roles of course very long conversation but if you had any insights that would be really great to hear thank you Marla for that call. Maybe talk a little bit about coaching. LBJ In particular the thing that will one you've got to avoid and when creating a character judgment you mustn't judge characters you have to see them in their own light and you have to see the the really where they've come to how they've come to certain in decisions rightly or wrongly you know if you're playing out of Hitler. You're playing Winston Churchill. You have to look at the journey now adult feathers that such a cliche element to it but at the same time he was this failed painter he was this he had a kind of vision of something and and he had a particular star period and also he had enormous help from people like goring and a and a whole Coterie people around him who sort of supported him so so you you you you don't judge you never judge characters you allow the audience to judge them. That's for the audience do not for you to do you have to present who they are and it an an it's. It's it's what you know. I always go back to the the Bod Shakespeare. He he talks about holding the mirror up to nature in showing being its own form and that's precisely what you do when you're playing rose like LBJ or or Logan you have to show them who they are and therefore the better your at doing that the more interesting audiences become because they recognize something that they know they don't necessarily they like but they understand where it's coming from and it's the same with playing somebody like. LBJ LBJ is flawed individual extremely flawed kind of rough brutal sort of sometimes but also Dr Vary a great seducer a great way that he can spin plates extraordinaire Mechanica but again this floor which is to do with lying and that's the thing was finally what he felt was. He's undoing and then to have the extraordinary courage to say. I ain't doing this no more because I've just made a mess of. I'm not doing it. I'm out and not very many American presidents would do that. You can't see them in that when they finally say you know this is not this is not my time too so there's Brian Cox offering some advice to actors actors and acting instructor so we have a clip here that went viral once again this week. I think it's from twenty might have been I posted in two thousand fifteen but regardless here's Brian Brian Cox giving a masterclass to two year old boy named Theo. I guess it was actually back in two thousand nine it involves the Soliloquy probably heard once or twice but not quite like this this single to be or not to be thing that is the question good good to be or not to the that is the question Brian Cox full clip. You just show such joy in it. You've gotten him there and he starts looking quizzically but he's playing it back with. Oh No. He's amazing. It's it's it. Children are the best actors they are. You know people go on about Oh children. What have you in my but I've always actually interestingly enough and I think that's one of for example Kieran Culkin's great qualities as he was a brilliant child actor and he's brought it on. I mean he's still got that. He still got the ability to come at something without baggage. He just does that thing that the children do brilliant well and Theo Theo who was not an an actor I mean he's often he's now twelve ninety two off doing stuff but he's he just had this thing about language anguish and I I could hear that he understood he had a thing about language so I was I I'll take him down this route and it was his father did the filming of it and it was it was one Christmas as we were just we were having breakfast and we just suddenly did this moment.

LBJ Brian Brian Cox Lyndon Johnson Vietnam Logan Roy HBO Kennedy Brian Cox Theo Theo King Lear twitter theodore George Wallace BBC New York City National Theatre Vivian Beaumont Theater Kieran Culkin
"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

