35 Burst results for "CISCO"

Cyber conflict between Ukraine and Russia

The CyberWire

05:46 min | 6 d ago

Cyber conflict between Ukraine and Russia

"Security firm proof point this morning released a study of chinese people's liberation army threat actor ta four thirteen. That's deployed a militias fire. Fox browser extension fryer fox in a surveillance campaign directed against tibetans. Ta four thirteen has also used scan box and support your malware in its operation so far this year the units targets include tibetan groups both domestic and in tibetan diaspora proof point assesses ta four thirteen tool said as limited but quite effective against dissident communities. Which after all have what proof point aptly calls a low barrier to compromise the campaign also suggests a shift to more open source tools on the part of the p. l. a. ukraine's national security and defense counsel has accused moscow of compromising a ukrainian government file sharing system the system of electronic interaction of executive bodies zd net thinks. The group responsible is gamero. Don a group widely regarded as a proxy for russian intelligence services. Kamera don has certainly been active against ukrainian targets in the past. But it's an odd duck while often thought of as an advanced persistent threat that is a government. Run operation in some respects. It doesn't really act like a government agency or even a straight up contractor like iran's mob group for one thing gamero don doesn't restrict it's targeting the way government operation normally would nor is it entirely indiscriminate in the way the lower end criminal gangs tend to be for all that gamero. Don is both noisy and aggressive. Research by cisco's talos group suggests that gamero don is also a mercenary player in the criminal. Criminal market talos wrote in. Its recent report on maradonna quote. We should consider the possibility of this. Not being an ap t at all rather being a group that provides services for other ap teas while doing its own attacks on other regions and quote so Kind of contractor perhaps a criminal organization that hires its services out to intelligence services but that also does business with other criminals while its principal state sponsor by general agreement russia turns a blind eye so gamero don is one of the most active and undeterred actors in the threat landscape it does the work of an ap t but it uses a cybercriminals style. It's worth noting that the operation the ns dc describes seems to be a software supply chain compromise as an s. d. c. tweeted. The attack belongs to the so-called supply chain attacks methods in means of carrying out this cyberattack allow to connect it with one of russia's hackers spy groups this is therefore a different matter entirely from the distributed denial of service attacks ukraine complained of at the beginning of the week the de dos attack targeted. Both the national security and council and the sba you security service bleeping. Computer reports and ukrainian authorities did claim that the attack had its origins in russia in as they put it russian traffic networks. The ns dc describes the diaz thusly vulnerable government web servers are infected with virus that covertly makes them part of a button. It used for de dos attacks on other resources at the same time. Security systems of internet providers identify compromised web servers as a source of attacks and begin to block their work by automatically blacklisting them. Thus even after the end of the de dos fix the attacked websites remain inaccessible to users and quote. But it seems that this denial of service harassment was probably the work of the criminal. Gang thought to be retaliating for the arrest of three of its members by the cranium. Participants in a big bilateral franco ukrainian law enforcement sweep alleged members of gregor. We should of course say allegedly engaged in criminal activity. These particular alleged. Hoods seem to have belonged to a gregor's ransomware sub gang french authorities in particular had blood in there is because as france entire reports. A gregor was allegedly implicated in ransomware attacks against hospitals. So paris in kiev. Good hunting. go get him. There allegedly bad guys researchers at mcafee this morning released their study of uc ransomware. A new strain detected earlier this year. It's another entry into the ransomware as a service market whose operators hawkins in both russophone an anglophone criminal the criminal markets. It uses the familiar attack. Vectors common in the ransomware space phishing emails of course but also exploitation of compromised accounts index has gained through unpacked. Systems with known vulnerabilities. Babba criminal customers seem so far to be most interested in hitting victims in the transportation healthcare plastics electronics and agriculture sectors. Their activity has extended to a number of geographical regions and the malware doesn't use the sorts of local language checks often employed to keep the operators out of water in countries whose legal systems tend to be vigilant and unforgiving mcafee's notes on abbott. See an interesting division of labor across its two principal linguistic communities. The operators will use an english language for them for announcements but a russian language forum for affiliate recruitment ransomware updates

Gamero Don Gamero National Security And Defense Kamera Don Talos Group Talos Liberation Army DON Russia National Security And Council Gregor Moscow FOX Cisco Iran AP SBA Babba Kiev
Economist Scott Irwin: How Chinese Buying Is Causing a Boom in Agricultural Commodities

Odd Lots

03:44 min | Last week

Economist Scott Irwin: How Chinese Buying Is Causing a Boom in Agricultural Commodities

"We're going to dive into the whole issue of food price inflation as well as the new dallying hog futures contract by poplar request. We're going to be speaking to scott irwin. He's an agricultural economist at the university of illinois scott. Welcome to the show be here. Cisco in addition to being an agricultural economist. You're also an actual farmer from iowa. Is that correct. Well try technically speaking. I don't actually get much tractor. Driving and physical participation but i. It's an interesting situation I from the landlord's side of my family's farm out niwa my eighty five year old mother and i provide the management and do all the marketing of the crops. So i lived through the epsom downs of the grain markets. Like everybody else plus a get to try to work the market with my card playing eighty five year old mother that sounds extremely satisfying. And fun right now. You know sort of mentioned this rally that we're seeing as pretty intense across various soft commodities agriculture commodities. What are you give us the sort of basic big picture of what's going on what's driving This bid china perfect is that is Sixty does the yeah. It's not the only factor of course but in the market that's the number one driving force we've seen a Justice explosion in a grain exports to china basically started about last july and as shown little signs of cooling off some of that related to their phase one trade agreement that was negotiated. A in the previous trump administration Some of it also related to rebuilding of their hog her because of the african swine fever and then some of it is also Related to just their desire to rebuild some of their reserve stocks as well. But that's so one thing. I always wondered about you. See these headlines that china is building up its grain reserves. And i don't know i i can kind of see. Why countries would do that. But i i always wonder how useful those reserves are over the long term and how they actually use them. Can you give us a sort of like potted summary of what building up reserves actually means well classic example of something a sounds good in theory and rarely works well in practice. We have many decades of experience with different kinds of reserve schemes. Here in the us They've tried it metals grains and all sorts of commodities soft commodities over the years so they're called buffer-stock. Ski seems and the problem. Is you know the idea. Is you build it. You know it's kind of the seven fat years seven lean years a biblical example put in practice and so that all sounds good in theory but it all becomes very political and Governments have tendency to not want to release the buffer stocks when they really ought to to You know maybe calm markets down because farmers are mad because you're driving the price down So it's just it's a deeply political and it rarely works as a well as it sounds in theory.

Scott Irwin University Of Illinois China Cisco Iowa Scott Fever United States
Ranch vs. Blue Cheese

A Hot Dog Is a Sandwich

04:41 min | 3 weeks ago

Ranch vs. Blue Cheese

"I love blue cheese all everyday not even as a wing dipping sauce blue cheese dressing. I like blue cheese crumbles. I like it on a wedge salad on the side of you know. The stake have one time mistake and i made blue cheese pound butter. Wow what a wonderful yummy. Oh that does sound good bread. Yeah i love blue cheese. And i think it's verse it on. I think people just have a weird aversion to mold. You think blue cheeses versatile. I think it so versatile foods that i didn't necessarily well you kind of just named like wings salad and then stake but stake when really blue cheese. Would you blue cheese dressing on a stake. Blue cheese dressing rate is like the arguing. She's dipping sauce. We like dipping sauce dressing all blue cheese in general. I brought a list of blue cheeses. That i like. Well no but. I mean a lot of people like as a kid. I didn't know that blue cheese was a standalone cheese. Only had it in dressing for in. I'd only had like bad dressing. I think bad blue cheese dressing is much worse than what is bad. Blue cheese dressing wishbone. We're never getting wishbone. Wishbone wishbone boise. Addressing. there is no blue cheese in there. It's like a little bit of mold powder and then all parents love wishboned. Blue cheese dressing. That's why we grew up with it. He's like. America does corn syrup and chemicals america america french dressing. Wow i have nothing. I'd love wishbone. I love the shape of their bottles. Correct i think. Ken steakhouse highfalutin. That's the zinc legit jesse of all time. I can't bring myself to buy like fancy salad dressings. Because i'm either buying like a valley or like a wishbone equivalent or making my own spending. No seven forty. Nine for paul newman. Do you like making your own ranch. Yes is it as good as a bottled ranch. It's not as good as this. We we need to offer up a correction here for a previous episode. I don't even know what the heck we were talking about. We mentioned how good cisco ranches and we brought it specifically outback. Yeah mansion house. Oh no but i mean to me. That's a testament of. I love taking foods that are like really good prefab like stove. Top stuffing right like making my own homemade version of top stuffing and trying to make it taste exactly like that. And i love doing that like cisco ranch. But those don't no one's talking about cisco is the gigantic food distribution company that delivers like ten gallon drums What's the one cattlemen's cattlemans barbecue sauce. Brands that only exists that go through cisco and sell in ten gallon increments until like every crappy chain across. America uses the same barbecue sauce cisco small mom and pop restaurants long thoughts. Yeah they'll source of a lot of diners especially that have really big menus aren't so using very true. Isn't blue cheese dressing just ranch plus blue cheese okay. This comes to a very good point ranches. The mother sauce dressing is the variation on the mother. It's like you have holidays. Then you add shallots in tarragon and you get burn as you have ranch dressing. And the ad blue cheese crumbles in blue cheese dressing. Which is why. I think ranches superior s coffee rolling in his grave right now. The disrespect that you are giving towards his muscle. Tear down your french cooking idols. All right because the hidden valley corporation made so much more money so many more people in this coffee. You don't know that where your second. Though that i got a rifle actually hidden valley is worth a ton of money. They got top chef money. They sponsor entire seasons of top chef last chance kitchen which is also one of the most brilliant digital marketing devices last chance kitchen so top chef hidden valley would occasionally sponsor like a quickfire challenge on top chef. Literally be like yeah. Oh there's and they can get all wacky with it. Like reynolds wrap sponsored one one year and literally had to only cook using reynolds wrap as like equipment so people were like fashioning saute pans that have just reynolds wrap. Oh that's so fits on the up and they go on the show on top chef. Can i go yeah. I don't think i would win. But i would. Just a lot of people are like top chef. And i was like literally like the one of the first challenges. There is called a pre where it's like you have to perfectly breakdown or trust chickens. Yes technical stuff. That i have no idea i feel like i could go on. Chopped cut their kitchen. All the garbage food network shows. Top chef is an entirely different level. That i could not happen. Yeah yeah yeah.

