36 Burst results for "CIO"

Fresh update on "cio" discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

01:04 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "cio" discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Welcome back to exchanges deep died the battle for our screens. In the first episode, we talked about the rise streaming in movie theaters are adapting to this new world of at home entertainment in the subsoil with a look at how work has changed. Many of us have been hopping on zoom meetings with colleagues, the digital ship post much further deeper than that, and there are a couple of new tools and platforms that are poised to change how we were forever. We'll hear from Heather leaning of our research division Barkor Genty, our firm's co CIO chief information officer in Ryan. Noland. Who Works in investment banking, division. Then, we'll wrap up with the client interview from Renee James Seal Ampere computing semiconductor startup tear about her vision the modern workforce. First up, we have heather billion Terry from our research division though provide some data behind how we worked in how productivity has changed since the pandemic began. Heather before we dive in what are some of the headline numbers of a few of the key stats that you're watching related to workplace technology? So we're looking at one point, two, five, billion knowledge workers today that is the starting point for everything that we're focused on were looking at where people are in the s curve in terms of penetration of different technology trends. So the biggest trends he been, it would be related to public cloud penetration ten percent penetration as we exited twenty and nineteen are CEO surveys would suggest that will be over forty percent. When we look three years out, we've had companies like zoom go from thirty adding thirty thousand Hus-. Tumors roughly in two thousand, nineteen to already adding. Over one hundred, fifty, thousand customers in the first quarter of twenty twenty. So you've seen these massive accelerations and we expect to see in things like public cloud even more acceleration as we look ahead, what would you say are some of the biggest overarching trends are responses that you've seen at the enterprise level? So I think to look for you actually have to look back a little bit. So I'm GonNa give you a little bit of a brief history. I'm kind of how we've evolved from a technology perspective. So we look at technology cycles it's happening every twenty years and we're just at the beginning of a new one. If you go back from the sixties tonight, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty s it. was mainframe computers that characterized where we were the nineteen eighty s to two thousand was defined by things like client servers and bold goals such as a getting pc on every desk, and it was also the start of the commercialization of the Internet. The last twenty years two thousand to two, thousand and twenty. It was all about web architectures. It was about API application programming interface connectivity, and it was the start of public cloud and software as a service enterprise board auto, which we call it is going to leverage these one point two, five, billion knowledge workers that we mentioned and it's going to be an era that's defined by disparate workforce's in. So we think it's going to change all sorts of. The ways we communicate and interact with people day to day, it's going to be areas like collaboration areas like video that would be things like zoom collaboration would be things like slack or Microsoft teams, and it's not gonNA stop there. You're going to start to see wholesale replacement of some of these legacy technologies that have just been still in in use and just haven't had a reason for them to change up until now pb X.'s what you used to have from the nineteen sixties is still around today, we're going to have unified communications as a service you're going be able to have your phone number, follow you around. You're going to have things like project management applications, anything that will help distributed workforce. Worked on shared task. So there's a bunch of these different trends just named a couple of them that are going to define what we think happened over the next twenty years know when you look at what individual companies are doing and obviously this cuts across everything from giants like Microsoft and Google than Amazon too small startups. Are there any specific examples that you've seen of technology adoption accelerating that we wouldn't have seen? Without this environment I think Santana Delo, Microsoft, summed it up the best when on his earnings call last quarter this this was the march quarter said that we've seen two years of digital transformation occur in two months and I think that's exactly right especially in key areas. So few notable accelerations to get to your specific question and I I kind of alluded to before. But Zoom added over one hundred, eighty, thousand customers. They have over eleven employees on the March quarter they added only thirty, one thousand for all of twenty nineteen. So any just massive uptake in the use of their technology that I think everyone has probably used at some point over the last six months Microsoft's employee collaboration product, which is called teams. They've seen the euro per year growth of its unique users average around nine. Hundred percent some the pandemic began docu sign. So is still seeing unique user growth well above its pre pandemic levels and I think we again something else everyone's probably used especially over the last six months as documentary almost always being signed digitally today. So those are just a couple of examples that really stand out. Yeah. You know I mean I think one of the things that. We're certainly all feeling is the replacement of travel and everybody in our industry is talked for decades about video conferencing replacing travel, and now we're in a world where we have no choice. But for that to be the case, how much of this? Do you think sticks when we go back to whatever normal is gonNA look like? So you know in terms of how much will stick when we're finally out of the pandemic look at there is you hear people talk about text fatigue or zoomed fatigue there are people who long for the personal interactions and I think there's people who are perfectly happy. You know kind of continuing what they're doing working remotely at just communicating as needed. But ultimately, you know my view in all of this has been some of this technology adoption is here to stay. So for example, you know you and I used to jump on planes to go to one meeting in whatever part of the globe that might not happen as much anymore you. Won't get as much pushback if you offer to do a meeting in London or in Hong Kong for an hour remotely bursts what you might have had to do before going to California for an hour long meeting I think that will become more commonplace for that to take the place of travel. But I also think that people typically move when you look back at technology trends people usually move too far to the extreme. So while everyone's saying, no, one's going to travel anymore for business meetings. I probably not going to be again as I mentioned as much travels what we.

Microsoft Heather Renee James Seal Noland Barkor Genty Terry CEO Ryan Santana Delo CIO Chief Information Officer California Hong Kong London
MacLane Wilkison: NuCypher  Proxy Re-Encryption for Distributed Systems

Epicenter

04:08 min | Last week

MacLane Wilkison: NuCypher Proxy Re-Encryption for Distributed Systems

"Using them. What are some of the hurdles that you've encountered in getting people to understand the value and utility of privacy preserving technologies, and are there some things that just most people will never really be able to pass off? The unfortunate reality of trying to sell technologies enterprise is that it's much more about like the enterprise sales mission and how good you are, how good your Oregon's at that that it is about the technology. So do you have sort of enterprise sales or they can reach these customers that can reach the influence these decision makers there's a whole lot of sort of comedian and bureaucracy to get sort of particularly something like this where it started touching their core infrastructure and encryption is very sensitive and it has regulatory and compliance implications for the end user like there's a lot of layers of approval that yet to go through. To go through compliance, they're going to want to know who you're institutional backers are they're going to your existing customers are because no one wants to be like the first bank to adopt something and then goes wrong. I think like if you're building enterprise -nology selling top down to CIO or. It's much less unfortunately about like the technology and much more about enterprise sales motion and whether you have that expertise inside of the organization and ashes not I think for for me not really a salesperson that's not something that I'm especially particularly intrinsic interest in. With Zero DB, what were some of the like technology that you had to use their? What's it like and how like related to sort of stuff you ended up building at new? Cyber. So she was actually quite simple. So it was an encrypted data end to end encrypted database where you encrypt everything client side before you uploaded to the server and the server never see the plain text data. So usually when you say that people like Oh, it must be like fully home orphee encryption was not it was much much simpler than that. So basically we would. Like remotely and incrementally traverse like a B index. This index clydeside sent it to the server, and then like we want search for something, we'd ask the server for the you know the included root of the tree fetch that down decrypted that we know which branch of the tree to go to next and we just basically do that. So it was pretty simple and kind of a little bit naive. It wasn't nearly like a fancy like fully morphou conscription sort of on everyone is looking for. Sort of like a client side search but like a smarter way of doing it basically. Exactly so like you couldn't really use it for applications that were performed sensitive, but you could use it maybe for things that you didn't really need to get a result back quickly. So the use case that we were pitching to enterprises, you can use us to archive stuff. So a lot of banks at the time and still currently I think are basically just habit archiving everything from like tapes whereas using zero DB they could theoretically throw that into something cloud storage like it abuse glacier or something, but still never exposed to Amazon would be able to query back. You know regulatory a regulator asks for something from eight ten years ago. So that was the basic technology and then we also built in this functionality to allow other people to query that encrypted data as well, and that was how we discovered this technology called proxy re encryption without proxy re encryption. Obviously, whoever has the key? Basically the person who included a client side? He's the only one query you know zero DB database but we started getting interested in proximity encryption because then like the enterprise could enable partners whether it's like. Supplier, regulator or customer whoever to also delegate access to that encrypted and allow them to do the search as well, and that ended up actually becoming like the the most interesting part zero was disability sort of delegate access to encrypted data, and that's ultimately what morphed into through this. The First Avenue Cypher Network, which is basically a decentralized network of a bunch of notes that perform this proxy Rian corruption function the basic idea of be sorta left behind. But this proxy rip jeter delegation to Encrypt data is what we kind of pulled out eventually

First Avenue Cypher Network Oregon CIO Jeter Amazon Rian
David Soto - The Draw of the CISO Position

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

05:21 min | Last week

David Soto - The Draw of the CISO Position

"You need. You've been into space for while Ed you know coming from I think it's a unique perspective you've got going from the. The Sea so to the adviser and back to the sea like that. That's a really unique perspective to bring. What do you think the what are you keeps you going back to the sea. So role not got I. Just realized I said that like, why would you do that to yourself? Why would you do that to yourself? Man. Gun for punishments of. WanNa. WanNa. Continue. It's I always have this leaf than we can. We can still do better right and it's And I hope. That I am Yeah Glutton for punishment because I'll jump in here, I'll do it, and if I can prove, it can be done than everybody should be able to do it and Bhai though it runs me into hey, here can you take over and do this year? Yes. I do watch how lead by example and I think that's where gives me flipping back and forth also the other portion is it helps to get that experience again of being shoes of jumping over and then being adviser and helping others right I, run a seasonal round table here the few guys board members here in Orange County and we have. I wouldn't say crying session, we have normal session every. And we we go over you know what are the latest issues that were having? What are the things we're having to deal with and it's sometimes it's I opening sometimes it's you know some of us are sitting there going yeah. We we did that. Here's how we fix it. But IT'S A. It's always good I. Feel it's my way of giving back. It's it's interesting to to think about that because Rafi, we just talk last episode You know outgoing from C. so to earn maybe one of the previous episode right see. So to advisory role back. I lose track you know and kind of that. That idea you know like Oh, man, I've I've hit retirement but you know that's a fantastic point to bring up of you know when you start going out and doing that other side you lose touch sometimes with what's really going on you know and and all that expertise and all that stuff you have like i. see it sometimes you know in the development side like man all that great knowledge I had of dot net two point Oh you know isn't as relevant anymore these days it. If you're not going back into it, you lose touch with that and now that experience that got you there. As kind of you know is no longer relevant you know you have to kind of. into. that. Yeah and. If you're not flipping back and forth I think they sometimes, you do lose touch of some of it. Right? Not all of it but some it because some of the things that you take for granted like the political issues that we end up dealing with in the role, right you lose touch with not in it for so long. Right and it's how to get consensus across everybody. You may think by time you've been out of it for a while ago. I could have. You just do it this way and it's like now things have changed a little. I think we start asking the questions. Why can't you just do whatever like why is it so hard because I have to have seven indeed meetings before anybody listen to me it's like I think I think goes back adopted together. We used to joke about layers eight nine of the US I model management and budget. Oh Man. Oh, those layers yes we used to joke about that one. Even back. So give you an idea back when I was at some life even riding I'm there I remember I used to have constant meetings and people will be like you just do this and it just works and I'm like, no, you don't realize I have to get everybody on one side Wail and get them actually hitting the whale in that side. So it will turn gradually and they'll just take us time to get there because without getting consensus and without getting the pain for the whale the well, just keep going straight. There's no reason for her. and. That's I feel is one of the biggest hurdles that we ended up over having overcome. That's that's the truth I mean it's. The status quo can be shockingly difficult thing to overcome even in a world where we watched the news every day, and it's some some Some you know exploit don crazy somebody gets hacked. Somebody gets shamed another you know CEO is called before Congress like you think every would buddy would be cybersecurity crazy making it their number one priority and yet. Right. Yeah. No, it's making it. A priority across is just no, it's a they see it as utility right then. That's exactly how they hidden but by so I just like `electricity is in everything that we have in her doing same with security should be in everything that is done and that's how we should be teaching the CEO's and the CIO's and the board. Hey, look we're through everything and everybody's a member

Bhai Wanna CEO ED Congress United States Rafi Orange County CIO
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

06:33 min | 2 weeks ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"So we we live every day we run it, we operationalize these solutions. Two seventeen we were spending most of our time setting up platforms in showing cost advantage in value inefficiencies that we'd achieve with net platforms in partner platforms running in our data centers and we were able to then go to customers and say look we found a twenty percent efficiency in eighty percent efficiency in running these platforms in his innovative fashion, and by the way we're happy to share that with you as a customer in certainly as a partner. where we've come from those since then is much more much more aggressive posture. We built out an entire operating platform for our company called cloud one in it is a hybrid multi cloud platform. The route allows us to run specific nap workloads that are containerized in mobile and portable in our private cloud utilities and our public clouds of choice in all of that's connected through a very nimble data fabric, and we branded that cloud one in it. Many of our events we stand up and talk to our customers about how we've built provisioned and run this cloud one environment that gives us a lot of flexibility in a lot of choice. So it's been a great journey of going from running in talking about cost benefits to actually engineering a hybrid multi cloud world that we can live in In last year Peter we've gone beyond that and is this is really really thrilling for me. We've built out a full devops capability on top that cloud one instance. got a minute to talk about that. Can we talk a little bit about that? Please do I'd love to hear more about it. He had. So when we looked it at operating a company like, Nanak right we have legacy platforms, applications. We have modern cloud utilities that we can talk about two, and then we have sort of customize software that gives us competitive advantage and most companies have that most CIO's I talk to on a weekly basis have these particular workloads very Germane in specific to their business. The problem is a lot of those age, right they get they get stale there in yesterday's technology, they're hard to grade because operating systems and databases. Consistent with the platforms and the hardware that you're running in a data center, we used our cloud. Capability our underlying hybrid multi cloud infrastructure to build a whole application development environment to basically convert a traditional enterprise to Endeavour Ready Development Organization. We brought the right people in the do this we designed it. We purpose built it in. We moved a couple of our key customer service applications. I mean applications faced our end user customers in we move them into microcode based new software incarnations. It gets tremendous flexibility in the devops modern world, and it's really hard for traditional companies to do that look if if you're A. You know if you're a Netflix's or an Uber and you're going to start from scratch and build a whole software suite with some venture caps lot easier to do that in a true devops capacity much harder to do that as traditional enterprise. But we've done that in it's given us great value and You know one of the rare benefits I have in my job a forward-looking organization like this is. I. Don't have to worry about future development for for in house custom developed APPs in neither do most of our engineering teams because they've de adopted this devops framework that we built in. So that's a rare pleasure not to have to worry about how been developed my next generation of internal software applications. I, I wanted to also get get back to the points that you yours your company has built this ecosystem which really brings to life at a broader value proposition than simply going in alone and I wonder a great cio also needs his or her own either system partners to deliver all that that's necessary to serve the company first foremost, and ultimately the customer's as well and I wonder how I'm I know having known you from past stops broadcom, for example, I know that you have orientational towards this that the didn't begin with net APP but I wonder if within a company that has really thrived by virtue of establishing these these important partnerships, the extent to which that's colored the way in which you've thought about building your own system in order to ensure that your team is successful. Peter a great question, and it really has been a theme that permeates everything we do and I'll talk about it on on two halves. One half is a follow up what we just talked about and building out this customer one cloud one platform that we run the business on in an shift over and talk about just our our daily dating methodologies and. How use partners? So we couldn't build something like cloud one. We couldn't something like our devops framework without using all of our partners because net. APP. Has Incredible a data management capabilities and storage capabilities but there's a lot more that goes into it than that you know to build out a full suite of platform. So we leverage customers like Cisco where we have flex. pod delivery partnerships utilizing their compute. We have Lenovo is a key partner we lines their compute platforms we depend on red hat, for example, in their in their containerization and cloud ready platform. So we have lots and lots of partners that we build these capabilities outwith in that basically gives us a large ecosystem of capability. Again, it's a round net APP I but. We bring those partners in to build a complete and total solution and to your point we even we even extend that Parker framework to to integrators. So we've used partners. We actually have in our go to market organisation companies like Atas companies like trace three who resell our solutions with partnered with their professional services groups help us build these environments within that..

partner. Peter CIO Netflix Nanak cio Lenovo broadcom professional services Parker Cisco
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:13 min | 2 weeks ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"They'll niller welcome to Techn- Ovation Peter. For Having me today I'm glad to be here. It's always a pleasure bill. Great to see you well bill. I thought, we might begin the logical of starting point your rule you are the senior vice president and chief information officer net APP and I. Wonder if you can take a quick moment, just provide a bit of a description of how the Seattle role how it it's in that router technology landscape, a net app you take a moment to describe that. Sure I'd be happy to do that Peter. I started with net APP in the fall of twenty sixteen. So I'm coming up on my fourth anniversary shortly here, and it's been a a really thrilling journey journey a transformation in so many different ways you know. The job at net APP is a little different than some other CIO jobs. It may be similar to some CIO jobs in the bay area here particularly companies who are. Building designing, deploying it solutions for it customers, and I think that's a little bit unique from what some other CIO's do so. My Role Peter has a bit of a duality right I'm expected to design implement in line solutions for the business to run the business operationally to provide the cyber-security overlay that we all depend upon and to run our operations for the company and stay current in delivering those capabilities and capacities to our internal nap customers, but also to many of our end customer. So that's one piece of the job, but the other piece of the job is to be able to deploy leverage in innovate. Our technologies and our party technologies in to be able to produce narratives to show that value to our external customer. So I have a team myself and my team we spend an awful lot of time in executive briefing centers, narratives, and industry events with customers sharing how we run that apple. Neta. So there is an interesting duality keeps most of my days quite fascinating. I want to talk to you about the notion of net Abba. As you point out you the of a company that itself in many cases serves cio, and so you are the.

