19 Episode results for "CBO"

The CBO

Behind the bottom line

14:07 min | 1 year ago

The CBO

"Hi I'm James Scofield. The writer of the stories in season to this podcast behind the bottom nine. Can I ask you a? What do you really know about the people you work with? What I've learned is that everybody has an unusual story to tell about themselves. These stories might be funny. Side will frankly weird and over the years. I've turned these people under Vince into short stories for various magazines in each episode of behind the bottom line. I read you my original story an off towards I tell you something about real life background. So let's here today. Story the C O and find out the path to success in any cooperation the CBO. When I heard that professor Thomas Kozlowski was coming to campus. I was desperate to meet him. Kozlowski was business grew to the business cruise as A. Us media often described him. The man is a living legend advisor to corporations and governments inventor the concept of Turbo Management and world famous for his economics text. Non-linear descriptions of linear relationships the professor had done everything gone everywhere and met everybody. Luckily for me Kozlowski was coming to town to visit the Dean who had been a student of his as editor of a small college newspaper. Alabama with the most exciting thing I'd written about was when classes were cancelled because of snow. This was a dream come true. Though at first it was something of a nightmare professor. I began after the Dean had introduced us. What's your proposal for reducing the US trade deficit with China Miles? He said if I'm going to talk about the business world I need a drink. I took him to my favorite bar in town which was a mistake because it was also the favorite bar of Our College Baseball Team. Who just won a game and the professor was a huge baseball fan. He spent three hours discussing home. Runs strikeouts and a million other things with them. I was just about ask him what he thought. The best way to regulate Wall Street would be when the team invited him to a party held by one of the fraternities on the campus. I lost him halfway through drinking contest. And it must be about four in the morning before I found him again. Foster sleep on the couch. A cheerleader had her head on his shoulder and her arms around his neck. I was able to free the professor and we tried to find a way to the Dean's house miles. He said after falling over the same tree root twice. I need to sit down. We sat on a bench watching the moon. I try to think of something intellectual to ask but my head was a sea of beer and vodka. There was only one question kept floating to the top. Professor is finally. I hope this doesn't sound too stupid. But what's business really like? I mean I've only ever been a student someday. I'll have to work somewhere. What's it like working for a large international firm? He laughed loudly. Zen Silence for awhile miles. He said after a pause there are only three groups of people in an organization. He reached into his jacket pocket and pulls out a can of good visor opened. It drank deeply then passed it to me. Firstly explained you have the cows you give them grass and they make milk cream and butter that produces they create value for the company. Secondly you the wolves they look to the cows. They make sure that the counselor in the right place have enough grass an milt regularly the cows do what the wolf say and the little wolves do what the big will say. Finally you the most important group of all the butterflies. I laughed so hard that I choked on my beer. He hit me on my back until I could breathe again. You have to realize miles. Life isn't much fun for council a wolves. The cows are afraid of the wolves because of their sharp teeth and the wolves have problems not unworthy cows who don't always do told but also with each other big wolves by little's and sometimes there are fights until one of them runs away but when cows and wolves see the butterflies they all say oh how beautiful they forget that problems and can concentrate on their work. I said yes but I can see. The cows of workers and the wolves the manages but who the butterflies trainers newsletter writers moderators event organizers and the other communication experts in other words the ones who helped the cows wolves feel that what they're doing has a purpose butterflies. Have any one natural enemy. Who's that management consultants who has added downsize? The company said the professor. They hate butterflies. The management consultants might shoot a cow. If it's not producing enough milk will drive out a few lazy wolves but they chase all the bus flies away. He stood up and tried unsuccessfully to walk in a straight line. Well that's not so good is it? I said following. It's best to be a cow or a Wolfson. She thinks that he said after six months with no butterflies. The cows and wolves become so depressed that they're ready to kill themselves seven because the big wheels didn't know how to solve the problem cells. They decide to have a team building workshop. They invite a butterfly into the event and within another six months the company's full of butterflies again Jimmy onto only one group. I asked at the start of your career. You can try to find out what roles suits you best but then you have to make a decision and stick with it because if nobody is sure whether you're a cow a wolf or a butterfly nobody will trust you. We arrived the door of the Dean's House the difficulty. He put a key in the lock. But what about you? Professor? What are you? He stood there for a moment trying to focus his is his hat. All Wild BS stains down his shut and the cheerleaders lipstick on his cheek. Butterfly of course. Big One though. I'm a CBO CBO while you probably heard of CEO's CBO Chief Butterfly Officer. And then he flouted off to bed faster. I hope that everybody who is listening is great. Didn't attempt to do an American accent. The story I think the results would have been very embarrassing but pretty who knows me will recognize that off the three current two types described in the CBO cow wolf and butterfly. I am very much a butterfly. I'm but the CBO is really a kind of summary of my philosophy is of business Probably BE SURPRISED TO LEARN THAT WAY BACK. I did Hoffa an MBA And the bits of the NBA. I really enjoy the organizational theory in management styles and so on a great Where I fell down with only accountantcy as my bank balance. Civil reflects unfortunately But I'm I developed to that a a big interest big reading interest in the whole topic of management and organizations and how they work and so. I've done quite a lot of reading. On topics of Management Styles send organizations. I'm and amongst an apart from will the classics from Peter and Qatar and so on John. I'm which I found. Really interesting to read was a book by Joel. Back and called the corporation the pathological pursuit of profit and power and takes a very dim view of alcohol. Basically see some as psychopathic another book. I like very much was a book called the sociopathic stole by Martha Stout and according to something like four percent all people are actually sociopaths. What's interesting though is that this figure rises to twenty percent out when you look at. Ceo's so maybe Joel backing has something that when he thinks that corporations are actually psychopathic. I'm but anyway the various books influence my My perspective of how organizations are divided up into these three groups of cows Wolfson's and butterflies and also experience my experience working in different organizations which are gone through Reorganizations and transformations and outsourcing and restructuring. I'm and so I've seen actually how it works in organizations how what happens when when there is a big change in a big reorganization and I had to admit in the CBO. The people who don't come out very well the management consultants. I'm actually have a lot of time. Management Consultants and some of my best friends management consultants. I would say I'm and a super bright people Austin and they work. Incredible hours and When you are working with them when his nobody very grateful for the amount of effort put in But I do think they have this perspective all because they come from outside They to rather have this perspective being able to see the value of the butterflies and as about fly myself. I find this rounder offensive This is probably why the management consultants that come out to the roads particularly well. I do think it's interesting though. I think it is important in any organization that you have this ecosystem that you have this balance. I'm that she need people who are able to connect the walls and the cows because I mean let's face it most of the time most of the things that you have to do your job A not so much fun and somebody who is able to help you look at things differently. Help give you a different perspective. I think this is extremely helpful and useful and that is why I argued very strongly. The role of the butterflies severely underestimated in most organizations corporations on and I look forward to the day when CBO CHIEF. Butterfly officer is a genuine role on the board of a company. I think I probably have to wait for quite some time because I don't think anybody's going to buy into the theory of mind. However if they do remember you heard it here first. I hope you enjoy this episode of behind the bottom line. Please subscribe on spotify Apple. Google podcast whichever APP. You used to make sure you never miss an episode and tell your friends right an online review all right to me directly at James Dot Rupert Dot Scofield at g mail dot com to let me know what you think until the next episode of behind the bottom line. This is James Scofield saying goodbye.

professor CBO James Dot Rupert Dot Scofield Dean Management Consultants Thomas Kozlowski CEO Us Alabama Vince writer College Baseball C O Turbo Management Google Apple baseball Martha Stout advisor Joel backing
What Did the Arecibo Radio Telescope Help Us Learn?

BrainStuff

07:39 min | 5 months ago

What Did the Arecibo Radio Telescope Help Us Learn?

"This episode of brain stuff is brought to you by electrify america across country network of electric vehicle charging stations here to help electric vehicle. Owners feel free freedom of around their neighborhood. With charging stations near the places that matter and free to hit the road quickly by enabling access to ultra fast charging find out what's new electrify america dot com that's electrify america dot com electrify america. Hello freedom welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio brain steph. Lauren local bam here for fifty seven years. The air cbo observatory Radio and radar telescope facility located about twelve miles nineteen kilometers. South of the city of air in puerto. Rico was one of astronomy greatest treasures until recently era cbo had the biggest radio telescope in the world and its ability to detect distant signals. Made at one of the world's most powerful tools for studying both planets and moons in our own solar system and mysterious objects in distant regions of the universe over the years. Scientists used it to determine mercury's rotation rate and map the surface of venus to discover the first binary pulsar and the first known exoplanet air cbo's researchers also made important findings about the properties in of asteroids that are potentially hazardous to earth back in nineteen seventy-four. Air cbo was even used to broadcast a radio message toward a globular star cluster. Twenty-one thousand light years from earth filled with data that could potentially be deciphered by extraterrestrials to produce a simple illustration depicting the stick figure human our solar system dna and some of the biochemicals of early life. The message was designed by astronomer. Frank drake with the help of carl sagan and other scientists the telescopes deterioration became evident back in august of twenty twenty when a support cable failed slipped out of its dish. Leaving a one hundred foot or thirty meter gash in the ditch. Engineers worked to try to figure out how to repair the damage and determine the integrity of the structure but then on november sixth a main cable on the same tower broke as well a that other cables might be weaker than initially believed at that point an engineering evaluation determined that it would be too risky even to do more repair work on the telescope on november nineteenth. The national science foundation announced that the observatory's radio telescope would be commissioned and dismantled. But before that could happen on december first the instrument platform collapsed. This nine hundred tonne instrument platform was suspended by cables attached to three towers at a height of four hundred and fifty feet. That's about one hundred and forty meters above the telescopes massive radio telescope dish. It's one thousand feet or three hundred and fifty meters diameter. the platform suddenly broke away from it supports and fell. The national science foundation has authorized repairs to air. Cbo's lied our instrument and a smaller telescope used for atmospheric science but rebuilding air ciba's radio telescope would cost an estimated three hundred and fifty million dollars a national science foundation official indicated at a december third press conference but it can take years for the federal government to make a decision about whether to do that but in the meanwhile they said the observatory close completely in addition to operating the smaller dish and the light our instrument. The visitor center would remain open. The sudden and shocking apparent end of air cbo's radio telescope caused an outpouring of remembrances on twitter with the hash tag. What air cbo means to me both from researchers who had used telescope and ordinary people who had visited the observatory and been inspired by it people chosen to get married there and it was used as a setting in the nineteen ninety-five james bond movie goldeneye and nineteen ninety-seven scifi drama. Contact air cba was built back in nineteen sixty three at a cost of nine point. Three million dollars which is close to eighty million in today's money. It came to exist due in large part to the efforts of cornell university physicist william e gordon who interested in studying the earth's atmosphere gordon shows puerto rico site because the sun moon and planets pass almost directly overhead plus a natural sinkhole south of the city of air cbo provided a cost effective way to support his design of a spherical bowl shaped reflector planted in the ground with a movable receiver hanging over it pretty quickly scientists realized the observatory would also be useful in the then new fields of radio and radar astronomy in nineteen sixty. Five one of the observatory's first. Great accomplishments was to discover the true rotation rate of mercury. The nearest planet to the sun was just fifty nine days. Not eight as had been previously estimated in nineteen sixty eight air cbo. Scientists showed that sporadic radio pulses from the direction of the crab nebula supernova remnant came from pulsar located at the center of the nebula other important discoveries followed in nineteen seventy four air. Cba was used. Discover the first pulsar in a binary system which provided important confirmation for albert einstein's theory of general relativity and for which the astronomers involved were awarded the nobel prize and nineteen ninety-three and the eighties and nineties. Scientists used air cbo to make more discoveries about the solar system they used telescopes radar to produce the first ever maps of the surface of the planet. Venus whose thick cloud layer had blocked optical telescopes view and they also found that despite mercury's high surface temperature. The planet still has is in shadowed craters at its north and south poles in nineteen ninety-two air. Cba was instrumental in yet another monumentous. I the discovery of exoplanets which are planets outside of our solar system orbiting around in two thousand three air cbo provided evidence for the existence of hydrocarbon lakes titan a moon of saturn and in recent years air cbo has continued to gather important information including helping to calculate distances that are important for understanding the universe it's also produced radar images of mars reveal lava flows and other geological features that hadn't been detected in visual images of the red planet. Today's episode was written by patrick gig hager and produced by tyler client for more on this month of other farseeing topics visit. How stuff works. Dot com breen stuff is production of iheartradio or more podcasts. My heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows ever wondered how it's made into a movie or had a massive yard of cooking either way we've got you covered with the two guys from hollywood podcast. I'm alan evans agent and talent manager. And i'm joey santos economists and celebrity chef on our podcast britain and serve you a fresh perspective of the entertainment industry alongside our favorite celebrity guests. As we like to say we don't dish we serve. Listen and follow two guys from hollywood on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. We'll talk to you said.

cbo america national science foundation Frank drake puerto rico carl sagan william e gordon Rico
The Skeptics Guide #806 - Dec 19 2020

