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Washington DC Brewery Joins Black Is Beautiful Beer Movement

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 d ago

Washington DC Brewery Joins Black Is Beautiful Beer Movement

"Movement that started at a San Antonio brewery has made its way to D. C. The Black is beautiful beer. We'll hit local shelves. Soon. Our news partner at NBC for spoke to Kofi Moreau, co founder of Sankofa Beer Company, one of the many breweries making the beer. It's highlighting all of the lack of diversity and beer. It's highlighting a lot of the people that look like me. It's raising a ton of awareness and you've got all of these birds bring this fear that they're going to sell. All of the proceeds will be donated to the Lunn. Double A C P. Almost 1000 breweries around the country have signed up for the brew and to support it and supporting racial equality. 2

Kofi Moreau Sankofa Beer Company San Antonio Lunn NBC Partner Co Founder
Several protests to take place over holiday weekend in Washington, DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

Several protests to take place over holiday weekend in Washington, DC

"Protesters are still working to bring about change as the movement to support black lives continues the organization DC protests has put together several Marge's since the death of George Floyd, including one today in Malcolm X Pork. There's still not enough reform in the police system, and we've been protesting for about 30 plus days, though we're out here trying to take back before Justin Dawes is the co founder and says they're working with a number of organizations, including the Equal Justice Fund Initiative and bartenders against racism. And they plan to continue providing education within the community. Our next protests and demonstrations be focused on more education and getting all of our community outside locally vote, So we're out here, enforced and showing up in numbers, so let them know we won't be intimidated and we won't be silent. Melissa how w. GOP news

Equal Justice Fund Initiative Justin Dawes George Floyd Marge GOP Malcolm DC Melissa Co Founder
EVO 2020 was cancelled

Gaming Ride Home

07:17 min | 3 d ago

EVO 2020 was cancelled

"Yvo Twenty twenty has been canceled due to various sexual abuse allegations. Yvo Is the biggest annual fighting game tournament in the world, and even with the covid nineteen issues plaguing everyone on the planet. The tournament was soldiering on with plans to make it fully online. Earlier this week, however that all fell apart, and in order to learn more about it, I called on Imran Khan to explain everything Imron. Come into the gaming ride home show again for having me Yvo was canceled. And I just want you to give me the full story. What happened? Why was it canceled? Everything start from the beginning, so ego is the biggest fighting tournament in America Kinda the biggest in the world. There's like some discussion about that at this point, but ego is basically where fighting games have been aspiring to for the last twenty thirty years and listening started in the ninety S. This year, obviously because of covid kit have their usual Mandalay Bay Las Vegas big gathering of fighting game players. So this year they ended up canceling I place. Eve Online Eve online was a different thing where the. Mainly, got games together with like Netco like mortal Kombat eleven and them fighting her indie game that was originally based on my little pony, but basically it was A. It has to evolve brand that could stay around despite not being the big mass gathering tournament that they expect over the last couple of weeks. There's been a bigger. industry-wide movement to out sexual predators in gaming and the gaming industry, and some companies have been hit harder than that are with that bubis off for example, but for the most part it's. It's not a huge thing within the FTC. Because the FTC's always kind of had a reputation of like. Being a bit more open with their sexual harassment and it's always like. It's never been to a level of. A mass critical mass. Joey quilter this past week yesterday in for yesterday in fact was outed by a player. Named He's just does mikey. He goes online and is after the tag is crack. Peron but George Taylor. Who is the head of the current? President Vivo who founded it with Tommy Tony Kanaan. was outed for experiences when he was. Close, to twenty, where they were southern golf land, which is an amusement park in l. a.. That mikey accused him of basically. Paying money to young kids to take their shirts. Germany polls mikey related experience where he said quarter. Paid him twenty dollars to see his genitals inside a restroom and bought him pornography so. It's IT'S A. It's a larger thing that when you look at it from the perspective of not a child who just thinks they're having fun. It's real creepy, but what is conditions came out. Other people's Front, also coming out of the woodwork, saying like more finding old chaser people were talking about doing these things, but not naming names, and now that it's out. The floodgates are broken out. Yvonne immediately went. No, WE'RE GONNA put on administrative leave and check this out, so I mentioned Tom. Tony Kennedy before their more famous like they are obviously co-founders of ego, but there are more famous right now for being developers of Product L. at riot games so. They had to step in for this and go okay. We're looking at this right now. We're investigating and seeing what happens. It did not take very long before nether realm. I believe the first one like say. Are Involved with ego involvement in that sense means we don't WanNA game there. We're not going to earn any money towards prize pools. We're not doing any advertising which is fairly big deal. Arguably moral combat was like the lead game for that tournament. Right for the online tournament. Yes, Merle come at usually has a hard time with like the in person tournament. Fighting community hasn't really take to that game too well, but as an online net code game like for example, smash brothers was canceled for Eve online because the net code. Isn't that good, so this is more time to shine. The actual like really arguably was streetfighter as it is every year. This year. Are Not meeting her, but a little bit. After another canceled COP CANCELED IN ONCE CAPCOM cancels gets away from ego. Then that's that's the ballgame lets. Everything goes away soon after main sex developers of them biting heard who this is their big chance to become A. Kind of a household name and if I didn't need community, they cancelled. Bay Namco canceled and ran into that ego are the canons came out with a message from as ego saying? Hey, we were cutting for joy color. He is not president anymore. In the future, he will have zero involvement with the organization this not he's going to not be on. He's going to be on the board, or he'll be the FCC or he'll still kind of tournaments. They're cutting it off completely. Shortly after that they also that announced, we can't under these circumstances and this change in organization also do evil online in a couple of weeks in August. A month or in August? I. Know that screws over a lot of people, but. It seems like honestly the best. Call right now of. You'RE GONNA have to go through with work. That joy has done or you're going to have to. Try It's from scratch. Cobble together in event that takes at least a year to actually set up and try to get together in a couple of weeks. Yeah, I mean they just they basically. Got Rid of the boss in the most public way, possible right I mean it's it's you can't just like recover from that in a matter of weeks. Really Yeah, it's. It is one of those things of a lot of this is. Probably high time for the funding community insert reckoning with a lot of these things, because it's an issue for a number of years, it was I. I don't know if you recall but a about eight years ago, there was a street fight across capcom across Tekken. Show online, and it ended up ending as a result of some sexual harassment claims, and those a big divide in the community about like whether sexual harassment was a just a part of the culture or not and. Stuff like this doesn't help that argument. No I mean I like you, said earlier I mean like. Feels like the right call to elevate it, and as disappointing as it is for Yvo to be cancelled like it's a big flag for like we need to address. This is if we're going to cancel this event because we need to look at ourselves internally and I think I. Mean Hope the hope is that they come out better on the other side. I mean it seems like this is one of those things where. I. Hesitate to say Covid kind of save them but. If. This were an actual in person things still at Mandalay Bay then they wouldn't be able to cancer that quickly an online tournament. Shuttered a lot more easily. The bigger question now is what happens next year.

Harassment Yvo Twenty Twenty YVO Mikey President Trump FTC Mandalay Bay Las Vegas Imran Khan Mandalay Bay America Joey Quilter Riot Games Netco Namco Germany Tony Kennedy Tommy Tony Kanaan. Yvonne
EVO Cancelled After Accusations Towards Co-Founder Mr. Wizard

The Esports Minute

01:28 min | 3 d ago

EVO Cancelled After Accusations Towards Co-Founder Mr. Wizard

"Amid dreams and the sports minute presented by e sports network. It's just the Cherry on top of what was a crappy week in sports and the game community as large ego is, or maybe I should say was one of the most prestigious events in east sports as the top event for most fighting game titles. This year, the competition and moved online due to the pandemic, but after allegations of sexual misconduct towards Joey. Cuellar the CO founder President. Eve Online has been outright canceled Kular, better known as Mister. Wizard was accused of acting inappropriately towards teenage, boys, Multiple Times mikey crack prawn fan was the one step forward. The allegations publicly after those allegations went public Capcom nother Rome and band dynamic. Oh, all pulled their gains in the event. In addition, casters players also pulled out leaving Yvo, no choice but to cancel the event Yvo says sever all ties with cooler going forward, but he was a key part of the creation of Yvo and actually decision event from its Co. founder will be difficult. Defining game community was splintered this week. This is just one of many many allegations. Put forward by various. Various members of the community for much larger conversation about what's happening this week. The myriad of allegations and the lasting effects on the FTC I've just published an east sports network podcast episode with fighting Gabe writer Danny. Howard we cover these topics in depth, my condolences and the goal of sports network go out to

YVO Co Founder Cuellar Eve Online Joey Gabe Wizard Howard Founder Danny Writer President Trump Its Co.
EVO 2020 Online Has Been Cancelled

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:58 min | 3 d ago

EVO 2020 Online Has Been Cancelled

"YVO has been canceled. This is John Quarter at the verge. Fighting Game Tournament organizers. Has Been canceled has cancelled Yvo online and removed co founder and president from the company, after serious allegations surfaced about his past behavior, long running eastwards event had previously been scheduled to take place in a new online only format starting July fourth due to the coronavirus pandemic, the announcement of the event's cancellation comes less than twenty four hours after finding game player Mikey. CRACK PRONE FEM That quarter had behaved inappropriately towards him I in a number of other teenage boys in the nineties and early two thousands following the allegations, multiple companies pulled out of the event, including Capcom Nether Realm, a band nine am co as all players and commentators according to Pc Gamer. This is evil statement. Over the past twenty four hours, response series allegations recently made public on twitter. We have made the the the first of a series of important decisions, regarding the future of the company effective immediately, Joey Waller will no longer be involved with Yvo in any capacity, we currently are working towards his complete separation from the company and real relieved of all his responsibilities. Going Forward Tony Kanaan will act a CEO in this position, it would take a leadership role in prioritizing credit greater accountability across evil both. Both internally INADA events progress doesn't happen overnight, or without the bravery of those who speak up against misconduct injustice. We are shocked and saddened by these events, but we are listening in are committed to making every change. They'll be necessary making Yvo a better model for the stronger safer culture. We all seek as a result, we'll be canceling evil online and were to issue refunds for all players who chose to purchase a badge will donate the the equivalent of the proceeds as promised to Project Hope. Even said it'll be issuing refunds to anyone who purchased the bachelor for Eve Online. I'm back to the article now. and that'll be making a donation project. Hope equivalent to proceeds from the event.

YVO John Quarter Tony Kanaan Eve Online Twitter Joey Waller Capcom CEO Co Founder President Trump
Cameo now lets you book 10-minute Zoom calls with celebrities

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:56 sec | 3 d ago

Cameo now lets you book 10-minute Zoom calls with celebrities

"People pay celebrities, entertainers, musicians. And influencers to record messages for them. Now the service is expanding into live Zoom calls. Every single athlete actor celebrity at the core is really a gig. Economy work, Stephen Go. Llinas is co founder and CEO of the biggest things Get Paper Game. Musicians get paid per show. Stand up Comedians Get Paper Act, which raises the question of how much should it cost for a 10 minute zoom call and our celebrities setting the right price. We have price for their talent. Modern and almost these Tom slick, like in real estate, where they can see people that are similar statue. Maybe teammates of theirs on a sports team are a similar calibre musician and another band. A 10 minute zoom call with comedian Gilbert Gottfried was recently listed for $150 while actor Charlie Sheen was going for $500. I'm Charlie Pellet. Bloomberg Radio. Radio.