CIO senior vice president and chie Peter Seattle Neta apple executive
Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

"America's working class has been cheated is an assertion that has been getting a lot of currency lately are last presidential election went deep on that claim in both parties by the way and the culprit most often blamed for that. It's that monstrous five syllable word globalization, the philosophy and the practice of free trade which has been great for companies and for shareholders but has had a devastating impact. It is argued on the American working woman and. Man Well Economist do agree that in the past four decades the American working class, which we're defining tonight as people who lack a four year college degree. They have seen flat wages and a steady disappearance of good jobs. But is globalization a main reason that that's happening to those workers and for those workers is globalization entirely bad. Well, we think this has the makings of a debate. So let's have it. Yes or no to this statement globalization. has undermined. America's working. Class I'm John Donavan, and I stand between two teams of experts in this topic who argue for and against this resolution globalization has undermined America's working class as always. Our debate will go in three rounds and then our live audience here at the Saint Regis Hotel and Aspen Colorado where we are appearing in partnership with the Aspen Ideas Festival will choose the winner and as always if all goes well civil discourse, we'll. Also win a resolution once again, globalization has undermined America's Working Class Jared Bernstein you have debated with us before. So welcome back you're a senior fellow at the center on Budget and policy priorities. You were Vice President Joe. Biden's chief economist. The last time you debated with US interestingly Jason Furman who is your opponent at the other table tonight was your debate partner as a team you were formidable formidable I, almost want to use the French pronunciation. Formula, so are you planning to use your insiders knowledge of Jason's debate battles against him to very much am the way to do that with Jason is to make a lot of sports analogies because they repealing confusing. All right. Thank you and I see you detail to Aspen. You were a to aspen well I. Think the guy with the tie is the guy you want to listen to, but I'll let you decide. All right. Thanks very much. Jared Bernstein and can tell us who your partner is. This someone I've known for twenty five years she's a dear friend of mine and I consider her my mentor in this topic feely gentlemen feeling. Theo welcome to intelligence squared your president of the Economic Policy Institute. You've spent two decades as an economist for the AFL CIO, which is America's largest federation of unions. It represents some twelve point, five, million working women and men. You've spent twenty five years working on trade policy. So what got you interested in trade? Well, when I came to Washington in the early nineties I got drawn. INTO THE NAFTA debate the North American Free Trade. Agreement. And I realized pretty early on that. This was not some kind of a dry text book discussion about tariffs but it was a transnational battle over democracy good jobs, workers, rights, and regulation. So I was hooked because a lots at stake a lot is at stake. Okay. Thanks very much thelia once again, team arguing for the motion. And motion again, globalization has undermined America's working class. We have to debaters arguing against it, I Jason Firm. Welcome back to intelligence squared Jason you're a professor of the practice of economic policy at the Harvard Kennedy School you're a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, you were Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama tonight. As we said, you're going to be debating your former colleague Jared Bernstein on the impact of globalization. So is this the first time you to have debated the globalization issue with each other jared and I agree on I'd say about ninety five percent of economic issues and my goal tonight is to bring to one hundred percent. Thanks very much Jason and can you tell us who your partner is someone I've only known for a few years and every single thing. He's ever told me I have believed James Manica Legitimate James Manyika. Welcome the first time telling squared you're a senior partner at McKinsey, and company you're the chairman of their economics research arm, the McKinsey Global Institute, your first time debating with us. But not your first debate you debated at Oxford I did you studied robotics and computers earlier in your career you were visiting scientist at NASA. So how do you go from very eclectic from robotics and space to thinking about trade policy? In American. Workers I've always been fascinated by the kinds of technologies that drive innovation and growth, but also affects what will people in the real world actually do. So when you put that together with the economy, these issues around trade and workforce become very, very important. Those are the issues that motive a great perspective to bring here and then once again, thank you. Thank you again to the team arguing against them.

America Jared Bernstein Jason Partner Senior Fellow Jason Furman Economic Policy Institute President Trump Chairman Aspen Jason Firm Vice President Saint Regis Hotel Chief Economist Colorado John Donavan Senior Partner
Whats Working Right Now with YouTube SEO

Marketing School

03:44 min | Last month

Whats Working Right Now with YouTube SEO

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about what is working right now with Youtube. Seo. So just F- I just reminded for everyone youtube is still the second largest search engine in the world. Again, it's owned by Google. So Neil, what is working right now 'cause with Youtube you've got what about seven hundred thousand subscribers right now. The biggest thing that I found that works with Youtube. Seo like everyone talks about the key words you need to put the keywords in your title you need have attractive thumbnails for CTR's, and that's all the stuff that everyone's doing. It's just like traditional Seo right you know this better than anyone else everyone can modify their Meta tags everyone can create content that's ten minutes long or everyone can write two, thousand, four blog posts but the big trick that I found that really boost your ranking see youtube opposite attritional Google. Seo which traditional Google, CIO, slow, and steady wins the race in Youtube, Seo whoever does really well in the first twenty, four hours of the video being released tends to win the race and you can get your rank is literally the day you pop up the video doesn't have to take months even for competitive terms, it literally be days. The real question is, how hard can you push the video in the first twenty four hours and what I mean by that is, can you do email blasts, push notification blasts and? FACEBOOK MESSENGER blasts, text blasts, anything. You can't get views in the first twenty, four hours. If you get a lot of traction in those views watched the video, they watch other videos on Youtube Bay comment because they liked the video will find is the video starts ranking really high. Yeah. If you think about it I, mean these social media tools are all created by human beings. Right. How do these algorithms work? If you think about Lincoln if I post something Lincoln or someone's share something with me, they're always sharing with. The bunch of people want a bunch of people to like it. They want a bunch of your comment. They want a ton of engagement initially, right? That's what these algorithms looking for. They're looking for the initial rush. So you're lucky enough you're fortunate enough to have audiences across the MLS. If you have push notifications to Neil's point earlier, that's good for you. Now here's the flipside tonight. Love you might be saying, well, what have we don't have an audience while I just spoke to a guy yesterday new you should definitely check. Out This podcast I think you would enjoy it. My spoke to a guy named George Gammon very successful entrepreneur was doing like twenty four million bucks a year in the retired bought of a bunch of real estate and now moved Medellin Colombia. Now in St Bart's but points this he does a really good job of teaching macroeconomics and Learning Economics in college all I did was I went to distinct called the ECON- tutor and he just gave the answers and we all copy the answers and we went into class and We all got a beep is hilarious. My point is I didn't understand much about economics, and then now I'm realizing the current climate, you have to have a really strong understanding of macroeconomic. So this guy went, he's youtube channel. This guy's audience at all from two hundred subscribers is at one, hundred, sixty, five, thousand subscribers now he did it all organically why is he so successful? It's because his level of content nobody's doing anything like that right now nobody's breaking down macroeconomic and making it super simple. It's always like three. Simple steps, right. That's what he does is topics are really good. It's not like he has amazing headlines All the time, and then I found out from yesterday he's like, yeah, I spent about twelve hours on each food. I'm not saying you need to spend twelve hours on each video but the level of your content if you can touch upon things that are hot and explained in a simple way, it becomes very easy to share I learned of him to Robert Q sake the guy that wrote rich Dad Poor Dad. and. Boom Robert Gates money channel boom thirty five thousand subscribers instantly, right. So point is if you don't have an audience, yes, you might have to slog it out a little bit what look this guy went from two hundred to one

Youtube Neil Patel Google Eric Su Lincoln Robert Gates CIO Robert Q George Gammon St Bart Medellin Colombia
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:47 min | Last month

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Enabling customer experience differentiating. Value Propositions. You've mentioned in a couple of different ways. This notion of ecosystem ecosystems of of of the strategic partners like aws Microsoft's You also talked about the partnerships within tax in the sanctity imports. API's for instance to connect with other organizations with immunity business keep talking about as you think about the fintech landscape innovation that's happening within the financial services space the way in which you and of cooperates and partner with emerging of Benin's as a as large powerful Boeing concern how you'd think about almost. Petition that happens between the been tax and the larger banks have how do you think about that? Part of it is actually giving them the opportunity to challenge us John Thinking. So we do have you know regular cadence so where we have some of these texts and up and coming in founders of innovative. Common Challenge process. With a regular cadence with people can come and challenge us. And for me as as well that you know created. is in the past as well. I WanNa make sure that the steering committees and or design authorities or the architecture review board not just might not pricly. CBA staff. Only I actually have designed towards steering committees without us would a actively challenge us as well and say, Hey. You know thinking about this dimension, you know thinking about this technology or you know thinking about this best practice. So continuously involving them as well to help you know design a better you know marketplace API, infrastructure all that aspect. So creating that openness Is Way keen for me, and this is how we started putting that in place as well. Well, actually have an operational now that's correct keen to get that intellectual debate. From inside as well that outside. Ask why. Thank you so much for for joining me today. It's been great to hear about your most recent experiences in your current posed a bit about your career arc and all that you've learned across the various Major Angela services institutions that you've served as a technology executive as usual it's been a great conversation. Thank you, Veda. Thanks for tuning in. Please join me on Thursday when my guest will be former CIO of metlife in current founder and CEO of uncork Gary Overland..

John Thinking CIO Microsoft CBA founder and CEO metlife Benin Gary Overland executive Boeing partner
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

07:18 min | Last month

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Time to market and make product milestones more predictable. were collaborating to prove concepts with clear invalidated business value. That has then led to scaling out our current solutions, and as a result of of all of this were really rapidly expanding our AI efforts were getting a lot of You know visibility sponsorship in Safe Paul in I think one of the benefits that we're seeing from these AI implementations is that they've gone relatively fast right at compared to a lot of traditional. You know a large scale investments that take a long time to deliver on the value in. So the poll from the business has really descend. Fantastic Also ask you archie you actually this month of account high dates. Correct is mature seventeen coming CIO fine initially as a divisional earlier, you have since been a cio at Timex at ingersoll rand at. Baker. Hughes H. E. Eaten prior to making the Post. As you noted earlier in January, in Intel I'm wondering if you could take a moment and reflect upon that the role and how it's evolved from your standpoint across seventeen years of of having the title and sort of the role, it plays within the corporate structure. Yeah Yeah. Look. The role has evolved and continues to evolve right. If I think about innocent my earlier CIO experiences, right? A lot of IT I. Always, been. At the heart of or at the core of an organization you know. But I, think if I think back, you know seventeen twenty years ago. Kind of timeframe. A lot of it was focused on in I'd say more inward in terms of. How do you make an organization more productive? Right? We were looking at transforming Through York implementations, data warehouses, right in a lot of it was about process and productivity. If, you'd go forward in time it became more about. The experience and how do you expand right? How do you use it to really expand Your Business and business models? Right? So you know. In, the days of. The Internet I'll say rate and opening up, you know all of the different sales channel Hockney do that in a different you know with a different way. Right you. Moving to online sales in how do you think about brick and mortar versus? Digital, right, and so you know we we we kind of went through that era and we're still continuing in there. But I think it just continues to evolve and so. Then, we we kind of take the next after an I think about is moved around you know in the CIO role. you know a lot of the productivity plays, etc. I would say my ut experience in a timex was really that can mortar versus digital, right? How much do we continue to do? Physical infrastructure. And the way we go to market right versus you know thinking and in a more digital way in even the products that we develop rate nobody's interested in in wearing a watch for time. Right? So you know Product expectations around digital, right? It's gotTa be more than. Telling you time. And then if I think about the industrials, right. It's about products are becoming commoditised, and so you know how how do you create the stickiness factor in a with a higher value proposition? For customers and so for me enrolls like that, it's been about you know things like A home automation, right? So. Connected home with, you know being able to control your temperature. You're swimming pools, your alarm systems in your refrigerators, all that kind of stuff you know to building automation, right? Or you've got security video in all of that in suffer for the CIO, you kinda stepped out, you know really thinking about. And the services you provide in an organization to know how do you? Have a seat at the table. In terms of high, be go to market You know with new revenue streams, new business models. How do you expand you know margins, right. So in all of that continued in now you know Nights the if I think about in a h. p. e. n., an Intel right. Now, a lot of it is about you know, how do you take this latest wave right without not with the amount of data that's getting generated right in the world is data centric. So how'd you build you know? Models, right business models that really. Leverage all that data and give different kind of value to customers. Right, and so I think. It's been. You know just constant evolution of the role and I think for those that are really on the forefront. You know what you're seeing is not, Hey, talk to me about an IT strategy. It's more about. Being part of the core business strategy in for CEOS. I. Think there. Again have a deeper understanding of the technology that's needed to really drive that type of transformation in. So I think it's been I mean for me. It's been a fantastic journey in of never never been bored right We have to challenge our thinking ourselves in terms of you know the value creation, how we thought about it before versus how we think about it today. With excellent. I, also, wanted to just briefly all ask you about trends that excite you. We've talked about a number of rising trends for analytics data strategy to artificial intelligence among others. Are there others that are making their way onto your roadmap? Is You look to the future? I think if I had to pick one right now it is for me I. I think it's around data and a I in what I'm most excited about Peter is thinking my entire career when I think about all the transformation work. That I've seen in these different industries and the been driving myself. You know as a leader, what I'm seeing here is just our ability to deliver. So quickly on the value I, think that's you know if I think about a trend that it's really really got me excited I think this is the one You know. Obviously, there's a lot on the horizon and you know we're constantly looking at new trends that are evolving and how they'll shape you know where the future goes. But right now I'm super excited about the work that we're doing. In A. More Marci Desk. Thank you so much for joining me today on tech nation. It's been great hearing about your experiences recently with Intel and across your best. Career as a CIO, thank you so much. Thank you so much Peter. I, really appreciate the time this afternoon and. Really had a great time talking with you. Thanks for tuning in. Please join me on Thursday when my guess, we'll be Tim Campos. The former chief information officer of facebook, who is now the founder and CEO of woven..

CIO Intel Timex archie Baker Paul ingersoll rand Peter York founder and CEO Hockney Tim Campos facebook chief information officer
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:04 min | Last month

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Prior Intel she held cio roles at HP Baker, Hughes, Ingersoll, Rand Timex, and united technologies. In this interview, we discussed archie purview as the global cio of Intel and our experience up to speed. In the role, we discussed the current pandemic, including Intel's response to it, and how it will impact the long term future of work as well as Howard team has been enabling the ship to remote work. Finally, Archie provides insights into the company's data first mindset and their corporate data office. How the. The company is using artificial intelligence, how the CIO role has evolved over archie seventeen plus years in the post in a variety of other topics. Before we tower interview, I wanted to introduce you to our sponsor Zozo and the company's President Timothy Cabbie. Prior to taking on his current role, he was the chief information officer of a number of companies including reliance industries, sears in Trek Sauna, and the warehouse group. He's now Zoa most unusual enterprise software company wanted to share some perspectives from it. Take it away. Howard professor, Doctor Zubov says that Google and facebook are not iterating newness realization, but represent a new and problematic market form that traits in predicting and influencing human behavior surveillance capitalism. As she calls, it has taken human experience, specifically private human experience and unilaterally claimed it as something to be bought and sold in the marketplace. A quick look at one of our big crm competitors shows that they have hundred seventeen trackers on their site creating their customers activity behaviors to the surveillance marketplace. Popular Culture Fascinated with tech entrepreneur worship has lost sight of the price they're paying by having the inflammation in the human behavioral marketplace, but we. Can't afford such worship. We have to protect our employees customers information. That is why zo who has removed all turbulence trackers from our sites including Google analytics. Aboard move, you might say, but it.

cio Intel Archie Doctor Zubov HP Baker Ingersoll Rand Howard Hughes Zozo united technologies reliance industries Google Zoa sears President facebook
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

06:01 min | 2 months ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"To make them available to customers. The big benefit brought to facebook though to I. Think the body of making before is at the products become better as a result of the fact that the launching mixed, only because we cannot feed by study from the externally and be enhanced, abroad are building features are make changes to the broad based on the feedback externally, which in turn makes product better facebook about six Vin Ben from that perspective that you know. The customers get the benefit of the uniqueness of the products and some of the unique solving. FYODOR facebook big at the benefit from that and in done dead feedback on a better. Benefits this. Very interesting. I appreciate you walking through that. You also talked about how yours is. An I t team perhaps different from past CIO Roles that you've had a where your team is not so different from products team from the from from the engineers that are throughout the entire organization, and I'm curious to what extent then is the author permeable from Fe- other parts of the organization in back. Do you find that there are people on your team that then go off and either set, spend the so to speak a year abroad, and then come back and vice versa are there. Is there a permeability to that filter? Vamos oh, so you know of, but then suffered. Engineers are not it manages the designers you know in in the Jonathan Naza fears that you know engineers. Our designers get to work on the promise of the they want to solve, so it's very common for someone to come in to facebook in enterprise engineering, and then what for a couple of years building and the rise eggs, and then maybe developing distance are going and working on the consumer side, and going maybe instagram or facebook wants out still be be have not up people who go from our side there as well. and. At the same diabetes. Of people who've been working on consumer products a long time, and decided that they wanted to try their handed and vice providence on May want to solve problems in the enterprise market specifically do grow facebook, and then they will come over from their assert. It's been so the betty to your your black. You use very. From that standpoint in the design space in the product space. In offer engineering space people going back and forth fairly regularly. and I think it enhances the organization. It enhances people's careers because it gives the opportunity for people to be able to essentially you know. Spend spend a lot of time. Vince, as for their careers. Wasn't having to leave their company and go somewhere else. Yeah very interesting, and I wonder also as you're describing your purview and the differences between it versus past experiences that you have there are so many aspects to to facebook, singular or very different than singular digital native organization, and of course, one of the one of the prime examples, additional data organization that I wonder also teach as you as you think about how the role of I always translate in this environment. If you were to be able to go back and whisper into the year and offer advice to your younger self at places like you're in or NBC universal. What sort of advice would you offer to? And of course extension? This question is, would you? CIO's Today who work at digital digital immigrant organization citizens for as opposed to digital immigrant rather than digital native organizations like when you currently were were. What advice would you have about the way in which you one should think about the? Bowl and essential value created from it so the way. I think water heater is like. That are quite a few things that translate well. From. A digital native door immigrant organization by I'LL GIVE YOU A. Couple of philosophies that I think might be a full if I was advising my younger self to your own the foot, the first one is. Actually fairly early in my career through the advice of one of my seat, CEO's acted. This was back in McPherson bays electoral. Sometimes you know people who lead technology organizations are working to all of your organization's. It'll get focused for technology and technology's sake. What's is VDI focusing on the problems of the business has tried to solve and that technology should be an enabler for solving those problems, so you know I, spend for example a lot of time with my business partners in all of the different Oxo facebook understanding what goes are what the bronze trying to solve, and how technology can help them either solve a problem or pursuant opportunities that connected us with the business I. Think is really really important. Because technology for Rally Sake you might invent something really cool, but in the end of Mar A. Business. Opportunity is not particularly helpful for the organization so I think that's one thing, and then the second thing which specifically in the facebook environment, I think other other non digital natives companies can actually benefit from is that you know the limbaugh listening? Agility are providing solutions quickly Israeli or mega one one thing sort of phony believed him that a good solution provided really quickly is infinitely more valuable than the perfect solution provided too late. So that. Agility is really really like I'll give you a good example like. Colbert nineteen. The world we live in today head. You know you be entertaining this entire. Organization which you know if you are talking about in a forty five thousand employees plus ends up thousands of.

