37 Burst results for "CDS"

Fresh update on "cds" discussed on Z Morning Zoo

Z Morning Zoo

00:32 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "cds" discussed on Z Morning Zoo

"She was discovered by a fellow student at her university whose father happened to own a successful publishing company. Many producers turned her down for this album simply because they didn't favor her musical direction. Nonetheless, it received widespread critical acclaim for her vocals and lyrical content. It also topped the charts and many of the countries in which was released. You mean the trivia CD is already a media almost obsolete. The first CD was introduced to the consumer market in Japan in 1982 CDs didn't make it to the states until 1983 with the first CD pressing plant opening stateside in 1984. The first two CDs to come off the line were One was a promotional CD called The Edison CD Sampler, the other the appropriately named Born in the USA by Bruce Springsteen. His real name is Peter Hernandez,.

Peter Hernandez Bruce Springsteen 1984 1982 Japan 1983 First Cd First Two Cds Born In The Usa Edison Many Producers ONE
38 killed as Myanmar protesters suffer "bloodiest day" since coup

BBC Newshour

04:54 min | 1 d ago

38 killed as Myanmar protesters suffer "bloodiest day" since coup

"Mass protests in Myanmar against the military coup just over a month ago. Wednesday was one of the bloodiest day so far with reports that 38 people were killed after the security forces opened fire on the demonstrators. And yet today Thursday, large numbers of protesters are back on the streets despite that threat of lethal violence. This footage was taken in Yang gone the main city and captured the sound of stun grenades and tear gas being fired at demonstrators. have also been reports the live rounds of again being used today. Well, the protesters reinforced barricades with tires and barbed wire, many chanting in protest. Been talking to one leading pro democracy activist in Myanmar, also a former TV host in Yangon. She's thin zah suddenly who's been telling me more? Do we have in horror, serious, fatal shooting yet, But we've been hearing arrest being conducted by the police and authority. So and also we'll worry about the detain people there. 1000 people already got detained and some of them are already ensured that they couldn't meet with their Even with the lawyers, But what lots of people are still come out onto the streets, even though it was so dangerous yesterday exactly. Despite all these brutal killing yesterday, But today we witness large numeral people even more than yesterday, you know, get on street, especially on those area with the brutal Crackdown in me engine in mo. Your more people in Ah, in a township level protest happening the whole day today, but on people scared, scared for their lives. Obviously, people are scared for our life that we are more scared off the future like our generation's future If we don't resist if we don't Ricks our life right now than our generations. You can't would live with us forever. And what can you tell us about these reports of protesters barricading blocking off their streets? That happened since the crack house that it so in yesterday as well in no local Oppa, where the Buddha crackdown happen in the angle the block in the last gig in the main road. So that military track cannot come in. So and then, when we can block the roads, then the protester can protest in their own place in a safe are, you know in the far distant place? Um, not just make sure very Kate. You know, because the military you nick and military in Yemen are patriarchal societies. Also now woman are using their and the well, you know, as buried as a barricade as well. So you can see today's photo. These soldiers are so busy picking up you know all these trying to destroy all these very gay because they can't get in and under the woman and away because they feel like if they go into that, then they don't have any dignity at all. This is a kind off social norms that they have religious noon. So it's stop them. It was actually working on. Is it true that some members of the police have bean abandoning their uniforms and going over to the protesters? Is that right? It's not like they're going directly to the protest area is like they're deciding the police stations and they're joining the CD M 70 so we don't movement because of the brutal killing. They would not the experience and they couldn't Um well, they orders anymore. So we're seeing today more more. Policemen are joining the civet. So Vidia movement, But how many is it Just is it just a few Compared to the other day. It was more like we're seeing around 30 30 like as reported from the new sources around 30. Police meant, um in the nationwide level are joining. I think They have many more were not reported. You know, even I was helping. Ah, police meant, you know, running off in the early morning just yesterday because he couldn't wait any day. You know any longer, Tonto to get our office Police stations were about to speak to the United Nations Human Rights Office in in Geneva. I just wonder what would you say to them? The United Nations being in phone about me or my situation for a long time since 30 years ago, the ethnic minorities from my country are being reported about the project killings, arbitrary arrest and all these things. Find the same army in the same pendant. You know, indiscriminately doing the same thing to us theory ruins of people as well. So the United Nations is already in for more than enough. Just that they need to actually add on that

Myanmar ZAH Yangon Yang Ricks MO Vidia Yemen Kate Nick United Nations Human Rights Of Geneva United Nations
Fresh update on "cds" discussed on Unchained

Unchained

01:21 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "cds" discussed on Unchained

"The tipping point which proposed that quote bitcoin could become an international trade currency as it essentially and firm of payment cds researchers however cited scale ability environmental considerations and capital inefficiencies as potential barriers to widespread adoption jury in timur fidelity's director of global macro global asset allocation compared bitcoin directly to goals in a recent research piece while admitting that bitcoin faces risk from volatility competitors etc he ended his note by writing quote for investors. The question of the coin may no longer be weather but how much next headline the. Irs clarifies the ten forty question crypto investors who simply purchase crypto with fiat. Money in two thousand twenty received clarification from the internal revenue service on tuesday on the current generation of the ten forty. The irs asks quote at any time during twenty twenty did receive sell send exchange or otherwise acquire any financial interest in any virtual currency according to the irs crypto faq tax payers who solely purchase crypto in twenty twenty are effectively exempted from answering. Yes if the above section stress you out perhaps it is for to witness that tax bit a utah based startup announced a one hundred million dollars series. A investment round. The company offers crypto specific tax software for both individuals and businesses. And in case you missed it. Be sure.

Tuesday One Hundred Million Dollars Both Ten Forty Question Twenty Twenty Two Thousand Twenty Timur Fidelity Utah Ten Forty Bitcoin
Trey Mancini's Struggle and Strength

The Lead

03:36 min | 1 d ago

Trey Mancini's Struggle and Strength

"Sedan baseball fans. Probably know trae mancini as this really good power hitter on a not so good team but can you give us a quick snapshot of his career before he broke out under the scene in major league baseball. Yeah he was never thought to be the guy so he had to keep working every single level to prove himself. He started out in high school in florida. was when a really good team there but he was the first baseman he was right handed hitter and so he didn't get a whole lot of looks. His name and number is up at his high school. You own the big placard but the numbers wrong. It's actually number eighteen instead of number sixteen which is number there. That's kind of almost indicative of the things that he is going through that he's always been kind there but there's always been a player on his team or something and he's always been kinda overshadowed basically. He went from rung to rung to wrong in the minor league. Ladder finally made his debut in september of twenty sixteen and basically exploded those first few games that one in the air left-center field has dave sadegh first major league at his mom beth getting your round the basis faster than anyone this year. Who is in a home run and then in two thousand seventeen was fantastic and ended up being third-place rookie of the year behind. Aaron judge andrew benintendi in the american league. And just how good was he during the twenty nineteen season. Oh he was by far the best player. Understand you thirty five home runs. You really broke out. Towering fly ball left center field. Hit hard by trae man's cd way back in the wall. Hey goodbye homerun. He should have been there all star but when your team is bad as your only get one all star pick and john means was having a good season for the orioles as well so they went with a picture instead of manzini but he was absolutely breakout. Star back goes that god does get on the board. O est back cd hot getting four point seven five million so a huge jump and he is poised to be one of the better younger players in the american league so heading into the twenty twenty season. It sounds like his baseball career really his life. Were just in a great place. Oh yeah it was going exceptionally well for him in pretty much every aspect of his life including he started dating a woman who had been one of the on field reporters for the orioles. Forget this you home runs for infield heads for you. What's on the difference maker up to this point last year honesty. If you'd sarah perlman she's now works for nbc sports. She had left the orioles in july. What does it mean to close out. Games like doesn't get the w. carnival. Not exactly how he drew it up towards the end there but and that was going really well at the beginning of a new relationship he just become a millionaire for the first time. Everything was going perfect for him. Going into two thousand twenty and dan walk us through what happened in march of twenty twenty so like all baseball players. They get their annual physical when they get to the spring training camp and he did his regular physical bloodwork everything else and then around march. I the athletic trainer came to him and said. Hey your blood's a little wonky like your iron levels are pretty much low you all the way throughout and basically you saying you know. I don't want to scare you. But i think you're having some sort of internal bleed that's causing. It could be stomach older. It could be healy activities. Or you know there. An can't that I remember them. Asking if i had a family history of colon cancer and i said yeah my dad had obviously they did some more tests and they decided you know what we need to get your co nas copy. Because things don't look right. They had the colonoscopy and they told me found a major mass in his colon

Trae Mancini Baseball Dave Sadegh Aaron Judge Andrew Benintendi Orioles American League Manzini Trae Sarah Perlman Beth Florida Dan Walk John NBC Colon Cancer
Spotify Wants To Sell You CD-Quality Music