Charlie Pellet Charlie Sheen Tom Slick Gilbert Gottfried Stephen Go Bloomberg CEO Llinas Co Founder
"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:40 min | 4 d ago

"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Just you probably just get rid of the people. Just have your best people. They're not managing anybody. The. Other thing I'd say is that you know when you're in the earliest agents like the cost of somebody being bad is super high. Totally Kill Your company. When you're later stage, the cost of somebody being bad is pretty low, if somebody in a role, whatever if they're low performers, who cares? But if one third of your team is a low performer, that's just not going to work right like that just means you're team is low performing so yeah I just be extremely picky you probably the whatever urgency you're feeling around hiring. It's not worth sacrificing for even a B. Plus player in the early days. And that number that like you know grading regimen, whatever it's totally like finger to the air fuzzy, but for the role. You're hiring you WANNA hire somebody who's the best in the world at that role. I will continue my my ran for just one last point which is. Just because somebody says you need to hire, the best person in the world for the role doesn't mean that you need to hire the best person in the world in their discipline, so if you need to hire for example the best. React if you're building a react APP you WanNa hire the best react engineer in the world. That doesn't mean you WanNa hire the guy that works or Gal that works on the react Colonel Ray. Because that person probably doesn't solving problems that you have you wanna find somebody who's the best in the world at the sort of domain that you actually care about you like you necessarily want to hire somebody who is tremendous at writing algorithms. If what you need to do is build, Web APPs. Like their competence in this deep technical domain doesn't help your startup. It might help your ego, but it doesn't help your star and what you really want is somebody who's going to help your start up. How you think about compensation, it was sort of philosophy. Behind. So I thought a ton about this. The way that basically look at it as pre seed. It's basically whatever you can negotiate that person's basic before before you raise any money based prison, basically a co-founder whether you give them. The CO founder title is your decision. Not Mind whatever you negotiate, anything goes. There's no rationality here. Once you've raised some money well. Look at his, you know. If you want a really strong team. You pretty much just straight up. Tell people that they can't be in it for cash like as a seed stage startup if someone comes in, and they're like yeah I need one fifty to start. It's there's just like no way dude..

Colonel Ray engineer co-founder CO founder
How Much Equity Should You Give To Your Partners?

Marketing School

04:54 min | 4 d ago

How Much Equity Should You Give To Your Partners?

"To another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil, Patel and today we're gonNA. Talk about how much equity you should give to your partners and I. Think Neil this maybe a good way for us to start this off after we kind of talk about a little bit is to share stories. Yeah, so equity guys just to recap. What percent of the company should you be giving to potential partners and I think the high level answer to that would be depends, but I think it'd be helpful for you guys to get an idea of how Neil I have thought about this historically and how we've done things, so neil you WANNA start. Yes so I'm a big believer and basing on value if you think someone is. Doing a lot of work, carrying majority of the way, or they should get majority of a are doing very little work. She get much lower of equity if they're doing half the work and pulling hathaway fighting half value than give them fifty percent, the reason I would vary it a law and don't always look at it as you deserve the majority or you deserve, the least amount is if someone else is doing the majority of the working. They're carrying the company and you do very little, but you own a big chunk or more than half eventually they're not going to be. Happiness can create friction. And then eventually the business can end up going to zero or does not work out on the flip side. If you own majority an were, you can also think about the opposite way as well right so in essence well I've learned and I've done so many different business partnerships says it has to be equal based on the value and effort that each partner is providing, and that could be one partners, providing more money or do. Do More work or they're bringing more deals are revenue. However, you want to slice dice. Yeah, and one way I think people might be thinking. Hey, like what if I want this to be an exact science? I think it's tough to make an exact science, but if you want to do it, there actually is a way to make it a lot more mathematical. There's a website I, think it's called slicing pie so slicing it. Slicing Piedras actually a book on do and basically you actually have to record how many hours you're putting in for the year and I think at the end of the year it calculates equity you got now. That is much more mathematic, but to Neal's point. Let's say somebody joins a company and they want equi now I think it's good to entertain the conversation, but really it's basically a negotiation. You're having so okay. You want equity in the company. How much do you want? Okay? You want twenty percent. Okay? Why do you want twenty percent? Okay, how? How much work have you put in so far? How much money are you going to put in now? If it's really zero zero, starting out I'm just joining because I'm talented. That's hard to compute because if the companies are doing well, you've been doing it for five years. You put in the sweat equity and you put in the money already and this person just come in and say I want this. I think they're probably being unreasonable, but if they're being reasonable, then continued negotiation. I think you've gotTA. Make all parties. Happy on that front, so I. I think with partnerships in the past. We can just talk about our partnership here. Neil like fifty fifty right down the line, so that's true so in general. What do you do with all your partnerships? Because you have multiple partnerships, some are less than fifty fifty summer more than fifty fifty. How do view it? Yeah, so let's look at the software side of things so originally it was two co founders that this is for click flow so I starting out with sixty percent, and a he started out with forty percent of the company and the reason. Reason for that was because I was using my social capital, so I was getting people to put in money for the company secondly Ozzy Mike Capital as well third was using my social capital to get US customers at the same time, and so he thought that was more valuable, and he also wanted me to handle the recruiting financing division all that kind of stuff, and he was going to handle strictly to technical side of things, so that's how we split it that way and we agreed, and it was fair to really know fights on that front. Have you ever had business partnerships, not out and people are fighting and arguing yeah. I mean Oh single rain. Were you were a partner before two? Yeah years ago. Why didn't it work? Single Green didn't work out I guess or the Partnership Workout Right? There's many reasons why the company didn't work out, but why the partnerships not work out partial didn't work. This is my opinion. I think the level of work was not distributed. Some of the people that had equity were no longer putting in the work, and so that actually caused issues friction, because it was like I'm putting in this world and this person just kind of sitting on the size I. think there. There is kind of that going on, but at the same time the company wasn't doing that while anymore. Period because of all the algorithm updates that google was making so cash was coming in, so that led them more stress and people were just like. Forget it at this point is like the company's not really worth anything that was where I think it landed, and then there were five partners as myself a zoo and there were three other people, and that's what happened. Look, at the end of the day business partnerships are GonNa go to ups and downs, oil and a finding out is equity mainly becomes a problem when you're making money when you're not making money, no one really cares for some reason. Even when partners are all happy when money starts rolling in dozen people get greedy and picky and have issues, and that's why it's not structured fairly at the beginning, it creates issues wants money is trying to be made.

Neil Partner Eric Su Google Hathaway Ozzy Mike Capital Neal Patel United States Green
Netflix to Invest $100 Million in Black Community's Financial Institutions

KCBS Radio Midday News

03:44 min | 6 d ago

Netflix to Invest $100 Million in Black Community's Financial Institutions

"Joined today by Bloomberg Entertainment reporter Lucas Shaw and Lucas Netflix is pledging $100 million to help black communities in the United States. Where is this money going to go? Do we know It's going to go to financial institutions that in some way lent money to or support black communities. A lot of institutions will be black owned or Or black lead, you know, One of the 1st 1 is Hope Credit union whose CEO Blackman and Bill Bynum, another $25 million is going to the Black Economic Development Initiative, which is a new fund that's gonna invest in black of financial institutions. But the big goal here is to try to take out of some of their cash and give it to institutions that can help facilitate investment in black communities and that the initiative was inspired. In large part by theory of research on the racial wealth gap on how much less capital a lot of black Americans have access to than the average white Americans. For example, besides the benefit of the direct access to money that these communities will now have What does it say that a big companies like Netflix is doing something like this? You know it send the real signal to a lot of the other big companies in the U. S. And around the world. This is the second pretty significant action that that Netflix our CEO Reed Hastings has taken Reid Hastings. Donated $120 million of his own fortune, historically black colleges and universities and I think that was really hoping that this particular commitment will inspire other companies to do the same because Netflix compared to some of the other big tech company has a relatively small amount. Of cash on hand. It's got about $5 million right now. That sounds really big. But then when you think about the fact that companies like Apple have hundreds of billions of dollars in cash, and they're bound sheet if they committed Tio investing some of that money or shifting some of that money Into some of these other financial institutions. That could really be a huge benefit the black communities across the US well, and then that makes me wonder how much weight does Reed Hastings carry in the tech community? I mean, the fact that he's done this Is this likely to inspire others? He carries a lot of weight. I have to say, you know, he is somebody who is very well respected by his peers. He was one of the co founders of Netflix. Prior to that, he found it a couple of other tech companies. He used to sit on the boards of both Facebook and like a softy with the biggest tech companies in the world, and he is really somebody So I think it's seen as one of the leaders in that community that being said he is a little bit of a lone wolf. He kind of he does keep to himself to a certain extent. On doesn't put himself out there in the same way that that may be a mark Tucker Berg does he sit. He has very specific causes that he focuses on me spent a lot of his adult life. Investing money and education, which is why his personal investment in the HBC use without a shock. But you've seen him come out pretty strongly following the death of George Floyd and kind of position Netflix as as a leader trying to invest in black communities, and if if that's going to be a place that he puts his time on energy and money, I think he'll probably push a lot of his peers to do the same. Lucas. Not a lot of time left. But is he doing any work at home if you will, because Netflix doesn't have any black executives. Yeah, it's the 3rd 92 at Netflix really does have to improve its own diversity, especially senior leadership position. None of it really is a black. It has one black board member. But that is something that executives the company acknowledge. Must be worked on in the years ahead. Lucas.

Lucas Netflix Black Economic Development Ini Netflix Lucas CEO United States Lucas Shaw Tucker Berg Reed Hastings Bloomberg Entertainment Hope Credit Union George Floyd Apple Reporter Bill Bynum Blackman Facebook Reid Hastings
Milton Glaser, Designer of ‘I ❤ NY’ Logo and New York Magazine Co-Founder, Dies at 91

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | Last week

Milton Glaser, Designer of ‘I ❤ NY’ Logo and New York Magazine Co-Founder, Dies at 91

"Cell Milton Glaser he was the guy who designed the I love New York logo beautiful in its simplicity literally militarized heart and it N. Y. woman Glazer died yesterday was his ninety first birthday Glazer along with others founded New York magazine in the late sixties he designed posters logos advertisements book covers for ever associated with that generation among them the nineteen sixty six plastic picture Bob Dylan with multi colored hair seem to be blown in the wind fun fact to blazer designed the I love New York logo completely

Milton Glaser Glazer Bob Dylan New York New York Magazine
Apple makes another acquisition: IT startup Fleetsmith

Mac OS Ken

00:52 sec | Last week

Apple makes another acquisition: IT startup Fleetsmith

"News of an acquisition apple. Apple must says the Cupertino Company is picked up the mobile device. Management Startup Fleet Smith. The news was announced not by apple, but by tweet from fleet. Smith, CO founder and CEO. Zach Blum who said Fleet Smith is now part of Apple. Our mission from day one was to balance the needs of it with the experience. Users love about MACs, iphones and IPADS. We're beyond thrilled to continue that work at Apple. On its blog, the company went further saying our shared values of putting the customer at the center of everything we do without sacrificing privacy and security means we can truly meet our Vision Delivering Fleet Smith to businesses and institutions of all sizes. Around the world.

Fleet Smith Apple Zach Blum Cupertino Co Founder CEO
Miss Jessie's Haircare Co-Founder Miko Branch

Breaking Beauty Podcast

02:54 min | Last week

Miss Jessie's Haircare Co-Founder Miko Branch

"You mentioned your sister. T T, so you guys decided to open a salon in one, thousand, nine, hundred ninety seven. Is that right? And how did that come about? She came right agent. She was a field producer eyewitness news in New York City. She left her job and she decided to be become an agent for creative artists, so she had one in the house, and that was me I was a hairstyle, and she didn't have much luck with her other creative artists, but ironically she had. A lot of luck. When she started representing me and she landed a job for me at Ashley Stewart, and I worked for one week, and with one week's worth worst I made eight thousand dollars. And Yeah so with the money that we've gotten from that. Ad Campaign, Tiki in ice splitter I I might have gotten a little bit more Tiki, but we were still in the minds of being sisters, and then that's when Tiki said you make. Let's get out the house and take this money opener salon and it was the scariest thing because I was really comfortable doing year in the house, but I always let my sister lead within the sister relationship. NTT was right again, so we opened up our first to chair salon in the form section of Brooklyn, and that was the beginning of our of our career in beauty. Beauty Business. What was the VIBE on your block? In Brooklyn back then it must have been so different rookies in business. T deny. Make some bad this decision than we didn't. We didn't get a chance to stay downtown very long. I think we stay downtown, maybe a total of three years and then We got kicked out of our salon. We made some bad decisions. And Luckily we bought a Brownstone in the BECKFORD stivers effects of Brooklyn, and we had to refuge there and bring our business there. That was part of open that was really really at time, not thought of or was not known as duty capital. Or we asked our customers to come and take the a train and get off at knowstone avenue You have to understand getting off at notions. Move back in nineteen, ninety nine. It was a bunch of music blasting a resilient people a lot of street vendors. It was just taller than five in. Downtown Brooklyn. Many people actually didn't want to come, so we lost a lot of customers, so Tiki and I just kind of took it back to thinking box, and luckily it was vast pine with my son, because I was a single parent. At the time I realized that I could no longer wear. My hair styled straight. had to embrace the curls, and that's when the conversation started between us and our handful of clients that were left that were willing to come to get the here done in the hood, which was known of. Goodstein. DOOR DIVE