facebook CIO Roles NBC Jonathan Naza CIO McPherson bays electoral Colbert Vince instagram Mar A. Business CEO limbaugh
What To Do When Stocks Go Down by The Finance Twins

Optimal Finance Daily

04:07 min | 2 months ago

What To Do When Stocks Go Down by The Finance Twins

"Twins dot com. If you're wondering what to do, when stocks go down, you're not alone. This is a question. We've started to get asked more and more. The stock market has been dropping and everyone is afraid that the incredible market performance is going to slow down and their 401K's will lose a lot of value. So what should you do with your investments? When stocks go down, the short answer is nothing. Don't change a thing. When the stock market drops, and the prices of your stocks go down. The problem with doing nothing is that it's hard. It goes against our natural instinct and desire to be proactive so that we aren't the last to move. Buy High and sell low is the mantra of investing right. Everyone wants to react when they see their investments lose value. When the stock market drops on the other hand. They want to invest more. When the stock market is shooting up, the problem here is that it's impossible to accurately time the market consistently. Don't be fooled by randomness. The research shows that this emotional desire to try to time the market by trying to buy low and sell high actually hurts investors, according to renowned Princeton economists and CIO of wealth, front the behavior. Behavior gap between the S. and P. Five hundred and the average investor returns may be as large as five percent annually over a twenty year period. What the data shows is that most investors will follow recent returns so when the stock market is going up, more money flows into stocks, but when the stock market drops, money will flow out of the market by reacting to performance. Investors are actually selling low and buying high the opposite of what they're trying to do. Won't I be protecting my investments by selling when they are high before their value drops. The problem with this train of thought is that no one knows when a stock has hit rock bottom or has truly peaked. If you knew exactly when to buy or sell, you'd already be a billionaire and would be on a private jet on the way to Paradise. Right now at least what we'd be doing. In an article by Hoffman at all, it is reported that investor risk tolerance decreased during the worst months of the two thousand eight recession. This highlights the emotional reactions taken by investors and the importance of sticking to your investing strategy. If you felt confident investing ninety percent of your 401k or Roth, IRA in stocks and ten percent in bonds when the market was strong, you should stick to your plan when the stock market drops. If you panic can sell, you will only hurt your investments more. So if my portfolio is losing most of its value, I should sit back and watch it drop without changing anything. For the long term investor, this is the perfect strategy. You want to minimize your emotional impact on your returns. If you are investing for the long term, which is what you should be doing know that your portfolio will recover with the markets. If you sell your investments, you will not have as much in the stock market when the prices pick up and you'll be kicking yourself. According to Dalbar is twenty fifteen report, the average mutual fund investor was outperformed by the S. and P. Five hundred by over three percent in two thousand fifteen. But how can you be outperformed by the S. and P. Five hundred, when you invest in a total stock market index fund that tracks the S. and p. five hundred, the answer is because people buy and sell throughout the year in hopes of timing the market, buying and selling based on what the market is doing prevents you from fully capturing the total market return. When should I invest? Should I wait to invest my money when stocks go down or we go into a recession?

Dalbar CIO Hoffman Paradise Roth Princeton
How to become a malware analyst

Cyber Work

05:44 min | 2 months ago

How to become a malware analyst

"You started out in kind of this this you know sort of loose umbrella organization the security. Checkpoints and stuff? But obviously it was a big jump between what you were doing there and moving up to a CTO and infrastructure manager, and so forth says you started configuring networks for small businesses so like. What were some of the major sort of stepping stones where you went from? This area of knowledge, and then you've got you know this this much higher in this tire. What were some of the sort of transformative things in your career that got you to where you are now where you're starting on companies, and so forth yet so when I said twenty, three, twenty, four, twenty, five, remember the age now and one of the big challenges in the olden days I should was Maui mostly through email arms. It was a constant challenge seems we would buy foul would say that I would change it with. Would by Boris you stop with the answer virus, but. Announcing to be constantly constant challenge to the businesses How could we start now at Einstein, which was the best dog. Back then as well coming into the network and we kept buying Butson kept going on today to see asking for more money. And why? Why did you spend this much money in the digital and so? From that? I decided that I wanted to follow in the logical me was. I don't think there should be a business issue. Technology issue on if I was running a technology company. I have ends do whatever I wanted, and then the baton. We could change your bowl so I saw saw company. Hold at sleep. At which wasn't enough security today and the idea was was to. Move Email security teams. Kyle. which everyone looked to me like headset. Quarantine is selling. It's good to get quarantined in the cloud. That was the mentality that unto make it a Subscriber Solution I. I thought that company. As a see, I became Iras, we took investment. And We grew fast not completely I in Dot com date to the to the embezzles on not later became a think fuse mail, which is now by viper that still going somewhere. That's GONNA. Fifteen Years Eissa. Nice legacy! From that when I Got Very involved in some government stuff some some logic at the right I saw A. It was the time was inspired by security advisement. Advise up a full, many large companies and. I helped trying secure environments in addition a lot of recovery ransomware Congress opponent came after the next is. A lot of breach recovery's reach detection I'm cigarette. And one of the things, we always still route throughout my twenty s I guess ninety now getting more than twenty nine thousand eight is. It's a waste Maur so it's whether it's somebody opening an email attachment whether it's. Pushing out like wannacry into seventeen or glass. To Wasting Maui, that's the pain point, everybody. Okay. Well, let's let's jump right into. That did so. Our topic today, specifically ransomware, but malware in general, so we've. We've spoken about ransomware on on past episodes. We had a great episode of a while back. We might release it with a Christian beak of McAfee who else talked about the no more ransom organization, but certainly as you say Malcolm. Malware ransomware aren't going away anytime soon, and they're always sort of. Staying one step ahead of Cybersecurity, expert experts, and you know sort of counter, a malware methods, and so forth I've always. We're always putting new sort of Maur of the week up on our on our interest resources site, and all sorts of crazy things, things young gap jumping and all these new technologies that that. you know added to things so What is the state of ransomware at the moment? Do you think it's gone down? Stayed Up, stayed the same in the age of Covid nineteen people. You know being decentralized locations and working from home and things like that is that make people more or less susceptibility thinker it so I know. Unfortunately it's gone up till nine extreme level at Bobi the highest job we seem. In the last three years. It's happened in the last three months. Okay, I. That stems from various various things one is we've now. The premature is now gone where. Nitty gone, fall, but the people who are outside liver attendance, being more technical savvy sales guys us, not pulsing used to get with technology and the threats. Now we've taken coal centers outside of the rental. We've native. People who pay lowest salaries outside of the purposes of they've lost. A little bit permits security. We've seen massive amounts of increase in things coming through, but more money things executed. The other huge contributing bachelors. Nobody knows what the moments anymore nobody knows. Is it normal to get an email from my CIO estimates? You're Oakland Sunday because. Normally. They're Managing was sitting across the evangelist our when people are home, in Saudi the most tech savvy people get these emails. ACID mortal enables macaroni. Viljoen down his file. Oh, you need to die. Leagues get access to this site on making a diving. It's not actually diabate Moran. We'll sing Momo. People get tricked into doing things that they. Traditionally do.

Maui CTO Boris Butson Diabate Moran Mcafee Viljoen Viper Covid Kyle. CIO Oakland Malcolm
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:38 min | 2 months ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Focus we fool is to further consider date. our coordinated and the reports during. Scenes finally as possible and therefore implemented near real time. They think degration of data points. Once he had that. on deep integration, we can leverage this prediction and Jackman. into our. System. I. Spoke something that he's promotional wedding allowing our employee's space and time to own exceptions, why so being served those predictions by record in the in the system, so Brecqhou the system or engagement that every day, and so that they can optimize that work at. Section and obviously how the foundational beside big loot continue to develop our cloud migration continue to develop our risk management approach and the cybersecurity companies. And they go down a couple of years. And less. Making sure that them increase fluency for across all our our PNG people now those on the digital it is. For activision we are laser. Focus on use king. they've been use case driven approach and walk mother's most for each. The market. And this I know we have relied. On Nineteen Boys, why business technologists! And work side by side and must work side by side with what is in market. From an organization point of view, Horn action plan is two fold. Number one ensuring we build and Montaigne internal expertise. Was I personally believe. That a good to delegates operational communities to punish. Is Not, a good to abdicate expertise, and so it's always important to maintain. Expertise. And second make sure that we have proximity to our contemporaries and business units in line with the way pg thirteen, more old and quite successfully. and so working closely with teams and units using very often and giant approach at Camden even. Give being weeks what used to be then you've heard the monster that evening wakes. my I'm a war I think is continue to novel talented idealization and Ason Cordage I have cultural group INC on shipments. 'cause he. You Know I. Always say that Camilla Joan doesn't chase things. People do and developing talent be the primary objective. Of all good sales! Vittorio. Goes the the responsibilities of good CIO's. You've been a cio or quite some time where where chief technology officer your your time, you spent nearly twenty six and a half years with Mars where you were the CTO getting back to two minutes two thousand two. You were a cio of the ringling business, and then the global information officer, four and a half years, dating back to two thousand thirteen, and I'm wondering as somebody who has such a wealth of extreme inside the technology executive. How you seeing the role of CIO evolve across your tenure. I think it's I.

cio CIO activision chief technology officer ringling business Camilla Joan Jackman. Montaigne Camden Horn CTO officer executive
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:36 min | 3 months ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Else. Pay Guy you know. A Good New England or there's some good ideas. I am a good New England. So tell me you've already covered a number of things that connect to prominent or rising trends in the tech space, but I wanted to actually save a little bit of time date than for for some other ideas that are making way onto your personal and professional roadmap. You find particularly exciting when you think trends and you look to the future. At one of the things that I've always been intrigued by in especially in our environment. Where we do have people all over the country. We have folks that sit in our building, but also said it customer sites. We have people that you know are insecure. Areas or non secure areas is a lot of different ways of working. We also have a lot of teleworkers, but really the future of work and I think this area is really cool and and it's far out. You know when you start thinking maybe twenty thirty, so you look out ten years, but you start talking about augmented reality and V are you know? Do you have mobile offices? With Thomas Vehicles, and how five G. is making this all possible, so I think it's A. The technologies coming along. But the cultural piece is a challenge right. There are still many many people that like having office. To come in. They they they WANNA. Do meetings in person they were. Very specific how many monitors they want I mean there's a very. Specific Way people work and and are comfortable working, and when you think about this, this kind of leapfrog to the future of work, that's coming very very quickly. How do you get there? You know so I'm certainly focused on just the the little things right now like improving collaboration with you know tools like slack. You know you know looking at different. You know video type things you know you know whether it be zoom or teams or web ax. You name it right to looking at those kinds of ways of working and pushing some of these more game, people more comfortable with working in a virtual world. Well Nathan. So much for joining me today on. It's been great to understand a bit more about your experience. as a CIO across multiple organizations more specifically. Your Experience Saic now is cio of that that company It's been a great conversation. Thank you very much. I enjoyed it and look forward to her and. Thanks for tuning in. Please join me on Thursday for an interview with Sweeter van. Boo, the founder and chief! Executive Officer of 's Ohio..

New England CIO Thomas Vehicles Experience Saic Executive Officer Nathan founder Ohio
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

08:04 min | 3 months ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"You know what what works and what could be better, and and that was a great experience, and that experience really led me to be able to think strategically about okay. What is the strategy? How do I tie Tessie ICEES goals? How do I tied to what I've heard and build out a roadmap, and and I was able to put a roadmap together that really got the organizations backing, and it's something I continually update actually just presented at this week. so it's something we continually work on so I'm very transparent about it. It I posted on share point where any employee in the company can see it so it's something that really took my first couple of months and once we got going. You know it was about execution the other big thing that I had to work on last year. No one ever wants to talk about this stuff but I'll I'll pull it out. There is We had a huge synergy target. We told you know the street. Part of the deal was that there'd be synergies right, and that's cutting costs when I. You know a lot of times you think cutting things cutting labor, but in it two-thirds usually of your costs are non-labor, so I spent a tremendous amount of effort last year, consolidating our vendors and our partner landscape, and renegotiating and rightsizing contracts and really thinking about how we use I t and that got us to really start to talk about okay. How do we go digital? 'cause we were mostly on Prom. And thinking about the cloud, and where it made sense to go first, because as you start moving into digital right, you can get better functionality, but at a lower cost, and that really start to build out our strategy for this year. that were were really starting to move into this becoming more digital and transforming. So that's that's how last year Kinda came along. And that's very interesting. Because you mentioned you, you join through acquisition. You were the chief information. Officer Ability Corporation You had been for for multiple years three years. If I recall correctly, and and with the company for a bit longer than that for or change by again if I recall correctly and an unusual scenario you usually in an acquisition, it's the acquired executives who went out over the the the acquiring rather executives. We're not over the acquired executives, and so an unusual scenario. I think you could knit. Of of being part of the acquired acquisition. Acquired entity, and then taking this leadership role on I'm hearing in your response as to how you spent the early stages of getting to know the business of you know going to various locations meeting people going on sort of a listening tour, my to my words, not yours as a means. Getting to know this new entity that you would be an executive of. But maybe I'd be interested as you thought about that. And bringing together these two teams, and now representing a a company that you previously not even been a part of some of the interesting aspects of that. Yeah, no, it. It is a unique situation. What's funny about it? I I've been through it three or four times now where I've been I keep getting acquired and managed to survive so I I enjoy it No, it worked out, you know my predecessor was phenomenal and he. You know he was it it. It worked out. You know he was ready. To retire Bob and he's a phenomenal cio and you know he. He's a you know. One of those Cio Hall of fame guys, so he's fantastic right so so so it was a really good situation for both of us so it good and I had his mentor ship coming in which was great. So. You know with with Jill dougherty. being bought by SAC SAC was not just buying the assets. They also wanted to to really look at the methodologies, the processes and try to have a think about doing things a different way than just doing what we've always done forever. I and I gotta give it to the leadership of essay. They really looked at the leaders out in Jill dougherty and the different organizations that how do we truly? You know this isn't just? We're going to integrate them in, but really bring the two organizations together because we so well complimented. Complimented each other, but we were in different areas. We bought a lot. The team Bartolotta Intel to the plate. But how do we not only just bring the two together, but think about process improvements and we did, and we went through all the huge process to make sure we kept the right talent you know and I happen to be one of those people that got to come facie, which is great, and then we also just looked at everything for so from an IT perspective. We looked at all the systems and we said okay well. There's some that. Are actually enjoy got maybe a better system. Here are a better process or better people. Let's bring them in as I looked at I and bring the two teams together I didn't just say Oh well I'm gonNA keep the people I know and let the people go that I. Don't know you know I really was. We were really thoughtful about it, and we said well. Let's bring the two teams together and do that assessment and figure out where it makes sense, and if we do have to, you know, do any changes, or thoughtful about it. It's not just reactionary. It's not political, and and it was very open to it, and we just bought Unisys federal and. And we'll close on that deal shortly, and it's the same thing. We're really look they're. They're experts in the cloud, so we're not gonNA. You know we don't want to mess up their secret sauce. What we WANNA do is learn from it incorporated in make say I see stronger, and I think with each acquisition that I say he's done. It was site tour before that that was constantly about making the company stronger. It's not just about buying contracts. It's really how do we take what each company does? Really really well that secret sauce an added to ours I. Mean we do a lot of things great, but we can always be better and we constantly WANNA try differentiate so. As a as someone coming in I've felt like. I had a voice from day. One I. I'm vocal and able to talk about what I see and give ideas and I feel listened to, and with great discussions I. It's really fantastic the fantastic environment, I honestly pinch regularly that I get to be the CIO of. I mean it's a phenomenal organization must be been Tasso. Anyone that wants to join FA. I see they should go to our website and look at her career site great company. A great great pitch certainly. It's it's it's interesting. I know that innovation is near, and dear to your heart, and it's very much part of your strategic roadmap ensure that it is a source of innovation, and I can only imagine the challenges of balancing these major integrations, which as you as you point out, have not ceased you join through an acquisition not long ago, and now a another eight acquisition in UNICEF federal is on the books as well. How do you balance those integration activities with you know sort of thinking to pass them to the future or towards? An agenda that also includes innovation. Yeah, so in some cases. WHAT THE INTEGRATION! We actually are almost meeting. Together so, for example, and Had chosen a cloud hr tool set and saic really liked it, and so we brought ingenuity NFL together quickly from an HR perspective in the current. Hr Tool set, but we. We decided early on that. We would then take that next step to digital platform that would really imply improve the employees. especially the managers experience so those are the types of things that through the integrations. We've actually been able to talk about. Okay, let's not just say you know we're going to. Integrate this and be done. Let's think about what the long-term vision can we meet their or do? We need to kind of two steps like we bring us together and then go there, so we've spent a lot of time looking and really last year we tried to do that. Integration piece and set us up to quickly move a lot of these things to the cloud I'm especially SAS products. You know from an enterprise perspective, so I'm looking you know HR and be D. collaboration that..