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

1:47:26 hr | 6 months ago

The Skeptics Guide #806 - Dec 19 2020

"You're listening to the skeptics guide to the universe you're escape to reality hello and welcome to the skeptics guide to the universe. Today is wednesday december sixteenth. Twenty twenty and this is your host. Stephen bella joining me this week or partner bella. Everybody cara santa maria. Hattie j novella guys. End evan bernstein. Good evening folks. So what have we got to episodes. Left in twenty twenty ara and one regular episode. That'll be next week and then we're doing the year you so if you haven't done it yet please go to our website and give us your feedback on what you want us to talk about during the year in view your favorite segment. Your favorite gassed biggest news item. Skeptical hero skeptical jackass all of the usual stuff. Give it to us and we'll put together for a year. Have you show. Yes if you if you want to go to the to our homepage and then just put in slash. Wrap up twenty twenty and that'll take you to the form which you can fill out and we'd really appreciate it couple of quick cova news items are mentioned before we go onto the full news items so the vaccine's being rolled out the pfizer vaccine and didn't take long a healthcare worker in alaska had a serious allergic reaction to the vaccine to the by. What happens ample access like be staying reaction. Yeah ok though. She's okay but surely she have never gotten vaccine because they could have been totally predicted previous no begins by so to people in the uk who started getting the vaccine before the us atom talking about had allergic reactions but they had a history of allergic reactions. This woman had did not have a history of allergic reactions so this was a serious allergic reaction in somebody without prior history. So that's new. And that's not a good thing and that oh to vaccine. And how likely is that owed to just like you know the fact that we develop allergies throughout the lifespan. So any vaccine has this. Potential and people are allergic to components in vaccines. Yeah you're just like any drug drug and you're going to give a drug to millions of people. A certain percentage of them are going to have allergic reactions. Yeah this is a new vaccine. You know thought. Like i don't know how much overlap there is in in atrovent. Whatever between this vaccine. And previous i my understanding was not much because this is the marnie vaccine and it's really different. It's not like there's a products or other things like that you know where you're going to other vaccines so in any case and this is not surprising. It's good that the the patient did well. She get absorbed overnight. It this is not gonna change anything. There still rolling out the vaccine. It says the recommendations are that people and this was already the recommendation that people observed for fifteen twenty minutes after they get their shot shots just to make sure they're not going to be someone who gets a reaction and then and you just observe longer if somebody has an has known right allergy. But here's the other thing is that in the clinical trial. They excluded people who had known allergic reactions. And so we're just typical you do that and clinical trial you. You don't want to see like how are healthy subjects going to respond and you. You may exclude somebody. Who has would put them at a high risk group. We've talked about this. In the context of clinical trials in general the the strength of a double blind placebo controlled. Trial is that you control all the variables so you could isolate the variables of interest that but that goes hand in hand with a weakness. Which is the more you control those variables. The less the outcome is generalize to general population. So now this is a perfect example of that. You know forty thousand. People got the vaccine without an allergic reaction but none of them had any history of prior allergic reactions. Now i take a sample of people and you're going to have people who have allergies gained also people with really serious other medical conditions. People were pregnant women but yeah. It's often that you you remove all of those people from your sample to reduce the risk and then with covert. It's such a tough thing right. Because the people who need it most are the people who have certain types of sicknesses. I'm wondering how broad their their clinical sample was with vaccine. So there's definitely going to be side effects cropping up again when you go from forty thousand to millions eventually to hundreds of millions eventually billions. Maybe whatever you're obviously statistically you're gonna more things are going to crop up. But still as i mentioned i believe last week. The risk of this happening the risk of you being one of those people who gets a serious allergic reaction is still less than the risk of getting the corona virus and having a serious complication. and again she did. She's fine one night in a hospital. They treated her and she's fine. So but i'm sure you know probably won a million people or something is probably going to have a serious about the rate of serious reactions to thousands of people like her then but the case. I mean that's why we have a vaccine core like you know. We have mitigation effects for this because drugs have side effects and sometimes people get sick but again. This is a public health issue. So i promise you though. Three hundred thousand people are not going to die from the vaccine right. That's exactly that's the point that we have to emphasize or or get sick or get hospitalized or anywhere near it exactly. There's also been a good news. We have to see journa- plays out. Wolman is approved by the fda this week but the fda approved an instant at home tests for covid. Oh very cool like a paper test. The pregnancy test. I at home still not still not where we were we needed to be. But it's a nice first step for the testing because it's about thirty bucks which is going to be expensive for a lot of a lot of people. Maybe their insurance cover that you know what we need what we need to aim for something so quick and easy and inexpensive that we could do it every day. Barely even thinking about a smartphone. Like when you're brushing your teeth bam to test every day. How fast is it within minutes. Like instantaneous kind of test. how about that a pre-test telling you if it comes up positive you go get another test. Yes oh for sure if any ad home test basically positive then you go get the real test. Yeah okay but i mean i agree with you too to some extent that would be amazing like in a perfect world but also in a if that were the case we wouldn't be in the predicament. We're in having a rapid to other countries have done in other countries have done massive testing beyond anything we've done that and their and their numbers are much better right so i think that you know even before we have a test that we can keep enlarge stock in our own home. It's a function of. Can they use this in schools. Can they use this for public transit. You know think about the cases where people are indirect contact and in those cases having a rapid test is going to be a game changer. But for me sitting at home not going into work know. I don't. I don't need to use those resources. No but it certainly would have changed the way. This winter is turning out to be absolutely we had we had. This should have been one of the big big priorities months and months ago. Imagine if we had this six months ago and that's a lot of things we could have done differently rights and this is just one. That's in the news because the fda one for the home so yeah. This is just another failure. So it's exciting. I mean hopefully. It'll be one more tool that we have. That will hopefully help get the sunday a pandemic under control. Yeah especially for folks who aren't aren't frontline. Workers don't have pre existing conditions like there's going to be a slog. there's a. There's a time delay between when most people are going to be able to get the vaccine. So yeah but think about it though because. Generally i think people being very lax if anything the test will might motivate some people not to get together when they would have otherwise. Done it You know what. I mean pro and probably less likely to give somebody a false sense of security that they otherwise wouldn't have had. Gosh i hope so. I hope it's not seen as like a green light to just go. Do whatever the hell you want is that would be really right. That is always that the the the false sense of security always resume or else we've onto some full news items by you're going to start by telling us about all the wonderful things that the cbo telescope has done for us yes. The iconic air cbo observatory is no more after a series of events leading to. Its collapse early in this december or a good idea is to go over what it was. What it what it has done interesting facts about it. In some of amazing accomplishments of the cbo observatory also known as the national astronomy. And i fear center and aic Is in puerto rico. Puerto rico and it's owned by the national science foundation nsf. It was created the year that i was born over a half century ago but luckily i'm nowhere near collapsing yet. The business end of it air cbo refer to the era cbo observatory assist air. Cbo the business end of air sea but was a three hundred and five meter or thousand foot spherical reflector dish. This was created using a natural sinkhole. Actually it was a karst sinkhole which basically means most singles are karst sinkholes. That just means that. The underlying rocks are soluble. And there's fisher's allowing drainage often into caves and stuff and don't look into this because it's a rabbit hole. It's the fascinating thing that i spent time looking into the making up. The dish was almost thirty. Nine thousand one by two meter aluminum panels and they were all supported by crisscrossing. Steel cables and underneath that on the ground was vegetation that didn't mind being in the shade so much specifically planted that there or they just group you know you don't care about the shade that much guess you would naturally grow there anyway. So but above all that then of course was and hung on cables was a steerable receiver and radar transmitters. And that's about one fifty meters or five hundred feet above the dishwasher. It's really way up there. I was actually. I thought i knew something about air. Cba there was a lot of. It's made even more amazing discoveries than i realized. Did you know that astronomers used to think that pulsars could be created by white dwarfs. I did not think that white works ruin contention to explain them early. On in the late sixties that was until the air was spotted. A pulsar in the crab nebula rotating every thirty three milliseconds. That's important though. Because white dwarfs can't do that which means that the argument that pulsars were actually a neutron stars. Got a huge boost. And which of course we soon found out that pulsars were in fact rotating neutron stars. So i guess it has to do with the mass of the white dwarf and just can't couldn't rotate that much mass it's not dense enough to rotate that fast. I assume So that was interesting. Thank you air cbo. Did you know that. W-was observations of the planet mercury in the ninety s suggested that ice might be permanently shadow craters at the poles nasa nasr's messenger spacecraft later confirmed that and you might be thinking of our moon right now and if so brought to you. This discovery on mercury raised the possibility that such crater ice is on the moon. And as you lunar files already know it certainly does. It is there. It is confirmed that isis definitely there in permanently shadowed. Parts of many different types of craters. So thank you. Eric cbo for that as well. And did you know that the air cba observatory sent the first message meant for aliens in one thousand nine hundred. Know that right not surprised They sent it to globular star. Cluster m thirteen and nineteen seventy four. It is said to be the most powerful signal ever sent from earth and it wasn't really like oh. Let's try to talk to aliens. It was more of a techno demo of the observatory's new high power radio transmitter than than anything else but still that's really cool And thirteen contains three hundred thousand stars and is about twenty five thousand light years away. The message itself was sixteen hundred seventy nine bits of information and it was in binary code Trying to Give some information about The chemical the chemicals in our dna. It had a stick figure sketch of human. If you put the if you put the information into into certain arrangement You'd see the figure it had a layout of our solar system et cetera. So so yeah that's signal was sent seventy four which means that it has eighteen ten thousandths of the way there for because we're forty six years into the twenty five thousand year trip so a long way to go. But thank you for that air cbo. Did you know. I did not know this. That air cbo detected the first indirect evidence of gravitational waves nineteen seventy four. It's not the first. What's the indirect evidence because we would know we had nowhere near the technology needed to detect them directly back then but they found a pulsar orbiting another star and as the star and the dead star spiraled closer and closer to each other. The energy that was lost during their changing orbits matched. What would be expected if that loss were due to gravitational waves emanating away it really it matched up so that was a really really good argument for the existence of gravitational waves without having to detect without having to have the insane accuracy that that lie go has today. They pretty much show that yet. It looks pretty damn good that gravitational waves actually exist. And how about this. Did you know that. This discovery of indirect evidence won the nobel prize in nineteen ninety-three three in physics. Did not remember that either. So thank you for that. Air cbo and finally. Let's see. did you know that air sea will detected the first exoplanets. I think. I think i knew that and then i forgot it so i just haven't good sounds like something that i absolutely would have known briefly forgotten so so we of course we've discovered many thousands of well over four thousand exo planets by now but the first one was discovered accidentally in the early nineties by air cbo. The observatory was being repaired causing it to be kind of frozen in one position now. Generally the dish was kind of frozen right but but you know the receiver can move a little bit so you can. You can get a little bit but because if it was it was being repaired it was not moving a millimeter at all. Except maybe for by the wind. I don't know if when you would even do that. But it wasn't moving and that caused a specific Pulsar to swing into view of the earth rotated and they they were looking at. It might as well look at what it's looking at anyway. And they saw tiny millisecond fluctuations in the radio waves coming from the pulsar which indicated. Of course that there's probably massive bodies close to the pulsar gravitationally tugging the pulsar. To and fro is that called the wobble. Yes and that's yup. It caused a wobble of the of the pulsar caused by these planets targets. These were the first exoplanets target and so that made them think that. Hey maybe there's exo planets everywhere if we found him accidentally but it's ironic though that these types of pulsar planets are are pretty rare. They're they're not comment at all but still the fact remains that air cbo detected the first x. planet confirmed i mean detected and confirmed. So thank you for that as well. Air cbo so really. The only thing left is the talk about. It's unfortunate and recent demise. Actually you could track it starting kind of around two thousand six when the national science foundation's funding for the observatory dropped. We're starting to drop more. And more of the funds that the national science foundation had earmarked for air cbo went to newer observatories and then making it worse off after that was the fact that there are a bunch of hurricanes damaged that damage their cbo and that took away even more of the budget so that was kind of like the beginning of the beginning of the end. I guess maybe you could say of course stuff really got real in august. Twenty twenty twenty twenty when when the cable break started happening and those events turned out to be the last straw because november twenty twenty The nsf decided that was better to just Dekom decommissioned the telescope instead of repairing it. And so that's what they were going to it from what i read that it was just going to be too dangerous to to really repair that Match repairing that and somebody dies is like oh boy that wouldn't have been good Which was which was a real risk and then of course the big collapse happened. I think it was on december for december. First the december. I seven fifty six. Am local time The platform fell into the dish collapsing the telescope. So yeah that was a big exclamation point. Yes this is done. The observatory will remain open. Because there's other things going on there. Still but i really kinda bummed that never got over to Arazi were puerto rico to actually see in all its glory it is it is such an iconic observatory it will be missed and it just amazing to consider all the amazing discoveries that were made that That i wasn't aware of so. That's that's great. Yeah that's always. That's an iconic telescope. Really was said to to see collapse like that. I think people don't unless you're interested in astronomy. You may not be aware of how much how the look at the universe with through the radio frequency. You know god yeah because it doesn't give you the pretty pictures. The hubble does but the science that was incredible. And i'll say you can't visit hubble you can visit moniquet or other ground based telescopes okay. Jay is artificial intelligence going to finally be able to predict the weather. Well i mean first of all of nothing truly predicts whether we just get an idea of what's going on right so it's not one hundred percent but yeah predict all the time we just get a wrong. We need a word for like inaccurate predictions. Like just one word would be nice bullshit. So the yeah. We'll we'll get into the artificial intelligence other some researchers have been working on it and it's a different way of forecasting the weather. But i took the opportunity when a weather news. Item came up just to talk about like. How do we predict the weather. And give you a thirty thousand foot view on what takes place in. How hard is it so the modern daily weather forecast happen. When when do you guys think we got you know the time. The first modern daily auburn. When did people start getting a daily update on what the weather is going to be are. We didn't almanacs us to predict weather for each day of the years. I'm not talking about. I'm not talking about talking about that. Talking more about like using some type of some type of science some type of legitimacy. Well the question is are you. Talking is post satellite appre satellite aircrew free pre for sure. But you got weather stations. You can you ships to go into the ocean and radio. In what kind of weather they're experiencing so that's probably how the first ones day forties thirties. Well let me tell you because it's a little complicated. I you know people were predicting the weather by observation for a very long time. You know they would. They could look at you. Know what's on the horizon clouds coming in. And the cia ancient chinese had weather prediction so it wasn't really uncommon but when i the the keyword here was modern. Daily forecast was actually published in the times on august first. Eighteen sixty one sixty one. I know new york times what you said. It said the times of london. times has london. I think it is london. Because of what i'm about to. So how. how would they text that information. Everybody back then was just like it's going to be foggy today. Every day that they used to send out tweets using pigeons How nice nice. So the first weather maps were produced later in the same year and now we click forward to one thousand nine eleven. So the the the they began issuing the i marine weather forecasts via radio transmission which is called these include. Gale storm warnings for the areas around great britain. So seems like great britain. Kinda got got. The first weather reporting happening where people were able to gain access to on a regular basis. The first televised weather forecast using weather maps. Nineteen thirty. six. To bbc did a test broadcast of showing people what the weather is. An one thousand nine hundred. Tv's in one thousand nine hundred for the test tv seven right exactly so buckingham palace so as most of you guys know i can tell by the sas all your voices. Historically whether weather predicting has been reliable. It's hasn't been that reliable. Sized computers advanced and weather satellites deployed whether prediction has steadily become better and better. So there's still of course limit to how far into the future we can accurately predict gas about loves to say this who so the x. Saying you bastard to bob. It's like one of those things where he'll get mad. He gets mad if you say like. It's eleven days ten days about pm twelve. That's going to save it for the twelve hour. Shows care all right so the experts are actually saying it's between ten and fourteen days. I found a news article that straight up said. It's ten days anything past ten days and it's just not not gonna be accurate enough but it's it's less than two weeks. Let's say that so even so as you know and that's because we know why though do what do you want to ask yourself. Why not get jay. He's not getting mad he's passionate. I love this on the show that if one person has knowledge about something we get so excited. We're like wait but make sure i don't know and it's like yeah. I did prepared. So bob was trying to say was whether is unpredictable because of gremlins. It's the gremlin. See that many people that excellent so. Yeah well i'll get into it. I'll get over the last thirty years. The accuracy of weather predictions has dramatically improved. Everyone agrees it's We've seen weather forecast. Go in my lifetime. I've seen weather forecasting go from me to pretty damn good. So today's meteorologist us incredibly powerful computers. Right they run these huge numbers of calculations to predict the weather. The weather prediction however is not really in real time because we have to wait for the computers to chug through the latest batch of information they give them so for accurate but short term predictions. We use technique called now. Cast you look outside the window. Pretty much i mean. That's part because you know meteorologist actually We'll we'll do that and read old school barometers and gather measurements and all that stuff and also like local. Newscasters no their locale right. So they could get the data from the computer and the naked tweak it a little bit because they have a human brain that can see the big picture in a way that you know a physics calculation in a computer can't see so they'll take these measurements and they can give a very highly accurate prediction. That can go about two hours into the future so this is great for like you know when is when is the hurricane gonna hit. When is the snow going to start falling. That's how they get these super accurate predictions because they're using very local data. They're not using national weather data. They're just getting multiple. Multiple data inputs from tons of different things locally could be radar. It could be whether balloons satellite imagery you know. And what's the big weather. The big weather radar thing that they use. What do you call that dollar doppler radar. Yeah that's actually really important but longer forecasts use different ways to interpret the data because a lot more atmosphere has to be included in the model right. So if you wanna do a longer forecast you can't just look at the weather within ten miles of you. You have to look at the weather that is you know a continent away from you. Because that's how fast the weather moves. So that makes things a lot more complicated. In bob's to bob's point we can't really predict the weather past say ten days simply because of just how chaotic the atmosphere is so the the atmosphere and the movement of weather is basically the distribution of heat. Right so you get cold fronts touching warmer air and the air's shift and everything and get to a point where you really can't forecast what the air is going to do. And where the heat's coming from to such a degree that you could go past ten days because you would start. You would need to have unbelievably small units of data meaning. You would need to know like the temperature in this the wind speed and the pressure and the and the humidity of way too many data points. And we don't collect data on that small if you think of like you split the world into giant three d grid like a big rubik's cube with tiny little cubes in it. You need to collect data all over the surface of the earth and these tiny little cubes in order to be able to really predict farther than what we do today. And we just don't have that level of data collection or that ability to number crunch. That's a big when you go to a website where it has like the next fourteen days or they're just hoping you kind of don't look at those last few think. Where do they get those numbers. Do they really expect people to think fourteen days out that this is a seventy nine or eighty percent chance of no but i mean the question though is just that the accuracy goes way way down or is that it's literally not predictable. Air bars airbus. Go way up as yoga's go farther in the future and j. It's even worse than than you're saying because it's not just a matter of like we don't have enough say whether stations but it's inherently impossible by its very nature to predict an arbitrary distance into the future. And that's because of like you said it's chaotic. It's not many your dynamics and it exhibits the sensitive dependence to initial conditions so eh every measurement that you mentioned is an average so if you have an average of like the temperature and the pressure and the humidity for a parcel of the atmosphere say a mile a mile and of over the entire atmosphere you would have a certain level of accuracy but that's an average and even if you got the parcel of atmosphere down to a cubic millimeter that would still be an average because it's an average the era. There's going to be some errors in there and those errors multiply. They get bigger and bigger as the days. Progress those errors eventually swamp out the entire signal so you would need actually perfect accuracy of every point everything in the atmosphere to do the prediction as far in the future as you want. Which of course is inherently impossible because of quantum mechanics heisenberg uncertainty. And all that it is inherently impossible so even if you had a six chilean little nano bots in the atmosphere telling you everything about the weather it would still error out after after a couple of weeks or so technologies and relevant impossible. We never do. It's an impossible feat to comp. Yes what you're saying in principle. But bob if we had all those nano bots wouldn't we just have them change the weather. Go right when you're talking about technology like that then yeah you could. Actually try to nudge the but the thing is that you couldn't really per you couldn't perfectly predict what effect we're going to have in the future anyway but you can make short-term little adjustments. Hey i mean. I think whether control like that. It's things that's actually an interesting point. I mean fabri instead of predicting i. This is what we fascinating. This is interesting shit. Oh boy i'm bob was going to have to scratch that edge of course loves it. There is something wonderful about seeing somebody geek out on a topic that they love and they know a lot about him. I love it. i love it. I thought that i was like the extreme like giggling the backer well. Why don't you just like well. I have a question about this. I don't know if it's a silly question if you're are in some places just a lot more predictable than other places desert. Hey thanks so what a certain. Don't you have to kind of compartmentalize it into a geographic that you're right and that actually is a good thing to you know to kind of segue into the next part of my news item here. So let's talk about artificial intelligence and using question until so. The university of washington is developing a different approach to weather forecasting. So they're collaborating with microsoft microsoft research to use artificial intelligence and what they're doing is they're analyzing historical weather patterns. So this is what evidencing we know that you know san francisco. Has this kind of you know this kind of weather in. Its doesn't change as often as it doesn't new england which is every fifteen minutes so they take the historical weather patterns to help predict future weather events. They take forty years and we have a good solid forty years of of decent weather data. And it's different. It's different than using a highly detailed physics calculation to figure out what the weather's gonna do. Artificial intelligence comes from a completely different angle. So the system at its core is doing pattern. Recognition it compares current weather patterns to forty years of weather patterns and figures out. How the current pattern like the current pattern of the weather as it is right now. Typically evolves so probability it's a probability engine. It's not modeling the weather it's just using past data for as you say pattern recognition right so as a really loose example so when you know the air in the desert is this hot which is ten miles to the north and when the high altitude winds are coming in at this angle and read this relative humidity at this time of year typically. This is what the weather does in this square twenty mile radius. And that's what the is doing but it's pretty. It's pretty cool. Check this out so right now. The predict the is prediction. Ability is a little less accurate than most modern ways that we that we use computers to predict the weather however the version uses seven thousand times less computing power to produce that forecast so for the same number of locations around the globe. When you think about it the way i can predict. Let's say twenty thousand weather locations around the world and you add up the fact that it's using seven thousand times less computational power in all of those calculations that's an amazing amount of workload off of the computer systems that we use the systems that we use to calculate whether are monsters. These are desktop computers. They're generally supercomputer suit supercomputers so that much less computing power means what it means that we can get results faster from the ai. Because it doesn't have to do as much computation. And the researchers say that because they have so much computing computer processing power at their fingertips. They can run more models at the same time using slight changes in the starting conditions. So that means yeah. Isn't that cool. So what they'll do it can. It's like a shotgun prediction of the weather. They'll say right. Here's what we got right. Now give me the predictions on the actual. What's happening right now. And then give me a prediction on you. Know two hundred variations slight variations on what the weather is right now. Let's see what we get and it's pretty cool because when you had that less of computational needs you could do a whole suite of other things so check this out they call it and sambol forecasting which is so cool So the i will produce. A spectrum of potential weather outcomes so unlike today's number crunching of incredible amounts of weather related. The the i will come up with relationships between different patterns of weather and this kind of calculation it just can't be done by physics based models a physics b physics based model. Can't do this because the artificial intelligence because it's an artificial intelligence it can. It could make comparisons in a way that straight up. physics programming. Just can't do so time. The scientists believe that they'll increase the accuracy of their technique. So this make it better and also they said as the years go by. We'll just more data to collect more data and it just will sharpen itself automatically because it's getting more data and also when it makes mistakes. It's sharpening its data. You follow that. Oh yes sure. How about this though jay. If the climate is changing though is no old data going to be less and less accurate. Well that's steve. That's a great question. I mean think about it. The rules are changing. Yeah i wonder if the time horizon for past experience predicting future behavior is going to shrink or might just an algorithm like you know. Add onto that like for those. Yeah here's how you compensate. I'd like to know that that's a fantastic. A point you bring up all this kind of reminds me of the of the technique that was used by some of the forecasting for the recent election presidential election in the us. We all know how that turned out right. That was not. There was a couple of standard deviations off. What they were saying is going to happen. So within the range but yeah. The last two were not great in terms of prediction. But i guess when you're dealing with massive anomalies that's when things start to get really hard for an ai to predict. The voters are less predictable than the weather. I think that's right gonna vote ten days out from an election that this sounds like it's going to be a cool new tool and i do like the fact that its strength is not that it's more accurate. It's just that it's seven thousand times less calculations that needs to be done to get to prediction even if it's a little bit less accurate at the end to could do it with more efficient more quickly more efficiently. Therefore you can do more of. It are all right so guys. There's an interesting study. i wrote about yesterday about being manipulated by robots. Oh do this already. Every day so far this is a pretty straightforward psychological. Study nothing new. But just the element of of the robots is interesting so they were looking at risk taking like how willing people were to take risks and they use and already established validated paradigm of risk-taking. It's a computer game in which you hit the space bar and every time you hit the space bar. A virtual balloon blows up. It gets bigger. Yeah i've done this one. At any point you can cash in and the bigger the balloon gets the more money you get. But it's gonna pop but at some random point it will pop and you get nothing and so. The question is how random. Yeah well they can mess with that too. Depending on the experimental parents it several times it will happen at different times unpredictable. So it's not timing it to a certain point and it's not necessarily more likely to pop as it gets bigger. It's just that there's more opportunities for it to pop and eventually it's going to pop and so the question is how do you cash in early and take a bird in the hand or push. How far do you push it. They did this test on subjects. Probably students with three conditions. One condition was just with nothing. Just you know just playing the game. The second was with the presence of a robot that would give them instructions on how to play the game and then remained silent and the third was a robot that would give them instructions on how to play the game and then would give them little nudges of encouragement throughout the game. Doing donuts. don't be keep pushing the space for basically shaming but they just use like little bit little bits of encouragement and the students who got the encouragement from the robot took significantly more risks. Sure so those thing. that's interesting. Is that the group that the robot encouragement group that took the most risks made the most money. Oh which indicates that the other two groups were overly risk averse to be optimal and what they found was that people became really risk averse after a balloon popped a blue and they would like really check it out and cashing early. But that wasn't optimal for making you know. So they were overly risk-averse they did it maximize their money. The robot encouraged group actually made more money because they they were willing to take more risk more chances with a little bit of support from basic as a robots like a plastic bait very minimal humanoid robot with right and that's really not even the point. The point is that there was a fake yer. The point is that there was a voice. And that's my question where you would for human or like a devil say although when i wrote about him like i really would have loved for there to be a fourth group with a human human just to see if there would be any separation between the robot and the human. So care is right. I mean there's multiple layers here right. There's the whole risk averse thing we could talk about like why are people so risk averse. Why were where people overly risk-averse rather than you were think. Evolution would optimize that right. But what i suspect is that when the stakes get higher. It makes sense to be more risk. Averse like evolution's much. About how many pennies you make on a computer game. But they can they do care if you get eaten so you know in in life or death situations probably makes more sense to be risk averse and we just carry that through our lives even come with a little shock in their finger unethical all right so the other layer here is that we're our behavior so easily manipulated by even little nudges like this little psychological ledges. We are so easy modifiable. Yeah i mean it's like it reminds me of classics studies where you were asked to bisect align and say which side is bigger and put the plants in the room and they would be like the left side when it was clearly the right side but people would still go with whatever. The plant said that was very very classic psychological study. And there's even i remember. I didn't participate in it back in the day when i was a guest host on brain games before the the latest iteration we didn't episode called the god brain and one of the things that i did was it was like we told a story about the fact that somebody died in the room. We're in like an old university library and we told the story about the fact that somebody died in that room and they're go still haunts it and don't sit in that chair because that's where they usually sit and the chair happened to face where they were doing. This like exercise and like the presence of the idea of spirit in the room tended to influence people's behavior. It was fascinating because it was. It was a study about honesty like they did something with nobody watching and then they had to tell us how many mistakes they made and people were like way more honest. Ghost walked into the men's layer. Here's what we are social creatures as well and so that that our socialization is important and it affects our behavior we are evolved to respond to social cues very very easily influence other people but then the other layer here is the fact that we're layers doesn't matter onion bobby. Keep peeling it away. It doesn't matter where social that the agent of social cues doesn't even have to be a person doesn't even have to be alive and this gets back to You know. I've mentioned this before. On the show the fact that our brains have an algorithm for determining if something has agency or not our brains actually aren't concerned with whether or not something in our environment is quote unquote alive just whether or not it has agency and agency is the evolutionary marker for being alive and in the end the marker for agency. Is you guys. remember what this is. How does our brain determine if something has agency if it moves on its own. Yes more technically speaking if it moves in a non inertial frame so if it moves in such a way that cannot be completely accounted for by external forces such as gravity or wind. Or so steve you. Could you could design a study where you had like a plant. That has a lot of motor movement done though and see if people respond more emotionally. Are you hook up an evil clown to a motor and set it loose in the room this guy. The researchers already gone to its logical conclusion of stripping down. You know the elements until all you have left a two-dimensional shape that's moving. In a non inertial frame and we impose agency onto it. Is this famous video like a circle. A triangle square moving around the screen and people come up with a story. Like that's the daddy you know. And that's threatening the child in the mother's protecting it and it's just these shows moving around the screen even happens in non human animals. I have a friend who's doctoral district. Dissertation was chickens and they were looking at theory of mind and chickens and they would get their chickens in there they raise them in virtual reality cages so the walls were screens and they could get their chickens to imprint on like red dots and like yes fast. So let's why cartoons can make you cry right. It doesn't matter you two-dimensional drying if it's acting in a way that is it's moving in a way that it appears to have agency our brains process it as if it's an entity a person and what that means neurologically is once our brains identify. What the thing is it then connects to our emotional center and attaches emotion to it. So there's literally a connection that's being made because it's been categorized neurologically as something with agency and it could be a rock if that rock is moving around in a way that it looks like it's moving under its own power our brains slotted as. That's something with agency. And therefore i have feelings about it that connects to your limbic system whereas everything else could slotted as not agency no emotional connection to it but those feelings don't have to be posit positive It can be discussed. It can be anything fear. Yeah just from a survival point of view. The things we need to worry about in our environment are things that could act on their own accord with their own purpose. You don't have to worry about things that are moving passively in the you know in the environment so able in any case what this means for practical point of view and i think what this with this research is highlighting is that things with agency can include robots. It could also absa virtual things like a i. It could be a voice. It doesn't even have to be a physical thing because there are other ways to trigger you know emotions and us and so this then let this is. I'm leading down. This thought process of and this is already happening of course so to. What extent are we going to be manipulated by robots in the future. You know as part of the background. So i think this is already happening in the in that by some estimates for example half of twitter accounts are bought. Wow right right. That's those are. That's basically a and those are agenda-driven bots that really do drive human behavior. Yeah attempting to manipulate human behavior. And it's agenda driven. There's somebody behind them We're not even talking about about. Generally i like not an artificial intelligence deciding what to do. Just as a tool of of of people who have an agenda of social influence. Yeah yeah now think about corporations who want to influence your shopping behavior address. All comes to advertising margai hugh power politicians wanted nothing other form of influence your voting behavior or imagine a totalitarian government wanted to control all of your behavior you know and imagine the cage that can be built around people that is kind of invisible and in the background but manipulating every decision that we make go to north korea. Well this is the stuff of science fiction books that i used to read all the time. So that's the simile. Yeah it's already happening into talal -tarian countries so that's the maximally dystopia. In view of how where this will lead the maximum utopian view is that a benign government would use this to be to encourage pro social behavior positive courage getting vaccinated discourage criminal behavior. But yeah we have a real running our society would it. Would it could do no no more or you might consider the ultimate utopian outcome to be this completely banned and nothing is influencing our behavior without are explicit knowledge and consent. That's gonna unrealistic. So but i we have to decide that we have to create our own future. We have to think about this. We shouldn't just so here's the thing. I don't think that we should just let it happen. Organically like whatever happens happens because that's definitely not going to be what we want to happen. I don't know what it's going to be but it's probably not going to be anything close to actually want to have happen. Also steve. There's no such thing as that happening. Organically it's being driven by human decisions. Since i know that. But that's what i mean. There's a cushion. I mean one persons do people with generally speaking people with mon. You know who stand to gain monetarily decisions. That's exactly what i mean. Though by chemically meaning individual corporations entities in dental people are making decisions in their own interest. And that's in the aggregate. That's our decision as opposed to. Let's have a conversation as a society and come up with a collective decision about where we want to go at this rather than just letting people do whatever they wanna do egalitarian. I mean otherwise. Yeah it's always going to privilege certain people and really screw other people over right this thing. This is so powerful. And you're already. We're already dealing with us again with you know you go online. You're reading news online. You're reading facebook post in two hundred six. You are being manipulated by bots. So how do you. How do you compensate for this. What what what what can you say that. How did you find the psychological aspects mckay. Who's gonna it's still going to happen. I think individually individually just need to be aware that this is right and your awareness of it gives you a certain doesn't make you proof from it but it gives you a certain level of control. At least you're not going to be completely at the mercy of being manipulated if you're aware why everyone should take a social psychology course or read a book or whatever because if not you're at you're at the mercy of people who will use that social psychology technology to manipulate. You do the individual there. It's just like with plastic pollution right. It can't just be about reduce reuse. Recycle that's not how we're going to get rid of the problem. We have to see pressure on. I agree i agree. I just always think the system should be set up so that you don't have to protect yourself protect yourself right exactly. Yeah it's like yes you're right. Somebody's shouldn't be able to defraud you. But you know this is how you don't get defrauded because the system is not perfect and absolutely you gotta be a real in many ways you gotta be released. So you're saying if you give people a minimum amount of tools. That's certain that gets them. That gives them enough defense or help enough. It will help enough people to make a difference. How are they going to make a difference. But it won't be enough. It's just getting right like you might be as secure as possible. But there's always going to be a new a new hacker. Who's gonna do you in a way that you're never gonna be sophisticated enough to see coming. There's good online hygiene where you can minimize the chance of you getting fished or your identity stolen or whatever but that's not going to protect everybody and it's and you can't guarantee that you won't get exploited but if they're if built into the system there are protections of laws and whatever and that minimizes the chance even further. So i wouldn't tell people. Don't bother to protect yourself because it's not. It really shouldn't be on you. But i i would just say here's how you protect yourself but did we have to think about you. Know how regulations and laws could protect the maximum amount of people. The the idea that we are you know. Technology and society is getting so complicated. The idea that you can entirely protect yourself from any way that somebody might exploit. You is just unrealistic. It's absurd you know all right. I want what i wanna know is. Does jay have ten pounds of genetically engineered bacon and his future if he wants to probably cost of this. This does this go back to an inside joke that predates care. I think