Brooklyn Beauty Business Tiki NTT Ashley Stewart Field Producer New York City
Cards Against Humanity Co-Founder Quits After Complaints Over Sexist, Racist Office Culture

WBBM Evening News

00:36 sec | Last week

Cards Against Humanity Co-Founder Quits After Complaints Over Sexist, Racist Office Culture

"FM one of the creators of the popular and controversial card game is leaving the company but not on good terms that Simpson is stepping down the website polygons system can who helped create cards against humanity faced growing complaints about inappropriate conduct Chicago based company system came with a longer interact with staff or draw salary some current and former employees claim the company has maintained a racist and sexist culture in a statement the company said a few years ago it reduced Max's managerial role in response to complaints from sap but he says it's clear that we didn't fully appreciate the severity of the problem Keith Johnson is ready one of five point

Simpson MAX SAP Keith Johnson Chicago
THERE IS A SOLUTION

Big Book Podcast

05:13 min | Last week

THERE IS A SOLUTION

"Welcome back my friends to the big book podcast. My name is Howard. And I'm an alcoholic sober since January nineteen eighty eight one day at a time. In this the Thirty Eighth Episode Chapter Two there is a solution from the second edition of alcoholics anonymous originally published in nineteen fifty, five. There were only a handful of edits to this chapter from the first edition, but one of them is most significant as it referred to a celebrated physician who treated the American businessman Roland H. The second edition named that Docker as the world famous psychoanalyst Dr Carl Young. WHO PRESCRIBED FOR ROLAND? In Zurich, in the Early Nineteen Thirties? As recounted on page twenty, six of the second edition Dr Young told Roland H that his alcoholism was incurable by psychoanalysis, and that the only thing that might help was a spiritual experience. That suggestion along with membership in the Oxford Group lifted rowlands compulsion to drink, and later helped him bring abby t to sobriety. EBI INTERN HELP SOBER UP. Bill Wilson Co founder of a in a nineteen sixty one letter of gratitude to Dr Young Bill acknowledged that Rowland's conversation with Dr Young was the first link in the chain of events that led to the founding of alcoholics anonymous. And Now? From the second edition of the book chapter, Two, there is a solution. We of alcoholics anonymous, no thousands of men and women who were once just as hopeless as bill. Nearly all have recovered. They have solved the drink problem. We are average Americans. All sections of this country and many of its occupations are represented as well as many political, economic, social and religious backgrounds. We are. Who Normally would not mix? But there exists among us a fellowship, a friendliness and an understanding, which is indescribably wonderful. We are like the passengers of a great line. Her the moment after rescued from shipwreck, when Camaraderie Joyous nece and democracy pervade the vessel from steerage to captain's table, unlike the feelings of the ship's passengers, however, our joy in escape from disaster does not subside as we go our individual ways. But feeling of having shared in a common peril is one element in the powerful cement which binds us. But that in itself would never have held us together as we are now joined. The tremendous fact for every one of us is that we discovered a common solution. We have a way out on which we can absolutely agree, and upon which we can join in brotherly and harmonious action. This is the great news. This book carries to those who suffer alcoholism. And illness of this sort, and we have come to believe it. An illness involves those about us in a way, no other human sickness can. If a person has cancer. All are sorry for him, and no one is angry or hurt. But not so with the alcoholic illness for with it there goes annihilation of all the things worthwhile in life it engulfs all whose lives touched the sufferers. It brings misunderstanding fierce resentment, financial insecurity, disgusted friends and employers warped lives a blameless children, sad wives and parents. Anyone can increase the list. We hope this volume will inform and comfort those who are or who may be affected. They are many. Highly. Competent psychiatrists who have dealt with US found it sometimes impossible to persuade an alcoholic to discuss his situation without reserve, strangely enough wives, parents and intimate friends usually find us even more unapproachable, then do the psychiatrist and the doctor, but the X. problem drinker who has found the solution who is properly armed with facts about himself can generally win the entire competence of another alcoholic in a few hours. Until such an understanding is reached, little or nothing can be accomplished. Until such an understanding is reached, little or nothing can be accomplished. That, the man who is making the approach has had the same difficulty that he obviously knows what he is talking about that. His whole deportment shouts at the new prospect that he is a man with a real answer that he has no attitude of holier than thou nothing, whatever except the sincere desire to be helpful, there are no fees to pay no axes to grind no people to please no lectures to be endured. These are the conditions. We found most effective. After such an approach many take up their beds and walk again.

Dr Carl Young Dr Young Bill Roland H. Early Nineteen Thirties United States Howard Bill Wilson Co Zurich Oxford Group Docker Intern Founder Abby T Rowland
"co founder" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

06:16 min | 2 weeks ago

"co founder" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"A holiday that marks the end of slavery in America which is why it's been referred to as the true independence. Day I hope all of you were able to honor the day in your own way and reflect on what it represents. I'm so glad you're tuning in because today's episode is incredibly special I know I say that every week, but this week really is. It's with Powell of alleged a pastry chef based in Washington DC and the CO founder of Baker's against racism. The initiative started as simple call to unite bakers in the fight against the unjust treatment of black people in the United States, Paula and her co founders were hoping eighty or so people would join in their bake sale and stead. They sparked a global movement bakers against racism, his ignited solidarity on five continents and seventeen countries, and in forty one states until corona virus devastated the restaurant Industry Paulo was the pastry chef at the critically acclaimed afro-caribbean restaurant, kith and kin, she has creative, charismatic, honest and force to be reckoned with the industry is lucky to have Paula in it, I'm honored to bring you this conversation. So Palo. We're GONNA start at the beginning. I'm telling me where you spent your childhood. So I grew up in the Bronx. In New, York City and every summer for three four months depending on. How my mom felt I would go to the Dominican Republic and lived there. She thought it was really important to make sure that I. Slit my difference Salah I knew my heritage, but also you know experienced the American way of life. And did you stay with family members in the Dominican Republic? Yeah, before everything happened like with my grandmother. Passing away my grandfather fascinating way, we would just stay our family home in the what we call is uncomfortable, and it just means the well. It means camp literally translated, but it just means like the countryside that's where I kind of like learned how to appreciate food, and how to grow my own veg and herbs and appreciate like fresh fruits. You see a lot of that in my desserts. Now I'm so sorry lost your grandparents winter. They pass away. I was young. I was fairly young. You know maybe ten all the so hard. Yeah, it was it was difficult. You know, but my grandmother really with the time that we did have she. impacted my life. Changed. Everything that I thought about you know where before I might have not appreciated food, because when you think about American culture, you think about fast. She kinda like helped me like slow down at a very young age, and really look and see in what the earth against us, and how the world nourishes us from a very very young age I understood the complexities of food, and how we hold our heritage through it. Can you tell us some of the things that she both cooked and grew, she would cook a big meal which consists of rice beans, chickens that we would grow not grow. Her is very traumatic first because they were my pets and then I realized very quickly. The food system was like Oh. You know she would make this huge meal and she would invite everybody in the neighborhood. Everyone that was able to come. If you it didn't matter if you're rich poor, it didn't matter if you're young or old, and we all kind of sit in the front yard in the backyard and eat from my grandmother's food and she had that meal in Cup of Coffee Ready. Ready in the middle of the day for everybody always matter what was going on and our lives. She had that ready, and that's something that we as a family now when we go to the Dominican Republic, we continue as a tradition, so everybody knows our family to be hosts, so it's very fitting that now I work in the hospitality industry. Did Your Grandmother Specialty. Yes, so she would make coconut rice with peace so much Guan Lula cocoa and it was cooked in the woodfire. We had like a house that was open open air that they had bricks that you put your woodfire in, and that's how she would cook. Everything was cooked, by Soviet, Elena, which means over fire while all of my experience in the Dominican Republic I didn't know what stove was in the Dominican Republic. My my brain never made that connection that you could have. A gas stove. 'cause we always use what fire so. How about some of the things that that she would grow you mentioned fruits. You mentioned herbs. What were some of the things in her garden? Her. Garden consisted of this plot of land in front of our house, and behind our house, and we call it in cal-, and cal means the Cacao trees, and it was just rows and rows and rows, and rows of of wild ca cal that would naturally in our backyard laced in between were mango trees, tamarind avocado plantations right next to our house in our well of rain water was guava and passion fruit, which I always like to say whatever fruits like. Like to grow together will always taste good together. We had herbs in the back in the shaded area. Where is anything that you can think of shot? They CILANTRO or no Kulan. Throw and more we had for me. We had lemongrass growing by the side of the House and I would drink that tea, and it would be a natural mosquito repellent so pretty nice, you know. Oh, my Gosh! I'm starting to get the impression that it's no surprise. You became a chef. I I think so? I mean it was a good fit i. feel like I was the only one in my family. That kind of took that same sentiment of food, and being connected with nature like that like my grandmother did and turned it into a way to give back to the community, so I've always been using food. As a way to connect with other people because I'm very shy I don't make like a great first impression is very awkward at first I'm like. Oh, I'm sorry you had to go through that with me. You know, but with food I can show you who I am without.

Dominican Republic Paula CO founder Palo United States Industry Paulo America Washington Powell Salah Guan Lula Baker York City Elena
Pine Ridge Indian Health Service regains accreditation

Native America Calling

04:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Pine Ridge Indian Health Service regains accreditation

"This is national native news I'm Antonio Gonzalez the Pine Ridge Indian Health Service Hospital in south, Dakota has regained accreditation and can now bill Medicare for services. Jackie Henry has more the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. Services ended its provider agreement with the Pine Ridge IHS facility in two thousand, seventeen, citing the facilities failure to meet care standards. Losing that agreement meant the facility couldn't reimburse treatments through those programs by November of last year. A CMS survey team reported the hospital to be one hundred percent compliant with standards. Last month. The Joint Commission awarded the hospital full accreditation after a virtual survey. James Driving Hawk is the Great Plains area director for Indian Health Services? Services he says the Pine Ridge team has demonstrated, it can consistently meets standards. We have expanded leadership oversight from the office to the hospital and improve staffing levels, and we have increased requirements for medical staff, credentialing education of our staff were quality standards and implemented new checks and balances to ensure new issues that arise are addressed promptly. He says the agreement with CMS will help. The facility maintained and expanded services going forward now that all of our visits that we have a with our our patients are are able to be reimbursed, fully reimbursed now and so those the hospitals will receive that additional revenue, and then we take that revenue investment back into to. Into Services Driving Hawk says one of those investments planned renovation of the Pine Ridge IHS Emergency Department I'm Jacky, Henry in Sioux Falls South Dakota native people, their allies and city officials took part in a celebration in Santa Fe. New Mexico Thursday after a statue a Spanish governor Don. Vargas was taken down. They also called for the removal of a war monument, bearing racist inscription. The celebration followed demonstrations earlier this week in Albuquerque and Rio Arriba. County were statues of Spanish. One day on Yati were removed autumn. Roseville a CO founder of three sisters collective spoke to the crowd about the atrocities. Committed against Tacoma people in the late fifteen hundreds, hundreds of people passed away dirty, not massacre, and the men who survived the were enslaved, and had the right foot amputated. And that's why you saw the statue. In the late nineteen ninety S, Donlon Yahtzee with his right foot cutoff. Because we still remember native people say the removal of statues of colonizers in new. Mexico is a long time coming including tribal leaders who've worked with politics on removing the stone pillar, honoring military actions Jorge Rivera former governor of a Pueblo and has been involved in talks about its removal. MONUMENT CARVED IN MARBLE We're referred to as savages and savage has a lot of meaning both legally and culturally. Has a lot of meaning, and it was not appropriate for it to be used. In describing are people. I. Think are people are. the public people touch people now hope people create the image of the southwest, and everybody knows that you know that tribes are still alive and vibrant in this area. The mayor of Santa Fe Ellen Weber spoke at Thursday's event, calling the removal of statues part of healing and justice. He did not mention if for when the monument would be taken down or a statue of Soldier Kit Carson. The Hilo River Indian community has closed its casinos for two weeks due to recent spikes of covid nineteen in Arizona. The tribe halted gaming operations in March due to Cova nineteen and reopened in May after the state lifted stay at home orders. The second closure comes after a casino employee reportedly died recently due to complications of Covid nineteen I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Pine Ridge Indian Health Servi Indian Health Services James Driving Hawk Pine Ridge Ihs Antonio Gonzalez New Mexico Santa Fe Pine Ridge Ihs Emergency Depar Jackie Henry Dakota Hilo River Indian Community Joint Commission Medicare Covid Tacoma Cova Sioux Falls South Dakota Vargas Albuquerque
Power to the People