12:19 min | 1 year ago

"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

"That's one the second pillar would be media. So we think of today, as you know, the internet news television, all of that is media town, formation spreads arts and entertainment is the third so everything from the art that we create two plays and movies and magazines books. All of that would be arts entertainment, business, and marketplace before. And so that is thinking about industries whether the tech industry and the energy industry. The auto industry all of those be business. Marketplace's down to the small business, the mom and pop shops, the retail online business, all of that would be Mark. Place case. That's the fourth pillar. The fifth one is education both primary and secondary. So the public education system, private schools. Colleges universities. Seminaries all of that would fall under educated, religion would be the sixth pillar. So that's the church and other houses of worship all different. Religions would fit under that sort of pillar of society. And in the last one is family. Now, those are not an order of importance. Certainly, I think you make the argument that almost backwards in order of importance. But those are the seven. And so the idea is, if we can influence government media arts business education, religion in family than we can move the Domino's. And we can tip all of society in a certain direction. Now that's a big sort of macro level way of thinking. And let me explain why it is. I think that's so relevant to us that we think about ministry has taken place in the church will that's one pillar and it leaves the other six out. We need to be thinking about. Ministry as a Christian as a believer as being spread across all areas of, of life gay being spread across all areas of life. And here's why I'm gonna get theological with you for a second. I'm gonna go back to the practical side theologically God's kingdom is very subversive stetzer wrote a book some years back called the subversive kingdom, and it's a great book is one of my favorites on the topic, I would pair it right. With Scott mcknight's book, the king. Jesus gospel, those two books really frame. Well, my own viewpoints of what the kingdom is the king Jesus gospel is, basically, Jesus is king. And so the way that you become a Christian is to swear allegiance to the king. And you say he is my king. I submit my life to him. I turn from my sin. I trust in him. I'm part of his family and part of his kingdom now. And so that's the key. The king Jesus gospel and the story that flows around that throughout. History. And then at stetzer talked about how the kingdom of guide is a kingdom. That's not of this world. It's, it's not one of the seven pillars and you might think what isn't it? Religion will. No not. Exactly. Religion is something that is humanly established. It's, it's organized. It's regulated. The rituals are things that we sort of manage from a human perspective. But God's kingdom the bible says within you it's invisible. It's hard to see. It's, it's basically the rule and realm of Jesus. So everybody that says, I follow Jesus. That's the kingdom of God. And so the kingdom of God operates on different principles than the kingdoms of the world around us. The kingdom of God operates on the principles of, of servitude, purposeful willing servitude toward other people that is that, that I am here to serve other people to serve my fellow man. I'm here to love people in Jesus. Name jesus. When you visit people in prison, when you get give somebody a coupla co watered, my name, you have done it, as, though you're doing it to me that you've served in my name, you've represented my kingdom, and the subversive kingdom is the idea that God's kingdom does not come in and dominate people or dominate culture or dominate any of those seven pillars of society. But rather the kingdom of God subversively springs up here and there within those different realms K. So within the school system, you have Christians who say I'm here to serve here to help, and they may influence the educational system by just being there and loving people in Jesus name and saying, I'm here to help, but I'm here to serve, whatever that means and they're, they're therefore their lives influence others. And that's this subversive kingdom. So I believe that we need Christian entrepreneurs and again, I mentioned earlier, I feel particular calling to, sir. Serve and help and coach and minister to people who are church leaders who want to think entrepreneurially and entrepreneurs, who want to think ministerial Kate. So the reason why is because I believe that God has called us to the marketplace that we can make an enormous difference in the marketplace, and what the churches tended to do. Sometimes to kind of lag behind. We just sorta wait and whatever the, the world around us, innovates, and comes up with and does we'll tag along. And we'll we'll catch up about fifteen years later and do things about eighty percent as well. And just sort of take our cues from everything around us. I think you see this Christian film. I think you see in Christian entertainment that a lot of times we give free pass to very poor quality because we figure, well, this is the Christian version. It's not supposed to be as good. And so we kind of lag behind we wait for the marketplace to tell us what to do. I believe we need Christians to step into a leadership role, not a domineering leadership role. Not a we're here to fix everything and show you how to do it our way. But instead it from a standpoint of being a servant to people to come along and say, one affect change in our culture, wanna make a difference in the marketplace, as entrepreneurs wanna engage society and culture and commerce and so forth and so on. Let me give you four examples of where I believe