it does the bacon. yes it does. Tell me about the bacon. No something about me it was. It was the omega fish oil bacon. Yes omega three fatty bacon if they ever came out with bacon. That was a mega three fatty acids instead of horrible animal fat. Then i would ten pounds of it in one sitting right instead of having to take the fish oil pills or eat all that fish so it's eating ten pounds of bacon. That won't kill me. That's really what it's yeah. It sounds awesome now. This one won't help with that though it's not going to be healthier for you but it might not kill you if you have an allergy. And that's really the big takeaway here. We still don't know if it'll kill you if you have an allergy but we'll probably know soon so okay. Two days ago as of this recording december fourteenth the fda put out a news release that they have approved a first of its kind intentional genome alteration. That is a term that they use a lot intentional genetic alteration. I think it's their way to say. Gmo without freaking people out boy in a line of domestic pigs for both human food and for potential therapeutic uses now this sounds like holy crap. Wait what gmo pigs and we can eat them and we can make drugs out of them and it. It is pretty awesome but just earn for a second. What what we may not know or remember is that there are already. Gmo animal proteins for food and they're already gmo. Animal for therapeutic uses. Did you guys know though. Sure okay so you might not remember but in two thousand fifteen towards the end. A salmon was named the first gm animal. That was safe to eat. And i think this might have been the same salmon that i studied. When i worked for aljazeera. We did a story about. Yeah this chick. Salmon gene that went into the atlantic salmon. That may grow really fast. I think i was looking at one. With an ocean pout. Because it was in canada but similar thing it was basically a gene that was inserted that made them grow super fast. So you could. Their life cycles were shortened. So you had you know bigger turnover. We also had in two thousand fifteen. A gem chicken that was approved for medical use so we don't have any. Gm chicken eat but the egg whites from this chicken. We're used to make drugs we've also seen. Gm goats that make a drug out of their milk that helps reduce blood clots and actually one of the potential uses. I think for this new. Gm pig could be that as well so i think we often forget that although we are very biotechnologically advanced in many aspects of biomedical science. There's still a fair amount of drugs that require the utilization of animal products fair amount of drugs. But we have to do not just experimentation on animals but we need reservoirs to produce drugs themselves and so let's talk about this. Gm or as they're saying this pig steve. Had you heard this idea intentional alteration. Yeah from from what i gather. I feel like honestly this is just good marketing from. I think that's exactly what. And i love the name of these called gal safe. So let's see where. Where does that gal safe come from a from alpha gal syndrome this also ties back to a story that i'm sure we covered on the several years ago about meet allergies. You guys remember covering the story. Yeah people get bit by lone star. Tick they have an immune reaction. Were they basically. There's a surface sugar. It's called galactosyl alpha one three Lactose and for short it's called alpha gal and alpha gal when certain people are bit by this lone star tech will have like an intense immunoglobulin reaction and because of that carbohydrate it just it induces this reaction and unfortunately in some of those people later when they try to eat meat. They'll have an allergic reaction to that. Because of that immune system response now alpha gal found on all mammals the only mammals that don't have alpha gal weirdly apes humans in old world monkeys so our genetic lineage doesn't have alpha gal but every other mammal does and so if you want alpha gal safe food it means that you can't eat mammalian products so people with an alpha gal allergy. Aren't completely allergic to meet. they can still eat poultry. They can still eat fish and weirdly. In some cases they can eat super lean meats like venison apparently guess the alpha gal load is just very low in those mutes and it doesn't trigger a reaction but in some people they can't even eat those ungulates and it sucks right like smoke. Can you imagine you get bit by ticket. All you can eat meat. I mean maybe it's a good way to to go meat free like for the environment. And i can't think of i can't think of a scenario. Where would ever be beneficial by like really really were like man. I want to go vegan. Veg it's just been a goal of mine my home life and every time i try that bacon just comes to call it and then you get by the ticket now your book but honestly like not to make light. It's a pretty. It's a serious reaction for some people so kind of standard allergic reaction. It runs the gamut everything from high itchy skin swelling in the mouth wheezing shortness of breath all the to antef alexis right like potential death. Researchers at revive core inc have sought fda approval and received it for their gal safe pig so these pigs are just the same as the pigs that they came from except that they have been genetically modified not to include this gal surface shuker and so because they don't include gal they can't induce or alpha gal sorry they can't into induce alpha gal syndrome or at least that's the thought so the research so far that has led to fda approval does not have anything to do with whether or not alpha gal syndrome is induced. It's only about whether or not these. Pigs are safe environmentally and safe as a food source for the general population. So obviously there's more research to be done kind of the downstream. Hope with these pigs is they can be used as an alpha gal safe food source that they can also be used as an alpha gal safe medical source but before Those types of studies need fda approval or before those types of studies can can translate into into products that are available on the market. They they need to seek separate fda approval so this is the first step. The first step is we've we've done the research and we've shown that these alpha gal safe pigs can be eaten and have no negative health consequences. It's for all intents and purposes the exact same as eating any other Pig meat a and also. There are no downstream environmental effects of these alpha. Gal safe pigs. They're actually much more expensive to keep i think just because they're genetically modified pigs so the source material costs more so they're probably actually kept in better conditions and you see actually environmental positives downstream but the next steps are really interesting right like the food source might be basically a meatless meet which is pretty cool or meet allergy lists meet. I said that weird. And also there's an idea four potentially using them to grow tissues and organs that could address the problems in zeno transplant. So it's not uncommon that we have to use animal tissues for transplanted products in medical intervention. And unfortunately it does seem to be that alpha gal. Sugars are one of the causes of rejection and certain patients and so if we can utilize these pigs that don't have alpha gal. Then maybe we're going to have a potential breakthrough in the ability to to do tissue transplantation with a finally. The fda evaluation also showed that after multiple generations. The gal safe pigs still don't have the alpha gal sugars so it's a line that can be utilized again and again and again for research and eventually perhaps for commercial uses so you know the headlines are always like first of its kind and it's like yes it is technically the first of its kind because it's technically the first animal product that is both approved therapeutic uses and as human food but we already have human food approved. Gm we already have therapeutic. Approved animal gm. It's the first that does both we also still don't know yet if it is going to completely not induced allergic reaction in alpha gal patients. But there's good reason to believe that because there's nothing within the pig to induce the allergic reaction and we don't know what the future holds in terms of the types of medications or the types of therapeutics that could be developed with this but it's a really interesting new source for a lot of future research alpha gal. Sounds like a superhero name. I know alpha. Gal cracks me up every time i hear i'm like whoever named that is very creative and i love alpha gal working on the other one. I've been following is trying to develop genetically modified allergy free peanuts. Yeah yeah. I've been seeing a lot of that but that would be amazed. Haven't they haven't cracked that nut. Well just reading in two thousand fifteen. We're close you know but it just hasn't having crossed the finish line. Yeah and they may have some proteins. That are making it hypoallergenic. But you could still get an allergic reaction to it and it has so much to do with. Like how complicated is the allergy late. Cool thing about the alpha gal syndrome is that we know exactly. What's inducing one sugar. You knock out the sugar all the sudden. You're not going to have the allergies. So here's hoping that it actually turns out to really improve the lives of the people who are affected by both in terms of being able to receive therapeutics but also to be able to get that bacon. Yup absolutely okay ever and this is a quick one just going to give tell us what happened. When high abusir haya boozer abuser higher. Booster to to came back. Did it have samples from the asteroid or not. Yes it did. Oh who's item over all right this past monday. The japan aerospace exploration agency j. a. jackson. They made an extraordinary announcement. They successfully collected samples of gases and dust harvested from an asteroid and brought them safely back to earth. This is the world's first sample return of material in the gas state from deep state from deep space wo cool at sounds sort of basic in a way but at the same time fiercely complicated an amazing incredible achievement. That took place here so it was the high a booster too and it was launched december. Third two thousand fourteen and it met up with its target in june of two thousand eighteen. That's asteroid one six two one seven three ragu our way yuji. You were you gu. I used to love playing him. In street fighter right third. This is a near earth. Asteroid surveyed the asteroid for a year and a half and took the samples. How did it collect the samples. Well it fired an impacter boom into the asteroid at took place in february two thousand nineteen it created an artificial crater and that allowed the spacecraft to collect a sample from beneath the surface of the asteroid. Very very cool so after that. It took li it collected the sample. After a little more time it took leave of the asteroid that was in november of two thousand nine thousand nine but before the mission went on to continue into space while it was doing near earth fly by it jettison the container of samples and it felt her on december fifth and it came to rest in the australian desert fully intact. Thank goodness and they collected it Soon afterwards and already started doing tests on it and It's been tested there to laboratories that have done tests on it. The first laboratory on december seventh suggested that the guests differed from the atmospheric composition of the earth that way but basically their way of saying that the gas collected is not contaminated and they went for additional confirmation of this it was performed on december tenth and eleventh and that led to the same conclusion so they've released their press. Release the other day explaining that this was this was the result and there's also some bits in their little bits little particles which they didn't have too much to say about that. It's obviously all still new. They're still doing analysis but They're saying what they have. Here is definitely gas from deep space. Very cool cool. Yes mission accomplished now. They just have to do the analysis to see what it is so right that could take months before we see anything published or could take a while and they also are going to be distributing some of this material to various space organizations world. Yep and they'll run tests so we're gonna be learning. It'll unfold over this over the next several months. I'm certain if not years and came on the heels of cyrus meme. We talked about that a couple months ago. In which the us we're going to have those samples back in twenty twenty three and we have a. We'll be sharing some of those samples with japan sort of an exchange of the samples that they're going to share with nasa exchange there. Yeah and china just returned samples from the moon back from the chiang gay five suite so we can do it. The more you think about it. I think it lends more credence to the fact that when we start exploring places like mars. It's really going to be robots and animals and these sorts of technologies. Definitely gonna lead the way more more so. I think than humans and now that they have see successful missions. Why wouldn't you go that direction. Yeah we definitely robots are going to be leading the way anywhere we go and space no question absolutely all right j. It's that time all right steve. Last week i played this noisy. What do you guys think it is. Be window world down as you're driving down the highway. Who knows jay. It's a game we had when we were a kid where it had a helicopter attached to a An arm that would go around in a circle. You could pick up stuff. That's where it was not even close now. I'm writing. I'm like the i think it's creative right so we had. I got so many guesses. I got so many different guesses like you. Just can't list mobile the just cruise through some of them mir so listener named rob cook road ends at high jay. It sounds like wind so based on your hand. I'm going to get some someone recording themselves. Skydiving and i could actually see where rob's coming from with that. It's not correct. And i've i've heard people actually. I've heard audio from that. It's a lot more like wendy. I don't want this is more of a crunchy noise. I think for scrunching kind of contacting noise. Grunge jiang's crunchy crunchy covers right. That's the other guests from a listener named chris. Waas moore who is the husband of a former co worker of mine who happened to be a listener of the show and he emailed me. I thought it was really cool. He said i think the noisy is in another meter for measuring wind. Speed spinning up in a strong gale or hurricane force wind love the show. Thanks for providing two hours of saying news and thought provoking content every week cheers. Chris you guys know at meter is that winter in a monitor is probably a mamata win speech. It's a win measures. Wind speed is one of those things that spins cups or whatever and they spin around and tells you how fast winds blowing typically. They're paired with something that tells you the direction of the wind like a rooster. You know that is incorrect. And i liked it because i learned something which is always good but that one is not correct. I actually tried to find the sound of one of these devices. And i couldn't so i can't tell chris how right or wrong he was but chris. If you have a recording of one you know email me. And so. I can hear it because i want to hear it. That sounds like another one. Here is the last one before the reveal visco to of course he wrote in now remember. Vito said that he was gonna try to answer every single. Who's that noisy this year. And i think he did a cool so far. Yeah he's one away so he's done great. This year. vito said sounds like ice. Calvin calving reich. Having calving glacier having quite possibly from afford designed by s- lardy bar fast bob who is slurred on douglas adams he designed he designed all the coastlines. He's very good at fjords already. Barred fast. I think if i look this lardy bart bar. If i remember correctly they didn't. They find his signature in a glacier. Yeah but yeah. He's won awards so anyway. That's not correct. That is not correct. Another good guests here is the person who did not win but came the closest all right. There is no winner this week but became the closest gary record said ricard actually said hijab quite sure someone else has probably already now this one but this noisy sounds like a recording made while riding a sled down a snowy hill. How about them apples love. Gary came very close. This is not the sound of a sled scrunching snow underneath it. This is the sound of car tires. Scrunching snow while driving over fresh snow. Listen again all of you. That live in the north. You should know this it. Every single person that has driven in fresh snow has heard that noise if no excuse northern or southern and northern hemisphere bias. Come on also come from the north pole. Everybody knows that. So i picked this one because it's winter related item and because chris was coming and all the holiday season i figured people would have snow on the brain. We are getting fifteen inches tonight. Some of us in more ways than one. Thank you bye snowing three times. What is a weird. I put the around my driveway. And then my dog pull them all out and then i put him down again. You put steak down and you don't expect the dog go and eat the steak no safe over the edge of the driveway. And then he also i. Of course my dog also likes to eat every package like gets dropped off in the front of the house so we got a delivery box that nobody uses. They told us for tonight. They delivered something. I ordered for my wife and my daughter for christmas. Little like stocking stuffer type gift. I got them those little like rape alarms a little fob that you carry with you and all you have to do is pull the pin. And he gets like a flashy bright light in a loud siren. So i suppose it's well it's it's one hundred thirty. I think it's nice. It's free so we live in a world where people by other people rape alarms for stock so it was of course. They didn't drop it in the mailbox or in the delivery box. They dropped it on the front on the front step and my dog ripped it to shreds but he accidentally pulled one of the pins. Dog was getting raped. What has been aired the crap out of him which is great and then of course. We're inside the house. Like what is that noise. My wife noise sounds like an alarm and then then it hits me like the whole scenario instantly hit me ordered them they got delivered and say you can rip them optimal. Oh my god. What did this happen just tonight. Oh my god. Steve did blew the surprise. I had to pick them up off the front lawn. Steve remember when. I ordered something for those plastic clips. Yes and they. Mysteriously the package never showed up and then we found them strewn across across the lawn. Some of them were half eaten. Dog just goes for it. He anything that gets dropped off at the front of the house and says his toy. That's what the people are delivering toys. Dan that's awesome awesome his dog and my dog or best friend. Totally steve's new camera guys really know that for my phone for everything. We name he destroyed. Yeah all right so. I got new noisy this week. This was sent in by listener. Named ray ort or cloud or rt baby one. Oh okay so ignore all the other noises in the background like the wind and the guys some guy there. It's just moaning type of noise and want you tell me what it is. If you heard anything cool this week you can email me at the same address that you should email me if you know what that sound is what it is. The guy in the wind was something else going on here all right. That is steve's rape alarm in the front yard as sagan rips the pin out of like i always think of a grenade a grenade pin at pull it out in the long because it's a rape grenade. Oh my god the rape grenade email me at wwdc at sky guide dot org but j j. They have multiple uses one of the uses. You could make a trip wire in front of your door connected to the and then people trip it go through nice. That's true you play fallout four. You know what trip wires totally are. We gonna do one one email this week. This is a collective email. This is the most email topic. I think we've gotten over the last couple of weeks so a couple of weeks ago. We were talking about the news item about the archaeologist who claims to have found jesus house and the primary argument that it was the house of the biblical. Jesus was that the stonework was pretty good. You know and and jesus father was supposed to have been a craftsman and there you go so i thought that was a pretty pretty pretty thin argument and as an aside said. It's hard to claim that you've discovered the the house of someone that we don't even know if they actually existed or not and i just briefly mentioned the arguments there. The reason why i was. I thought i could just very quickly touch on that topic because we've already done a deep dive on it in the past. I don't expect everyone listening to the show to know our entire catalogue. You know. we're over. Eight hundred mention if we did do a deeper dive on that. But i have been doing a lot of reading on this. I've been engaged with a lot of email. Conversations with people emailed me by. I do want to update this topic of it. So the question is. What is the evidence for the history. The history of the jesus of the new testament. I wanna say a couple of things about that first of all if you have not done significant reading on this question you have no idea this is. This is a very very deep topic it really is and i. Just don't just advocating for a little bit of humility. You know this is the don't think you can read a quick one off about it and you have any idea what's going on. It's it's also a fascinating topic for me. Skeptical point of view. It's really extremely interesting. And many of the scholars involved in this discussion are using a lot of logic and techniques. Beijing analysis. A lot of things that we talk about as skeptic a a lot of skepticism in this topic. I recommend if you're interested in it to find some good sources and read about it but let me give you some some of the feedback that that that we re getting so the claim often is that if you look at just historians write to not theologians but historians looking at the historical question. Was jesus a historical figure that there is a strong consensus that the answer is almost definitely yes and so we can just take that as a given and again the point i was making two weeks ago. Which is still my position is that we cannot take that as a given. And i'm going to explain to you a little bit more detail why that is first of all i will push back on the notion that there is anything approaching a solid consensus on that question but i you have to recognize that there are a lot of theological historians in the mix here and so you really do have to consider them separately and and really only need to consider if you consider secular historians who are not coming at this from a strictly religious faith point of view which doesn't mean that they're atheists and and et cetera. Also say that this question is completely irrelevant to to. The position of atheism is not like atheists need for jesus to not have been a historical figure. It doesn't matter either way really. You'll understand more why that's the case in a moment but there isn't really a strong consensus. There is in fact a strong debate going on on this question among the secular historians and the question comes as a couple of ways to frame this question so first of all some of the scholars have said that the question of whether or not jesus was a historical figure is not really even the question that they're trying to answer. It's really just one. Sorta side question the real question. They're trying to answer with the his records that we have is. What is the origin of christianity. Where did christianity come from right. One possibility is that. Christianity came from a guy named jesus who had a ministry and he was the founder of christianity so the real question is was a historical jesus the founder of christianity versus some. Because if there wasn't a historical jesus then then he wasn't the founder of christianity therefore must have some other origin right. And then if if you think. There are other origins of the religion of christianity that are plausible or consistent with the historical record. Then the question is is the the character of jesus. Is that a mythologised historical figure or a historic sized mythological. Figure that so. Those are the two questions. What's the origin of christianity. And did we did the incarnation. You know the narrative incarnation literary incarnation of jesus. Is that that start as a historical person that then got a follow charged or did it start as a mythological concept that then got historic sized. Both of those things happen throughout history. So we know that the both of those processes you know have have occurred one of the people that i've been reading. I've read them. I've been read this guy a long time ago. But i just read more of his. Recent writings is richard carrier. Richard carrier is on the most myth assist end of the spectrum that jesus started as mythological creature and then was historic sized this. I really liked the way. This guy argues his writing. I find to be very humble. very skeptical. very logical does not overstate his claims or his case in basically saying we don't know that's really what he's saying is you. If you take an honest look at the evidence we actually have and what we can say with confidence. You cannot conclude cannot conclude that jesus was probably historical figure at best you conclude you can conclude that we really don't know that we're really uncertain but there are a says here. Are the best arguments for here. Are the best arguments against the acknowledges which arguments for the history of jesus are valid or legitimate when they may be sure may not be true etc. But there's a sort of rereading a lot of this recently learned. Some new things reminded me of things which are important so to show you how much we don't know right so first of all like you address. The question is how do we know if character from you know from legend is historical or not one question that you anticipate is ask is are there any contemporary documents. Right is any contemporary reference to the character from the time period that they were supposed to have been alive and you. Do you guys know what the answer is for. Jesus i probably no no. You don't know where the answer is now. I think the answer is no. There was not a single reference to jesus that his contemporaries not a single eyewitness jesus that wrote contemporary and jesus wrote nothing we have no writings of jesus but they describe him writing in the sand in the gospels. I believe yeah but we have both so one of the arguments against the history of jesus is the argument from silence. We have a lot of records from that time If this is somebody who started religion you would think there might have been some mention of him. It's not a slam dunk. One notch on the he. Probably you could argue that he may not have existed because there was no contemporary mention of him. Do any of you guys know what the first the oldest documents referring to. Jesus are so. We're the oldest christian documents that we have. I hundred years later. So do you know what they are. So what what are the the right hospitals. It's the gospels for the second that was basically a generation leader gospel before the gospels. As would so there's something before that note there. The letters of paul for letters of paul got the first historically oldest actual references. We have to jesus. And so if you read paul that is the perhaps the best. We could argue the best window. We have into the origins of christianity game. And that's really the question here. How did this whole religion begin. And so paul never met jesus while he was alive right makes no mention of it. So how does paul portray jesus in. If we look only at his writings he entirely refers to jesus as a spiritual being entirely. He makes not only did he not know him when he was alive. He doesn't make any reference to the living. Jesus not a single reference. Jesus is one hundred percent a spiritual being in paul's writings so that's the first generation. After the time period of the that jesus was supposed to be alive it does. It's not until the gospels which is a full generation later that there are stories which talk about jesus a living being. How did paul get his pulse. Source of information about the spiritual. Jesus lsd spas tirelessly. It's entirely through revelation through visions. Oh okay so. I'm not that wrong entirely visions so not guys like me a comedian. Yeah the guys like a medium speaking to a a mythological spiritual being and that's it there's no mention of ever being alive now there are some there are some sort of phrases that paul uses that people use to argue. He wouldn't have said that if jesus was never alive. But they're all problematic none of them are slam dunk. So carrier uses a lot of logic. That's basin he says all right if we look at all of the people throughout history including religions all of the figures right that have the same kind of characteristics that jesus has they were said to be divined they were said to have risen from the dead right blah blah blah that fits sort of the narrative role that jesus does how many of them were mythological and how many of them were historical and almost all of them are mitha logical and so he's just from out of the gate from just a higher probability figures like jesus are mythological. Almost always and so. That's not a bad starting point. And is there anything that reverses that that would say there's enough evidence to conclude that he was actually a living person and they're really really isn't you can't rule out that there wasn't you know a of jesus figure that started the christian christian faith although it's not necessary because you you can make a reasonable argument was started by peter james and john they. They were the ones who started christianity. Paul then his his he was basically on a mission to craft it into a certain philosophy. There were many christian sects at the same time. Essentially it started as a jewish sect. Paul is the one that made it a non jewish sect and then but there were many other christian sects the same time then what happened around two hundred years like a day right when the when the the the catholic christian church was gaining power. They are the first ones to really decide that every christian sect other than them was heresy and they started wiping out all of the references. That were not canonical. And then when the roman empire adopted their form of christianity as their official religion they had the power of law to to decide that everything else was heresy and destroy it systematically and so we we basically have a very sanitized record of just this one sect of christianity and in fact some scholars argue that the original sect of christianity which was jewish died out and that this one. This paul's version survived while thirty other one survived as well but they were all then systematically eradicated however we have some recovered evidence from it. This is the the mastic gospels that the gospel according to remember the gospel going to to judas the caught the the gospel according to truth is another one and these paint completely different pictures of who jesus was and what happened so the versions of the person jesus that we have are completely different and contradictory. We are completely different. Mythological conceptions of what jesus was there are some very eastern conceptions some very jewish conceptions and then the one that ended up being the canonical christian conception even the very fundamental things like was he divine all fundamental questions. There are there are. There's many different permutations were floating around at that time. Have hindsight bias that we think of quote unquote christianity as the one that one survived and declared all others. Heresy the other main line of argument and got pushback for not bringing this up so bringing up quickly here is that there are secular references to jesus as a person like josephus. Tacitus are the two big ones but with the scholars argue is that these were completely unreliable. Sources they were not contemporary. They were not eyewitness and they were basically hearsay after christianity already existed as sect and essentially. They were just reporting what those christians were saying and so they are zero historical value in terms of addressing. This question yes. There are different interpretations of all this. It's horrifically complicated again. I'm not saying this is what we know where this is. The way is absolutely true. It's possible that that somebody named jesus rockin around two thousand years ago but it's also possible that there wasn't and we really don't know and there isn't a this consensus that people refer to. It really is just a way of trying to shutdown debate. In my opinion. That's what it sounds like but guys. This is such a fascinating story. It really is just trying to reconstruct this. We could analogize the formation of the christian religion with the formation of the mormon religion right and that analogy. Paul is joseph smith and jesus jesus is ny and nobody yeah. Nobody thinks that. I is a historical living person. Right right it's clearly. Mythological being but that relationship is actually almost identical to relationship between paul and jesus who saw him envisions and never referred to him as an actual living breathing person. You know right. But what i it could work both ways the points that you could make it work both ways the other point that multiple scholars make at either end of the spectrum. Whether you're at the historic assist and or the mythologised end. They both say what we're talking about here has nothing to do with the gospel. Jesus right the gospel. Jesus meaning the person who was born a virgin birth who had a ministry who did miracles. Who was crucified right. No secular historian is saying that that gospel jesus existed. That's not even up for debate. That's not the question from a historic historical point of view. It's just more just. The founder of the christianity was the founder of christianity. The person jesus who had a ministry. Or was it the peter james and john and then and then paul with the founders of this christian sect again keeping in mind there were many other christian sects so there is no historical evidence based logical argument. You could make for the gospel. Jesus having existed or being a historical thing. That's that's not even on the yet. Yeah and again. I always like to emphasize this has nothing to do with faith right. You could believe whatever you want to believe. We're not attacking anybody's faith. I'm just. I'm addressing the premise that from a historical point of view that people say there's a consensus that jesus was a historical figure. And i'm saying that's not true. There isn't a consensus and quite honestly. I find the arguments at the other end of the spectrum far more logical in compelling than the ones at the extreme historic suspended a spectrum although unwilling to admit. It's all possible and we don't know scratch that edge. Good steve. y'all yeah. I scratch that. It's real good real deep all right. Let's go on with science fiction time for science all fiction each week. I come up with three five items quarterbacks to feel and think i challenged my panelists kept to tell me which one is the thing. Just three news items this week. You guys ready. Yes all right here. We go item number. One neuroscientist find that reading. Computer code heavily involves language processing areas of the brain and is therefore similar to a language are never to a study of the most distant known object in the universe galaxy g. n. z. Eleven which is thirteen point. Four billion light years from earth contains heavier elements which means there are older galaxies. Still and number three astronomers report the first possible radio signal coming from an exit planet. Jego go. I did this. First one neuroscientist find that reading. Computer code heavily involves language processing areas of the brain. So they're saying it's similar to language. The thing is coming from software background. It's i wish. I knew other languages other than english because i could well but i do know that the way that we string the thoughts together even though that order can change computer language does have a way of bringing things together However it's very different. I think than language man. That's a tough one. I mean it is a way of communication has a repeat. You're very repetitive languages. And there's lots of similar elements. I mean yeah. I see that there's some something to it that say that one is a definite maybe not on my list next one study of the most distant known object in the universe which is galaxy. Gnc eleven which is thirteen point. Four billion light years from earth contains heavier elements which means there are older galaxies. Still do you understand that. So in other words as old as this thing is it must be things even older. Because this can't be the first galaxy or the stars and it cannot be the first stars because it contains heavier elements from older stars. A ha- understood. Yeah that makes sense. I thought we did find the oldest galaxy though and the farthest did this is a zeal. Okay that one's on my probably fiction. Let's go last one. Astronomers report the first possible radio signal coming from an exit planet. A radio signal that crazy you know for a planet some some type of thing that is is sending a radio signal. It's basically just you know the the spectrum of light so that doesn't mean that some device created it could be a phenomenon that created. That's i think more likely. I think the second one here about the gnc eleven. That's the fake okay care. Oh gosh okay so j you think that. It's not weird for a radio signal to come from an exo planet. I i have no idea. So i'm going to say bocquet so it's going to be between the other two so basically you're saying with this the farthest away object which is this galaxy based on its composition. It makes us believe there's probably things that are even older than it. Even though that's the farthest away that we have detected so there could be farther away things that are older or there could be older things that are closer for reasons. I do not understand but it seems possible. I feel like a lot of things are very possible with cosmology. Reading computer code involves language processing areas and is therefore similar to language. It involves them. I know you didn't write the word but do you mean like mostly or heavily heavily involves language processing. Oh you're right you're right. I didn't even see it. Okay cool it. Heavily involves language. No man i think computer code process more like math than language. I don't know it's like all the things we know about neuro linguistics like like everything that we learned over so long about how we process language and inherent rules of language and how we develop them and iterating them from the time. We're really young computer. Code just doesn't fit any of those concepts. I know we use the word language when we talk about computer languages. But i think that's the most similar thing to it. It just doesn't have all the same syntactical rules. So i don't know this one. It's weird with me. So i think i'm going to have to say that. This one's the fiction who frequent galaxy. One is science or not but this one. I don't like this one so The the language code is the fiction for me. Okay evan okay. Bob was worth a shot. I guess i'll go in reverse order because okay the first possible radio possible radio signal coming from an extra plant that means what has yet to be confirmed so that i think that follow up confirmation but i think that opens this one to being science. Because you know there's still working it out figure out and get it. You know validated. And yeah i think of radio signals to happen in nature so i i don't think that one's that's cool. I'm glad they're able to detect it. Because you know we want we want we want transmission of i love lucy from whatever planet or the equivalent Was the futurama episode by the way about television. Signals and faraway planets. But i digress. I digress the second one about the okay distant the most distant object. Okay thirteen point bill. Four billion my last understanding is that the universe the best guesses what thirteen point seven three billion years old. So that means you got about three hundred thousand years there between big bang and this object which means that a galaxy would have had to what come into existence and explode to make the in go supernova million to within three hundred million. thanks bob. Hey that helps a lot. That makes this thousand times more plausible. Wouldn't that matt and so. Yeah okay yeah three hundred thousand. I was going to say no but three hundred million shore said anything. I think that one works. That means that leaves the one i know nothing about. I don't know about computer language. Computer code none of it processing areas of the brain. I was kinda thinking what kerry was thinking. It was math so that was kind of all. I was hanging my head on math more than language. So i guess. I'll go that route and say that neurosis the language processing areas of the brain. That one's fiction and pop start with three. Yeah at first blush. A radio signal from an extra planet is crazy exciting. But then i think yeah it. It could be natural. I mean it's not. It's an extra plan. It's not a star but i think there's almost definitely natural ways to produce rather than some technology for some creatures which would be amazing But probably not see The second one here. Yeah the The most distant galaxy that we know of thirteen point four billion years. I just don't know why the galaxy could not be old enough to have already had multiple generations of stars that created the heavier elements and And bombarded the newer stars helped create the newer stars or help see them i mean after all supernova stars at our big supernova. They don't live that long one hundred on the order of hundreds of billions of years. So i don't know why that wouldn't be. But yeah i there's no way. I don't think we're quite ready to say. This is the first galaxy. So i also have to be. You know not the first galaxy at all so so that would make sense from multiple angles. Yeah the first one. Yeah i agree with cara and avenue. This is more like a logical progression rather than you know a language. Coding does not done some coding and definitely does not strike me as a as a language language. So i'll say that one's fiction all right so we'll start with the third ones that you all agree on that one. Astronomers report the first possible radio signal coming from an exit planet. You all think this one is science. And i guess the question is is it the first. Maybe oh shit that there's a radio signal coming from an threat but this is the first time we've discovered that and this one is science this. I never heard of that. Yeah so this is coming from the system in tau bootees. It's not it's who owed at my one of my dear friends at our entire dissertation on. She called tau booty. I joke astronomy. Protecion guide pronounced tabu. Ot's not boots. And not. Booties specific interesting. Yeah she was taboo speed. What kind of planets. St what kind of exoplanet. That's a good question. What do you think would be well. My hope would be that it would be a rocky or earth like planet probably was probably like a gas giant class one. Jeez yeah cool. So probably has its own magnetic field. That's strong enough that rating the radio signal minister is not far away. It's like fifty one year so it was pretty close. Damn that's the first one. I was a little surprised that that was the first. But it's not common for exoplanets to be radio sources themselves and i say possible because they haven't fully confirmed it and right. It's not the firms that they're picking up a radio signal. What they haven't they have to confirm is that it's not coming from the star right to stars in a system that is coming from the planet and not one of the two stars or the microwave oven in the cafeteria. Let's go back to number two study of the most known object in the universe galaxy. Gnc eleven which is thirteen point. Four billion light years earth contains heavier elements which means there are older galaxies. Still j you one is a everyone else thinks science. So did you say how old the galaxy is they. I mean the universe. The universe is how old thirteen seven thirteen point. Seven seven seven seven seven so that would mean this was existing three point seven three or three hundred seventy million years after the formation of the universe. And it's the oldest thing that we've seen so the question is the oldest thing that we've seen because it is the oldest or is there something even older that we're not saying probably what they did was they did spectra graphic analysis of the light coming from from this distant galaxy and they found heavier elements. So this one is a lot of population to ours. Stars free this is. This can't be the oldest thing there has got to be something. You've been a little one hundred million years old or something. Yeah so this and so this is you know this study. The point of it was to learn more about the very very early universe so that we know at three hundred seventy million years after the big bang there already was second generation stars. It tells us something about how long it took for the very per starts to form and this. This analysis was done using observations from the keck. One telescope in mount acacia in hawaii. All right. let's go back to number one. Neuroscientist find that reading. Computer code heavily involves language processing areas of the brain and is therefore similar to language. J. thought this one was the science science but this one is the fiction and care basically nail that math. How math yeah. It's it does not. In fact with the study showed is that there was almost no activation of language areas. Wow language processing at all but it uses rice hearts of the brain that are involved with math and problem solving method pressure. But i'm actually surprised like no language simply for the visual the character so it was. It was very little you just. It wasn't involving language processing to any significant degree. But that one could have been tricky. Because yeah we call them. J. kind of went through the logic goes. I was hoping that would say well. Yeah it's kind of like your reading language and it was tricky when you think about like if you ask that question is it. Are you using language processing to read computer code or using math. you know. it's an interesting question. That's why they did the study right. They were trying to. They didn't know the answer. They were trying to figure it out but it clearly showed that. It's it's math in problem solving not actual language so evan as their yes hi i time i m okay. We got the need to reduce. Dissonance is a universal mental mechanism. But that does not mean we are doomed to be controlled by human beings may not be eager to change but we have the ability to change and the fact that many of our self protective delusions and blind spots are built into the way the brain works is no justification for not trying carol tavarez from my book a stakes were made but not by me why we justify foolish beliefs bad decisions and hurtful acts. Yep cow taveres is awesome. Yeah asked she writes very well so this is the last episode. That will come out before christmas but with christmas coming. Oh so there. You go in and next week's episode will come out on december twenty six. The day after christmas was that will be our year end review episode or boy and we will. We will not be doing a friday livestream on the twenty fifth. You know we'll be busy right. We will be doing a friday livestream on january first however so just missed that one week all right guys will thank you all for joining me. This week chairman. He's and until next week. This is your skeptics guide to the universe skeptics guide to the universe is produced by s productions dedicated to science and critical thinking for more information. Visit us at the skeptic skied dot or send your questions to info at the skeptics guy dot org and if you would like to support the show all the work that we do go to patriotdepot dot com slash skeptics guide and considered becoming a patron and becoming part of the sat you community our listeners and supporters. What makes possible.

