35 Burst results for "CHO"

Mark Levin's First Ever Podcast-Only Special Launches Tomorrow

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 2 months ago

Mark Levin's First Ever Podcast-Only Special Launches Tomorrow

"First time in over 20 years You won't hear this Sauron radio What am I talking about Well you'll be able to listen to my first ever podcast only special My first ever podcast only special And I want you to listen to my first exclusive podcast only our right here Where Subscribe to the mark of intro podcast to listen to my first ever podcast hour It will be launched at 5 a.m. tomorrow Eastern Time Those of you who have already subscribed to the Mark Levin Cho podcast you'll be able to hear it And it will launch 5 a.m. tomorrow Eastern Time but you'll be able to hear it throughout right mister producer Now those of you who have not subscribed to the podcast you can subscribe to the Mark Levin show podcast on your phone's podcast app Or go to Mark Levin show dot com click audio rewind to subscribe to your favorite podcast platform Apple Google stitcher Spotify tune in or Amazon If you're already subscribed again you don't need to do anything to get the special podcast I will automatically show up on your podcast platform I'm doing one hour this month one hour next month one hour of the following and one hour after that for fresh hours Focused specifically on the election

Mark Levin Amazon Apple Google
"cho" Discussed on Netflix is A Daily Joke

Netflix is A Daily Joke

02:09 min | 3 months ago

"cho" Discussed on Netflix is A Daily Joke

"But in the 80s, I was a straight up dike and it was different then. I mean, we didn't have queer eye, you know? We didn't have anything like that. You know, when it was dangerous to be gay and it was very hard. It was like the 80s and I was like, I'm gay. I'm gay. I had really heavy boots and cargo pants with lots of shit in the pockets, like caribbeans and D rings and measuring tape and lesbians just like that hook shit on other shit. It starts with a fucking friendship bracelet. And then booking one thing into another thing and then it's a U haul. So you're just hoping one thing or another thing. Heavy is fucking gay. I'm gay. You know, by Jade and a messenger bag and a CD player playing on it a Franco. And I was gay 'cause we were gay 'cause you had to be gay. You had to be strong as a lesbian. We had to be strong in the 80s because our brothers, our gay men, were dying of aids. So we had to be there for them, be strong for them, courageous for them, and they were learning how to have safe sex and use condoms. So lesbians and solidarity were using dental dams. There's nothing sadder than trying to eat pussy through a piece of plastic. Just trying to gum that pussy. It's like talking to the pussy in prison. On the phone. This dangerous to be gay. Watch Margaret Cho perform at standout and LBGTQ plus celebration. On Netflix

Jade Franco aids Margaret Cho Netflix
"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

02:08 min | 7 months ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"That. Did <SpeakerChange> I do that? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> So this is not <Speech_Male> even. <Speech_Male> I don't know what the appropriate <Speech_Male> emoji is when you're talking about <Speech_Male> death, but <Speech_Male> I just kind <SpeakerChange> of liked it <Speech_Music_Male> because I don't know what else to <Laughter> <Advertisement> say. You <Laughter> just liked Asian. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> It's the most Asian <Speech_Music_Female> emoji too <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that sweat when it's really <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a long <Speech_Music_Male> duck dog. <Laughter> Yeah. <Laughter> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I <SpeakerChange> fucking love <Speech_Female> long duck young, man. Yeah. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's like a very like <Speech_Female> sweat, like one sweat. <Speech_Female> It's <SpeakerChange> even his <Speech_Male> hair is like kind of like <Speech_Male> sweaty. <Speech_Male> It is kind of sweaty. <Speech_Music_Male> That's <Speech_Music_Male> amazing. That's beautiful. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yes. If I can <Speech_Male> thank you so much for doing <Speech_Male> this podcast, man. This is <Speech_Male> an incredible thank <Speech_Male> you. Experience <Speech_Male> for me and Mike, we'll be <Speech_Male> thinking about it on our deathbeds. <Speech_Male> I hope we can <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> meet <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> one day, you know? <Speech_Male> We shall. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Make sure we shall. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> But <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> mostly in LA. <Speech_Male> Word. Well, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm in LA. We have a <Speech_Male> show in LA and New York. If <Speech_Male> you just ever want to run <Speech_Male> shit and do <Speech_Male> whatever. Let <Speech_Male> us know. Happy to have you on. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> We will do a lot <Speech_Male> of bowing. There will be tons <Speech_Male> of bowing <Speech_Male> and oranges <Speech_Male> oranges. Oranges, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> exotic chairs, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> whatever you want. <Speech_Male> Oh yeah, I'll <Speech_Male> peel your fruit for you. <Speech_Male> Oh my God. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Look at <Speech_Male> our fans. <SpeakerChange> Find you <Speech_Male> in your work. Anything you want to plug. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> People can find me <Speech_Female> on Twitter <Speech_Female> at Margaret Cho <Speech_Female> at <Speech_Female> Instagram, <Speech_Female> Margaret underscore <Speech_Female> show on <Speech_Female> TikTok, <Speech_Female> the Margaret Cho. <Speech_Female> I'm gonna follow you guys <Speech_Female> too. I think I already have <Speech_Female> maybe we'll see. <Speech_Female> We have to figure it out. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Trying to <Speech_Female> understand TikTok. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Margaret Cho dot com, <Speech_Female> I have a movie coming <Speech_Female> out in June <Speech_Female> with Joe <Speech_Female> Kim booster <SpeakerChange> and Boney <Speech_Female> Yang. Awesome. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Called fire <Speech_Female> island. So <Speech_Female> it's going to be <Speech_Female> a big <Speech_Music_Female> Asian gay <Speech_Music_Male> summer, hot gay <Speech_Music_Male> summer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Yes. <Speech_Music_Male> Beautiful. <Speech_Male> I love this. I love <Speech_Male> that. And please false <Speech_Male> on all socials at Asian <Speech_Male> Asian pod. I am <Speech_Male> also under at the fumi <Speech_Male> abi. Does THE if <Silence> you have my <SpeakerChange> ABE? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You can find me <Speech_Male> on Instagram at

LA Margaret Cho Mike New York Twitter Instagram
"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

02:25 min | 7 months ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"Real fast, doesn't it? It's all genders on Japanese. But I was just like, I literally respond like, what are you talking about? What did I miss something? And I feel like I shared that with Mike and Mike said that sometimes from time to time, his mom will bring up death out of nowhere. Just out of nowhere. She'll just be like, hey, I'm gonna die soon. Just like out of the way, we're just like watching The Office or whatever and she's just like, hey, I'm like, okay. All right. Well, you know, so I don't know. You know, I feel like, you know, Margaret, you got like a real monk view of the story. What's your view on this, man? What should I do? Well, we have a very strong relationship with death, not only because we have a lot of war in our history, but because we do have, you know, yeah, there's so much of that in our lives and in our lives are just our recent ancestors. Also, we have very strong practices where the people who are dead, we still talk to. Our ancestor worship is very real. Koreans set like a Jessa table, which is like all the foods that your ancestors loved. We would put styrofoam, so we wouldn't have to put all the food there because they're not going to eat it because they're good. So we just stick it to the outside or even like a picture of food or you'll get like a picture of something and burn it at the temple for them to have in heaven so they could have money in heaven or cars in heaven. Or if you're cleaning their grave, that's very Japanese. So I think we have a closer relationship to death that's not tragic in a sense. So there's a reality. Also, Asian people, they don't fuck with transitions. Even in your presence, you know how they'll just change the subject. They're just changing. They don't care. It's not very, there's none of that anyway, but my parents still don't know how to text. They just like a fake FaceTime. They just go straight to face. They fucks with FaceTime. They fucked with FaceTime. Or they do, yeah, they do love a cacao talk. Oh yeah, yeah. That's nice. My mom also put a old people don't even know these emojis properly. My mom asked what she said that she put that smiley face emoji with the sweat running down your forehead. If I had to express that in the American language, it's kind of like.

Mike Margaret FaceTime emoji
"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

04:20 min | 7 months ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"Like the Joan Collins of everybody's TV show. You're in a lot of stuff I love it. I'm like super excited because to me this is like, I don't have to I don't have to worry or be scared or be the only one, which is also super weird. Yeah. And to me, it's like a very gratifying thing to, and it's like what the Asian respect for elders is super real. Yeah. Like that's so beautiful. So that's a wonderful part of being able to endure in comedy is I get that from all of the Asian American comedian populations about me. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I love it. And I am very proud and very supportive and excited to see the future of it. So to me, it symbolizes actual growth change that the world is changing that America is changing and that entertainment is changing for the better because it used to be so incredibly white and so incredibly hard to even imagine ourselves in the picture of America. And now we can. And so that's powerful. You bring up being a guest. And this is something my wife always my wife is a huge, huge fan of yours. And she loves when you're in it, but she's always like, why don't why isn't she the main person, you know? And I hear you because you don't have to worry about it. You get it in there, you do your thing. I'm like, boom, you elevate the episode or the series that you just happened to stop in on. But do you feel like, oh, this is what I want to do. Do you want to, you don't want to ever be in the driver's seat, so to speak, I guess? I do. You know, it's like I'm trying to, like, I'm trying to figure that out and figure out what that looks like. And working towards it. And hopefully that'll happen. I actually did a pilot a few years ago, which was all about, it was so fun. It was with minars, yuya Jong. And Steve Park, and it was we were doing this whole series that was about a Korean American weed growing industry that we were starting in LA. And it was very like Minari, but it was weed. That's so funny. And it was just like too far for television. People couldn't imagine it, and people could imagine this Asian family. Of course, you know, it's something that I'm always like way too ahead of everything. Yeah, yeah. So we just waited too fast, but it was so it was so great. And it was just about people getting super rich, really fast from weed and so it was right before that all happened. So we were going to be like the Kardashians, but to actually pan out. But fortunately, I keep on trying so we'll see. I mean, I'm working on it. You are always ahead. That story reminds me when California was starting to, I guess, decriminalize it before they fully legalized it. I asked my mom because she loves growing stuff. She's got a greenhouse. I was like, mom, grow some wheat. You're allowed to have at the time. I think it was like 5 plants or something like that. And I was like, mom, you would be so good at this. And she ultimately said no, but I could tell 'cause she thought about it for like two minutes and she did the whole rubric. And to me, that was like, huh, maybe I can grow weed. As far as second, I was like, my refugee mom might become a weed dealer. This would be amazing. She's just a grower, you know? That'd be so beautiful. Yeah, like it's like Breaking Bad, but it's with your mom. She's got the dankest weed and olive Orange County bro she would grow the dankest weed for sure. And when you buy from her, you get a whole thing of oranges, you know? Beautiful. She's really plugged. She really wants to be an orange farmer. That's her actual passion. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Aw, I love that. Damn it. Man, weed Minari would be so good. I mean, I would just love to imagine like the grandma lighting the farm on fire and just getting high as fuck by herself. Yeah, totally. Just burn it all down. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Be so cool. Oh man. Okay, so.