CIO Jill dougherty. executive Tessie ICEES Bob Unisys cio SAC SAC Officer Ability Corporation Bartolotta Intel UNICEF partner Tasso saic NFL
Court backs Trump administration on virus safety at work

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

Court backs Trump administration on virus safety at work

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting a court backs the trump administration on virus safety requirements at work a federal appeals court has ruled the trump administration does not have to issue an emergency rule requiring employers to protect workers from the corona virus the unanimous ruling came from a three judge panel of the U. S. court of appeals for the district of Columbia in its two page ruling the appeals court said the occupational safety and health administration is entitled to considerable deference in its decision not to issue an emergency temporary standard the AFL-CIO sued last month in a bid to compel the labor department's workplace safety arm to issue coronavirus workplace safety requirements Mike Rossio Washington

Mike Rossi Columbia Afl-Cio Mike Rossio Washington
Police unions dig in as calls for reform grow

1A

05:32 min | 3 months ago

Police unions dig in as calls for reform grow

"States across the US are in their second straight week of protests over the killing of George Floyd by a police officer many hope to see police reform they have reached a current though and that's often the police unions to talk about the role of police unions and the power they hold over reforms we have Booker Hodges assistant commissioner at the Minnesota department of public safety and let's bring it round the lord a police union labor negotiator former police officer and the former president of a state wide police union in Texas run thank you so much for joining us well thanks for having me we're getting a lot of comments from the moment given example one listener tweets it seems all other unions are under attack but police unions only gets stronger what accounts for this and then Richard tweets the left is finally realizing public unions make it very difficult to remove crappy employees teacher police if you suck at your job you've got to find another job these these questions Rauner kind of centered around what makes police unions different I think and could you answer that for us to can we look back to the history of police used to get the answer well sure and I think the I always call it kind of the duck billed platypus of unions they're in a union but they don't look like other unions and there's a big reason for that because of the nineteen nineteen Boston police strike it pretty much wiped out unionization in America until really into the nineteen sixties they do said paternal so ninety eighty five ninety percent of all the police United States do not belong to the AFL-CIO they have one chartered union and it's a it's a small percentage so the police were late getting into the labor firefighters had an international in nineteen eighty S. all the public employee unions construction units you know that some of those are a hundred years old so police were late to the game they were used in many times as strike breakers and picket lines and so they didn't gravitate in there tend to be conservative by nature so their unions look different but they're still just working people their blue collar working people who form the groups who have become adept at using the American political system to increase our wages and pay in for job security so I'm not ashamed to be in a policeman or representing the police they can only do in a increase their strength or get their message out it's all illegitimate nature so different than people that are anti gun and pro gun you know free speech no free speech in America everyone has a right to speak out on things so well of concern to their members we got this tweet Booker from Tracey Wheeler and she mentions what Ron just said about the fraternal order of police Tracy says the police union's name the fraternal order of police is symbolic of the fact that it operates like an old boys club officers who speak up about bad cop behavior are ostracized in this culture and I want to put this book or in the context of what we heard earlier from you lie at the the Marshall project who was saying that often times African American cops don't want to join leadership because they don't want to be part of that culture yes so yeah I think there's there are some differences between African American officers on what offices regarding union membership I mean mia love the vast majority of my career I was in the union I was a union president you know so I didn't have some of those issues but a lot of the other people I know who are in other organizations did have issues regarding how that they didn't feel that the union represented them or didn't defend them as strongly as they did white officer so I I I'm fully aware that that issue does exist within the labor unions run it sounds like you wanted to respond to that as well well that issue exist in America so you could say I'm a seventy two year old white man who grew up in the south where our view the world may be different than a black person my age who grew up different but men and women officers have different views about things Hispanic officers have different views are Asian awesome so that's in it in and of itself but you have to say policing in America is eighty five percent means there's been no woman firefighter president that I'm aware of any part of union in America ever so so we look at it and then we say yes but they appear to be older white men yes but there haven't democratic elections welcome back officers in America only about twelve percent of the police no less maybe nineteen so that's wrong but the pollution is not hurting anybody the city hires the city provides room recruitment in six cities were even worse off when it comes to female officers their lesson about twelve percent of the police which is half the number of Canada Australia and other European countries so thank you in that profession is eighty five percent median and whatever sixty seventy percent white means that white men tend to gravitate up yes but lots of officers don't become involved in the

United States George Floyd Officer
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:35 min | 4 months ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Tax, which really explorer some. New areas that are outside of our own business and potentially represent. Revenue. Generating opportunities for us in the future. That's quite a quite a broad purview, and in fact, one that. kind of although it's growing among the CIO. Still, certainly not the average CEO that is involved in the kinds of innovations and technologies will because to refacing and essentially revenue-generating as well as I as I. Believe I'm hearing from from those sorts of things that you and your team are working on. Yeah and I mean I think if you're in a very unique place because we are a very information, driven organization, and technology really is at the forefront of our business in clients. Do Their businesses through our? Our trading and investment platforms, and so since it's such a some corridor business really everything that we innovated in is around technology, and so I think it was a very natural evolution for my role to encompass some of those responsibilities as well. It's interesting you about innovation is nearly a responsibility and you further kind of. Qualified that as new ideas within the core business talk a bit about how you define innovation. What what What constitutes an innovative idea that the organization is pursuing? Yeah, I mean. I, think when we think about this, it's really can take a couple of different forms and I tried to be one of these people that's an innovation purist by any any seven imagination so I, really a big believer.

CIO CEO
Stocks slip as markets await Trump's Hong Kong response

BTV Simulcast

09:10 min | 4 months ago

Stocks slip as markets await Trump's Hong Kong response

"Hong Kong security law and the U. S. responses to later on this Friday and setting up a pretty gloomy end to what's been in next month for Asian stocks Menton has stalled after April registered the strongest surge since twenty sixteen that's crossover to Frankfort and twine queen a CIO of emerging markets at Deutsche Bank wealth management so I think this week we saw a little bit of a a preview of what could be the calm here when it comes the rising U. S. China trade tensions market so it seems to be taking it in stride for now but what could be the next driver for markets in the next couple weeks or so in June after we saw a pretty decent last two months exactly so I think now given that we have seen quite a strong rally from the lows in March and now that a lot of countries in the world but no stopping in the U. S. with the exit strategy stock market that turning a little bit more to of feed now and of course as you read he said China you attention would be one of these but the thing that is more of the election recall a kia as you know we are of course not in the middle of the election campaign to with the election in beginning of November and and the the approval rating of president trump has falling quite choppy he had of course now to two district case border he and now directing to China is maybe one of the possibilities and of course as I mentioned with the exit strategy we also have to watch now how this is going to play out if there's a second wave which could trigger a potentially old sold a second knockdown I think these are the main themes we are looking at and then of course how the economic data will also then follow we know and we have been to one date which was bad but of course everyone should be aware that cute too in your role and within the U. S. would be even worse than Q. one yeah I let you see this divergence right of what the real economy is seeing versus what I meant financial markets have outperformed essentially how do you think this all gets resolved will stocks eventually catch downing and get a dose of reality or do you think that the economy are we're gonna see a decent enough bounce back to justify the hope that's been priced into markets yes well I think what the markets are currently pricing in it is exactly that story fifty economies are open again we don't see a second wave and that things are slowly returning back to some sort of normality maybe you can call it in you Norman but if we compare then of course the reality is he right he said with the expectation as I mentioned it is also of course so a lot of pride in so when I look at a lot twelve month target for example bought the S. and P. five hundred we think that if not much upside potential and the reefs at this level is Robert to the down side from our perspective to let go fast you Melis from China out of four point eight percent of GDP veces the likes of the U. S. at fifteen percent Japan at twenty percent how much of a risk is that for eons we don't think it is much of the race because when you look at the data and the we how China and also about Asians and countries have said to deal with the virus I think of the if not the need to be so aggressive in terms of to Malaysia the markets with maybe a little bit disappointed with the the number of the stimulus measures also compared to other developed markets but the I mean China is we know has been the vehicle two months ago in January and and February but since then the economy is open again we have a team of course the the data recovering not at thanks to the previous level but of course China and the rest of Asia at least two months ahead of the rest of the woodlands that he's not that kind of needs for such a big stimulus but I think the old so that if need be then the the government here will that also increase the similar so from that perspective we are not worried at all what I want to take a look at the bond market sell these Asian bonds in particular have had a great time best performing in Asia in Q. one are you still finding Indonesian Thai Filipino bonds attractive at current levels on the elective bases yes broader market as you rightly said the performance has been great already so we are still recommending clients for Camry but it tends to be much more selective especially now the run we have seen so it's not just by the whole market like when they see it September but now it's more on the collective faces and also in terms of conviction calls right now what what do you see the most opportunity it seems like we're or seeing the last couple weeks or so this rotation out of out of quality into value and and it and people are pricing as you mentioned this this recovery but then you're flying of course the risks of all the second wave as well so how do you hedge your bets at this moment yeah you read me that so we have been recommending recorded quality goal here because I think in such an environment where most of the companies are not able to provide guidance it's even more important to look at both companies with a strong balance sheet with total visit the business model and that's why we have identified especially the technology but also the head Catholic thought to be for Indies quality growth area if you ready said we are also seeing it in the last one or two weeks I would be some rotation into value but we think this is maybe not the numbers we still think the win in the pot supposed to be the winner in the future as well but of course they have called to reach now valuation levels which not cheap anymore so can you also again have to be selected if a lot of you offer continuous recovering would not play out then of course as the hatch we still like gold on the other side I think he with interest rates being still very little we don't really see much in creation I think because gold is the to have a meaningful with a location in now hold clients but for years we've seen at least when it comes to global GDP estimates that things perhaps of bounce are these bottoms for twenty twenty one do you think that's still looking a bit optimistic because I seem to be the reason are catalysts for many bowls to really continue to track cases rally if I were you is and I think as I mentioned in the beginning of the year a GDP would drop quite massively and half of it Q. two will be the worst quarter since the second World War we are expecting corner me in the U. S. to read cover back to end of twenty nineteen level in twenty twenty two so but bounced bank will happen in twenty one but it won't be enough to be back at the level from Lafia so it would take another year in twenty two in order to be back then two levels of nineteen eighty and you roll depending also on Khan three the eight my take likely long maybe then Q. two of twenty three and at the same would be for earnings and this is I think what the market is looking for and stopping now also to discounted twenty win from don't your bank wealth management speaking to us from Frank but thank you so much

Hong Kong
UN migration agency IOM lauches $206 million Syria appeal

UN News

00:55 sec | 4 months ago

UN migration agency IOM lauches $206 million Syria appeal

"An urgent appeal for the people of Syria has been issued by the UN migration agency CIO amid growing concerns that millions of people displaced by years of fighting are unprepared for the threat of nineteen. The disease has compounded an already devastating crisis that has left eleven million people in need of help. Iom Director General Antonio Vitorino said at the launch of the two hundred six million dollar appeal. It's hoped that donors worldwide will show solidarity to support three million Syrians inside and outside the country of the total amount. Thirty three million dollars will be allocated to preventing the spread of covid nineteen. The government has reported one. Hundred and twenty-one confirmed covid nineteen cases today while no infections have been recorded in the northwest. The region saw an alarming rise in hostilities. In the first three months of the year and the health and safety of more than one million people living in tents in overcrowded under sites remain a serious concern

Director General Antonio Vitor CIO UN IOM Syria Government
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

13:25 min | 4 months ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"You like what you hear be grateful that you give us a rating on itunes or through. Whatever other sources you use for podcasts. Please subscribe so you. Don't miss a thing thank you. I guess this week is boy. Brian is the chief information officer. Immunity Technologies Danish American. The game suffered belting company focused on enabling creators to bring interesting ideas to life using three D technology as the company's first ever CIO. Brian received a strategy around implementing its core systems of record as well as corporate infrastructure operations prior to joining unity technologies. Brian was the first ever. Cio Dynamics this interview discusses how as enterprise becomes more consumer is goal he gained autonomy and then each bikes were changes. As a result he cites his in his team's focus on employee productivity. We also discuss the merging of business operations ninety but it's like being cio within a tech centric business out of managed fast growing organization in a variety of other topics. Brian Point welcome detective nation. It's great to speak with you today. Thank you very much a pleasure to be here Bryant. You're the chief. Information Officer Unity Technologies and for those who might be listening. That are less familiar with the company. I thought we begin with an overview of what the company does and your words you take him at his rival warming charity. Unity is really about enabling creators to Bring interesting things to life using three d technology whether it be. You know our primary primarily. We're known for the the gaming business but Increasingly architecture and animation and various other things that will evolve out of the use of real time three D so really is a platform for creators to bring their visions to life. Excellence and talk a bit about your role. Is Chief Information Officer? What's your purdue sure so I am Overseeing a lot of the strategy around implementing our COR systems of record as well sort of corporate infrastructure and operation kind of keeping the business running. We have a highly distributed workforce and something like you know forty offices which is Close to forty offices. I think which is pretty large for a company of our size so keeping kind of taking along and make sure that everyone is collaborating and and running across time zones is is a big part of my job to employee. Productivity is huge for us as well as sort of developer productivity and trying to pull together all the engineering tools that we use and make them accessible to our employees is quickly and easily as possible. As you really wanted to GULLIVER'S NOT TO TO LOSE. Am You figuring out it stuff? That's great? Brian and I wonder can talk Omitted about your current strategy. You mentioned a few things there. In terms of in ebeling this distributed workforce so ensuring that employees and developer particularly is as high as possible Talk a bit about some of the brexit going into greater depth there if you wish but other aspects of your current strategy is you look to the your head so you know and the company that's growing quickly in unity is is growing really quickly. You know we're somewhere around three thousand employees now and when I started you know a little more than a year and a half ago. I think we're probably around fifteen hundred so we've grown quite a bit in quite quickly Pockets of sort of emerge business grows and whether that be you something as fundamental as a finance system that needs to be consolidated something and run in a more central fashion as we scale so part of what we're doing is trying to centralize this sort of operational business systems that in company as things like CR in European all of the you know the large amount of immigration to go around these systems integrating those Consolidating them and making sure that their run in a way that we can understand. The financials of the company who our customers are and things like that. So that's been a big part of the strategy is really consolidating. A lot of that effort when it comes to the sort of you know employees developer productivity. You know the strategy has been an interesting one at unity we have. I think I alluded before quite a bit of offices and the real strength for us to have people from a lot of different backgrounds working on on solving these problems and we have a lot of smart people in in pocket. Sometimes we have offices that are between twenty five and fifty people which may not suit a fulltime. It's poor person on staff all the time so we have tried to leverage a number automation and is trying to keep things as elegant as possible when we choose a tool set. You know that someone can use without meeting a whole bunch of help. So that's sort of one of the key principles that we've gone into. This is how how can get out of the way of the employees to make sure that everything works well to to to let their laptop run and not not sort of take over the laptop experience either something that especially software developers pretty sensitive about if you if you don't give them the tool chain that their laptop can do to develop products. You're really taking away a part of their autonomy. And we're trying to to to to not do that specifically that's interesting and as you as you highlight you are. Whereas there's some companies where the preponderance of technology talent is in it. Clearly that's not the case unity. Technologies where you've got talent throughout the organization. And how do you? How do you partner with the rest of the organization and I guess begun to allude to it but I'd love to delve a little bit further as to how you add unique you With an IT in a sea of technology. Talent like you have yeah. I think it's a it's a it's A. It's an interesting place to be. It's not always a comfortable place to be in But it's it can often humbling because our you know. We have a lot of really really smart people. That are you know Graduate degrees in computer science and You know graphics engineering and things like that. Who are much much more cold than I am. Horse and certainly getting more technical than than I think the most of my team So you know you can't really always win technical argument so And that's okay but it makes you sort of rely on On a number of other things like hey you know. We're at the coin in this company where we have X. number of people and we need to all do one thing because I can't take care of seventy five you know. Seventy five beeping technologies or something for instance. You know we kind of need to pick one so we can make sure that we're doing it properly and I think for the most part people are reasonable and and And understand that. Hey we're here to kind of make decisions and provide a strategy and to try to make it as you know as a simple and secure and as As functional as we possibly can so I ended up killing two people on. That aren't quite a bit There's there's a log repealed you know what I mean I think Like mentioned before you know it as a company skills rapidly sort of wellspring technology pop up all around the company and You know sometimes it's not necessarily like search and destroy mission but more the listening exercise like hey wait what the why. Why aren't you able to use this thing that I'm doing? And what is it costing you and you know what why? Why am I in your way on this? What can we do to this? And I think people are are receptive on. I spend quite a bit of time. A sort of Engineering operations leader in our in our company to understand what their roadmap is and how we can get out of out of their way. What's really interesting and unity is because we're kind of working on the cutting edge be are you know in a are technologies sometimes a lot of the hardware kit that that. It needs to come up with you know may may not be publicly available or maybe you know NBA or top secret stuff right and Also introduces some some interesting challenges for us? So it's kind of a fun place to be but you. You need to really approach it with quite a bit of humility because everyone will have feedback. No matter what choice you make no doubt you mentioned in the roughly two and a half years that you've been CIO. The company is doubled in size in terms of people. And I wonder how you think about Planning for that kind of scaling you know a lot of. Cio's your peers were more mature organizations that have growth rates that are much lower than that the process of adding some capability adding some you know. A ability to expand in scale is not at a level that you're experiencing is how do you. How do you plan for you know the organization that that that doubles in size or grooms is wrapping as this one does to ensure that everyone is this productive as possible? Yeah I mean I think it's kind of like a hang on loosely tuition in some cases right. I mean you're you're never GONNA be out in front of this kind of growth from an IT perspective because the next thing you know a team of five people will sign up. We work in law grabbed or something right and then And then the then there's issues the Wifi in and we works and things like that. I'm like well you know I can't really you know I can't really help you there because that that's that's nothing we can control it like that is an example of something that You're always slightly behind the like we. You're literally sometimes find out. Oh there's a new office in in this location So it could be chaotic at times. But you Kinda have to just Be ready for that and You know I think it's simple things to like. You know. Find a way to make. Sure your Your employees can retain admin race on their. Lots of you know if a if you have them. They're smart technical people. They can follow a lot of these problems on their own. Without having to have somebody walk over and again that made me applicable only enter Tech Company. But it is a strategy that we use. Hey we've got some smart people here. We don't WANNA get in their way or make them contact somebody I think You know really trying to Make the employee as productive as possible and get out of their way is. The key is a key thing. We're not we're just not going to be able to control everything and and it's not our job really to to control everything and it's the same thing with a lot of Vendor technologies just kind of have to assume that everybody is out there entering their credit card into you know into software companies other software companies websites and downloading tools. All the time So our so our business model is like Oh you know oh now. There's twenty five thirty people using this thing. Maybe the vendor will reach out to us and say hey would you like. Would you like to onboard this? And maybe we can add some security features that those things are just. GonNa Happen. It's part of it's part of doing business in a company that's growing and if you try to if you try to control it you'll end up squashing the growth trajectory and being in the way and you won't last long I can tell you that so So I think I think you can add your voices concern and try to guide it and And be a part of the growth. But it's really a listening exercise because people are trying to at the end of the day solve problems and do their job right and that's interesting and so so Whereas a lot of your peers push as they can at least towards developing standards for the organization to use for reasons of simplicity security in scale ability these sorts of things in many ways. You're embracing the The the use of a wide array of tools because an essence. It sounds like you. Let me know if I'm paraphrasing incorrectly. But the developers get vote. What they believe is going to be The most productive Tool to use the tool is going to get them to their destination. More quickly as something really disappointed. That that fair yeah. I think that chair. I mean you know. It doesn't mean that we we. It doesn't mean that we can't say no right. I mean there's you know there's certain things that it's like listening. Not everyone can go out and build their own. Hr system you know. That's a different thing you know you know like you know payroll things like that like listen like this is how it is right. We've tried to do the best job. We can or financial systems but you know could get the project management tool or a communication tool or something like this that just sort of abound on the market today where people can just go. You know You know whatever vendors website and download the tool in and know start going away at. He thinks just kind of you know. We've got all this stuff nick. Someone prefers one project management over another. It's like you know God bless I'm not here to really dislike that so I think I think there's some things In it now that you still have to do everything. Europe. Some things some things you can help you know for instance the Your team is trained to implement like a learning management that's primarily going to be driven by an HR team or a customer.