we need Christian entrepreneurs to show up and be present for kinds of people that we need filtering out of the church on Sunday and into the rest of the world throughout the week and throughout their lives in order to make a difference an impact for the kingdom and to improve society and to foster human flourishing among people. So I, I think we need we need people who will live out a Christ, like ethic. In the marketplace. Another words, we need people who will live and serve and do business, the way, Jesus might do business, and I'm not suggesting that Jesus would do business. I'm just saying that Jesus came up with ideas like going, the second mile for people taking the high road being brutally committed to honesty, often Tissot and charity. And giving all of that originated in the mind of God in the mind of Jesus, and so businesses that are committed to solid ethics to honesty to truth to generosity to charity. They make a difference and they stand out in an age of corporate corruption and greed. So in the middle of all of that we get to be counterculture. We get to live out a Christ, like ethic in the marketplace, and we get to do good business. We get to be good at creating products and we get to innovate and we get to shake things, and create new things and. Develop new platforms and softwares and go start things that go big, and that's great. But in the middle of all that we get to demonstrate what it's like to be committed to a Christ, like ethic. Secondly, I think we need people who will serve others in Jesus name in the marketplace. I mentioned this a minute ago, but I want to amplify it for a second. I believe that we need people who are willing to look around and go, who can I help? How can I serve not looking for what I can get out of it, but how it can contribute to the lives of others zig Ziglar, who was very successful and became very wealthy by the end of his life. And yet, still managed to be even though it was a motivational speaker a great salesman managed also very humble and very Christ like in his life zig used to say, you'll get everything. You'll have everything you want in life. If you help enough other people get what they want in life. And what he simply meant was if you just give an value to people's. Lives before you expect anything in return, you're gonna make a difference in your experience success in your own life. The reward comes around the whole idea that it's more blessed to give then to receive an even when you are great at making sales, even when you're great at, at building businesses and leading teams and all of that, even in the middle of that, that you get to say, how can I serve people? How can I elevate people? That if you own a business that has employees, you get to look at your employees and go, how do I elevate you? How do I make your life better? How do I hope you take care of your family? How do I hope you grow professionally that you get to serve other people gay fourthly? We need people who will create wealth from the marketplace to support missions to create wealth from the marketplace to support missions when I hear about Bill Gates or Warren Buffett or so many others who have made millions or billions of dollars. And then have established. Foundations and trusts in their name, whereby they can continue for their legacy to continue to distribute money through charitable causes throughout the years to come. I think that's awesome. I think we ought to celebrate that, and I think we ought to duplicate that, that Christians, if we really have a desire to eradicate aids to improve education to tackle issues, like poverty and health care round the world, and if we really want to plant churches, raise up leaders and share the gospel, everywhere that we possibly can the we need to be creating wealth from the marketplace in order to filter into missions, now that does not mean I get to be money hungry and use as a justification. Well, when I get filthy, rich someday, I'll give a little bit to charity. That's not what I'm talking about K. That's not the kind of heart that I'm describing describing a heart that starts with the motive of giving that says, ultimately I dream of making a difference in my world, even financially being able to give and. Be generous and bless people and change the lives of others in different ways that I can fix problems for some people by, by writing a check, perhaps, because I've been willing to be committed to high Christian ethics been willing to serve people, and I've done. Well at this, and I've created wealth, so that I can give it to missions, number four. I think we need to be able, we need people to be creative thought leaders in the marketplace to be creative thought leaders again. This goes back to the idea that we shouldn't just sit around and wait for the world to invent everything that believers that Christians should feel the freedom to flap, our wings and speaker minds and, and to do so in a loving way, but to be innovative innovators changed the direction of society, when you think about the most influential people in history. So many of them were innovators. We know who Gutenberg was because he invented the printing press and out of the printing press came all of the books in the libraries in the bookstores that we know today. And so you have someone who is innovating and creating and changing the game, and they're sort of breaking the cycle in starting a whole new ark in the story at and bringing about the industrial age in the tech age, and so forth and Christians ought to be right in the middle of that shaping the thought of culture around us that we should be thought leaders that we should be not afraid of science, not afraid of psychology, not afraid of the various disciplines around us. But instead, fully engaging and being creative thought leaders are marketplaces..