Cisco America Ken Steakhouse Paul Newman Boise Jesse Reynolds Brands
Plaid plans European hiring spree despite Visa deal falling apart

FinTech Insider

04:16 min | Last month

Plaid plans European hiring spree despite Visa deal falling apart

"Clad and visa have ended plans for their monster merger almost a year after it was announced visa has cooled off. Its deal to buy fintech plaid for five point. Three billion dollars off to the us department of justice sued to block the transaction on antitrust grounds. We're confident we would have prevailed in cooled as plaid's capabilities. A complimentary to these is not competitive. Said al kelly chief executive when the deal was announced in january. Twenty twenty mr. Kelly said it would put the combined company at the epicenter of the fintech world but the doj moved to block the deal in early november arguing. That visa had chosen to a quiet plod because it was developing payments platform that would challenge visa dominance in the sector. Zach perry plaid. Ceo says it has only just begun will also stating it grew. Customers by sixty percent added hundreds of banks to the platform recently So ouattara thoughts on this. I suppose i double on the doj's decision. They made the right decision And then on top of what you think is next applied and indeed for visa you know visas strategists the scott. What's it gonna do instead Who wants to confessed on this one. I have no obvious. Talk on the story bradley. I'll go straight to you oklahoma. Dj positioning oversee. This was a memo. I think the visa describing is future competitor. But it's kind of like if you look at shell or chevron will be one of the big oil and gas guys if they go and invest heavily all by one of the renewable energy providers without be something the doj against odin think. so so. i don't view necessarily a competition. It definitely is an aggressive move would have been by visa. I'm but it's not. Apples to apples. Is competing new way of paying the more. Traditional banking rails. I'm it wasn't than buying competing conference. That i think would have been than trying to own their own. Their own immedi system. So i'm sure agree. With the ruling on deeply never went cold so almazo writes Will arenas once it's interesting time. Isn't it broadly. The famous volcano picture was the Was was the that was mentioned and this idea that plot was gonna move in that direction. The doj's argument was always that will fees is nearly sixty sixty five percent market share in the us. It's clearly dominant position if they're acquiring something that could compete with the very called rails itself then. A potential competitive type was being taken off the table and visa would continue to own a even if the rails would move from called to something that was more account based are the question to your point as to whether or not that was ever going to happen but certainly in a lot of the country. I've seen online In the past a couple of days and days since cisco announced on twitter a lot of the vc community is sort of saying it looks like plot themselves may have been motivated to terminate this because five billion dollars for a for an api data company. Seems like a really big price when visa. I pays it. But it's a testament to why we are infantile. That plot could probably got a better deal. I'm and actually the growth in neo biking and challenging ranking during the pandemic has been so astonishing that why wouldn't plod to go somewhere else and could they built mobile themselves than they cut on the on. The visa's umbrella suddenly seems like fintech. Twitter is very very bullish homeless firm plots perspective. I'm but then also people who all big funds of visa think. This is a good move for them as well because it kind of moves them away from being They were always very friendly with the banks kind of the position with the big banks. They have a great relationship. Plods account dates are access is not very well liked by a lot of the major. Us banks indeed. Many of them have been trying to block access to screen scraping together on direct deals in place and that might be one of the biggest threats in plots business model so visas business just gets a lot clearer. All of a sudden plot may be able to go onum become that competitor or something else so a good result all around personally

DOJ Al Kelly Zach Perry Ouattara Almazo Chevron Kelly Bradley CEO Oklahoma Scott Shell Twitter Cisco United States
How Netskope is Refining Edge Security

IT Visionaries

05:09 min | Last month

How Netskope is Refining Edge Security

"Today we have sanjay beri. He is the ceo and co founder of netscape sanjay. Welcome to the show. Thank you great to be here all right so we always give all of our guests an opportunity to tell us exactly what their company does. Your the ceo and founder of netscape. What do you guys do absolutely so. Our focus is making sure that organizations enterprises across the world can leverage the new way people work remote for example and do it securely star focuses protecting enterprises from threats theft of data while enabling them to work the way they want to liberty in cloud leveraging the internet working remote in so on and so our category as making would call. It is something called secure access services edge. It's a redefinition of the market of data security to a new cloud security edge. All right so. Explain that to me without using the your industry buzzwords. Because i think this because i'll i'll let me frames up my perspective on this. I've worked at different companies. Or let's say remote i so or maybe they're even cloud native i so we didn't really depend too much on too much. Enterprise security everyone just kind of logged into public cloud. If they were developers they would have me. Vpn are asa access. So that would get them to their development instances so there's a lot of audience that doesn't quite understand exactly why enterprises needs connectivity. Security solutions like netscape kind of framing for me like what's happening in the marketplace. What's happening with your customers. And why products and services like yours are needed to begin with totally totally so just if you step back. The single biggest market insecurity people spend close to thirty billion dollars a year on. Is this market call data network security and what is that. It's the stuff that you heard of like wham. Gateways firewalls data. Loss systems proxies. They're all boxes Somewhere near network so biggest. market insecurity. the problem. There's problems with that market. The world has moved on meaning one sixty seven percent of people work remote and people don't want to go back and bp another corporate network anymore they want to go straight to the internet straight to cloud and so one. The location of those boxes wrong It's forcing inefficiencies performance problems too much expense and so people are saying. Wait a minute. I don't want these boxes. Mike perimeter. I want this edge in the cloud. Where no matter where i am. I have great fast access to my resources in. I have this security on ramp right that is everywhere in the world and you know with us. Fifty milliseconds away from anybody in the world doesn't matter what country would city and is this virtual clouded so one the change in the way that people are working remote partners accessing things assessing the change in location if your security in this market to the language has changed and so important point every ten years maybe fifteen. The language of the internet changes so reality is remember way back when paolo to networks came out and and they said hey we're going to beat cisco juniper and all these folks and it's because the language internet has changed it's all about application identification. The reality is that that has happened again. Ten years later and now the world and the language and internet is. Api's it's j. It's you that's how applications are built. The internet is built and so as a result all those systems that you spend thirty billion on that. Sit in the wrong location. They don't understand the language. And so i'll give you this great example. Send with his so and she said to me. Hey sanjay Okay is about four years ago. she goes I got these systems. I got these proxies. I got this firewall. In what more do i need. And i said what are they telling you. And she goes water all their bill. You know five or cave data amazon. And i go to her will. What are you gonna do with that. I mean i don't know a quarter of the internet goes goes to actually. I don't know what to do that. And i go well. It speaks the wrong language stickers in sticks his in and i our system tells her actually that guys on slack gonna public channel sending credit card by the way it is fighting. Mccabe data amazon. They're both right and i go. What do you want which one she goes. I want the second one data this point. The language internet changed and so this concept of mexico is put your security where you want in the virtual edge no matter where people work there and speak the language that the internet speaks so you can set in protect your data in a much better way to. That's a short summary for you.

Sanjay Beri Netscape Sanjay Netscape Mike Perimeter Sanjay Okay Paolo Cisco Amazon Mccabe Mexico
NFL game predictions: Buffalo Bills vs. Indianapolis Colts

Bro Bro Bro Bets

01:35 min | Last month

NFL game predictions: Buffalo Bills vs. Indianapolis Colts

"I game one. Oh five saturday. Currently it's six and a half. The colts visiting the bills. It opened as a seven point game. Sixty percent of the bats. Sixty percent of the money is on the bills. Michael will start with you where you going on this one but my number say i should go with the coast but i like the bills all week. I'm gonna go against and based on what you just gave me. You steered me off the ledge. I'm gonna go with buffalo. I think buffalo's the second best red zone team on third down in football this year. They're scoring at a rapid rate. I think brian daboll were really have a good handle on. The eib reflects defense. And when i look at philip rivers the last two games in january that he's played the baltimore game that they want was fifty two degrees but when he plays below forty one degrees. He's played three games. He's lost all three. I'm gonna go buffalo and since you me that the team wins their cover. So that i'm gonna pick tick. Buffalo galvin lead dude. Colts have ability to play down and up to teams. Let's go philip. Rivers five and two against the spread road. Playoff games rivers four. No wild card weekend and bills have the worst run defense of any team in the playoffs this year. Jonathan taylor to the todd town called cisco to keep it closer. We can't let it get away from of a ballgame all take the points. Bharti's going bills guppies with colts pat. I'm going with colts. Just because i don't want to have to wear Area who wanna