Lost Notes

05:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Power to the People

"In nineteen seventy-three Michael. Torrance a twenty two year old Black Panther he's dedicated himself to the cause and obeyed every command. He's a true soldier, but five years of complete devotion to the panthers has taken a toll now torrance's. Focus on his personal life just for a while, but to do this. He needs to get permission and it's gotta come from the top. Torn shows up at the lamppost. It's bar in West Oakland. Where Panther. Leader Bobby Seale is having a birthday party. The two men huddle in a corner and talk for a while, but it's all good seal gives Torrance's blessing for some time off. Torrance's relieved, but as is making his way out of the bar. Someone tells him that Huey. Newton wants to see him. And he wants to see him now. Newton is seals, comrade and Co founder of the Panthers for Years Newton has been a strong and charismatic leader. The reasonably his moods have been unstable tonight for whatever reason he's agitated. Torrance's into a back room in their flanked by a couple of serious enforcers is Newton and he says. You WanNa. Leave us. He's well. Do you WANNA leave bad enough to die. Do. You really want really bad enough to on the question. Is. My. Man On. Sale. So, this is what's GonNa Happen. You State. But at up. Would you elizabeth than at Awkward Talking and so? You give me a boot how? To correct it? Okay. So. You say. I'll Palette. So, Michael Torrens has just been persuaded to rethink his request for some time off. An epistle to the head. It's hard to argue with. Route. Then the. TORRENCE's five years in the panthers have been intense. It's been a roller coaster. Live of extremes many times. He's picked up a gun, but he's also picked up a microphone. Now, turns didn't join the panthers to sing, but the movements minister of Culture gave him and three other young soldiers, especial assignment for the 'cause it was a musical Qadri whose mission was to spread the seed of Social Revolution through the Trojan horse of funk and soul. It was an rn be group called. The London's music is explosive. Band is powerful, and so is the message. The lumpen work. For the cause killing it wherever they perform San Francisco La. New York Philly and throughout the Midwest, but it only lasts eleven months. Then things in the black, Panther party begin to implode. which you're about to hear is the story of the rise and fall of an unlikely aren't be grew born out of social upheaval. But why did the Black Panthers even need a musical act? Why did they need a band? WHO's militant agenda? Put them up against the forces of prejudice and law and order with every downbeat. The thing is the lumpen were not out to make hit records. There were out to change American culture. It's a journey unlike that of any other band and Michael. Torrents was at the center of it. Up? In Nineteen, sixty six Huey Newton and Bobby Seale Co the Black Panther Party. Most students at Merit Community College in Oakland within a few years. The party offers educational programs, food, service, free, medical care and Drug Rehab. The black community and the panthers lead the fight against rampant police brutality. By the end of the sixties, changes in the air in the bay area is Ground Zero. San Francisco that I will ruin. The fillmore district was very very hot tension. Police were riding. You know if I've if you are selling your papers would come in. Who asked us at you pay? Arrest at new. But at the same time there was a lot of energy. an s the best thing about it. You could really feel the energy particularly among younger people that we felt we could really make a change. Not only make and we're GONNA make. Their will us this commitment to die if necessary.

Black Panthers Huey Newton Torrance Michael Torrens Bobby Seale Oakland Torrence San Francisco San Francisco La London Michael Co Founder Midwest Elizabeth Drug Rehab Bobby Seale Co Merit Community College New York
Power to the People

Lost Notes

03:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Power to the People

"In nineteen seventy-three Michael. Torrance a twenty two year old Black Panther he's dedicated himself to the cause and obeyed every command. He's a true soldier, but five years of complete devotion to the panthers has taken a toll now torrance's. Focus on his personal life just for a while, but to do this. He needs to get permission and it's gotta come from the top. Torn shows up at the lamppost. It's bar in West Oakland. Where Panther. Leader Bobby Seale is having a birthday party. The two men huddle in a corner and talk for a while, but it's all good seal gives Torrance's blessing for some time off. Torrance's relieved, but as is making his way out of the bar. Someone tells him that Huey. Newton wants to see him. And he wants to see him now. Newton is seals, comrade and Co founder of the Panthers for Years Newton has been a strong and charismatic leader. The reasonably his moods have been unstable tonight for whatever reason he's agitated. Torrance's into a back room in their flanked by a couple of serious enforcers is Newton and he says. You WanNa. Leave us. He's well. Do you WANNA leave bad enough to die. Do. You really want really bad enough to on the question. Is. My. Man On. Sale. So, this is what's GonNa Happen. You State. But at up. Would you elizabeth than at Awkward Talking and so? You give me a boot how? To correct it? Okay. So. You say. I'll Palette. So, Michael Torrens has just been persuaded to rethink his request for some time off. An epistle to the head. It's hard to argue with. Route. Then the. TORRENCE's five years in the panthers have been intense. It's been a roller coaster. Live of extremes many times. He's picked up a gun, but he's also picked up a microphone. Now, turns didn't join the panthers to sing, but the movements minister of Culture gave him and three other young soldiers, especial assignment for the 'cause it was a musical Qadri whose mission was to spread the seed of Social Revolution through the Trojan horse of funk and soul. It was an rn be group called. The London's music is explosive. Band is powerful, and so is the message. The lumpen work. For the cause killing it wherever they perform San Francisco La. New York Philly and throughout the Midwest, but it only lasts eleven months. Then things in the black, Panther party begin to implode. which you're about to hear is the story of the rise and fall of an unlikely aren't be grew born out of social upheaval. But why did the Black Panthers even need a musical act? Why did they need a band? WHO's militant agenda? Put them up against the forces of prejudice and law and order with every downbeat. The thing is the lumpen were not out to make hit records. There were out to change American culture.

Torrance Panthers Newton Black Panthers Michael Torrens Torrence Bobby Seale Oakland Huey London Michael Co Founder Elizabeth Midwest San Francisco La New York Philly
Voice in the Operating Room with Heather Utzig

Voice First Health

05:38 min | 2 weeks ago

Voice in the Operating Room with Heather Utzig

"Spend time with you today. I'm really excited to speak about all the cool things that you are doing, but before we get to that, let's learn a little bit about you, so maybe I can ask you to introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about your background. Okay. I'm the CO founder and CEO of Pragmatic Boyce pragmatic voice. company that provides development services for companies are. In particular healthcare. For bringing their technology or any of their applications onto the voice platform, and then we also our product company, we've developed several products in the healthcare space with voice enablement. I am have been in the healthcare industry for twenty five years, working in a hospital during college to being even an insurance, and then the pharmaceutical medical device world, and then worked on bringing innovative products to the United States from around the world and have had the opportunity to work in many different areas in the hospital and in healthcare, and when I learned more about voice became very interested in how we can apply this technology to healthcare in general. Perfect so you've got lots of background. Obviously in the healthcare space I'm always interested to hear about the stories of how somebody got interested in voice. And what was your introduction to that? So could you share a little about that? Yeah so I was developing technology myself for. Another company that I own and I had requested voice to be developed for it because. This is around instrumentation in general, and we work with service providers on repairing and looking at infection for the instruments inside of hospitals and surgical centers in one of the things that happens in that particular dynamic people are needed to be hands free, and they're also very active in moving around, so they're not really sitting in front of a computer, and in the process of of wanting to have that developed. fortunately met my co-founder, and really learns quite a bit about voice in have been part of this journey of seeing you know all the applications, but also realizing that there's at this stage. We're really on the. Emerging Space for, US. I?

United States Boyce Co Founder Co-Founder CEO
Voice in the Operating Room with Heather Utzig

Voice First Health

04:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Voice in the Operating Room with Heather Utzig

"Heyer welcome to the PODCAST. It's great to have you here. Hi Terry Thank you nice to spend time with you today. I'm really excited to speak about all the cool things that you are doing, but before we get to that, let's learn a little bit about you, so maybe I can ask you to introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about your background. Okay. I'm the CO founder and CEO of Pragmatic Boyce pragmatic voice. company that provides development services for companies are. In particular healthcare. For bringing their technology or any of their applications onto the voice platform, and then we also our product company, we've developed several products in the healthcare space with voice enablement. I am have been in the healthcare industry for twenty five years, working in a hospital during college to being even an insurance, and then the pharmaceutical medical device world, and then worked on bringing innovative products to the United States from around the world and have had the opportunity to work in many different areas in the hospital and in healthcare, and when I learned more about voice became very interested in how we can apply this technology to healthcare in general. Perfect so you've got lots of background. Obviously in the healthcare space I'm always interested to hear about the stories of how somebody got interested in voice. And what was your introduction to that? So could you share a little about that? Yeah so I was developing technology myself for. Another company that I own and I had requested voice to be developed for it because. This is around instrumentation in general, and we work with service providers on repairing and looking at infection for the instruments inside of hospitals and surgical centers in one of the things that happens in that particular dynamic people are needed to be hands free, and they're also very active in moving around, so they're not really sitting in front of a computer, and in the process of of wanting to have that developed. fortunately met my co-founder, and really learns quite a bit about voice in have been part of this journey of seeing you know all the applications, but also realizing that there's at this stage. We're really on the. Emerging Space for, US. I? Have enjoyed, myself Quite a few products I loved audible from the very beginning. Would burn discs that I love I. Love Anything. That's really in the. audio voice world, and just I think they applications will be an are very very beneficial, more user friendly and can also help us well. We're really moving around. Perfect and so I think that's a nice segue into what you guys are doing with with your company, pragmatic voice in the healthcare space so. Maybe you can talk a about the origin of some of the things that you are working on the ideas, and how you saw the opportunity to get involved in, and then go to describe a little bit of what you are doing. Yes so. Since I. Have the healthcare background naturally? Considering how voice can be applied just just when you see the problems and you look at the solutions and and how? At the health care space really it's about human connection generally especially wins on the patient doctor, side and then even just with the staff that the fact that there's so many moving parts there. Most people in healthcare are just not sitting behind a computer and. Re when of the things that became particularly interesting to me was just looking at those times where people would have to stop. Try to find a computer when in reality and healthcare. Everyone's moving very very fast. And I also was. Really going through a lot with supporting some companies that were developing Emr's and or HR's back in two thousand ten twenty eleven and twelve and the government in the United States was providing incentive packages in watching the frustration with tech for the healthcare practitioners in general in seeing that they didn't have a human connection

United States Heyer EMR Boyce Co-Founder Co Founder CEO
"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