stetzer zig Ziglar Domino Scott mcknight salesman Kate Bill Gates Warren Buffett eighty percent fifteen years
"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

"Eight seven. Fifty fifty or fifty six hours, maybe you sleep, and and the rest, you spend time with family, and you rest, and you get some leisure time in. So we all have that much time you can do huge things with that time or you can lock yourself into doing only small things because you'll believe that time is more limited that for you than for other people. Okay. Here's a third big limiting belief. I just can't be myself because I'll be rejected. This one's extremely common. It is. I can't just be who I am. I can't just be free to pursue my passions. I can't just be you. I am in my personality. I can't just lead the way that I really feel like I'm wired to lead because I'll be rejected. If I do people won't like the real me. And that's a limiting belief. You are you God made you and then he broke the mold. There's never been another one like you. And he looked at you when he got done with you. And he said, you are good and your reflect my nature. So who you are. And who you're cut out to be who you're wired to be by craters good. So don't believe that being. Yourself is just a pathway to rejection K number four, I'll never be loved people believe this because of past rejection, they believe it because of childhood they believe it because they came perhaps from a broken home, or or someone who abandoned or walked out on them when they were young they perhaps believe this because they've been through a couple of messy situations and relationships a couple of divorces. And so we wind up believing that there's nobody on earth that can truly love us. And that's just not true. I believe it's not true. Because I believe God loves you, God is proven that. And he is sent other people in your life to love you. And so the idea that I'll never be loved is a limiting belief that relational holds us back from exploring what it means to love others and be loved in return. Here's number five. It's not my fault now by this. I mean, nothing is my responsibility. When whenever you meet someone who always has someone to blame for all of their problems. You're meeting someone who will never overcome the problems. If I believe that everything that's wrong with my life. As a result of what other people do to me? Then there's nothing I can do to control it. There's nothing I can do to change it. But when I start to look internally, I started take responsibility for my life for my decisions for my relationships or my attitudes. Then I can begin to change things. But as long as I believe that everything is everyone else's fault that I'm just the victim of what other people do to me. And what society has done to me the government's out to get me. My friends are out to get me. My parents are out to get me. My spouses out to get me if it's everyone else's fault. I can't do anything to change my life. And so that is extremely limiting belief K number number six hour up to number six. I can't take risks because I'll probably fail that. Is we go right up to the edge of a big dream of something that we want to attempt or try and we hold back because we might fail and the reality is yes, you might fail. But. If you see failure as an end than you're in trouble. But if instead you start to see failure as a step toward success failure. As a learning opportunity failure is shaping and growing opportunity, then you can take risks, and you can grow you can break out of that limiting

Earl Nightingale depression Brandon Cox YouTube Cheever Hamilton Twitter ninety eight percent ninety five percent ninety nine percent sixty eight hours
"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

11:20 min | 1 year ago

"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

"Changed the game for you and your organization, and the people that you lead over the long haul case. So here they are rapid fire. One after another the first one is today. You can expand your knowledge today. You can expand your knowledge the bottom line is I've never seen a leader excel to greatness or lead an organization to greatness or make a significant impact on the world who was completely self absorbed every leader, I know that's ever been affective was a learner. And a listener they read things they listen to things they took things in. And so a lot of times I come across some. One is how can I make my life better? And I'll say something like well, have you checked out this book, I'm not really a reader, and so often I just want to sort of level this truth become a reader become a reader. I wasn't always a reader. You. Don't think you're a reader, but you gotta give it a shot because without reading you're missing out on so much knowledge. But even if we're not talking about sitting down and flipping open a book and reading page after page, there are other ways to to learn to take in that you can take advantage of today. The the big point is Houston to be feeding your mind with something that's not up there yet. And so you can expand your knowledge by listening to podcasts. K expand your knowledge by subscribing to YouTube channels expand your knowledge by taking an online course expand your knowledge by exposing yourself to information that you haven't had before. And I wanna especially say, what is in rich my life, deeply and expand. Did my own capacity for leadership is to always look for sources of knowledge that are written and created by people who sort of our head of me in my particular field of interest and passion. So if I want to know how to lead a church better. I need to read books by other pastures who have led churches and are now sharing knowledge, I need to read that I wanna read people who have done really well in business people who've done really well in their lives. I wanna read people that challenge my mind in terms of how I think about people and relationships so here lately, I've been reading a books by dean Grozny, OSI, Napoleon hill Bernabei Brown. John Maxwell, Robert Schuler read books by people that I don't necessarily agree with all the way. And it's funny. How when I mentioned an author's name some listeners go he reads him. I can't believe he does that. But the fact is you need to be willing to read things written by people that are just. Outside of your comfort zone that they don't necessarily line up perfectly with your exact perspective because then you get the small world view. So you can expand your knowledge today. In fact, I wanna give you a tip for that. I think you should go to YouTube and find the shows and the channels that are produced by people that you tend to learn from just a little while ago. I was listening to a YouTube show by Ed my let you can go look him up. He's phenomenal. He's a tremendous motivator and leader business guy, and Ed was sharing things that inspired me that made me think about life in ways I hadn't thought about before. So I just watches YouTube videos. They're compelling easy to watch their entertaining, very educational. So expand your knowledge if you don't expand your knowledge, you're done if you stopped listening and stop reading and stopped. Feeding your mind you're at the limit your the limits of you want to. Spain your capacity you've got expand your knowledge K. Here's a second thing challenge. Your beliefs challenge, your belief, so expand expand your knowledge and challenge your beliefs. And I'm not talking about changing what you believe about. God. I'm not talking about changing what you believe theologically. I'm talking more about those limiting beliefs that hold us back. So those of us who struggle with the scarcity mindset, or we struggle with fear, or we share it with ourselves a lot of self defeating thoughts. We we believe in repeat and rehearse lies. And limitations about ourselves. I'll never be good at that. I'll never be able to do that. I'll never be as cool as that guy. I'll never be as as great of a leaders him or her those are the kinds of beliefs that shape, our actions that we need to challenge gay because out of our beliefs we act out of our actions come the habits that shape our lives and our destinies K so challenge. Believes ask yourself. What am I believing? That is limiting me and holding me back. Sometimes my limiting beliefs are the lid on my leadership, and I need to punch through those and knock them down with some big truth in order to go on further. So challenge your