Brian Point cio developer chief information officer CIO Officer Unity Technologies purdue Europe ebeling NBA Bryant Vendor technologies Engineering operations partner
The Chief Security Officer in (and out of) a Crisis

a16z

05:56 min | 5 months ago

The Chief Security Officer in (and out of) a Crisis

"When I first started working in security you would generally have see so that reported somewhere under workforce. It like a very focused. I will make sure your laptop is secure and that was security. Probably Twenty years ago I had to study the nature and design of chain link fences. That was protecting my data center right. That was very much a part of the curriculum. If you wanted to get information security was understanding physical barriers. We no longer run data centers. Everything's Amazon everything's in Google. Everything's Microsoft the world has gotten more complicated technically and there's a combination of factors. There one is just the evolution of the cloud. Every company has a hybrid environment. Now if you've been around for more than five years and you have the emergence of crypto currency and the pressure. It's putting on financial security in particular. The laws have changed so you have. Gdp are in Europe which is just starting to see the massive fines come out on the companies that didn't invest the right way insecurity or had major security incidents we're seeing boards and CEOS held accountable. And so there's a personal sense of anxiety that those board members and senior executives have and they want to have a senior leader who can help them navigate the security issues that they face looking at all those complicated factors. I think it leads to this question of is that too much for a single roll to handle as these teams get to be really large. It's hard to find a security person that can run a couple thousand people organization that can run a hundred plus million dollar budget. We've never really develop that muscle memory in that skill set in some of the larger organizations. You're still seeing the decision not to go with Ceasar's Eso and have different leaders for each of those functions sitting in different parts of the company. When I was the CFO at Uber I had responsibility for the technical security of the company. Meaning make sure we don't get hacked but also physical security of our offices and safety of our employees oversight of our attempts to minimize fraud and then rider and driver safety. Those are four very different disciplines that require very different technical teams. Sometimes you'll hear why don't they have a senior security leader and it may be because they've decided our physical security risks are so different from our technical risks and we don't have one executive who can do a great job over both of them the fact that these companies sometimes are structured in a single role. Sometimes they're structuring it out based on the different types of problems. What do you see as the trade offs in those two? Different structures is one better than another more. I think it definitely depends on the company and the business that they're in but there is a bit of a pendulum that swings from centralized to decentralize and I think I'm on the second shift of that pendulum. Now as we've moved from building highly centralized organizations we get these massive security teams and then we can't really find leaders that can run these security teams and then so it goes back towards a decentralized approach. My personal opinion is centralized the organization. You're sort of seeing this accountability. Wave twelve years ago. I went through a massive breach at a very large bank. I was running the incident response program so I was kind of frontlines and they held a cio of business align technology executive accountable and the security team actually got more budget. Now we're seeing when there is a breach of the ceasefire has held accountable. There's a new team that gets brought in. There's a complete restructuring and a big driver is the regulators saying that they want to see a meaningful commitment to change and that the sea so should be empowered to make changes in the organization. I want to talk a little bit about win. This role makes headlines. What's the role of the sea? So when there's a breach or when there's an event will if you step back and think about the role of a security leader regardless of which of those functions you're talking about physical or digital or safety cars. There's really three different responsibilities number. One is prevent something bad from happening. That's what we all come to work every day and probably why most of US chose the profession in the first place but then job number two is assume that you've failed at that and have a good incident response. Plan have the ability to detect something bad going wrong as quickly as possible. Then there's the third discipline which is okay. There's a crisis. How do we respond to it? And the interesting thing in this profession is that a lot of us joined because of number one prevent harm but get judged on number three crisis response. There are a lot of really good security engineers who say wow the head of security Job I don't want because I don't want to be a sacrificial lamb. I think it's really interesting. You brought up the concept of sacrificial lamb. 'cause we did just see capital one replace there see so following the data breach. To what extent are these breaches inevitable and is it fair to beholding anybody to account if you go to the closed door? See so conferences. This is one of the topics that debated heavily right now. So the first time I took this role was at facebook and I got great support from the executive leadership almost unlimited budget ability to grow and hire great engineers and by technology and the most surprising thing is that you realize you can't buy your way too good security you literally can't write a blank check and have great security tomorrow. Security requires long-term investment requires you to run alongside the development teams and the business teams understand them and help them reduce their risks. And on one hand you'll hear the sows who think it's unfair saying look. I shouldn't take the fall if I don't get to make all the decisions to prevent the fall but the reality of the role is you. Don't get to make all the decisions security. Such a cross functional process. There's so much that goes into what risks the company decides to take versus what they don't and then on the other hand there's no going in. I'M GONNA be the fall guy or fall girl if we don't do it right and so they're going to probably be more vocal and championing their cause among leadership

Executive Europe Microsoft Ceasar Facebook United States Fraud CFO Amazon Google CIO
AI in the US Federal Government  Interview with Suzette Kent, US Federal CIO

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:51 min | 5 months ago

AI in the US Federal Government Interview with Suzette Kent, US Federal CIO

"Hello and welcome to the today. Podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh. I'm your host Ronald Schmoozer. Our guest today is who's that. Who's the federal chief information officer of the United States? Hi thank you so much for joining us on today. Well thank you Kathleen. Nice to join you. Yeah welcome Suzanne and thanks for joining us today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role as Federal Cio Berlin Kathleen Ryan through that Canon. The federal chief information officer and that role. I have the our pleasure of working with all the agencies of the Federal Government Executive Branch. And how we use technology. That's both the policies as well as a looking at how agencies actually perform against those policies and intense. So it's an exciting face because the most important thing is how we use technology to serve mission and I came to the federal government after almost thirty in industry most of that in financial services show when we think about many concepts particularly around. Hey I for use of delivering services to citizens the importance of privacy and transparency and ethics. Many of those things were part of my career in the private sector so happy to join you today really excited about this topic. Because it's one of the things that as I look across. All the technology areas that are part of the role of the Federal Cio. The opportunities here and the come in across the agencies is really important in this area. You know that's really great because you know. Artificial intelligence is a transformative. Technology is transforming industry and society and governments across the board. It's part of what we've been really thrilled to cover as part of our now hundred forty or so episodes of today plus all of our research. So it's really exciting to see that the federal government United States has made a priority. So where do you see federal agencies today in their adoption? That's a great question Ron and I actually think it's across the board and I'll share some examples of what I mean by that but I'm GonNa Start with emphasizing the way you open the question investment in a I both in private sector and in use inside. The federal government is a priority of this administration and there have been multiple statements and commitments about that and most of the examples and things that I'm going to share. Obviously were about what we're doing inside the federal government and what agencies are doing but but your question I see it across the board and what I mean by that is some agencies like Department of Energy and Dod Nath. Nsf COMMERCE HHS. They're more than and they range from. Having formal focus business units and teen data curation expanded infrastructure in a multitude of projects and investments. And their own you know high performance computing capabilities and other agencies like va PSA labor transportation and interior. They may be in a little different place. And maybe in some cases not as mature across that entire spectrum of investments but they have targeted mission project. They've pilot initiatives they're driving maturity of data capabilities their computer capabilities and workforce skills development and of course every single agency has opportunity to use a AI as it's embedded in many of the products that we're getting from our commercial vendor partners so they're bringing in elements of Automation Analytical Advancement. Hey I and some of those mature data use capabilities as we leveraged commercially available product. So that kind of a broad spectrum across all the agencies yeah that's a really good overview and I know that for our listeners who have been following us for quite some time we've interviewed various leaders from government and I think that every agency does have their own adoption and maturity but it's really nice and refreshing to see that everybody is working towards that. I know that the United States also wants to train an AI. Ready Workforce as we continue to bring ai into every aspect of our lives. It's important that we have a workforce that's able to feel comfortable and work with and Bill. So can you share with us what that means to have an AI? Ready Workforce how the US government plans to get a already workforce. And maybe what? Some of the long term projections are for this type of training. This is one of your questions that I was most excited about and so I will do bear with me kind of for a longer answer on this because an angry ready workforce is really a big statement. It's an important commitment as well because the goal extends beyond the technical workforce to our entire workforce the missions face and how we interact with the American people. What makes a difference technology versus? Some of the things that we've seen in history is that this is really driving a paradigm shift and what I mean. By that is many of her legacy technologies. They captured aided they move data. They store it. They present it but largely the State Action John Interpretations for she'll done by people and as we look at a I the human land and people at interpretation. Does it change but the capacity and the capabilities that we have changed significantly. And I'll give you an example of shared in the past one of the things I was very excited about. It was one of my favorite simulations that combine weather data transportation data power grid data labor and Commerce data to answer really complex question or a simple question with a lot of complex factors as. Where's the optimal placement response teams during the hurricane? So you had to look at kind of. Where is the weather impact can be made? And what the impact of water and wind on road power. Where would people be they somewhere? They worked in where they live. And that makes us think differently about all the people who have to be involved in building that capability beyond technicians deep mission expert individuals who understand implications of the mission. And so with that kind of long answer. I'll take it a second step and then talk about actual training. I was recently visiting one of our university chains who are recipients from some federal grant. Ai and they were taking that scenario that I just mentioned to even further step by saying if we know what's going to happen. How can we recover faster? Where will there be treason degree that needs to be removed? And what is the workforce that we need to repair flood damage not only use the capabilities to minimize impact to speed up recovery? When you think about this type of scenario that fundamentally changes are end to end workforce those designing and developing from a technical stage. Those are part of the mission. The subject matter expertise in multiple kind of rings of impact that scenario so to train our workforce to leverage the powerful capabilities. We need not only but commitment from the technical side but mission operations in the business teams who understand and have the insight to help us identify e contract and reconstruct some of those complex interactions and in all of that for the citizens that were serving. We have to invest in the transparency in plain ability. Of how both that data and technology are being used so it is a very different approach to technical operational and service delivery and the way that we are looking at. The training is kind of end. Those different components hands on skill but literacy in. How a an information is used and heard the term Dev ops in development but how we empower our in the workforce through the business processes changes how we design and deliver the capabilities because we have to expand it throughout the entire business process from the genesis of the data to the experience of the end user. So that is somewhat of a long winded answer. That part of the transformational capability when you actually address the entire flow from end to end.

Federal Government United States AI Chief Information Officer Federal Government Executive B Kathleen Walsh Federal Cio Cio Berlin Kathleen Ryan Ronald Schmoozer Suzanne Canon RON Dod Nath Department Of Energy John Interpretations
iOS Interview Questions For Senior Developers in 2020 Part 2

Inside iOS Dev

09:01 min | 5 months ago

iOS Interview Questions For Senior Developers in 2020 Part 2

"And today's episode as part two to the previous episode about IOS interview questions for Senior Developers in two thousand twenty. The article that I wrote S- and this is the part two episode where I'm covering article so in this one. I'm going over questions next question. So we'll start with question number four. What is what is NBC? It's a very fundamental question again. Even though it's very basic question senior developers also need to know about and expected to give more detail on the show more depth of knowledge of such basic questions so NBC stands for Model View Controller. Software Design Pattern apple adopted. It came from small talk. Apple adopted its towards their own. Had has has its own reincarnation of it Model is responsible for data controller is responsible or views responsible rendering the dates and getting input from the user and control are supposed to glue views and models together right and be this coordinator control right at the end of the day. Apples flavor of it is More view skewed towards the view. That's why wouldn't really have controllers. Who Have you controllers what you should know? Besides there's this basics That that I just covered you also need to know and understand that model view controller. Nbc is not your application architecture. That's just a design pattern foot of you and if you want to architecture application especially architectures for scale you probably should go for something something else. Something with more flexibility. Something's more advanced at least. I'M VM MVP COORDINATOR. Design pattern or go for a heavy duty architectures such as viper and ribs but again as a as a senior developer. You should be aware of that so erratic flag that could raise here as well simply not knowing what an NBC is right. What what it stands for. And what that's fundamental Basic design pattern of APP Iowa's Apple Development in general I think they use it on all the platforms but nevertheless I again as I mentioned already as a senior. Dev rather the expectation is that you know. Other design patterns and architectures for further reading. Look at Apple. Apples article on their developer portal. It's called model dash view controller Then ABC's Dotto has a great article Cold lighter view controllers. It's from one of their previous issues of Went UP CIO. Had this Monthly I believe issue of their articles. Then there's another article on a con Lou con Lou. I think that's how I say it that come about massive you controller. Kennedy shoes with NBC. Another one is on a Napa soda actual this podcast inside. Iowa's Dev where and I covered the the issues with controller skull the problem with the problems with controllers another article you could read introduction to n. b. b. m. that's also obviously that article And then another episode of this podcast view models to the rescue As far as I recall Andrew in that episode. Goes over a great example of where? Mvp and could could save your bacon in the overblown view controller. Massive you controller code base and another article could read up on a model view presenter. It's MVP by Martin Fowler. It's on his website. March and following dot com. And as usual. You you'll find those links south. Put Him the Up put the link to the article in the show notes and they're in the further reading for that question. You can find links to those articles that I mentioned. The next question is number five. What do you know about? Singleton's where would you use one? And where would you not Singles Singleton Severi? It's very common design pattern. It'S CONSIDERED TO BE CO CORE. Competencies design pattern and it's used everywhere throughout all of the apple examples and They they actually utilizing soon bilton themselves in the API COCA API that they provide a four us. This jar short answer. Singleton Is a class that returns only one. And the same instance no matter how many times you requested what it really means at the end of the day that you have a type but say networking services and you implement a static or property rather. I think that's typically the implementation called shared or something like that instance and then in there you basically cash that instance the very first time. It's accessed you initials it and then you cash it and that's it. And then every other time when the in through that static property the instances rick. The SINGLETON has requested to return the same instance Singled and Sarah unfortunately anti pattern. They have a lot of issues with them and specifically they encourage global states. The they they really did. Sir and there are a lot of issues with dependency injection they. They really don't help at all with it. They make it more difficult. They you have to tie things to specific concrete types instead of relying and interfaces things like that so and in general even though apple promotes it. I do not recommend using singleton's and I know it's a it's a kind of a debatable topic if you will but there are a lot of prominent articles written about by prominence experienced developers Basically kind of debunking if you will the design pattern than explaining why. It's an anti pattern. So the Rad flak for this question as well you should actually know what a singleton the is and how to implement it and how to work with it even though it's a necessary and or unfortunate evil quite often and for further reading to to kind of get into the details of why. I'm saying it's an anti pattern. There are two resources you could go for. One is actually episode of this podcast. Called Y Singleton are evil and another one is actually similar styles. Single single are evil. It's by you can find this article on Viki Dot C two DOT com. They cover it more. They're in in more details in an an unwrap all the issues with singles. So the next questions number six. What's different between delegates and TV? Oh so this is a this is also quite common question on on. Irs INTERVIEWS THE DETAILED. Yar The cute. Let's let's start with What what is Ki? Ki Ki all right cave your sense. Four key valley observation so delicate design pattern and Kiva observation both are techniques for to establish relationships between objects and delegates establishes and declares using the delegates. You declare one to one relationship using protocols delegate protocols and Dan with Kiva labs operation you declare and establish a many to many relationship using other techniques but mostly. It's a kind of declarative key valor. While the that that's in the name Kiva Observation and your keys likely will be there strings or I believe you could use like selectors or something about for

NBC Apple MVP Singleton Developer Iowa Coordinator Kiva Observation Lou Con Lou Kiva Labs Napa IRS CIO ABC Kennedy DAN Rick Martin Fowler Sarah
Supply Chain On The Brain - Lisa Morales-Hellebo

American Fashion Podcast

03:20 min | 5 months ago

Supply Chain On The Brain - Lisa Morales-Hellebo

"So you started the New York fashion tech lab which have since departed and that. That's running on its own. Yeah what was it like to to start that? How did you pull all the pieces together? Because I mean that was. That was something that should have existed for a long time. And just didn't yeah. You're right so after Shops shut down. I was having dinner with Amy Millman from springboard in the city here and she said so what next for the first time in my life. I have no freaking clue and she said well what if you know money was no object. What if you didn't have to worry about an income and I said well in that case I would love to build the fashion tech accelerator? I wish had existed when I went through stars and it would be focused on really getting buy in from the C. Suite Executives and champions within these huge companies to actually hand select the technologies that they thought were most meaningful to their bottom line rather than what. Vc's think is flippable within a couple of years which is a vast difference in in focus and then really having them dedicated to Chaperoning them throughout the program to give them access to anything they needed internal to get to a. Yes for pilot a paying customer partnership collaboration. Whatever because that was far more valuable than just raising capital so from that first dinner. Amy Said you know I'll get a couple of at Sombor D- If she is on board then she'll bring the first couple of brands to the table That so that was two thousand thirteen in the summer. Right before Christmas we met with three brands coach. Kate spade and J. Crew See does and CIO and Two of them said yes. And so- January first. Amy Calls Me and said okay. Lisa go and I had from January first until I think it was April third or fourth when I turn on the website open applications to do all the legal the branding the website the Closed Ten browns. Get them to pay for it to dedicate their C. suite executives times and commit throughout this program To coordinate calendars which was the insane. The most insane part in that time and being able to get inbound so that we had applicants we didn't have budget to promote it for weeks in advance and we literally turned on the switch and had two weeks to get applicants with no prior promotion. So I knew I needed to have the brands to put on the website to attract so when we launched as soon as I turn on the website I was inbound with like fast company. Women's wear daily saying how. What did how did this happen? It happened overnight. I'm like no. It took little over three months of sixteen hour days but there it is so we had more applicants than springboard had in the prior fifteen years of them having programs and more media coverage and we raised more money in a short period of time so they were really excited about the success of the program. I realized throughout the cohort that

Amy Millman Kate Spade C. Suite Executives New York VC CIO Lisa
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