Buffalo Brian Daboll Colts Philip Rivers Michael Football Baltimore Galvin Jonathan Taylor Todd Town Philip Cisco Bharti
Kispert leads No. 1 Gonzaga past San Francisco 85-62

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Kispert leads No. 1 Gonzaga past San Francisco 85-62

"His purported twenty six points to lead number one consecutive pass that for Cisco eighty five to sixty two in Spokane the senior forward makes nine of eleven shots from the field the Bulldogs also getting eighteen points from Joe Ella yeah you entered in part would score fourteen drew to me adds ten as the nation's top scoring team improved their record to ten until one and on the west coast conference Jamari Bouvier paces San Francisco with eighteen points the dons are now seventy five overall a win two in league play I'm Mike Reeves

Joe Ella Spokane Cisco Bulldogs Jamari Bouvier West Coast San Francisco Mike Reeves
Fat Mascaras Annual Naughty & Nice List

Fat Mascara

05:09 min | 2 months ago

Fat Mascaras Annual Naughty & Nice List

"All right. We're going to kick it off with a little naughty. Okay who's been naughty this year jess so my on the top of mind audie list are all the agents. The hollywood agents were telling their celebrity clients. Right now you know what i see for you. Doll and twenty twenty to your face on a cosmetics line. You need a skin care line. Almost saying the world needs it. But i think we're good for now. It really has been a year of celebrity line. Launches hasn't it yes. I've got a list of someone's that i don't know if they've all launched this year but here are some names you've talked about in the podcast this year ready ready lady gaga letting gaga. I mean we just talked about her last week as you know her. She trademark for skincare. Line that she has. I know house of gaga makeup line. Jennifer lopez is launching her line at the beginning of twenty twenty one riana fendi fifty skin Just launched for rail launches getting caroline alicia keys launched a last so clare which is like a whole skin-care but it's even bigger than skin care. It's a whole beauty nettle health. Line carmen electra. Into that one. We didn't even talk about her yet. To raji p. Henson has a haircare line. Selena gomez has a makeup line and yet. Does you doing skin to. It's not yet operative word serena williams is into hair care right or no no cisco son care. Spf member eleven. Yeah eleven right lauren. Conrad we had on the show. She is doing makeup end. Skin-care kristen bell she come out with a line or best friend. Kristen who we will fight to the death if you say anything bad about her so i don't have any problem with any of these individuals by any means. Were really well done. I liked a lot of products from a lot of those lines. Yes so we're not you know. I don't wanna hear like wait a second. You guys had these people on the show you promote them. What are you saying. You're talking to both sides your mouth. That's not it it's just. There's a saturation of celebrity. Like beauty. lions right now. I'm not sure how many more we need at like. I'm not sure how. But we definitely don't me. I don't know how many more the world needs. And i'm not really sure what. Us ps unique selling points. There are if we have too many more celebrity cardi right now through zeta-jones with her mar inducing video. Yes with her eyeliner. Like i just. I'm just not really sure how much more we can add to the conversation right now before it becomes like a parody. Do you remember all the fragrance lines came out like the end of the two thousands. It was like every celebrity became drink. Eventually yeah yeah i just. i'm nervous. Were getting to that point. Yeah i i. I agree with you and i think in general i found my job as somebody. Who's a beauty journalist. Who wants to try things and bring you the best. I found it really hard this year. There was just too damn much. Yeah so naughty naughty to the faceless agency i like it or blaming agents. It's true because those people get money out of it to all right Minority was my naughty mask. Ni twenty twenty two biggest off twenty twenty mask asked matthey okay so you guys know what that is that we didn't it didn't even this existed. We have the name. we had hormonal acne. Which often shows up on the lower half of the face. This is different. I got pimples this year in my mustache area. that's not hormone acne. That's mask me. Get this the american academy of dermatology published research papers. An eighty three percent of healthcare workers in china suffered skin problems on their face this year. Because everybody's walking around in a pp's which great a warm moist environments will logged pours. Acne and i'm just going to add onto acne naughty enough. it's not just acne. I was doing some more research on this and basically what the mass does. It just creates an inclusive environment the same way like your pimple patch does when you're healing pit bull that's good in some cases but not when you're using active ingredients so hey guys out there if you don't have mask knee. Heavy notions really read or the sides. Of your mouth cracking. Maybe he's a retinoid. It's more effective under that hot moist -clusive environment so like you gotta you gotta like pare back on all the active stuff.

Caroline Alicia Keys Gaga Raji P Jess Carmen Electra Jennifer Lopez Serena Williams Selena Gomez Kristen Bell Henson Hollywood Conrad Kristen Lauren Cisco Lions Matthey Jones American Academy Of Dermatolog
SolarWinds hackers breached US Treasury officials’ email accounts

Cyber Security Headlines

02:52 min | 2 months ago

SolarWinds hackers breached US Treasury officials’ email accounts

"Attackers stage. A dry run get solar winds in october. Two thousand nineteen. Yahoo news is sources. Say the operators of the attack conducted a test of the campaign five months before the supply chain attack began in earnest. This test sent files without back. Doors through signed updates to orion seemingly detest they would actually be delivered and detected and updated. Faq by solar winds indicates that this was the first modification to its updates. It was aware of in related. News and analysis by the wall street journal farsight security and risk iq identified twenty four organizations that installed solar ones orion platform with militias backdoors installed including cisco intel invidia. Vm-ware belkin kent state university the california department of state hospitals and deloitte nso group spyware reportedly used against journalists a new report from security researchers at citizen lab at the university of toronto details. How government operatives used the pegasus spyware from nso group to attack the phones of thirty-six journalists producers and executives at al jazeera as well as journalist at el arab tv in london the attack was carried out using the click kismet exploit chain and i message that worked against phones running. Iowa's thirteen dot five dot one or earlier. Apple said at pets vulnerabilities seemingly with iowa's fourteen. Cia agents exposed with stolen data. A new report in foreign policy looks at the impact of data stolen by state-backed groups and other ap tease round twenty thirteen. The cia began to notice that undercover operatives in africa and europe began to be rapidly identified by chinese operatives. This marked a period where the us intelligence community noted a general professionalization of china's intelligence operations building infrastructure to process that data. They were already collecting both officially and illicitly as well as general rooting out of corruption that previously led to deep penetration into the chinese government. In the early two thousands china began tracking flights and passenger lists it also when after biometric data at airports like at bangkok this information was correlated with data gathered on an attack at the office of personnel management in two thousand twelve which leaked personal data from twenty one point five million people that data could be analyzed to figure out who was a us agent pair that information with travel data and you could figure out who from china those agents met with and with the background data indicating who might be approached at becoming sa asset europol. The european commission launch a new decryption platform. This platform was lodged in collaboration with the european commission's joint research center designed to aid authorities in decrypt information that is obtained lawfully in criminal investigations and managed by your oppose european cybercrime centre functionally. This platform will use in-house expertise with both software and hardware tools to provide effective assistance to national member. state investigations. National police forces from member states can now send lawfully obtained evidence to europol for decryption.

Belkin Kent State University California Department Of State Citizen Lab Nso Group El Arab Tv NSO CIA The Wall Street Journal University Of Toronto Al Jazeera Yahoo Intel China Cisco Iowa London Office Of Personnel Management Apple Africa
The First Of The Three Spirits

Our Life In Transition

03:16 min | 2 months ago

The First Of The Three Spirits

"When scrooge awoke it was so dark that looking out of bed he could scarcely distinguish the transparent window from the opaque walls of his changing. He was endeavoring to pierce the darkness with his favorite. Is the chimes of a neighboring church struck for quarters so he listened for the our to great astonishment. The heavy bell went from six to seven from seven to eight and regularly up to twelve and stop twelve ms past two when he went to bed. The clock was wrong in high school must have gotten into the works twelve. He touches this spring of his repeater. Took correct. it's most preposterous clock. It's reputable pulse. B twelve stopped. Why it is impossible. Said screwed slept through a whole day. In far to another night it is it possible to anything has happened to the sun and this new the idea of being an alarming one he scrambled out of bed in groped his way to the window supplies to rub the frost off this. Leave of dressing down before you see anything very little. Then all i could make out was that was still very foggy in extremely cold and that there was no noise of people running to and fro making a great stir as their unquestionably would have been if he had beaten off break day and taking possession of the world. This was a great relief. Because three days after sight of this first of exchange pay tavern screwed or his order and so forth vic become a myriad united states security there were no days to count by scrooge went to again thought and thought and thought it over and over make nothing of it the more he thought the more perplexed he was the more he endeavoured. Not think the more thought barney's bothered him exceedingly every time he resolved within himself after mature inquiry that it was all a dream. His mind flew back again a strong spring. The least twits first position in presented. The same problem to be worked author. Who was it a dream or not screwed soleil in his in this state until the chimes had gone three quarters more remembered on a sudden goes had warned him a visitation when the bell tolled one result. Lie wait until the hour was passed and considering that he could no more go to sleep. Then go to heaven. This was perhaps the wisest resolution in his power. The quarter was so long that he was more than once convinced that he must have sunk into a does unconsciously and miss. The clock at length broke upon his listening year. Ding dong quarter pass through discounting ding-dong half its ding dong quarter to it said scrooge ding dong the ourself cisco triumphantly and nothing else.