07:46 min | Last month

"co founder" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Take your personal experience in in arbitrage of personal experience. Okay go ahead Eric. If you wrote this today besides the every quicker would it be meaningfully? Different not really. I think I think some of the things have been sped up. Because you know you you. Can Incorporate online stripe is there? No Code is there. I'd probably advised not and and online services much more right because you can get pretty far that I might also say that you know and this is the third model. At which is you might serve the community. So there's idea there's executioners community right so you know nowadays on I've got a following on my twitter removes or what have you and the interaction of them is sort of like you know person community Fit Right. And then that community you can withdraw. A protocol can withdraw a product and so forth. And that's something. I was just less thinking about back in twenty thirteen today but that might be third angle on things you know to take a community. I approach and how about the Kobe requests for startups or anti replacement startups. This shea. Talking about I. What is this graph? This is the Telegraph of thousand days in the life of Thanksgiving Turkey. Life improves improves improves. And then a ridiculous sudden reversal. Okay and we're seeing Thanksgiving Day charts across the economy and where the rubber is orange. Okay and look at that ridiculous Thanksgiving giving day drop and breach by the way has risen dramatically right so uber is now essentially just breeds their second. Business has become their first. That's literally their business. Okay now the thing about this is a reversal business. Plan for you know like fortunately for over it. At least the corporation they can. Disengage drivers when demand plummets. Like those but But that's like a you know ridiculous. Drop right like seventy percent drop revenue. However here's the thing. Notice how we dropped but not breeds one of things. I was short on Uber. Benatti reads is pretty good. It's pretty specific prediction in terms of what to be long insured on. And frankly you know. I never talk about trades online because that's investing Advice River Bellizzi. That if you had reallocated full you listen to me around the time you would have done pretty well right so like for example. X Rays drones antivirals. Cat Scans Autonomy Diagnostics. Facemasks remote were Tele presence bioinformatics at that holds up. One of those were in drones. Me Put an asterisk on simply because there's such supply chain disruption demand me there have been not not the supply we'll have to see. You can make VR headsets in the US but everything else is clearly going especially like Mike. Remote workshops zoom and stuff and then on the short side of things. I think that holds up pretty well as well traveled tender grinder hotels AIRBNB airlines in person. You know blue cities come back it up. Real estate is crashing commercial real estate and blue cities restaurants conferences digital nomads. In the sense of moving around the world. You can't do that anymore. Remember Berates so I think that holds a pretty darn well right and I think that's like let's call it a part of the comp investing thesis if you remember this concept of the digital divide this is the thing in the late Ninety S O. Some people have access to Internet others. Don't right so April seventh. This concept which I think is one mental model. The fiscal divide bright digital is now cheap with billions of smartphones around the world. It's a physical. That's expensive case for last two years. We've made the cost of putting a bunch of transistors on a chip that that's now cheap but putting a bunch of people in rooms now expensive okay so the measure of a competent society is one that can actually hold a rally if you can do that you are. You're confident in the people. There are confident of the steam and the diagnostics. And so on that you know you can have this huge crowd that it's being tested to them into their life and they all come and congregate there right. I from incompetence state and for citizenry. That is not cooperatives. The Commons are attracting. And you can't basically there's a field state in between your house in the next person's House. You have to wear masks you you know you basically house a like like a place where you can't show your face you know. Maybe it's pollution meets infection. It's not the comments aren't actually traversable. So I think this is a powerful mental model for the next several years at least that physical is expensive and one thing that means by the way is digital now cheap physicals now expensive so everybody is GonNa want offer substitute for things because you know Sadler tweet. By the way that I was really surprised. People wild doubt about the I one more question for you which is a CO founders. Are we sort of in the picking co-founder similar to sort of dating before that you're limited to the people that you went to college with or worked with or is that for Co founder? Is that actually good? She's should you stick to that pool. How do you think what's your framework for picking the Right Co founder? Yeah know so so like the way I kind of think about this is having and being like an investor and having seen like lots of these things and whatnot so you should pick somebody who who's is complementary to you okay and there should always be clear. Ceo that's like the most important component the thing about that is like the question of WHO's the CEO. That's like one of the very first conversations you need to have and ideally. It's something where that's obvious between between you but if it's not a for example at the beginning of joint base itself public knowledge but you know Brian and the Guy who helped found blocking didn't so they had a screaming. Send you know what they were outright and basically blocks company and Mrs Good Company. That type of stuff shouldn't be resolved. There's also an ideological dispute watching to be able to have a wallet where they couldn't have the password password reset four the road actually very substantive. It's two different visions of the future. Both of which trinite illegitimate visions of Crypto? Right true product. Difference on on simple thing pastor reset so so that's that's like a good example of a few things. I who's the leader Second Woods A LONG-TERM IDEOLOGICAL VISION THIRD OUR SKILLS COMPLIMENTARY? I do not do these. Co-founder dating sites or whatever. Kids these days you know like I don't know I don't know if that works. I feel some could work but it feels inorganic. Maybe you know I think the best thing to do is to actually work on a project with that person and find that there's an actual division of labor nothing substitutes for that because working with somebody is just very very different from talking to them on. It's like they have to cash the past when you throw it into it. What you meant not necessarily what you said. Lots and lots of little things like that have to tolerate your using 'cause nobody's ever heard strong and every dimension or some people are few and so I think actually doing and shipping project. Ideally one involves money and customer support with them like is is probably the best bet naked or something like that but try to push it all the way through such that book that you have legal liability together or or customers yelling you. That's real trial by fire. Balji thank you so much for coming on give a digital rotten for her volatility. If you're an early stage entrepreneur we'd love to hear from you check us out. Village Global Davi seat..

Co founder Ceo twitter Eric Advice River Bellizzi US Kobe AIRBNB Benatti Mrs Good Company co-founder Sadler Co-founder
"co founder" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

Listen Money Matters

04:00 min | 2 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

"To build a mailing envelope. No we're going to buy a gift greeting card and blow. Oh let's go find DVD. Oh I see these close enough And that is. The skill is finding a proxy. Which allows you to begin learning about the world and your ideas your ideas place in it. It does not need to be repeatable or scalable at first at this an organ specific example. If I have time you're really briefly. Yeah so women. Women came to me At at an idea she goes he cool if we could do peer to peer clothing. Rental were basically. I know I have always clothing in my closet and I think I would want to rent that and I could rent. There's and she goes I'm Anita Mesa money and how do I find a co-founder? How do I build my initial APP? And I go. Whoa WHOA. Whoa whoa let's begin seeing some. Let's collide this idea with reality. Go get a piece of paper get a sharpy right on the piece of paper. WanNa borrow my clothes. Knock and pasted on your door right and let's see what happens. Let's see first of all anyone knocks if they do. Let's see what happens when they're looking for your clothes. Is there a fit problem? Is there a taste problem? Let's see if they do bar. You're close. Let's see how you feel when they come back stained or dirty or what you have to do to get them repaired or how you feel about this. Let's begin learning by doing nothing more than writing on a piece of paper with a Sharpie. You can't run a business like this but that's not what you're doing now you're trying to understand. Is this idea real? And she did that and little by little by little. She accumulated evidence about this problem and ways to solve it and so yes six months later when she was going to raise money and someone said how do I know this ideas. A good one. She could talk your ear off about the evidence. She had what people would pay. How long the rentals were how much you'd have to do for cleaning. What percentage And Wow that's the person you WanNa follow you back in invest in. Yeah it sounds like Renaissance Wag. Actually sounds bad. Exact business model but Is that she ever yes. It's a smaller business. Because she's still in school but she is moving ahead and she's moving ahead based on finding a way to. I caught validation hacking away to validate or idea without actually a doing it. For Real Right. I only have like a single story. That is almost a little different. But a friend of OUR EX GIRLFRIEND OF MINE. Her Dad wanted to start a business where he sold a MO mobility scooters and all he did was get business cards printed. He had no had no shop. He had no product. He had nothing he had a little bit. You know he knew you. He used to sell them in the past for a bigger company. Just got business. Cards and went door to door does not under the door until he had enough business where he could take fifty percent deposit and go actually by the scooter. And then he would do all the The the repairs themselves until we hire somebody. It's just everything was just started with a business card. I love that story because it is another entrepreneur. I know he he had an idea. Use at a party is eleven o'clock at night raining and they ran out of beer and all began arguing about who is turn. It has gotten find the beer. The usual Millennial problem Yeah the idea is cutting while ago because basically my phone knows where I am at knows. My taste has my credit card database. Open liquor stores great idea but same thing as your friend rather than saying. I'm going to raise money. I'm GONNA find a technical co founder going to build an APP going to test this. He just had business cards printed up. That said need beer. Call me with a cell phone number eight stand outside apartments on weekends and.

Anita Mesa co-founder co founder
"co founder" Discussed on Building A Unicorn

Building A Unicorn

02:42 min | 2 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Building A Unicorn

"Your clients. Montana is the CO founder and Chief Operating Officer of Quinoa an online platform that allows you to easily create the business documents you need and then send them to your client as individual websites including dynamic pricing information and the ability to sign and accept that proposal. Right there on the web. The core idea behind cua is that Files suck at the way that the documents work in this. This world is sort of based on this like nineteen eighties way of thinking about the documents atmosphere being largely kept in place by the glorious Microsoft Monopoly And so all queries is a way for anyone to create. They had documents especially sort of customer facing documents as Web Pages. And so if you can re imagine a document on the ground As you know what you can do in the web and not have to be in this four rectangle hyper. What can you do you know? Why can't you have analytics? Like buttons? Do things why can't you haven't lived in this world of of SAS in the cloud where it can push and pull data from different systems rather than just being a dominant ugly file. Mock grew up in Sydney and throughout his childhood was surrounded by entrepreneurs. His Dad ran his own architectural business which he grew to around sixty or seventy staff and his uncle also had a number of startups. Mock went to school at Sydney Grandma and low. He was a good student. He couldn't see himself for showing the same kinds of career opportunities that his friends were interested in he wanted to carve his own path. Although he wasn't quite sure what that path would actually be. There was no like plan. There was no like I said. Look back on it like some people have these amazing narrative ox of their their life and their career. And I'm deeply skeptical because I think that really life happens and you. I think people who are very good at adjusting knowing Knowing where on paternity lies and able to dive into it. Sort of an opportunistic in that side. I think I think that sort of rings true to me and certainly I remember being at the end of highschool being like I feel have plan and I kind of really didn't have at university mock studied subjects. He was interested in. He did history and philosophy and also became interested in student politics but he thought maybe he wanted to issue. I curry in business. But it wasn't quite sure what that actually meant so when he's caused finished any trying to work out what to do. He ended up getting some work with his uncle on an e book. Stop cold read how you want. But.

Mock Sydney Chief Operating Officer of Qui Montana Microsoft cua CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

Breaking Beauty Podcast

02:12 min | 4 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

"Say was interesting. That's when we found the wizard the is Diana Ruth. He was a coo co-founder but she creates all the products. She has an amazing background hard. Candy Bliss. Cosmetics was William Fung for a long time but she is just a creative genius and she will never ever create anything that already exists. She's all about innovation stories. Great Components Ray so we we joined forces with her by then. I remember her first meeting with us. We're all around the table going because we had a lot of. I did get a lot of passion like Rosie. Jody and I kind of just sat there staring at the three. I was going. Oh my God. This is going to be so interesting. She managed to take all this. This energy these ideas these thoughts and make them into tangible products I really think the interesting part of the packaging that sort of push pop idea with clear sight milk. It's very it's a very modern fawn. Yeah exactly it's very transparent as we are as a brand and everything about it. I always lean into the idea. That's for utilitarian so we have sticks. We have dispenses with rolling balls. We have click pens. Everything is extremely easy to use on the go as well because we originally always had the milk goals get ready quick We have so many things going on. They creative ambitious very fast. Paced lives the girl and the guy and we wanted to create something align that they could use very quickly in the back of a cab changed their look five minutes down town and something that you know worked really hard but was kind of Felicita on kind of rewrite. All those. The things that were contradiction terms. We wanted to rewrite. Why can't you get ready? Quick but still have really great payoff. Why can't you have cool products? That are actually still clean. They can still be extremely low maintenance but yeah a high tech.

Candy Bliss Diana Ruth co-founder William Fung Jody coo Cosmetics
"co founder" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

13:29 min | 4 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Of girl boss. And you're listening to girl boss radio. Everybody's you know game is on point these days and I know I'm not the only person who loves to see crazy now are on instagram. Whichever way you spin it. The nail game is a pretty big industry but if we go back a few decades time well no Polish used to just be nail Polish. It was bland. There was a thing you grabbed at the drugstore on a whim. Or maybe you got a fresh manicure. You weren't really paying for the brand on the bottle that all changed with a little company called. Opie I yes that OPIE I. It's the go-to Nail Polish for a lot of us in on today's show we're going to hear from the CO founder and Brandon Basseterre for opie. I her name is suzy. Weiss Fishman and. She's known as the First Lady of meals. She actually co-founded Opie I with her brother-in-law and it started out as a dental products..