14:26 min | 5 months ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Don't miss a thing thank you. My guess is weakest Julie. Ragland Julie's Senior Vice President and chief information officer of Navistar. Eleven billion dollar revenue manufacturer. Ursel trucks buses defense vehicles and engines. We came to be company. Navistar invest in permitted years in her mandate was to modernize organization much of her work over the past year plus has been highlighting the art of the possible through technology. Purna Join Navistar. Do he was the vice president of technology. Addy in this interview Julie Discusses. The I team has evolved Itself Premier Business Organisation by embedding gets people within the business. Units also discusses approach to creating new value streams and how? It has grown in strategic importance We discuss the on-command intelligent vehicle platform and how to start uses insights from the platform to change internal processes we also discuss trends in telematics and connected vehicles in a variety of other topics duly. Raglan welcomed the tech nation. It's great to speak with you today. Thanks Peter it's great to be here great so Julie you're the senior vice president and chief information officer of Navistar thought we begin with the company itself for our listeners. Who may be less familiar with the company? Can you just take a couple of minutes and give a brief overview of the Business Navistar? We are the manufacturer of international trucks. International trucks are large Semis Severe Service Construction Vehicles Companies People might be familiar with brands like Mack truck or peterbilt which would be our competitors. We are in the large truck and transportation industry. Talk a bit about your purview. As chief information officer so I came to Navistar little or a year ago I came into an organization where we had some years of steady while the company was going through some financial challenges. And I feel like I came and really kind of a perfect time where the company was demonstrating their ability to come out of those challenges and demonstrate that they had illuminated profitable and they were really looking for a way for it which had been under invested in for many years during that period of time to really C. I T comment a much more modern position within the organization so a lot of my work over the last year or so has trying to help an organization with systems that are in some cases thirty plus years old. Really see art of the possible. This is a an old company with a very long history and a lot of people who have been here for many many years and interesting to watch them understand that new and modern. It system can completely transform the way they do their business and and really give us a leg up in terms of our operational effectiveness and away. We go to market. Must've been a great thing to come into an organization with an appetite for the change. You described Nevertheless it also sounds like a cultural change that was necessary in order to take the organization forward. I wonder if you could reflect a little bit about some of those changes in terms of kind of rebranding even if just internally rebranding the way in which I t thought about itself in addition to how the rest of the organization thought about it. That's been a really big part of the conversation that I have internally with my team which is really. There's something that was created within the team for many many years that the cost of. It was something to be contained and minimized and you know every dollar associated with an IT investment was viewed as taking away from the opportunity to invest in. Something else. And so a lot of what we've been trying to do is really turn that conversation around into you. Know How do I? T investments transform the function that we're focusing on not only see the. It teams having a sense of confidence around the technologies that they're representing and the way that goes can really change our business but also to see the business partners that we're working with really engaging in conversations about technology and it that they hadn't engaged in before and getting their their time and their attention and using that time to explore You know what other companies are doing. We have vendors come in and and sort of give us their dog and pony show and then to go away from that and start to try to internalize what that means. Sort of some of the culmination of that Just even yesterday I was having A meeting with our chief operations officer and he really was with his leaders. Engineering leaders of manufacturing leaders procurement. Really now starting to say if in order for us to achieve our vision what must be different about the way we do. Our work and recognizing that in order to do that work differently there's an IT component of Making that happen and so it's been. It's been pretty dramatic over the last year or so as we've been really trying to foster these conversations in you mentioned part of the responsibility you and your team have is is providing the art of the possible to the rest of the organization and no doubt that also means a weaving yourself in your team or firmly into the strategic narrative of the different parts of the organization. He talk a bit about how you do that and how you bring that to life. We have a portion of our it organization where we have deliberately structured and organized ourselves to be a mirror to the Business organizations so we have people who are specifically aligned to business leaders so somebody aligned to our operations You know senior vice president. Somebody aligned to our sales and after-sales so they are embedded in with those business leaders in their daily conversations and really trying to make sure that they understand the day to day Challenges of of what? The businesses is Trying to achieve as well as then Being able to be a voice at the table four times when we believe we should be taking a look at whether or not. It as an opportunity to solve the problem for them. And I know from some things I've read about you that you've also worked to develop seven major value streams. I believe it is I wonder if you could take them. Open described some of those and the way in which your team works on optimizing one of the early things I tried to do was to start for us to start to take value streams and use that methodology to represent different systems that we have in our current state and use that as an opportunity to help businesses. See that we had historic decision making which those decisions were made without context. Four particular business process were made within the context of a function and so when we see the value stream we see the business process represented in terms of how it traverses different systems. We can now have a conversation with that particular business area to help them see that their business processes broken and the one I use frequently as an example is our procure to pay or source to pay value stream which we've asked our senior procurement vice president to own that value stream but it is executed that value stream is executed across several functions finance manufacturing. You know there are a lot of functions in our organization that actually have a part of executing that And so he now sees that The finance organization made a finance decision about the pay part of procure to pay whereas he had his predecessors made a different decision around the sourcing procurement part of procure to pay and so now we can see that that is broken. We've used that technique and a variety of different areas of the business to try to help them see beyond the scope of their function into the value stream and how a value stream representation gives us insight into nowhere. The systems not be working for them in is the idea. Also Julie to identify some of these value streams that run across multiple parts of the organization so that they can be more common methods were appropriate can be applied So the the the organization is establishing a greater efficiencies as opposed to having one off solutions doing the same thing across mobile parts of the organization absolutely as not only are we taking the value streams. And we're trying to within individual leader for the value streams help them see their own individual value stream but also now starting to weave together. How as we see these value streams and an end to end for the entire organization. Are they working together? And so yesterday is conversation that I was telling you about with our operations organization. You know we were talking about how you know. How do we make our manufacturing operations world class and in order to make that Operation World Class? It implies we do some things differently in the engineering process or it implies that we have streamlined direct materials procurement and the supply chain processes into our manufacturing processes. So there definitely are now As we start to mature these conversations we start to see their conversation going across value streams and we start to see the organization understanding their upstream downstream impacts. So it's been really helpful another interesting area that you got involved in is the. You're the executive leader for on-command connection intelligent vehicle platform and I wonder if you take a moment in a bit about that. So our industry. Actually we've had telematics devices in trucks for decades way before passenger vehicles. Having that kind of capability we had our customers putting a telematics device on a truck given the way they were using those trucks. You know what they needed to collect off of those vehicles in order to run their business and so our on-command connection solution. Is You know we know that our customers are running a variety of trucks in their fleet. On-command connection allows them to gather that telematics data across a variety of different telematics service providers across a variety of different Makes of vehicles and see it. All on a single pane of glass and then once they see it. All in a single pane of glass. We commend start to help them understand across the entirety of their fleet. The health of their vehicles and help prompt them with things like preventative maintenance. Or you know things that they should be doing to make sure that. The vehicles are operating in a healthy fashion. But why are we are going now is actually oftentimes telematics? Devices historically have been an aftermarket installation now. What we see that's happening in. Our industry is not only as the telematic device being factory fit but along with it is essentially. What would be edge compute power? So we're actually put it in compute power into the vehicle along with that telematics capability so that we can start to do things like reflash the engine or help the customer around programmable parameters that they might want to delimit speed for example if a vehicle's rating and in a certain area in the city on highway so we start to see more and more that an intelligent capability in the vehicle will become a part of what makes that vehicle productive for our customers. We're just at the cusp of that. And you'll see that you know more and more as we start to put these devices on the vehicle as they leave the factory you know we will be able to change the way. Our vehicles operate based on the conditions that they're operating in on the flight very interesting and and how is value derived your or informed? It sounds like there's a safety component An efficiency component perhaps even revenue component to. This is that are those those three apt. I think you know. We're still learning exactly where the where the opportunities are. I mean for our customers. Certainly we WANNA make sure that yes definitely. There's a safety component. There's an asset tracking component. There's a vehicle performance component. We hope and we envision that potentially there starts to be the ability to help a vehicle become more self healing and it doesn't necessarily always require a visit to a shop you know so. These are values that we're putting in the hands of our customers at times. We believe those translate into ways that we priced vehicle or ways that we price that service In the on-command connection platform. So you know some of that. We're still learning in terms of what's the market acceptance of that. I think also one of the things that I would say however that one of the things that really we need to capture is you know. How do we use what? We're learning off vehicles to inform our internal private processes so do change our selling process because we now know that certain vehicles perform better than other vehicle configurations so can we be more consultative with our customers around the types of vehicles that would be better given their use case or can we now also make sure that.

Senior Vice President and chie Ragland Julie Navistar vice president of technology Julie Discusses senior vice president chief operations officer chief information officer vice president Mack truck Raglan Peter peterbilt executive
Interview with Oki Mek, Special Advisor, HHS

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:10 min | 5 months ago

Interview with Oki Mek, Special Advisor, HHS

"Hello and welcome to the AI. Today podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh and I'm your host Schmeltzer. Our guest today is okay. Mack who is the senior advisor to the chief information officer at the US Department of Health and Human Services? Hhs So okay thank you so much for joining us on Ai Today. Thank you for having caffeine wrong. Yeah thank you so much for joining us. You'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. And tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at HHS. I am a. I am the senior adviser to Sasebo. And I'm also the technical integration. Lead but edgy reimagined but my background is really cybersecurity but my principal around cybersecurity. That just knowing cyber alone is not enough. You really need to know and understand the business I've been with. Hr FINANCE BUDGET GRANTS ACQUISITIONS. I was leaving sponsored to help onboard new employees for personnel security and badges and laptops. So I find that to be very critical and crucial in terms of modern nine station in the government just knowing to three sixty just understanding what you know what budget stream is coming through. What is the budget calendar Audi acquisition services and products and even just getting people on board with badges an laptop? Just getting that three sixty view and been very critical in terms of you know modernizing trying to innovate in trying to change the landscape Embracing Emerging Tech and dealing with big data paradigm shifts excellent. Yeah it's definitely the government's been very interesting. Adopter not just technology in general but especially with artificial intelligence. Because you know is is a transformative technology. Just like You know many of the other big transformative waves in the Internet and mobile and big data and the cloud and now five G. and then blockchain so all of these technology transformative right. They had changed a whole lot of things or multi. System the multidisciplinary and so obviously there are many ways that we see being applied to government agencies organizations. And we've been very impressed. One of the things that been talking about here a lot today is sort of the many ways in which is being adopted. Not only an industry as a whole but especially in government very impressive actually some of these ways that hopefully it's making the government more responsive more efficient more effective more. Give it more visibility into things. So can you tell us some of the ways that? Hhs is currently adopting AI and various solutions. And maybe how those ways are unique to. Hhs or perhaps similar to what other of different governmental agencies are doing in this space so we start of area to the CIO. And I started a program like celery leveraging ai machine learning and blockchain. It was the first watching network that had been authorized to operate in the federal government but in terms of a I think we are using similar to agency mainly we use it to clean and format the data and as you know you deal with a lot of data set the day. I need data. The biggest thing is cleaning the data. Ninety five I believe ninety percent of it is cleaning the data. People WanNa do they WANNA do machine learning they WANNA do. But they don't focus on they're gonna up a root of baking because Clinton. The data is the biggest component of that process. So we use a machine learning to basically normalize the data from different data sets using supervised and unsupervised learning to normalize the data. And then we also get into linear regression as well in terms of predictive analysis. One of the main thing that we'd do accelerate is looking at prices paid and just as so large we do about twenty five billion in spending on products and services just minding data and cleaning the data at it was a big call just to look at. Why are we buying things that different prices and a good example is? I'm just throwing the example while we buy that. Dobie pro at cms for aided aqua- eighty dollars per license and buying that CDC thirty dapper night or licensed an opportunity to mind data to come to the table to be able to negotiate a different price. You can't come to table to negotiate without having that insight so data claiming and looking at data mining and looking at predictive analysis the three main usage for a for us. That's great you know Melinda. We produced a report last year. And then we did a follow up report this year Dataprep prep and data labeling and I think that a lot of people underestimate how long it's going to take to actually get their data into a usable state so it's great that you pointed that out because I think that people underestimate the time and the difficulty that sometimes it can be actually get data in a usable state. Data's the heart of AI. So you need that. For these systems to learn as a government agency adoption of new technologies such as artificial intelligence can bring its own unique set of challenges that sometimes the private sector doesn't always run into. These can be issues around privacy data usage. What can and can't be used where it can be stored so can you tell us some of the challenges you've seen with Ai. Adoption in your agency and how you're overcoming them by the biggest mistake that people do is looking at the technology before they look at the business and the mission of agency. I always say that does no such thing at it. Project and the business project with it components. You have to start with the business. And what are you trying to saw? Most of these challenges that the EPA my experience I've been in a government close to twenty years half awaiting contractor in private industry and also have in federal government. The challenge is not the technology challenges to culture is leaning chain change management and. I don't think we do not a strategic planning. Just because we have one hundred idea doesn't mean we pursued ideas. We need to look at you know strategic planning comes into play. You may have one hundred ideas but you should only pursue one idea through strategic. Planning you know. The first thing is really feasibility studies. I didn't even feasible to at any regression issue. Anani downstream impact. Accountability is big. I think in terms of trying to modernize. Can you prove a concept just because you have this idea? People might think is a crazy idea but if you do it at a tangible way that you could prove that idea is feasible and it's scalable because you wanNA start small and scale that big as well. Sustainability is huge as well just because the project is a success. Doesn't mean that sustainable as your culture your agency your privacy mature enough to take on this new shining toy you know this new technology but the important part is marketability I we. I can't overemphasize that did not marketability is people. Don't think that the government market but you have to market you ideas. You have to win. The hearts and minds of the workforce the people that They coders you have to be able to market in different ways to senior leadership to middle managers workforce. I think culture is the biggest obstacle. But I think doing a thorough strategic planning analysis and putting emphasis on marketability analysis is key and the biggest part of marketability is human design is really engaging the workforce I'll model in terms of accelerated that. We're not building the solution. We are allowing the workforce to go to solution getting them engaged yet here at thoughts and pain point incorporating agile depth. Bob You know building something. Every two weeks and bring him back to them is a Saab issue and we cycled out every two or three weeks and that really is the key of getting people to lean in and to win the heart and mind of people.

AI HHS Caffeine Bob You Kathleen Walsh Audi Senior Adviser Mack Schmeltzer Saab Senior Advisor Principal Sasebo Chief Information Officer Clinton
AAIS OpenIDL update and developing a network data strategy

Insureblocks

09:24 min | 5 months ago

AAIS OpenIDL update and developing a network data strategy

"Joann thank you for joining us today. I can't believe it's been eighteen months since our last podcast for our listeners. Who Haven't heard our first podcast. Could you please give them a creaky deduction on yourself? Well thank you. Well lead happy to be here again. A lot has happened in the last eighteen months. And it's great to have a chance to catch up with you I have a background technology as a CIO. Even though I'm a operations senior vice president operations today and I've been with a s a national advisory Organization for the past eight years a serving in both capacities so with that We have completely restructured the way we serve as a national advisory organization and that led us to the creation of open idea and I am the executive sponsor of the open ideal brilliant. Thank you so much for that. So like in our lives podcast in September. Two thousand eighteen. Could you please explain to our listeners? What is blockchain? And how does it work but additionally this time I'm curious to know? How much has your opinion changed over the last eighteen months? Blockchain is a technology. It's a distributed ledger. Technology and that is a a starting point for lots of things that could be done with this technology. What makes what makes it different than other? Say Data Technologies is that it is a distributed ledger in which a copy of the ledger is available on. All of the nodes the participants in the network and that solves a key problem that is existed with other technologies that we have an immutable record with blockchain technology that we don't with other data technologies so it enables us to create systems networks based on that concept and it can be used for a wide variety of a solution such as transactional networks or in the case of the open ideal using it as an analytic platform so the technology itself provides a secure way to store data it provides transparency in how data is used and then it provides that immutable record that is so critical to trusting any activity that happens with with the data on the network. Then after that. There's lots of things that you can do. In terms of private data stores. How transactions happen and get stored on the network And how the results of those applications are delivered to the participants. So we're going to see lots of blockchain networks but they're all going to look very different accents. Thank you very much for that so for our listeners who Aaron familiar with the American Association of Insurance Services. As could you give a little introduction on it please? So in the United States the insurance industry is regulated at the state level and there is a mechanism to provide some consistency between all those state regulations. And that's a national advisor organization so our or our company is formed by regulation and we are licensed in all fifty states to do a couple of things. One is we serve as a bridge between the carriers and the regulators and the way they Exchange information or share data and through that exchange we also use some of that data to create products such as a homeowner's policy with a rating plan or an auto plan and with that we then bring consistency across all the states in the way those products are delivered to the market. And certainly the curious pick up our products and the ad a lot of value on top of that that that baseline is what we're doing for the industry and we've been doing it that way at for over eighty years and we know that it is not as efficient as it should be and it needs to be modernized because we have different needs for data today in our industry so while we've been doing this for eighty years a lot changing for us as well as as for the carriers themselves brilliant. Brennan so in August two thousand eighteen. You launched the open. Insurance data link known as open ideal. Could you please give us a recap on what is over ninety? L? And the problems. It's looking to address well. We didn't know that we are going to create the open ideal when we started on this journey. We actually started with the problems we needed to address. We knew that The way we were collecting data and sending the reports over to the regulators was fundamentally broken. There were a lot of pain points in all of the participants in that process. The old style statistical data plans had been used forever. Don't contain enough information for. As in advise you organization to do everything we need to do. The result of that is that the regulators also found the same thing that they stabbed plans. Don't have the graded answer the question. They're getting from their legislatures. So they started doing data calls many years ago where they go directly to the carriers now and they go around the adviser organizations to get the data they need that was causing a lot of pain points with the carriers they see increasing volumes of data leaving the security of their data centers being transferred to third parties and they don't have any insight into how that data's being used once it leaves they worried about security that data so through a number of design thinking sessions. We were able to identify those pain points. And then look at what the possible solutions might be and as we looked at the data technologies that are available today and were at the time we had a number of problems with those platforms in terms of data security when large files are being transferred from one entity to another the transparency. In how that data's being used in then of course As a regulated industry that audible record that immutable audible record about all of the activities that are occurring with that data. So that's what led us to the use of blockchain technology and we started with a prototype. That turned out very successful. It solve the problems of the curious and the regulators We went through one Pivot on our architecture. We changed the way we think. About what stored on chain and how we ensure the privacy of data in that resulted in the open ideal that we have today so that architecture has been completed. It's it's stable. And we're now building out the network for increased use We have some prototypes around regulatory reporting. it's not being used for all the regulatory reporting that's occurring today but the regulators in the carriers love it and so we're moving forward with it now. Okay so you've been running for for eighteen months and you mentioned on some of the prototypes that you've been running during this period of time. Could you share with us? Some of the data points that demonstrate the impact open ideal has head has added to the property and casualty industry in the US. Will the impact has been? I on how it's changed the relationship between the carriers and the regulators and how they think about using data for the benefits of the entire industry in the past. It was kind of a contentious. The relationship that lacked trust and so the first thing that the open idea brought in to the community was that sense of trust. Then we've been able to work on a number of reports that bring value to both the carriers and the regulators that was a key component of our design. If we're going to ask security is to provide data around for example a cause of loss To the regulator so they can make good policy about that. They'd like to get some value back. And what we've been able to do is create reports on a statewide or national basis that allows the regulators to understand what a cause of loss might be offer fire or some sort of other catastrophe. And then the carriers can see that reported the state or national level and they can compete against the data that they have internally and make better decisions at the same time so the platform itself has changed the way this whole process is viewed and the regulators now are so excited about it that we have a coalition of those regulators that are interested in changing the laws about how regulatory reporting occurs To make the use of this blockchain platform the standard in the future and the carriers are excited about it because they've seen the value and regulatory reporting but they've also seen the value in the new data stores that are available through the blockchain network. And how that might be used not only for regulatory reporting but also for some of their internal operations as well.