Business Wars Daily

04:25 min | 2 d ago

Spotify Wants To Sell You CD-Quality Music

"I'm happy to be in your earbuds because today we have a story about sound right now. You're listening to a podcast which means the audio you're hearing has been digitally compressed. The highest highs and the lowest lows of the range of sound. You're hearing have brought closer together. Compression generally make sound a little easier on the ears. Well one company. That deals heavily in sound says compressed audio is so out spotify announced last week that it would be adding an additional service to its music subscriptions lossless audio as in sound in its purest form not compressed which means music has more depth and clarity. If you're struggling to imagine what that sounds like just think back to a bygone era remember cds because they're not usually compressed cds deliver lossless audio naturally and spotify. Says it wants to return to that without you. Know making cds thing again spotify. Hi fi will be available to subscribers in select markets later this year. It'll cost more than the nine ninety nine per month users currently pay although spotify hasn't said how much more they say hi fi will let the most discerning listeners. Experienced the music the way artists intended it. The company is just the latest hop on the lossless audio train or i should say track in two thousand. Nineteen amazon rolled out amazon music. Hd for fifteen bucks a month or a little less for prime members and streaming service title offers lossless audio for twenty dollars a month reports the verge but neither rival comes close to spotify's user numbers spotify counts around one hundred fifty five million paid subscribers worldwide while amazon music. Expect to hit forty million this year and it's estimated that title only has around five million subscribers spotify says its users have been asking for higher quality audio so now that it has it it may spell trouble for spotify's smaller competitors but one big name is notably absent from the list of lossless audio providers. And that would be apple music apple. Subscriber numbers are inching up. They hit a little over seventy million subscribers last year and with roughly the same number of songs available as spotify. It would figure that spotify would wanna keep apple at arm's length hence spotify move towards something. Apple does not have and is reportedly not planning to have a paid tier for lossless music apple and spotify have been dealing for a few years in another space. Which you may be familiar with if you're listening to this right now. yes podcasts. While the term more than a decade ago a mix of its ipod and the word broadcast spotify is looking to be the latest dominant force in podcasting unclear at times exactly which companies doing more in the field. Some reports put apple on top in terms of podcast downloads and revenue others put spotify on top either way each companies looking for ways to edge away from the other when it comes to podcasting and for apple that means toying with the idea of a paid subscription service for its podcast library which has always been offered for free bloomberg reported the plans in january and says apple is also aiming to ramp up its creation of original podcasts spotify. Meanwhile plucked one of the country's top. Podcasts the joe rogan experience and made it a spotify exclusive at the beginning of this year. They also recently announced plans to roll out the spotify audience network which it calls a first of its kind audio. Advertising marketplace advertisers will be able to connect with listeners through quote a broad range of content. Spotify said in a statement. The company says the marketplace will allow creators to earn more for their work while delivering a greater impact for advertisers unquote. Podcast wars aside a lossless music tier four spotify seems to be the latest attempt to get the edge on apple for apple though lossless. Music doesn't seem to be on the horizon at least publicly. In fact apple enthusiasts media outlet apple insider said last week that during blind tests twenty fifteen listeners couldn't seem to discern lossless audio from compressed audio being played on an iphone that might mean lossless music might only be a boon for the most discerning listener. Which if you're listening to business daily as you right

Spotify Apple Amazon Joe Rogan Bloomberg
We must end ‘deadly addiction’ to coal for planet’s sake, urges Guterres

UN News

00:58 sec | 2 d ago

We must end ‘deadly addiction’ to coal for planet’s sake, urges Guterres

"The world's major polluters have not been bold enough in their pledges to cut emissions. Un secretary general antonio guitarist said on tuesday but he's insisted that they're still a fighting chance to hold back global warming if fossil fuel power stations are phased out in an appeal to governments private companies and local authorities to end our deadly addiction to call the un chief reiterated the urgent need to reduce emissions by forty five percent this decade highlighting three key measures mr guitarist called on countries to cancel all global coal projects in the pipeline and in particular the thirty-seven wealthy countries of the organization for economic cooperation and development. We cd who should commit to phasing out coal by twenty thirty the un chief also called for an end to the international financing of coal plants and investors to shift to renewable energy projects. This transition could happen coal plant by coal plant. If necessary misty guitarist insisted in comments at the powering past coal summit hosted by the uk and canada

Antonio Guitarist UN Organization For Economic Coop UK Canada
Douglas Stuart Reads Kevin Barry

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:29 min | 3 d ago

Douglas Stuart Reads Kevin Barry

"Hi douglas debra. How are you. I'm alright welcome when we talked about doing this. You had originally been inclined to choose a scottish story to read on the podcast but in the end you settled on an irish one. Do you think that the two traditions are interlocked. The certainly have a very close relationship. But even in reading the kevin body still here realized how much of the pronunciation and the expressions weren't familiar to my ear and so although the close they are quite different in terms of This story it feels a little like a fairy tale in a sense. I mean it has that sort of fable like quality to it. And i feel so it may work in a tradition of irish fables. To what you think you think it's certainly in that tradition of irish oto storytelling. It starts off with You know the narrator. Saying so. I bought an old hotel in the fjord of killary and just the way he brings you into the story. You have a sense that not only as a fable but it's the type of story we would pass around in pubs and from most both and that i think is the irish tradition and certainly the scottish tradition. Because sometimes when we don't find ourselves in literature it doesn't mean we're not natural-born storytellers and those oral stories. Don't always get written down. That is absolutely true here. And i think that's part of the charm of this is just the mixture of these canisters. When you see it almost feels quite other-worldly at times. And i chose the story because first of all it's just totally entertaining but also because it made me nostalgic for a time when we could gather and and be together without thinking about the consequences about the weight that comes with with those gatherings. Yeah yeah having scenes in a in a pub with everyone talking it feels like another world. That's true did you read the story when it first came out in two thousand ten. I didn't actually. I was led to kevin body short stories. Because norma s- fan of his novel night bhutan. Jere and i was thinking about what i wanted to read. I love kevin. Barry and i was actually surprised to see. He has published many stories in the new yorker. Yeah the first one. I believe and Do you think that this one sort of fits in with his general themes it. Does i find him always writing about masculinity especially men on the margins. But what's interesting about this is. There's an absence of hard man or criminals or Petty gangsters that he often populate has novels these other short stories. These are just people who are gathering together in a pub And there's a poet at the heart of it. We'll talk some more after the story. And now here's douglas stuart reading fjord of killary by kevin berry fjord killary so i bought an old hotel on the fjord of killary. It was set hard by the harbour wall with moody amount across the water and disgracefully gray skies above. It rained two hundred. Eighty seven days of the year and the locals were given to magnificent mood swings on the night in question. The rain was particularly violent. It came down. Like handfuls of neal's flung hard and fast by a cd asli royal sky. God i was at this point eight months in the place and about convinced that it would be the death of me. It's end to the fucking world stuff out there. I said the quotas of locals and the hotels lounge bar as always ignored me. I was a fruitful blue in by their mark and simply not cut out for tough gnarly west of ireland. Living there were listening instead to jon murphy or alcoholic funeral director. Albury anything that fucking moves. He said bastards suicides tinkers. He said i couldn't give a fuck monkeys he said. Maria is the most depressing mountain you've ever seen by the way and it's gone looming shape filled almost every view from the water's edge hotel. The loans bars included the locals drank. Mostly bushmills whiskey and guinness stout and they drank them to great excess. I wiped they're slobs from the counter. With the bar cloth i had come to hate with a passion verging on the insane.

Douglas Debra Kevin Douglas Stuart Kevin Berry Fjord Killary Jere Norma Bhutan Barry Jon Murphy Neal Albury Ireland Maria
WIRED Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks 'Wild Tech' Built Into Perseverance

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:21 min | Last week

WIRED Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks 'Wild Tech' Built Into Perseverance

"So adam. Let's start with a couple of notable things about this rover one. It's collecting and to you. Just wrote a story on wired dot com this week about the cameras on perseverance and how they actually perceive imagery much differently than we do. Tell us about this. And why this is significant for this mission will. there's something almost philosophical. You have to address if you're going to send not people to explore another planet but robots which is you're trying to acquire like sensory information and some of that some of that can be quantified can be sent back as data. You know the numbers for certain for certain analyses that you can send an instrument to do and i. I can talk about some of that but some of it. Is you want to send a robot that can look at stuff that can hear stuff in this case they can sense this world. And then that that information through the sensory organs the mechanical sensor organs the technology. That you send the microphones and the cameras and the sensors instruments and then it has to get home has to get back to us somehow. Us not wired reporters but jet propulsion laboratory and then the whole vast team of humans who process all of that through their own machinery and then it becomes something that they can that they can look at. Its this this. Arc of how data becomes information and then becomes knowledge so we humans send these robots to mars to some extent to learn how to send better robots to mars a lot of the instruments on perseverance. That's the rover that's there now are versions of instruments that went up on other missions and now they kind of the scientists that jpl and are all these universities. Nasa know how to make them work to do more what they wanna do which is to look at their surroundings in ways that that we humans would would. Would i be able to identify easily as looking at stuff to to see things in the colors that human is also see we were standing there and also to look at them multispectral hyperspace literally and other parts of the electric spectrum that human i wouldn't perceive but the eyes of this rover is in scare quotes that i'm making on a on a screen even though this audio medium so that's not helpful at all. The eyes of this rover can see into the little bit into the ultraviolet partway into the infrared. And and also can see x-rays and have an are using a laser project light outward to obliterate some bits of rock. And see what what happens when you do it. And to listen with microphones that that might be more sensitive than human ear. Then all of those things get get reduced transformed or changed in some way into meaningful knowledge so that we can understand more about what what's on this other planet where humans have never been but humans have sent a lot of our stuff. You're saying that each brand has gone up tomorrow. At least the ones that we have had progressively better technology on them with each version. And i think it's kind of interesting that this rover that just went up now. Perseverance is essentially the first rover of the iphone era. Curiosity launched in two thousand eleven and it was designed for a period of five or six seven years before that so the imaging technology on it is very representational of like that time in imaging technology the imaging technology that we have now and the imaging technology that we have on. Perseverance is pardon the pun astronomically better than the tech that we had ten years ago. I mean if you think about like how bad your instagram photos. Were in two thousand eleven. And how fantastic they can be now. You can see just like as far as mobile technology goes and just imaging sensors. The leap has been huge. That's a it's a really interesting observation. I think that's right. Although i will also say that like one of the one of the instruments that i wrote about is called the masked kim z. And so it's this. This binocular camera to cameras linked together left and right eye on top of the tower. That's on the rover so sits up a little. Bit high zina's presume because there was a mass cam on curiosity the z. Has zoom capability and it does a bunch of stuff. It's there to identify targets of interesting scientific potentially interesting scientific value and also to be able to look around and navigation and take pictures and do a whole bunch of other stuff. The the ccd the charge coupled device the optical sensor the to in mass are off the shelf kodak cds and they have the they have in front of them the bear pattern of pixels. The probably gonna get this wrong but like the red green blue. I think that that's that would be familiar. That if you if you could look into your phone you would see it. And then mass games does what. The experiment instrument is take advantage of some capabilities that our phone cameras. Don't really do to do much more. Because because the also can see into the infrared a bit and so if you put the right filters in front of them you can do even more science with them so there is some sense that we send up a camera. That would be the same camera that a lot of people have in their pockets right now sitting on their sitting on their desk. I can get sort of derivative about but there's something important i think in the pictures that are starting to come back already. That include parts of the rover itself and people will describe those as celsius as mars selfie camera taking pictures of itself and and nasa among all agencies is very very good at At its own promotional work saying like. Here's the thing. Here's the picture of the thing we're doing. There are pictures. There's video of the landing which was dramatic but also like the video of the landing. Is there to video of the landing has engineering value but also publicity value. But but i think the calling it. A selfie also includes the recognition of the the. It's not personal because of course it's not a person of the machine hood of the individuality of the humanness of the technology that that we sent that has to do a thing there. That's doing technological work and and seeing mars through a kind of filter that's akin to but slightly different than the filters that if mike if you took that billionaire ticket up tomorrow how you would see through the visor of your of your back suit