Joan Collins yuya Jong Steve Park America LA California Orange County
"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

03:56 min | 7 months ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"Yes. I'm going to tell you this. And I don't want to tell you. You're going to hear it, and you don't want to hear it, but we're doing it. Oh, so it's like that kind of the general take of that reminds me of that joke he has about like, you know that joke he has on the HBO, especially when he goes, but maybe. I don't want to think this. I don't want to thank this. Yeah, I don't want to think this, but I'm thinking it so you're going to think it too. Yes. He does that all the time. Your thought system. Wow. Oh my gosh. Well, wait, that was a great podcast in general. Thank you for the series. The whole series is done. That's what I was here for. The mic drop. It is let make the mic drop of, and that's like a Chris Rock thing is like, stop thinking, because this is the last thought. This is the last thought that anybody can top this thought. The last word. So it's almost like an actions you can totally, because he really codified mic drop. That he does. This is what it is. His special is always end like that where it's like, thank you, boom, right? Did I just make a great point or not? Boom, yeah. There's nothing that can be snuck and nothing else can be said. This is nice to hear because I feel there's a lot of comedians that are sort of in me and Mike's class with the advent of TikTok and all that. I think there are a lot of comedians who are like, oh, stand up is stupid. I'm not putting you on the spot, but you've said that. You can't really change anything. Hey, there's no money. I always think that. I'm always, yeah, go ahead, go ahead, sorry. But I guess the point is, I've been hearing it from my Friends and sometimes that because I've always loved it, but I didn't really know how to describe why I did until you just said it for me. But when my close friends start talking like that, there's a part of me that's like, maybe this is really, really fucking stupid. Maybe it still is, but it's nice to hear somebody's been in the game for decades to be able to eloquently express what I've always been thinking. And I think a lot of people have been thinking too, but we just didn't know. It can be stupid, but it can be really smart. It can be everything. It can be whatever you want it to be. And art is in any way like it can be stupid, it can be smart, it can be trying to aggressive, it can be holy, it can be profane, it can be dumb. But I embrace all forms of it. I think it is more important than people realize. Yeah, that's, I mean, that's an incredible thought. I mean, I do want to ask also, you know, you've been around for a long time, and you have, you know, you keep coming back to the art form, of you're still working. And I feel like this art form is so tough. And comedy in general, any kind of comedy and art life is so tough that you really have to feel like you have to do it in order to keep doing it and obviously you keep doing it. But I want to ask you because I feel you're in a unique position to really step back from the timeline and see from the 80s to now and a question we always started to ask is are things changing? Are they getting better? I want to know what your long view, the Margaret Cho Longview of Asian comedy, whatever that you want to say. You know, like even for us, we won't be doing it like 8 or 9 years. And I've done. Yeah, it's a long time, but things are changing, sometimes they are. Sometimes they're not. And we're seeing a new class of even now agent comedians coming up. But I wanted to get your take on it. Your long view of everything. I love it. I'm so excited because I want to guest star on everybody's TV shows. I'm.

Chris Rock HBO Mike Margaret Cho Longview
"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

05:57 min | 7 months ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"I also wanted to, we at the top of the show, we were talking about, you know, hey, if you're if you're listening, leave us a review, hit 5 stars, and leave us a review on the podcast. I love reading them. And recently we got one that I think really like a cut deep. Not because it was a big deal. It was a good review. And very, very fair. This person gave us four stars out of 5. And the heading of the podcast review is keeping it real. And I'll just read it to you right now. And again, this is real. So thank you very much for the person who left us. It says, I used to like this podcast, but they have been getting boring recently. I understand because we haven't been talking about monk core. So I hope that's better. But continuing, I feel like they're still trying to figure out what kind of podcast they are. There is no flow. I may change my rating if it gets better. Wow, that's great. I love the four stars. Yeah. The idea, the real hinge on this was, I feel like they're still trying to figure out what kind of podcast they are. And for me, if you change the word podcast to comedian or man or person you want to be, that's me to the core. I think about this an embarrassing amount of times. Like every day. I wake up literally every day, and besides clogging the toilet, I'm like, okay. What kind of, what kind of exam I today? You know what kind of person? What kind of comedian? What kind of Asian person? I feel like I'm so many different things. And I feel sometimes comedy forces you into certain roles, I guess, or especially on TikTok. I don't marry if you're on TikTok. I feel TikTok rewards a very specific set of jokes from me. Like it's very like Asian mom jokes or actually weirdly enough, when I talk about how I'm not tall. It's like that's the other thing people love. So it's very, it feels very stifling in some ways, but it is a question where I'm like, what kind of person am I? What kind of comedian am I? And I wanted to ask you that, Margaret, because I feel like there's a very distinct you, I've always felt, you know, I don't know if you've always felt this way that there's a distinct you and I'm doing this and I'm a Margaret Cho and I'm gonna do me. I'm gonna be a monk. Whatever the fuck. But I don't know if you can relate to that question. Like, what kind of X am I, you know? Oh, totally. But I think like in comedy, there's essential jokes like my essential joke. If you break it all down, like in the DNA of every joke that I do, is I'm not supposed to be here, but I am. So I think yours might be, I am questioning, like who am I? Like Jerry Seinfeld essential joke is, is it me? So every joke that he does. Oh, that's the joke. And then Dave Chappelle's is, Dave Chappelle says, you can't tell me what to do. Yeah, oh, man. Yo. And so if you let go down, actually, the questioner is actually a very legitimate joke teller to be. It's related to both is it me. It's also related to, I'm not supposed to be here, but I am. Yeah. But it's also like another channel to like, it's kind of like the sculpture, the thinker. Yes. It's like, where we ponder these queries of identity. So I think it's a very legitimate channel to cultivate that you can actually keep on questioning and that can be that's probably your essential joke. Oh my God. I just got an email from the masterclass franchise and they want you to teach a class on comedy about fucking insane. That was a comedy. That was just like, you know what I'm saying? You are a monk. I tried to snatch the pebble from your hand and you were just like, no, just carry this. To carry the joke with your forearms, but it's like, I think that when we have these pervasive thoughts that seem intrusive and kind of like a problem, actually, when you embrace that and you realize, oh, that actually is who I am. And then go into that fully with the knowledge of, okay, well, this is great because we need somebody who questions all of these things. So you can question everything, including beginning with yourself and your identity, and what kind of what kind of comedian you want to be and what kind of Asian you want to be, and all of these things are very important to question, because there's not there is no questioner in the community of comedians. Now, or Asian comedians in particular. I'm a sensitive boy, so I keep a little like diaries and stuff like that. And when I look at my old diaries, the question is always, what am I going to do with my life? I've asked that question, essentially, since I was like an adult ever since. Ever since I realized I wasn't going to be a doctor, essentially, right? Then it's like now what? And now you saying actually that is the answer in some ways. That is the essential question. And embracing that, because all this time, I've been in opposition with it, right? And wow, that's amazing. I mean, did you, when did you figure out, first of all, that framework that way of thinking? And then second, when did you realize your essential question? Well, I think it's really just you look back and you see, oh, this is actually what everything was. And then I started to see everything. Because it didn't come until a few years ago, I started to get really into perfume. I love perfume. I love flowers, and I love scent. And so every big perfume house has a DNA that they put in every perfume. So every perfume has a kind of a skeletal frame that smells the same..

Dave Chappelle Margaret Cho Jerry Seinfeld Margaret
"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

03:54 min | 7 months ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"Saying? She'd just be like hey Linda, you want some oranges? I got you. You know? Making it orange. Making it orange orange. Do you have do you have like a situation? And also she's really into orchids, which I didn't realize. They're really expensive, hard to take care of. She loves doing it. She's always posing in front of it taking pictures. So are you into stuff like that yet? I have this intense orchid that I have to move around my house and outside to follow like the proper bright indirect light. And I missed it with this water that I purify myself in this weird container, and then I pour it also into Chinese terracotta teapots. Oh my God. Put that next to it, and then I'll open up the teapots. And so I can collect rain so that I can pour it on my plants, but I also have a bunch of carnivorous plants. Put your plants and Venus fly traps that are like, they're like people, those plants, they're I just got them, but they're very temperamental. So I actually baby them and follow the sun with those two. So, but the orchid is I hurt all this weird stuff about how the orkut is actually like bad Feng Shui and so now I'm like oh I don't know because you know there are certain plants that are supposed to be good and I really don't know. And it changes from year to year and sure. It's very confusing but the orchid the orchids are very tough. Yeah, yeah. I hear you there. I am trying to think now if bad things happen to us when I feel my mom, she would risk it. She would be like, this is so pretty. I will take some bad luck because it was kind of diffused. I think you can diffuse it with like, if you put like running water in a certain area, you can combat that. Like there are certain things that count to that energy. Because Feng Shui is really about like, well, if you want it like this, then you have to put this element here and then it's sort of like, they do battle in your house. So it's like a constant like rock-paper-scissors happening in your home environment. So it's like a Pokémon situation. That is so stressful to think about. All you're trying to do is make an apartment look pretty. And now you've started a melee between amongst plants. Rocks and water and fire elements. And so it's just a very, but then also if you have living animals that can offset everything too. So I have a bunch of animals too, so it's kind of like a very, you know, we live in the natural world, Asians embrace the natural world. And so now I'm like, because I used to think that, oh, I'm real futuristic and brutalist. Yeah, yeah, yeah. You know, but I'm actually not like, I'm just like a wild woman. We are. So you heard it here first, Margaret Cho is going to try and go out and maybe steal a roadrunner and or cactus. Yes. Because she's out. And coyote. And a coyote, maybe make him into medicine. Who knows? Check it out. You know, we always like to start the show with asking each other. What kind of Asian you were this week? I have a stupid one. I'll just go very quickly. I was a backed up plumbing Asian. I live in I live on the ground floor of this house and I took a dump and as you do. I clogged the toilet and I was like, oh, okay, I clogged the toilet. So I plunged it, but something wasn't right. Do you guys know what I'm talking about when you're plunging and it's just like, it's just not taking, and this went on for a while. And I was like, this is a serious plunge job. And I was plunging and plunging and I stop and I look into the bathtub and water had come up from.

Feng Shui Linda Margaret Cho
"cho" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"cho" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

"A bearer of of my rage. And it's strange because come to terms with my own personal faith. Now as i've gotten older especially as i have a child and don't have an explanation for a lot of things and while i'm still not okay with a lot of what korean christian culture is like. I have found ways to make peace with my own relationship with what i believe. God or the universe is and it's strange though because this next book beyond god doesn't mention god nearly as much as i even though i have a more personal relationship with what i believe is god i think because i am in a place of peace with myself and so i'm not having to process that relationship necessarily as much as i am processing now the relationship with the attachment figures and so that's sort of the way that mike christian experience has affected my writing but you know it does really break my heart when i see it still happening right. My in laws are very much involved in their korean christian community. And every time i talk to them. It's another story of some kind of drama with some some kind of corruption within the church. And it's just it's sad you know that this could have been a safe space for people especially for immigrants and yet it's just like a hot pot of toxicity. Somebody's thank you for sharing that. My secret dream is that someone or we should or. I don't know anybody should start a podcast just talking about the exact phenomena and i was really interested to hear you talk about how god figures dozen figure new work and so could you read the second part of the poem sure. Once i followed a man into a hurricane minutes before it stripped half of manhattan from power. I trailed behind him when the transformer line exploded and the night sky flashed a gas leak..

mike christian hurricane manhattan
John Cho Addresses ‘Cowboy Bebop’ Fans Who Think He’s Too Old

The Fantasmagorium Show

01:38 min | 1 year ago

John Cho Addresses ‘Cowboy Bebop’ Fans Who Think He’s Too Old

"Flicks is live action. Adaptation of the iconic anime cowboy. Bebop arrives this november with john showing the lead role as of spike spiegel. And the actor knew from the start that he's casting would be somewhat controversial. Spike is a twenty-seven-year-old bounty hunter in the cowboy bebop anime cho- turned forty nine years old this summer. The actor was asked by vulture about the cowboy fans upset that the series did not cast a younger actor in the role to which show admitted the biggest fear. That i had was i was too old. I knew people were going to have issues with my age. And i had to get over it. I'm not a person who says age is just a number or whatever it was gonna be harder physically. And i was going to look different than a twenty five year. Old guy show continued at some point. The opportunity is yes or no. Do you wanna do it. And i did want to do it so i wasn't going to stop myself from doing it for anyone. Who believes show is too old to lead cowboy bebop. The actor maintained the series benefits from him. Being an older actor. First of all. I couldn't have done it when i was cast when i was twenty. Seven chou said. I mean maybe i would have been better suited aesthetically or athletically but in terms of my discipline. I am strangely better suited at this age. I don't think i would have done justice. To the emotional depth. We tried to give spike. There's always a trade-off what young men are typically best at as actors is rage and that might have been more pronounced element of the character when i'm better at being older it's showing weakness and vulnerability and love. Those things are more accessible to me. Personally i'd prefer the version. I'm able to show. That's my