Weiss Fishman Brandon Basseterre CO founder
"co founder" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

05:58 min | 5 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"This CNBC podcast is brought to you by TD. AMERITRADE investing isn't one-size-fits-all every investor has a unique style. That's why TD Ameritrade our trade offers two different mobile APPs there's TD AMERITRADE mobile. Which lets you manage your portfolio with streamlined? Simplicity or thinker. Swim Mobile. which gives you tools as you need for more advanced trades an in-depth analysis visit td ameritrade dot com slash APPs to find the one? That's right for you once again. That's TD AMERITRADE AMERITRADE dot com slash APPs member SIPC bring in show musically. This is squawk Fahd the daily sleep podcast brought to you by the team behind squawk box. CNBC's essential morning chef worked every day. Get the best stories debate and analysis analysis from the biggest names in business and politics today on Squawk Todd. Joe Becky. Andrew are at the World Economic Forum with the planet's the most influential leaders in business and politics. We've got a huge lineup. This week. This is Are Super Bowl for the world of politics and business a roundup of the best sound bound from CNBC's interviews with the CEO's of Verizon Bank of America and steady plus the leaders of some of the best known and largest asset managers and hedge hedge funds in the world and an interview with author investor and Philanthropist David Rubenstein Co founder of one of the world's premier private equity woody firms. The Carlyle Group right. Now I don't see any prospect of a recession in two thousand twenty so pretty good the best of the World Economic Forum Day One plus some behind the sounds from Joe and Becky. We're double Switzerland. The Beautiful Alps beautiful behind us to bed. You guys can see it. I'M CNBC ABC producer. Cameron Kosta it's Tuesday. January twenty first twenty twenty squawk pod begins right now three one. Good morning everybody. Welcome to walk on. CNBC we are live from the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. I'm becky quick along with Joe. Kernan and Andrew Ross Sorkin the World Economic Forum is exactly that an Economic Forum Michael Corbett the CEO of city spoke to Joe Backing Andrew about the trajectory of the global economy. When you look at the growth prognostications coming up while we're here three point three percent global growth down from three point four four prediction but up from two point nine for the year right? So that's that's not horrible if you get some of these clouds to clear. I think they're still runway left here of course at a conference this size with this caliber of attendees there's a diversity of perspective and of advice. Ray dallaglio billionaire founder of bridgewater ladder at the world's largest hedge fund shared some of his firm's investment strategy issue is. You can't jump into cash. Cash is trash. Okay you have to have a well diversified portfolio and first of all you have to be global and you have to have ballots. Think that you have to have a certain amount of gold in your portfolio portfolio or you have to have something tarred another theme today and probably all week trade between the two biggest economies in the world the US and China Steve Schwarzman founder and CEO of Blackstone Group has a long history of business investments in China and was in the room for the phase one signing literally. He's he's competent. That fees to as at least a priority for both parties involved. It's in China's interest as well as the US interest to do a face to deal. Most of the tariffs were not rolled back in this phase. One so there's a lot of incentive if you will to get to face to and They're they're quite serious about that in China all your on Squawk box and certainly as long as we've been delivering use pod guests have been debating capitalism And that theme is no different at Davos. Twenty twenty on the broadcast this morning. Billionaire Hedge Fund manager Paul Tudor Jones. A legendary investor kept corporate responsibility. What's ability at the center of his conversation? We know what's happening right now. As causing millennials not to believe in the system. We know that there's a threat to free markets. I'd much rather see us. change the sharing agreements organically bottoms up where. CEO's put employees. I put with the planet in communities and customers on par with shareholders also calling for corporate. Responsibility was Brian Moynihan CEO Bank of America. He's he's also the chairman of the International Business Council an advisory body to the World Economic Forum itself but of all the companies apartment job is commit the carbon neutrality. That will help drive. I the demand for alternative energies at the power companies need to get them carbon neutral and the final theme today new tech the CEO of Verizon Hans. Berg says five G. is way closer on the horizon than some other things. What comes first? I get a five d phone where I fly on a seven thirty seven. Max We there without five G. You're getting the best of our Davos coverage right here on squawk pot coming up will be investor. Author journalist Philanthropist and Co founder of the Carlyle Group. David Rubenstein if I knew how to solve income inequality I'd be in Iowa. I do think she companies that worry about more than just shareholder return of probably the companies that are going to get more people buying their stocks in the end. And they're probably going to do better. Plus Katie. Kramer is onset in the Swiss Alps with the anchors. Ready by Beck apply Rubinstein's interview and in some behind the scenes of Davos.

CNBC CEO Joe Becky Davos Joe Backing Andrew Carlyle Group David Rubenstein Co China founder Joe founder and CEO Davos Switzerland US Switzerland Beautiful Alps Co founder Hedge Fund Swiss Alps Cameron Kosta
"co founder" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

13:49 min | 7 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Hi Everyone Sophia. Bush here welcomed a work in progress where I talked to people who inspire me about how they got to where they are and where. They think they're still going. I'm so excited for you. All today's guest Pamela. Hunter I I found out about Pamela through her company. She started her own business called sheltered co and may make the most beautiful weighted blankets. And they're not only gorgeous to look at but they're very sustainable levels. Which I love? I found out about her. Because as any of you who follow me on any of Internet's No. I am obsessed with a weighted blanket and Pamela. The story is just so inspiring. She is the mother of three whose daughter was diagnosed with a sensory processing disorder. She was inspired to find something thing that would help her daughter sleep and stay calm while helping to promote body regulation and she created this blanket kind of by accident in that quest and the accident turned her into an entrepreneur. So today she's GonNa tell us about her journey. She's going to shed light on invisible illnesses. They are way more common than you would think. Pamela is so inspiring and I'm just really thrilled to.

Pamela Bush Hunter
"co founder" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:30 min | 8 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Kibble dot com like the dog food no similarity similarity there And of course we got to that point it was tough and in fact we had this list of ten finalists and they were weird. Names was like take two was replay. One was cinema center and then there was Netflix and quite frankly a lot a lot of people didn't like it because back in the late nineties The euphemism for a pornographic film was a skin flick so oh skin flicks. And then of course there was that big x at the end of net flicks. But you know desperation does strange things. And so that ended up being the best of a lot of choices and so even though it sounded a little corny net flicks. It was here mark step by for just a second because I want to just let it a caller here. Susanna is calling from Cape Elizabeth Maine. Susannah you're on ear. Hi there I just was calling comment that In nineteen ninety eight my. I'm sorry ninety. Nine my husband and the group from the bay area New Mexico onto the Navajo Indian reservation and where we live which was right in the reservation. There was a little eighteen video store but this election was dismal. It was basically really ancient movie either B. Movies and my husband had heard about that flicks and I feel like we're one of your first subscribers and I just wanted to say that it was a life changing for us for the three years. You're on the reservation. We'll thank you Susannah and thanks for your some small way helping. Put My kids through school so we both got something out of this relationship Susannah. Thank you for your call. Okay so back. Act To this big the big idea you had about putting people on subscription like Like Susanna they're a pretty quickly got a couple of hundred thousand subscribers But the company was I mean I mark. Forgive me like I'm just going to have to pull you away. From your standpoint of ruthless optimism and down into reality because net flicks clicks was still losing money even as you brought in a lot of subscribers and so talk to me about those Those months in years before the company went a public it was not smooth sailing. No we were as I describe it drowning in our own success and you heard in the commercial you played how she had a articulate. What was this crazy thing? No due dates no late fees subscription and. It was so complicated that the way way to get around that was to give our subscribers their first month free. But when you do that you take all the cost up front and then make it back a little a bit over many months which means when you have runaway success you have runaway expense and so customers were flooding in and on one hand that was going. This is awesome the other hand I was wringing my hands going. Oh my God. We're going to go broke and just to add insult to injury. This came to a head good in the fall of the year. Two thousand which was the very moment that the final bits of air were streaming out of that dot com balloon so so there was no money to be had and we were losing money hand over fist..

"co founder" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

13:12 min | 10 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Don't get caught up in this perfect thing the test everything try something and fail at it because the failure is learning moment ladies and gentlemen welcome back to short story long first and foremost it is live event time. I'm doing doing the next young reckless live event on October twelfth. Picture live all day live short story long podcast with all my favorite people that have ever been on the show and some who haven't doing keynotes. QNA's panels all of the above. If you want to come just go to events dot young and reckless dot com. Get your tickets also. I'll put the link in the description of the episode. come check us out. I think you'll really really like like I think we did one back in May it was incredible. five hundred people showed up it was sold out and everyone left really positive and there was a really cool energy not in the room of just people there to learn and share ideas and I was really proud of it so this is round two and I couldn't be more excited. Today's guest is Marc. Mark Randolph Mark Grand off is the CO founder and was the CEO of Net flicks and as you can imagine you has a lot of good stories we ran through how Netflix how he even got to the position of when he started Netflix and how Netflix was created and where he was with Reed Hastings the other CO founder when they came up with the idea and decided to go for it that as well as all the challenges of running a company of that size size and trying to scale it and trying to just completely disrupt the entire industry. You guys are GonNa. Absolutely love this episode. Mark has a new book coming out called that will never work with a lot of really good stuff in a lot of good information and a lot of the stories more on the stories that we talk about here on the podcast if you like it if you like any of these episodes share it tell your friends posted on instagram hit me up on Instagram at drama. Let me know you think semi. Dm Tag me in your stories. Literally anything works. I'm reposting and communicating with you guys all day long. Keep that coming. I can't thank you enough. That's it. Let's get into the episode Short Story Long. It could take your whole life develop clarity second patients patients probably whatever you think you don't have you have something else in his the short story mark welcome to the pod. Oh It's a pleasure to be here. I'm so excited. I'm excited because because you know I have a lot of entrepreneurs founders CEOS on this show and some from a lot of well known companies but I think the moment I I kind of saw your stuff and started reading your stuff and saw that you were a co founder and CEO for a little bit of net flicks. It was obviously Lisa like well. This is another level and it may not feel that way to you van to me it does and the way the reason I liked that is because I really like I really live in the world of kind of these. We started up a Lotta apparel businesses and online marketing and stuff like that but I just feel like the things I can learn from someone who has kicked off something on that level. are probably endless and I'm really excited to try to get as much out of you. That can hear well. I mean that's kind of what I mean. The book in many ways is about that untold story Ori because everyone thinks it started out as one hundred and fifty million subscriber screaming giant but for years we were just a DVD by mail company for years. We could could make it work. Yeah I mean I was telling you earlier. I came into the into the building here and like all of a sudden. I got that vibe like Oh my God. This is start feels like a startup and for many years that's what Netflix felt like and that's the part you love. You love that started up energy yeah you know. I sometimes say that. If you're really lucky you kind of figure out two things about yourself like what you're good at and what you like and if you're really lucky you actually get to do you both those things yeah and I kind of figured out. It's early stage companies and it's not just that I like it. I suck at the companies. Get Big. It's I don't know how people do that. How do you manage like thousand people. Just I totally different game. I'm so happy to hear you say that because like I was telling you before before we started recording. I have always just sort of instinctually avoided letting my business get to corporate. I love that startup feeling and even recently the past few years. I've really tried to make sure that you know I'm covering the right basis. Still the right infrastructure is in place and the right you know talent is where it needs to be but I just. I don't know there's something about it the. I've never felt like I wanted to to try to get it to that place. I've I walked into a lot of these massive clothing companies and it just doesn't look fun anymore so to hear you say that makes me feel really feels like I was right. You were so uh-huh on target in fact I'll give you the advice is don't ever start making things more efficient. That is what kills companies real. Temptations -tations are going to be there. I mean you're going to go. Wow you've had this nice stability. We're growing ninety. percent of my orders are coming in a certain way and you're going to start hiring people who are real experts at efficiency agency because we can help. You cut a few points of margin. We can help you ship a little fee. They're really good at that efficiency stuff but the people who are really good at efficiency Z are clueless when all of a sudden your world changes and your world's going to change everyone's world changes yeah and so what you WanNa do is build this culture in this environment fool of people who are really adaptable who are Jacksonville trades who are comfortable with making decisions based on incomplete incomplete information because then when your world's suddenly shifts those are the people who can then okay and they shift in on it again. Yeah that's funny. Would you say that the main reason we all know the story three of these big corporate companies that can't pivot or make a move. Would you say that's because they're built around efficiency of of what used to work unquestionably and if it's a combination of things six that's what gets him into trouble. Is They go wow this is nice for years and years were doing the same sort of thing growing nice and steadily we have this nice to stage age distribution resell to wholesalers celery and so they hire these sales people who are really good at that and the warehouse there are people who are really good at that and then all of a sudden someone comes along who says screw this multi-stage stuff. I'M GONNA sell straight to consumers so and they can't do it. That's part one is that they can't do it but the the worst part is. They're scared to do it yeah because they go. I can't sell direct because my distributors Poke Hilmi and right. Now distributors are ninety five percent of my business business. So you get stuck me it is. I do a lot of I told you before I did a lot. I do some you know speech a speech sometimes and usually by half half the clients. I'd say or big companies who are scared shitless what's happening and the executive see they see it coming and they're trying to rally the people. You've got to be flexible. We've got to be innovative and so I go in and try and rally the troops whatever you can do in an hour so there's that piece and then the rest of my time I am. I'm working with the early startups helping them take down these big companies so it's this form of job security yeah. That's true either way it goes. That's good good stuff with what's interesting. Though is the best way to learn is to be on both sides. I'm sure yeah I'm sure that's amazing because to me now and you had a history and clothing. We'll talk about that but I I see what's happening with you know macy's and Barney's and all of these retailers that were just staples like you never I thought they would ever go anywhere and people are closed indoors and go and bankrupt and do and it's just like at this point this late in the game because you know we've been talking about retail apocalypse for five for six years. I just sit there and I watch and I'm like how are you not doing anything. How are you not like you know what I mean like. How is your literally. Your ship is sinking and you're not ah you know but that makes perfect sense so deeply set up to act one way that it's so hard to pivot. Here's a classic one so take supermarkets okay I so free really frustrating business for a consumer long lines and all that crap and supermarkets have seen what's going on ECOMMERCE and they're going out. That's that is not a threat. No no way no one can replace selling fresh vegetables and having milk and doing what we do and they just and then someone looked at it and said this is crazy having this checkout. Why can't you just go take stuff off the shelves and walk out and was the innovator who came up with that. Safeway or a Kroger knows was Amazon. I mean the fact that they left that open open for twenty years on them. You know so let me ask you to like I mean I just got right into advice part but if you are one of those guys or you you are even a medium or small sized guy that just has your you know your thing figured out and you have a really good thing going. What do you do like do you have. Do you have a department in the back office. That's constantly only trying to figure out how to disrupt your own business or what. Do you do to avoid that happening so I mean I understand. You know large. Your audience is probably not these big companies but all dispense the big company advice right now. Lease problem is you can't do it. Internally people go I want set up skunkworks and all set up a few people in an office Jason and that might work temporarily but as soon as they try and bring that out into the open the immune system is triggered and the white blood cells come swarming and then every department department in this big company kills the start up the only way to do it is to have it happen separately and so the way you really should do it and this is my opinion is as you basically set up a seed fund big company you invest in las a small startups not so that you can own them in certainly not so you can make money but you have a seat at the table big ten to see what they're working on. You get to understand the future. Eventually you can participate and perhaps them. It's really really really really hard because here's what happens in my world I have you know essentially small business and game example of something that happened. We came up using athletes artists and all that stuff to promote our business all of a sudden this thing started happening that we're social media influencers and so we're like okay well. Let's send him a bunch of clothes and we'll I don't know let's just having where a close on Youtube and so we did that but one thing that happened I will admit out from under me that that I didn't spot was it became so easy to make t shirts and so easy to start a shop store and so easy to start a website that now you have I mean there are some youtubers I doing ten million dollars plus a year in Merch and all of that is my business going somewhere else and that's something I could have spotted and I could have had ten indifferent merch lines or these things or whatever and and I didn't spot it and that's a big one where it where it happened for me. You know what I mean but at least you're watching it and seeing it. You're not gonNA catch everything but you're but that was a pretty fast despise us and I can predict what's going to happen. Next of course is right now. The U you too and INSTA- and face we're going to go. Why is this schmuck making ten million bucks a year emerge on our platform and it's GonNa be taken away from them. What do they do about that though they stopped distributing things like how many likes you have. They stopped letting people know what your followership is. I mean they have it. It's a dance because you don't WanNa driveway the people who are building building your platform but absolutely instagram for example and that's what I'm speaking totally off the cuff here. I don't work in-store Server. you know of this is just not stable environment for a company to keep on saying. This is a great deal. We're we're letting leading the influence your make all the money so then it goes back to obviously they want people to spend money to advertise not get it for free so it'll go back to the companies that are advertising on the platform. We'll we'll get the absolutely right so you know you can wear the shorts on the on the on the youtube if you want but the person who's GonNa make the money is instagram advertising whatever they want on the platform good stuff or so. It looks anyway. It's not so much exactly work because quite frankly as I say in the book. Nobody knows anything and electric. He's going back to the very first thing we said is..