JPL Kim Z Nasa Adam Zina Mike
Times Square, NYC Then And Now

Talk, Tales and Trivia

04:32 min | Last week

Times Square, NYC Then And Now

"If you haven't been. I will make sure that you feel like you have. I hope that you enjoy this episode. You know new york city is fantastic. And i love it a matter of fact i have been there many times and i used to live there as i will tell you in this episode but i also want to tell you that it was in the late seventies and eighties entered the nineties. That new york city star to lose its attraction. It started to lose the people that came to visit and it star to be a real dumpster. People didn't want to visit new york anymore and so it was the governor's the mayor's and police commissioners started to take back new york city rebuild new york city one step at a time starting with times square in nineteen eighty eight is to murray hill in new york city. I lived in a three story. Walk up but first and second avenue on thirty first street not exactly prime real estate but safe enough. It was near the united nations and right above the entrance to the queens midtown tunnel Now you know if you are a new yorker or visited new york you know exactly where i lived then a couple of years later i found myself living in the salvation army apartment building for women. It was ideal. It served two meals a day and it was right across the street from the much coveted. Grammercy park the oh so glamorous and it was a close walk to eighteenth street between fifth and sixth avenues where i worked. I thought it was a dream. Come true and it was. I never really ventured to the west side past sixth avenue or anywhere near times square. Well that's what we're talking about. Today is times square and new york city. Everything i needed was right around where i lived but times square was unmistakably a major part of the city no doubt a black guy on the city a disappointment to the twelve hours of manhattan and somewhere that was to be avoided if wanted to dodge trouble darkness dealings and drugs. If you have seen the two thousand and nineteen movie joker with walking phoenix. Ps and by the way. I suggest that you might have an idea of the area and new york city. That was the cd and trashy times square. The closest thing. I can compare it to is a scenes in the movie joker to find a seedier place was difficult when they were filming. The movie and times square didn't look like does today so in the two thousand nineteen movie joker with no cd place to replicate times square. Really the producers of the movie had to go to newark new jersey a real old fashioned pit hole. If ever there was one to newark that was of the same timeframe as the movie never fixed up and never given a real chance to survive and today's society. It's a real shame but it depicts it perfectly times square where beauty came to die. No kidding in nineteen eighty six. When i was there there were multiple pornographic theaters and times square. The motion picture association of america introduced its rating system that included an x rating dip became associated with pornography. And so all the movies that were in times square were x. rated or the dreaded triple x. and everything was pornography back then pornography and. I should say drugs. The times square as a porn capital error was part of new york city's in the seventies and eighties amid its fiscal crisis. And later the crack cocaine epidemic which was rampant and it wasn't until the mid nineteen eighties that there was a push to clean up times square and new york city

New York City Times Square Grammercy Park Murray Hill New York Salvation Army United Nations Newark Manhattan Phoenix Motion Picture Association Of New Jersey
Spotify Announces CD-Quality, Lossless Audio Streaming Tier 'Spotify HiFi'

Daily Tech News Show

00:49 sec | Last week

Spotify Announces CD-Quality, Lossless Audio Streaming Tier 'Spotify HiFi'

"Spotify made several announcements at its stream on event. Haven't had one of those a couple years The big announcement spotify. Hi fi come into select markets later this year no details yet but promising lossless cd quality streaming spotify says. It'll be priced competitively with other high quality audio streaming tears. So what do we know. Well that means probably around twenty dollars a month spotify ten dollars a month now for three hundred twenty kilobits per second title offers. What is often considered lossless at one thousand four hundred eleven kilobits per second with three sixty reality audio in dolby atmos and such for twenty dollars a month so spotify added ten dollars a month onto it's base package for hi-fi that would make it about the same as title spotify is working with speakers to make sure it'll be compatible with your most common high-quality speakers out there

Spotify
Spotify's New HiFi Subscription Tier. What Is It?

Techmeme Ride Home

01:47 min | Last week

Spotify's New HiFi Subscription Tier. What Is It?

"As i'm recording this spotify just wrapped up its spotify stream on event in which it announced a bunch of stuff including new tools for creators. Monetize ing options even an ad marketplace for podcasts. Which might be too in the weeds for our purposes. Although i reserve the right to reassess that later what is probably more interesting for normal. Consumers for at the moment is the fact. That spotify is launching a new subscription product. Later this year called hi fi that will offer cd quality lossless audio. Quoting the verge. Spotify has done small tests of higher quality streaming in the past. But now it's going to launch the feature more widely with the caveat that it'll be available only in select markets and pricing is yet to be announced higher quality streaming has apparently been among the top requests from its customers as it stands today spotify tops out at three hundred and twenty. Kbps audio amazon rolled out amazon music hd in two thousand nineteen. The lossless plan costs. Fourteen dollars ninety nine cents per month or twelve dollars. Ninety nine cents per month for prime customers a premium over the standard amazon music unlimited service title. Which has supported high resolution audio since its very beginnings price slightly higher at nineteen dollars ninety nine cents per month for the hi fi plan title offers. What it calls title masters that go up too. High resolution ninety six kilohertz twenty four bit audio smaller services like cuba's have also sought to appeal to audio files with lossless streaming apple music on the other hand still lacks any kind of lossless streaming tier despite apple selling the very high end airpods max headphones and quote which you have to figure might be about to become an untenable situation.

Spotify Amazon Cuba Apple
pisode #35  Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

Conversations pour Elle, partages de sagesse féminine

05:02 min | Last week

pisode #35 Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

"With us on the lobster savvas zone. The was pm almost young. Duncairn unix daniels on punk combined and his sons pissy ticket shows kush toll bagel Fox replays on. He added shushma There mickey soc nine now was super allows. this was so in motion. And i'm on the the kiss jan mumbo from the in toss financial concerns me yet put down stairs committee. All the polar dogs s become should body police secret dossiers even modern jeep indefensibly young put on the hostile metro area. Don't kill lou wop are highly. Listen you can lose moisture inch normal analysis To new to new number. don't care. Skiing mongrel geneticists tizzy komo privacy solutions. More lab senior key can you. He ended up. Don't do these emotion. Keith's manifests komo. Hover says it said burial laps yemen ad. Foam kiss turned ma on the. Da shows moldova's young till noon. We'll see a pattern allergy. Lucy bacall tunnels on a cd-rom metal set. Espy la pursue clash. Pf of wa. Who passer washington komo On a duty newly well spa style Example second level year until voc grew in neon new palette bent medlock A sorta p pallet fantasy. Not man and knock them up. You can see on this deserve. Speak here look trap. Kalani fungus kong secure. This is super sandy Tom put the point. Back by the copa habita- homes bhaskar bessemer dot. There are five are were doto the question and data sonate signed on as all put dorothy house. Ski faker bail you. Devolve year this town under file a cuisine and mia to new white house signed on it cuts the and bounce kotova. You're just took on paschi spouse wall septum farm. So michael community agreement signed docile cume of peer pundit poor pe- can you dr pair basketball dominate bonanno cast cylinder labus much. Craig glossy found league dick's p male fiscal sur. Five are tom of walk. It's just a kick acre cuisine. Could to serve democra- chris european malcolm dot com massacre And super attack my bhakta. The league belle pound. I love the minds found evil just wonderful spots if oh nouveau producer. Spirit said whenever say formats if calmly copeland apple dies on me the a mark. I'm so the fam- keep rooster while dope pass on liz off downscale. Vp conquer a nozzle bikes hotter yet. Dope person give the shows but panay ms similar p dishes the savasta savage Plant the kootenai against the for his social museum nesper. Pacifica defy fan cone factory the global and our cats in addition the performance. And the rest. Of the sixes. Not after the war. Just explain me them jobs. We have come up with a quantum abi of board. don't just get dot com. Donald took sa- salad come Less bengals facilitator. Some mr scuola. Paul son vie to see up. You don't don't the caribbean on the wii sipple. Total if die but access simba's school for dawn that built

Shushma Mickey Soc Jan Mumbo Lou Wop Lucy Bacall Espy La Sandy Tom Dorothy House Komo Daniels Labus Craig Glossy Moldova FOX Chris European Malcolm Skiing Keith Allergy WA Bonanno
New York City lawmaker will not seek a second term

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

New York City lawmaker will not seek a second term

"Lawmaker, one of a few moderate Democrats in the New York City Council says he won't run for a second term anymore. W one of my CDs David Cruz, has more Council member Mark Joan. I blamed a political climate that isn't favorable to centrist Democrats like himself is the main reason for declining to run again. He represented district that includes City Island, Pelham Bay and Throgs Neck. And although Democrats dominate the district, patches of it remain conservative. Jonah represented the Bronx in the New York State Assembly before winning the council seat in 2017. Several scandals were linked to him over the years, including one where he earmarked $130,000 in city council funds for an unregistered nonprofit tied to him. His departure will likely clear path to victory for Marjorie Villa squad is a community organizer and district leader in the Bronx.