Spike Spiegel Bebop Spike John Chou
"cho" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"cho" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Football getting pushed through some of these shows really early in my career and they say pay. I think it's great but don't do it to your medic. You can never do the tonight show too late. You can never do you. Letterman too late you can. It's there's no such thing you can always do it too early so make sure you're ready so i made sure i had tons of training and doing Shows in front of a camera. You know did even improv than some of these other cable things were it was important but not as important Before i did the big ones and yeah. It's it's the scariest thing in the world when you're standing curtain you're getting introduced you're going okay. I got four and a half minutes here going to pretty much dirt back and it's a i would trade up feeling the world though you know. That's that's what i do it. That's why i worked for and every time it's happened You know it's just been great. Well henry what what a what a pleasure it has been to to have you here and we hope you'll come back. And maybe if tennessee ever beats alabama you. Can you can work. Act around that you know what i've already got written eighteen years core evolved. Everything's evolved references. Like mike tyson references. They got an update so henry thanks so much comeback. We absolutely love thank grammy. I'll come back anytime thank you. I love it. You go vol's at the end from henry. We'll take a break thirty minutes remaining here on a thursday afternoon. Listening to the paul. Finebaum show podcast. Wherever the city of new orleans will require proof of vaccination or a negative cova tests within seventy two hours so It also applies to two lane. According to pizza animal. Same same re- i mean. Obviously it's city. Worlds and oklahoma is playing in new orleans on opening weekend of the season and we are back and Squirrel is up next From mississippi hello squirrel and I run to new orleans a couple months ago and Got him a little place. Right there between saint charles avenue and magazine straight. No it well. yeah so. And he's at his vaccine. So i guess he can go into saints games so life is good. Life is good. Enjoy henry He he's a really funny guy a couple of friends As the interview is going on about Having had him to certain events. And i was. I was blown away by by him. I i really I'd never talked before and between between east tennessee and arab alabama. That's that's a pretty good repertoire. Didn't have to go to alabama can come up with around the fifty mile radius of knoxville. So he'd never have to leave at little that little one hour drive but no he's pretty funny and you know being a com- a comedian with the that'd be a hard gig nowadays with the political correctness. I tell you what i. I never even dreamed of but i will tell you a story. I didn't event years ago squirrel. It was a big event. A couple of thousand people and the guy said i really liked you but And then when you if you come back next year. We'd like you to tell jokes. I'm going okay. Great so i called a friend of mine. joe hobby. I think he's been on the show before he was a comic writer for for jay leno and a comedian. And so i we work on this because i. i don't like to telling jokes. It's not my ideal. I like to get up and tell stories skills. You've got some comedic so okay. So i said i'll i'll do it. I mean it was worth it. I mean it was a big time. Big time law firm and they had two or three thousand people at this deal and joe and and his partner come up with a joke and he said this is the best joke. We have ever had Leno has killed with it in vegas. He said just opened the event with this joke. And you will not have another problem. Okay you know where this is going. Don't you squirrel probably feel pretty flat. Walk out there in front of two thousand people not a comedian. And i tell this joke. I don't think. I had a single laugh but i will tell you the next hour was maybe one of the most enjoy already already got the check. I knew i was never going back. And everything i told bob. But for some reason it didn't faze me. And i could not some some guy started heckling me which actually have helped the event very much because i began doing what i do best And it but it. What a so. I'll never do that again. I will never. I would never lean on a joke and that was the end of my comedy career. Well you know. I got i got to watch what i say to you. Know and you. And i don't spend a lot of time complementing each other you know. During our calls we have more discussions but one of the things that you told me during our conversation was that he thinks. I'm kind of a found bomba kisser. That was his words. Kind of our buddy. Jim during our company. Yeah but but That's not watch my compliments. But i gotta watch my compliments but you do have some comedic talent. But it's more the sarcastic nature You've got a good sarcastic humor. You can come back with somebody critic quick with usually something and it's pretty smart sarcastic using pretty funny and that's one of the things that initially told me to the show many years ago but Anyway just wanna let you enjoy henry and Thank you probably talents to come out of knoxville. Thanks choral greater yeah. The thing about about comedy. I believe in knowing a number of comedians. It is the the audience is very important. And even as somebody who. I don't do much of it if any of it anymore but i used to do a lot of speaking and you would walk in a room and you look out there and you would know pretty confidently whether it was going to go over well or not. I mean audiences. Either i mean you would think if you pay money to go here comedian. You would want to be entertained. But it's not always true and if you don't have the audience the funniest comedian in the world is not going to be successful in this next car. I think could have been a comic in his youth and may still in his elderly years. Larry is up next area. I got a name for you already. Larry the cable guy my income. Oh my you know. I'm always serious. I know comedy made you know. I do think you do. Good on comedy. Well maybe i need to start thinking about that because this gig based on what some critics are saying is close to the end. No man going brother. I pay paul bomb. I'm kinda tired. I gotta selma bass boat. Man checked out that larry. I just. I ain't got no energy to you know when it's a nice bow out there..

henry new orleans arab alabama alabama joe hobby Letterman mike tyson knoxville grammy east tennessee Football tennessee mississippi oklahoma jay leno saints Leno vegas joe
"cho" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"cho" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"I think he got sick or something or playing was delayed and they needed a clean opener. Could jerry was always clean and was only clean comedian within the region. Anybody you've heard of so here. I am six months into my career. And they say hey. Can you get to atlanta. Sure so. I drove down over for jerry the first night and and after the show he goes man. Okay you're okay. You know what you're doing this really six months. I said yes he goes all right. Where are you going next. And i'm like well don't have a whole lot he goes. Oh here come to come to charleston with me come here. And then he went back to la and told all the big headliners. His buddies about me. So i started getting phone calls from all these guys gary shanley and all these guys to tour with them so the next year and a half. I went out with the best comedians in the country. And then they're like man. You gotta come to la so you know. I went onstage january. Eighty six I started start working full time as a comedian that spring and may and then I moved away in january. Eighty nine and you know. I've got to pay. I did pat sadek show like three months later and designing women later that year. The tonight show right after that and it was just one of those things You know no one had ever seen anybody. Lock me Being being from tennessee. Born there My accents different than it used to be. Real thick east tennessee accent but in nineteen ninety five and six hosted friday night videos embassy and my first video introduced was air. Smith with steven tyler. They're like we can't understand it word. You're saying you gotta move your mouth. And i'm like i hate. I'll try and so my accent has evolved into what it is now eight and no one's happier than my kids because they talk like me and elector cousins from alabama henry. Well there you go Typical tennessee is cheap. shot at alabama. Try try beating on the field henry. Okay Hey my wife and i have been married twenty. Two years i was ten. I know the first ten years of our relationship and that was about something other than football or was that about the football game now. That was football here. Yeah we met ninety six. I do remember those years for ten straight years. I was ten in. Oh and then it reversed unbelievable. Yeah i can help you with that. It was Two thousand and six henry. Vote the last time you got to win on that resume. Trust me and i. I'm not sure why i'm acting like i'm from alabama. I'm from tennessee. I think what we'll do. I wanna i wanna dig a little bit deeper into your Your your philosophy. Here we need to take a break. Henry show is with us. University of tennessee man grew up in knoxville. Now big time comedian. We'll be right back to listening to call finebaum. Show podcast. And we are back with ten show median from knoxville. Henry you said it admitted going. I think it went right over my head about alabama. Now explain to the audience..

gary shanley jerry pat sadek tennessee la alabama henry charleston atlanta steven tyler football alabama Smith finebaum knoxville Henry University of tennessee
"cho" Discussed on By The Book

By The Book

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"cho" Discussed on By The Book

"Princeton is playing this clap. Representation matters margaret. Cho says it so many times in her book. I love that you're just talking about it loud and proud wherever you can because we need to really understand how much representation matters in order to fucking get over our hang up about like hiring enough representation. Yes thank you kristin. I am so in love with you right now. I'm sure margaret. joe would be as well. What did you do next. I waited into step to give peace a chance. How did you wait in while. Linda as you know the. Us announced plans to withdraw from afghanistan. Right before we started living by this book but we are still there now and supposedly will be out by september. We'll see but it hit me. This war has been going on for half of my fricken life. And that means there's a whole generation of children and young adults in afghanistan who have never known their country as a safe place who have never lived in a nation that's not war-torn and it. Just oh my god. The reality of that hit me so hard. Yeah it's fucking mind-blowing. As i said here thinking about it i remember. I was in sixth grade. So someone my age in afghanistan as dealt with it since grade. Yeah and i decided. I need to learn more about what all the young people over. There are going through. And so i read articles. I listen to podcasts. I watch documentaries and here are some of the stats i learned. Oh god this is just terrible. One child in sixteen dies before their fifth birthday which is nine times that of the us. Thirty eight percent of children suffer from stunting due to malnutrition. Forty two percent of children are out of school and seventy six percent of girls. Struggle to read and write twenty. One percent of children are engaged. Child labor instead of learning fifteen percent of people have been forced to flee and conflict. Fifty five percent of people live in poverty just heartbreaking. It was all incredibly upsetting. And i didn't really know what to do with all that i was learning other than to make a donation honestly and so i did. I looked up different organizations. i decided to donate to save the children's efforts in afghanistan. And i'm not sure it's quite what margaret show asked us to do She kind of has the mindset that the pen is mightier than this award. But i decided in my case my credit card was your pen. Wrote a check sort of yes. That's a good way to look at it. I mean if we can flash back to lake. Let's say the nineties when check writing was all the rage. Oh i remember checks. You and i are. Maybe the last generation to remember is going to say. I did have my first wallet. Had like a checkbook colder like because i use checks enough. Yes it's happening. We're all so that's what i did. I think she'd approve. I feel like your awareness is important reading the stats here. Where i'm you literally just educated me like you're spreading than awareness. Hopefully someone listening may learn something and of course like leg. I said you know you're using your pen to write a check and like money literally always helps. It's sad but true right now. What did you hit up after that. I figured since i was already dealing with depressing realities i would do step seven and that is the right to life..

afghanistan margaret Cho Princeton kristin Linda joe Us
"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