Pierce Scrooge VIC Barney United States Ding Dong Cisco
Houston averaging lowest gas prices in the country

Money Matters with Ken Moraif

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Houston averaging lowest gas prices in the country

"Top top story. story. Houston's Houston's economy economy is is closely closely tied tied to to the the oil oil industry, industry, so so it's it's not not really really good good news news that that Houston Houston has has the the lowest lowest gas gas price price in in the the country country today. today. Lundberg Lundberg Surveys industry analyst Trilby Lundberg says today that arise in crude oil prices that's good brought a little increasing gas prices. It's still 35 cents lower than this time last year. The highest average price per gallon of regular is $3.34 No surprise that since entrance Cisco Lowest Price was found at your favorite pump in Houston Diesel also spiked

Houston Lundberg Lundberg Trilby Lundberg Cisco
Ex-Cisco Employee Convicted for Deleting 16K Webex Accounts

Smashing Security

11:17 min | 2 months ago

Ex-Cisco Employee Convicted for Deleting 16K Webex Accounts

"I'm gonna tell you about a chap called sudesh qasaba ramesh and he was working at cisco which of course the giant technology firm working there from Midway through twenty sixteen up until april twenty eighteen where he departed the company. Okay so he spent. How many years say he was there for almost two years to fully months. After he left the company's employment he decided to log into their systems specifically some cisco systems which were hosted on an amazon. Aws server when those cloud buckets those blobs of computer mitchell. Don't kinds of clever things up there in the cloud. Do we know where he is in america. Always in the state somewhere else can start. Yes yes But he is no longer under their employees so he's no longer working with them but this is only months after he left. Let me just let me just repeat that. This was fi months after he some heat when he was able to do it. Not just he thought about it he actually did he did. He logged in Has it never happened to you. That a client has left the gates open after you no longer working for them anymore. I'm sure they have. I'm sure correct answer because you've never checked because that would be a bad thing. It would be yes. I i exactly. I'm sure there have been Companies i've worked for who haven't changed the credentials and you're working for technology and security firms Well in some cases. Yes so. I'm just saying i'm just saying i'm not surprised that just when i was working down kentucky fried chicken to him some extra bob. It wasn't yeah we'll okay but this was cisco you're right so cisco's is a big dog. Okay so five months. After this guy's finished employed he manages to log in. yeah he looks in someone. Forgot to do something. I wanted just having a nose you think or know. He's not just news around. They'll just have a curious to see if the company still doing well in his absence. He's not doing that. I wonder how cisco doing without me. No no i miss. I have yeah. Yeh we've all done it. That's why. I wonder how bad doing no i've left up shit. Grew up to something else. You're saying yes. So sudesh ramesh. He looks in to this. Aws server and deletes. Oh four hundred fifty six virtual machines. Oh boy which were being used by cisco to power. Its webex video conferencing service. Oh for god's he's trying to bring go to it's knees through its web x.'s. As though webex doesn't bring the entire world to its knees on a regular basis whenever you into it. Music video chat yet. The video conferences. You must have used it. Have you guys used webex video Yes pre pandemic. Oh yes it's been usurped by things. Like zoom zoom really has sort of caught everyone's imagination now hasn't but webex was. It's still worsley going strong in its eased by some organizations. What's the mark corporate one. So as a consequence of ramesh deleting all these virtual machines as a result of this over sixteen thousand webex teams accounts. Were shut down for up to two weeks. Imagine the impact on productivity. That's right productivity. Must have gone through the roof. Yes well we can't have a meeting. Oh darn we'll have to do some work instead over the sending email You're on mute and having all those kind of kenya hemi austria on my last call cheese every over there so they can hear you over the line. This is the way so. I'm just doing next to somebody who did exactly that on the national conference call five. Am called into the office showers loud as that two countries anyway and so sixteen thousand accounts were shut down up to two weeks cisco spent roughly one point four million dollars restoring the damage paying people to restore the autism restore them. Don't you have to just press. Go back to you control z. Issue dragged out of the track. They would have backups. Shirley we would think so. Wouldn't you and they also had to pay over one million dollars to customers in refunds. 'cause they're hosting all. These webex is for other companies. People would have had contracts and they would have had to say. oh terribly. sorry you haven't been to use it two weeks. We can haul webinars that people were not able to host yet. Not just internal inside your company but one would have been given to customers. Mike god the product marketing manager is going insane thinking like from the marketing team. Like oh there goes yeah calendar. We've got a problem. We've got to change the landing pages real to reel who's who's at full the guy did it. Yeah ultimately him. Yeah yeah. I mean like leaving your car unlocked right so if i left my car unlocked and then someone stole something from inside my car which has happened to me. Whose fault is it right. Ultimately prison stole a thing for my car because it is parked in my drive. But they're opportunist and you'd say well lock your doors dumb ass. Yes so so cisco should have looked dolls. Demolish had the kind of. I'm guessing pretty high level privileges to do that. Much damage that easily. I mean nobody locked. Is the countdown nine. A little bit. I mean jeez. Five months later. I mean i can understand if it was the day after he left but five months later. My guess is that win. Some sunlight ramesh left employment at the company. They may well have revoked his access to active directory and his ability to log into his email or something like that. But i wonder whether access to the aws server or something which was available to many people in the it poem. Maybe they were sharing credentials shared crafts. Yep and. I think that's probably what was happening. And it's hard to workout if you do share credentials inside an it team who might know those looking credentials in. It's a pain to change them. Because that's gonna affect lots of other people and lots of other services. Well not if you use a really good password manager. Well simplifies a lot right because you can change at the admin level for everybody. Yeah i suppose so if you also have services which might be logging into these systems and it may be. It's grabbing the password for everything. The real mistake here is sharing. Paul sweats right. There are teams of people where the password we'll be known to a variety of people and they'll log in they'll doing administration and all kinds of different maintenance and our work on a particular system and the thing is that they don't have individual password see can't just revoke a person's password scrape advice. We share passwords possibly shared. Yes we share passwords to run this. Podcast jimmy yes. You're not cisco though. I know we're not cisco but i'm saying we know better and we do it because the work around to do it. Any other way is too complicated like just ridiculously complicated. Can i show you cro- the if one of us were to leave smashing security to set up a podcast about. I didn't know piccoli predicament. Something in fact took off and weren't interested in smashing security any more than i would change the past or whoever remained would change the parts of those accounts. And so that you or whoever had left would no longer be a system really. Does this mean you're joining our podcast now. Is that what i'm understanding. It sounds like to me. So there's clearly some in the of cisco they should have changed the log in credentials right just like you would expect when people leave a company to hand in their badge or giving any keys which they have to look doors but shed credentials bad bad bad ideas so for something that business kercheval legs the kingdom. I mean it's one thing to say you know. Here's the marketing log in for. I don't know something really unimportant. But your admin credentials for your entire webex product. So cisco call sedition when they figured out what happened and say look. We obviously dismissed bad way and offer him a nice severance package and a hug will in a donut to get to the bottom. Exactly what his beef was with sysco. What made him do this with some months. Later is not really an act of passion is it. he was still doing. Shushing takes five months to stir it be angry with the company. But you're not angry necessarily move its customers and you're not probably angry with most of your former colleagues so remain professional. Don't take it out on them. Because what if you are though. What if you do eight all. Your fork is a justified in this case. Reminded me a little of the case of terry challenge. Do you remember terry. Childs was a former network administrator the city of san francisco back ten or fifteen years ago. I remember his name right. Well yes he infamously looked up. The city's entire network for days in two thousand and eight resets nor the admin passwords. So that only he knew them and he refused to reveal them to anybody and the excuse he gave and you know. He was arrested in things in a week and a half. Nothing was happening. Because no i'm gonna tell you the password you can't and he claimed it wasn't going to tell the bosses or the managers the passwords because he was concerned that they would indiscriminately share those credentials with third party contractors and so. He didn't like that. People were being careless with passwords. He was like l. So you so you the vaults you cannot break it and ultimately oh my go to me. The mayor of san francisco had to personally go and chat with him. He was the only trustworthy person. That doesn't sound just like a typical quote rogue employees. I think there's some mental stuff going on there because that's a baby or something. That's that's that goes beyond anyway sedation. Ramesh he pleaded guilty on. The ship has now been sentenced to twenty four months in the clink and to pay a fifteen thousand dollar fine as well and because he was here on a visa as well. I suspect he may find it difficult to stay case

Cisco Webex Sudesh Qasaba Ramesh Sudesh Ramesh YEH Mitchell Amazon Kentucky Piccoli BOB Austria Kenya Shirley Ramesh America Autism Mike Jimmy Sysco
What to Do About All Those Digital Photos?

The Digital Story

05:17 min | 2 months ago

What to Do About All Those Digital Photos?