YouTube John Maxwell Brandon Cox Ed Spain grace hills church CEO Grace ama Akkad OSI Houston dean Grozny Napoleon hill Bernabei Brown Robert Schuler twenty thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars million dollars eight years five K
"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

11:20 min | 1 year ago

"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

"Off. Hello and welcome to digital leadership with Brandon Cox. That's me. And this is the space where I get to talk about life leadership and even sometimes some digital marketing. I want this demeaning, courage, meant to you. I have a vision to grow leaders to help leaders to grow for all of us to expand our influence together. Because I've Aleve that the world is a much better place when we do. So I want to dive into something today that has been very personal me over the last few years. And that is I wanna talk about expanding your leadership capacity to expand the capacity for how much you can handle as leader for the level of influence for the size of the organization for the the kind of impact that you want to have. I want us to talk about expanding all of that. How do I grow in terms of my ability to influence people? How do I grow in my ability to lead a larger organization growing or? How do I help the people around me to grow? John Maxwell often talks about the law of the lid. He wrote about in a couple of his books and the law of the lid, basically states that the level of an organization will never excel beyond the level of its primary leader, and then there's some other ramifications of it that whatever spot you lead from whatever your lid is. You'll always struggle to lead other people beyond it. So leadership is all about growing other people. It's all about developing people, right? It's lifting and raising people. It's developing other people to their potential leadership is not about you being the rockstar leadership is about you pouring into others developing others, inspiring others, giving others a track to grow on. And you are a lid for your organization your lid for yourself. You're live for the people that you. Lead. That's true of every last one of us. Another words if I'm leading at a seven I will never be able to take people beyond a five or six I'll always kind of keep people back behind where ama- little bit Jesus was a tin. He took the disciples as far as anyone could ever take anyone because he's just the master leader. But all of us are somewhere below that. We all found ourselves different places at different levels. The question is how do I lift the lid, how do I change my capacity? How do I grow in my ability to influence other people over the last eight years of experience this at grace hills church? We started Grace's about seven and a half years ago. And every time we cross a new milestone every time we enter a new season or a new era or something happens that significantly positive. I'm always faced with the question. Am I going to be able to lead us further? Am I going to be able to take us on from here? To the next level to the next place to the next goal. And you've probably face that as well. I think the answer that question can be. Yes, if we're willing to expand our capacity, if we're willing to grow as leaders, if we're willing to put ourselves in the position of expanding and growing and our ability to lead. No, I want to dig into how that happens. How it is. That you expand your capacity. How it is that you lift the lid on your own leadership. And I'm gonna make a statement here. That's kind of key to all of it to lift the lid and expand your capacity, you must embrace and create change in your life. You must embrace and create change in your life. That's also true organizationally. If you want your organization, your church, you business your ministry to grow. You're gonna have to change things in order to expand the capacity just as. When you have to build a larger building when you have to expand two more locations when you need more infrastructure when you've got gotta move to new software. We have to be able to to grow beyond in in terms of making change happen around us and change is almost always difficult. It's almost always painful, but the fact is growth is change by nature. If you're not willing to change you'll never grow because growth is changed things that change over time grow and not all change is growth, but all growth is change. So if you wanna lift your live, if you want to expand your leadership capacity, you gotta change some things you gotta become the catalyst change in your life. You have to instigate change. And if you're the leader at the top of an organization, if you're the senior pastor, the senior leader, you're the CEO you have to instigate change you have to be the one to make the ripples to make change happen. Doesn't. And you'll be the only one, but you've got to be willing to go first. So let's kind of talk for a minute about the kinds of changes that can and cannot be made in your life, and your leadership in your in your organization, we need to acknowledge it some change cannot be made it all. In other words, you might say today, I could lead better I could lead at a higher level if I had blank, and he kind of fill in the blank with something that is not possible for you to create if I had a different leader over me if I worked for a different business. If I if I had a ton of money, if I whatever the case might be your your sort of filling in that blank with I could lead better if and what goes after if is something that you can't control you you've got to come to peace with those things and find a creative way around them. There's certain things you're not gonna be able to change. You're not gonna be able to control you can't lift certain lids around you. It's the reason why some people wind up changing organizations they wind up going. Somewhere else to work or starting a new business or whatever because they've hit a spot where they can't change what's above them. What's around them? And so you need to acknowledge you can't change everything. And some things are just never going to have control over. And then there's a category of things that you can change, but they have to be changed slowly have to be changed over time. So you might say I want to be wealthy. You know, if I just had a bunch of money about a million dollars to make Akkad really do good for the world. The problem is if you're earning fifty thousand dollars a year now, and you've got twenty thousand dollars in savings. You're a long ways from a million. You can't get that overnight. You you've got to commit to the long term game. You've got to have the patience to to let those things develop over time. Now, you can make incremental changes now, but there are certain things that can only change over long periods of time. What I want to dig into today in this episode. However is what are the things? I. Can change today. What are the decisions I can make right now that expand my capacity as a leader starting in this moment. And I wanna give you five K five ways to change yourself five ways to challenge yourself five ways that you can grow and expand your leadership capacity that make a difference longterm. These changed the game for you and your organization, and the people that you lead over the long haul case. So here they are rapid fire. One after another the first one is today. You can expand your knowledge today. You can expand your knowledge the bottom line is I've never seen a leader excel to greatness or lead an organization to greatness or make a significant impact on the world who was completely self absorbed every leader, I know that's ever been affective was a learner. And a listener they read things they listen to things they took things in. And so a lot of times I come across some. One is how can I make my life better? And I'll say something like well, have you checked out this book, I'm not really a reader, and so often I just want to sort of level this truth become a reader become a reader. I wasn't always a reader. You. Don't think you're a reader, but you gotta give it a shot because without reading you're missing out on so much knowledge. But even if we're not talking about sitting down and flipping open a book and reading page after page, there are other ways to to learn to take in that you can take advantage of today. The the big point is Houston to be feeding your mind with something that's not up there yet. And so you can expand your knowledge by listening to podcasts. K expand your knowledge by subscribing to YouTube channels expand your knowledge by taking an online course expand your knowledge by exposing yourself to information that you haven't had before. And I wanna especially say, what is in rich my life, deeply and expand. Did my own capacity for leadership is to always look for sources of knowledge that are written and created by people who sort of our head of me in my particular field of interest and passion. So if I want to know how to lead a church better. I need to read books by other pastures who have led churches and are now sharing knowledge, I need to read that I wanna read people who have done really well in business people who've done really well in their lives. I wanna read people that challenge my mind in terms of how I think about people and relationships so here lately, I've been reading a books by dean Grozny, OSI, Napoleon hill Bernabei Brown. John Maxwell, Robert Schuler read books by people that I don't necessarily agree with all the way. And it's funny. How when I mentioned an author's name some listeners go he reads him. I can't believe he does that. But the fact is you need to be willing to read things written by people that are just. Outside of your comfort zone that they don't necessarily line up perfectly with your exact perspective because then you get the small world view. So you can expand your knowledge today. In fact, I wanna give you a tip for that. I think you should go to YouTube and find the shows and the channels that are produced by people that you tend to learn from just a little while ago. I was listening to a YouTube show by Ed my let you can go look him up. He's phenomenal. He's a tremendous motivator and leader business guy, and Ed was sharing things that inspired me that made me think about life in ways I hadn't thought about before. So I just watches YouTube videos. They're compelling easy to watch their entertaining, very educational. So expand your knowledge if you don't expand your knowledge, you're done if you stopped listening and stop reading and stopped. Feeding your mind you're at the limit your the limits of you want to. Spain your capacity you've got expand your knowledge K. Here's a second thing challenge. Your beliefs challenge, your belief, so expand

YouTube John Maxwell Brandon Cox Ed Spain grace hills church CEO Grace ama Akkad OSI Houston dean Grozny Napoleon hill Bernabei Brown Robert Schuler twenty thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars million dollars eight years five K
"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