"For me. I have a theory a little bit of a theory. Oh it's it's in sociology and You know there's a recent book by mark peng pod who who talks about how you know. A lot of americans. First experience of tie was through thai food and so because they their first experience of thai culture was through thai food they are conditioned to want things like authenticity and so they understand tie. Americans through that lens of authenticity and so many of the ways in which americans are exposed to asian cultures are through this lens of authenticity. Any any culture right right right immigrant cultures specifically and so like. That's why they expect high americans to know all of these different flavors because you know food is one reason you know. Food is a big way that asian immigrants have kind of navigated and like you know create an existence in america and is like one of the only places in which you know if you're white. You're not familiar with immigrant cultures. That's the place where you touch it. You know there is a kind of. I think there's Part of it is It shows kind of courage to go to the deepest darkest africa you know into the heart of darkness in income. Back alive kind of a thing. Although i will say the flip side of that is i've always felt like as much as maligned as white americans are in in this in this respect They can't be extraordinarily open. In a way that i look back in the country of my birth and i go are koreans. Korean seemed to be comparatively. You know a much more closed off and much less accepting of difference. You know what. I'm saying so that there's the good and the bad here. I should know that. I mean we would not be here all of us me and my family without the kindnesses of specifically white churchgoers you know what i mean. And they're even. I'm not sure what they thought about us. I can't say. And i'm i'm sure there were lots of things they didn't understand. I'm sure there were things that there were suspicious about. But still you know. I owe them some of my sweetest memories. Are you know i would them. Yeah even in the modern day to you mean. We can't waste anyone's goodwill you know. My my my editors white you know the people who hired me at the la times white so so yeah definitely. I mean it's just. It's all a part of like this. Is i guess for for anyone listening from. Is this disclaimer from my for myself. This is all sort of thought exercises for me trying to figure things out as i move forward all right. We got to wrap up this conversation. Unfortunately we need to get to these bad as and confessions that we talked about at the top of the show. Basically we're gonna share a timer thing that's made us feel like we're not asian enough with the idea of critiquing. Why my bad. He didn't confession. Why have so many but This past weekend. I went to Ken king food court to do my corona virus panic buying because they have this A freezer there with a bunch of dumplings and bows and montas. I bought six packs of dumplings a feeling like a king. You know driving back home with all these dumplings in my cooler in my trunk. I get home. I get distracted by something. I leave them in the car. A couple of days later. Discover the melted frozen dumplings in my car. Just so wasteful. You know. I thought about what my mom would say. You know. i thought about what my dad would say. I guess i just felt like a bad asian. Because asians are supposed to be frugal. You know my mom and dad raised me that way and my my parents. When they were kids they still remember being hungry. I only really lost like forty six dollars or something like nine cents based on the the pricing they have at gang gang led like you know it's still hurt to lose that amount of money and yeah. I just felt like such a terrible terrible. My bad asian confession is that. When i was a kid for about ten years i actually played. The japanese. traditional instrument called the koto. The koto is this long wooden stringed zither that you play with ivory picks when you're a kid your grandmother's dress you up in kimonos and you're told to basically channel like a perfect dull as you sit there and perform eye sight read japanese music. I even like sang along phonetically in japanese when i performed and this is something that was a part of my life for a long time growing up but around high school. I chose to stop taking these lessons in order to spend my spare time doing things like playing soccer and those things i also loved does are very much a part of who i am as well but now that i'm older. I kind of regret stopping the koto lessons. I regret losing that part of my life. I still do have my koto at home here with me. And i break it out once a year just to see what i remember if i can still play the songs in read the music and sometimes i think about maybe taking up lessons again But that is one thing that i look back and i. I can see that. When i was that age very specific age specific time in my formative experience i chose to say i want to do something different. I want to explore different part of myself. So that is my fat asian confession. Okay give it to us john. What is your bad. Asian confession I tell why people that. I will take them to koreatown and i and that is a lie i i've never have and i never will why that i don't wanna be anyone sherpa. I don't want to take. I don't wanna participate in this anthropological study. That they're doing. I don't wanna make anyone feel down. They are down or they're not. They can get korean if they want. I don't know why i need to be there. I don't wanna show open any doors for them if no one's opening for them i don't want to force open any door for them. I.

mark peng Ken king montas la times africa america soccer john
"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

"Welcome back to asian enough. Here's the rest of our conversation with john show. I am curious though when In two thousand sixteen a screenwriter. Name william you created a hashtag in that. Hashtag was starring john and it was basically envisioning in all of these huge. Hollywood marquee films in blockbusters to to ask. Why aren't there more asian american stars getting these sorts of chances. In what was it like for you to till they realize that this was happening strangers. Were were advocating using your face and in championing uis weird A minute was the idea was really cool and what he was saying. I was one hundred percent behind the wheel. You shadow to will you. And he's a really smart smart guy And i thank him for getting that discussion started. It wasn't really about me obviously was As an artist. I don't know whether i was thinking. Or i need to be in the shin or whatever you know what i'm saying i don't have a That's important i guess to some people to In the bigger picture. We need an asian superhero I don't really care about superhero movies personally So that that part of it the political part of it. I'm disconnected from emotionally. And so but that's what he was talking about the political part he wasn't saying john chose should be in a great performance. You know he should work with scorsese or soderbergh. He was saying he should be in the avengers or whatever. And that's an interesting argument. I'm not emotionally connected to that argument. But i get it and i support it. You know what i'm saying. Yeah i mean. I also think the arguments just like john show is like incredibly underrated and i wish that i had seen him on all these movies. Do i i for me. That was like one of the things that spoke to me about that. I thought you were really good as the romantic lead in harold and kumar for example. Right i know like it probably feels weird to get so many props for just getting the girl or whatever like but you know i was definitely one of those guys who kind of giving you the props you like. Yeah kind of made people feel like they could get the girl. I grow growing. I'm in tennessee. Where you know. It wasn't a lot of dating opportunities raisin guys so yeah yeah but how does that make you feel to get like props for that to hear that. Yeah well that's really really cool bums me out. Which is the other side of being being really cool like a bums me out that that that it's informed by that makes me think of you know i always wanted to do a movie as a valentine for asian american men that was Killing people like kill bill action hero. No just a murderous rampage. And because i do feel like asian american men. No one knows this. Except asian. American men At least for portion of our lives we walk around with in our pocket is a clenched fist. And we're ready. We're ready to fight because people have been shitting on our heads all our lives. And like i just feel like that. There is an ultra violent streak in so many asian american men because of that anger because of that emasculation. I mean the ing. I got chills when he said that because like yeah i think angers and natural state for asian american men but also asian american woman. Like you know like it's a different type of anger based on the genders. But you you know you just spend all your life being told that you're something that you're not you're spend your life trying to be bigger than the stereotypes applied. I look around. And i think i see and this is different from our father's our fathers did not grow up with that they they they come here and the experience racism when nobody's changing their minds about who they are you know. My dad is korean. He's a man he's proud of who he is. He knows who he is. And you can ching chung him to death. He doesn't give shit but us his his sons were different. We when we were soft and malleable. We got told we weren't worth anything and then we believe them you know and so it's so then. We grow up with that anger. My dad doesn't have any of that. We wanted to be treated better than you know. Like i think. I want more than to be able to like earn a living and send money home to my family i want. I want citizenship. Like everyone else. Has you know i want. I want identity and person hood you know. That's always complicated too. I mean all these cinematic victories. Also have a kind of you know. I'm not sure what it means for. Asian americans for you and me. Well okay when you took on for example your upcoming big upcoming lead errol in cowboy bebop had he described people who don't know cowboy bebop. What this project is. i don't bother describing it. It's based on a japanese anime. If you know it you'll know it's the best. It's the best because it's hard to say what it is You know you don't know it's a pipe until you look at it and then you got people who don't know what it is at was really weird metaphor people who don't know cowboy. Obviously it's it's it takes place You know in post-apocalyptic galaxy we're bounty hunters And going from job to job And the series is afraid not afraid to To rome you know and and do things that are narrative strange and And the music is incredibly important. Part of it you know which is set him up as a cowboy and A new are figure a detective Yes and so. It's sort of almost Like all my dream roles into one or like all these genres into one role. Why is it important to you to take roles like that. That aren't you. Know in your face about the asian as they aren't identifiably like that you know i don't consider myself. Asian i and the world does or americans do because we're obsessed with that. But i consider myself. I don't know maybe. I mail you know and then husband father son artists in know like seventh or eighth does asian probably in terms of how how i think about myself you know and so i. I suspect that most people are like me and so for you know from a character point of view it seems false for people to be talking about being asian. Or you only do that when you're doing a podcast so narrative i think it doesn't really work well on that's really it and then You know ironically like searching was a movie that didn't can wear it's asianise on enslave and on the other hand. It was incredibly specific. You know we work hard. And i Some mrs but for me. We i was trying to bring a lot of stuff in my personal life into it.

john show john scorsese ching chung Hollywood kumar william harold tennessee errol rome
"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

"Like the new. These questions never go away. Yeah it's sometimes like it's it's encouraging in the sense that a multiple generations have dealt with in. Sometimes it's depressing. I think from a perspective as an artist. It's hard to see you. Know what the impact of representation in art is. you know. I know that your roles have all like meant a lot to me personally. Like seeing you and heralding moving. No i mean you're the only guy out there man like there's no one else you know. I grew up in tennessee. Anytime i would see someone asian in popular culture. It's been a long time googling and searching about them and you know as my That experience i had the same experience Minus google but it was so positive to see like george decay on star trek so exciting on the flip side. It was so depressing. To see people. Speaking japanese on mash you know or and all that stuff so scarring it has been a bit of my guy just like imagining myself as twelve years old and going would win that guy appreciate this role. Or would he be bummed out. So i consult my twelve year old self a lot earlier on. There were a lot of things that were borderline. I'd always turned down the the explicitly racist stuff right right off the bat but there were a lot of things that were borderline and So there were. There is like an asian guy network that i would call in and be like okay. So the part is network Guys that went to high school with and then after a while herald from harold and kumar actual herald actual herald. Were were very close. Friends and I like his angle because he's also wants me to succeed. He wants me to make money. So he's a great sounding board. Who's an actual harold. I'm sorry i'm yes. There's an actual gerald My god you should see free baseball. It's amazing i love. Say this is I told him. I was coming here. And i talked. I talked to him about this by him around a by him. What did he say he likes it. But you're saying like even back earlier in your career you would sort of be like. Hey guys what do you think about this. Where's where's the line. Yes you know. We get into the weeds about stereotypes. But like there's there's an anti stereotype that references the stereotype like you could be asian Playboy and if that's played for laughs you go what what are we laughing at our we laughing at the stereotype is just. I'm not playing a stereotype. So it's like what are we doing really here. That's a lot of asian representation. Today is is is sort of the popular culture. That's how they get around it is trying to subvert subvert references stereotype very directly. I think there's a whole process like the stereotypes are applied to you. They hurt you and then you define yourself in relation to the stereotypes and you figure out who you are after all this crap. Is you know off your chest you know. And i think we're we're starting to move into that phase where we're no longer defined by what hurt us. Yeah i'm thinking back to the shane gillis thing mean right like before she was fired from snl his comments may bothered me. I i don't. I didn't even i didn't do much research into it or anything but i read about it in the los angeles times. Oh the record of not thank you let What bothers me about it. And i think what we have to think about is why does he and many comedians. As a matter of fact feel that they can do racist jokes about asians and they get to say. Don't you have a sense of humor. And it makes me think that what they really want to do is do were jokes. But they think. I'm gonna take heat for that. I'll go take it to the wissies. You know the people who won't complain and and we have to. We have to bite you know when that happens and why how come when we say it's not funny. They just tell us we don't have a sense of humor. I mean in a way. I think there's like a weird connection to rape culture to which is like kind of bullying a woman into sex or do you would you What are you frigid. What are you would he uptight you know. Can't you take a joke you know. It's a bullying disguised in this in humor. And i hate it. D- feel like i mean you talk. You talked about your reluctance to use social media to sort of make those kinds of commentaries. But i feel like a lot of your roles are in themselves radical choices. Yeah i mean listen the the experience of watching somebody Watching a story. You can get two people. I frankly am suspicious of the medium The ability of the medium of this electronic medium to change anybody's mind about anything. I could be wrong. It's just that's my observation. Is that no one seems to be changing anyone's mind And then there's just spending time in a place that's not this world and you're leaving your family. You're you're going. you're. I'm leaving this room in going up there and Is that good. I don't know I'm guessing not you know. And i noticed an improvement in my mood when i was doing less of it and alternately you know an increasing anxiety when i was on it thinking about what others thought about me. Total which is a terrible place to be. Especially if.