David Cruz Mark Joan New York City Council Pelham Bay Throgs Neck City Island New York State Assembly Jonah Bronx Marjorie Villa
New CDC reports warn variants could lead to rapid rise in Covid-19 cases

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

New CDC reports warn variants could lead to rapid rise in Covid-19 cases

"The new covert 19 variants that are spreading across the U. S CDs. He says those new variants could easily lead to a rapid rise in covert 19 cases refreshing its calls for people to postpone travel and continue wearing masks and social distancing. UK and South African variants are thought to be more transmissible. The CDC cited a study of cases in Zambia, which shares a lot of commerce and travel with South Africa, and says within a month the number of variant cases there grew 16 fold. CDC says the UK variant is spreading rapidly here in the U. S, and could be the dominant strain sometime next month. Marco Malard ABC News Talk

U. CDC UK Zambia South Africa Marco Malard Abc News
Bring Me Chocolate Or Bring Me Dead Stuff

Short Wave

03:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Bring Me Chocolate Or Bring Me Dead Stuff

"All right emily kwong lay some of that chocolate goodness on me. You got it because chocolate is the true meaning of valentine's day only chocolate. This pure can be this. So i love you but lactose intolerant. Why are you doing this to me. I thought about this. The thing that gives chocolate. Its flavor is dairy free. Did you know cocoa comes from a fruit that grows these amazing looking multicolored cacao pods and i was. Cd's read things hanging from the trees. While what are these things. This is food scientists. Darren ostrom suka at the cocoa research center at the university of the west indies. Speaking with simmons safety and our friends at life kit about his fascination with cacao pods. It's like it's like a football shape. Fruit it can be smooth. It can be wate. it can have ridges. Darren saw these pods all over the place. Growing up in trinidad and tobago. They grow on the couch. Frey or theobroma cacao in under story crop of the tropical rainforest meaning they grow pretty close to the ground and the exterior of these pods is hard like it's tough but not so tough that critters can't break it open to go on a little cow binge correct if i was a squirrel. This would be what i would do. I mean absolutely. Darren breaks open a pod with a special tool kind of like a dull michigan it resists when gives time what it feels very satisfying on. Then when you twist the blade you hear a sort of crunch on you see opening insite describes the inside of the pod like a sticky cobwebs it has rows of caucases which he calls beans covered in this gummy white pulp called musa delicious mm-hmm usage and the aroma hits immediately. I'm spending my and it smells. Citrusy like like citrus flowers. It's like a subtle perfume Yeah there's so much flavor potential in these cacao beans at this point once the pot is opened fermentation begins so after. The seeds are removed from the pod. They're collected and transported to an area where they can ferment for days. Yeah and naturally occurring microbes breakdown. Those beans unlock their flavor notes. I i did not know that. Quang i mean for meditation gotta love it. Kind of sounds like like wine a little bit. Maybe a little bit. Yeah kinda if you think of cacao beans grapes and the tastes does reflect the ecosystem from which it came. The beans are then sorted roasted and sold to chocolate-makers to become the chocolate. You know and love. it can be fruity. it can be floral. It can be bright. So i like to think of a flavor profile that cuckoo offense to be like a good piece of music is we. What makes a good piece of chocolate is a harmonious 'presentation of flavor notes that in balance with each other at the coco research centre. He works on the level of genetics and with farmers to optimizing flavor and adopting their crops to climate change and disease. Darren even works with the cacao. Farm used to pass as a child. Chocolate is something he just can't stay away from is like with ocala. Florida is she. You can check out anytime you want. But you've been the relieve gets on the skin and it becomes your positive your consciousness so for me. I don't really work at a job. I work at

Emily Kwong Darren Ostrom Suka Cocoa Research Center Darren University Of The West Indies Theobroma Cacao Frey Valentine Tobago Simmons Trinidad Football Michigan Coco Research Centre Ocala Florida
CDC recommends double masks to protect against COVID-19

Start Here

05:08 min | 3 weeks ago

CDC recommends double masks to protect against COVID-19

"New cdc report showing that tightly fitted masks. Make a difference and that a tightly fitted with a cloth mask over it. Double masking as it's called is also effective. A new study from the cdc suggested that double masking putting a second mask on you. That fits really tightly actually can protect you from covid better than a single mask. Let's get some info on this. We got someone who ran the cdc at one point. Dr richard besser was the former acting director there. He now leads. The robert wood johnson foundation. Dr beshir can we start with the practical stuff. What is the current recommendation at this point when it comes to wearing masks like how many do we need. What type do we need right. Well brad at the highest level. The recommendation is that everybody should be wearing masks. Glad that we have a reasonable thinking governor who has lifted the mandate. I don't wear a mask unless i am made to. I see so many people. Today who aren't wearing any mask and even wearing a single mask will reduce the likelihood that if you have cohen you'll spread to someone else and will reduce the chances that if someone near you has cova that you will breathing in and get infected date ever used from cdc today underscore the importance the importance of wearing a mask correctly and the cdc's said in their study and this and this was published in the wr which is their journal of record is is that wearing cloth mask on top of a surgical mask or or the procedure massive. They're the same thing will improve the fit. And that's what this is about when when you put a mask on. There are gaps around the side of that masks. There may be gaps around around your nose but if you wear a surgical mask that has a wire at the top and you pinch it on your nose and you put a cloth mask on top of that. It will ensure that there aren't the the leakages sides of that surgical. The surgical does a lot of the work. And then the cloth is there to prosecute against your mouth exactly because if you just put on a surgical mask with with doing anything else. What you're going to find is that it doesn't fit tightly on the sides there big gaps there but that cloth mask fits properly over over. Your ears will will hold that surgical mask in in place and in their studies found that this reduced the amount of particles by by over ninety percent well fitting mast provided the greatest performance Blocking emitted aerosols and exposure of aerosols to the receiver. They cautioned though that. Don't take those numbers and say and assume they're going to try to you because they tested one type of cloth mask and one type of surgical mask but the general principle is a good one. That wearing a cloth mask over surgical mask will help. They give some other alternatives as well. This includes wearing a mask with the most mold. Fire nodding the ear loops on your mass. You cannot decides of a surgical mask and if you go to their website they'll show you what they mean by that so that it will fit better on the sides of your face or you can you can purchase. What's called a mask fitter which is like a plastic or nylon device. That goes over your mask that that helps it fit on. your face. looks the neck gaiter. That were always saying. They're not great mask but this looks like a neck gaiter. It's good for that yes some of our navigators and some are like a plastic frame that holds it on your face but the takeaway from it is is really this that wearing a mask as good but making sure it fits properly is is really important and will increase the benefits that you get well so okay so i understand that scientific conclusions change with more data right. I get that but just so we're clear like can we walk this back early on. Cdc was saying hey. We have no reason to recommend mask. We haven't seen any in july of last year. Data does come in. They they change it to what we do recommend mask. It's really there to protect other. People won't necessarily protect you. Then november comes around like actually does protect you. We started to see that data and now a full year after covid reaches american shores. Say oh actually. I just want us to masks are actually really good. Like is that counterproductive at one point when when we feel like the guidance shifts month after month well you know one of the advantages. We have now that we didn't have last year is that we're having cd scientists out front explaining what they're learning. How someone who are tired of hearing about masks as well as tired about of wearing masks can be cumbersome they can be inconvenient mass growing is not to make your life mess comfortable and we're seeing our political leaders stand up and say the exact same thing next few months masks not vaccines are the best defense against cove nineteen and hopefully that will allow people to take this in and say you know. I've been hearing a lot about these. These strains of the virus these mutants that can spread more easily. There's actually something i can do until you get vaccinated. Hopefully that will help people you know not feel like no one knows what they're doing but i feel like people providing answers as this is changing and that is a good thing. We can adapt ever ever so slightly if we need to.

CDC Dr Richard Besser Dr Beshir Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Cohen Brad
Should Women and Men Handle Money Differently?

How to Money

07:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Should Women and Men Handle Money Differently?