Netflix instagram Mark Randolph Youtube CEO CO founder QNA Marc WanNa Reed Hastings Ori macy Lisa Jacksonville Safeway Poke Hilmi INSTA co founder Amazon executive
"co founder" Discussed on OFF RCRD

OFF RCRD

11:28 min | 10 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on OFF RCRD

"Anyone anyone to find that talented student in your dorm you want to build something with you can just do that and so. I think looking where you don't need permission and building their first is going to make you far more attractive two mentors in the future great advice. I'd love to talk about the open door story and how you got connected to co-founders. How did you meet. How'd you get connected two or three or four CO founders? He has three other founders so I was rabbe. WHO's now a general partner at Khosla ventures former CEO of square one of the pay tall mafia keith and I met at a square party at Red Door Coffee Celebrating squares? I were at a million dollars in sales in the platform and if you look at what they're doing today it's almost it's pretty funny to think how small they were then maybe thirty forty people and we got into an argument during this party. I newly was from twitter at the time and we third arguing about fraud loss rates and I was just convinced that they were GonNa make the same mistakes. They made a pay pal where the cared too much about fraud in solving the problem at the expense of customer experience. I don't remember the exact position each of us had but at the end of it he tried to hire me to run the risk team which I thought was funny because I knew almost nothing about risks and certainly nothing about Credit Arctic cards. I just had a passion for the customer experience around it because I decided I was totally unqualified. I said no we ended up becoming good friends and arguing about startups for a few more years and a lot of that time was spent talking about real estate why real estate was broken and what could be done about it and through that he had this idea for a long time called home run where you would go to the site you enter your address and you'd say what you're willing to sell your own four and decided to say yes or no and I I didn't think that was a great idea but I thought had the nugget of a really good idea. Took Keith is telling people about this time eventually connected me and Eric are CEO he had started a company that sold Trulia. He had run a fifty to one hundred home portfolio okay since he was eighteen years old founder market sit with sort of off the charts so we really clicked. I respected how he thought about customers really respected how about customer development and the reason reasoning mentioned. Keep trying to hire me for this risk. Job Is Fourth Co founder Ian Wong who ends up taking that job is leading risk at square and we pulled him out of a out of another small start up to start this company together other so I'd like to ask. How did you buy your first home. How did you know there's demand for this product. was there anything that you did early on to kind of assess the demand for open door yeah. You know it's really funny. I don't think we've told the story publicly before. Selling a home is a really important in emotional moment. If you've never done it before we really did not want to mess it up before before we really launched or even raise any money and did anything we'd be created. This fake brand called simpler sell dot com mostly to figure out we actually do this. Could we offer fair market value on someone's home and would it be a great France for them. We we didn't want to cause any kind of trouble. We didn't WanNa make any mistakes. It worked. It worked really well. Our first customer Josh Brewer out in Phoenix took the plunge with us. You know went to a facebook ad clicked on it entered his home address than sold his Holmdale Sembler Sal I think probably ten people in the company at the time and we've all had this bottle of wine. We mixed blended together called a simpler cellar which I'm aging in my basement right. Now it's great and what do you wish you'd started doing more of much earlier. In your life like typically action with compelling tax I I think I massively underweight the importance of listening to other people and the importance of building relationships around disagreements disagreements instead of using them as a way to get to the truth. I think one of the things I did really poorly earlier in my career I've done. I've totally gotten a lot better at is when I had an opinion whether I was right or wrong too soon for the sake of the argument I was right. I viewed my job as taking someone from their position to mind as efficiently as possible that it doesn't work all that does maybe it does work to a certain extent but it's definitely not the best thing to do and much more effective way to do that as to deeply understand where someone is what what led them to their conclusions and then fill in context sort of draw the path from where you are to where they are and then you can both walk on it and that's a much better way to both get to the truth and also you to build much stronger relationship with that person which allows you to get harder questions in the future. Who would you say some of your mentors. Today is still very much. A mentor of Mine America's a mentor of mine. I Still Keep Joe Mentor of mine. I have a lot of internal mentors at the company. I have my spiritual mentor as my executive coach which I highly recommend to anyone anyone who has a a large team is to get an executive coach you find mentorship in so many places. I think twitter's a great way to get that one way mentorship you. Can you know look to the smartest people in the world feeding incite constantly who will often even engage with you if you just reach out to them that's amazing in a recommend biographies in which biographies you know what's funny about recommending books is that the needs to be at the right moment in someone's life for them to really hit books that have been really impactful for me or sometimes books looks set today would mean absolutely nothing or tomorrow might be the most insightful thing. I could possibly be handed so harshly to recommend any kind of book without knowing where someone is today but recently I've really enjoyed Benjamin Franklin biography by Walter Isaacson. I really enjoyed powerbroker Robert Caro. Yeah I could probably name ten ten or twelve others but against that point in time and when did you start with the executive coach and I'd love to dive deeper into that yeah. I started open-door when I was twenty three years old and I had maybe managed eater so people before I found myself within a larger team and a lot of pressure to go very quickly. I think one of my co founders Keith give a talk during wiessee startup school about operating a business and there's the company growth curve in your personal growth curve. I think whatever you can can do to accelerate your personal growth curve as founder in a company is incredibly important worth prioritizing in so I decided in heard before that an executive coach be a great way to accelerate your personal growth curve and that was worth the investment in when did you get that technical which was right at twenty three when he started the company or is it a year or two or three end. Yeah I think I I interviewed probably twenty or thirty coaches before I settled on the mccutcheon work with today. I believe we've been working together now for about two and a half years so probably about two two years in how big was hoping to our at the very beginning of that period tuneup years ago. Yeah I think probably around forty or so people eighty six people got what are some of the the biggest things that you've worked on with this coach and where you've grown with this coach yeah. I think it's a lot of it is interpersonal. Dynamics less so on like strategy I ah most of that mentorship from Mateen here hiring really great people you know what's interesting as you grow the company from one to ten one hundreds of people that you just have these different chapters when my favorite rules is this like the rule of threes every time the company triples everything breaks just like everything that worked really well is complete disarray in a disaster and set you learn learning by trial and error the first ten people everyone in that group of ten people is going to replicate themselves at least ten times if you're successful all of their strengths all their weaknesses houses and so it's critical that every single person that initial group is someone. You're ready to spend twenty four seven with because you're likely going to do that. The next stage is like this a call like the the band of brothers and sisters stage. It's like that first thirty forty people and they really shaped the culture so I think a lot of founders of the states are hiring for culture fit but you really should be looking. I'm for cultural contribution. It's really crucial that you develop an open dialogue with everyone in that group about what's working. What's not working and what the company can do about it? You want every single person that band of brothers other sisters to be like a missionary for the company in the mission. You want part of their identity. The reason get a coach at the next stages because you hit this. It's all changing stage from fifty to one hundred fifty. People were a lot of companies falter because you're growing so fast and everything is absolutely on fire and there's not enough structure yet. You don't really have necessarily you know a leadership leadership team built out and so at the stage earlier employees who previously were generalists who owned a large swath of the company they feel disengaged because it's no longer that band of brothers and sisters. They don't know everyone anymore but you can turn that into empowerment. You can sit them down when I wanted to say. You're a flagbearer for the company. You are flagbearer for over north culture in everyone who is joining today is going to look to you for how to behave and how to contribute and it's on you to teach them what it means to be a member of the team here because if you don't they're going to change it and I I recommend at that point also sort of reaching out to every one of these missionaries in your company gathering their opinions about what the company's values are and using that bottoms up process where everyone contributes needs to write down and establish a set of like what are your company's values and make sure everyone knows you mentioned that executive coaching is something that you do to accelerate your own personal growth curve. What are some things that you've done to tolerate that growth good question done or doing. I think the biggest thing for accelerating growth curve is just understanding that people draw US incest surrounding yourself by great. People is a single best way to grow yourself. I think the the adages you know your average of the five people you spend your time with your you probably the average of the thirty to forty people you spend your time with probably in proportion to the amount of time you spend with them so be really rigorous but who you're spending your time with and thoughtful who you want to be eh that helps a lot in being able to grow in the ways you. WanNa grow. Let's talk about Keith little. He's been on the show before great episode. What are some of the things that you've learned from him. You know it's funny about Keith is that he's basically a state machine for the right answer but he hasn't always necessarily know why he knows what's right by working with. Keith you sort of this this this cheat code to the answer and then you get to work backwards to why he's right. That's helpful in frustrating. That itself is a huge accelerate. What are some non obvious things that you've done as a founder. Let's make open door successful. I think it's really important once you have a team of probably thirty or so people to do a great job with orientation when when someone joins everyone remembers their first day and being present for that and making sure.