harold shane gillis tennessee kumar gerald george google baseball los angeles times
"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

"How's it going. thanks for. thanks for coming down. Thanks for doing this. Yeah john we were thrilled when you said yes. What was it about our podcast that made you wanna come on l. a. times. It's my hometown paper. Secondly i listened a lot of podcasts. I just become really interested in the medium. And then thirdly i was Few months ago. I was listening to divvy chang's podcast and he had I can't remember the guests now. But he's had a few asian americans on and when they got into culture was so unique. Or i realized it was very foreign to hear asian speaking to one another in media and i realized also called a buddy of mine and we who had the same reaction he was so excited to hear it and it wasn't anything explicit. It was just like the tone was different. I realized also at that moment. I've been talking about being asian my whole career to white people and i thought oh i have to make a concerted effort to talk about these things that come up To asian americans. And i i would like asian americans to hear that conversation. Well we're going to start out by talking about. I guess your childhood your life. Well so your family came to the us in the seventies you grew up in a bunch of places including like monterey park and went to school in glendale what was that. Like which component of that Growing up in monterey park. I did i was there very briefly as born in seoul was there till i was six years old and then came to houston texas went to elementary school in houston then the roaming started we went to. I think seattle daly city san jose monterey park We settled in glendale so the year. You kinda went off to college was was nineteen. Ninety-two right. ninety nine thousand nine okay. Yeah because i was wondering you. I was wondering if the riots happening in a. With your family here. If yeah i was i was in college when the riots happened at berkeley yes and i remember ago bears. I remember being very distressed at seeing while i mean the whole situation and then when i saw the men going up on the roof In create town. And koreatown their guns. I mean some people i think. Experience it as pride like you know these men standing up for what's theirs and i experienced panic like they're gonna die. This is going to cause more bloodshed. And i was freaked out on. These are like the images. You're seeing in media because you're like all over northern california. Yeah these are images of korean business. Owners defending their their businesses. Essentially though they're all veterans do the military service is mandatory career. So these these are men you know they're not hunters they're like they were trained in the military they can take apart the rifle and put it back together So i don't know. I was a different crowd up there. You know what i'm saying. Yeah exactly. I just ask. People grow up in la. During that time periods they talk about like a koreans of racial awakening at the time. I remember seeing this documentary. And there was a korean guy holding a sign and it was like a rally the day after the riots and i had never seen it before but the signs said responsible our government and white and it was just like interesting to see them recognizing the racial context during that time or whatever it was i always felt like it was also the moment we collectively became that we got our american membership card that day april twenty nine th nineteen ninety two it was when when koreans became american we took up arms fought for our property. You know and we're victimized. I mean that's pretty american. Let's rewind actually your your family came to the states In obviously grew up around. La but your upbringing was very different from your father's for example yes Tell us a little bit about that. In how and when did you really come to understand his experiences. Well that's an ongoing question. I'd say you know. I mean if there's anything that's really caused me to have empathy with my father. Think it's becoming a father myself. You know the process of having children is you know you relive your own childhood so it's almost like you're living for the second time and remembering those things and it's also then living the life your parents lived while they were raising you so then you're in both you each day. You're imagining yourself in both positions each day that your child is alive and So i think that that's in the process. One of the one of the things about having children i think is examining. My parents lives in our relationship and Seeing you know for as a child. I'll use these straight road but as an adult looking back you see all the junctures in in see where they turned and made choices choices. You know yeah sorry. How'd you describe it. You know the. I was told as a child that they came for our benefit which i think is true. Her that too but as i think is also not true. I think asian americans tend to believe it. You know it's probably a bit of a manners thing that the that they're reluctant to say listen. We wanted a better life. We'll we wanted to get out of dodge and shame prevents them from saying that so they have to say we came for you. I always felt that That was too much to put on a kid and that we grow up we meaning you and me a we grow up feeling like we owe our parents something. They made the choice to have us. Yes and we don't owe our parents our lives. You know what i'm saying. We we should live our own lives but you start that narrative when you're three hard to shake. There's some things that i would do that. I am doing differently. Consciously that's one of them is. There are a lot of things about my childhood that i'm trying to.

monterey park seattle daly city san jose mon glendale houston chang seoul elementary school berkeley john texas california la us La
"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

"How's it going. thanks for. thanks for coming down. Thanks for doing this. Yeah john we were thrilled when you said yes. What was it about our podcast that made you wanna come on l. a. times. It's my hometown paper. Secondly i listened a lot of podcasts. I just become really interested in the medium. And then thirdly i was Few months ago. I was listening to divvy chang's podcast and he had I can't remember the guests now. But he's had a few asian americans on and when they got into culture was so unique. Or i realized it was very foreign to hear asian speaking to one another in media and i realized also called a buddy of mine and we who had the same reaction he was so excited to hear it and it wasn't anything explicit. It was just like the tone was different. I realized also at that moment. I've been talking about being asian my whole career to white people and i thought oh i have to make a concerted effort to talk about these things that come up To asian americans. And i i would like asian americans to hear that conversation. Well we're going to start out by talking about. I guess your childhood your life. Well so your family came to the us in the seventies you grew up in a bunch of places including like monterey park and went to school in glendale what was that. Like which component of that Growing up in monterey park. I did i was there very briefly as born in seoul was there till i was six years old and then came to houston texas went to elementary school in houston then the roaming started we went to. I think seattle daly city san jose monterey park We settled in glendale so the year. You kinda went off to college was was nineteen. Ninety-two right. ninety

harold lee frank sean los angeles times kumar harold Jon columbus ching chung john
Interview With Actor, John Cho

Asian Enough

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Actor, John Cho

"How's it going. thanks for. thanks for coming down. Thanks for doing this. Yeah john we were thrilled when you said yes. What was it about our podcast that made you wanna come on l. a. times. It's my hometown paper. Secondly i listened a lot of podcasts. I just become really interested in the medium. And then thirdly i was Few months ago. I was listening to divvy chang's podcast and he had I can't remember the guests now. But he's had a few asian americans on and when they got into culture was so unique. Or i realized it was very foreign to hear asian speaking to one another in media and i realized also called a buddy of mine and we who had the same reaction he was so excited to hear it and it wasn't anything explicit. It was just like the tone was different. I realized also at that moment. I've been talking about being asian my whole career to white people and i thought oh i have to make a concerted effort to talk about these things that come up To asian americans. And i i would like asian americans to hear that conversation. Well we're going to start out by talking about. I guess your childhood your life. Well so your family came to the us in the seventies you grew up in a bunch of places including like monterey park and went to school in glendale what was that. Like which component of that Growing up in monterey park. I did i was there very briefly as born in seoul was there till i was six years old and then came to houston texas went to elementary school in houston then the roaming started we went to. I think seattle daly city san jose monterey park We settled in glendale so the year. You kinda went off to college was was nineteen. Ninety-two right. ninety

Chang Monterey Park John Glendale Houston Seoul Seattle Daly City San Jose Mon United States Elementary School Texas
"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"cho" Discussed on Asian Enough

"From the los angeles times. This is asian enough each week on this podcast. We talked to one. Asian-american gust about the joys the complications and everything else that comes along with being asian american. I'm genuine motto this week. We're revisiting our very first episode. The conversation that kicked off season one with the actor. Jon show you might know him as harold lee of harold and kumar or as sulu in the star trek movies or even as milk guy number two from american pie. His films also include. The acclaimed indies columbus and searching and the highly anticipated cowboy. Bebop movie coming this fall in this episode asian. Enough co-creator frank sean. And i debuted the podcast with a revealing conversation with john who opened up about how becoming a father helped him understand his own parents how he wrestles with the complexities of fame and the emotional scars that racism often on asian americans growing up. I look around. And i think i see and this is different from our father's our fathers did not grow up with that they they they come here and the experience racism. Nobody's changing their minds about who they are. you know. My dad is korean. He's a man he's proud of. Who is in. He knows who he is. And you can ching chung him to death. He doesn't give a shit but us his his sons were different. We when we were soft and malleable. We got told we weren't worth anything. And then we believe them when we first aired this episode. The corona virus pandemic had recently exploded and as cova numbers skyrocketed so did reports of anti asian racism and violence a month after this episode came out..

harold lee frank sean los angeles times kumar harold Jon columbus ching chung john
Margaret Cho's Self-Care Ritual: Skincare and Walking

Forever35

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Margaret Cho's Self-Care Ritual: Skincare and Walking

"Start almost every episode by asking our guests about a daily self care ritual. That is important in their lives So we wanted to start there and see if you have anything to share something that you do on a regular basis that and helps you get through the day or the week Well i have a few things. There's like a a do like a two hour walk with this little nugget child. That's actually been probably the most helpful because usually during the walk. I listen to podcasts. Or books and music catch up on kind of stuff so i'm just sort of like not doing anything but exercising her exercising myself and just breathing leaving. Go in the rain when it rains like retook two or three times a year here but i mean it's really important part the other part is i do Microcurrent skincare with a zip and a new face. Why don't use the jails that day. That are branded. I use aloe vera sometimes. Use a koito. Silver dressing like a burden dressing like burn south but So those are the things that i should have given makeup pretty much for the time being so i just do. Skincare and walking. I mean that sounds. That sounds like a perfect

US Unemployment Claims Drop to 473,000, a New Pandemic Low

Frank Beckmann

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

US Unemployment Claims Drop to 473,000, a New Pandemic Low

"New unemployment claims dropped last week to 473,000 pandemic Low. A number of people signing up for unemployment benefits is still about twice. The number is before the pandemic struck last spring. Jenny Cho Sola Fox, New

Jenny Cho Sola Fox
Make Your Business Stand Out With Nutritionist Judy Cho

Healthcare Business Secrets

02:21 min | 1 year ago

Make Your Business Stand Out With Nutritionist Judy Cho

"This episode. We're talking with judy. Show judy's an author speaker and nutritional therapists she's nutritional there with a psychology and communications degree from the university of california berkeley and she also has a function utrition and hellenistic house private practice and house of patients with health issues with non finding the true root cause of the problem. Welcome to the show. Thank you thanks for having me. I really wanna get you on the show because you're doing some really interesting things nutritional space as well as the business space so give audience some context onto who you are what you do and what you're about sure. So hi everyone. I'm judy chohan for those of you. That don't know me. I go by nutrition judy. I am on multiple social media platforms so youtube instagram facebook and i just share nutritional content. I kind of follow a meat based diet and so you know. I find a lot of healing in the space and for a lot of people. There's not a lot of information out there. And so i'm just providing nutritional therapy bits of information in these bite size portions and you know just making nutrition easy for people to consume. And i know there's puns in there. I guess they're all intended. And you know the thing is. I came from a business background. So i was a business management consultant for like twelve years and i worked with these big corporations and we were trying to find the ways to have more efficient processes. So i manage these multimillion dollar projects and my health started declining. And so as i got ruling into the whole science at a nutrition and understanding. How food can either be a slow poison or it can actually be medicine for the body. I realized that you know. I think my calling is actually in nutrition and not in business consulting but you know learning from what. I learned in management consultant. I can now like streamline the process to provide education that's understandable for the general audience. And so you know. I married that and my psychology degree. And that's how i've been able to be successful as a speaker to grow my social media relatively quickly and to you know. Build my own nutrition judy community. A now i'm about to release a first ever carnival cure published book.