"So first of all. Let's talk about how you get money in the first place and that is earn it right and according to the pew research center Women earned eighty five percent of what men earned in two thousand eighteen That pay gap is shrinking Particularly for younger workers which is a positive trend but that is still a meaningful hurdle to overcome. The pay. Gap is partly due to to work history. You know like having kids great you know. But as we mentioned with the fidelity study earlier taking time off to have quetta's like it often leads to job offers in worse income prospects not to mention the years of not generating any income which often reflects years of not investing in a workplace retirement account in particular. If there's a match there right and those are some big disadvantages to overcome yell like you said at the beginning matt that stat also reflects some structural issues when it comes to male and female pay. But here's another thing to matt When we're talking about pay women are actually often averse to asking for more money than their male counterparts. There was a survey from ron saad. Last year the found that sixty percent of women have never negotiated with employer. Overpay women are also more likely to stay at a lower wage job to according to The personal finance web site the balance. And that's not good right because even just a small bump in pay with a new employer or in a job that been in for years can have just a massive impact on your ability to earn more throughout the years and then also save more for retirement. So i think of all of the things in this episode where we see. Maybe you know women as sex falling short. It is in in the ability to ask for more at knowing what they're worth again. This is another instance where you might be listening and you're thinking i've never had a problem negotiating a race like i've never had a problem asking for more money so again. It's important to keep in mind that though the research shows us like we know any totally doesn't apply to everyone. I'm specifically thinking of two conversations with Kirstin and julian saunders. The couple behind rich and regular that was episode. Eighty six and julianne was just bragging. About how great pearson is at negotiating. Evidently she's just like the queen negotiating more. Pay if you had to listen to that upset go back and listen to that one. Is that regardless of your gender. Earning more it's just so important right and all of us could stand to our abilities on that front And we've had lots of different conversations on the show that specifically cover you know not just stories of individuals negotiating but just how to go about doing that. I'm of Ramiz sadie that was Backing up said one ten and he outlined a great process a great method You know when it comes to wanting to up your salary. You know what steps you need to take. In order to negotiate a solid race gam thinking to matt had far new darabi on the show. She is just awesome personal finance expert and at the same time. She is someone who has made a killing as a small business owner. She knows her worth. she knows. how to negotiate. Yes so like you said there are many women out. there are crushing it. Who don't have a problem and asking for what they're worth. Who don't have a problem asking for a raise. It's just when you read those statistics. There are obviously a number of women who do though. And i wanna see. That number changed for the benefit of women as a whole absolutely. Let's about spending to do women spend more. That's an interesting question. My wife personally met hates to shop. I really. She just defies the stereotypes. And actually i don't know i don't mind shopping. A little bit roles are a little bit reverse exactly but there was a study by the wharton school of business that found that women are more likely to view shopping as a recreational activity. My mom definitely fits that bill Most men wanna leave the store with their purchases quickly as possible but even though women enjoy shopping more it turns out men still spend more than women in a typical year so while men might not enjoy the process of shopping as much. They still shopping. Just from a utilitarian standpoint sure yeah also that increase spending with the stats as well. There's there's a survey from wallet hub earlier this year. They showed that men are more likely to max out a credit card. Women are apparently seven percent less likely than men to have maxed out credit card at least once in so while women they might enjoy the shopping experience. More than men do a lot of different stats. Show that women are more cost conscious. They're more likely to shop at alice. Stores more likely to to wait till something they want is actually on sale The store brands more than men. And so you know when it comes to spending this this is definitely a win in this category for sure And so i i of see this as a call to min to stop spending so much money on neighboring items fan. Yeah i feel like. I'm totally guilty of this. I totally fall into the study. I don't like to go looking for the best deal. I do because i'm spending less but like i'll look at maybe two or three different sites and then i just purchase right whereas for you like i feel you are so good at hunting and making sure you're keeping your eyes on the best deals out there making sure that you're spending the the least amount of money possible. I feel that's something that we all need to make sure that we're doing right. And so you know regardless of who you are. We should all work to just become a little more conscious and how it is that we spend our money. I gotta say mets. I don't care whether you're man or woman but store brands should be high on your list because they're going to save you a ton of money it's just like in savings when you go for the storebrand over the name brand equivalent unless it's your craft beer equivalent And you're wanting to spend a little bit more on the because it makes you feel nice. Can't name brand everything though. I think i think sometimes that's a tendency here. Maybe that men have The men just gravitate towards the name brand no matter what it is without thinking about it and that's where we need to shake things up right and we we need to consider storebrand's more frequently also too. I think we've talked about this. The quality of store brand items has gone up a whole lot in recent years. Her kirkland signature brag. There's other ones too man. Like target has some great Store brands that are better than their name brand equivalent. Sometimes so yeah. It's not just costco yeah costco rockstar Let's see let's talk about saving as well. There's more good news here. It turns out that the the savings rate for women is actually higher than their male counterparts. They save a higher percentage of their pay. They spend less of what they bring in and much of. That is due to the more frugal. Tendencies that we just highlighted when we talked about spending differences but even the women are saving a higher percentage of their income on average. They've actually got less than thirty percent of what men have in savings accounts according to data from the federal reserve from a few years ago That is likely due to the fact that overall they're still making less like we discussed earlier which means a smaller amounts of money saved overall. Yeah one of the reasons. Women have a higher savings rate as well Is that according to a survey by. Us bank women of all ages value financial security more than men do. But here's the thing than that. Focus on financial. Security can often backfire. If you keep more of your overall assets and savings and cds instead of invested in the stock market right like savings for saving for long-term goals is really important but so is investing For the really long

Pew Research Center Women Ron Saad Matt Julian Saunders Ramiz Sadie Darabi Quetta Wharton School Of Business Kirstin Julianne Pearson Storebrand Costco Mets Kirkland Federal Reserve
How Canishiea J. Sams Is Changing the Nail Art Scene

Side Hustle Pro

05:41 min | 3 weeks ago

How Canishiea J. Sams Is Changing the Nail Art Scene

"How long were you booth renting before you decided to create your own spot. So it's crazy. I was booth renting at two different salons before i got my nail studio which is like basically a room that i pay monthly on but it was like my room so before that i literally was like in open space like basically what she would call like the like when you come into a salon a greet you forgot what that spot is caught. But i was working in like open spaces like around everyone and that's not ideally. Want it but i knew like i'm going to have to start somewhere. It can't just be like what i want. And i taught me like a lot of like what i do like. And what kind of vibe and energy. I want for my space. So i think i worked boof raining for about two years before i got a nail studio and that was amazing. It was like my other studios have walls. I finally had a walls in door and it was amazing and i created the ambiance. I wanted and it really like my clients come in. They're like smell the central oils. She got the erica about do plan like just like i wouldn't switch that up on just like this is my vibe and i hope that attracts people that wanna see me. What other steps did you take. You know now that you have your own studio at this point did you formalize your business by incorporating or just officially make yourself a business so you go through a process of like state board you get establishment license. You get a tax business tax license. You pay your yearly fees has a manicure is and you know you. Get your your. Cpa like tax person. So you go through those little steps you get your insurance for your room. But at the same time. I was in a studio building with other people who are running their businesses. So next to me. I had exhibitions that working in their studios also so it was like a shared space but everyone had their own room. I've been to a space like that before. And by the way. I think that business model is so smart sleeper smaller super smart rather way everyone licensed. And that's what when you're going to these new very important. What was that investment. Like as you know a young mom going into this point. Was this something where it was. Easy peasy to pay for or did it require serious serious saving like. Can you tell us ballpark. What was that investment like. How did you prepare for it. The investment was steeped in a sense of like like me and my husband were in college or broke college when we decided like okay go to nail school can she so. My husband actually like i don't stay. I don't sell everyone to do this. Because i'm not a person about getting into debt for your passion but my husband put my nail school like half of the on his credit card and i was like. Oh man like it's official so we gotta do this and that's real that israel. Thank you for sharing that. We're not giving financial advice on this. Podcast everyone just disclaimer here. Okay exact all we're doing is sharing what people do all right exactly so we. It was expensive because of the type of nail art in the supplies. Like you have to make a major investment in yourself to kind of start out like nail school. They don't give you any of these things. It's basically like their sanitation in like step by step like how to keep your clients safe basically. But they're not teaching. You now are any of that stuff. I picked up that along the way so a lot of it was like investing in the best materials and stuff. So i'm pretty sure like it was in the thousands like lease up to seven thousand of just like you get one thing and you get the lap and then you get the product line and then you gotta start getting buffers and files like things that you constantly have to do. Maybe taking classes But a lot of things. I learnt on my own just through like practicing but a lot of it was like i did not know previously to going into like nails that it could be so expensive. I people think it's just polish in the site. Oh my god it's five million items so let's look at those early days of being a business owner. How did you balance the juggle of personal life. With being in business for yourself and the ebbs and flows of business. It was hard. I'm not gonna lie like it was really hard trying to figure out like my space my like my place in this industry at first you know Because it was like. I just moved to a new city and now those work like in our new cd. We didn't have much family. It was just like my uncle here so it was just like a lot of just like growing pains really beyond his and like the first two years of me like blueprinting. I wasn't necessarily super taking care of myself like when you're in the salon space you like gogo going. You're lying you like starting out so you take whatever incense your schedule's like hectic so i will work like evenings. My husband would get off work because we didn't have childcare so it was just like whenever like he worked during day and i will work in the evenings at night so i missed a lot of like saturday like sunday. Type situations a lot of dinners because we have opposite schedules so it was like really hard. And then it got to a point where i have to establish a set schedule my boundaries just for mental health purposes. And just like sanity like it's hard to separate your business in your personal life when they're very intertwined like that but it was so necessary in once i did that begin to like really enjoy it a lot more.

Erica Israel
CD Projekt Red's Source Code for 'Cyberpunk 2077' Has Been Stolen

Daily Tech News Show

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

CD Projekt Red's Source Code for 'Cyberpunk 2077' Has Been Stolen

"Cd project red makers of cyberpunk twenty seventy seven posted on twitter. Tuesday that somebody gained unauthorized access to its network attempting to look at data and left a ransom. Note cd project says it's restoring the data and will not pay the ransom. The company doesn't believe any personal data of players of its games was accessed. The ransom note clammed had source code of cyberpunk twenty seventy seven gwent and witcher three including an unreleased. It also claimed to have access documents from accounting administration legal hr investor relations and more. The attackers gave forty eight hours or they would sell a release the source code and send the documents to journalists project. Read says we aren't paying you. We won't the company seems Seems to be pretty confident that what was being offered for ransom was not worth paying the

Witcher Gwent Twitter
It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

05:46 min | 2 months ago

It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

"All right. Today's interview is released. Special gee-gee langer has been sober for thirty. Four years used a twelve step program but what is so wonderful about. Her story is all of the other resources that she's used to do. Even deeper healing. We talk about energy work. Inner child healing topping Rural linguistic reprogramming. Meditation cranial sacred healing and outta jillian really incredible books to read all of which are linked in the show notes. This is proof that healing goes on forever and that your recovery won't look the same forever. Either she is the author of the book fifty ways to worry less now and is retired in florida with her husband. It was an absolute joy to get to know her. Here's digi langer hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and worse

Gee Langer Florida Jillian Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
"cds" Discussed on Health Hats, the Podcast

Health Hats, the Podcast

05:00 min | 7 months ago

"cds" Discussed on Health Hats, the Podcast

"Difficult. Problem..

"cds" Discussed on Health Hats, the Podcast

Health Hats, the Podcast

04:34 min | 7 months ago

"cds" Discussed on Health Hats, the Podcast

"Of this. uh-huh..