Data Technologies Blockchain United States Joann CIO Senior Vice President Operatio American Association Of Insura Advisor Brennan Aaron Executive
Virginia governor seeks to delay minimum wage hike due to coronavirus

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Virginia governor seeks to delay minimum wage hike due to coronavirus

"Virginia governor Ralph Northam has delayed the state's minimum wage increase from member station W. A. M. U. Danniella chancellor has more raising Virginia's minimum wage above the federal level of seven twenty five was a top achievement for state Democrats the first rate hike was supposed to take effect in January twenty twenty one democratic governor Northam has now delayed the start date to may citing the need for economic certainty amid the disruption of the coronavirus destiny live here is the spokeswoman of the Virginia AFL-CIO that represents more than three hundred thousand workers are working are really on the front line I'm telling you it's a bad day for them today state Republicans say struggling businesses can't handle any minimum wage hike lawmakers have one more chance to reject the delay when they reconvene

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam Chancellor W. A. M. U. Danniella Governor Northam
World Fuel Services COO Jeff Smith

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

08:55 min | 6 months ago

World Fuel Services COO Jeff Smith

"Terms of operations where we're global And so for me. You know a good chunk of what I do is related to technology because technology has a place you know from the initial customer experience ordered a cache procure to pay record to report so that plays a big piece and that's the the people and the process and the tech strategy goes with that but then there's overall financial operations and shared services for. How do we support our line of business segments when when they conduct their business and and how can we run those kind of back office functions a lot more efficiently and in the right locations with the right skills and it's really you know the the guts it's the engine room You know that enabled us to go out and attract business and and you know executed efficiently. That's really my my core role and can you talk a bit about the form that digital transformation takes an organization like yours. I mentioned a moment ago. That said clearly part of what excited the executive team about your abilities in in bringing you on board talk a bit about the formats taken across the now as I say to. Nearly two and a half years so that you've been enroll it's quite pervasive because the digital transformation is everything from the systems and technology that allow you from the very beginning of you know just doing looking at the opportunity. So that's in your your crm systems. It's in your data systems that allow you to you. Know Ingest customer and supplier information that's in portal strategies its self service increasingly because a lot of our supply base is third party it's creating API's and more of an ecosystem to allow different participants to play without having to make it so complex and and build Point to point integrations or do it manually. So in one sense that's one piece of the digital transformation on the other it really is around the efficiency and and in using robotics Cr and different Technologies so that every piece of data that comes and hopefully we can bring in digitally. We could process it. Digitally we can analyze it did Chile and make more sense out of all the data that we're collecting. You know to make better business decisions and and that can be in in pricing. We buy an awful lot. You know we're buying and selling you know. Forty billion dollars worth of energy in one way shape or form and it doesn't take you know a you know a bit of an intelligence we can use that data you know. Apply some a and machine learning to a can. We actually improved you know our operating margins but also improve the experience back to the customer so that it really it entails everything from the very very beginning from opportunity all the way back to you know how we close the books and do our our analytics on the back yet. No doubt a lot of what you just described Were things that either were in nascent forms or perhaps in some cases were were already up and running. I'm curious when you join the organization. How much change was necessary. wraps the changes continuing in order to realize the vision of what you just described. I think one thing I learned Who wore wounds pass rules and stuff as well as your strategy and tactics have to manage the town? That's you have on the pitch so if you WanNa you know you want to move to the cloud aggressively and use and use digital technologies You know you have to have the skills to do that. So a good chunk of my very first year was really taking a look. You know from the bottom up you know what our core skills. We need. How those roll up into roles? How do we create an Agile Organization? We did something quite different that I experienced And my last couple jobs as well as rather than doing an orange strategy top down. Go from the bottom up. Look at what work needs to be done. What's do that? Well and apply more of spotify model of grouping people into small self directed teams that are kind of loosely coupled tightly aligned into tribes tribes into a domain so that you run a leaner management structure unless levels. But in order to do that. You've gotTa have the talent to bring that in so we went on. You know you know really strong. Assessment training bringing new skills in and I would say over the last two years. We've turned over You know about a third of our workforce you know you needed that amount of replenishment to bring the skill base up because there is no You know there's no compression algorithm for experience. You need to have done it before so we needed to bring people in that. Could you know others could could learn from at an accelerated pace and pick the right partners and ride their way? And so I think that's the other key strategy of being ready as you know you're only as good as the people you surround yourself with sweets that you have ever principles. It's pick our partners based on the company I product second. Because your company's you leading indicator your product features you're lagging we spent. The first year was an awful lot from you. Know who we need at the executive level. What kind of practitioners do we need? What kind of special skills and analytics and digital and cloud and and replenishing to the point that we could execute strategy that we really want to really like that pick people based on company I products second for the reasons you articulated as you thought about the people that were the worst of this replenishment the replacement of the third. Or so of folks who changed over. How important was experiencing the type of work that you foresaw as important or more or less important than experience in the industry. You need that you need experience in the industry and we had a a decent amount of that but it variance in the the technologies and how to solve problems in different ways. You need a mesh need this kind of diversity of thought in any great organization and and that's in addition to gender and race so you need the industry piece but my piece my history experience would tell me that attitude is is more important than an aptitudes you need to create the right culture and and people have a much larger capacity to learn then they get themselves credit for but you have to have the right people to create the right environment and then set high expectations and the better people will come up to speed more quickly that we have a capacity to learn whether it's a business domain or technology domain far greater than we think and but you have to have enough congestion of talent and leadership. You know just to enable that to happen they have very interesting indeed. I'm also curious. You talked about the need to build a better set of partners a broader ecosystem. My Word Not Yours but how on translating what you were describing who curious what sorts of changes you made from that perspective as well. Clearly you've been thinking about the mix of people the internal as well as extra. What sorts of changes did you make as a result of that analysis? Why think on the on the partner side we had a few business objectives and I think this is probably the other thing at least good advice for. Cio's that went to you. Know take on other broader business roles look at it in terms of what's the business objectives and the business outcome. You Really WanNa get in one of the things that we needed to do. To connect people across the world in a more effective way was to create a strong productive environment for them so that they could collaborate and learn from each other at a faster pace so we looked at. Who are the best companies in collaboration? And we're GonNa make you know hard. I would call student body right. Turns and get on those companies because we knew that in addition to the products they sold we could learn different things from them so three companies. We used in what I would call. The employee. Collaboration environment were box. Zoom in slack and their three. You know great run companies. They've got they've run it's interesting. They run similar management systems with okay ours which are from John. Dora and how you do a objectives and key results and you know box for content management zoom or video and PBX and communications And then slack for collaboration and all three of those companies have helped us Outside yes their technology is in use utilize them for the problems they've solved we've looked at their leadership techniques If you take a look at zoom one of the top rated companies to work for actually all three of them are looked at their leadership techniques. We looked at their engineering practices at at box. We sit on their advisory boards to to you know. I think one of our other key principles. Both parties should benefit outside the commercial relationship. And so we use those which. Reiki changes. I'd say in the collaboration environment and the we had a very big goal to Closed down our data centers and Migrate Everything to the Cloud. So we partnered with. Aws than they try. They train onsite even help us recruit at universities. When we're looking at undergraduate hires and really help us become better company. By looking at some of the things that they do in their leadership system and And even how? The recruiting practices things like that. So those are four partners that we have gotten measurably better at a faster taste because we were relying on your good skills internally but also hiring what's needed but also partnering with the People that are measurably better than the ones we

Cloud Executive Chile Spotify AWS CIO Partner Dora John
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

08:46 min | 6 months ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"The culture transformation not only the digital teams business teams so we put together a pretty comprehensive strategies that look at people processes and technology and that's what we under dosing as as booked excellent You mentioned The fifth area Scaling digital ecosystem. Yeah I'm talking about the partnership with Google is one of the examples of that I I'd be interested to understand how you thought comprehensively of building that he goes system How you think about what can be delivered internally versus the necessity to develop that ecosystem more rapidly acquire technologies or were leveraged talented outside as well as inside your In how do you? How do you think about that ecosystem? Yeah we are. We basically have what we call digital gambled to really create. That is the legal system. What we are looking at it is you know. Do three areas one is would shot the startups. That could really help us to expand into adjacent an exponential opportunities leg example investment in applied is an example where we are playing in the digital customer engagement platform play for with other utilities opportunity The way we looked at it as you know we really can globally. What all those startup companies. That could really help us to really play into descent Glueing botox companies applied customer engagement etc. And we really created a kind of a plan to look into those companies NBA going partnerships. Honey invest potential investments. That are other radius. Automated example off deficient intelligence talent. Right being not able to kyle fast because of this was heavily. Ability be partnered with a couple of companies. Wade we are basically leveraging the talent to really to really skill the use cases execution so Ecosystem is bolted startups and also some strategic partners like Google like this Audio Visual Intelligence Company to really execute decided gee but also expand into other opportunities. Yeah I wanted to also ask you you you are. You've had a particularly long tenure as digital eater. Were there were aspects of your time even dating back to General Motors This is a a tenure which ended in two thousand eight at Ingersoll. Rand you're also. Ci Do Caterpillar chief digital officer. You mentioned already your experience at Ge prior to joining a yes I'd be interested in your thoughts with regards to the chief digital officer will more. Generally speaking at part of my curiosity is It's a role that a lot of A LOT OF PONTIFICATORS. The gardeners enforcers of the world for example Thought there'd be title wave of this order taking over the CIO set of responsibilities for example and in the grand scheme of things. It's actually been a there've been some key leaders who've taken on these sets of responsibilities but it hasn't still the CIO is is the predominant role within organizations. I'd be interested in your own thought process as one of the people who is the longest ten year now across multiple fortune five hundred organizations as a CEO. How you see that aspect of the role evolving. Now I think in what I've seen with my experiences Caterpillar. Jeez and even here Having the CD would roll it really force it's not just about deploying the digital platforms and deploying the some of the You know I D capabilities right. It's really to really drive. The Transformation Roun- how digital cintas business models had evolving. What could be the new revenue stream opportunities? What could be the new growth opportunities for the businesses through digital And you know. How do you really drive? The customer experience innovation through digital et Cetera in that mindset is something you need to bring it to executive leadership team also to the board so that you really get the more transmitter opportunities own the grow. The new innovation ends at Temple. I think not having the city will really inject those kind of a new ideas new opportunities Appears he's a great. It's needed for a meeting to see because every indices going through that kind of disruptions. That's why we've seen in. Whether it's a caterpillar. A has been seeing that more and more customers. Expedients INNOVATION THROUGH. Diesel is important. Mri that digital production dot which intradex blow digitally enabled emerging business models. Right so those things. I think the CD Woodrow's becomes more and more important in looking. I think For Small and mid sized companies those could get must busy will have the responsibility to I think in even in the Seattle. Right die for locate. Lot of data center is moving to the cloud. So some of those things are really transforming into more of outsource star. You know really moving to cloud our more providing the SAS off et Cetera so the CIO's will also become wonderful leaders that mindset needs to be about transforming the business really explore new things new growth That's what I see that. becomes a very critical going forward for any companies sought even technology companies. Interesting in part of what you've mentioned now. Also multiple times is a reorientation towards driving revenue growth. In addition to the efficiencies. Racial excellence kinds of metrics that this old understandably had their eyes on he talked about how you have thought about that contribution. I don't know if they're vignettes. You might be able to share. In terms of your team's ability to help drive new revenue. Yeah look you know I think as part of as I said in Damage inside one of these. At transforming the growing the court businesses all about revenue generation. Right on what we really looking entities. How do we really try to custom unexperienced innovation through digital and Innovation Process Transformations? But also use that as a springboard to really launch new digitally enabled Parkinson visas. What could be the new imaging business models digital those are the ideas we are looking at it. Look at our digital strategy We have targets on what kind of a newbie wanted. Generating next three to five years So we mostly see opportunities. Do Really Driving the growth through cross sell up Salak Customer experience innovation and also really go through launching new digital Services and business model innovations. That's going to be the golden opportunities. Yeah you've also been a board member now for example. A member of the directors of ITALICO enterprises I wonder knowing a lot of peers of yours both the CIO's and CEO's have aspirations to join boards thankfully more and more are doing so. But I'd be interested in the genesis of your board experience. How did you identify opportunities to join boards? Or how did they find you as the case may be than in part of the question of courses with advice for others who might wish to walk in your footsteps looking because I've Part of es My boss on this daily thought that because that business utility businesses digital is becoming extremely important in driving the customer experience innovation new business models at Santa I could add a lot of value To the board discussions so really enjoying that role. Because I'm really bringing this new idea on. How do we drive? The new growth in newly new opportunities Y customer experience innovation becomes extremely important. That would drive the future. Growth opportunities like Trading et CETERA. I'm able to really contribute Laurel digital fast. Now potential opportunity growth ideas to the board discussions Really I mean I think I really took this opportunity because one because it's in a company down that he's really able to drive this new ideas new via flea.

CIO Google CEO Ci Do Caterpillar NBA officer Ge General Motors Seattle Salak Customer kyle Rand Ingersoll Wade Woodrow executive cloud SAS
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:45 min | 6 months ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Gwen forward Fourteen intelligent enterprise apply and data ACROSS AUTOMATION TO REALLY BECOME EFFICIENT INTELLEGENT. The last one these scaling digital ecosystem we want to create a digital ecosystem with strategic partners globally example. We launched a strategic alliance with Google in now timeframe to really exploit the cloud opportunity and to really exploit new opportunities by Google. Same thing without blight at Sweden looking at Strategic Investments in partnership with the Startups to really look opposite to expand as a Jew platform date disadvantages. And when you join the organization roughly year and a half ago How many of the building blocks were in place in order to bring a vision like this to life? In how much transformation was necessary in order? Set the appropriate framework or or a platform to grow upon that to deliver. What you've described when I joined in I think in October two dozen eighteen. Basically the What we had as a typical Standard CIO. Idealization mainly focused on a lot of back office infrastructure et CETERA. There was no distant strategy since I joined the later. The digital strategy brought in some digital leaders from outside also being building the data science team Artificial intelligence team to really be on top of the all the capabilities. One thing I would say is visiting the business side has presley in our nation's no plant etcetera dead been deploying some digital tools to make everything connected So there was some good work done. They really look at the people processor mation. That foundation was good. Now we want to really apply data and ad to take it next understood and You mentioned that one of the clearly one of the key differentiator between what you've acted perhaps what would existed previously is much more customer centric city. Yeah you talked about traditional CIO organization. Most of those Have an operational aspect to them or internal focus for voracious reasons traditionally anyway A now this reorientation towards thinking about you've mentioned that one in multiple parts of Nassar's customer experience and and creating Better experiences with customers eight. Yes you talked about some of the new talent that you brought in no doubt that was part of necessary in order to build that. But I'd I'd ask about the I wanted to ask you about the cultural changes that are necessary in order to deliver what you've described clearly. It's a different area of emphasis as a different way of thinking that ultimately a different way to think about the value that a team like this can can deliver talk a bit about that your looking at culture transformations very big important It's not just within the district team but also the business teams now. One of the things we did. Is You know once we really articulated the Vision Strategy Roadmaps digital I really worked with a lot of my business leader. Peers to really engage them. In the process of they would actively engage in this society development And we really looked at this example. Customer centric aspect of it. What is a cultural transformation? We need to implement right You know one thing is if you look at this industry Now it's becoming located on non. Traditional competitors are showing up like Amazon's ET CETERA. So customer experiences becoming a huge differentiator. You know I.