"Digital photos pilot faster than leads in autumn in. Today's show is dedicated to getting them bagged up in organized. We're going to rake up this job from two angles using common sense organizing techniques and a dash of artificial intelligence. I'm so glad you're here. I hope you enjoy this show. So i thought okay. End of the year We're kind of getting our act together trying to get our act together in so many different ways a lot of us are working on our homes are parts are living spaces. We're trying to clean up some messes at work. Get ready for what we hope to be. An exciting and productive twenty twenty one now one of the areas that always needs work for folks that. Listen to this. Podcast is our digital photo library. That's right because you know the thing would be. If we stop taking pictures we would stop adding to the problem. And what does that problem. Of course that problem is what to do with all those digital photos. None of us are going to stop taking pictures. So we gon ago about this a different way so i have a guest To start out the show today is isabel. And she's terrific and she has some wonderful ideas about some of getting your arms around your digital photo library and maybe how to approach it so that works best for you and i think that's the main thing because there's no one right way to do this. It depends on what your needs are how much time you have which your priorities are all that good stuff and i think that is the place that isabel is coming from. So let's turn it over to this conversation that she and i just recently had and then when we come back. I'm going to talk a little bit about this free or affordable depending on if you have ten dollars or not a organizing tool to also help us with this process. So we're going to have a little bit of isabel common wisdom in a little bit of machine learning we're gonna roll it all up and hopefully they come out with a better handle on our digital photo library already. Here's isabel isabel. Welcome to the show. Tell us a little bit about yourself. I- derek i I have been an illustrator for most of my life. And i did this cisco i came back to new york into southern food and up to seven eight and i was kind of disaster and i realized i wanted to do something because i was doing less work in editorial illustration and i just moved all might photos and i had to sought my photos and i realized i needed to learn iphoto to put things in order so all my cow chaos. I kind of organized it. And then i did this for of people. And then i realized what this is kind of the same thing that i do with illustration is i tell stories i. I work with colors at work with humor in shapes in this. I'm not. This is fun to do an hubbard if i do this with other people. And that's what i started to do. And that's what. I do now some of the things that you've learned not only with your own photos but you know working with other people in terms of us not only organizing our photo library but standing are photo library understanding what we have and you know what what is important and maybe what isn't as important but maybe we hang onto anyway can so let's start with the serve understanding our photos and then we'll talk a little bit about organizing them as well sure. Okay so is interesting because things have changed so much so now i could work with someone and their pictures starts from the two thousand right. Some people had a digital camera. Right away i could have a family and their kids the only have digital pictures and then there's nothing printed in the meantime we have the iphone and the iphone to kind of change everything or android or any kind of that you have which means that we use the phone as a notebook and we use the phone very differently that the way we were using digital camera so we ended up with so many photos that are. I would say if unroll photos. We don't need for the future and lots of screenshot soak when everything gets mixed up in one place. It kind of creates problems so we have a lot of junk photos that maybe we need to clean up and then we have everything that is every day moment in the big moments of the lives that we used to take the camera and do film with them so we have a lot of things that maybe don't belong together but we have the photos in chronological order. We need to do something about it. So i feel like once you understand that you kind of realize okay. I have twenty years of photos. Maybe maybe fifteen years maybe ten years but it's like life is can be a big mess.

Isabel Isabel Isabel Derek Cisco New York
Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

Untangle

05:27 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

"Dr ron epstein. It is so great to have you on tangled. Thanks so much for being here real to be with you. I just want to read some of the quotes that are in the beginning of your book because they really struck me. John cabot zand says this book will be phenomenally useful to all of us who are desperately in need of true health. Care and caring. Dan siegel says the book is a beautiful synthesis of inner wisdom and hard earned impure cle findings and you start the book by saying that you believe the practice of medicine depends on deep understanding between clinicians and patients and that human understanding starts with the understanding of oneself. And i would just like to start with this question. where did you begin with understanding of oneself. It's probably in my james to some degree. Because i remember even as a young child being interested not only in the world outside but also the world inside pat. I was interested in what thought was and i was interested in breeding. I was has not as a child so badly. Learn how to briefing not cost kind of interested in how the body were town on a mind. Were tell ideas got into your mind. Things like that from a pretty young age. I guess it's the upside of being somewhat introverted at that dual view of the world just that interior human observers you. When did you first recognize that in yourself. will you ten years old. Did you have some influences. It sounds like you a seeker that you were asking a lot of questions. Her number certainly started before high school. I was really interested in reading. And i read things that were beyond the point where my world experience but allow me to truly understand and i was reading cavu when i was in junior high school. Obviously you can't really get what he's talking about. I mean i knew the words. But i kind of had the sense that he was really trying to understand the world and sewers. I am discovered hermann hesse fairly early on also that actually resonated with the because all of his novel is basically the same plot to people who start out life one becomes a contemporary live and spends there's lives on monastic search for wisdom and the other goes out in the world becomes longer and tries to understand universe through experiencing the world in a deeper way and i saw both of those in myself and quite a young age thought was drawn to that. I think it was sometime. In highschool that i learned about maslow's hierarchy of human vs botanist like survival and at the top was self actualization wanted the express train to sell That's where i wanna be. I can't say that there's wild ridden. It does the same thing from the. I discovered his poetry. We had to read some of his poetry like a junior high school or something that i really discovered it as a personal manifesto probably but i was like fourteen or fifteen history of connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just observe that but i have merged myself in this i jumped into the water and the deep end and swim through it. So that was the place i started. And as how i ultimately got interested in meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a monk. A serious attempt back. Yeah you spent a few months. At the zen saying cisco center person there. And why did i. I can't imagine what some of the older students were thinking about this young kid. Who is there that i just needed to do. That was the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. How did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and originally when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing and i look up. I interested asthma. As as matic started reading about other illnesses aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. i wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor

Dr Ron Epstein John Cabot Zand Dan Siegel Hermann Hesse Maslow Cisco Zen Center Matic Asthma
Haunted Virtual Meetings

The CyberWire

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

Haunted Virtual Meetings

"Ibm researchers have found and disclosed vulnerability insists goes widely used webex video conferencing service. Ibm says it's a major user of webex itself which is why it looked into the code. The vulnerability amounts to the potential for hunting. Someone could join a meeting as a ghost on-scene among the participants but with full access to audio video chat and screen sharing capabilities. The ghost could remain in the form of an audio connection even after being detected and expelled and the ghost collect information on meeting. Attendees full names. Email addresses and ip addresses without even being admitted to the conference cisco has patched the vulnerability and users should apply the fix

IBM Cisco
At Disney, Streaming Soars as Other Businesses Struggle

Wall Street Breakfast

01:19 min | 3 months ago

At Disney, Streaming Soars as Other Businesses Struggle

"Following a quieter week on the earnings front. Investors had several names to watch after the bell on thursday. Disney rose as much as six percent after revealing seventy-three million paid subscribers per streaming service disney plus it had targeted sixty million to ninety million subscriptions by two thousand twenty four though it's other divisions parks and studio struggled during the coronavirus pandemic and it had to forego and other dividend cisco soared nearly nine percent after starting its fiscal year with softer than expected earnings. Drop and issuing guidance it exceeded expectations. Meanwhile shares of pelham tear bounced around and trading on a wider loss though the data analytics firm showed fifty two percent sales growth in the first earnings report since its public debut after rotating out of stay at home plays on monday only to have a tech rally resume days later. Traders have been getting whipsawed nearly every session this week while all three major. Us indices closed lower on thursday stock index. Futures are in the green this morning climbing. Nearly one percent ahead of the open. Many are still weighing the impacts of surging kobe nineteen cases and a vaccine roll out against hopes of the corner on the pandemic and expectations that pro business policies will remain after last week's u s

Disney Pelham Cisco Kobe United States
Cisco stock jumps on earnings beat and strong forecast

CNBC's Fast Money

01:15 min | 3 months ago

Cisco stock jumps on earnings beat and strong forecast

"Welcome back to pass money. We've got earnings alerts enciso in the newly public pollen tear full team coverage standing by to tackle both the names. Let's kick things off theater on cisco's quarter de well melissa. Investors have been cautious on this name cisco has struggled amid the pandemic. It's down some twenty percent year to date though if it can hold onto. These current gains could cut those losses significantly. It's the company strong at look here. That's boosting the stock. It suggests it's a recovery. And that's more good news for enterprise demand last week rival recent networks reported results that also painted a pickup now on the call. Ceo chuck robbins. It said and i quote here. I think this enterprise thing is going to be fine when pressed he said. They're seeing a robust pipeline. He says that everyone race to get set up for work from home earlier in the year but then they saw a positive that last quarter as many companies reprioritize what they were going to be spending money on and that brought them we'll bring them back to cisco now another thing that investors may like. This quarter is cisco's new. Cfo scott hair and he comes to cisco from autodesk a company that has been successful in migrating customers toward a cloud based model and that is certainly helpful experience as cisco executes own restructuring

Enciso Cisco Ceo Chuck Robbins Melissa Cfo Scott Hair Autodesk
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 5 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
"cisco" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