cbo nsf allergy bob puerto rico fda Stephen bella cara santa maria Hattie j novella evan bernstein Wolman Eric cbo Dekom moniquet
The Hashimotos Disease and SIBO Connection

The Dr. Hedberg Show

25:12 min | 2 years ago

The Hashimotos Disease and SIBO Connection

"<music> welcome to the doctor Hedberg show for cutting edge practical health information for the latest articles videos and pod cap visit Dr Hedberg Dot Com. That's D. R. H.. E. B. E. R. G. DOT COM. The information in this show is intended for educational purposes only always consult your healthcare professional before attempting anything recommended in this program and now here's Doctor Hedberg yeah well welcome everyone to the doctor Hedberg show Biz doctor Hedberg and this episode. I'm going to be talking about the Hashimoto's disease and CBO connection so CBO is small all intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Basically what happens is there's migration of the bacteria in the large intestine into the small intestines. Normally you have twice as much bacteria in the large intestine as you have in the small intestine so there's fewer bacteria in the upper G._i.. Normally in CBO it it Kinda reverses so you have twice as much bacteria in the small intestine the upper G._I.. As the lower G._i.. In the large intestine so there is a there's not a lot of literature on this. There's a few papers tapers that connect hypothyroidism and Hashimoto's disease and CBO so I'm going to cover those today so the first paper is and by the way I'm seeing more and more CBO just as time goes by more and more and more patients were coming in with CBO and and they also have Hashimoto's disease hypothyroidism so CBO is is I would say very popular right now. <hes> a lot of people are finding out that they have it and a lot of them also have Hashimoto's disease and hypothyroidism and sometimes they don't know they have one or they have the other and they can't figure out why they're not getting well. So this first paper is called association between hypothyroidism and CBO This was in the journal of clinical endocrinology algae metabolism and so the authors talk about CBO. You know it's like I said it's an overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine and this damages the Gut Wall and that leads to manage organ of nutrients. It's so you'll have like low iron and zinc and protein deficiencies and things like that so the the main signs of CBO that you might have it or bloating seelig bloating reloading all the time or bloating after meals abdominal pain cramping a lot of gas weight loss and then you can have either a diarrhea dominancy bow or a constipation dominant CBO or you can have actually a mixed CBA. Were you have alternating constipation and diarrhea so about sixty percent of the people with I._B._S.. which is irritable? Bowel Syndrome have CBO. Oh and that's what's actually causing the I._B._S.. So those two are intimately connected as well so the main causes of CBO. So why would you get this are hypothyroidism a a proton pump inhibitors aunt acid so if you've been on any of those for a long time you're at increased risk he local b-actor Pylori infections autoimmune diseases malnutrition immune dysfunction. Function <hes> if you have any head traumas like history of head trauma concussions that can cause it anything that can decrease gut motilal ability so basically <hes> CBO is an issue of impaired Gut Motilal so the food is not able to move through the gut like normally should so it's very slow and the bacteria Syria back get backed up and they ferment the food that is you're sitting there not moving through the gut and that's how they over grow so if you've had any gut surgeries like appendix removal or your gallbladder removed or anything like that that can leave some scar tissue adhesions in the bowels that can lead to CBO and he kind of metabolic issue with your blood sugar adrenals thyroid and then if you have any muscle or nerve illnesses so those are the main causes of CBO and then also if you have a history of taking a lot of antibiotics as a kid and throughout your life <hes> that can lead to CBO I would also add birth control pills and their if you've been on birth control for a long time that can lead to CBO so a lot of potential causes there that you're <hes> functional medicine doctor will do the detective work figure out which one one of those it is so we know that thyroid hormone especially T. three is involved in the proper movement of food through the intestines and that's called Paris doses so if you're T- three levels are low or the t three is not able to work in the cell because you're fair ten is low or your zinc deficient or if you're under a lot of stress and things like that then your parasol sus will slow down and so for example those with hyperthyroidism graves disease. They tend to have diarrhea because there's so much T. three driving the food through the bowels and then of course those with hypothyroidism tend to be constipated because there's not enough thyroid hormone. The bowels get sluggish so it's a very common common symptom so this in this study the authors wanted to answer three questions number one is hypothyroidism associated with <music> Sasebo number two how does treatment of CBO affect those with hypothyroidism and the number three the CBO actually affect thyroid hormone levels so we had fifty patients nations with hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's disease so they all had Hashimoto's and that caused their hypothyroid. They checked T._S._A.. CH- free t four free t three thyroid peroxidase and antiviral viral globulin antibodies so they considered hypothyroidism T._S._A.. Above two point eight so that was actually kinda surprising because most studies use a higher cutoff point for T._S._A.. It usually around four or four point five so that was good to see we want to yes h between point five and two point five and most people so they're actually pretty close here and then they also considered people hypothyroid if they had low free t four and Free T. three and that was also surprising because you're lucky now to get a free four from your doctor and is next to near impossible to get a free t three as well so the thyroid antibody levels were elevated and thyroid ultrasounds were done and the ultrasounds of the thyroid shows tissue tissue changes in the thyroid gland and that's a normal all diagnostic signed for Hashimoto's disease so they gave the patients t. four which nor actually normalized their thyroid function in about two to six months before starting. The study so they began by giving them prescription thyroid hormone and getting their numbers looking good so the good news is that there was a control group of forty healthy volunteers and remember with what if you WanNa really strong study you have to have a control group and that increases the validity of the study so they did a glucose breath test <hes> and that's what I use as well to <hes> diagnose CBO so basically you drink a glucose solution in the morning on an empty stomach and then you blow into tubes every twenty twenty minutes for a few hours and that measures the amount of gas that the bacteria are producing in your gut so they measure hydrogen and methane gas so every patient who tested positive positive for CBO was then actually treated with a antibiotic reacts Amon for Seven Days and reflects Amon is the most effective antibiotic for CBO so then they repeated the glucose breath test one month after the antibiotic treatment to see if they had eradicated the CBO thyroid hormone levels were tested in the beginning and one one month after the antibiotic treatment and then one month after the initial evaluation and those who actually didn't have CBO so they measured their hormones and those who did have CBO and those who didn't and then the patients filled out this questionnaire before and after treatment about you know abdominal pain bloating gas constipation diarrhea so these are the results so twenty seven patients so this was fifty four percent of the group that tested positive for CBO compared to only two in the control group so that was definitely statistically significant so about half half of the subjects with Hashimoto's and hypothyroidism tested positive for CBO so that's a really high percentage there was no significant association found between the presence of CBO and age of hypothyroidism diagnosis or then matter how long they had it and the t four dose that they were taking that didn't matter either the most common. I'm an symptoms they reported and those who had CBO were abdominal discomfort gas and bloating and there was really no significance however related to constipation or diarrhea okay so nineteen out of the twenty seven patients remember twenty seven patients tested positive for CBO so nineteen of them. That's about seventy percent who were treated with antibiotics. -Biotics four CBO tested negative for CBO after a month so the real facts men was effective in seventy percent of those people so those nineteen people who were successfully successfully treated with refraction men four CBO did report significant improvements in their bowel symptoms so they had less abdominal discomfort less bloating and less gas but there actually weren't any changes in their constipation or their diarrhea interestingly enough and then none of the symptoms improved in the eight patients who were unsuccessful be treated for CBO with antibiotics. Antibiotics so that all makes sense the daily dose of t four was similar among all patients regardless of how they responded to antibiotic therapy for CBO and the thyroid the hormone levels were similar to those who tested negative for CBO so the the author discussion basically says that the authors did it conclude that hypothyroidism awesome do to Hashimoto's disease is definitely a risk factor for CBO development and so their hypothesis is that insufficient thyroid hormone levels leads to decreased gun motilal eighty and that leads to insufficient clearance of bacteria from the small intestine so the patients with CBO did not require extra thyroid hormone that indicated that any Mala L. absorption caused by CBO didn't affect their T. four dosing actually and those who were treated successfully for the CBO did not show any changes in their thyroid hormones so we weren't given actually their thyroid antibody levels before and after CBO treatment and that would have been interesting to see I would I would guess that those levels went down and in the people that had CBO and were successfully treated so very strong study <hes> there are a few other ones out there that I linked to on Dr Hedberg Dot Com and there's let's see I linked to one two three four more studies that do connect hypothyroidism with CBO so it's it's is a pretty simplistic mechanism. Actually your hypothyroid you have low thyroid hormone levels thyroid hormone drives the movement of food through the GUT and so if you're low and thyroid that slows down everything backs up and you get CBO now the second paper that I cover. I can't actually cover the whole paper because it's only written written in Polish. I reached out to some people I know who who speak Polish. I was unable to get a translation so all I can do is give you the abstract information and <hes> a table that I could view in the actual paper so the paper is Auto Poland. It's called Fire Roy dysfunction in patients with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and so they say that Cbo uh-huh similarly as thyroid diseases is characterized by chronic diarrhea or constipation but it's not known whether there's a causal relationship between these disorders. The aim of this study was to assess thyroid function and in different clinical forms of CBO so we had thirty four patients with diarrhea dominant CBO thirty patients with constipation dominant CBO and then thirty thirty healthy subjects so again. This is a good study because we had a control group so the CBO was assessed with lacked Yalo's breath testing and so you can use glucose or lack yellows four CBO tests they also measured T._S._e.. H Free T four Free T. Three and T. P. O. Antibodies and so I'll summarize summarize have a table that I made <hes> on this particular article on Dr Hedberg Dot Com if you WANNA look at it and so the diarrhea dominant CBO. uh-huh Group there T. S. H. was around two point five and then the constipation dominant CBO group there T. S. H. was around three point eight so that makes sense because the constipation <hes>. I think that those people are probably more hypothyroid than the diarrhea dominant CBO cases because the Free T. four and the Free T. three were also lower in the constipation dominancy and CBO group than the diarrhea dominant CBO group and also the T- Peo- antibody levels were higher in the constipation group then the CBO dom than the Diarrhea Korea dominance CBO group so they conclude that thyroid function may be impaired in patients with CBO which should be taken into account and the diagnostic and therapeutic management judgment of the diseases of these organs so there wasn't a lot going on in the study is they don't treat the CBO or anything like that they just compared the thyroid of blood tests <music> the hormone levels and the antibodies among the groups compared to the control group and so the Control Group numbers were actually very very similar to do the diarrhea dominant CBO group so actually not much difference there but the constipation dominant CBO grew their numbers were much worse than the control group and the diarrhea dominant CBO bow grew now methane gas is produced by bacteria in the gut and that's most likely to result in a constipation dominant CBO whereas hydrogen gas is more likely to cause the diarrhea dominant CBO group so if you're methane dominant CBO it is more difficult to treat those patients who have methane producing bacteria and constipation those with high hydrogen levels and diarrhea dominant CBO. Those people are much easier to treat and to get rid of their CBO Abo- so as you can see from these these studies and the one that I just talked about from Poland <hes> the G._P._O.. Antibody levels they are statistically significant skin compared to the control group so there does appear to be a connection in this study with Hashimoto's and CBO but remember they're not really clinically significant since there well they were well below the five hundred mark they were only around ninety four and these subjects so I really am not surprised the constipation dominant CBO group they had higher <hes> thyroid antibody levels and their thyroid hormone levels were worse than the other two so as you can see these are these are some decent studies. There's a fair amount of information here in these studies and previous studies that I linked to so I think we we can conclude at this point that there's definitely a connection between CBO Hashimoto's disease and hypothyroidism now the CBA 'cause harshly motives odors and hypothyroidism or does Hashimoto's and I both Arabism 'cause Cbo the answer is that it can be both possibilities so you can get CBO for a number of reasons. And other than hypothyroidism you can get it from all the things I mentioned before like head trauma major stress and acids <hes> blood sugar issues way too many the antibiotics you know all the things that I mentioned before so you can get CBO for reasons other than Hashi motives and hypothyroidism so you could start with that and then also develop Hashi Motorcyle hypothyroidism because of the CBO <hes> because the CBO damages the gut lining and we know that if you have abnormal gut function in a damaged intestinal barrier you're you're more likely to develop an auto immune condition. That's one of the three things you have to have to develop Hashimoto's so to get Hashimoto's. You have to have three things number. One is a genetic predisposition number. Two is a gut issue number three is some sort of trigger and that's usually an infection like a virus or bacteria or like a major traumatic stressful events or a toxin like mercury anything in the environment <hes> or infection or trauma that really hammers the immune system and <hes> triggers the auto immunity so CBO Zebo can cause that second aspect the gut issue and lead to Hashimoto's disease and then vice versa you could start with harshly motives these hypothyroidism and that leads to sluggish wjr bowels and then that can lead to Cbo so what you really need to understand is that if you have harsh motives these hypothyroidism and you have any of those symptoms that I mentioned four CBO is probably league good idea to get a CBO test and be evaluated now. It's really important that you work with someone who understands CBO <hes> it takes a lot of education to understand Dan CBO. I've been to all the <hes> the major CBO conferences and I've read all the research on that and like I said in the beginning I'm just seeing more and more and more CBO so I'm pretty well versed in it and of course <hes> as well as Hashi motives disease <hes> but you definitely want to work with someone who has a lot of experience with CBO because it is a difficult condition in a lot of people people and sometimes it takes a lot of trial and error to get the right <hes> supplements and diet down to treat it and overcome it in another important point is that two thirds of the cases Sasebo end up relapsing so people get treated and then three months six months a year later the CBA comes back and that's because the reason for the CBO was not I was not actually identified and <hes> treated in the first place so it's important that if you have CBO you don't just treat it with herbal antibiotics or her <hes> prescription antibiotics or all the other things that are done for CBO and then expect it to stay that way you wanna be sure that you evaluate all the reasons why you may have developed CBO in the first place and get corrected and that could be Hachimoto disease and hypothyroidism so if you go to Dr Hedberg Dot com I have the the table that I mentioned and I have the breakdown of these studies. If you wanna I read them I linked to those but very very strong connection and <hes> I think the literature is clear here all right. This is Dr Hedberg. Take care and we'll talk to you next time.