"cds" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"cds" Discussed on KCBS All News

"CDS time eleven fifteen it is the sports line now Joe Salvator joins us from oracle park in San Francisco all right Melissa will star with college football number games in the top twenty five all the third quarter including six drink Oklahoma blown out Texas tech at home forty one to ten it's Wisconsin with a seven to three lead over northwestern they're also playing at home the badgers course OP two eight three and start Iowa rank fourteenth in the country leading middle Tennessee twenty seven to three Michigan blown out rockers thirty wanted nothing at home in Arkansas leading down number twenty three Texas a and M. twenty four to twenty one it's really at the start that the S. Stanford cardinal were hoping for one and three so far on the season really need a win to stay bowl eligible they're all take on Oregon state on the road David shot talking about what is been the biggest problem so far for the cardinals. you had. hello the number of penalties this past game on the offensive side. but it's hard to play good football we have a first and fifteen the second and twenty five multiple third eleven pluses those are hard were behind the change a lot I will see if Stanford can be a little more contained as far as those penalties go when they play at four o'clock this afternoon the giants right now honoring their late owner Peter magowan as he is being inducted into the giants wall of fame he's the first non player to be inducted Atakora metallic started the wall of fame back in two thousand and eight giants and Dodgers get started here at oracle park at one OO five the ace will be keeping an eye on the Tampa Bay rays who they are tied with as they battle for that home field advantage for the wild card game on Wednesday the race get started next hour in Toronto Oaklyn will be in Seattle take on the mariners.

giants Tampa Bay Atakora Oregon Iowa badgers Oklahoma mariners Seattle Toronto Oaklyn oracle park Dodgers Peter magowan Joe Salvator football cardinals. David S. Stanford Texas Arkansas
"cds" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"cds" Discussed on TechStuff

"It was a very ugly story. And also like I said a warning not just to companies, but to consumers that be aware that anytime you are. Introducing anything to your computer. There are the their possible vulnerabilities, you could be introducing and some cases it could be really really intrusive. So you gotta be careful now this is not to say that the decline of the compact disc was instantaneous that the CD form factor when obsolete overnight it's stuck around for a really long time. In fact, it's only been fairly recently that some of the larger retailers have kind of moved away from selling CDs in the winter of. Two thousand eighteen retailer best buy announced that it was going to stop carrying compact discs in its stores starting on July first two thousand eighteen target. Meanwhile, when a slightly different route, they said they would continue so compact discs, but they would do it on consignment. So in other words, instead of ordering a large inventory of CDs and trying to sell them, you know, paying for that inventory trying to sell the CDs. And then if they didn't sell stock they would send it back to the the studio for credit for future stock instead of doing that. Now target says no here's how we're going to do it. We will sell copies of CDs. And for every copy we sell will send a little bit of money back to the studio. But otherwise, we're not doing it. So if you don't wanna work with us on that, you're not gonna have your CDs. Hell he'll carry it in our stores because people are buying so few of them now and it puts the risk of inventory on the music studios. Right. Other than on targets stores, and it just changes where the the the risk ends up falling that change has continued. Right. And really you could say that the writing was on the wall by two thousand fourteen when digital music sales over the internet were eclipsing CD revenue and even then digital was on the decline. It wasn't. It was already on the downward slope it had peaked at at that point. And was it was outperforming CDs, but both CDs ended it'll sales were starting to to lag behind like I said a moment ago in our next up Assode, we're going to explore the rise of the digital file Arab which leads into what we're seeing today with consumption moving more towards streaming services rather than downloading tracks or buying physical media. One thing. I want to shift you before I end this episode would be the evolution of video media in the wake of the D, the digital versatile disc or DVD evolved from the compact disc, it was effectively the second generation of the CD technology, even as companies like Sony and Philips were trying to get the D into the consumer market. They were simultaneously researching how to improve that technology in order to store even more data on it, including video with sound. That development would mostly happen behind closed doors for a little more than a decade among various companies by the mid nineteen nineties. There were two formats that had emerged from our indeed departments they weren't on the market yet. But they were almost ready and one was with Sony and Philips they had developed technology that they called the multimedia CD or M C D. Meanwhile, you had another group that. That was including the Time Warner group and to Sheba, and they had developed a different approach called these super density or SD disc. Neither side was eager to engage in an all out format war like the one that pitted. Betamax versus VHS and fractured the market. So instead, they decided that they were going to work together to develop a common standard between them, and it was mostly based off the SD format from two Sheba this became the DVD and by nineteen Ninety-six companies were starting to produce DVD players, which originally went on sale in Japan, and then expanded from there and like CD players when they first came out they were pretty darn expensive. But it actually the the path for DVD to hit widespread adoption it happened much more quickly than CD players did like a CD player..

Sony Philips Japan Time Warner group Assode
"cds" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"cds" Discussed on TechStuff

"Music I'll touch on that a bit more in the next episode. The laser disc gathered a devoted audience film lovers, but the expense of the devices and the limited video library meant didn't get widespread. Adoption the man laser discs were pretty darn neat. You typically had to flip them over to watch a whole movie one side might hold thirty or sixty minutes worth of materials. They had a limited capacity. But they also introduced other stuff that would become standard in future format stuff. Like extra features, which you wouldn't get an typical VHS tape. You know, you buy VHS tape of a movie, you get the movie you buy a laser disc of the movie, you might get some commentary. You might get extra scenes, you might get a lot of stuff, and you could jump around and watch different scenes through essentially. The random access approach. But you couldn't do that. With VHS you had to just watch. At whatever point the tape was at you could fast forward or rewind. But you couldn't just jump to a chapter or something you can do that with laser discs. So this was stuff that would carry over into the DVD and Blu Ray eras, and it opened up new opportunities in entertainment. So again, we see how the evolution of technology would change the actual business of entertainment Phillips, initially was ready to say cienega to the optical storage format. After the laser disc failed to win out over the cassette based video formats are already on the market, but eventually the company along with Sony came around to the idea for audio discs. And compact disc was born Phillips unveiled a prototype of the compact disc in nineteen seventy nine though, it'd be a few years before the format was standardized for one thing Sony, allegedly demanded that a single compact disc would need to be able to hold an entire perform. Prince of Beethoven's Ninth symphony. So if you've ever wondered, why standard CD as four point seven inches or twelve centimeters in diameter, allegedly it's because of Beethoven the duration of Beethoven's symphony depends upon the arrangement, but typically the ninth symphony tends to last somewhere in the neighborhood of seventy minutes. However, they were looking for the longest version of the symphony recorded to make that the standard and it clocked in at around seventy four minutes and to hold that much audio the CD would have to be twelve centimeters in diameter. And there we have it Philips and Sony established the standards for CD's nineteen eighty with Phillips showing off the first production model meant for consumers two years later. And according to the BBC the first two commercial CD presses ever were a recording of Strauss's alpine symphony and the immortal album the visitors by Abba super when the CD got started in the early nineteen eighties. It wouldn't. Really start to be a threat to the cassette until the nineteen nineties. So in our next episode will continue our look at the C D And its impact on the entertainment industry, including more about the audio file objection. I mentioned earlier will also look into the birth of DVD's and their successors and lay the ground for the digital file era. I hope you guys are enjoying this series. I really like looking at the sort of big picture stuff this evolution of technology. And how that changed not just the business, but our very thoughts around entertainment, how our attitudes about entertainment have changed as the technology has enabled different ways to consume that that entertainment to me. This is what I love most about tech stuff this relationship between technology industry, and our society. So I hope you guys are enjoying this. And if you're not don't worry pretty soon, we're going to be off this topic and talking about all sorts. Of other stuff. If you have your own suggestions of what I should be covering next. Why not semi an Email? The address is tech

Sony Phillips Beethoven Strauss cienega Philips BBC twelve centimeters seventy four minutes seventy minutes sixty minutes seven inches two years
"cds" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"cds" Discussed on TechStuff

"See he had an idea that his company was going to partner with some other companies on developing proprietary. Playback device primarily they were going to partner with Phillips and this device was called disco vision. And would later be called the laser disc, and the plan was to release content for this device, and it would only be able to play that content back. Couldn't record anything. It could only play back prerecorded material. And now a give universal full control of its television and film, libraries that could say, hey, do you wanna see our movies? Well, you can do that. But the only way you can do it is to go through us to buy these proprietary disks that will run on this proprietary hardware, and that way they could have full control of the situation, Walt Disney productions would join with universal in this lawsuit against the Sonian, and they sought to block all sales of Betamax machines. Now Sony argued that the Betamax was similar to tape recorders which had been deemed illegal product all the way back in the nineteen sixties. So the US district court would hear the case in nineteen seventy nine and they ruled in favor of Sony. But then the case went to an appeals court and the appeals court reversed the decision in nineteen Eighty-one. However, this point the VCR was really doing pretty well VCR sales were picking up and the VHS format which wasn't even Betamax was already ahead of the Sony Betamax approach. So even if the court had argued that there needs to be a block on Betamax sales VHS was already winning. However, the case would continue through the court system finally making its way all the way to the United States Supreme court in nineteen Eighty-four and the supreme court reversed the appeals court decision and ruled in favor for Sony that settled the matter officially saying these devices do not violate copyright law by nineteen Eighty-six. Half of all American household. Aids would own a VCR as for the movie studios. Well, even as the case was making its way through the court, it became clear that video cassettes actually represented a new line of revenue generation that it wasn't going to hurt the studios. It actually really help them studios could dive into their back catalogs of movies and sell videocassettes to consumers movies that would otherwise just sit in a storage facility. Maybe like an old salt mine, they could actually earn money again, even Disney productions would jump on board though is largely due to a change in leadership because a guy named Michael Eisner became CEO of the company and Eisner led the studio to release several of their classic films on video cassette and before long Disney movies captured something like seven out of the top ten best selling video tapes of all time. So it was a very much a winning strategy for Walt Disney, even though earlier the company had opposed the. Technology that same year. Nineteen Eighty-six was when the videotape industry actually overtook the film industry in revenue, and it turned out the fears of piracy were largely misplaced just like audio cassettes. Most VCR's can only record at the same speed as the playback of a source. So if you're trying to tape a two hour movie, it would take you two hours to tape. It. It wasn't the sort of thing that the average person could do to just churn out. Pirated copies videos, though, if you've got your hands on some semi professional equipment, you could do it at a faster clip, you could reproduce videotapes faster than you're your, you know, store brand VCR, but that was an investment most folks weren't able to make. So it was possible to generate, you know, lots of of unlicensed copies of a film. But only if you had access to this equipment, if you were just using to VCR's at home, it was such a painstakingly long process that it didn't. Make much sense now in the early days prerecorded videocassettes were really expensive. Like if you wanted to go out and buy a movie on a videocassette, you were shelling out some big bucks. For example. When Columbia Pictures made Ghostbusters the nineteen Eighty-four Ghostbusters available for purchase on VHS each copy cost the princely sum of eighty dollars, the company sold more than four hundred thousand copies of the film at that price..