Judy University Of California Berke Judy Chohan Youtube Facebook
Margaret Cho's Asian Chicken Salad

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Margaret Cho's Asian Chicken Salad

"Is margaret. Show is sometimes completely. Forget that i'm asian. I totally forget. When i'm reminded it's a bit of a shock i was on i was on a plane and stewart was coming on the aisle serving lunch to everyone and he's coming down. The aisle is sale. It can sell it asian chicken cell and he gets to me and he's like chicken salad

Margaret Stewart
Interview with Tuvia Tenenbom

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

08:51 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Tuvia Tenenbom

"He's my absolute pleasure to welcome back to johnny gould's jewish state to via tenenbaum. Absolute pleasure to be with you again. You know you are a true free speech. Doyenne and for this particular podcast. I think it's the first thing verson ground rules as you can smoke. That's the first thing eight you're wanting to billion and the second thing is you truly opened my eyes to my own. I think tolerance of jew hate when we first met two years ago thinking because before that time you know. I've been conditioned i think in growing up in the uk in school where they're only three jewish kids to tolerate the what they call politely banter works erm you would call anti semitism and it did overstretched itself from time to time and i think that is a sort of shall we say looking for a better word but would have jimmy cued. I think from a lot of british people. And i think that's what you sean likes this book. Which is finally out in english. That's why it's called the tame taming of the ju. it's not just a take on shakespeare. It's the taming of the jewel. I mean giuseppe. Funding indicated biden. Own amazing to me edo deny or tolerate and sometimes joined together. Fox's would there accuse us we'd the hate us. That was shocking. I mean the fell. Shocking was citizen. This admit is imminent burden. I didn't expect it. I went to britain. Because i'm a tinto naomi's love english data. I said okay. My published opportunity mean sister. Go anywhere you want whatever you would like to go is i like to go to britain. I like to go. i like to see did out. I mean zane ought to do it better than anybody else. That's what i remember. And then the was black seed said. Okay i'll see you two belting stone which one stone i didn't expect anti-semitism and i didn't expect such a contaminating such a contagious. Such deepen. they semitism so deeply rooted. You know it on an island katelyn or in england which is the most important of course a bit of the uk but it was a frightening to sit and what is more fighting. Wants to see the basically. I'll kind of collaborating. Sometimes they had to fight jewish lead. Doesn't seem like law. Your people told me this and that your people told me i interviewed. People not told me are available. The life is a horrible thing so this is the common people and it took time. Tim's admitted but one that gate open has had them open and started talking. Honestly say to me you know. How many times have been told delta jew oh you know let us all kinds of dips and it's like amazing much so and little kits in manchester of hasidic. The auto talks kits in manchester and london will have had acts pelted them only storm so whatever it is i mean is a big addictiveness and we talked to jewish leaders saying even when the time used to say anything against wirelessly well owning two positions if to say one wowed against jimmy coleman only now's opt in the position you know as it became hewison you wayne saying that a one is easy allies. That are not going to be selected you know in a volume label for example district. Tina zero willing to say it was piping to see that one of the most disturbing rates. I think of british antisemitism and this might go around the world as well is. There is a sort of dog whistle so that someone can maintain that they're not anti semitic so someone who is an influence on me. Extreme left and concise something assiduously continuously hard left without. Referencing jews but then. His followers commend dog whistle a really serious anti semitic sort of betrayal of what they think themselves. I'm using an example of a very powerful voice. Which is john bishop. Who has who has three and a half million followers. He prostrate himself in front of ken loach on twitter. He said all this great interpreted it was as though he transferred the word. A jeremy corbyn for ken loach. I would kneel before him. And then if i couldn't anymore i prostrate myself in front of him which set off a huge torrent of jew hate and of course he a month ago on holocaust memorial day. Couldn't believe the terrible tragedies and then this is where the problems lie and that's an eye opener i think for british choosier surprising the anti-semites i mean disgust for britain and coastal are the places. You know that they took very nicely. Buddy dead jews in world war cho- you knows such nice people bubble and so bad and let's give some money to memorize them and and an make any fence you know maybe even endows of comments may be whatever it is making events you know in in a beautiful place to memorize their juice by the juice living was you know i mean it's like at all let's let you know what's album changes on the plane and of course the cord is a polish time. The code is is the stinian am am by itself. You know if you kill by the palestinians you know it doesn't mean that you don't like jews you know if you're critical officially doesn't mean that you're antisemites if you are cup only fizzle and if the only people who care about our justice palestinians because you killed by nobody else. Don't get about. Muslims in china while being tortured by million. Your don't care about syria. Don't care about libya you don't care about lebanon. You don't care about you. Don't even know what happens in yemen. Of course you never heralded by the war in chechnya and and distorted opening their head about anything. Only but it's going to stadiums you know is that there's a problem and they interesting thing when when i went into states and talk to the people and i tied to figure out. Why only this issue bottles you know. Other they show from people is back know underneath it. The other side was fight. Independence genius he. So did choose members alleys jews and a hall of people or some people would say something like you know what you will high. I don't know why feedbacks why feel about palestinians and i don't feel about anybody else. I have to think about it not over the palestinians up. You know it's like when. I wanted to start with like anyone to my my wife. Easy as you mentioned and i went to take a towards kamla sound everything and i'm gone to straight on that and i pick up young people young white folks as they call them. You know students. And i say i. My name is ahmed. And i'm from palestine. Would you like to appointing the individual cumberland. I say to say some wards full touma. Addison sister palestines and yet when you see slice cates looked like he must santana even studious and everything or well drafts. And the person free pop stein. And then he apologizes up. Tradit- day. Yes not yet picked up to join the battle. I'm just like you away. Think i'm posting. Think whether you might want to. Nobody looks like from his teens. You don't even have. Some people do not know the distance. When i asked him to stupid question between lemon palestine.

Johnny Gould Verson Jimmy Cued Britain Tenenbaum Jimmy Coleman Ken Loach Hewison Tina Zero Manchester UK Giuseppe Zane Biden Naomi Shakespeare Sean Jeremy Corbyn John Bishop FOX
What a WoW virtual outbreak taught us about how humans

Science Friday

11:51 min | 1 year ago

What a WoW virtual outbreak taught us about how humans

"Hit last year, people reacted in different ways from complete denial to volunteering to help others. Some people flouted the rules, while others didn't leave the house, and some even used it as an excuse to hurl racist insults and physically assault other people. These actions may have seemed unpredictable. But a group of epidemiologists was not surprised They'd seen this all play out in another pandemic in 2005. One that happened online in a video game called World of Warcraft, players there became infected with the virus due to a glitch in the software. Side fry producer Daniel Peter Smith is here to talk more about that. Hey, Daniel. Hey, John. So briefly. What is World of Warcraft for those who don't know? Yeah, it's one of the biggest online multiplayer games of all time. It's been around since 2004 and basically you're playing in this huge medieval fantasy environment with millions of other people across the world. You can play as an orc made warrior. That kind of thing so kind of dnd stuff. On Deacon, explore the world and fight monsters and go on quest with other people I've heard about it never played myself that this m pretty cool. So how did this all start with the epidemic in the game? Yes. So in 2005 Blizzard, the company who makes world of Warcraft they created a new challenge. And basically was you go to this one area you battle of big villain, which is called a bus. This big snake demon thing that would cast a spell on you. That gave you a kind of infection, And this infection was called corrupted blood and the small basically, just like slowly sapped your health away while you were fighting it. It would obviously affect you in battle. But once you defeated the boss, you could like go out into the main world and you're basically non infected anymore so individual players could get infected while battling the boss. But then how did the spread the other players? Great question. So there was a bug in the software where if you had a pet with you can have these like companion pets. Your pet would also get affected on when you left the area and went back to the main world. Pet continued to carry the corrupted blood infection, and it would spread it to other players and other characters in the game, and they would slowly die. So this is basically a computer virus that was acting like a real virus, right? And this sparked the interest of some epidemiologists who happen to be playing the game at the time, and I talked to Eric Molinski about this. He's the host of the podcast called Imaginary Worlds. Which is a show about how we create these worlds and where we suspend our disbelief. And he reported the story about this outbreak and how studying virtual epidemics can teach us how to deal with real ones. And I started by asking Eric how the virus started to spread in the world, and he told me that in a virtual world, it spreads very easily and very quickly. In the real medieval world, you know, plague would would travel about as fast as it is the horse But you know, in this magical medieval world, you can teleport back to cities. And a lot of these cities have what we call in PCs non playing characters, so it could be like a shopkeeper or guard or, you know, just sort of townsfolk in the background. But they all got infected with this thing. So they were walking around, infecting everybody else. A symptomatically, which is also a very weird thing, which has been which is not supposed to happen. And so that's another way that they disease spread really quickly and like did you have to be like really close to them toe like actually get it like how it works with Cho. But, yeah, Yeah, You definitely need to be close to get to get to them. And also, you know, the longer you play in the game, the more sort of health and wealth you build up. So you you could almost be like the NPC is where you feel. It's equivalent of you have a cough. You know when people get Coben and they say, Oh, it wasn't that bad. It was just like a mild flu. Or maybe somebody has access to, you know, very, very high and medicine. You know, it's different from some of the lower level players that people that just don't have the time to invest that much into their characters and build up. That health and those people were just getting wiped out like crazy, and you would really get sick. I mean, you would just listen. I like about the blood would come out of it wasn't it Wasn't like you just sort of like turned into a skeleton and disappeared. Yeah, that is pretty graphic. So this country attention of some epidemiologists in effect, Furman, who at the time was at Princeton and Eric Lofgren. So they were gamers. Also, they were like, also in World War craft at the time. Yeah, What was fascinating to them was not exactly the way that the virus spread in the game as much as the way people reacted to it, because his epidemiologists they would often do you know models try to figure out how are people going to behave on economist have talked about this lately to that for so long. They're mathematical models would assume that in any situation People would behave what they were considered to be rationally and so with world of Warcraft, Here's a virtual environment where most these characters are being controlled by real people, which meant that they could study the behavior in real time as to how people reacted in the situation like this. It was really fasting to them because they were reacting in ways that no mathematical model would have predicted. Yeah. Can you describe those reactions into some of the amazing similarities to hell? That epidemic mirrored our real life pandemic? No. Sure, So has the menu before the sort of subset of players who were inadvertently responsible for spreading the disease were hunters who they're, you know, they're digital pets got infected, So there was a lot of sort of scapegoating against these, You know hunters, and I mean, it's a much, much more serious situation, real world. But there's a lot of anti Asian racism that you know, immediately started when covert 19 came to the U. S. It is still going on today. There were fake cures being spread around and just Ton of misinformation and conspiracy theories. People thought the company of Blizzard had created it on purpose. Or maybe there was some disgruntled employee who had created it. It was very hard to get correct information in the sea of misinformation. Another thing that was really interesting was that there were people that were good Samaritans people with very high health points. You know, people had a lot of health and wanted to help use their you know, go into infected areas and use magical spells to cure people, But very often they overestimated how healthy there Characters were and then they would get infected well, and then you know, there's a subject you've talked about before on the show Briefers. Um, you know, in this case, you know, it's people that basically have very troll ish behavior online, and there are people that would actually go up and try to infect other people, Which you know doesn't happen very often. You very rarely hear stories about that. But actually, Blizzard wanted people to do social distancing. But you know, in a video game where the whole point is that you get to interact with other people through their avatars. Social distancing is not a fun way to play the game. And they were just a lot of people that simply didn't care. People are flooding the rules. People were being jerks, and then the other people who are taking it very seriously. We're upset, and we're just saying, you know, you're ruining the game for us. This is not a joke for us. And that kind of conflict in terms of you know how seriously do you take it from? How much do you follow the rules? That, you know, had a lot of interesting parallels as well. How How long did the epidemic last in World of Warcraft and how many players got infected? Unless for about a week, which obviously compared to what we've been through doesn't sound like much, but so at the time World War craft had about 6.5 million players around the world and over half of them. About four million were affected by the virus. So it was huge. I mean, you had to just kind of like, you know, escape to a virtual mountain top and let your character just sit there for the whole week. You go to your your virtual cabin in the woods if you wanted to avoid. This thing or just not log on which obviously for you, cos disastrous, All right. It's like, oh, boy. Time to go to the top of a mountain. Do nothing. My favorite game log back in and see if my character is still staring at the sky so the virus is spreading in the game. There's like unchecked spread. People are traveling all over the place, and eventually, things like Stop mirroring. Reality as I understand it, because unlike reality, World War craft has an all powerful game developer named Blizzard, right? Yeah. I mean, this is the thing where you know you wish you were living in a virtual world. They took control of the whole thing there. First. They tried to put in a bunch of patches to stop the virus and that wasn't working, And eventually they had to just reboot the whole system. Yeah. So one of the things I thought was really fascinating about your episode is that the epidemiologists really anticipated this wave of noncompliant behavior that popped up with our current pandemic. I'm going to play this clip from your podcast, imaginary worlds. Epidemiologist Eric Lofgren talking about that, and I think one of the things that we're seeing in parallel is a lot of people don't take infection seriously, if it is not personally a risk for them. So you see a lot of people talking about Corona virus, and I'm like, Well, I'm young. I'm healthy. The mortality rate isn't that high for me. So why should I care? And I think in the corrupted blood case There was a lot of that similar thing where, you know, Okay, This is bad if you're high level, but it's not all that big a deal. But like the server is being destroyed by this epidemic. The economy has been crippled. Everybody can we cooperate for a little bit and get rid of this? Is, I think, sort of the important parallel there. Yeah, it's just incredibly important that epidemiologists are not taken by surprise. To some extent. I mean, obviously they're surprising things about it, but it was not a complete shock to them. And I think because this kind of began to lay the groundwork for epidemiologist understand that people are not going to react like mathematical models and It's an important part of their messaging as well to the public is to is to anticipate that this is gonna happen and again, not be surprised by it. Yeah, we've had quite a few epidemiologist on the show over the past year. And it's almost like they have to be kind of part medical scientist Part social scientist It seems like yeah, they're really inseparable. And again, I've noticed, you know, economists over the years have been talking about this as well that too often that they based things off of these sort of mathematical ideas of what people will do, and people are obviously ah, lot more complicated. It's ironic that what seems like kind of virtual people You know, even though they're controlled by real people is is kind of what made them realize that Do you know what direction was like to this paper when it came out? And if it in the paper had any impact in the scientific community, especially in covert, so was I Guess it is huge. I'm in the paper when when the paper came out, it was huge. Eric Glass granted. Nina for vermin give a lot of talks. It was generally very, very well received paper people were pretty fast in and buy it, and it's and and had a really fun. You know, element do it in terms of video game that I imagine a lot of epidemiologist papers. Don't you know? Don't have so What do you take away from the story after you finished working on it? Well, the thing that I really thought about a lot was what counts is human contact to some extent, you know, that's so interesting to watch. These people interact virtually through this, you know, in in this virtual world because we've all been doing that over the last year. In a way we've all become Maura like players in a video game, you know where we have You know, even when you're on zoom. I mean, you're sort of constantly watching yourself on zoom and it's like there is kind of an avatar version of me that's interacting in this virtual world. And I just I feel like in a way, the whole world has become more like the world of work Craft. Over the last year, and I really began to see that coming when I worked on this episode, and so it's kind of played out exactly the way I thought.