CBO Dan CBO hypothyroidism Hashimoto Dr Hedberg Dot Com constipation chronic diarrhea Doctor Hedberg bloating Hedberg E. B. E. R. Dr Hedberg Dot overgrowth abdominal pain journal of clinical endocrinol
The Bi-Phasic SIBO Diet with Dr. Nirala Jacobi

The Dr. Hedberg Show

42:31 min | 1 year ago

The Bi-Phasic SIBO Diet with Dr. Nirala Jacobi

"Welcome to the Doctor. Hedberg show for cutting edge practical health information for the latest articles videos and podcasts visit Dr Hedberg Dot Com. That's D R H. E. D. B. E. R. G. DOT COM. The information in this show is intended for educational purposes only always consult your healthcare professional before attempting anything recommended in this program and now here's doctor. Hedberg talk well. Welcome everyone to Functional Medicine Research on Dr Hedberg and really excited today to have Dr Neurology. Jacoby on the show. Dr Jacoby is a or certified naturopathic physician graduated from last year. Nineteen Ninety eight and practice primary care in Montana for seven years for Rivington Australia. She's one of Australia's leading experts in the treatment of CBO which are going to be talking about today and she's also the medical director for CBO test and that's an online testing service for practitioners. She's very passionate about educating practitioners So much so that she founded the CBO doctor. This is an online professional education platform for functional digestive disorders. She lectures nationally and internationally about the assessment and treatment of CBO. And she's the host of the popular podcast which I listened to. It's called the CBO Dr Podcast. And she's the medical director and senior naturopathic physician at the Bio Clinic Center for Functional Digestive Disorders in New South. Wales she's one of the CO founders of the Australian naturopathic summit Zeh biennial event that aims to promote and showcase the art and science of naturopathic medicine and Australia. She's also a member of the gastroenterology association of naturopathic physicians and the Natural Path and Herbalist Association of Australia. So Dr Jacoby. Thanks for coming on. Thanks for having me great. So we'll be focusing a lot today on treatment and approaches to CBO. Let's go ahead and begin with your by phase Etxeberria Diet. This is something that I've used in practice for years now as very very effective. So why don't you walk us through the by phase ICK Diet and why you created this for people with CBO well first of all? Thanks for that introduction. End To let me know that it's working so well for you because it's always wonderful for me to hear from successful practitioners like yourself that it is indeed over the useful tool that. I've created so that's really good for me to hear so the by Diet came about him biggest ultimately I needed a little bit more I as a practitioner I wanted to give more structure to a dietary approach rather than just this sort of spectrum of foods some of which you should avoid at some of which you shouldn't avoid which is of course the fought map diet and also what I found. Is that many people that were unfought map. Menashe Fahd map diet still had symptoms of CBO. So what I wanted to do was structured in use the CBO specific food guide. Which is from Dr Alison Becker? Which is based on the fog map diet as well as says. Cbo specific. Sorry the a CD the specific carbohydrate diet and so what I wanted to do is take all of that information and put it in a format that allows practitioners to structure that treatment approach and so basically phase one is. The is what six weeks long depends on the practitioner. How long they want to extend that diet? But typically four to six weeks and really. It's about reducing pretty much any fermentable food which is which includes grains and potatoes and all of the vegetables that we know that our fermentable and the idea was we do this before we actually start antimicrobials so the aim was to reduce bacterial from tation. So that when we do introduce the antimicrobials they won't be such a tremendous dial and then phase. Two is a little bit more generous where we start to see the reintroduction of certain grains and potatoes and so forth so really it. It helped me not just a structure the Diet but also the treatment in terms of what supplement. I wanted to use during which as so. That people weren't leaving with twenty different products per visit. So that really was the inception for me of the Zeke Diet in what's come out of that is also now the newly added a vegetarian version. In what we wanted to I co authored with an Kreiner was a natural path. Here as well as a nutritionist. And we wanted to not just take them. Meet out of the BICYC- guy. We really wanted to offer a lot. More to our vegetarians and vegans. So that's also an a good adjunct to the regular BICYC- died if people don't want to eat that much meat. So and then thirdly we have the last part of the collection the by basic diet which is the Histamine CBO by as a guy because I found a lot of people were very histamine intolerance. So that's sort of has now evolved into these three different types of diets excellent so that I four. Six weeks were removing many foods. That are pro. Inflammatory that can ferment of very easily by the bacteria and That's going to reduce a lot of their symptoms and inflammation as any other anything. You WanNa add there. As far as why? You're removing those foods in that initial period. Yeah and as many practitioners know when when you first see a patient where you don't know if it's CBO you don't know if it's me bald or large intestine bacterial overgrowth or C. Which is small intestine fungal overgrowth or any of the myriad of other functional issues that we face when we see a patient that ultimately has some form of IBS or dysfunction. That's a functional in origin. So what I did was the first part of the Diet. Phase one actually has two subcategories where we the first part is the restrictive part and the second part is the semi restrictive so patients have self died themselves through phase one end and increase their commendable foods or more slightly more fundamental both foods when their symptoms have really improved. And what I found with. This approach is really most people will already have a tremendous improvement in their symptoms Just not just because of anti inflammation and bacterial less bacterial formation. But it's also sort of like a hypoallergenic part of the died where we remove dairy removed Luton and many of the things that people are reactive to so I find that it's just a wonderful way to calm the got before we then add in a much more sort of caustic agents in some in some cases like Oregano oil or essential oils to kill bacteria and fungi so or in in other cases antibiotics so for me. That really showed me that improving the gut before you even get to. The antimicrobial part was really effective in terms of patient. Outcomes so that I just you know because it's such an accessible resource we've now had used by thousands and thousands of practitioners worldwide. And we get just rape feedback from it and sometimes you know and there's always some cases that have either been on super restrictive diets for a long time already You know you and I know those kinds of patients that only eat like five foods because they react to everything and that may not be then appropriate to start them there. So it's really a basis for individualizing each patient but it's a good starting point for many practitioners in their patients. Run into a few issues regarding the restricted versus the semi restricted. And that's mainly related to energy especially in women office that A lot of female patients. If we do the full restricted their energy just drops too low so we have to add in some race and possibly Keno To try and get get their carbs after energy up. Have you found that as well? Well I've seen excuse me I'm at the tail end of a cold. So what I've seen is Anything from improved energy to fight for those people that are now. There's always some metabolic individualization that we have to consider where if people really are Energy depleted and have a low basal metabolic rate as well as Just they're underweight and things like that they they are gonNA respond differently than somebody who does not have those sort of roadblocks metabolism so. I think that that's one of the reasons I really individualized instead to addition as though you might need to start with Rice. That's totally fine. That's up to the practitioner to decide on a case by case basis. But for the most part I find if I just have somebody a patient that has never really you know maybe they have reduced gluten or dairy just because they have continued gut symptoms. And they're just fresh. They haven't read anything about CBO. They haven't been diagnosed. I don't really get those patients anymore because I very complex patients now but but any every now and then I get somebody who doesn't know about CBO and starts the Diet and I re acquainted with the fact that wow it is really effective for those that have never really done any other dietary restrictions right and so after that first phase and then they go into the second phase where just adding some more variety and I found that patients. We don't even need the the herbal antibiotics just following this diet. They seem to do pretty well without having to take anything. Probably with the more complex cases like you said you're not seeing that as much but have you seen that in the past where there was just no need for antimicrobials. While the way I do it is in the way the reason I structured it. This way is because I imagined a patient arriving in the practitioners office and You know the the practitioner suspect CBO orders a breath. Test take gives the buffets diet to the patient to take home. It's a do this until we have the Do Phase One. That was really the impetus for me to do it that way. Also besides the products so but really you know. I always think about once I get the test results back and CBO's present just managing it on the Diet for me is not It can be an answer for some but what you're doing is you're permanently keeping somebody on a low fog map diet which also has it's negative. Which is you're you're not really providing a good amount of fermentable fibers to the large intestine. Which of course as we know is the home of our microbiome of are the or the majority of microbiome so we don't really WanNa keep them on this diet forever and if we find that CBO is indeed present then eliminating these organisms from the upper got will give them a lot more dietary freedom in the future. So that's kind of how I frame it. Is that really the other reason why? People are proving for the reasons you've mentioned which is anti inflammation and reduction of fermentation but then as we go to phase two in introducing some of these more slightly fermentable foods. Were actually wanting to for bacteria to wake up a little bit so that they are more capable right. So that was really. Also the the reason to broaden the Diet in face to so that we can actually be more effective without antimicrobials strategies. I'd like to take a quick moment to make you aware of some important resources that are available to you. The first is to make you aware that I not only see patients in my practice in Asheville North Carolina but I also have a virtual practice where consult with patients worldwide through telehealth. So it doesn't matter where you live in the world. We could consult through our telehealth software. The second resource is the resources page on my website. Where list all of the supplements products I use both personally and in my practice this can be found at Dr Hedberg Dot com forward slash resources and the third resource is for healthcare practitioners who want to learn functional medicine or improve their functional medicine skills. I offer online. Functional Medicine Courses at the Hedberg Institute which is my online functional medicine education platform. You can see all the courses I offer at Hedberg institute DOT COM and sign up to watch a sample course video no charge. That's Hedberg institute DOT COM and now back to the show and when you start phase two when you're having conversations with patients obviously some of them are going to add some of these foods back in and they just might not do well with them so you giving any specifics as far as say beans for example we just have that By themselves and see how you do or or do you just tell them to start adding all of these back in or are you a little bit more cautious. I'm definitely more cautious beings. Don't actually make another entry Really until you're done with your CBO treatments unless you on the vegetarian by phasing died where you actually ferment or would not permit what you can sprout these these Lagoons to make them more digestible. Sprouting what we know actually completely In a lot of these mental fibers and makes this new Nagoum a lot more digestible. So it's a great way or people to enjoy more looms. Because they're they are a really good protein source for Vegetarians. So that I think broadens the spectrum of how we can use looms not just in the vegetarian portions but yes. You're right so when when we do have sensitive patients and I wouldn't be too well yes goons but More dairy riot and those kinds of things when they start making an entry. I definitely on alert people to that people typically when they start with lentils usually say look try can blend tool because can lentils when you drain them a lot of the fought. Mansa in the liquid and Canned lentils are very well tolerated. By even those who say I can't eat Beans on an tolls. Because you know it's just Too much gas production. Even those that don't have cable and that's because You know we have this award lentils Have this very tough outer cellulose structure. That's really hard to digest even for those without CBO and sometimes I tell people try beano which is Alpha gallic. Today's an enzyme that breaks down the cellulose so sometimes it's just it is just an enzyme deficiency that by just simple enzyme supplementation can really help help them to kind of become accustomed to so Yeah those those would be the heavy hitters. You know the the number one problem I find with the by fades guide is many people relied too much on eggs and anybody who does allergy testing sees the reaction to Ed. Come up time and time and time again so I often tell people. Especially if they're energy drops 'cause eggs tend to cause a lot of nausea. If in those that are very sensitive nausea fatigue. I think I'm the primary symptoms icy with egg allergies. So that's more what I tell. My people is just just be aware. And if that's the case then I might suggest a very low fiber protein smoothie in the morning rather than Than eggs was just talk about a few specifics that you mention in the diary one being oscillates and police are practitioners will know there's connections there with kidney stones and a few other issues like joint pain and things like that anything you want to say specifically about oxalate. S- and what to look out for so oxygenates are the crystal crystalline structures in plants. That some people are are susceptible to but one of the things that happens with. Cbo is Or anybody with functional digestive disorder. Doesn't it's not really just an exclusive to see that we see food sensitivities? Certainly not with oxalate. What happens is normally you dietary? Calcium actually binds to oxen it. And there's always trace levels of calcium and many other plans in grains and so forth trace trace amounts and they actually bind to these oxygenates and basically It gets eliminated when people have a lot of diarrhea. As is the case in CBO in many cases. They can't really a bind the calcium to the oxygenates so it gets eliminated Calcium actually doesn't bind to it so you absorb or calcium sorry oxygenates so in that case You know people can become sensitive to these oxalates. Another reason is the loss of accelerator from Genie's which is a native species of bacteria that helps to break down oxides. And when that's gone due to lots of antibiotic use We do see some problems with oxygenates. In general the other the third reason is Candida right. Candida has complex mechanisms with which to increase oxalate as well and anybody who doesn't organic acid test can see very often fungal markers oxalate or accelerate acid be elevated so those are the three sort of Things to look out for and to be aware of. But yes so I often find. Volvo are pain and pelvic pain associated as well with bladder paid with oxygenates and joint pain as you mentioned right and then solicits. These are also found in in various foods and they can cause different symptoms. Some of them might be kind of across over or people might think. It's an allergy cause they get things like itching puffy eyes sinus congestion things like that. So can you talk a little bit about Solicits and what to look out for. Yes Oh solicits are away for the plant to defend itself and most of us can tolerate solicits this when they reach a certain threshold. We see a problem with solicits and one of the reasons why we see problems Especially people that are on carnival carnivore diets or Some to some extent even CBO died. So Paleo Diet is because they become also very acidic submissive Typically once they are ingested get absorbed and about eighty percent off this late. Go to deliver to be detoxified through Gooky Roenick Password. So if you've got any issues any snips in that way you can also be sensitive to solicit late in twenty percent that are unbound to to albumin Don't go to the liberal. They go to the kidney to be excreted. In the kidney or in the urine is too acidic we actually can't excrete some estimates very well. So what they found is that by Alkali the urine we see greater than eighty percent increase of secretion or excretion solicits so these little tricks of the trade. I've learned with my extremely sensitive patients. But yeah it is one of those issues where when food sensitivities are present there is a lot of overlap with things like histamine and solicits and to some extent also sulfur sensitivities so the stood practitioner really has to kind of look into these different sensitivities and seeing the presentation and Look at the different foods. And we've created several different. Add ONS to the by Phasing. Diet to help practitioners like we have a solicitor high solicited food and what I do. Give hand out to my patient and say look at the high solicit foods for example olive oil right olive oil and coconut can be quite high in a solicitor late so you might just or in. Berries. Honey is another one so it can be a little bit of a do some sleuthing. But you can tell your patient just remove the really high amount or the high solicit containing foods because otherwise if you end up with the buffets diet and several add ons you really have not much left to eat so you have to kind of a kind of be aware of that and what I typically do. Unless it's really clear cut solicits or oxygenates usually start with a histamine. Somebody's super super sensitive. Because it makes sense why people are sensitive to Histamine. Or here's the main intolerant in in cases of CBA. All because of the loss of damning oxidative which is the enzyme that breaks down food-borne Histamine And is on the tip of the micro. Eli So when we destroy that we start to see people become more sensitive to Histamine in general. Let's talk more about that was let's bring in fermented foods and histamine since those kind of overlap in a number of cases. So you know you'll see a patient come in and they've been eating a lot of bone broth because they read that it's really good for the guy but they a lot of symptoms of Histamine histamine overload and we know that bone broth can actually you know cause issues with with histamine. So what is your approach with fermented foods and how does that tie in with Histamine? Yeah so anything. Fermented is a or aged has the potential to have a higher histamine content. And mostly we see that with an animal products like Cured meats tinned or canned. Fish is very very high his to me. And then there are certain foods like spinach and like you mentioned fermented foods and there's a whole slew of other foods that quite high and Histamine as well as contain histamine liberating foods which is a different sort of category But based on biogenic means but basically yeah you you kind of have to be you know. May the Histamine by Phase Zeke. Diet is quite restrictive because we have to remove histamine containing foods history liberating food N. Fahd maps so. It really is a restricted diet for about four weeks and we don't usually mix that with other diets. It's a standalone protocol to really see if your patient That even with mass elective Ation Syndrome. histamine intolerance all the way to mass syndrome. We found this diet to be really phenomenal. In terms of being able to reduce the symptoms of Histamine intolerance quite dramatically. And then as you introduce the foods again you can really see which food is is the problem but for the most part during that time you also want to improve histamine detoxification. You want to start working on fungal issues. Because we know there's a big connection between Candida in Histamine intolerance because there is a shared talks with occasion pathway of Candida and Histamine through the aldehydes the hydrogen ice pathway. So really there's a lot of work can be done with with improving histamine intolerance whilst you on this Quite restrictive diet You brought up. Fungi just wanted to bring that up here because I think it's it's important for everyone to know about the CFO. Small Intestinal Fungal overgrowth. And so if the stool test does not show any fung guy if organic acids is not showing any fun guy and then he kind of blood. Antibodies are negative. But it's something that you really suspect. I think I'm only aware of one doctor. Now who's Gastroenterologist? Who's doing a aspirations of the small intestine and actually testing for fungi. Are you aware of any new testing or a ways of identifying CFO? Oh Gosh that's such a great question because it is the bane of our existence. Isn't it as practitioners. Fungal issues are so pervasive And so detrimental to our patients hell. But I haven't this short out. There are really haven't and I would say that if all three of those are negative ads I would actually make more at mold issues And external issues like micro-toxins and mold spores rather than you know. I mean I find that mold. Ten symptoms tend to be much much worse than people that have an internal source. Like candied up. You can still have a reaction to all of those mold. Toxins and non have Candida on board so but if a rabbi knows the other fund will markers are truly negative everything negative. I might actually abandoned Candida treatment at unless it's just there's no other explanation for somebody symptoms. I go more into like microbial restoration really right right so with with histamine. Intolerance you've mentioned Dow earlier and and most likely a number of these patients will have dow enzyme deficiencies and the gut or a genetic predisposition for that. Are there other reasons that everyone should know about as to why histamine intolerance can be so frequent and people with CBO? Well I think the other reason is see full which is so common and Co Morbid with people with CBO. Meaning that about twenty five while the doctor that you mentioned Dr Sibusiso. Who Does the aspirants did that? Study on C. Fall did demonstrate that up to twenty five percent of people with CBO also have fun overgrowth. I personally think that number if we did bigger studies would probably be higher because I see it so often in my clinic because Morbid with with CBO Zoll Candida is a big driver of people having poor detoxification of histamine. Remember that we in Dodge endogenously make histamine. Because it's an important neurotransmitter an important regulator of things we don't just get it from our food source which we normally detoxified quite well through Diomede Oxidizer metabolize. I should say through diamond. Oxidise end histamine and missile transfers. Which was more of a Enzyme also in the epithelial lining of the digestive track? So we have good mechanisms in place to help us Take down history but also we have other pathways off detoxification because histamine is is made in the body. The other reason why we often see this sort of endogenous rise of Histamine is because there are certain cells that contain histamine a They sort of the storage vessels called mass cells and mast. Cells are really pretty well known in asthma and other allergic diseases Tend to be migrating into the small intestine in many cases of CBO so in those cases we will then have a loss of diamond oxidative as well as endogenous. Histamine release through these mass cells. And that that's what we see in really dysregulates patients road so a patient goes through phase. One they go through face to of the buffets CBO died. And they're doing relatively well at that point. I assume you're mainly looking towards microbiome restoration. So can you talk about how you approach that? And some of your your strategies. Yeah and that's really really important aspect and I'm really a huge fan of the Mike of microbiome. I think we all are. I mean it's so absolutely fascinating the research that's coming out and anything from psycho -biotics which are probiotics that act on the The neuro transmitters and and the brain chemistry Super Fascinating. So I what I do in my patients and I don't often necessarily wait until the end of CBO treatment because again I see people that actually for the most part have failed other treatments. So I gotta look pull out all the guns and look at everything at once. So I do a stool tests. That does microbiome assessment on the Sixteen S AREN. A kind of a microbiome markers so and there are a few of them. I don't like most of them so I do. Usually just use one of those tests that that helps me really get an idea of the different filer and find a violent for those of you who are not microbiome. Boss is just a group of Factoria that all share similar traits. But they're very different a lot of the bacteria of The let's say the group Rodeo bacteria that contains Your your gram negative. Bacteria like E. coli but it also contains self Vibrio which is a hydrogen sulfide producer. So we can have these imbalances in these different ISLA and the best way to improve that is not to slash and burn necessarily but to us very specific prebiotics off become a really big fan of prebiotics which are really kind of the opposite of what we WANNA do in CBO which is with selectively feeding bacteria. So that's kind of what we what what I love to do. And I'm also a big fan of strain specific specific probiotic so using for example Bifida BACTERIUM LACKED IS H. One nine four the four constipation type of presentation. It's really important to also remember that when we use probiotics. We're not replacing anything right. We're not replacing lost native species. We're just using them as key metabolic or modulators of the Environment. Because what we find is when we used different probiotics they kind of act like a fertilizer. They can help to increase your own native species so You know that my approach really is to improve and broaden the Diet as much as possible and use a lot of plant based food sources and Polythene all diets which polyphenols give give the plants in the fruit and the vegetables that color. So they're very rich in berries and green. Tea is another great one great. He's actually a wonderful polyphenol. That helps with microbiome Restoration so there's a lot I mean that's a whole nother You know many hours conversation but those would be the basics. I think what we close by talking about The nervous system. I just want to bring up psycho neuro immunology and and the vagus nerve and some of my listeners might be tired of me bringing up psycho neuro immunology. But it's just a point that I just really want to drive home so they basically because I don't want it to be overlooked and you know patients. They come in and they have a diagnosis of CBO and they have got symptoms and of course some symptoms outside of the gut and so the whole treatment. The whole focus is just on CBO and the GUT. And I do worry about that and a lot of people because there's so many other components to good digestion Going back to the brain and PSYCHOLOGY TRAUMA. The vagus nerve and things like that. So is this something that you are your worried about as well. I know it's something that you address with your patients but obviously were not psychologists were not psychotherapists but I found that. I've had to bring that in quite often to get really good results. Working on childhood trauma Adult trauma and all those kinds of things. So can you speak a little bit about that? Yes sorry absolutely and in fact. I'm really glad you brought that up because it is as you mention We still compartmentalized that. This is the guy that's the nervous system. And we are starting to make strides with connecting the gut brain axis and the vagus nerve but as you mentioned adverse childhood events are huge In in even setting the stage for a poor microbiome we we. We do know that research has shown that I have found that it's that it's absolutely indispensable to work. With with therapies hypnotherapy right we know that gut centered hypnotherapy for example can be a huge benefit to our patients. I also use or recommend different types of trauma strategies from somatic experiencing That's Peter Levine's work Or any hoppers dynamic. Neural retraining system. I've had some amazing results without especially with advanced M. cast patients or mass allegations grow. So what I actually just Im- in the midst of completing my advanced civil case management course in one of the module is all about this about the autonomic nervous system the vegas nerve end the limbic system and the enteric nervous system so and how they all work together and the neurotransmitters they produce and so it was a really interesting journey to try to tie this all together which is somewhat difficult. But but I kept coming back to that You know especially in in in these days where there is so much anxiety I mean. It's it's it's an epidemic of anxiety and overwhelm and despair and all of that as we are seeing not just our natural world be in great peril but just the the sheer survival of what's happening on this planet. There is just a really heightened sense of anxiety on few how much you find that but I certainly see a lot of it in A. They're not even sort of even aware of it but but old trauma is really coming to the or front for many of my patients and to have good referral systems. Is I think key. And this is what I tell all of practitioners that I teach on Functional Gut. Disorders is find somebody that that does got censured hypnotherapy. They actually even did a study looking at skype. Visits with hypnotherapy and found that there's slightly less effective than in person but they're still really effective so you can refer to somebody who is not necessarily in the same town so that's a good one to have somebody that really how to work well with trauma and I have found at that. Absolutely expedites people's healing journey and sometimes is instrumental in a massive game changer. So those kinds of therapies that are really deep and profound. I think We we have to consider them in not just got people but really in in most of these chronic illnesses that we're faced with so that's that would be. My recommendation is to to have good referral network. I like those recommendations so somatic experiencing I've referred out for that with with good results dynamic neural retraining. You brought up. That's good hypnotherapy out also add. Em Dr and acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive behavioral. Therapy and meditation is something that can help patients with with gut issues as well so hopefully yeah absolutely. I mean mindfulness all of that. Those are core strategies that in this day and age as a practitioner functional practitioners. We owe it to our patients to really understand them for ourselves and to be able to recommend them so that people can get the most out of their Treatment really excellent. Well this has been great neurology. Why don't you tell everyone where people can find you online? I think you have three websites. Anything else mention. He's pleased to thank you. Thank you for that. So my main training platform about CBO is the CBO dr where we could find the podcast. You can find the by phasing guides. I also have a free questionnaire that people can download in practitioners can use called what caused my CBO in. It's about really trying to identify. Is it an adhesion is hypothyroidism? Is You know those kinds of things. So that's useful end and also all the training programs that I do. What CBO mastery. Then I have a clinic called the Bio Clinic and we are in lovely northern New South Wales Australia and then I also have a breath. Testing company called CBO test. And you can find all of that online and of course. I'm on facebook and instagram excellent. Well this has been great so to all the listeners. There is a transcript posted of this conversation at Dr Hedberg Dot Com to search for Dr Jacoby and we'll have all the links and everything we mentioned today so thanks for Tuning. Everyone take care and we'll talk next time. If you enjoyed the doctor Hedberg show you can support it by sharing each episode on your social media channels like facebook and by leaving review. I tunes please visit Dr Hedberg Dot Com. That's D. R. H. E. B. E. R. G. DOT COM to access the show notes and resources for today's episode.

CBO Histamine histamine Cbo Dr Hedberg Dot Com GUT Candida Hedberg Dr Jacoby Functional Digestive Disorders Dr Alison Becker Dr Hedberg microbiome Montana Australia Functional Medicine Research microbiome Restoration Dr Hedberg Dot Herbalist Association of Austr
"CBO Brother, Where Art Thou?"

Pod Save America

49:52 min | 4 years ago

"CBO Brother, Where Art Thou?"