United States Supreme court Sony Walt Disney partner Michael Eisner Disney Ghostbusters US Phillips CEO eighty dollars two hours two hour
"cds" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"cds" Discussed on TechStuff

"Tough gave gave Ginsburg call to bring him over and Pontiac tov hope Ginsburg would be able to help the company come up with. Means to record broadcast quality television to videotape. There have been some experiments with this. But the results had not been really marketable promising, but not marketable. So Ginsburg led a team to design a system Ampex patented his design in nineteen fifty two and that same year Ray Dolby whose name should sound familiar. If you're into sound if you've heard about Dolby sound he joined the project he was nineteen years old at the time and his time with the project would get interrupted as he would be called into military service for a few years, and then he would rejoin the project anyway, this again is not to say that these are the first people to ever work on this problem, or even produced technology that could do some form of video to tape shortly after World War Two engineers had been trying to find ways to preserve television on magnetic tape. But the previous efforts used audio tape recorders and in order. To store the same amount of information of video as you would with audio. You had to run the recorders much faster. You had to dedicate a lot more tape to hold all that extra information since you had video on top of audio which meant that you had to run these things at incredible speeds to achieve a high frequency response suitable for preserving television and by incredible speeds, I mean the tape would pass under the recording tape head at a speed of around two hundred forty inches or about six meters per second. At that speed even short program would need an enormous amount of tape. And that was just one typical approach a Bank Crosby he wanted to be able to tape essentially a month's worth of shows in a single week that way he would work for a week. And then have the next three weeks off sounds ideal. I wish I could do that. I just I I don't think I can physically record them any episodes in the week and then take another month off, but he worked with. Pex to use audio tape recorders and with his approach Crosby's approach there were actually running even faster they were running on speed of three hundred sixty inches per second. That's nine meters per second of film or other tape not film, but man super fast so Ginsberg's team comes up with a solution. But it wasn't easy. According to Ginsberg himself, the project took four years of research and testing to come up with a viable way to get around this problem and along the way the project was shelved twice rather than have the tape pass at this incredible rate of speed over the recording head or under the recording head the idea was build a rotating recording head the head would spin as tape passed underneath and it would record tracks of information in arcs, and such a system is called an architect recorder. And that's a word I had never encountered before I did the research for this episode. In fact, the first time I saw. It printed. I thought perhaps I was looking at a typo and what they meant to say was an accurate record. But no them they meant Arquit in that the information was being recorded in arcs onto the tape. The recording head that Ginsburg's team built was actually the initial one was actually three heads on a rotating drum and it would scan tape that was about two inches in width for about five centimeters. And the tape would move past the head at a relatively leisurely thirty inches per second or seventy six point two centimeters per second, which is still pretty fast, but nothing like the two hundred forty inches per second of the earlier method. What's more the rotating drums speed allowed Ginsburg to record the same amount of information as he could if the tape were moving at a blistering two thousand five hundred inches per second. He could cram far more information onto a shorter length of tape using this methodology still this early prototype produced recordings that in Ginsberg's owned. Words produced an quote almost unrecognizable picture into quote, the next prototype added another recording head so Br brought the total up to four on the drum. And with some other technical changes that get a little too complicated for me to go into in this episode, but this version had its own problems and at this stage. The project was shelved technically it was shelved for a second time. And this happened around the summer of nineteen fifty three and the project would not officially start up again in earnest until August nineteen fifty four however in that off time.

Ginsburg Ray Dolby Ginsberg Dolby Ampex Br Bank Crosby Crosby Arquit two hundred forty inches two thousand five hundred inch three hundred sixty inches nine meters per second six meters per second five centimeters two centimeters nineteen years thirty inches
"cds" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"cds" Discussed on TechStuff

"So it would be better. If you could find a way to record a show, and then broadcast it at a different time slot for other markets and most shows were being shot in New York. So you want to have a show in New York air in Los Angeles. It made more sense to record the show in New York, and then send that recording perhaps even via cable out to broadcast stations in Los Angeles. Which would then broadcast it. So you still had to figure out a way to record the show. You're actually doing and recording show was easier said than done television cameras, and modern technology was best suited for live broadcast. So you would use a camera to capture images, but send that signal directly to a transmitter and blasted out over radio waves, and then television sets all over the region would pick up those transmissions and show the live broadcast right then and there before the invention of videotape one work around for this was the Kenneth scope now this was not an ideal solution. Basically, you would take a film camera kinda like the ones you would use to shoot a movie, and it was. Typically, either a sixteen millimeter or a thirty five millimeter film camera, and you would put it behind a television monitor you would point at the TV monitor. So you would be shooting a program on television cameras, and the monitor would actually be displaying the image live on it. And then you would use a film camera to capture the image of that which was on the monitor screen, so viewers at home at least outside the region that you're directly serving would actually looking at a picture of a picture. It's as if you were to play a YouTube video on your computer. And then you use your phone's camera to stream that video to someone else. It's not ideal. One other thing had to be done for this to work, by the way, the cameras actually had to be synchronized to the monitor's scanning rate. So you might remember I've talked about this and other episodes cathode Ray tube monitors paint screens line by line from the top to the bottom. So they paint a horizontal line. They move down the paint the next horizontal line, technically they. Could paint every other line in do a second frame where they're doing the other line. So you do all the odd lines I than all even lines. But you get the idea it's the sequence of painting lights now it's done so quickly that our brains can't process this. We just see unbroken moving images. We don't see a series of lines being painted on a screen. But if you have a film camera that isn't synchronized with the scanning rate, then you can pick up an artifact typically, we see this as sort of a rolling horizontal line moving across the television screen regular cycles. If you've ever seen any real cheap productions that especially like home, videos, or something that are pointed at a TV screen, and you see this weird line scanning across the screen over and over again. That's what you're seeing..

New York Los Angeles YouTube
"cds" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"cds" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"That the internet goes away but if the internet goes away you're not going to have your electricity you're not gonna be a player cd's so you'll probably find throw your cd's good what do you do right you know i see that point and and i have a lot of people who ask me about buying a lot of time but you know i spent most of the eighties nineties replacing like meticulously replacing all my peas with cd's and it took me forever and it was incredibly boreas and expensive and i'm not going back man i mean i love records but i'm just not gonna go back and replace all my cd's again with records so it it streaming for me looking for the physical representation of it although it is important for many people and i agree with your point that it's great to keep records alive i love record stores but for me personally i'm not going back i feel you i mean i just i do hear people say oh i need to buy music i need the physical thing that's why like cd's and i just feel that makes more sense with vinyl or frankly with a t shirt so there is room for technical innovation but you know it does feel like this world is set streaming and maybe vinyl and the cd as a d win ruling category and certainly available in used form throughout the nation for the foreseeable future does that phil baron at does feel that right yet yeah i think that's true cd's are definitely dwindling vinyls definitely increasing and streaming is just overwhelming that's that's the way the future and real quickly i mean we we haven't touched his much on the fact that people aren't buying digital fouls which seems to make the least sense of all by a digital file when you can stream in unlimited number for ninety nine a month why would you buy one album for nine ninety nine on itunes unless it's you know unless it's like taylor swift or something where she hasn't put on streaming but short of that it doesn't really make much sense it seems like so yeah.

phil baron taylor
"cds" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"cds" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Voiced active activated alexa thing which could be big what we'll see but it could certainly have to be very big plus all the stuff that amazon sells so music is now perhaps destined to be a loss leader for tech companies very sexy very exciting stuff it has been it has been the store as well now steve this very little hope for the cd format is there i don't i don't think so i mean maybe it'll come back at some point as kind of a retro form at the way vinyl records did and record stores everywhere i was just in austin texas and i went to the great water records and their cds everywhere and you know i'm spotify subscriber and i've got purchased dozens of cd's at waterloo over the years and i didn't buy any and i felt sad about that you know and and i like to think these record stores will survive they sell cds vinyl though survived by you know uc vinyl is a blip because you're looking at it from the very broad sense of the music industry but that blip is keeping a lot of stores alive and is is a pretty strong cultural movement in itself yet and you're right in in sort of the macro sense it is a blip at the same time you know if you restore staying alive from it it feels pretty great and i can see a world forming where it is some form of streaming and vinyl because there are always going to be those people who want to purchase something and hold it in their hands and i think vinyl makes more sense than cd which can be precisely digitally replicated i was i had this debate with david brown under earlier incarnation of this show you know on title when you stream at at the hi fi quality you're literally getting exactly the same file as a cd via streaming there is no difference and this is something i have a little trouble explained people for some for some reason but so therefore you don't need your cds you just don't you know i i can understand swimming streaming goes away or you suming that you know.