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"cisco" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"With Cisco shoal just so happens this is the last short this but I'd so we're gonna try and make it really good my lease in here with me just going to help the hosts a shoal I appreciate that so much my only happy to be here what a run all manner yeah over thirty years hard to believe and I I want to say a couple of things first I want to say hi to everybody who is listening to the R. G. and Ursula shoal yesterday because I when I walked in the chiral we are going to miss you so much Cisco we just love you little emotional we had yesterday we were very excited to give him a sendoff we had as we had some cupcakes Dr yeah but he stood up and clapped order black tennis to stop blew my mind so it was so hard not to hug Cisco we were all saying with social distancing we most of all people came out to me before and instead I just can't believe that I can give them a big hug it's hard it's hard it was wonderful and the all of the comments that they played and G. and Ursula show blew my mind Jeff Probst was on there yeah and Megan called no I was so nice to hear for Mersal why it was wonderful so I want to say a couple things here right away before I take any phone calls M. one is that I want you to know I'm not retiring in any way shape or form so if you go to my talks page right now there are over twenty talks well my I don't know whether they'll cancel night because there's no way in no one right now yeah I'm already twenty canceled and there's twenty more in mind soul I just got my fingers crossed that I'll get to see everybody at those talks and it'll be sold one to a book signing sept what was some soul wanna let you know about that right now I'm doing segments a new date how well I've still doing my usual I north a new day northwest I couldn't find the one that I did last because it was it was a disaster your daughter does your it was very was filled with it I was awarded a die you couldn't you couldn't see any to plant some minor you would we watched it berry was guided tried to whisper what Margaret was saying it was really funny but I think we've got it down we're going to do a lot better sort I can't wait to watch I want you to know that I'll be I'm evening I'm the king five news you know they just called me up but he will you do something I will send over a photographer will do that and zoom we were keeping our social distance referral mom I definitely am going to be doing that using dean I'm king five soul out there will be one nine next week and from what I've heard we're going to keep making them for a while so that's really exciting I love that it almost that's really fine and Bob there are a bunch of videos out there right now that I've done there's one for Sasquatch and I think Mary are there under some more I did one with the spokesman review over in Spokane one was Sasquatch one with the king county library system because I got picked as a literary Y. in and then they couldn't have the big events so I did something for that there's there's another one out there too but if you look at Cisco dot com you'll see all those things I'm doing let me just see if I'm forgetting anything while I'm right here there we go yeah I saw it yeah right so anyway I know does to arrive near and lots more things going to be coming up and we're going to list it all on my website M. Mary right now she is repealed and a website not supposed to be telling us get it didn't trouble now but it's going to be really cool so why keep an eye on it it's going to tell you everything I'm doing what I'm doing and everything else and you never know I may pop up on radio again you never know about privacy and recently showdown ends jag and come back to generously because everyone just loved you so much yesterday at the whole you know some people who are I eat different audiences loved G. was freaking out he was Ursula W. as tax under the I think I am glad to meet you yeah I'd never got there but you don't so that's going to be really fly I mean you you too I got along great you but have such great energy well great well let's take some callers Hey thanks buddy I I promise I think now I can go out without parole about my buddy Greg as quality and and she has been a guest on their show many times Greg Butler really I need need guy and I told him he had to be the first caller because I knew if I talked to him I won't be crying anymore so because this guy is the funniest guy I've ever met in my life Hey Greg how you doing buddy either you big baby what a manly man you were but you look at your phone apart that's because I drink Chardonnay now now great so what am I gonna do with my Saturdays from now on Chardonnay was I'll be at your house at two PM all beyond that you're on the sidewalks regarding classes yeah I'll I'll tell you why die so just for people I don't know what is says Greg Butler he he writes a blog for Swanson's verse three and I was just there two days ago to and bought a slew of way out so I've got my whole drive ways for stuff I got M. plant because I've been terrible in my garden your staff hi are you tried to buy someone else's plan support I can't believe I did that that's okay that means I am I actually brought someone else's car you may start it right no Bob for that and then they come out with a car and this poor woman is like what happened to my she probably thought it was a huge compliment that Cisco Morris was so impressed with her election she the fact that was quite a good selection so right this year my plant that but angry but also as the record for giving the same talk the most times ever in any venue and and how many times did you give the humming bird talk at Swanson's bursary last year I think it was five or six I don't know that they're.

Cisco
"cisco" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"cisco" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"How the heck did we get up here with the SNP five hundred hitting all time highs? Dow hitting its high for the year. If you're gaining two hundred forty nine point say, it'd be point nine five percent. Nasdaq woes point eight percent, and more importantly, does this balk at have what it takes to keep powering higher car. This of what happens with the president with trade with the Federal Reserve just hit the fundamentals of individual companies, which is what we do best in Kramer. I think it's worth wondering what might happen if we stay on even cue we need to know if the market's gotten too expensive. If it's got more room to run all, especially with oil, having a monster runoff just today because of tension with the rim. So let's zoom in on the top ten performances. And the Dow Jones industrial average twenty nineteen see we've got this, this will help us put it in context. So we understand how we got up here, and whether it is dangerous, whether it safe, they sense number one is Microsoft. It's eight trillion dollar household. Dave with the stock up nearly thirty five percent year today at these levels now this stock trades at twenty six times next year's earnings estimates, sadly, that's lofty. It's a pretty rich valuation, which is unfortunate because we own Microsoft by travel trust. And always have to be concerned that it's moved up too much on the other hand. The Cup is a habit of blowing away. These estimates wouldn't be my first choice of these top ten to go higher here. I think it's quality coming it just I think that the stock may have gotten. A little head of itself. No sin. That does happen. Number two. Cisco a thirty two percent. Now this brand new Cisco people. The company has changed radically under the leadership of Chuck Roberts. The new Cisco is not just a networking company. It's also a play on the internet of things and cybersecurity, the largest cyber security company in the world. Just within the housing Cisco, and it is doing best of all, even with everything it has going to stock. It sells it seventeen times says it's at a discount to the average stock in the SNP. And you know what I think it is, I think is a St.. Third place tougher for me because I love it, but it's rich is visa letter vais. Now it's up thirty two percent this year. It's not cheap trades. Twenty eight times earnings. Honestly, I prefer American Express, even though it from credit risk were MasterCard, which is slightly more expensive, but has official growth rate. And that's what we own that one for travel trust. But that's it visa and erotic trader prone to vicious tips, I think would absolutely be worth buying into one of those tips. Keep an eye on letter v it trades wildly. And when it trades damn believe me, this going to be nothing wrong with visa is that real run..

Cisco Microsoft SNP Dow Chuck Roberts Federal Reserve American Express Kramer president Dave official thirty two percent eight trillion dollar thirty five percent nine five percent eight percent
"cisco" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Decreased by twenty percent of the world's unicorns which future job creators, etc. Are start up and being is a naming in terms of it in it's primarily in six geographies where ninety percent of the US venture capital goes into. So how do we change that as a country is very doable. Now to your second question, always loved taking on big companies and with my startups when I select which wants to do and I get the pick of the litter, you could argue, I deserve that or not, but the venture capitalist uses eight years a portfolio, John, you knew how to skill companies. You gotta help them operations. You know how to develop CEO's. Give you very favorable terms. So I do get the pick, but my goal is for each one of them to be number one in their segment of the industry, they go after and I've never worried about taking on the giants union at Cisco. We took on companies like Intel like IBM and the initial days we took on the Nortel's loosens the Alcatel's and what happens is companies get bigger, they get slower. They often get crossway with government. They forget that you must give back is will take in terms of profitability, etc. So I actually think companies are more challenged now in terms of his tech for gooders tech for bad in this country. Never before and segment of it might be that it stifles segments of startups. I've actually found the reverse. Most of the innovation is coming out of startups today when you have a spark cognition partnering with a Boeing Boeing's very innovative company, but they're doing a fifty fifty joint venture on the next generation unmanned aircraft and how you do the systems to maintain this a company with two hundred people. Down in Texas, or there's another company in New York, basically artificial intelligence and all of a sudden, the biggest companies in the US are working with that company on how they transform their business. They went from a million four run rate last year to over seventy million this year. So I would actually argue that startups will be where most innovation happens and that as long as there's a level playing field they can do well. Now, to your point, maybe venture capital was shy away from an investing in area that might be to direct with an Amazon or to direct with Facebook, etc. But about the time that large players think they're invulnerable, they are very vulnerable. All right on that. No, we're going to come back in a minute. We're talking with John Chambers. He's the former CEO and chairman assists go. And now he's has a new book out called connecting the dots leadership lessons in a startup world. Support for this podcast and the following message comes from smart water, not satisfied being like other brands. Smart water looked up at the clouds and said, I wonder if we can one up mother nature for a pure crisper water and guess what they did. This is the kind of water that regular water gets jealous of. It's the water that refreshes like no other brand, try it. Smart water vapor distilled for purity, electrolytes for taste. We're here with John chamber. He's the former CEO and chairman of Cisco where it was forever right? John forever. Why would we did this together? He's the author of connecting the dots leadership lessons at a start where we're talking about where startups are now. So talk about the things and then I want to get to your leadership lessons. Sure. What can the government do right now assess this government right now or the past two administrations will. This one doesn't have almost any interest in that from what I can tell will this very provocative question and answer very square. I know you're curious what kind of Republican. Okay. Let me go in reverse order. I support as many Democrats do Republican. Okay. One of the few Republicans in Silicon Valley at the time you brought, we're talking about John McCain, and again, I'm so John McCain was one of my friends in life. You much. Much on this seem so much and you're kind of John McCain Republican, you're saying, but also understanding. I think the definition Republicans and Democrats as re blurred. I'm after a country where you just do the right thing for the country that you do the right thing for all citizens, inclusive of all citizens for all states successor..

John Chambers John John McCain John McCain Republican US CEO John chamber Cisco Boeing chairman Texas Intel Silicon Valley Facebook New York Amazon Nortel Alcatel
"cisco" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"Cisco lost weight. Cisco one. She says she believes in. Brotherhood and colors of green and grey. And. And. Laver? Katina? From the little. Thunder radio..