"Ears you'll never get bored get your first three meals free with free shipping by going to blue apron dot com slash crooked blue apron a better way to cook and the presenting sponsor of positive America is Bluey choose from a variety of new recipes each week or let Blue Apron's culinary team surprise you recipes are not repeated within the ACE and the Supreme Court stayed the lower court injunctions against the ban in a kind of convoluted way basically saying that the band injunctions and also statement from the Conservatives of the court including Gorsuch Alito and Thomas starting to speak to their belief that the on the allowing my stomach to experience the speculation of and then Kennedy's got downstairs Delicious Breakfast Burrito in stand for now with the exception of people who have and this is the term they used a bona fide relationship with people in the United States a deeply concerning this court seems to be hinting at a willingness to let this order stand and we're about to see a partially about the effect of having Neal Gorsuch on the Supreme Court which is an unfairness we can barely stomach but also their desire to send a message to lower courts Senator Capito who has not announced whether or not she is voting for this bill but we're GONNA get to healthcare in a minute let's start with some housekeeping so there's a new pod save the people tomorrow and also there is a special episode of Ana Marie Cox Show with friends like these where she went to a trump rally and talk to them I highly recommend another seat so that speculation no one has any idea but it's just a reminder that we've gotta get our asses in gear and win the midterms because this is serious business and I am not you might be asking yourself what does that mean that's exactly what everybody else is asking so there seems to be a lot of stuff going on here that people are just parsing through this is uh-huh Tommy Vitor today we have a special guest West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin we're GonNa talk to him about the Senate bill on his colleague best but you know it was useful exercise where people are coming from it was also really instructed to see like how much Fox News has just been internalized and regurgitated by so many people so many merits trump will prevail. I mean this is remember that this thing was sold to us as necessary because of some sort of urgent threat from refugees coming from overseas thank you Tommy you're welcome so we're obviously going to keep an eye on that situation but obviously the big story this week is healthcare I have written entirety of the first term of the trump administration because we're reading about this news on the day there's also rampant speculation about Justice Kennedy possibly stepping down announcing his retirement and that would mean trump has to fill a cooler channel so before we get to healthcare some breaking news this morning the Supreme Court has agreed to hear the trump Muslim ban ricketts ruling and the other efforts to slow this thing down so these guys are full of Shit is what I'm trying to say but this room courts going to hear him out yeah I mean not much more to add on this for now it's obviously crazy administrative nightmare as people try to prove that they have a relationship with someone in the US in order to come here these are the pits in your stomach we're gonNA feel for the from Individuals in these countries it was sold as one hundred and twenty day ban on day one hundred fifty five so that threat that urgency hasn't really panned out despite the nights you've analysts said I'd expect coverage to be eighteen to twenty million fewer than under obamacare he then went on to say why he doesn't agree with that number but of course he doesn't he believes in the magic doc of whenever the hell trickled healthcare economics so it anticipation of the CBO score coming out the administration and its allies went out to defend the bill this story in Yahoo Breaking this down Gary Claxton the director of the health care marketplace program at the Kaiser Family Foundation said fifteen or more million will likely lose coverage also a conservative listened to be I I listen to over the weekend and she did a great job of just going and listening to people and trying to have a fact based conversation and I think it was Remar- you'll pull your hair out when you hear it this weekend and they told a series of lies that were absolutely gobsmacked here a few of them and amazingly I liked that a lot we are waiting for the CBO score it is likely to come out today by all accounts it will show that millions if not tens of millions will lose coverage there was a the things that you'll only see on like Tucker Carlson show our spouted back in these interview so it's worth listening check it out very cool very in a bash we would not have individuals lose coverage that's ally Pat Toomey told John Dickerson the Senate bill will codify and make permit Kellyanne Conway told George Stephanopoulos that there aren't Medicaid cuts in this bill and that is the least agrees Wi that was told this weekend right because they claim not a cut it's just we're spending less than we otherwise would have spent it's bullshit if you're expecting money to come next year and then you find out less money as coming I think you'd feel as though you're indicate expansion which is exactly the opposite of what it would do it ends the Medicaid expansion and he said no one loses coverage again ally Sean Asian found that Medicaid not only as an eighty four percent approval rating among Democrats it has a seventy six percent approval rating among independence and a sixty one percent approval rating much worse much worse I have written in my outline because John's on the line while he's gone CBO brother where art is to what this administration is doing. But I digress Spicer said trump is quote committed to making sure that no one currently is in Medicaid in the Medicaid program is affected in any way which is reflected in the Senate bill and he's pleased with that so every part of that is a lie so here's why they're lying a poll by the Kaiser family found her salary had been cut and you're also assuming that no more people will get sick and that prices won't go up on all the things were paying for exactly Tom Price HHS secretary told among Republicans and the exact same poll we discover that only thirty eight percent of people are aware that the GOP healthcare plans cut Medicaid because a they've been lying about it be places like Fox News Aren't telling the truth or simply not covering the facts and see Mitch McConnell's plan to keep the bill under wraps has been Acer in a briefing on Friday that was not on camera because they don't WanNa be on tape lying and the White House Correspondents Association is unable to muster a response pretty effective So Tommy were waiting for the CBO score today we're going to keep an eye on it if it happens during the show do you think that the CBO score and the bill becoming public will get people more I mean the the Joe John Cornyn today said that they are that they are closing the door on a delay in the vote now that is worrying all said they were not ready to support the bill Mike Lee on Friday said something very interesting in a medium post and he said this far short cleaning West Virginia so that those are the stakes of what we're talking about we need these guys to to take fairly politically courageous vote when it comes to to break the tie so we need to pry off three Republicans because we've had unanimity among the Democrats for Conservatives Mike Lee Ted Cruz Ron Johnson and ran in the end Jonathan Swan axios who has really been running the story the ground reported yesterday that a widely held view in McConnell world is that he doesn't start donor class I mean I I read a statistic today that four hundred individuals who will get a tax cut under this bill or the equivalent of Medicaid expansion in like four or five including West Virginia all senators and we're relying on public pressure from the grassroots to swamp like you know the coke brothers are talking about spending three hundred million dollars in the midterm election sexy or so the local pressure from McConnell from their big donors in listen to their constituents in like Shit I wish I thought that I knew how this is going to go but I don't I don't know anymore yeah the repeal the Senate Bill Keeps the Democrats broken system intact just with less spending on the poor to pay for corporate bailouts and tax cuts a cynic might say that the Senate bill is less a Republican to turn that from an asset to a liability for him but that time just doesn't exist here and that is what scares me it should scare everyone out there that we have basically four days healthcare bill than a caricature of a Republican health care bill and yet he does go on to say after all that for all that I have not closed the door on voting for some version of it focused on us I think it will but I think you know our windows so small that it it's it's going to take a Herculean effort to push back I mean we're in a place now where we're relying on fifty two republicans he starts with fifty one many view Rand Paul as a lost cause and someone who has never gettable now that could be posturing that could be sending a signal that could be about where we are with the politics and with the vote remember we need three they need they need to get fifty fifty In the Senate so that Mike Pence ended consequences which are that Medicaid covers seventy four million Americans four out of ten American children are covered by medicaid ten million Americans with disabilities received yeah no can get changed slightly allow these guys to take a win and so they're already talking about carving out a special deal for Alaska that would change the way certain pricing occurred as a giveaway into kind of make the bill seem more engaged than it is but regardless Tommy how quickly do you think these right wingers are GonNa fold these stories are scary drafting errors look that the democratic process or passing Obamacare was incredibly intensive and public and scrutinized and all the rest but even still because the home for the July fourth recess. They don't come back because I did vote for this bill in part because of what everybody's been telling to put pressure on these people so let's you those senators and get their votes this happened under obamacare Ben Nelson custody of those called the corn husker kickback ultimately it took weeks in months of political pressure there are huge unintended consequences that would have effects on employer benefits on premiums on Medicaid and all the rest that we just don't even understand and let's just hammer home the because of the way the bill had to be passed because of the death of Ted Kennedy we don't need to get into it there were drafting mistakes that made it all the way to the Supreme Court it is very likely I try to have empathy for the individuals who are currently second worried about this but this is going to harm coverage from employers something called Association Health plans which means debt from healthcare problem and an appoint that Rand Paul made which is that he can't support this because it's too much like obamacare light it leaves so many of the regulations and it's Oh human stories here that needs to be highlighted and lifted up as we talk about this because like this is going to be devastating for people that have no voice they have no lobbyists they have no money they have nothing but to put back in caps and all the rest but ultimately the biggest part of this bill is the cuts to Medicaid and the tax cuts so that's what we're fighting so we're trying to paint a picture here of just how damaging this bill would would be and we are backed by the facts we are backed by the evidence we're going to be backed by CBO score but another important thing to remember is a your health insurance company can offer policy but it doesn't have to offer chemo or radiation so what we could see is he slow wittling down of insurance to something that's not we really want to go back to a situation where a child is born and goes into neo natal care and hits their lifetime limit on their health insurance before they left there's a really complicated issue and it's a really complicated bill and it was written in secret and it is just now hit the light of day the reason we have a big process the reason we have politics is then Rakowski we're going to ask Senator Mansion about Senator Capito given how hard this bill hits West Virginia Tommy visiting you were is it actually does matter that everybody gets a look at this because they might not have thought of everything they know the unintended consequences huge mistake drafting errors for care around up in the Supreme Court right now I cannot support a piece of legislation that takes insurance away from tens of millions of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Nevada it is pretty impressive that he went out there and said that Medicaid I mean this is going to go after the most vulnerable people in our population now Ari Melber did an interview with a mother and her son who was on disability insurance we any compromise they must vote for some kind of repeal no matter what it is yeah it's a sickness I think in the trump era Republican party which is he says I worried they will lull people into complacency. There's a lot of you know John Oliver did a good piece of miss last night like all the reportings like the bill is unlike support it's like well actually they introduced something four days to revamp one six of the economy and the point that I think a lot of you look there's a dynamic here and this is GonNa happen on any big piece of legislation but look we're we're he's wrong period on the politics but like the idea that he that Hugh Hewitt in the establishment Trumpian want to push the party off a cliff that should scare him in move voters yeah the money that these people are putting behind repeal is pretty incredible actually write the coke brothers are putting money come out against the bill and he did so pretty strongly stood next to you governor Brian Sandoval Republican and said this bill would mean a loss of coverage for millions of Americans and many Nevada I'm telling you it is a tax cut bill entered the Medicaid bill the the exchanges and all the rest they fuck with them they make them worse they're gonNa make seniors pay more money they're giving insurance companies the ability to the vote for something before they even know what it is absurd to me and meanwhile dean Heller has a million dollars being spent against him TV ads by trump SUPERPAC. where the you were ranting about this morning joely Hugh Hewitt has an op Ed that basically says Republicans have to be for something that they need to be for basic again I mean there was an NBC pull out this morning by three to one margin the American public holds a negative view of the ASPCA the House Bill Sixteen percent of adults believe that it's is not what he came to the Senate to do in fairness Rand Paul there is some truth to that in in that this bill does two things far more than it reforms the healthcare system and far more than reforms Obamacare SUPERPAC? What the fuck are we doing here? Where's priorities is that we spent fifteen million dollars on Jon ossoff phrase I'd love to see two or three million getting pumped into Nevada bees that seems like a guy that's trying to lash himself to the mass so he doesn't have the ability to change his mind Susan Collins of Maine and said she is waiting for the CBO score Lisa Murkowski of Alaska all useful to people? Yeah I mean something Chris has talked about a lot is that a lot of what this bill seems to want to do is create a subprime insurance market you know all these conservatives talking about how Oh these regulations that require hospital for the very first time I mean that is what we're talking about so let's talk about the senators that we do believe are reachable Dean Heller of Nevada has already certain benefits raising premiums and there is some truth to that because a lot of people had really low premiums and healthcare that didn't cover anything had a yearly cap at a lifetime cap I mean the calls it political insanity and beyond irresponsible to vote against a bill that we don't even know what the CBO score would be we don't even know the impact of it and you know those plans don't comply with any rules and you know what you have in your plan because states can waive protections or certain guidelines of what has to be healthcare plan so basically if you have cancer you can said she's going to crunch the numbers okay you do that you you say let's do this both Collins and Murkowski have talked about their commitment to planned parenthood collins more strongly on that a good idea forty eight percent said it's bad even Republican respondents are lukewarm about it thirty four percent view of positivity seventeen percent view it negatively so first of all like I Vata Alaska Ohio West Virginia where there may be a deciding vote and if you WanNa make calls from home again evolved as always we remind you that we're working with indivisible GOTO TRUMP DIS for poor to purchase insurance and visit doesn't do enough to get rid of insurance companies of coverage requirements. I mean these guys are as devious awful as you could ever imagine so subbing back there they're human beings and this is the biggest decision they'll have made in a long time for someone like capita in West Virginia has just gone to the Senate this may be the biggest decision she's ever made in her life care ten dot org slash crooked and you can call your senator you can email their legislative assistance and staffers at work on this issue we gotta keep it up yeah I just capital that will kick off continuous protests move on is calling it the people's Filibuster if you're in DC should go check it out there's also local protests and that's especially important if you live in a state right which is predicting what happens this week is a fool's errand nobody knows just light up the phones and social media just do everything you can I think that's really important I think to remember too is that a lot of these well trump is tweeting excuses so you know we're his heads out by the way how great was it that he called the House bill mean enclosed doors Paul Ryan went out and denied it and said he was misinterpreted than he was I was talking about this over the weekend it's like there's been a lot of like oh these centers were under so much pressure they're gonNA have to vote for they can't vote for it in center Brian Schatz of Hawaii made this point for during the trump administration and all of us should be calling our senators and members of Congress and everybody else we can put pressure on but also call your friends who live in the states and ask them because all the Oy than anybody thought you've seen Mike Pence gave a speech over the weekend where he said we will repeal obamacare quote by summers and serve early conceding that they may not be able to do it this week ah been one of the point on that is just like as much as as native the Medicaid cuts one thing I mean everyone listening if you're young and you're not sick now you will be someday that's what happens in life so positive America's brought to you by Harry's razors we love using Harry's razors here at pods America because even though I probably shave less frequently than most people I see yeah because it it it Ki- whe- it's worrying because there's a chance that means they think they have the votes it also may just mean they understand that if a bunch of their members much of these senators go home is have switched to Harry's Jeff and Andy Two regular bros. were fed up with buying overpriced razors started Harry's to fix shaving Harry's offers their AIDS at half the price of the leading fiber razor selling directly to you over the Internet claim your free trial offer from Harry's today a thirteen dollars value for free when you sign up during Shave Gel a travel blade cover go to harrys dot com slash crooked for your free trial right now that's Harrys dot com slash crooked Four years is a long time it feels longer every day but I sincerely believe that this will be the single most important vote in thing that we fight for can do the worst thing that can happen as they say no but if we don't try if we don't fight on this we will never win on anything else and the fact that they've taken off the table the idea that this makes me royal shave set for free when you sign up Harry's dot com slash crooked just pay three bucks for shipping why Harry's Harry's is all about a great shave at a fair price which is why over three million guys her to care for him in the home is on Medicaid everyone should watch it I people have been andy slaving he used to run import healthcare programs for the Obama Administration tweeted this out I mean there are a real just cover the three dollars of shipping your free trial set includes a weighted ergonomic razor handle five precision engineered blades with lubricating trip and trimmer blade a rich land. I've heard me say this a billion times one of the weird have you done the thing where Sonos has you tune your speakers I haven't done that I don't know what that is a new software update it's like it sounds even better so I honey let's just take a break we're back we're going to talk about some other stuff hey don't go anywhere this is positive America and there's more on the way the office office we've no furniture or podcast studio but we've speakers when's your man what's we're able to record podcasts in her office interview on Fox and friends by one of the morons might as well work for him and he was like Hey I called the meeting because it was you know I don't think it's that good you're just confirmed it was you're so excited he he's proud of his ability to name Hi and they said this bill doesn't go far enough that's amazing those pricks those guys are disappointed Jesus doesn't do enough to dismantle obamacare they're opposed abused they're still substance close shave every time and the blades common in my mailbox delivered every week enough to go to CVS and spend ungodly money wasps shave monthly your sister Eh and to to say that you know what this person is going to do I think is a failure to understand how people work so I think the pressure really works I think pressure's really effective already got US Dean Heller more strong research may be posturing but it may be that they know that either they're gonNA pass it this week or they won't pass it all you saw in that light note it was the most comprehensive story written to date about not just what Russia did to intervene in our election but the Obama administration's response so it's they included cyber attacks on their infrastructure releasing materials to embarrass Putin and then in late December ultimately Obama approved a modest package that expelled thirty five diplomats close CIA analyst. I guess and he's Mitch McConnell the stealth the worst member of minutes I mean just we'll get or four individuals only that had to be returned and that's when Obama started learning about what was going on and at that point it was clear hackers had penetrated the Democratic party networks part of the take home is that this was a partisan effort from the start the White House briefed the House and the Senate Leadership September at that meeting Mitch McConnell Voice Doubts about the accuracy of intelligence because he's yes I have my Sonos play baseball I watch my TV. I have one in the dining room I have one in my bathroom so when I'm watching a show I can hear it all throughout my house now we have some Blah and we're back last week the Washington Eddie he doesn't realize when should branding so on Monday Senate Democrats are going to have an all night talk a thon to protest the bill on Tuesday there's a rally at two PM at the Russian facilities in the US There was some narrow economic sanctions and then there were apparently some covert cyber measures that we just don't know much about but you know welcome to Pod Save America I'm John Host through its hat in the Pulitzer Ring With Greg Miller Ellen Nakashima adamant of bylined a piece called inside Obama secret struggle to punish Russia for hacking uh-huh and that is why go to high tea and then they go home and they shave Harry's is so confident that you're gonNA love their blades they'll give you their free July the FBI to open an investigation to contacts between Russian officials and trump associates over the over the next several months the White House debated all these options for deterring or punishing Russia agree one senior administration official said I sort of feel like we choked friend of the pod Russia expert Obama former Obama Mike mcfaul said the punishment didn't fit the crime stories like a punch in the face yeah yeah okay so ultimately they wanted to put up this big bipartisan statement got watered down turned into a non political statement in the article Obama's defender say that by August the damage was done wikileaks had the emails Obama Confronted Putin in September and likely prevented them from excavating these attacks and that the partisanship that the GOP response efforts to brief this and and to get us to respond as a nation constrain their options others did they respond as well as they could have given the nature of what happened in the time it takes to collect confirm and deal with the sensitive stuff yeah for so I took the McConnell piece August two thousand sixteen when the White House I briefed on this explosive intelligence and it talks about how the like this didn't get emailed over it was a currier over in an envelope that was when should have paid a much higher price from the attack and then we should consider more action so I guess my question for you love it or like one did Obama and the Obama administration choke or cost the government between Republicans and Democrats especially at the local level Mitch McConnell holding the Gorsuch seat open refusing to be part of this statement it positive America is also brought to you by SONA SEE LOVES DUNno we love tennis they ask you to do your own thing here are some notes I don't know I have someone else ever in my house I love it you got actually important to how what they were trying to do so they were trying to muster a bipartisan response not only because it would have been good politics but because managing our elections is a bipartisan affair that goes on all of them we'll have shown us to play them which is gonNA be awesome sonus makes us sound great speakers I love shown us go to senators if you're going to buy a speaker you're crazy if you buy anything else they're worth every penny in search in their great Tommy Vitor they're worth every penny and they're cheap and they're great they're great speakers by San Jose just to put a bipartisan sheen on what was an attack on our democracy and then him writing the Senate health care bill secret I think are the TRIFECTA of Steve Most sort of anti-democratic vicious UNAMERICAN behavior we've ever seen from a leader of any party in our lifetimes what is the rationale for someone handing you the head new I think what's new is the ability to use technology to sort of exacerbated to allow them to reach into our country from so far away but you know exports save the best way to deal with these influence campaigns is to make them visible I worry that we've lost our best weapon against these attacks because we have a president we're all feeling is everyone President Obama James Komi the Clinton campaign everyone was behaving as though Hillary Clinton would win influence consciously or not by political considerations in prediction that literally everyone got wrong in so that aside I'm still remained also just a little more complicated that said I do think it's true that anything the Obama Administration did before the election would be viewed as partisan period cyberwarfare is relatively new there aren't necessarily clear rules of the road we have public policies about when will use nuclear weapons when a rules of engagement for the military this stuff is being figured out piece at Emily's European countries have devoted years to countering Russian disinformation hacking trolling setting up sputnik in our T. in their country like this is not latimer Putin for any of this behavior and the thing that I'm frightened the other thing that I can't stop thinking about is Vladimir Putin interfered with our election if you're Mitch McConnell you can see or hear or be briefed on whatever you want yeah so so we can't let Mitch McConnell off the Hook I don't know whether the response in politicized and would be maybe even not probably would be unhelpful. I do think you're right though that ultimately you had a bunch of national security experts being how to deal with this on long term how to prepare for the future prevent future hacking of our democracy that's why I think it's so hard for us to look at this in hindsight because we were all in the mentality that Hillary Hillary would win and then we deal with it and then now we're living in the the aftermath yep I have some thoughts on this so I think it's hard to forget that this was happening was behaving in that way to prune was doing was despicable that it was helping the Republicans that it was wrong that it was an interference in our sacred democratic process but at the end of the day Ah this and that this is something we could deal with after in a kind of measured response when the the reins of power handed over and there would have been serious adults at the table to talk about was enough in the in the weeks preceding the election if they should have rang the alarm more they did talk about it and it was immediately politicized and made partisan my either something feels fifty fifty or it feels like one in a million and we treated trump winning like a one in a million when it really felt more like fifty fifty and everybody inside the government real time right we are gathering intelligence for real time not just any old intelligence but if we add intelligence on Vladimir Putin's personal involvement or signing off on whatever order today that trump is pushing for a meeting with Putin next month in Germany and not just like a pull aside at a conference but like all the trappings the bells and whistles of a full diplomatic donald trump's behavior toward Russia that is not nefarious in some way there is no way to explain a man who has no principle whatsoever no consistent Halsey meeting and I don't understand how anyone could think that that's good politics let alone good policy there is no explanation for unleashed a torrent of packing and assaults on our institutions when he thought that there was an administration that care yeah right instead of washing posted when I think it's they need silver made this point that may be wrong but I think it's a really smart point which is that as human beings we kinda have to settings when it comes to odds that prize that more was not done to punish Russia after the election yes yeah and and then of course we handed the reins over to Donald Trump who has no interest in punishing heard that's about as sensitive as it gets people could literally die if those sources or methods or burn can they may be already half the prevent us from being able to do it again so that's something to be aware of and build their holding up is mostly for show anyway that he wants to meet with Vladimir Putin that he won't seem to ask a single question to any of the national security do you want anything how he remains so steadfast in his view that he should never criticize Russia that they should possibly be holding up a sanctions bill even though the ponding Russia and getting tough on them who would probably pay significant political dividends for him right I'm not sure what he's holding out for think about all the Republicans a partisan atmosphere that refuses to believe they ever occur Oh and then you have the Sean Hannity the world saying Oh deep state deep state parenting Russia's propagates believable unbelievable all right guys when we come back Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia this policy of America stick around there's more great show cels that come to him about what we're doing to prevent a future attack I mean it is mind boggling his stories all over the place right for a while he denied it was a case he said it could have been a factor in the line so yeah it's dark times Tommy it's dark out there and we'll get into your point about Putin doing this with a a president he thought would would take a hard line against us the AP coming your way positive America's brought to you by texture with the conversation in pop culture but fake news alternative facts in the news media is interactive features video and so much more textures normally nine ninety nine a month and you get over two hundred magazines but if you sign up right now at texture dot com slash crooked for a fourteen day trial for free texture dot com slash crooked as always positive America's brought to you by our friends at I think the thing that baffles me is I think I don't think it's unfair to say that Donald Trump is deeply involved in the weeds of policy discussions in the things a lot more about politics and optics to know where your news is coming from texture features some of the most trustworthy credible publications in the world like Time magazine that Yorker Vanity Fair the Atlantic Brooke Ahed you get a fourteen day free trial why subscribe to a couple of magazines when you can have all of your favorites on your smartphone or tablet all the time for way less plus ext domestic and international news the APP has gone beyond delivering just a magazine itself they made it easy to find and enjoy articles you WANNA read with daily recommendations exclude that would be relieved and happy and gratified to see him turn on Russia it would be the smartest thing he could do it's not like the Republican base loves Russia they're they're sort of texture was selected as one of apple's top 2016 IPAD APPS so that's pretty cool to start your free trial now and download the texture APP go to texture dot com slash NBA affected with Medicaid it just hits every opiates first time we're getting getting treatment for opiate addiction so anything and everything that we have ever done good so let's jump into this health care fight West Virginia is on board Yeah West Virginia is among the states that has most benefited from the Medicaid expansion it's all fifty nine percent increase in enrollment just how badly would this Senate bill hurt West Virginia and what are you hearing from your constituents about it why don't you sit and talk to us why don't you work with us just I wasn't here in two thousand and Tim when it was past I'm understanding that basically went through the normal process went through the A- and affordable care act it's helped him have more stable finances and it's worked out very well for him but it's going to be very difficult so I'm I'm just begging them I said you know what so already be back sick of this thing is going to come out tomorrow honestly are they even on a honeymoon Janis tweeting about politics a lot so I feel like he's basically here joining us on the pod today we have West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin Senator Manchin thank you for coming on positive America thank you for having me both three aspect of our of our economy's going to be affected the rural hospitals rural clinics all of these things and I was governor you know we had to always sit down under some of the trustworthy one's going to be listed named stream media texture gives you access to not just your favorite magazines but also the latest investigative journalism US policy the cash out download it if you're a friend of the pod check it out with the other one this we're done with the other ones the cash app we love the cash APP did a John and emily get that bottle of wine you sent without telling me you fucking snake I realize from the band you know give me a break if not they're going to be paying five to one insurance can charge him almost five times the premium of a younger person if you're up to sixty four years of age we have an awful lot of elderly in nursing homes all of the hearings it went through markups it went through amendments and even Republican amendments were adopted but then still yet we couldn't get one in the public interest now what's driving this train come to the conclusion is taxes it's basically the tax rebate both bills they have a little different jersey effect I had a basement fat people anywhere could have been China hacking electric let's call that consistency I think technically it is possible that the basement wasn't but then you know with the hospitals because they had to give so much care away so much charity care we call it a disproportionate share and we'd help them every year just to make ends me now with a Medicaid nations I'm understanding of both bills they try to make him a little smoother if you will make no mistake about both bills removed all the taxes the way we he read The Washington Post story he decided to tweet out the choke line and said why isn't everyone blaming Obama never made it past tea did not read that that's where he was really long but it just unbelievable center your colleague from West Virginia Senator Capito has not yet taken a position on the bill she is one of the Republicans that stakes for West Virginia you also talked about the process and how poor it has been in terms of bipartisanship when the merits are so clear about the harm this would do to West Virginia we believe whose vote is up for grabs Have you spoken to her about this bill does she understand just how harmful this bill would be for West Virginia we've spoken about by any tax rebate or any taxes whatsoever but all nine hundred thousand we'll be affected because they have some family member that's benefiting from the plan I wanted to be bipartisan and I just think it's wrong and I'm hoping it doesn't pass we can sit down and hopefully craft good piece of legislation so you you talked about the well there's no graphic now one demographic in the state of West Virginia won't be affected not one we have an older population And you know that is why do you think that the politics aren't a no brainer for anyone representing your state vote against not been thinking about that both of you John Tommy to both of us I've been thinking very hard paid for it and it's the first tax I think that some of the super wealthy have never been able to circumvent yeah I I don't know I don't know that if you're GonNa do you do it as a group one time I don't even know where they're staying I don't keep up with that kind of thing so did you WanNa send them something or did he want to complain about it I wanted to be added to the thing that was already sent when the thousand people would get a tax rebate about five

dean Heller Senate America CBO Supreme Court Obama Alaska Blue Apron Susan Collins Lisa Murkowski Nevada Senator Joe Manchin West Virginia Hugh Hewitt Mitch McConnell Senator Capito Ana Marie Cox United States Tommy Vitor
The Radio Show: This Song Has Lived Rent Free In My Head