"It's gonna be all about financial freedom and work free. Adam and life freedom. So I really believe my purpose is to help people find freedom, and I do that in in a variety of ways. K it helps me to enjoy what I'm doing more. When I realized the things in my life with my purposes now couple of practical little things that are come out of that. When you re aligned with your purposes redefine what they are. And start to realign your life with your purposes, I think you're gonna have to refocus, and we'd some things out to get rid of some things. There's a lot of power and saying no, and one of the factors that leads to burn out. Sometimes we just we don't like say no to people. So we say yes to everything now at its root and core our unwillingness to say, no Alta comes out of trying to find our identity in the affirmation of people. So if I say, yes to them, the la- firm me, the lightning, they'll appreciate me. And so I got to get over that. I I gotta stop fearing people and stop worrying about their. Level of got it instead served people out of my purpose. But not feel obligated to commit to serving people in ways that don't align with my purpose to be able to say no to some things, and we'd some things out also have to learn to delegate and to trust. If you're in leadership delegation is key. And I don't even like the word delegation like the word empowering that I need to empower others. Giving example of how this worked in my own and my own church my own leadership. I wrote a book about how the church social media. So so that's a big area for me. So letting go of our churches social media was a huge challenge for me took me a long time to come to grips with I need to let someone else kinda manage this. But I did I entrusted. Martha she's on our church staff and Martha ran with our church communications. She does a phenomenal job with social me a better than I would have. Done better than I would be doing. She made. It manages it consistently and gives our church, great voice on social media. So what I found was that. I was afraid to let it go. Because if I don't control it it won't be great. Well, that's a lie. That's a lie, and I was afraid to let go because if I'm not in control of it than I feel out of control. But the fact is by giving it away I got to empower someone else who now gets a lot of fulfillment from it does a great job with it. And so you've got to begin to release things to say, no to things to realizing with your purposes. So sit down after this podcast, sit down and take some time alone to write out a sentence describes what's your life all about what are you gifted to do? What do you call to do? Not just your job. Not just your vocation. I'm talking about as you live through life. What is your shape? What? Is your identity? What are you here to do? Mine is to help people find freedom. What is yours? How has got wire? Jew to serve other people to impact the world. What do you do with all of that? So that's how you recover from burnout. And that's also how you prevent burnout. If you are spending adequate time alone adequate time with people, and you're constantly reaffirming your purposes, you know, you're you're making those declarations that that. We've we've talked about previously talk shared them at the end of the last episodes. If you missed that go back, and listen, especially the last few minutes talk about these declarations that I make every day that remind me who I am who got his how I fit into his plan all of that go back and do those things take some time alone to reaffirm your purpose, and align your life with it K. So another words, I don't think it's about balance. I don't think it's about priorities. I don't even think it's about time management specifically it is about making sure that your day. Your relationships. Your your activities are aligned with guides purpose for your life. And let me just close with a personal word of encouragement. I want you to hear this message loud and clear as we come to draw the close of this first of all you are needed like the world needs. You your people need you the people around you need you. And so if you're if you're place a burnout where you just think I'm just not doing anybody any good. You're wrong. That's a lie. It's a live from the pit hell you are needed. Secondly, you are loved God loves you, your people love you. You are loved in. You got fall back on that. When you feel burn out coming on. You know, you are loved and also you can make a difference. You can do this. Like you have in you what it takes to make an impact on the world. That when you align with your purpose when you discover your purpose, and you start living that outing start serving others and giving giving your life away to others in a way that aligns with your purpose. You're gonna make a difference. You're gonna make an impact you've got a message for people. And I'm glad that you're listening to this all the way to the end to hear you can make a difference one. Last thing if you're not in tune with your purpose. And you don't know what life is all about. You're not sure what the purpose of life is. Or why you're in this thing feel free to reach out to me. Just go to Brandon Cox dot com, click on the contact button and shoot me a note. All right would love to hear from you hope you'll tune in next time, I'm gonna talk a little bit more about leadership and some of the things that that get in the way actually next time. We're gonna dive a little deep talk some mental health issues depression, anxiety shoes. So. Come back and share this with somebody else along the way can't wait to to hang out with you again.