waterloo david brown amazon steve austin texas spotify
"cds" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"cds" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"You know when when cd sales were offended i was just looking at the figures for how many cd's were sold in nineteen ninety eight which was twenty years ago and it was five hundred seventy eight million compared to last year the us which which was eighty nine million but i mean back then that was the only model the record business head and all these executives and williams and everybody else just wanted to protect that that's all they wanted to do is sell cds everything was going so well suddenly you've had nassar pop up which was a pirate service it wasn't authorized and it allowed people to share files for free over the the you know the internet which was this new fancy thing that was confusing to a lot of people and fry from that moment when napster functional it created this world in which you could essentially think of the name of the song type the song and hear this song and the record industry's sort of mistake or whatever was thinking they could in any way forestall that future once we got a glimpse of that we were never going to go back right that's right that's right the record industry tried to stop it instead of saying i mean there were some efforts made to make a deal with napster and that's a whole complicated story we both reported on that in his fascinating and then it it could have happened they could have had a a world where they sort of made a deal with napster and we had legalized streaming in nineteen ninety eight imagine that that that could have happened they were talking about tethered download from nassar there's all sorts of things that could happen instead but so a few things happened before i tunes launched this ancient history now steve what people probably don't remember now is there is this period between roughly ninety nine and two what you're did i tunes launch two thousand three yes so during that period there was very little ability to legally get music he couldn't even legally by downloadable tracks really there was we'll go back to musicnet and press.

napster musicnet williams steve twenty years
"cds" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"cds" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Brian hiatt and this is rolling stone music now we're going to split up the episode once again today for the first part we're going to talk about the death of music sales which is cds ended downloads appeared to be on their last legs and in the second half we're going to do an artist to watch segment with the very excellent soccer mommy but right now we have steve knocker on the phone steve not per se longtime colleague of mine at rolling stone who wrote among other books appetite for self destruction the spectacular crash of the record industry in the digital age and that's a story that has never stopped giving has its dave nope i love going to that one thank you brian so what's happening now is first of all it was announced that last year digital downloads were surpassed by physical sales cds and vinyl and some people not quite understand the context we're like oh great cds or back vinyl is beating everything to and when in fact while vinyl continues to surge the actual issue is that streaming has taken over of course and cds are actually in even bigger trouble than they've been continually over the last few years best buy has announced they're gonna stop selling cds there is a new bruce springsteen box coming up and you'd think that bruce store some fans who are into physical media this is the box set the second part of his catalogue the middle part the first part was remastered and believes two years ago this is the middle part including human touch and lucky town and stuff when sony announced this box they announced a vinyl version and that it will be on streaming services no cds so what's happening here steve well i mean the main thing that's happening at that streaming yes there is a blip in vinyl and there has been for many years but it's still even though it's been.

Brian hiatt steve knocker sony soccer bruce springsteen two years
"cds" Discussed on Turned Up

Turned Up

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"cds" Discussed on Turned Up

"Award the physical copies and they don't want cds they want something different i mean who are the people buying this i dunno i didn't research that i didn't look at the statistics for the demographics buying these albums there's a it's again i mean just listening to a vinyl is a very handson experience start to finish you get a good you know fifteen minutes twenty minutes of sitting down listening to it before you have to physically get up in turn the thing over like there's just nothing about it that is it's an experience simple you know it's like i have to put it on the player i have to move the needle after set my the speed new my revolution i have to i've got a you know mine has a little knob to make sure that it's playing at the right speed you can adjust it a cases plane a little faster little slow if you've ever played one throngs beat it's a lot of fun for the kids at its it's fun thing for me to sit on my favorite spot on my favorite couch and put on an album and just sit there and listen to it don't turn on tv to have something distract you don't scroll through instagram i'm just sit there and listen to music is a different experience and all vinyl i have our of from my my dad's personal collection from when he was my age or younger and some from some from people even older than him who have had some ivan have in old vic trolla gramophone type of thing a portable one in a little suitcase that has like metal discs it place awhile they really really heavy it could be um that it's interesting from the eighth eight early 1900s while um not in english ashed brought that in man was i thinking but in has a whole little seerch secret compartment of metal needles that it plays on them as a crank yet to crank a cranked to wind it the crank is missing so i just spin it with my finger which makes for really interactive experience um but it has the devil will membrane old diaphragm on the needle so when you flip the needle onto it is little thing meth bigger than a halfdollar.

ivan fifteen minutes twenty minutes
"cds" Discussed on Turned Up

Turned Up

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"cds" Discussed on Turned Up

"Cds if they're on consignment so labels are just going to send them their distribute distributors aren't gonna cinema there anymore just a cell dargis saying you own them they're still your cds will selam and give you your cut yet no more we're not by they don't have a cd buyer anymore they're not going to buy these cds and in stock them and make money only if they sell them what does this world coming to well and so uh so many record labels now even are saying to bands hey we're not going to presser cd anymore that was a big thing was atlantic or even a new day under are under as we ascends deal uh they press our cds they have a manufacturer that manufacturers them and then we get them from the label and and sell them it shows or whatever they distribute them to stores because doors aren't selling them as much they're just not selling these labels are saying we're not going to make cds anymore it's just a big waste of money it's a waste of time when most of all the money that we're making are coming from online digital sales downloads or strains which streams now are the most popular way for people listen to music and i have to be honest i'm not listening to a month downloading and be 3's i don't download anything to my phone i don't download anything of a computer a very rarely would i unless a need it for some reason but i'm streaming through apple music that's the company i choose to use um they pay their artist better and they have a wider selection in my opinion of songs that i wanna here uh in in my car i'm streaming via bluetooth or knocked cable sometimes the mostly bluetooth straight and it has my cart newsflash does not have a simpler and that's not uncommon uh for the last few years now all auto manufacturers have been phasing out the.

apple
"cds" Discussed on Turned Up

Turned Up

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"cds" Discussed on Turned Up

"We're going to read those if you submitted an answer we are going to read all of them at the end of the pie all of them all of them there were a lot of them which only most of them there are so many that we got it but my point being there was there was definitely an overarching theme through all of them there was and i was kinda surprised by it actually to be honest when we get there will we'll talk about it who little foreshadowing we'll get there that you're gonna say foreshadowing little four showing the third member of as we sent is going to be here soon give me for the tour he's got to be on this podcast so how do we get to cds where where to cause cds are definitely the most recent they're the newest invention of tangible physical mediums physical yeah um but i mean unless you're talking about like usb sticks say which i mean no a young going to best buy and buying use be stick of an album saiga cds and these will be the most recent invention which if you think about it that's pretty pretty old they've been around since the 80s will get there let's start let's go back to the eighteen 50s first so you were around the gives a lot do as a lot colder than because global warming hasn't taken over as much okay by that point we not as much hairspray going on yet to kill the ozone layer so eighteen 57 as the air transport yourself back there okay and limited that's it the frenchman i spoke of earlier edward liane scott day martensville i guess he lived in martensville time 'cause he said that so french like thank you i don't think he did in his invented something called the fought for an autograph which is spelled like autograph with p h o n at the beginning of it and it basically was transcribed sound waves m m base little girl like a line that was traced on smokeblackened paper commit carbon paper or glass that had kind of smoke edged onto him the way it worked was it had a like a flexible membrane a made of parchment or some other kind of material a lot like that stretched over the small in.

edward liane scott martensville
"cds" Discussed on Turned Up

Turned Up

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"cds" Discussed on Turned Up

"Before that kate winslet um so you do look a lot like kate yeah i'll see the julia thing but i mean i they do a lot of cool things in hollywood i could see that again harry also a seattle club you can you can just watch any film where they die and uh and that's me what are we talking about today i mean i mean we're talking about a few things but really i think the overarching theme is is kind of the death of tangible music media as we know it and also the rise of a new one but more importantly like the why so you're talking about cds mike was let's talk about it with the elf in the room like cds are disappearing what i mean i'm really sad about the the fanatic grams oh yeah right those have been gone a long time see best been weeping for years now well especially to see one of your own inventions like that rubber you think your goes one of those things i actually coal worked on that with a french guy but we'll talk about that a second i give him all the credit because i didn't want to be that guy again called by the lord very um but awful oh we should jump it we should broke before we talk about the cds disappearing in how best buys pulling them from the shelves if you didn't know that newsflash for the spoiler but wish probably talking about how we even got to the cd like the the birth and death of other audio media i guess mediums if he will ways that the audio was captured in delivered into our ears over the years so we conceive as a pattern here and see what might be coming next if that makes sense saving see a trend so it had this pop up in conversation several times over the last couple of weeks with the we love awards that we were just that it came up because we were with other bans other producers that loud music people were there lauda music people label people as well as just clients that i've spoken with even you and i have talked about it so we pose this question to our fans of the podcast and we asked should cds die yes or no and why and why anna and so we got so many really interesting answers.

kate winslet harry seattle mike anna
"cds" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"cds" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Josh donate twenty years ago gregor lent some cds to attack new musician friend who sampled them on his album the album bowen went now but the cds were never return and that musician who borrowed them was moby gregor doesn't want credit or riches he just wants his cds back say i'm mobile like how would you ask demographic can have a cds heck here to listen to the heavyweight podcast for this and other stories of regret and second chances meet chievo the first never social robot for the home packed with personality knowhow and killer dance moves gebo his shirt to surprise in delight in now with chievo music powered by our radio you can simply say hey gebo blame using the here and i are radio station from your favorite genre joined in all the excitement as iheart radio gives away ten people robots this holiday season inter for a chance to win it i are radio dot com slash chievo today that's iheart radio dot com slice j i b o here in the nba geely you never know which future start you might be watch six teams full of players who are pushing towards that next level in the nba gle we never stopped work we never stopped getting better we never stop looking for our shot in the nba team leaning we don't go for good we go for great catch the action all season long on facebook live the thing in sky fullness at put your finger in the sky they put a finance guy i put two fingers in the sky to sabotage were but they suggested privately but never yuthana seem to come with black for you a funny recognize the phillies debt the sat foot auto unknown japan dana trust me he would baffling he's pled celtics you've been goal is i saw you wouldn't party cell flip saw spoke with something to buy a home fear he introduced us fairly now was heartbroken some people talk about their love at first sight to keep a real well know where that believe trump good it.

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