The Radio Show

1:40:15 hr | 3 months ago

The Radio Show: This Song Has Lived Rent Free In My Head

"Man what they talk. Talk guy bone that guests up the show got to wave action happening. Bob o'clock plus sharing their puerto. Rico going day god no to guy telltale because they keep you got you up to date with played is with basics on prime time. Never go wrong you. What's negative would like our today. Like what the radio show. Let them tell a phone rings. Yeah mona's stain important. I'm sorry and knock on. I know me. I didn't i didn't know that that was a bay. Applegate grip now. Social media will usually going social media you night. So i'm the lost grammy's i wake you know. No one talked about it now. Listen first of all. I found awkward. When i logged onto social media. Today i'm seeing all of these women like these gals counts for way. Grammy's gram he's like i was there any audience. What kind of situation is did it was a limited on. You know we saw. I thought nothing. I did party via stage like already move out practice not into performance. I heard about it because of the whole thing. We can't is always that happened today. you know what. Why are we still talking about this. Hor i think most people start giving people energy. I think most people probably go away is really good. I give so. She doesn't have trump anymore so she's like drew picking on anything to just stay relevant because she doesn't really have a platform anymore. You know i'd have to be honest with you. I had the same period about now council. Costa they've been talking about that for greater part of last year. The months whatever Nothing really been harping on more recently when we start our view in the cartoons changes like that because they no longer a champion or whatever. You know what i'm saying in office. And yet they got the funeral. Air base code word when people be like. Oh we gotta end castle. Kosher that's ak for. I can't say whatever. I want to say about any any person without consequence behind it. What sunny about cancer. that's relatively new branding. Nightly we talked about this before where essentially cancelled. Don't you just ask for your buck and action exactly if you want to take it even further and just say to these people trying to get rid of what they don't like eight. That would has already happened. Been you look back at my to locker. I was jonah antithesis of cancel culture right lane Try get charlie removed from it. Put me in jail when iraq beards. You know what i'm saying. It was court trout. Like there was that was a legal matter of a legal precedents with Homebody and you can go back. Even you know there was other people. It was What chicago did she get into. The bay area rene cbo dunno if you heard of him before as bay area. Rapid cbo jail because yeah kareem's refereed eighty nineteen ninety nine hundred eighty s if you google him in the list of people that he's working from the f. Forty you wouldn't have a smug look on your face. This the point that i'm getting the hey look i'm shocked that you named e forty like i feel like you hate forty forty. His name is ebo cbo cbo so bibo cbo burn care about telling the story anymore. I'm good changing. Because i don't know what you're talking about and i'm over it so of rhythm. The moment has passed now. I was going somewhere led to the nineteen ninety-one this this no as run more eighties than it is best for claims man. That's not what i was talking about. Tone the fact they none of us were know what you're talking about. And we were all listening. Means you're doing only rambling thing. Anyone wanted to almeira rambling. I got easy talking about that. The eighties and then. What is that in my defense. Cujo google to ensure that it was not eighty. Because you know but you're talking to was you story or lack. If i could have gone to. The story would have made sense so now. We'll look interleague series. Here's your platform for the stores. Willow utah okay. I'll i would say it's not okay. Although saying was is that cujo missing about two live crew and their issues with their cbo back in the day. This is like ninety nine hundred eight. He was actually put in jail for lyrics that he said on his. he's like on probation. They used as lyrics against him in court and he went to jail mystical tonight. Tonight's word declaration cbo could drop. It made a words name is seeing the there. Let me see seventy one. President was his claims frame pre. Aol so look. That's why you need it cbo known for yes. Well he he. He was Number ninety nine on the charts for his nineteen ninety five album. Tales from the grip is his biggest Move was nineteen ninety. Eight's til my casket drop them once you bet on it before them look number four on the no. No radio play went goal. I can't a cbo section on the radio city. I wait a minute. we can't. The definition is needed. I i'm not no okay okay. He's got forty cba teacher in east I feel like there's a very lazy title. They their names the twentieth cbo featuring boy the last cbo i got outlaws. Hard labor asong. I'm sorry browse next cujo to reach. It isn't like look if you get nothing else from this segment. You know your letters in your numbers. We'll see we'll we'll be sure to check him out. We never got to get him on the show now. Jailed theme man man was friend. This man was friends with two-pack. Okay he was dealing with masterpiece the height of his his hours man and when they get does he have he has powers. I feel like everybody talk story. Now pods several songs with pac man while he was alive. Okay what am i mean. I can outbound say you schiller. Nineteen ninety one british light sending through pokes offices sometimes passionate about this person in the nfl familiar in. He's like a super. Kit is not is not patch is more you know. You don't care as much so so bottom line on this was i will say that. I admire the amount him now that he has about hip hop during air. Because it is this one song that has live rent free Easy appraise live risk-free in my head. Since i was in elementary school when i have no idea what song is. I don't know why every so often it is powered Kill mall kill them. All i believe we just capping to save while i was walking through the house and he was like. Oh that's a song by. Why drag ray. I heard about it saying this one on raw had way older than all of us were it wanted to like. I was singing duty like a big song. I hadn't a win a heard it. How long ago is in my head. And i notice from our own town. He is is because it's during his time it was not can. You don't remember who was. I'm pretty sure you buy one spice one. All i don't know that a man that guy right there do their encyclopedia. Mayer it though. Just be locking little sleep jealous so don't worry about it all of it. If you apply that tower gonna say this is. This is your superpower. If you apply that to today using you can you can. Probably you could probably be a force in the radio world but instead you decide to stick major nineties late nineties and not all the way one of these days you know. We're gonna go through not right now. 'cause i was going somewhere with we're gonna go through everybody's recently played whatever this streaming platform is has fun with that mizzou. So have we kept our years long streak of there's been a war show. We're supposed to be a hip hop show and we didn't. We didn't watch it is. Does that count watching. Nfl rhythm. i mean you read. The i read the new york post this morning to see who won everything. Yeah you got the important information discount. Hurry and beyond say in blaby wanna green me for what everyone. Apparently she has a song once he brought on brass ganger so so has the grant s green is like if you look at like remember couteau we along time ago met. We broke down the best. The best rap album category grammy category years ago. One and it's like they just seem to somebody albums that were Given the you know the best you know. They won the grammy. It was by name of somebody that they knew and it doesn't necessarily have to be the best one there was like Got not just give it to him or remember they. They miss around and gave a macklemore and ryan lighting a look. That's best why people stop watching the graham now apple issue. I would send if you had to pinpoint a moment in history that that's that's probably that's when ratings down so dr jump the shark on any. They started the same year or maybe a year apple somewhere around the same time the oscarssowhite hashtag kind of cropped up tune so obviously the war shows that has been losing credibility and just kind of taken the award. Show that we're not trying to say this. Loss of salts is a is antiquated age. Spain this is. I don't think people care as much anymore. You know what i'm saying. Not i could. I agree agree. That especially with some of the. Like i said the winners. They had like if you go look at the best rap album category. Oh my god the nominees. This year were garbage lavar. Yes and he looked first of all. I don't disagree with that call. 'cause he that was easily the best album compatriots de sheets like now. Who's in because. I'm looking at it who've come. Let's go album called black habits by smoke Whoever that is pretty gives game. I didn't know that he called it. Alfredo might have to check that out about cocaine. That's kind of his thing. Okay yep or marinara. Actually original testimony by jane traffic because that was a he finally came out without after thirty years in the game so okay and then the allegory by rose royce. The five nine which i didn't even know he was still radner so I mean these person on it is Pretty decent list easy. Came out with anything anything for you know. She wanted a grammy was like. Rv song or something like that new song or is that too high. I mean it's about a year old so new now. Best rb album bigger little. John legend like that allen was amazing. Like i have listened to that avenue repeat like in all my feelings multiple times not going to take on journalism rubric. That john legend actually was my Like wedding song that we dance to and looking back on. I don't think he's saying no. He's not veer. Take all the warm. I would just say. It's it is polarized polarizing gave. He's not an amazing singer but like the in the performance of he's he's yeah yeah he makes good music. He's not trust long. He's he's great at what he does is just like he's not as talented as some other people yet but i will just say kings disease that nausea was very good Out muncie over found. He's very good. Yeah relevant people now in rap on the album was pretty good. I'm glad because he's been some congress or pass. Yeah i mean basically talked about it a while back. You know but like i'd actually told him when it came out that it was pretty good. I'm glad i'm glad nostalgia exists because there's a lot of people grandma incident incident. Titles in iraq is is definitely so you feel like he fits in that category where his career like you. You would never say okay. You would never say you'll never hear somebody say will nonsense wet because he's not wet but he has some peaks and valleys in his career where he's like super hot and then he just tails off. It's like when he's motivated and he's not motivated but he never been wacky. Just getting some on ethics. I think you can admit that. Somebody has a towels being his. His lyricism is is good. You know wrapping but then the bannon's of making good using you know what i mean. That is his exit point. There's a lot you and i had a lot of people. Don't have this conversation often. I do what i do. I take the stance that there's a difference in in being talented at what you do in may and music and making good news. You can be very talented singer. You can have an amazing voice but you make awful end and then you could have a trash voice. Just make amazing. They goes to your team. Because you know there's some people when you're on a label. They re talented and they're like. Oh well my record label say head to seen the song but this was the for me or they said. I had way bigger songs that i wanted to come album. But they didn't make the cut and so like you'll see here something underground like this is crazy or is just the interlude in you know that you hear somebody your like your trash but they give them the best producers abyss background people of you now. Gra- i call him like you know but only cujo is not now. I got a name. I call them like an artist that i call them. They make big songs like a to me. It example that even though she's immensely talented view but beyond saying makes big saws they might be best thing is the her but she makes big songs. She has that ability so much. You're saying it makes perfect sense now. Really a categories. Cassie casting heats. But i will not seeing my life enough Was integral eleo made hits. Now you're gonna people come on here. Cancel the yeah. You might get a comment saying you. And i will die where it could not say but you know because you seem on being in the personality and the image persona niche. Say all the tragic death and it was yes. I don you think like depending on who else is out as well who can even compete with certain people can give them more leverage than they would if they had comparable competition. Do you know what i'm saying. I think historically there might have been true. But i think today market is so saturated with arnesen produces the people you work with if it's not a whole lot of excuses other than the market is saturated like you might heard because there's someone using out you know what i'm saying you could but i still think they handpicked people who are allowed to be famous right now. You know what i'm saying. Now you know okay. So there was nicki menaj for a long time. There's nobody her language. Her name cardi b. Came in the united states. Had a really hard time getting back out there on the same level. 'cause when she released their last album it taint terribly. She's got this whole you following the now you've got like i think they're trying to shift where you can have like these other Cd girls you guide cardi b.'s. Got makes value so it's like they're allowing ran her course to write absolutely did. Nobody acts that lasts out. There's no one to be in the spotlight at the time when you. She missed her husband's unity to stay relevant for few years because she did when she when she refused to partner a feature in work with other female rappers i think in of course our attitude in her lashing out at on time. I just think it painted this really distorted image of her like she only wants to play with boys like she doesn't support female rappers in so they kind of moved at train. Without her like all the other female rappers was like. Oh liz collapse together. So they all have like this group they. She didn't want to be a part of a now. she can't get back she can't get back on and so people are just totally like oh never mind. Cause let's show with me because she didn't she think what hurt her that could really extended her career. She didn't want to collaborate cardi b. around out that helps dislike. So you female rapper. You hot cardi. b.'s. She's getting air. Y'all both in the same city like was crazy. Not wanna work with fans created that beef and then they played into like there was no beef between them assan people now we re nah like no. They didn't now that was that was the cardi via there was just lying. Carney came out like old is now a new breed Racially ambiguous ratcheting hard. Whatever else in came things on making band karn fans near time social media it was. I want you door showers and say stands. We're going in any eventual. They both artists played. It's an estimate that was that song be goes Yeah that started emmy after they help fight in a last hour on general social media on the story twitter. So i get it. What are we going how do we. How do we get anywhere. Business to make one more comment about the grammys Does based on what. I read a lot of these. Were just like default like okay. Yeah we got people to fill the category but we all know who clearly should have won this this nominees. I don't think there was a lot of strong competition this year. The only one. I got a rebuttal foreign. I mean maybe i'll catch some slack but this but i feel like the best rap performance was not a savaged by making stallion and beyond say. I think there's a lot of sounds in that category. That probably could've would I deep reverence by big. Sean nipsy Bought by the baby. What's popping by jack. Harlow the picture by little baby and then the orange pop smoke be main megan beyond saying. I think that's just know that was song. Yeah like i said. I don't personally but hey There was another one. I'll tell you what play list like. One s spinning continuously right down. Inhale was really. I see and beyond say one i mean everybody and they mama was singing the song she happened on. Remix that blew up makes you must be on a stanford brutus need and then you gotta think about like take talk like avery. When the pandemic everybody'll raking mama was delaying the savage on tax. I think you know that goes into like viral place. Oh that started tiktok dances from the unless unless there was between that one it was a psalm four and i just can't maybe renegate era relegate negate. Go go go Whistle mistake tucker. Everybody was doing a wo- video. But i don't know if that was used to graham or any bet needed. I think that was more instant woods. Bigger are not savage. Was the first one about science. Do now we got google. Cuccia name three made standings on you think being named neighboring board in the house bordering the hat in the house board the the truth behind that is the person starts talking about them. Then you hit it with him. Mike extensive knowledge of mega. Okay i'm gonna save you so bored and the house was definitely before Savage Out west with the jag boys trace go with that one was yeah and he came out yet. The i'm looking at and they got roxanne lottery that was by k. camp so that's the renegade song Let's see what else vesey any other one right. here i didn't know reverse was a tiktok. I bin out. I spy onto okay. Yeah so the those are the tiktok songs. There's one they've been planning the shit out of lately man. These beat boxing day. Yeah that's big in the dance quick. I think he's supposed to be but it doesn't. I will say some funny content has a come out of. I mean fun. Be doing it intentionally in places like that. I think that's when i liked who will so. Well what we pivot into right. So it seems like atlanta's gonna have a lot of new episodes of the first forty eight the way you shoot him to go on. What the hell. We don't need to late. nobody else in. We need to go on a whole lockdown for visitors. Because this is ridiculous. I think as people that live here personally because i mean they shoot today like five minutes from my apartment like six people got shot at a spa like but that's the thing i know for a fact that people are coming here in light hanging out for weeks because the kobe in nothing else to do. They're coming here visiting people and just hanging out unlike because was different like within the last year. That wasn't like this before you know what i'm saying because we stuff then you're crimes is just insane. What think the. I think is happening a lot more than went out. I moved here. Because i you know i lived in memphis okay and if you followed the mid if you follow the memphis police department on twitter a guarantee you. There's at least three shooting today. Memphis like guaranteed. It's happening in somewhere. So i think here it happened but it didn't happen nearly as often as like the city like memphis whereas now the it's happening in every day and i think you made a good point diva because like i was out on the beltline all weekend ride bikes and everybody and they mama was on. The beltline was at piedmont part yet. They got a lot of people. I think atlanta compared to other cities is like wide is huge tourist. Like i was going to pop up shop over off of edgewood and I could barely get down effing street. Because i came from on boulevard so the amount of people that was at the king center and was insane. They didn't wanna get out the street on my listening. Y'all are not effing pigeon so one things that are happening. You need to get out the way or wrong room. You know what i'm saying but it is a lot of tourists here. They're all amal like the people hanging out at laney sewer not like buying But you can tell you look at them. They holes if you call us Horrible you can tell. They're not from atlanta. The way they act the way they talk the way they carry themselves. That is not a atlanta vibe off period than a bringing their whole foolishness all star weekend was insane like those people were not from atlanta. I can tell by the way they dress in everything. I'm like we just need to just have. I don't know this is crummy you. You can't stop it. Lit like literally atlanta's wide open. Like if you are not from here don't live here and you come to atlanta. You would think there's no coat the way i mean little baby and somebody had a concert on all star weekend react house. That's what you're going to last year rates going up where we wanna only cities open. The last one closed soon. I was in buckhead village last weekend in it was packed. Like i mean. People are wearing masks. But i mean the candidate matter because any other assurance of pat like a we have reservations. There were no available tables at all anywhere. The courtyard of buckhead village was packed. I mean it was. It was it was deep. I mean me yet. A crime crime rate's gonna Compare i mean as the population increased is wailed is up you say so relative to now where people are. I would say that kind of level since yeah. I have people who fear system here. Yeah that's found out that the rates of moving people have been buying houses here like crazy because now everybody's working from home it allows them to go ahead and his relocate so a lot of people have relocated here from la from texas from new york from tennessee. Florida is huge hundred percent. True like people are moving here like we. We met a group of people out there. They literally just moved from california two weeks ago. No didn't change jobs. Didn't do nothing they just like. Yeah i think last year. Say that my privacy. The going but i think historically it's kind of an announcement retrieving mike. People like being front here a born and raised here. But it's like ed veteran ended a long time ago. People young. you're from here. I'm like yeah literally from here. They're like you don't sound like you're from him. Like i literally was born at grady. They're like dang. I never met anyone actually born here presented on this panel right now not from you. Yeah exactly. That's what. I was listening. You two are rare commodity this point because like the people i know that live here are not rummy right sent i think in you know at that company that you know we all used to work at or whatever x. Whenever we used to go out for lunch somebody were trying to make you know. Make the comment to the joke or whatever it was lying as a bunch of people that disabled right now in the allied have only one day we might have been all warheads or whatever that would from and this is crazy. But i like it was like everywhere. I went the other two missing people from alabama right. Yes oh wow. Wow so alabama louisiana georgia so that you know so so. Let me. Let me ask you this. Do you think it's a bad or a good thing that atlanta's become diluted if you will know he's bad co go leave while because this is the reason i say. Okay no you guys go. Well i will say. I like you guys here. If anybody has a be here. I prefer you guys to be. Here than other riffraff became because what happens is this atlanta. Culture has is very rich. But it's been tainted with people from other cultures. They don't have the same respect so they come here with all their little foolish ways in implement that into our culture and people think atlanta thing but we can tell exactly when something happens if definitely atlanta situation or if somebody who's now from your 'cause even when people do bad things in atlanta it has a certain style to it and when people do. Other things relate Now from here. 'cause we don't do stuff like that you're managing so i think it's too much going on in people coming here with their little gains in their little stupid scams and all this other stuff in atlanta. Don't move like that honestly. They don't they do other stuff that so. Yeah it's too diluted in people can't tell the difference in how can people tell us. Oh yeah that's atlanta stuff. I'm late how do you know 'cause you're not even from here. You can't even tell us that. Dan downsizing lane get blamed on native. Like yes folks from atlanta georgia in general where they like. All the traffic is terrible. Is all these transplants from other places. That's making the traffic bad or bad drivers or people don't support the sports teams because they're from other places They're from and all this other stuff. Have you ever been to a bar like on like back before. Covid socialite who people really be representing is everything but because they now from here. There's loyalty like people have moved to a new state and then all of a sudden super support data team right away for the most the most part that's true but that's a hold on lou. We know we know we know where our that's a bad example. Because you're trying to have us now go home at all where we start talking about. Now you're trying to not be able to go home ever but but that proves kudos playing you guys are transplants and literature repping. You've got on a t shirt. And he got all that stuff on the back of the but jonah will say he has been here long enough to have maybe something else up there but easy gets a pass because he's still new however only youtube happenstance baby one on at this point the children are saints. Fans is is first of all is abusive parenting. How how how dare. I love my children to baskin winning championships there. I should teach them to be mediocre. Were they on. You wanna tell me now. Yes one daughter one was yes. This this is borderline like the whole cbo situation. Nobody really remembers the date for him to go through and look at least ours is on dvd. Cowboys i mean any game system is win. Games look achieve. Hey you guys wanna watch the championship. Let me go get this city. Put it into the elicit eight on. At least it. Ain't on be vhs cowboys fans out here. They gotta vhs player. It's almost about the same this point because ads like somebody a sixteen go ahead and this is the coffin on them or i know you're waiting to say i know you wait and say gave me a dvd. We need you to watch this. And i'm like. I have no idea how that okay. You're going to go ahead and in there where you just my dad. That was only brand diet house. And i'm just lined canal street. It might be extreme. You could probably even all the antique artifacts there now. You may pay five hundred dollars but listen. I'm not even like i'm not even not. I'm not entertained. Thing i mean. Everybody's got jokes about that point. I guess the point that. I was getting august into sport. Argument was that a lot of the things and and stuff that's placed on people that live in atlanta or have moved here. They blaming everything else on all sides with might be partially true was the worst drivers that talk about estimate. Folks i know are from her say they that is a part of my rate today because somebody from a state that i will name cut me off in. There's a couple of states. There's four states of people that every time i get cut off or somebody's skis across five lanes of traffic there. From one of these four states one of my saying we got a melting pot. Okay right yeah new york a melting pot power whatever. Why big to the public transportation system where people don't do moved down here from new york. You probably just got behind the wheel. You'll first car at the age of forty six. Wow that's how that's how much you need a car down here. So i will say did you have people from across the country bringing their driving style. Lack thereof in like you dropped drop in one city where you have to have a car you keep more martin is not going to get you know i mean. Can we talk about who engineered the the interstate system because infrastructure's yeah. I know i'm drivers a half a mile. Two birds and try to get onto eighty five bear to shit. I m structure is banned but it was built through people that live here. We just having open partner population Texas is worse because has been a dallas before like literally the full awhile. It's like the streets is horrible. Like at least we have like a true exit ran on dallas like texas tech say instead of building this two lane highway this bill five on each side because we know what dallas is going to be and land on the other hand was like he's probably gonna bigger but we just keep it at three lanes of ps. You know whatever like what is he to eighty five aren't from here. Can't drive on the five safely traffic on eighty five or Definitely not sleep. La that probably wouldn't have a conversation about five lane hallways. Hey we have several inches. Depending on how intercity go but people who are not from day. Panicking can't use those. I'm just like okay. I don't know about that like like i said that. There's this two interchanges. I think that it just god awful. And it's a twenty getting on twenty five in the south of north and then there's two eighty five going to eighty five north. That should always backed up. No you didn't name the worst one. You skipped over the worst eighty-five trying to get four. Hundred is the worst thing in the history of life own. The worst one. Yeah that's it doesn't off anything going to eighty five. North gwinnett is a frequent nightmare all day every day. If you try to conference. Who eighty-five from dudley. To get on the eighty five. I can't tell you how many days you accidentally stay in traffic. And has nothing to do with two eighty five. Is everybody trying to go. Eighty-five nor to jimmy carter. Plays he'll You're trying to you for active. That traffic is horrible. No matter what time it is like he doesn't move it all. These four hundred has emergency lane to use the doubles an extra lane into you know between certain hours than other than this lane ever never send traffic. Yeah that that does gwinnett is war will like no matter what slick you may going to have to well. I know they're doing dunwoody expanding. The i take the landlords who they were for a long time she wasn't that's just and you gotta pay the drive in. Nobody driving them in the end. All those labels lanes the peach pass lane. Nobody uses you as well. So you talk about a. I seventy five north. They got one at all lanes. The express lanes always closed at the flakes. Pay were like if it's in high demand like dude. I'm not paying ten dollars driving stupid laying. It is what it is. And i work for myself so i'll have to be anywhere in certain time. Sorry ish ridiculous They were going to be a texas and get away with that kind of stuff. They shut down the toll lanes on four hundred or so. What made you think that you needed this whole new lane. Sometimes it's five senses. Total as four hundred was only to pay for the construction. That was on that. I mean the thing had already been paid for and they just can't run into its own skin years that's been paid for any look. How look it became bookie the that could. Would you say done like i mean. Oh oh nine. Maybe you wanted to construct. No saying he'd been done. Hello i'm running. Them told because new construction siege in like ninety nine. Two thousand Running up until that team give a damn clue visit told over here. It was like they still paying. I'm like this should been been finn in been a minute. I might've been used for Beard beard long time and he kept goes up. Cause a panic. May what are you gonna do. Gotta eat your car home. If is true. A calling menu kozo menu Yes i have something is it. I just wonder gloss on grabby by always give so to the point wages leading team romano attention k. If you with that lens cut so tell me if you look in case i won't take you take you take it take you take. You're looking for night. Luke issue so what. My own skin appreciate lipsey marty's she kissed middle spin because now check mate so michika wondering does she wanted to be forty keating. Is this just another check that you wanna play. I'm the crack one. You don't play with that. Don't play dead so tell me do you take you take it away so tell me what you feel. I won't take you take. you need. Take you take you take against jacob. Cognis look what is cameras garment championships. If you're familiar with the catamaran they do they do yes they they don't they don't miss as a kid. If you haven't tried several brand arthur. I was gonna say something some journalists and show. You want you shouldn't be what mrs shop and it's one of those things i can really see you. You could be you can make make sure panchal something out of chips this. I really really talented people just tastes like taste like briefs is or something or no. I mean this sounds like one you just by yourself like. You don't need a deal don't you not. Don't shoot his main that you yourself a little bit. But i just released brian. Harold arm. John was captured on mitchell. Thinks this kind union. But at the flavor rouse i was i was almost. I didn't have any expectations so they just was created and very likely zanu county spicy. You know like a different anyway. This is a very light. Flame is a very delicate. Condos karma keys not guard against not wilde's flailing hits the flavored as there is good if it makes it easily say because it makes it me and you get out being played so i'm excited. I saw this guy. Wanna china like i said you want crooked awesome Y you make some parmesan garlic flounder or something like that. You wanna crumble some chips over top of or create like a pinkel kind of break crossing the egypt's source that actually. Yes sir macaroni. Some places like like early fries or somebody heads mindset a little bit took place. I can think of that garden. Friars is Right now Comes to mind is the euro spot was placed. great rats american dot season arch. They start giving you the seasons that you don't tam slave issue fight words american. No greek fricks. Oh great rabbit seasoning. Gives you to quit on your briars. Great reps is garbage period. But that's another story. I was considering getting a euros back. I used to read the same same here early to mid two thousand the question an assignment end cubans loose. You give me the you give me inside. Appear in our news. Wish sell good. Hey guess i had today. I had the pies fish sandwich today. Were you seeing that same planes. I enjoyed it all of the components. Go together very nicely. I think next time. I'm gonna ask for more pickles. 