Cisco Laver
"cisco" Discussed on Equity

Equity

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on Equity

"Bromley we all the two factor authentication in the first part of it was unity on Nessim as send us MS message. You get a text and you type it in. That's your two factor indications safe and secure, but people are figured out how to hack it. You can have the you can, you know to pick it the same. You can transfer the your text messages to somewhere else. The heck that was announced vetted just this week was done. Exactly like that. The two factor authentication are using some as was hacked. What do does it solve that? Like even app, you gotta push notification, you've gone heck it is. So it's, it's, it's interesting technology. It's very, very, very useful for Cisco. You know, as as Alex was just saying the the, the, the aren't that companies are trying to get any business to Cisco has stated completely. That's where they want to be. They want to software company more and more. They want to record revenue more and more. That's the reason they are quite dynamics for seven billion dollars last year as well. That more Reverend revenue that's the, you know, that's why they're quite do as well. And I do things the right move for them. They have plenty of cash, they're, they're, they're looking at this high growth markets, large markets, interesting technologies that are come out and they're giving them capital to grow. They are, you know, they're acquiring them to get the record Devon, which make sense. So I mean, but how do we get from which is to like, how pay is like outside AmEx and do essentially they're trying to basically the connective tissue of work right yet. So so. But, but still that's there's a little bit of a jump from a switch to to to push notifications, but how how do we get there? Well, it's this is the party uniting the smart move that the is hard for Cisco to completely Jane d. n. n. start building, you know, a suffer. Like I've done, it makes us feel like do a security. So what you do is you you, you acquire some of the static companies there you've been around them. What's us go under that dynamic Yaqub dynamics and new build a lot of ideas. You know things around it and low. You acquire like someone like do security, and you know you, you build more things around. Cisco has a pretty strong security business that in which has been growing up at pretty heavily, so do return to their investors. So if it sold for two point, three, five billion in cash and some other whatnot. It was valued. I believe last at one point one, five billion about a two x valuation, but it only raised around one hundred and twenty million dollars. So a pretty good revenue multiple on investor capital. I think it's pretty pretty solid. And I think we've seen a couple of kind of go out of flat or negative valuations to prior private Mark. So this is a pretty solid results. I think CISCO's kind of becoming this quiet rainmaker for an entire like group of inter capitalists, but their last Brown was seventy mil in October of seventeen. So like what does that you know? Eight nine ten months ago. So they probably were snapped up competitively. You don't run out of seventy million that quickly. They weren't desperate for an exit. Yeah. So Cisco again, kind of Reno. We could call this like a halo effect from the SNP or the big five or whenever right. But Cisco also in the past year, their stock is up like thirty four thirty five percent or something like that. So it's definitely not. You know, it's not doing too badly. It's not like Facebook status where it where it's down, however, many percentage or something like that in the past or Twitter or anything else because comparing them to consumer starts because they didn't do well. But but I mean, thirty five percent is like substantial for a company that again, like you're talking about is making a not hard pivot, but a soft pivot into services, and these are extremely hot beverage to do from making switches and selling hardware and selling for one time to selling more subscription and records business becoming a software company..

Cisco Bromley SNP Nessim AmEx Facebook Twitter Alex Devon Reno Jane d. n. n. Brown thirty four thirty five percen twenty million dollars Eight nine ten months seven billion dollars thirty five percent
"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

"Cisco tried to target consumers around this time was in the consumer video camera market in two thousand nine, Cisco acquired pure digital technologies. That's the company that was behind the flip video cameras. Do you remember those kind of cool actually, kind of thought they were neat. Cisco might have timed that kind of poorly because two thousand nine was right around the time that the hand held camcorder market was getting pushed aside by smartphones, more of which were including cameras, capable of taking video, Cisco stuck with this plan until April twenty eleven, and then discontinued the flip video cameras because the company was looking Cisco that is was looking to extricate itself from the home consumer market entirely. The space was too crowded with too many competitors, and many of those competitors had been at the game for way longer than Cisco. In fact, even longer than Cisco had existed as a company. So things were pretty rough for Cisco. There. By two thousand eleven other companies were also starting to really seriously compete against Cisco in the network infrastructure business. That's the bread and butter of Cisco, at least up to that time. Cisco was still the dominant player, though is no longer commanding nearly all the market, the way it had been as a result, the company's earnings were lower than what they had projected previously. And so Cisco had to look for ways to cut costs. And if you've worked for a big company, you probably intimidate what happened next because one way companies cut costs after a rough financial year is by laying off employee's John Chambers essentially said, I've done goofed up. The really was more professional than I make it sound, and it wasn't like it was an obvious mistake on the face of it. The problem as chambers admitted was that Cisco had tried to compete in too many markets. Many of which had entrenched players like the home consumer market, for example. So the company was fighting a war that had too many fronts. And so changes said it was time to simplify CISCO's approach to narrow its focus. And unfortunately that also meant cut some jobs in the process because those jobs would no longer be necessary for the company's mission. Chambers wanted to cut expenses by about six percent, but six percent meant one billion dollars. Some analysts estimated that could mean the company might eliminate as many as ten thousand jobs which would be about fourteen percent of its workforce. Others said it was probably going to be closer to four thousand. Now according to Cisco zone time line, it looks like the real number was somewhere in between four thousand and ten thousand. At the end of fiscal year twenty eleven the company had seventy one thousand eight hundred twenty five employees..

Cisco John Chambers six percent one billion dollars fourteen percent
"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

"Providing and customizing technology for China's golden shield system. We have also called the golden shield system. The great firewall of China, the Chinese government restricts access. Yes to the internet. So a lot of sites are strictly forbidden. And the great firewall allows the Chinese government to essentially dictate which parts of the internet are are are accessible within China and which ones should not be accessible within China to very authoritarian approach to internet access. Now, the allegations state that Cisco provided technology that allowed the Chinese government to identify and pursue individuals that the government had identified as being undesirable people that the government had said, are dangerous that included practitioners of the Falun Gong religion. So according to the allegations, these people were reportedly hunted down, captured tortured, and at least one instance killed. The lawsuits accused Cisco of knowingly providing technology that would be used in those endeavors saying, there's no way the company would not have known. That the tech they were designing for the Chinese government was specifically for the purpose of the government identifying singling out and pursuing specific individuals within China. The initial lawsuit was dismissed. When a judge stated, the plaintiffs had failed to provide evidence that Cisco would have known. The technology would be put to such use. The plaintiffs appealed with oral arguments happening in April twenty seventeen, but then the submission of the case was vacated pending the judgment on a different case that the supreme court was hearing. It was called jazz nerve versus Arab Bank at issue was whether or not foreign corporations could or could not be defendants in suits brought under the tort statute. The supreme court found that they could not in a five to four decision. And as far as I can tell, the matter is at arrest there that that in US courts will not hear the case. That's my understanding. It may turn out to be different. I am not a legal expert. One of the ways that..

Chinese government China Cisco Arab Bank US
"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

"Two thousand six saw a big year of growth for Cisco company was really able to get out of that rut. It was in it was also getting into the business of Tele presence. It's, you know the whole video calling business, which in two thousand six was still a pretty young science and technology. It wasn't that it was really novel. Now, a lot of people had had made use of it yet. These days you can have it on your smartphone. It was still a dominant player in switches routers at that time, and it had grown to nearly fifty two thousand employees. So it looked like it was well on the way to full recovery and it continued to make strategic acquisitions. It also officially dropped systems from its name and simply became known as Cisco. They also launched a campaign called the human network. This was an advertising campaign pain to kind of position the company as one that had a place in the average household. Old and this was a relatively short lived attempt for Cisco to make a bigger move into the consumer electronics market space. Ultimately, the company would change gears and again, focus on enterprise customers. They would ultimately decide that it was a mistake get into consumer electronics. Now, one very disturbing story involving Cisco around this time that I started to emerge in the the around two thousand eight or so, and has continued to be a brought up in discussions since then was the company's involvement in supplying technology to China. Now, according to allegations, brought against Cisco by various human rights, organisations Cisco was instrumental in.

Cisco China
"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

"In nineteen Ninety-seven fortune magazine would list Cisco among the fortune five hundred companies listed number three hundred thirty two. But in just a couple of years, Cisco would become the most valuable company in the world tech company that is for short while anyway in nineteen ninety eight Cisco. I started offering cable modems for end users. This is one of the few products the company made for home. Consumers as opposed to enterprises. So they entered the consumer market in a limited way and experimented with this for a little more than a decade. And Cisco would later purchase companies like lynxes in two thousand three to increase this offering links this makes routers home, routers, that kind of thing, and head existed before Cisco came along. Then Cisco lumps links us and under its wing. However, Cisco would not hold on to all these consumer facing companies like lynxes, which Cisco sold to Belkin in two thousand thirteen one decade later. In fact, that time Cisco pretty much divested itself of all home market products in general, interesting side note by the way links this like Cisco was founded by a married couple. This would be janey and Victor Sal who founded lynxes, which originally had the name d. e. w. international and yes, the original site for that company was in fact. A garage in California because the arc type exists for reason nineteen ninety nine marked CISCO's fifteenth anniversary..

Cisco lynxes janey Victor Sal Belkin California d. e. w. international two thousand thirteen one deca
"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

"John Chambers had earned a masters of business administration from Indiana University. He had worked for IBM and their sales department in the late seventies and early nineteen eighty s and then went onto work for weighing laboratories makers of the Wang computer or Wong. If you want to use the correct pronunciation. I would say this was in the late eighties. This was a computer company that one time was extremely successful. A lot of people haven't really heard about Wong or Wang computers these days because they were again, sort of a business to business company. But by the time chambers left the company in nineteen ninety Wong was already on a downward spiral, and it would eventually declare bankruptcy, it would emerge from bankruptcy. It would then get acquired, and ultimately it would end up dissolving after a couple more acquisitions, maybe someday I'll do a full episode to talk about the history of that company anyway, by that time, John Chambers. Was already part of Cisco. He had joined that team officially in nineteen ninety one, and he would serve as the Cisco CEO for two decades. He would stay on a CEO until July twenty. Seventh, two thousand fifteen, and a lot happened in those two decades. So chamber serves as the news CEO of Cisco and it's business as usual meeting. The company is continuing to grow in the choir other companies. This was a time when people began to get incredibly excited about the potential of the internet. The mid to late nineties startups were beginning to bloom in the mid nineties, but that would really build to a fever pitch by the end of the nineties. It got crazy. The information superhighway was being hailed as the next frontier. It was where people were going to make their fortune. It was a land grab of massive scale. It was where we were all going to live, and we were going to have experiences in virtual environments that would let us work and shop. And play and experience life in a way we just could not imagine before the internet or at least that's how it was all sold to us. No one was really sure how it was actually going to shake out, but they were all sure that it would lead to this amazing virtual future and Cisco, a company that continued to supply the technology that made internet connect communication possible was profiting from this excitement and a very real way more companies were building out in that works at MIT, they needed the equipment that Cisco produced in order to do that. They were going to Cisco primarily because it was the biggest name out there. It was the dominant manufacturer of various network components like routers and switches. So if you need to build out your network, chances are you're going with Cisco hardware, they needed to establish safe networks,.