keith founder executive twitter CEO fraud Khosla ventures facebook Red Door general partner Robert Caro Co founder Joe Mentor underweight Mine America Trulia Phoenix Benjamin Franklin Josh Brewer
"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

Breaking Beauty Podcast

03:39 min | 11 months ago

"co founder" Discussed on Breaking Beauty Podcast

"It's our last episode of summer while it feels like summer is ending. You know people hate it. When people say that i've seen the back to school adds its own. No no no no no no. No don't bring that here. Oh not sure what we're getting here schooled today today yeah we are and we have an amazing founder who i am obsessed with and that is none other than alley web yes and she is the co founder of dry bar so that's the original chain of blow dry bars launched in twenty ten and she cofounded dry bar with her brother michael landau and her now ex husband cameron cameron webb. She's also just branched out into the small world because she created this brand called squeeze and it's really aiming to do the same thing that she did with dry a bar which is to standardize that whole experience of getting a blow out. She's doing the same with this this concept yeah. I think what you're talking about. Is that level love consistency. You know back in the day you would go and get a blow dry and you have one idea in your head and you'd say to the person okay i want it to be voluminous but not shoe voluminous at the route then you'd walk out with something that you didn't really want but you ended up paying for or instagram yeah and you so you didn't have a picture to show and i think just coming up with that. Menu was so genius at that time like here's six different blow dries we get it. These are all the different like mini iterations that that make a difference to people yeah that was completely revolutionary at the time and now with squeezed. She's aiming to do the same thing so you got the customizing the spa music it's all cashless you don't have to feel awkward about the tip at the end and the level of pressure at all that stuff that some times practitioners remembered ass and sometimes they don't that's all kind mm-hmm systematize saved in a profile so you basically don't even have to talk to anybody going squeeze so there's only one location of of this concept right now. It's in california but it's hopefully you're gonna roll out <hes> tomorrow place as soon can't wait to try. I know i need that and let's not forget. That alley is a fellow podcasters. She's the co host of raising raising the bar podcast which she host with her brother michael on our network dear media. She's had people like anina being. She's that famous fashion entrepreneur from from los angeles. She's had <hes> emily schulman from cupcakes in kashmir. She's had jamie schmidt on her show who we've had on our show and get into the nitty gritty of entrepreneurship so if if you need career tips that is a great one to check out i noticed you had tony coe from next cosmetics recently so i wanna be listening to that. I like i want tony on our shows. As a whole badly you beat us to it allie putting her on the vision board foreshore alley is also set to launch a reality makeover show which allie will will give us the full scoop on in today's episode. She's got so many things on the go first. We're going to get to the origin story behind dry bar because it really is completely jean s. and next year the brand celebrates its tenth anniversary dr are actually launched in the middle of the recession and despite that fact managed to have if such a huge success today there ninety two locations and they do over one hundred and twenty thousand blowouts a month now in canada dry bar. We don't actually have the locations. There's one in the nordstrom in vancouver which i frequent every time i go to randy. Vancouver definitely need a blow dry but when you and i went to l._a. Last year first first place be hit was literally the west hollywood drive our because who wants to do their hair getting off a flight. No i know and then our hair was good for four days. We went to sephora. Yes we were instagram. Graham ready our hair looked so crisp the entire time and we actually hit up the drive bar.

co founder cameron cameron webb alley michael landau jamie schmidt tony coe allie california los angeles founder nordstrom vancouver sephora hollywood Graham jean s. canada randy four days
"co founder" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Their businesses from being, you know, hundred thousand dollar businesses to being hundred million dollar businesses. Plus and to give them the real tactical trae. Meaning that they need to move from the beginning to the next step. I could not agree with you more. And the reason I have the conversation at all here is because I want to talk about solutions and approaches that have been successful in. You clearly have found the way to be successful in spite of and I for me, it's really it is a it is a balancing act in my own mind about whether we go there, we don't I don't want to ignore a problem that exists. But I also don't want to talk about it without having solutions on the table. Yeah. I've been thinking a lot about what are proactive things that can be done to equalize. The opportunities for women, and let's just speak about the world of entrepreneurship because that's the world. I know the most. The terms the legal terms that women are given early on in their business. I think are much worse on average than the legal terms that men are given. So for instance, we've been hearing in the media right now about this entire situation with Uber where Travis has kind of shares that are worth ten x the voting power of a single share. And we know that Travis has this and Mark Zuckerberg has this and many other male founders Evan Spiegel at Snapchat has these shares. I've never heard of a single woman having shares that are worth ten x her voting power. You don't have that. I had to I had to work to actually have a vote on my board. If you look at my first term sheets of rent the runway, my co-founder, and I while we were on the board our votes affectively didn't count. And my preferred shareholders held all of the control and sway as to what the future of the business was so we were starting not even from a, you know. Point zero. We were starting from like negative fifty and over the years. Thank God rent the runway took off from the very beginning. And we've been able to negotiate in every subsequent round of funding more rights for ourselves. But all we've wanted was fair rights to what we would be offered as a male CEO or a male co founding team. So what I would love to see is. I'd love to see women, and I'm happy to be the first to do this publicize put online their first seed round term sheets and compare that with the seed round term sheets that men get the and the reason why I say seed round just because at the seed round there's no evidence that any business is going to be successful. You're taking a bet on the founder itself, you're taking a bet on a person..

Travis founder Evan Spiegel CEO co-founder Mark Zuckerberg Snapchat hundred thousand dollar hundred million dollar
"co founder" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Janklow had ridiculous name, but it was a very innovative idea at the time, and it was related to another startup called yawn to back in the day and a recruiter from the start up beyond two decided to contact me through this and yawn to actually turned out to be Ari tros company, my co-founder and business partner in X Y O U is one of the only crazy people at the time in two thousand eight actually. Starting a company in two thousand eight when everyone was going through turmoil and running for the hills. Well, yeah. So so you and Ari how did that relationship happened was he the first person that had took a chance on you just like you just said like nobody was saying. Yes, you wanted to get somebody to say, yes. And then how did that relationship build up? That is exactly right. Yeah. He is the first person that said, well, this kid is smart. He's also very humble as well. Yeah. Yeah. You know? You know, he he he saw how passionate I was. And how driven I was. And I think what is kind of the metric and the thing that we care about the most at X Y O. And like what I look for an employees and new employees now is like how much do you care, and you could tell that I cared about what I was doing. I was passionate about technology, and I had zero experience. Right. He didn't even know what the heck he was going to hire me for. But he was like, you know, what I need higher this kid and take a chance, and he is the only one that took a chance on me. And so basically, I have spent especially with the amazing story that X Y O has turned into. I've spent a lot of my time re repaying him and basically making him feel great about taking a chance on me. So he was the first person to say, yes, what was the company about? What was he trying to do? And how did you fit in? Yeah. At the time. This is when the concept or idea of Facebook, apps didn't exist. So it was a brand new concept. He first off he credited technology for my space that allowed you to turn off those annoying layouts and all the color schemes on my space man when you picked your page. Yes. Okay. It was called sanity switch. So you head switch on your page and every single other person's page that you visited it would turn off their annoying glittery layouts home. I he he's a savior. I didn't know he was a say yes now here is what he discovered in doing that he discovered just how big the personalization space is. So he decided to do the exact opposite thing for Facebook. He created the first ever it was called the onto layers the first ever technology that allowed you to add layouts and personalization layers to your Facebook profile, and it caught on like crazy. Well, so I joined him in that technology company, and it was just a wild and amazing ride. So yeah. So what did you do there? What did you learn what did you? Discover about yourself because from starting out as somebody taking a chance on you to be in co founder of a black Shane company now valued at twenty million dollars spot. Number two, fifty I'm Queen market cap. And you're just having amazing party for your.

Ari tros company Facebook Ari Shane company Janklow co-founder co founder partner twenty million dollars
"co founder" Discussed on Tech Reports by Larry Magid

Tech Reports by Larry Magid

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"co founder" Discussed on Tech Reports by Larry Magid

"If you're just joining us Microsoft co-founder, Paul Allen has died this afternoon. He was sixty five Allen had said earlier this month that he was being treated for non Hodgkin lymphoma. Larry, you have been covering Allen and Microsoft. Since the early days, how would you describe his role in the tech world incredibly important. You know he'd not nearly as well known if Bill gate is or Steve Jobs, wealth, but certainly important pioneer. He and gates co-founded Microsoft back in nineteen seventy five that's year before the apple two came out and he helped he engaged together. We're responsible for Microsoft basic, which was probably the most important of the early early personal computer software languages. And then he remained Microsoft for number of year. I think until eighty two, when he was first diagnosed with Hodgkin non-hodgkin's lymphoma, this is not the first bout that he's had from Canterbury. He been diagnosed back then with three diagnosed and to come to a today, but he's been around he and he engaged from schoolmates. They were fourteen and twelve. They were playing around with computers way back guess what lie in the seventy s and you know, symphony wouldn't invested in sporting teams. You can't go to Seattle without seeing it, influence your mutual impact on the city. So you know an important person. What kind of a relationship did Paul Allen and Bill Gates having in more recent years? You know, I don't know. I, I assume they were in touch because they were both. You know, they're both very active in philanthropy and both in terms of international and and also Seattle. But I really don't know gates course haven't been at Microsoft. I think he's still on the board and it's been many years since Paul Allen resigned from Microsoft board. I think he resigned in two thousand though. I'm sure that they were in touch, but I don't know how closely we're and once he left Microsoft, did he try his hand and another tech business or, oh, yeah. He was involved in a number of interval technologies years ago with doing some very interesting. I can't remember what if any more because it's been so long. But he's been a certainly an investor in a number of tech companies, as well as a number of social entrepreneurs. He's given a lot of money to brain research, but yes, and by the way he wrote a book called idea, man, and that's sort of how fancied himself as you know, gates with the business guy and and Allen thought of himself at the the idea person pretty remarkable career all the way around. Absolutely. And the thing that not one, but two of them Bill Gates and Paul Allen both went on to do so much philanthropy. That's right. And you know, very big contribution again, not as well known if gates, but certainly a person with a huge amount of influence very early on and continuing. I think up until his death..

Bill Gates Paul Allen Steve Jobs Microsoft Hodgkin lymphoma Seattle co-founder Larry apple Canterbury
"co founder" Discussed on The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"co founder" Discussed on The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

"The president and co founder of the city blockchain summit got paulson and began with me today thank you so much for being on the shy polls appreciate your time it's gonna be right to have a chat love to be here i'm very happy to engage with you rank end i'm looking for i was looking for this and talking to you look this this the so much going on the spice at the moment it's such an exciting time and you're right there in the thick of it before we get into the actual city blockchain son at what you guys are doing who you're speaking to and i throw about a million questions that you what had liked to if you wouldn't mind poulsen just gives it a little bit of a background on yourself why you're in blockchain what you doing how you come to hear and what your objectives are absolutely greg i'm so i've been into a in the business from at least twenty years now twenty five years actually and republican complication computer user and what we've seen is you know do the today show everybody is afraid to jump on the computers and livable computers all afraid afraid afraid so we put of location he's the pain and and dispose the intimation in a very forced to fifth grade level of writing so it helped them a consumers just understand the technology and be part of the other than being afraid on it so become voted a lot of people into the computer age and then of course we had the big boom of the internet and i see the same cycle happening again in this base blockchain is very robust technology i'd have been around for a while but now that the only other stuff that's going on in the innovation that's happening in the in the industry is more than the full front now some of the big names all the fortune one hundred companies are already in it big time and i feel that again the consumers are left out of the dock and i'll go this to engage the consumers in another way not republication but throwing events in smaller cities and engaging them with the innovation that's happening in in the blockchain space so you've been there through the.

president co founder paulson poulsen twenty five years twenty years