Daniel Peter Smith Eric Lofgren Blizzard Eric Molinski Coben Deacon CHO Furman NPC Daniel Cough Eric Princeton FLU John Eric Glass Nina Maura
Congress adopts $1.9 trillion stimulus package

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

04:22 min | 1 year ago

Congress adopts $1.9 trillion stimulus package

"Will listen. I already love you. And now i just i want to kiss you and hug you and squeeze you over the covid relief bill because it really is as joe biden would say a b. Fd right. i mean it is the biggest progressive piece of legislation. Maybe ever right. Well they're saying maybe since the days of lyndon b johnson When so many of our fundamental bills were signed into into law but That's a long time ago on generations. Nerve law have passed. Since since then. And i so excited. And so proud and let your. He's only there in cresent for like a month and a half. I arkle yeah. That's operation warp speed. Yeah i mean honestly the number of vaccinations. Just the i think the amount of hope people are finally feeling. I mean and also just the contrast you said while the gop lear was reading dr seuss. Democrats passed a one point. Nine trillion dollar stimulus bill that will cut child poverty in half and deliver urgently-needed relief on it. Just it's sort of extraordinary that they that not one. Republican voted for a bill. That has you know a in a pandemic that killed five hundred. What twenty five thousand. Americans are more than that. I isn't it the politics over just completely eliminates me. I understand the only grace words. A partisan issue is in the congress. It sow because out in the world In our world The seventy five percent sometimes more in bowling. What this spill need this. Bill appreciated an. It's it's really a sea change in the interpretation of what government means. I think we have passed point. Were you know Government is the problem not the solution. People are looking to cover now and they're gonna get it. Joe biden said help is on the way. And it's it's coming. Yeah vote on this. It's going to be great. You'll think we're in the middle of watching well. My dad's party. I mean won a major party in america. Just commit suicide. I just i mean this. Bill has eighty three percent. I believe last poll. I saw public approval rating on. I mean they're they're hanging onto donald trump who helped them lose the white house the house and the senate who is actively telling people send money to me not to the republican party. I mean what do you make of. What's happened to your colleague here republican colleagues. How do they go home. And they say well yes. I voted against sending you that chuck. I voted against extending unemployment insurance. No your kids are not going to get that tax credit that's a alleviate poverty and we don't want to put food on your table and so we voted. No i i. i don't. I don't know what the you know. The message can possibly be well. As you tweeted representative he said as americans suffer and demand Relief and systemic change republicans across the country of united to suppress the boat. It's disgusting. We must pass the john. Lewis voting rights act. I keep saying. I only anything else matters unless we passed that because these bills are just. They dropped any pretense of voter fraud. They are just absolutely trying to stop. Cut the amount of people that can vote right cutting rolling voting to try to get away with vote by mail. Trying i mean i. I can't even keep up with all the techniques right georgia. They thought well you know that. Sunday voting where black people how souls to the polls that lets them vote. That brings out the vote mark. So let's just get rid of sunday voting. It's so blatant racism The is just shocking really. They don't care though they're shameless. they're totally shameless. Do what they think. They have to do to pick their own voters to limit people's right to vote. It's

Lyndon B Johnson Dr Seuss Joe Biden Republican Party Bill Bowling Donald Trump Congress White House Senate Chuck America House Lewis United John Georgia
Colorado bill would allow civil action on past sexual abuse

The Savage Nation with Michael Savage

00:10 sec | 1 year ago

Colorado bill would allow civil action on past sexual abuse

"Expired. Jenny Cho Sola Fox, New Colorado's legislature, is considering a bill that would allow sexual assault survivors to bring civil action against

Jenny Cho Sola Fox New Colorado Legislature
The CHO Cell Line  From Reliable Workhorse to State-of-the-art Protein Powerhouse

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

The CHO Cell Line From Reliable Workhorse to State-of-the-art Protein Powerhouse

"Welcome to the cell culture dish. Podcast the joseph line from reliable worse to state of the art protein powerhouse. I'm brandy sergeant editor of the cell culture dish joining me. Today is allen dixon. Professor of biology at the manchester institute of biotechnology university of manchester allen describes himself as a molecular cell biologist who thinks of cells as factories that can be used to manufacture life-changing medicines including protein-based biopharmaceuticals viral vectors and modified cells working with industrial and academic collaborators is developed key advances toward the understanding of how a popped toasties quality control mechanisms and genome localization of recombinant genes can influence the efficiency of choice'll systems. His laboratory were very early. Adopters of the application of olmecs approaches to provide molecular profiling of chou cells. And how such information could be used to direct cell engineering toward improve manufacturing processes alan's contribution to the sector was recognized by the award of the peter done health award in two thousand seventeen in addition to his research. Alan teaches undergraduate and postgraduate levels and has held several senior administrative roles at the university of manchester. Welcome to our podcast. Allan thank you for being with us today. Your group has a very long trajectory in bioprocessing research. And fact you've been working quite closely with the subject of our interviews day. The chinese hamster cell line today show cells are the workhorse for the development and manufacturing a biopharmaceutical products but back in nineteen fifty seven when puck managed to isolate and keeping culture. The first show k. Oneself nobody could anticipate this success. I wanted to ask what you think is so special about. Why has it ended up being so successful. Has a really good question to start with. Brandi one special berkshire well. Actually the survived forty to fifty years of use anita. They started off initially being isolated as i'm cells abuse to study cancer and divide very rapidly and a use for a long time in that context but at the same time people develop mutants that enabled them to be used in selection systems to express proteins. So by that amine being able to use a cell line noca- specific genes. They're able to use those same jeans in a vector cassette so they could use that as a marker to look the uptake of a recumbent gene. You know i think they'll janati of the true l. As because it was a. I have the bus cell line. Many groups were up on the built up. Loss of information about how the cells grew. I attended to be very or should we call a very amenable system to generate further mutations. The game the cells different properties that people could use to their own policies so as a first starting point and then i think also because show south started to be used for production proteins. The then became almost accepted. The products that kim from them went through the fda another regulatory authorities on were approved and consequently they the ease of that approval. Meant the others could follow along and also get that product to put if the us true sales as well so the became established. Now i think that's successful for them in terms of their ability to be used by many different groups to make many different types of proteins so it was a rapid growth large amount of information that was gathered about them. The selection markers it could be couple to vectors and protein expression and in the fight. They got regulatory approval. So i think that's a summary of that area who covers what special but there. Also i mean if you want to call them special. They are the million cells the right sorts of processing for the type of products. That might be used as human therapies. An such that also fitted into the special holiday volume for companies in terms of production. Who cell line.