Martha Adam Brandon Cox
"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

12:10 min | 1 year ago

"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

"Off. E welcome back to digital leadership with Brandon Cox. That's me. This is where I share some perspective and encouragement about life leadership and sometimes even some digital marketing stuff. Hopefully, you're into those things this will benefit you. Maybe you can even share it with others been talking about leadership, and what's killing our leadership. What is it? That's drowning us what is it? That's taking leaders out of the picture when we desperately need. Good leaders last time, I kind of talked about identity, and how the most dangerous destructive force on earth is a man who doesn't know who he is from a leadership perspective. I think there's some other factors. I wanna get into the next few weeks today. I wanna talk about burnout and burn out his actually closely related to identity, but burn out is a huge problem. I think it's misunderstood. I think it's underestimated in terms of. Of what it can do to sort of wreck the trajectory of a good leadership pathway someone get into some solutions. But I wanna talk about the problem. I when I was the editor at pastors dot com. We would sometimes publish articles about burnout how to recover from emotional burn out. And those were always the most popular articles. They got the most clicks that they had the most people reading them than the most people sharing them. They had the most comments had the most people opening up in discussion on Facebook and elsewhere about this is me I needed this. I'm going through this right now, I believe burnout is epidemic. And I think there's some reasons for that that I wanna get into in just a second. But, but this is an enormous issue. It's an enormous issue. And I want you to understand. It's an issue. I have walked through personally that when I go back close to a decade ago in my own life and leadership. I go back to a time when I was taking on too many things too many projects, partly because I didn't know who I was. I don't think that taking on projects is the problem. In fact, I think that can actually be a good thing. If you know who you are. And why you're doing it? If you understand the why. But I was in a period of phase of life where I I was no longer certain of who I was I was no longer comfortable in my own skin. I'd gotten discouraged. I had let of the approval of others become a driving force in my life. I was very concerned about keeping everybody. Happy and getting everything done, right. I was treating my own life kind of a legalistic mentality was a big checklist. And I was failing. And because of that my attention was all over the place trying to fill that void trying to trying to match up. Meanwhile, as a result of all of that, I was hurting in some relation. Ships. I was distanced from friends. I was distanced from my wife, emotionally speaking, I was just going through that sort of time where I began to isolate began to burn out. It was down ruled downward spiral. One of the things that changed was we moved to California and got into a healthy church and healthy community and into a good small group and into lots of situations that really helped me to recover get back on track regained, focus regain clarity. And just re, cultivate, a new passion for the things that mattered the most in life. And so out of that came a big emphasis in our church that we've been planting for seven years, grace hills church big emphasis on reaching out to people who are broken who are hurting are walking through problems and issues like that and who need help. So I wanted to help in this podcast. I wanted to tackle the issue of burnout because it's near and dear to my heart. I love pass. Shire's a love leaders of people who are in leadership and are suffering going to hard time. And I just wanna give you a some practical wisdom as well. As some personal encouragement today. I let me let me just dive in and talk about what I think are some of the misconceptions about burnout. Some of the reasons why we get burnout to begin with our because we miss understand certain things about life. Certain things are culturally popular, we we read books about them. And so we assume that that must be the problem, for example. I think there's a false emphasis today on balance, we talk a lot about the word balance in how you know, you need a balanced life. Don't be a work a holic be more balanced and the problem with balance it it's not as it's not that balances bad. It's that sometimes we misunderstand what healthy balance looks like healthy balance. I think is when you. You look at your life. As who you are. You are physical see have a body. You are mental. You have a mind you are emotional. You have a heart. You are volition all you have a will you have relationships? So if you're talking about I wanna grow in a balanced way. That's fantastic. Like, I wanna grow. Personally. I wanna grow spiritually I wanna grow relational. I want to be healthy physically that is a good kind of balance to seek after. But what we do with balance. A lot of times is we look at all the different areas of our lives. And we go Kay. I need to give make Shrem giving adequate amounts of time and attention to each area of my life. And so in a given week we might go while I need to work forty fifty hours need to do well for my boss needed to do. Good on this job. I gotta do good in my business. And then I've also got a marriage to maintain. So I gotta give some energy there. Get some time and some focused on my marriage got my finances. I need to give some time and some energy to managing my finances. Well, so let me focus on that for a bit. I've got kids. So I need to give some time and some energy to my kids of got the school or the nonprofit of the charity that volunteer with maybe the board I serve on. So I gotta give them some time and some energy and what we wind up doing is. We treat life like a pizza, and we try to give a slice to everything. That's that's grabbing for attention. We try to give a slice to all of the different areas. And the reason why that leads to burn out is because there's not really an emphasis on how much I have to give. There's just a constant demand and pressure to give more to everything and everybody and the problem is I've only got so much energy to give. So. What do you do with that? Then how how do you give to all those things in a way that that's healthy? That makes sense, but doesn't keep you sort of burning out. I believe we need to shift our emphasis from balance to rhythm from balance to rhythm. In fact, I did a whole forty five minute teaching session on this in the digital leadership lab. So if you're interested in going deeper into rhythm just out digital leadership lab dot com. Talk about this a lot there. But basically, it is instead of dividing my life out into pieces and giving a peace to all these different things. I need to respect the rhythm of life. I need to know that they're going to be weeks. They're going to be moments where I'm really busy with kids stuff. You know, like, my my kids might have a couple of programs this week at school some sports things some different things going on. And therefore, I'm not gonna be able to give as much to my job or two maybe managing. In my house, or my finances that week, and that's okay. That it's part of the rhythm that they're in my rhythm that they're moments to take breaks. Pastor. Rick Warren, always says, we need to divert daily withdrawal, weekly and abandoned annually. That is take some time every day take a day off every week take some take a week out of your year two weeks of year. Go on vacation. That's all part of the rhythm. Working hard is part of the rhythm of life being really close to my family and friends that's part of my rhythm in life. So instead of trying to divide myself between all these different areas, I need to find the rhythm another misconception. I think that leads to burnout is a misunderstanding of the word priority in our modern culture, we take priority, and we divide it into multiple priorities. And we kinda come up with his list. And so it's like, you know guy. God family church work. And so those are my number one number two number three number four priorities in life. And so God comes first and priority. And I understand that. There's some sense in that the problem is the word priority is not a plural word. It's a singular word the ancient concept of priority. We get it from our Latin a priority. It's a single thing. It's one thing. And so it's not so much about having your ten or twelve priorities in life ordered correctly. It's about living for one priority. And other words, what is my purpose and out of my one purpose everything else flows. Everything else fits for me as a Christian. I get that. From Matthew six thirty three where Jesus said seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness and when. You do that everything else will fall into place. So if I spend my life living for God's kingdom purposes, if that's my priority, then I'm gonna have healthier family, a healthier personal life, a healthier relationship with my co workers and so forth and so on. So it's not about having a bunch of priorities and put them in the right order. It's about living for your purpose and letting everything else flow out of that one purpose for which you live. I also think another big misconception. Another problem that leads to burnout is an over emphasis on busy nece and overwhelm another words. I don't just think we're addicted to business. I think we're addicted to talking about business. I mean, when you know, how is your week and most of us off as busy crazy house life lately. It was busy crazy. The funny thing is when I listened to high influence high impact leaders may be CEO's of corporation that do really well. And they have great family life or people that maybe have written lots of books, and they have, you know, a big ministry to millions or whatever when I listened to people in those scenarios. I don't often hear them talk about how busy they are. There's there's not a lot of talk among really successful people about oh, man. I'm just maxed out all the time. I'm just stressed out all the time. Instead, there's more of a confidence about life. And so I'm not saying that we should ignore business. I think if you're too busy will will come back to that. In a second. You don't need to be too busy. But I do think it's possible to do multiple things in life to have multiple projects and multiple things going on and still not be overly busy and overwhelmed. Part of it is we take we kinda take when moments when we're overloaded with things when we're busy with lots of things and we start telling ourselves, I'm just overwhelmed. I've just got too