CIO Google Gwen Strategic Investments Sweden Nassar presley Amazon
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

14:10 min | 6 months ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"CEO of Global Blas in this interview. Great describes how the company works to exceed its guests expectations in every possible way. Just rise into like customers. The company has ruled out. Ocean medallion wearable. Aucoin sized device. That could be sent by. Location and transaction centers throughout the ship is where it will remove friction by land crew members provide a personalized experience in it allows guests to pay locked doors. We also discussed the benefits of being an internal first customer rex. Take on data privacy data virtualization blockchain and edge computing is background as a CEO and how that's impacted his role now was a cio. At a variety of other topics Greg Sullivan welcomed technician. It's great to speak with you today. Thank you Peter. Great to hear from you will thank you greg. I thought we begin with your role in your company. You are the chief information officer of Carnival. The world's largest cruise company. And I wonder if you take a moment and talk about the purview of a cheap information officer in an organization like Carnival or me. We had no problem. I'm The Chief Information Officer Carnival Corporation. We are a collection of holding companies. That operate nine different friends that we sail under Some of the most popular cruise brands in the world we also owned a number of island. Resorts lodges. A we have rail cars properties railroad sent We're also a very large motorcoach operators so we have a lot of platforms upon which We have to deploy technology for the benefit of our guests and our crew but We're in the business of delivering fun and our mission every day so exceed our guests expectations and the delivery of their Vacation experience. That's great and talk a bit about the role of CIO. How do you fit into the broader picture that you've just described so A big part of delivering on those guests. Expectations is Of course rooted in by the technology that we use To serve our guests You know with our crew so That you know in the in the traditional sense that's Making reservations available online or to our call centers and so forth. But the bottom line. Is We have our guests for a short period of time so And they expect even at sea Land like Vacation experiences and that includes connectivity includes guests service You know even location based capabilities and things like that. They expect a connection to their to their social presence and And ease with which those affiliations can take place so we have to deliver On we have to deliver from solid technology platform all those capabilities that are expected by guests. And so when you You know we've built this organization through a series of acquisitions that So we started with different technology platforms different approaches different applications stacks In different platforms upon which all those runs so bringing all that together in a cohesive coherent and in a way to deliver consistent experiences part of the challenge. I have is CEO. I'm heartened by the fact that you immediately go to the customer implications of this. This is a role the CIO that for decades When you ask the CIO who is our customer was they might answer the internal constituents. That is one's colleagues and I think it's it's a it's a refreshing Evolution of the role that increasing number like yourself Gregor are really recognizing that there is actually just one true customer. That's the person that you're is providing revenue to the organization ultimately in great to hear about the the many touch points. It sounds like you and your team have in terms of impacting their experience. I'd be curious as you think about the various kinds of people gauge with Carnival Corporation. Whether it's a on the cruises With the resorts the railcars the motor coaches etc. I I have to imagine that. It spans a variety of ages and various profiles and even various levels of digital savviness. Is there a sort of persona or set personas that you have evaluated as you contemplate? What kinds of offerings to make director across all customers versus perhaps some things to opt in or out of as the case may be reflecting the differences in some of the some of the guests expectations. So Peter we I can't imagine a demographic we don't serve I mean You know we serve The You know retired. People well into retirement. You know that are still capable of travelling and enjoying kind of experiences we deliver we make it very convenient. Or even those that have some you know many limitations to travel and And families Gung old bring often their children their grandchildren or great grandchildren. You know even even a given group and span the age demographics across the spectrum. You asked about technology in particular on our Ocean medallion ships dying class ships. Which I can talk a little bit more about here a little bit but they Here you have the opportunity to effectively opt in to a new technology platform as a guest and It's a choice you can choose to keep your old crews card if you like but Our often are opt out rates on the ocean. Medina or in the single digits and I don't mean percents I mean. Single digit counts on sailings of three or four thousand guests so We are. We are seeing widespread acceptance across all demographics and in fact we find The most eager enthusiastic are often Some of our oldest gas so I don't We don't really see a distinction and the willingness and to use the new capabilities and we certainly don't see a distinction in the demand for it. Everybody expects those land like experiences when they're at sea. That's excellent and I know that the the ships that are out at sea are essentially like like sailing data centers now with the quantity of data that you are collecting and analyzing to do everything from make your operations more efficient to getting back to that guest guest experience in and modifying and improving it With with the analysis that you can do relative to that data. Can you talk a bit about the fleet operations center and the way in which you used eight analytics to improve the operation as well as guest experience absolutely so on the ship? You mentioned the data center All of our ships are equipped with the primary data center and a secondary data center or data center a and B and They have traditionally the type of relationship. You would expect where one is available to fail over to the other in case something happens in the primary one. All of our ships have some form connectivity to the cloud in the last year or two. We've dramatically be stop our investment in ship to shore connectivity through satellite arrangements and on these we primarily enable these for guest experience so they can have as I mentioned earlier. Land like connectivity At Sea for their own purposes. But we also use these this enhanced connectivity for the business about conducting ship operations and also for the data transfer back and forth. But I will tell you Peter. We EQUIPPED SHIPS WITH ENOUGH COMPUTER. Operate without being connected because at sea that does happen at times because of weather or obstruction. You know if you're near near a large fjord or something like that. So there's enough compute on those ships to do all the analytics. We need to do to provide the experience at our guests are expecting and that could include on any on those shows where you have location based capabilities that level detail on where you are on the ship. You need help in navigating to a different point on the ship or finding members of your party or if it's something as simple as you just have something you'd like to order and have a right to you wherever you are on this. Show great examples. I appreciate you offering each of those You you referenced. Earlier the ocean medallion and some of the Augmented experiences that you're providing using technology. I wanted to kind of peel back the onions a little bit further on that as well. Greg. If you don't mind. So the ocean medallion is recently rolled out on Our apprentice sleep and We've just fully equipped. Now I think are six or seven ship and have another six or so planned for twenty twenty so what we're doing is We have a wearable which is a little coin size. device that can be sensed by location sensors throughout the ship and different types of transactions sensors around the ship. So you can Receive this before you sail. So it's as simple as having it on you when you approach The embarkation hall and then get on the ship. You you configure it so that it associated with your profile. Whatever you choose to tell us about you so you need to tell us at least what we need to know to get you on and off the ship it also Will will tell you we. Can you can tell us your preferences And things like that. So we'll have that information available and then of course once you're on the ship and you're moving about the ship Similar to location based capabilities. That are on your phone We now have that information on the show. So all that's process on the ship and we can use that information to enhance a guest experience in the manner in which the guest chooses to that can include a ease of embarkation. Getting on and off the ship it could include It does include the ability to unlock your stateroom door on approach. So you don't have to fumble around looking for your crews card and touching to something that you're in the proximity of that door will open that or for you automatically it's When you approach crew member They'll have a pad and so they'll know who you are. They'll be advised of any special celebrations or special circumstances that you might have. And so the crew member will be able to engage you in a very knowledgeable manner it completely removes friction from Commerce on the ship. Whether it's like an retail venue. Getting the crew member will be able to identify you from your picture and not have to go through Other forms of authorization to conduct Commercial Transaction Casino. Same thing knows you there. So there's a lot of capability built into this ocean die then removes friction from the experience streamlines the experience and gives our crew opportunity to enhance. You know your vacation experience and that aligns with our mission from our CEO. Arnold Donald which is our job is to exceed our guests expectations and every possible way interesting. I'm also curious it strikes me Greg that you have you and your team have the great advantage of being able to be customers yourselves You know there's so many businesses especially let's say so teric business to business or business to government organization where the product is not something that the average employee can test drive but but yours is isn't fact that it's a joy to do so and I wonder how you and your team take advantage of being able to walk a mile in in On the deck of your boats or or through other experiences that you've described And lived at experience and develop suggestions for recruitment and so forth as customers in addition to being employees of the organization so bitter that timely question. I just had the opportunity to enjoy what we call shakedown cruise Which was a shift that we've just been delivered from Shipyard in Italy we Embarked in three s Italy and sale for four days and then we stopped in Montenegro For a day and we ended up in Athens and so part of our job on the ship is to experience. It like our guests were about to the next week and so And in fact that particular shakedown cruise was the first new build. That was fully equipped with the Ocean. Medallion and the medallion that so It was quite Quite enjoyable experience but yeah we I mean it's part of the job you're right. We have to go on the ship and have the experience at our guests. Have that's excellence and I I also wanted to ask you. You have a very unusual background as chief information officer you were the CEO of a company for more than a decade in global velocity and. Ask Such you've had the ultimate responsibility as as the head of a company in setting the direction the strategy and motivating its e and having the ultimate prophet loss responsibilities. And so on and I'm curious how that's oriented you as a CIO. You can appreciate that most of your peers in the role. Don't have that kind of global experience in global meaning that breadth of experience That a CEO would suggest since. I'm curious as you reflect upon your your career path how that's been colored by by your past experience as a as the head of the company so Peter Idea Right. I've spent my entire career. Starting companies and building companies and growing companies. Obviously with full you know financial responsibility Up and down the line. This is My first opportunity to come into an existing company. But it's also heater it's a you know we're approaching fifty years in age and I recall in one of my first meetings that I came to a carnival. They ended up a fifty year pin and to forty year pens and the forty. You're one of the forty year pens was from my predecessor. The prior CIO who himself had hand writing the reservation system that we use today for forty percent of our business. So so we're a company that.

CEO cio Greg Sullivan Peter chief information officer Chief Information Officer Carn Carnival Corporation Aucoin CIO sea Land At Sea officer technician Gregor director Medina
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

09:38 min | 1 year ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Favorite books that just released by Hydra Revolution press is a warranties and it and I love that they do a great job describing to the West that went to review on what allergic using and my response to that is this is not a technology thing and eventually is but it starts culture and you need to have so if you go to check air dot com it's a micro site that has our values on there and describes our culture but there are certain aspects of our culture that are really into a naval us to do this and then the tools and the processes come after that but you've got to start with the ability to fail and I don't mean I'm doing dumb stuff and being sloppy but I mean trying your hardest reaching hard for something and maybe falling down so when somebody failed tation I know it I know they did it because they were pushing the envelope I make a point to give a high five of them in front of everybody because I want them to know that failure because you're trying to be better is rewarded so that's that's one thing and you have to have support that can't get the shield people from the what went wrong was that how did that happen as soon as you get fear in your culture feel your slows down and it's molasses with organization you gotTa Have Really strong culture of reducing waste automating the heck out of everything doing things in the smallest pieces possible in thinking in that way that helps minimize blast radius it allows you to deploy frequently which means that you're meantime to repair something is really really low it means that you know we are like I said we can deploy to production or when it's L. System Multiple Times in a day what that means is I never more than a day out from releasing a change of the feature set into production which means I'm not more than a day out of creating for business value from our store system that's just you after I think that way and then crosses the slow from that and the technology is a is an apricot really at that point you in addition to spending the past twenty ears at at errands and Atlanta based company you're from Greater Atlanta you went to Georgia Tech you've worked for a number of companies prior to this in Atlanta or a greater Atlanta have curious actually your own perspective on the Tech Environment in Atlanta Georgia obviously your Alma Mater in Georgia Tech One of the Great Institute Sion's a generally speaking but also more specifically in developing talent is it has got to be just about ground zero in terms of the development of great great great people with great skills but I'd be curious in your own appraisal of the ecosystem in Atlanta and how that is developed in from the time that you were going through college and starting your career through two now yeah I you hear a lot obviously the dominant player in Silicon Valley you you've got Bausch and you've got Austin you've got some New York you've got some really strong uses that do technology great I think what we do really well and and Atlanta and in Georgia in general is we've got a really good well rounded because system that offers a certain level of innovation but also pretty good quality of life I've been able to raise three sons here my wife and I have phenomenal quality of life great place to spend time with your family to get out and enjoy yourself so it has that but it also has people that are striving to great things with technology you mentioned George attack but it's not even unjust Georgia Tech you go up the road to University of Georgia and all my buddies are GonNa kill your this but they've got phenomenal engineering around computer science etc up there now they didn't always that something that has changed then you you look at the universities that Saran found those two flagship universities of Georgia Tech University of Georgia Kennesaw State University Georgia state and Georgia College Milledgeville. We have a ton of great organizations pumping out really talented people one unfortunate thing about Georgia tech is we do see a lot of people leave and go to Silicon Valley and I think it's because they're working for that nate next big challenge but then We have enough talent that we're able to some things I think that's why you see a lot of companies relocating pudding offices in Atlanta we also have some interesting advantages in that We have real good strengths around security financials services healthcare it we're known a transportation and we're known to be an area that is really strong and those things so it creates an ecosystem where you can see if some technology companies because they have to technology companies these days and we have phenomenal sharing at the technology leader level I've always been impressed by the degree to which members of the Cio community especially seemed to have that as you say collegial relationship and ability and willingness to share air best practices or or share information about threats so that the collective knowledge goes up as rapidly as possible the great great summary onto your personal or professional roadmap that are worthy well really believe that data and the ability to understand large amounts of data and predict based upon that it is it is the game changer with data and all of a sudden you're able to take out a lot of inefficiencies and you're able to proactively or predictive we address things that in the past would have been difficult to do so I think there's a ton of value there for any business personally I love blockchain not necessarily because of the SPECULA- speculative nature of cryptocurrency although I I play in it in the same way people do fantasy football so that Certainly Mind Awesome thank you thanks for tuning in please join me next week my guess what we Tom Siebel chief executive officer of seat three dot A._I..

Georgia Hydra Revolution Atlanta nate Cio SPECULA chief executive officer Tom Siebel football
"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

12:06 min | 1 year ago

"cio" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"My guess is weak is John Trader John's the chief information officer of errands of furniture latronic appliances leasing company with revenues exceeding three billion dollars as Cio John Leads the technology option for the company including the BBC segment of the organization is held variety of through his twenty year tenure with the company in this interview John Discusses the benefits of operating in a product mindset rather than project mindset is team of the throat over the wall approached it instead the company strives to deploy working software into production as soon as possible John Argues that this product mindset leads to more cohesive teens eliminate separate interests within the organization we also discussed the tech landscape in Atlanta where errands is based Johnstown blockchain the importance of having failsafe environments in a variety of other topics John traer welcomed Techn- ovation. It's great to speak with you today good to speak with you Peter I feel like this is the moment where she arrived when he gets talked to you so I'm excited that's very guide you to say John Thank you John I thought we begin with your role Oh you are the chief information officer of errands and role you've had for nearly nine years of twenty with the company and for listeners who may be less familiar with Aaron's I wonder if you could take a quick moment and described business yeah sure we lease for Furniture Electronics appliances we have about sixteen hundred doors nationwide in our business the consumer space we have a business to business space that's based out of Utah I'm primarily focused on the part of the organization we ban then in nineteen fifty five and we deliver sure of a transaction in most us and Canada excellence and I wanted to take a moment and talk about the role the analogy plays in a business like this on the one hand there there are some aspects of your business that are traditional retail in terms of things you're selling whether it be pitcher appliances electronics But then of course there's the as you noted the financing aspect to this as well so there's almost a you know a sort of financial services so to say aspect to to the business in that you're in as well and I'd be curious how you translate the needs of business complex business like that into techniques solutions. Yeah I love that question because it gets to the heart of what I like the most about this role you know I talked to the IRS is a retail organization the financial service organizations and they only get to play in One of those spaces and I we get to play in both aces and really at the the Union of the two of them and so it's pretty exciting so if you look at a traditional retail organization Not Always GonNa know a lot about their customers preferences in need and want unless they do like a loyalty program or something like that and then the financial services they're really not they don't really know what the customer is motivated by and what they're interested in victor life better it's really more transaction not a fulfilling a dream that somebody has or or making something happened for them and because I get the the and both of those we get to do technology for both the so if we look at our what I call storage system our storage system is a retail point of sale system but that's maybe ten percent of it it's also a crm it's also a document management capability that bill lease agreements that are state by state comply ah it collects payments along the way so it has aspects of financial services and it creates a lot of complexity but it's a really fun complexity because is it's all wrapped around data and what you can learn to better serve the customer and position the company to do great things excellent very very interesting and I know you've been through you've been in the throes of a rather significant transformation as an IT team as you ballooned you can kind of talk a bit about that I know for example you know as as digital immigrants organizations those born a quarter century or more how as they looked to modernize to become more nimble there's several aspects to a playbook including becoming more agile adopting you devops practices just to take two of those and I I know from our past conversations that you're actually a very early adopter in any industry to say up your own into practices like bees so I'd be interested first of all as to where the insight the spark of an idea to be Tivoli early in these sorts of journeys came from as well as some of the benefits of of the work that the team is doing yeah the spark I don't I don't really know what the spark was we did start building everything with agile methodologies started in Dev and then when I became CIO expense. the rest of the organization in our technology team in about two thousand seven as we started that journey and I it US seemed right so if you if you read the Agile Manifesto and you look at what the principles are and things David people over process it it's all about people and it just seemed like the right way to treat people and the right thing to do business and when we looked at all the successes we had in the early two thousands a lot of them were because we didn't arrogantly no Gokul in knowing that we knew all requirements and that we knew exactly how things needed to be bill and reiterated and solve for something that allowed if the when I started we at four hundred fifty I grew to twenty one hundred and we were able to scale because we integrated our business and if your going to integrate a business it's you need to be able to integrate your technology along with the business so asking for these long lead times with a waterfall and doing the oldest or ways of building things just never seem to work so that was I guess it was really out of necessity because we had a company that operated that way and I know you you and I've talked about this before I don't believe that it's it and the business First of all we call our team the technology team the Has I think there's a certain antiquated nature to the phrase it almost like am I asked data processing but I believe that it is technology team and the rest of the business and then we're very much a part of the business now we may not be you know actually checking out a customer in our store and we may not that'd be moving furniture around our fulfillment centers but we are very much a part of this business so I only allow team to say the rest of the business so that we keep our mindset we're part of it and so if you do that then you need to have methodologies that map to that we started agile in about two thousand and seven agile me is really a means to an and it's a cultural thing and it it ended up when I became cio about nine years ago it was the only way I could survive because I needed to get the same practices the same nimble nece and infrastructure and operations support and databases that I had yeah APP Dev into really worked out well I'll probably answer a lot longer than you want but I guess that's kind of the spark of it the make sense I'll make sense shit you sharing those those those details and certainly sounds like a important moves to to modernize the practice of the technology team in your organization I know another thing that you've been passionate about is the move from project to products orientation for the technology team the thing that I that a number of it leaders are still not the average one Have chosen is an area of focus and transformation can you talk about your thought process says there and again the advantages that you see depending upon where you are where you feel you are in that in that journey of Change Yeah I love that too because it it all oh builds upon The the concepts of Agile so if you think of Agile it's Kinda gateway drug for these other things agile is the gateway into devops because once you're developing and releasing an air passion you need to have that cycle time that support art and then devops means that you probably should have a cross functional team so we really avoid the throw it over the wall concept of it where uh does something then they thought of Qa and they throw it over way to the point one of our favorite things to do is in sprint zero our teams love to deploy they want it they can we want working software in production as soon as we can and focus on that pipeline and the reason we do that as we wanna get as short a distance between us writing code and testing it as and creating business value so those than going the problem act once you do that and you start re composing your teams and you no longer have being separate interest within your organization you have one coach team I looking at our economy which one of the highest performing teams when it comes to continuous integration continuous deployment. I mean they do many deployments today a day to production in calm when I look at that team I can barely tell who's development who's Dev whose released in you actually you can barely tell and actually I can't even tell them I look at the team sometimes who is in the quote unquote business which we don't use anyway and who's in technology and it's because they're just salt in business problems and they have some unique skill do it so when we once the team gets configured like that then all of a sudden you go wait a second why would I throw away this cohesion not that understands the problem domain really well and understands the opportunities WanNa throw it away at the end of quote unquote project instead why don't I the best in the during team that have a roadmap of business value that they're gonna go after you empower them to achieve that out of the way you make it get rid of roadblocks you support an hour you can but then you creating product teams not project team and you create sustaining value along the way why this product mindset is is good inside refer people to learn more to that because they'll do it a lot better job and I have interesting indeed and a lot of what you're describing John Really entails a cultural change I I can only imagine that the Technology Division that you around twenty years ago to say nothing of the one that you began to lead nearly nine years ago is very different in its makeup in the skills that you'd better that are currently growing reflective of some of the changes that we've already mentioned but part of this really requires a cultural change as well and I wonder if you could take a moment to murder reflect on some of those attributes of the transformation you've led you are a hundred percent right about culture because all other sees CIO's will say Oh wow you deploy you can deploy in twenty seven minutes to all fifteen hundred locations your store system where most retailers.

John Trader John chief information officer Johnstown John traer Atlanta John I IRS Peter BBC Furniture Electronics Utah Canada Aaron CIO Technology Division Techn murder nine years three billion dollars