Allen Dixon Manchester Institute Of Biotec Brandy University Of Manchester Janati Allen Allan Alan Brandi Berkshire Anita Cancer FDA KIM United States
Bringing Hope for Heart Failure with CCM Therapy with Simos Kedikoglou

Outcomes Rocket

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Bringing Hope for Heart Failure with CCM Therapy with Simos Kedikoglou

"Cmos such a pleasure to have you here today. Thank you very much sean. It's great to be here. Thank you and so you know you are In from the uk and a love that you know the work you guys are doing from there is translatable. You know the nih and there's a lot of learning that we could do in the us health system and overall just In general across the globe. But you know before we dive into the work that you're doing at impulse than amex tell us a little bit about you and what inspires your work in. Healthcare against cat is eight phil to work in because you cannot do well for our employees for shareholders for the people of the impulse team by doing good for the patients getting the best thing for the patient galloping damage what inspires every day. We have quite a lot of Gauged on our website where patients themselves are talking with them or they spontaneously talked about how we have been able to change. That lives in. This is very motivating. That he's Everybody wants to have professional fulfillment but seeing this patient at being able to play with the grandchildren go shopping. Were their partner win. The davis likud then is something we find very motivating. Yeah for sure. And it's just a an amazing time to be able to do it. We do in health care and so talk to us about your company and how exactly you guys are adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes they now makes has developed. Ccm technology which is for patients in with caught fire. We had intervention had feigned grew. Having implantable device is for those patients that have exhausted financial statement by that not yet sick enough to qualify for a heart transplant or a full replacement off the palm of device. This is a lot of patience. Six or seven million patients globally. Roughly one one and a half in the united states and these the hatfield epidemic is growing fast the american heart estimates that is growing aspect four percent but he had a number of grocery four percent but he had are very valid our patients they can walk at most one flight of stairs. They can walk a thousand feet and then they stopped short of breath. They edit three from deep official daily life. They cannot go to church or the synagogue. They cannot go shopping. They cannot spend time with family went. We do is to try to help them to leave the latch that we have developed so extensive clinical trials and genetic development a device that makes them be to enjoy life again and we have immortal that the hope is here and i think this is how we think we're adding value now. We have also shown on many occasions that will reduce there okay. The frequency of their visits to the hospital the space course very much and so we save on resources. We have a detached of technology allows them to go for long without the pledge. Michelle we do. Take into account the economics. We actually value to the system but we also create value to the patients themselves by to join that lives. Now that's fantastic and simos so the so the work you guys doing. Obviously you guys have brought the technology to the us really globally. You're based in europe. But sounds like you're making a big difference here would you say makes. Ccm therapy just different or unique and what it's able to provide to patients show the communist based out of the united states and the technology brain development has been done in the united states. You jesse is unique is that we are helping people through a completely different way before People getting mushroom shorter treatment. Obviously everybody will exist for excitement before they concede that any device but instead of moving to the very invasive transplants ridiculous divides thinks that costs hundreds of thousands of dollars Ways for the patient we have stimulate or show. Take very unique concept we had. We had to develop survey stake in more than twenty years of research and more than obligations that basically trains the myocardium eight single it like when you go to the treadmill and you Start getting exercise overtime over the three months winter. You start feeling better. It's a very similar without device to very simple implant. It's now the fifth generation of the infants advantage simply for forty five minutes at basis typically. Go back out the same day at home and they don't even need anesthesia for implantation. Just like the dacian. This feeling better. They see the effect building up and This is what they consider. Unique is not only that it's a completely different not replacing the pump. Were just training the supporting the pump and training it to make able to deliver the blast at body needs but also that it's a fairly simple process. You know justified the five minute implant. The patient typically has to charge because we usually childhood by any to charge launch a week for forty forty five minutes and we have shown that more than ninety nine and a half percent of patients soundtrack. Because they see improvement cho- i would consider the uniqueness here is the concept itself which is malaysian. But from the patient's standpoint relatively big help for a relatively low invade not very invasive procedure and not quieting loss from this patient other than a weekly detach very good very good and is it charged externally or how how is it. It is a tax completely Just like your to say back. The judging and In new generations of the device which i'm happy to talk we are actually improving what we get out of. The device show not only the patients chancing but also devices being every week so we get out of the typical court lahore liberty three months in check your device which is just a bad into the basin. We have to think it through from the beginning in a way that is convenient to the patient inefficient for the healthcare system.

United States NIH Sean Davis UK Michelle Jesse Europe CHO
From Australia to Canada, how Indigenous people are coping with isolation one year into the pandemic

Unreserved

04:27 min | 1 year ago

From Australia to Canada, how Indigenous people are coping with isolation one year into the pandemic

"It has been almost a year since the covid. Nineteen outbreak was declared a pandemic. it's an anniversary. I'm sure many of us are not too happy to celebrate. This year has been a real challenge in the pandemic has fundamentally changed our lives but many folks have found ways to not let isolation get the best of them. I know so many people out there all around the north. Were ready to support you. I think a good storyteller reminds you that all storms pass. We've been here before but we can help to route at resilience and make them more aware of how strong young folks are this week. Unreserved how indigenous people are turning to digital communities storytelling and culture feel connected to squash those isolation blues cleo denny writer richard van camp has essentially been on a one book a year pace for two decades his latest called gathered share some secrets to great storytelling and it includes seven stories. Elders from his community have shared with him. Richard is here with us now to talk about his new book and how storytelling can help fight and banished loneliness especially during this pandemic. he joins me now from edmonton. Welcome back to the show. Richard musi cho- feeling sal. My see my friends thank you. So let's party. yes let's party. So can you tell us about your latest book gather. Oh thank you. Must he chose so. Gather really an exploration of my journey as a storyteller. For those of you. Who don't know my name. Is richard van camp. I m c show denny. I was born and raised in fort. Smith northwest territories treaty. Eight country goes born in nineteen. Seventy one and i was raised in a town. It was. It's the maty capital of the northwest territories if it's paradise schwartzman throws territories officially quadri-lingual so bush cre- dna a french and english spoken at any given time. And when i graduated from high school i ran. I went from hero to zero. Because i had no idea what i wanted to do. No idea at all. I wanted to be a break dancer. I wanted to be a minjah. i was nineteen. I had a mullet. Some pinch hickeys. And i actually had a real existential crisis. I had a midlife crisis at nineteen. Cause i was like what am i gonna do. Who am i supposed to be. And i saw that. They were looking for drivers for the handy bus. They were looking for volunteers. And when i saw that on the green screen in fort smith northwest actors. The bango channel. I realized that that was what i was going to do. I was going to volunteer. I'll start driving the elders around. Because i was a really good canadian. Really good treaty indian. I was a really good person. I was a former. But i was a really poor ki- chou denny. I didn't know anything about our language. I knew a little bit of butter culture through our mother. But you know i was so busy having fun growing up by what i realized when i showed up to begin my apprenticeship as a handy bus driver in fort smith northwest territories to the matriarchs to the lighthouses to the mama. Bear's portsmouth arthritis territories. And i'm talking about irene centers. Dora toronto seraphine evans. Emilia gate tricks. I'm talking about the sweethearts of our community. They could see right away. That i was a really hollow indigenous person culturally and that i was searching and they took me under their wings and it was bingo runs. Hospital runs medical runs. It was trips to cancers in the northern store and trips to the landslide to watch the pelicans return it was through those driving shuttling and careering the royalty of our community wherever they wanted to be that they started sharing their stories with me so gather is really about what i learned. The smartest thing. I ever did belan was i realized a few months into apprenticeship as the handy bus driver. Fort smith risk territories. No one was recording our elders. Nobody because the mistake we make as we think everybody is going to be here forever. And so i remember explicitly having this. Oh my god. If i don't record our elders and get these stories downs. I think we're going to. We're not gonna have this opportunity my message with gatherings. Don't wait to record your heroes. Honor them now.

Richard Van Camp Cleo Denny Richard Musi Cho Quadri Fort Smith Chou Denny Schwartzman Edmonton Denny Dora Toronto Seraphine Evans Richard Fort Smith Bush Belan Arthritis Cancers
Unemployment claims remains stuck at high level

Frank Beckmann

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Unemployment claims remains stuck at high level

"Is out and Fox is Jenny Casella takes a look at the numbers. The number of people filing for unemployment benefits last week declined from the week before 2 730,000. It's not as many claims is. Economists were expecting the aftermath of recent winter storms created power outages. Another disruptions, though that can make it difficult for people to file It also creates temporary unemployment. For some workers. New unemployment claims have been holding at high levels, though Andy Challenger of outplacement firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas is predicting fast job growth as hospitality, entertainment and travel get going again. Jenny Cho Selda

Jenny Casella FOX Andy Challenger Jenny Cho Selda
Unemployment claims remains stuck at high level

Frank Beckmann

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Unemployment claims remains stuck at high level

"Is out is and out Fox and is Fox Jenny Casella is Jenny Casella takes a look takes at the numbers. a look at the numbers. The number of people The number filing of people for filing unemployment for unemployment benefits benefits last week last declined week declined from the week before from the week before 2 730,000. 2 730,000. It's not It's as many not claims as many is. claims Economists is. Economists were expecting were expecting the aftermath the aftermath of recent of winter recent storms winter storms created created power outages. power outages. Another disruptions, Another disruptions, though that can though make that can it difficult make it difficult for people for to file people to file It also creates It also temporary creates temporary unemployment. unemployment. For some workers. For some workers. New unemployment New unemployment claims have claims been holding have been at high holding levels, at high levels, though Andy though Challenger Andy Challenger of outplacement of outplacement firm Challenger, firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas Gray and Christmas is predicting is predicting fast job fast growth job as growth hospitality, as hospitality, entertainment entertainment and travel and get travel going get again. going again. Jenny Cho Jenny Selda Cho Selda Fox knew about 150 employees that

Jenny Casella FOX Challenger Andy Challenger Christmas Gray Andy Challenger Jenny Cho Jenny Selda Cho Selda Fox
3.4 Million Washington DC Residents Are Struggling With Depression Amid the Pandemic

News, Traffic and Weather

02:15 min | 1 year ago

3.4 Million Washington DC Residents Are Struggling With Depression Amid the Pandemic

"Landed its latest probe on Mars. It's a rover called perseverance, and it's about the size of a car. You think that's doing for the first time are collecting samples that we hope to return to Earth one day It has a helicopter on its helping pave the way for human exploration on Mars for the very first time, That's Dr Daniel Nu Ting, who helped design the rover. She says One of the most important components is something called moxie, which will attempt to generate oxygen from the thin Martian atmosphere. Jeff Pooja, Look, Come on. You've been 323 days since family members have last seen sailors serving on the USS Nimitz. The warship left home Port Bremerton, April 1st of 2020 and his scheduled to return home soon. Initially, crew members were expected home around Thanksgiving. But the deployment was extended multiple times. Rose. Elliot's husband read is a nuclear electronic technician aboard the Nimitz, she told the CO. Moh told Cho Mo. The constant changes in homecoming dates have been excruciating. But now Just want their sailors home. Vast majority of us just want to leave Political Herb. Get out. How going sailor? Get them in the car and go home like I would like some pictures. Really, That's all I need. And then, just like, let me bring him home, so we couldn't just start being normal again because of covert. The crew of more than 5000 have been mostly confined to the carrier the entire time. Someone whose time 10 40 from the Beacon Plumbing sports desk. Well, tonight, Gonzaga beat ST Mary's 87 65 Cougars over California 82 to 51 Stanford beats the Huskies 79 to 61. Almost Bill Swartz says the Seahawks could have more money to shop for players next season. The NFL lost a ton of money during the pandemic, but will actually increase each team salary cap toe $180 million in 2021. That's a $5 million increase. The Seattle Seahawks trying to keep some defensive free agent stars Jamal Adams and Carlos Dunlap, Philadelphia ships quarterback Carson Wentz to the Colts for a couple of draft choices. In these other QB on the roster. Former Washington Husky Jacob decent Seattle Mariners officially welcome back South Paw pitcher James Paxton to the fold. The EMS traded the big maple to the New York

Dr Daniel Nu Ting Jeff Pooja Port Bremerton Cho Mo Elliot Bill Swartz Seattle Seahawks Gonzaga St Mary Cougars Huskies Jamal Adams Carlos Dunlap Stanford Carson Wentz California NFL Washington Husky Jacob Decent
VIRUS TODAY: Unemployment applications in U.S. up this week

Mark Levin

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

VIRUS TODAY: Unemployment applications in U.S. up this week

"The government reporting a slight increase in the number of new unemployment claims filed last week. Economists were expecting layoffs to ease last week. However, the number of new unemployment claims rose by 13,000 to 861,000 In the week ending February 13th and the number of claims from the previous week was revised. Higher. New applications rose the most in Illinois, California and Virginia. The biggest declines took place in Texas and Georgia. Claims are below the more than 900,000 in early January, and the number of people still receiving benefits declined to 4.49 million. Jenny Cho Silda Fox

Illinois Virginia California Georgia Texas Jenny Cho Silda Fox