Cisco John Chambers Wong CEO Indiana University IBM sales department fever MIT two decades
"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

"Systems purchased from that time up to present day, it would probably take about twenty minutes to do most of the were companies that focused on technologies relating to network. So within CISCO's wheelhouse, they were largely companies that made routers or switches, or modems or firewalls. Others, however, were in related fields like computer security. There was even a couple of companies that were related to internet television back when everyone was convinced that was right around the corner when reality it would take a decade or two after that acquisition for any sort of internet TV to kind of take off. And even then it was an totally different implementation than what. People had imagined back in the nineties. Cisco would also acquire companies in the mobile space. Also in surveillance in voice over internet protocol in digital cable and more even in consumer electronics. More recently, the company has invested heavily in cloud computing infrastructure. So in all, Cisco has spent around seventy billion dollars in acquisitions and most of the products Cisco offers comes out of those acquisitions. So you could say a lot of CISCO's growth came from buying out other companies and adding to their own offerings that way John mortgage and his successor. John Chambers, both used acquisitions as a means for growth according to a two thousand to business week article acquisitions accounted for about fifty percent of all CISCO's businesses. CISCO's moves also meant that it maintained a dominant position in business to business enterprise and it focused on network technology. It was the dominant. Player in that space. If you plan to build out a computer network, chances are you're relying at least in part on technology from Cisco, this included internet service providers..

CISCO John Chambers seventy billion dollars twenty minutes fifty percent
"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

"More companies like Cisco have had numerous stuff. Splits and I'll talk more about the result of that. At the end of this episode. I just wanted to mention that it was impressive that a company would hold a split only a year after getting listed on the stock exchange. When Cisco systems I went public, it had the market capitalization of two hundred twenty four million dollars. So in other words, he took all the shares of Cisco that existed. You multiplied it by the price per share. You get two hundred twenty four million dollars. That's how much the market cap is for Cisco when it launches in nineteen Ninety-one. Just a year later, that market cap was already one billion dollars in ninety. Two Cisco was awarded its first patent which was originally filed back in nineteen Eighty-eight because patent applications can take a while the patent office takes awhile to review a patent and then issue a patent. It was US patent number five million eight thousand thirty two. That patent was for a technology called the interior gateway. Routing protocol or Iggy are p. that was a set of rules that routers would follow for efficient communications within a computer network. Peaking ahead for a moment in the summer of two thousand thirteen Cisco would celebrate getting. It's ten thousand US patent, but to be clear, Cisco also grew quite a bit through acquisitions, primarily, Cisco grew by acquiring other companies. So I imagine many of those patents were part of acquisitions and not just that that were filed by Cisco are in d. Cisco also opened offices in Canada and Japan in nineteen Ninety-two and hit revenues of three hundred eighty one million dollars and grew to eight hundred seventy five employees. Now,.

Cisco US Iggy Japan Canada two hundred twenty four millio three hundred eighty one milli one billion dollars
"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on TechStuff

"So again, going back to that office building analogy, think of each office floor, not as having people who speak different languages on every floor, but different computer networks that are working on a different proprietary protocol in each floor. That means that computer systems on a single floor can communicate with each. Other easily because they're following the same set of rules, but computer systems on different floors can't communicate easily there each following a different set of rules. So you have this disconnect. This is where the concept of multi protocol infrastructure comes in in the case of Cisco, it was a multi protocol router. Now, a router is a device that sits between networks. It's kind of a connecting point. Sometimes we call them gateways, although for a while, there was a differentiation between router and gateway today they are largely one in the same, but these are connecting points between one network and another network. It could be two local area networks, so you could have a router between those two. It could be a a router between a local area network and a wide area network, including a local area network and the internet. So your typical home router sits between a residential networks such as one that covers one household. Old. Let's say that it's your personal router and it sits between that and the internet at large routers, direct traffic on the internet. So in data flies across the internet does so impacts. I've talked about data packets, many, many times. I won't go into it here, but packets can hop from one router to another until they arrive at their intended destination and different packets from the same file. Can travel very different pathways to get to that destination. Multi protocol routers as the name suggests are able to communicate through more than one set of rules. So they're kind of like interpreters, right? They can kind of interpret in one language and translated into another language so they can accept data falling one set of protocols and send it in a different set acceptable to the recipient and vice versa..

Cisco
"cisco" Discussed on Rose Buddies

Rose Buddies

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on Rose Buddies

"Yeah it's pretty good i like a lie i use you know me i used to roll some big clunker sandals that you would hear me clump and now i wore sandals almost every day well when it was warm in college i would not dress college sort of formal i would roll roll up in my flip flops any day where i possibly could shorts and flip flops and my my adviser would always hear me coming down the hallway and like yell at me from down the hallway 'cause he could hear like the you know the flipping and the flopping nobody flips or flops louder than griffin yeah like let the people know i was going to ask you if you've ever known anybody to call them something different flops for example on a thong thong sand i have heard that yeah but then i guess in like early thousands cisco the rapper invented a new kind of underwear and this one is you know how your buckets covered up most of the time by underwear yes he said noted that oh yeah sounds scandalous i guess sandton i guess castles down in here you like these i have to run them by you now i don't have a lot of saint castle experience i'm you used to go to myrtle beach and you know with the with the family we would make our we'll stand castles we make the moats i i always got my brother's got very excited about making sand castles always got way more into irrigation which i think says a lot about me but if there was a faucet on the beach i would you know make old canal that would run down see if i could get the water all the way down to the ocean or at the very least philip the mode with freshwater not sea water so could be sort of more comfortable swimming experience for the sand king and san queen.

griffin myrtle beach san queen cisco saint castle
"cisco" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Thus judaism that's crazy this is antisemitism at its finest right here you can't make anything you parasite get behind me satan now we should pray for ben shapiro the fine christ have you you're in my bedroom shapiro is not in your business now boy i'm not just drive up to cisco this weekend do drive up to cisco do it drive up to six you know why the cisco cisco kid was a friend of mine the cisco kid he was a friend of mine sitting around in drinking whiskey wine something you forgot what we did with the cisco jeremiah with this much i do know he was a friend of mine okay so i want him to drive up to shishko well that's not a short drive from texas to california either so maybe he'll be off here for a while i make that drive to and fro i don't know how far is it from austin or wherever he lives to cisco i go texas oh i thought he was driving up to know he's driving up to cisco ticks texas where the cisco kid was a friend of mine he drank whiskey pancho drank the wine he was ski pancho drank the wine we met down on the ford of the rio grande oh no eight to salted peanuts out of a can yeah we ate the salted peanuts right out of the can i don't know this why i have to say everything twice deals with the cisco kid army officers led me conversation with with with the with the billionaires that are financing you.

ben shapiro california austin texas pancho rio grande cisco cisco kid army
"cisco" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Cisco scott traffic couple your komo scorning sal fica stat trauma scale for windass conference over local people money say skin tesla maxima could be awesomeness bitcoin con apponator stomack ap walk cisco female fast cisco fuck you wilty maureen true fair pretty mediscare catholic has jeff fifty dollars people v frisco me more local nick.

Cisco jeff frisco fifty dollars
"cisco" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"cisco" Discussed on Risky Business

"Yeah the one that's been getting coverage this week is this bug in the cisco like switched self configuration configuration thing for we need to play a new switch cold the cisco smart and stole parents by default which i didn't realize in cisco catalyst switches and lets you kind of convict them you can take be new conflicts through the upgrade their firm in that kind of thing anyway apparently yeah people realize this hamilton's sheridan using shortens dada about scanning for it and owning up all sorts of cisco i o s i always route routers switches on the internet for all sorts of various reasons it turns out yes this go for the pot of saint basically this is not a bog this is kind of which maybe you should note packet filter at the edge of the network so you don't maybe you shouldn't maybe you shouldn't ship on by the fault that's another way to look at it he won't exactly yes yes a couple hundred thousand people apparently were running this internet pricing coding to show dan and a bunch of them had a really bad diet seems yeah yeah i mean just advise all of cisco's clients to just log into your device using the username cisco and password cisco and you'll be able to fix it that way why are if you forgotten the passwords they've helpfully set up some easy to use credentials for you but yeah some of the some of the datsun is various tokyo's getting owned by this stuff that i've had like ascii american flags dropped on them in on russian boxes in iranian boxes saying you know don't mess with our elections and stuff like that real sort of scillies giddy stuff that's been written up in motherboard apparently some group that was doing that owned a whole bunch of them and as you said defining ones and russia and iran and places like that and we're apparently patching at least turning off this feature on american ones so good old fashioned american vigilante moral storming cisco's of the internet.

cisco hamilton dan tokyo russia iran