Brandon Cox Facebook editor grace hills church Rick Warren California Shrem Shire CEO Kay Jesus Matthew forty fifty hours forty five minute seven years two weeks
"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"cox" Discussed on Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

"Off. Hello, welcome to digital leadership with Brandon Cox. This is a podcast where I share some perspective and some encouragement on life leadership and digital marketing. So if you fall into any of those three categories, you're alive, you're a leader or your into digital marketing. And hopefully, if your leader you want to learn about digital marketing, then I think you're gonna enjoy this and get some things out of it. Hope you'll subscribe and pass it along and share it with other people in this inaugural episode as I kind of launched this podcast. I wanna lay a bit of a foundation for the coming weeks. I wanna talk about some things that are killing leadership is really the burden out of which the reason why I'm launching this podcast to begin with is because I I want to speak into the lives of leaders. I believe that leaders are suffering that more than ever before were watching as people of. Influence people who influence their their world or community their church for good are struggling they're failing. They're falling. They're going through hard times, and and quitting and checking out and get knocked out and getting fired and just all kinds of things occurring around us in the leadership world. And I think there's some things that are killing us some some enemies some tactics. Some traps some threats that we need to be aware of and I want to cover those over the next few weeks. I wanna talk about six in particular wanna start off today by talking about a lack of identity, and how that affects us as leaders. Also wanna talk over the coming weeks about burn out about mental health issues about sin and spiritual lethargy and how to get your passion back. I wanna talk about marriage and relationship issues in the life of the leader. And I wanna talk about some limiting beliefs. But I wanna start off today by talking about the issue of identity. How is it that you? You as a leader come to know who you are zig Ziglar guy that I've come to appreciate a lot in the last few years once said and often said that you gotta be before you can do. And you gotta do before you can have what he meant. Was we often define ourselves. We decide whether we're successful not based on what we have. I have possessions. I have prestige have power have a position and the problem with that is you can't have until you do until you do certain things you do something for a living. You take some action. But you shouldn't do until you be until you know, who you are at your core until your identity issue is settled because when your identity issues settled, then you know, what to do. And then you will have the right things a love what zig said, I think he's spot on. Then I wanna just follow that train of thought for a minute and talk about what I think are some wrong. Sources of identity. Annual reports of the largest and fastest growing churches and so forth. And if you don't have a strong sense of identity all that can affect you. By comparison, you start to start to kind of compare your blooper reel to everybody else's highlight reel social media doesn't help. But you know, it's not the problem either. It's it's an identity issue. I think we also route our identity sometimes in our achievements and the danger in that is when my achievements don't stack up enough. I feel a loss of identity or when I walked through failure. I forget who I am. And I m I really am. I really right about this. You know, if all of my achievements, are what prop up my Dimity. I think I'm in trouble. My mom used to work for guy that had what he called an ego wall in his office. And it was a wall that had all of his degrees and certificates and and awards and letters from famous people and all that kind of thing had had it their article. That were written about him because he'd worked on some high profile cases and whatnot. And so whenever he would get down. He look at that wall. And it would remind him of all of his accomplishments. The problem is sometimes what we accomplish we don't necessarily have a lot of visual recognition of, you know, not a lot of certificates and awards for the things that matter the most. And so it's not just it's not just chievements. It's not just comparison. It is it is more than that. I think another source of identity that is unhealthy and wrong. Is that we often identifier selves, according to a tribe. According to the camp that we fall in another words, there's a group guys out there group of fellow peers colleagues, and they all tend to believe certain things, they all tend to say certain things behave in a certain way. And we get worried that if I don't believe or behave or talk. In the same way, as they do if I don't criticize the same people as they do I won't fit in anymore and tribalism is a terrible source of identity because what if the whole tribe is wrong. What if you need to break apart on an issue, you need to have a strong enough identity to go at the end of the day? Their approval is not what drives me so a speech super careful with those false

zig Ziglar Brandon Cox Dimity
"cox" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"cox" Discussed on WSB-AM

"The definition over time so a lot of people who were upset that net neutrality is be repealed it it's really not as just one of the liberal definitions has changed to begin with net neutrality means that information shen coming to you over the internet should all be treated equally so for example you get your internet fromn will you do i get mind for up from my company cox cox communications cox enterprises cox media group i get my internet from cox i actually pay for business line for our house because are you so much data with work so what neutrality would say is that if talks were to offer say wsb uh live streaming over the internet for free for people who get cox internet that they could not give it priority over or another streaming service they couldn't prioritize their own inhouse video feed over netflixing and i agree with that in principle because i am paying for internet i'm not pain for cox to give me wsb over the internet i'm pain for internet and i want to be able to access the internet and i don't want to be nickel the dying to death to say well if you want your netflixing you're going to have to pay even more i i weather i want netflixing right tunes or or wsb's livestream or what have you i i want them all treated equally and that is the basic concept of net neutrality and here's the kicker with the repeal with the repeal today of the regulations from two thousand fifteen that will still be the case that will still be the law of the land that level of net neutrality will happen in what the lifts argument about is a hypothetical future were that's no longer the case but that's not happening now there are some caveats and nutshells year uh that we got a we'd the rule short through and pick apart so that you could understand where the hysteria comes from but before we get there let's go check dress good guy your mind are needed a guy john burton than an hour dan whether you want to go one did novelty out over of libya what are your your round i wanted to web reweighting or even been download the unit over bravo wrote around where the break coming to the highway travel advisory.

cox john burton libya cox cox communications cox ent