'cause i disliked pickles but it was and then this genius. Put my sauce. Tartar off from the bottom in the top but not like overkill but just enough where i wasn't like you know dry sandwich because they put it on the top but like there's still the undermined dry so i was pleasantly surprised. It was very spicy but despite balanced for to be a in definitely was founder. Not like a You know i always worry about. This overly Patty after cod right manufactured by like so compressed down in weird but on radio square fish. Like what did you do the rest of it. You know what i'm saying like my fillet was definitely awkward. Shapes like real fish it was in. Here's fruit flies I was pleasantly surprise in. I've had i've had. Yeah i'm not too far behind. You wanna say like four for sure mike. Mike legit my go-to now. When i have gotten since they drop on the bond person in advice i was getting like the chicken tenders the franchise and i don't go there all the time because i mean to eat out i mean jesus christ towers if is led by the sandwich along five. A combo was like this is no. It's actually it's actually the cheapest thing on the menu. The like serena I think by itself the combos like that. This is san yeah but the compost heaps hail compared to the other shit on the main salon ninety nine. So i'm trying to find out. Is this here to stay. Is just lindsay's now valley here to stay primarily is definitely served its purpose for for this guy. I've got because they might do to in sixteen point. I think they might do what some of the other places do and destroyed out they keep on thank. You look really wanted them. Co-boys make rain for this. They sell pablo gave out. I know oldboy they got. They got a got a fish one. They do a museum too. But it's okay to the uninitiated on the main you because you have a lot of people who really they could capture a lot of pets. Qatar are people who don't want who just need a break from chicken. Sometimes in could definitely get a lot of people with that his. I mean when i'm really not in the mood to eat chicken beef pork and all that i would love to have like a better option. 'cause i just give french fries from places sometimes because there's not really another option for me own heavy being as i need to. I keep looking at it and gratitude. Man i just. I need to bring to a kuchar I seen it if you try to program in you saying that you know it's good to uninitiated you influencing by the as coming date at what i like. What would you bid with tangent fit with the extra bouquet is. It's like it's like the same thing is one of the Brad pie with like her. She's on the inside the me about it is the villain feel. It was great now. Desolate sailing. It's not of course steeled rene. I don't i don't disobey. I'll be honest about traditional sixteen. You can but i've never seen a been yay filled with a cream or a united. I feel yeah. I thought so i keep it in the back of my mind cujo. The next time. I go home i will go to cafe. Dumont specifically gives you some of those that you can have the real deal man There so i don't even know what happens to your stomach when you're a cafe dumont but is a bottomless pit of a mini as somehow find the wrong between that your coffee. You can live their eclair. And they don't and they don't cost a lot and all the closest one the closest thing to a a if you're just trying to like get something like similar texture benes on a whole 'nother level like a chinese chinese doughnut though that's like similar texture through our vignette like the pillow because most chinese donuts. I don't like the sugaring. Hey look hey look. We're not playing the game tonight but We yeah we arguing about this week. All right so i put it in the chat Where actually speaking of Pastries and whatnot. We're talking about bread this week. in restaurants so options are we got a the. Texas roadhouse buns. We got the red lobster. Cheddar biscuits got the olive garden. Brits dick's than we have a the bread from outback. Okay okay so what i want to say. Just the rip All of these are great. The cheddar biscuits are in their own category. They're not going anywhere. No allegation breadsticks. Amazing they're not going anywhere. So unfortunately i think outback's the out one here that gotta go not because they're bad but just all these three Awesome and if they don't bring out food and time you could probably you know fuck around get fulla any of those outback's out. I really liked that. You made that point. Because i was gonna mentioned something like when you go to a restaurant as a key. It or Immature person going to a restaurant. Which feel like. Sabrina is just a waste. But as you get older and you really appreciate a good breed at risk line. Sometimes echo shine the meal to be part of that trading. Much canoe new. Texas roadhouse realize how low back to I don't remember what word because i remember debris breed Sony river via stony river. In like two next weekend. I've never been there wouldn't d. He had a name for what you call that you call that butter angel. Taveres okay living. Okay let me take. Somebody's bread. I know we gotta go but let me tell you about this shit. Okay you want to talk about pillowy but yet crunchy salty could not stop eating it and they they they. They almost like a donut hole. Thank you yes. I'm say much in. From w thank. You don't have hold and like texter is so hard to put into words because it's fluffy to everything he just said i did. And they got the nerve to bring you out. Honey border smugly hundred it takes like they literally are making it in the back with honey like he called it angel to you. That's what he said. Did you put some age. Know what you call it out Yes or i would eat. The butter like donkey. Brees is bringing the butter out. I want to break raise. Listen but sounds like mainly alexa is so unbelievably good. Like don't make it makes no sense. It makes no sense this this even further you. I've been to stony river once and it was like two thousand nine eight. It's been well over two years. But i still remember this. Greet tag them at them. Maybe we could get a free food. Let me say it into much. they make. But that's not good now dealing on release they. Prime rooms mazed. I remember that too. They got anywhere but these philly cheese steak aired roles. That are beautiful. yeah. I mean we all got together. Manny the filippini eggrolls from philly growth from gulberg man. Somebody over today talked about how amazing they avocados ones. And i was like i. You know because i never heard like all works is like i know. There's one in dunwoody like right there. I wanna know. Jesus christ lynette tell you dose teams are freaking devil late so good but then they close at like four o'clock. They're only open for breakfast and lunch. They have you. Have you had avocado toast now. I haven't had like good sandwiches. Good rubens like you know real picky course de places on plenty of aku because men avocado toast. I'll tell you what man best way to eat at his throat to writing. Hey let me say. I was gonna say sixteen out about coach in like it was it was it was one of those pretentious. Like kinda you know what i'm saying. Hitler until tribal and it's so simple but what really is is the is the seasoning that you put on our costs yes because mcconnell vans like almost nothing flavored you naked man you got. You got get like a good brand though like you. If you have a really good bread and the like i love realized who. Yes brioches. Gray when i made it home remorseful. Yeah they do that like a hawaiian bread or something but some coconut oil on inning glazing it gives it is beautiful glossy on it but but in a burger so th-they put like tomatoes something we don't really scrapple really hit who please diesel. Garbrandt sticks can go on the tracks. Wow whoa compared to the good go and this is hard truck that was not the right to it but hey accept talking about hey. Hey everybody had their choice. I don t get text in her her view on it. But i understand what she means because she just wrote it. That was a competent more than it was the out to me. Still i mean at least with one has to go because now i'm confused. She saying they can go with that honey butter center. She don't listen. I'm saying feel like that was not. I felt like that was an endorsement by more than it was. But the game but the game isn't which one is saying. Even though you gotta go actually excellent well it looks. Kujo just acts so in the meantime photo it at the top. Who's the best okay. Fair bit further muddy. So that's what i'm saying. Yeah yeah that. Sounds like an endorsement boy. So her saying get the hell played the game. Say yes so the one that has to go on this for me is the first of all i would say red lobster bisque. Feel like you bought. Say no no hell no k than i aw. I didn't even know the outback was still out in existence to even be on this list out daring One in like oh it looks like outback has the same bread that you get like a longhorn would would've said oh pumpernickel i believe that's what it is. It's not but it is. Dr is the brown bread though. I assume all breads that colors pumpernickel so but now a distinct pickle taste to you know it. It's gotta our ministry takes but it's the one that has to go is going to be the outback. Just based on that part. The one that is not going anywhere at all is who is. It's tough in between the two. Because i'll go. Breadsticks was a especially when they come in man radio. Because you always think that like women. Are these total foodies to get like you know. I mean food is like you know we like to but to watch you guys get excited food. That is just awesome. I this is the whole thing. So i know how to get things done like this show with some bread for one of these restaurants in you know. Hey no argument no rebuttal know about your too much. They over here trying to cook these struggle meals right. He just prayed men. Don't don't driver usurp man live here leash show up with some of that some of that but first of all we compared to the started out as other ones. That's the only river all the tears before you asked me if you go there. Yeah yeah yeah yeah. Yeah well that fits the personality very well. Yes y'all gonna get. I'm joe what you do is just in the middle of a google trying to figure out what outback steak outbreak were. Longhorns is Honey honey honey week but apparently outback is similar. Something different in nobody stadium debating but even copycat recipe song molasses and honey in it in Coffee cocoa powered stuffing so. Yeah that screams. Australia so there is pretty unique. The interesting part of this is the site on reading about this copycat recipe. It mentions a question is who agrees with me. That free wrestler rid bridges. Some of the best bread. That texas roadhouse breed those red lobster biscuits. The olive garden brisk In outback steakhouse breed limited. Before things we've talked about man on the randomly fine which take in college. Those texas roadhouse rolls with the honey. Butter was amazing have been areas. But the last time i had them they. They dropped off a cliff. From what i remember. They were all younger child. So it's a it's a it's a it's a heck though to head embraer because like joe it earlier you might be mediocre but that bread might just be saving grace and big you know a lot of restaurants. They have the good bread that way throws off the mediocre meal that japan shit ton of money full red lobster. Whoa whoa whoa. Especially after darn darn sodium. Beth deputy yoga as well so families and we'll let me cookham. It has not good l. flavor is really texture more than it is slated I'm used describe. It isn't a slider saw in. Seo bring mich boca. i actually have only been to. Texas roadhouse once And that was actually. I think just last year or two thousand nineteen allow. It's hard to keep together with. His dad was virus yet. So i wanna say it's twenty for mother's day of may twenty twenty baseline nineteen first time going and i do remember the brit was could i remember me's like this About career over my is good. Y'all right to include this Outback steakhouse want to I'm gonna take that out. And i'm just gonna do because i've never been outback steakhouse i'm gonna say relaxed. And i haven't. I used to work the an i a clip of these biscuits aid them out of your appetite them out eighty system way chicken rahman the saw artists that they have their the employees. You only was able to get cheddar biscuits from working there down. I mean unless you work in the kitchen as a cook and you was eating stuff discontinued back and The only thing that you got freedman's union thing else you can invite all day for free go to the policy was debris and senate took me not me it. Does you wanna do with four boxes. Feel to be taking the school the next day. Either because our house who would eat chapter. Yeah you definitely. You definitely ages up out of boxes. Yeah damn frozen. Suckers endangered sullivan. Well well they stopped thievery like that a few years ago because they've made in the box. And you make yourself all my jimmy wilbur. Same similar little miniature everything else go. Yes yeah biscuits is. I have not eaten. Jim knicks before at all for right their mom in tim nick they had. This is like the best chain barbecue that you've had like chain. I like stains. If you are hussein's roof sex saints pretty good. You'll need to have jim in knicks. Because you'll never eat jimmy. Knicks is like one of the few barbecue places in this league lived in memphis. Yes and i've had like almost everything on their menu. Like i guess like i've had the ribs of had the brisket pork shoulder. All of its good. You can't live with you live. I wanna say within three miles of just based on you live within three tavon miles of agenda. I'm not saying that's me saying that. It's amazing in that's the only barbecue place the eat it because all other restaurants saturday boil their ribs or something. It's discussing was nothing. It was nothing personal like. Oh i just don't want. I just never. I just never thought doing just never again. I'll cheese is awesome too by the way like yes it is and i but i've had. That's what i'm saying like barbecue spot derek. Were agrees is horrible. Let me just say down like everything else is good I'm not announced this barbecue. Place they don't have like. Hey we're known for our world famous one dish like dimick's is like hey everything's did you know we should do. We're gonna do snacks and friends but we should do like another version with like restaurant. Lucas yes we should do like jim in and then we should do The chicken lanes Magic city we should do like three wrestler. Ethnic flavor on chicken wings mandate was just we just don't host from their wedneday so i'm tired of eating chicken wings zone Yoga today but yeah. We'll do that with another just a section or something than just film inside of it on youtube date man today. Yes you boss show you. You put room without that man. This is a collective snaking. that's sixteen. I wanted to shoot the next episode. So i was trying to be a team player transport what you did there. The little disabled like. Oh this is you. Just a case of business takes up really so he's not reading to buy risk you know. It's all good so wait. So this is whistle. Were invited something. Different right yes okay. Good as works worse. Yes kudos to the internet undefeated. Is it random time. Now branded radio host feel like go ahead. Go ahead i i do have to the hosted on shoot real quick so kelly just like we were talking about cancel culture earlier. Can we just cancel this new baby daddy culture. They're all of these. Young privileged girls are doing like. Have you not noticed that. All of these celebrity daughters are now like purposely these relationships with these men who already have a whole bunch too key like these will reproduce. So you've got zannini glitches. Ti chinese daughter ti stepdaughter. She's only twenty four we now she has a kid would a guy who has different rainy to bring charity had the baby. She already had the baby like a couple of months. She's twenty four. She had a baby. Some are walker got pregnant by london on track. He's got multiple kids everywhere. You've got emily. B.'s odors one of our orders. Oldest daughter's like twenty two. She pregnant by rapper. Guy who is on floyd mayweather daughter. She's nineteen a seat. That are pregnant by some rapper. Doing i'm light. Y'all have this talk about respecting your wound. A you're gonna. His name is nba young boy all day. So listen Wound ladies will also had nine kids at the age of nineteen. I feel like. I've mentioned on the show before. Yeah i understand the thought process behind part like in today's society where there's so many things you can do to not but come another baby mom like what is the deal with just thinking. Oh i'm not married to this guy. We're not in the super series relationship loses. Give him my child's people people who don't have to worry about financial risks are okay just doing stuff like that. I i think he's i think one thing. A lot of regular people worry about is being able to support their family being able to support having kids too many keys. Overshoot pockets mean ninety struggling to support. Don't overshoots club. Then this is more of my thing is fight from any emotional in ability points you. You're like volunteering. Like on purpose. Like with all of the advantages. You having life to sign up to do this. You know what i'm saying. I understand you're still young girls or whatever but issues perpetuating this team were this is go to just like not think ahead they let me try to have a family unit or me. Do something for my kid has a shot at a whole family. At least try but these girls were just going a guys blazing just wanting to be another name on a list. I mean so you know. Respect your wound thinking through china be in a more stable environment. If you are going to just give a man a gift of a child like that is just been so desensitized. The stability house respect your will respect her because my race you know so respecting your room ladies invite just thinking it before you just give a kid like that is like a big big gift in like these girls just throw it around like is free and it's not as it's going to be stuck on you. My second rates is all these horrible drivers from the following states. Florida new york yell delaware for some reason in north carolina. I really want to pop your tires. Every time consistently cut me off in traffic can never follow directions on your. Gps horrible horrible jar in drives low. Now florida name again. Florida new york north carolina and delaware now delaware drexel loose have been cut off by texas exes. Y'all are the worst drivers. I don't know that like please just thought coming here no longer welcome get out. Get out. Get out now. If only they listen to that message. You know five years ago. But it's been provoked diva. I mean good grief. She's she's a she's an angry black woman. Every black man women's history month man. Black twitter going killian cancelled women. History be cancelled black history mark. Oh so we'll let me let me jump in here too but diva as just cancelled These states up there all right. Don't want to slide this in here. Real quick that s machine. I know that with a stupid. That's that's what she said. She did know he stepped. Unless you. Bobby valentino you handle this race that i did come out. I want to correct it. Maybe divas divas. Okay say it again and a dvd. He's you want to say sitter. I'm just going to cut this whole heart. Xm is l. nice. Latin thanks that high applause over my shoulder here. This is my right shoulder. i don't know waiting for but degrees back there. So i have to say something about debris because he retired. That's the greatest saints player in our history that there will be another one like him. He made us relevant. And the reason why. I bring that up you know. He retied on the same day that he signed with us fifteen years ago. It's a great day. But i'm taking this opportunity to say that drew brees has gone from the war dead. It needs to be say that everybody louisiana's not a katrina victim. Stop asking people will probably every time. We mentioned it katrina. We're all not katrina victims. Okay do you understand me some more hand. We're not refugee taxes but prisoners. Are you did. Oh god family might matter where you go if you say. You're bro. New orleans is the for parts of louisiana. Like oh did you. Move like the st question. Did you get a stimulus shake. Because that was the first time i even knew people against the checks from katrina. Did you get a check is given out checks katrina it. Yeah when people came here like famous to to to move you know government assistance night. The wait for doing that. 'cause my last night i packs. You sure could like yeah. We'll talk about later. But like my favorite france game grade. They was getting those he didn't even ask either Yourself he been here. See down like a legitimate question because see your smile and then the question is do shake your head no ultimate. I'll be here. But you do being collected jake's listen collect nothing on saying stop. Stop making the default quest officials. Think you fresh off the the the boat with that right the deep into the racial crates fashioned family raising going anywhere good. I well because for so long you're still ripping those jerseys down a whole play from earlier. Is that makes people think that. You're you know you fresh and i'm gonna tell you yawning john yang. I'm talk about drew. Brees teams ask for fifteen years. Even the falcons was like yo drew. Thank you but we will miss you. 'cause he worked at ask for fifteen years i fifteen year. Who's next not katrina victims damage now as we who's the weedy who else is involved this issue he katrina victim. Neither no not not at all. It's funny because people accident. I'm like when katrina happened. I still have power like we didn't have any lead into a little bit of rain like mustard not as dramatic as what people were expecting. Jeez did finding people find out. You're matica chain victim disappointed. 'cause like i want you to say yes can end the conversation to move on but then you like now. I'm not from new orleans. Oh it's not a conversation. It's like what what what you mix with you though. It's not a house that a conversation start like. Let's let's focus on. What could be what i am truth. Try and playing that game. It's very uncomfortable oscar for people to argue with you to come up with a cool like refugee Immigrants being ams conversation starter. Right yeah my you know you being from the philippines. They might ask the digital questions about you know by that. My office know words like you. Teach me words or labor filipino dish. By what. I got some plain english silent which took my random is lost it. I lost it. I had when i was. I was hoping it was gonna be cbo open. It's not what we ran out when he ran. Its course at the. I don't think we have any more Cardiac arrest jokes now. Lost a hammer. You wrap it like that guy did to the. Oh gosh you know. I'm here in. Corbett's worked really hard on that. Psa me you like eight different things. I just wanna know who wrote the fees. 'cause you know the person who wrote in revenue that'd be totally arable. We have to find that his statement was he wraps courts. Move if i if i can find. I'm going to try to find it though if you end up punching to finish video it'd be right here you lessons name again like we got us. Names shooter dot com. That's gonna cut and splice. Thank you wait. What's no no. please do that. Like no breakthrough you could severely. I've lost it. I had went and i really lawson and now i'm thinking it more. I'm losing it more with their name. Could still do what you did last time. Like if you if it's on your mind text me to remind me so. I can tell you all my guy. Yeah i keep spacing on wall snacks. I can make this random it is a lot of people may not may not relate to those low Should remember my personal but Name though the web shooters versus organic will argument is stupid to me. Because you know there's there's there's gatekeepers though The organic whip who doesn't make sense because spires shoot where from their butts from from the ads basically and my response that that's really where you draw the line that this way you suspend belief is that he's gotta be from his ass ball not not as cool as personal. Why would you want that in my head. I just picture like a spider man just trying to talk sake of. He has finer based powers. He's he didn't get transformed into response. He can do can do which generate way where that comes from is it makes sense that it comes from the hands. Nobody's horse and see you flying batman to be more like a bad like batmans a bat by radioactive bet but the but the sun gives an extra manpower. That's just superman the crispy extracurricular under the yellow insulin. Get outta here. He gives extra regularly musae hurt from laughing. I don't think snowman black this hard on episode light Backlash there everybody in the courtroom. Do you're keeping an extra layer you. Here's a love needs breath he literally. Now i'm going about this diplomatic way. He wraps this is a wrap that you would put on. Pbs type shit. You know this is how. How does the lawyer go about like client to do this. Why i want to Do you get this. Reference was like all right everyone. Today's the big day. You don't remember that game funny when you explain the family guy peter was on child and bruce gotta they was like all right. Today's the big day. He said out because like as good as real good saw in our room but yet ramp into the jewish is comical. It's there's so much comedic value. And i wanna see what the statement was. He ran cohen. He just came under rent when he saw right but he literally wrap is statement. I now i'm totally going to look him up. They etiquette since he had a lawyer. Think about the times. He rehearsed that his legal team direction. I we have tomorrow. Let's go over your state me. Yes all right one. Do not waste like all right. I want you to go again but this time. Want you to flow a little bit more. This is nineteen ninety eight so we want to release. Oh gee i'm trying to get off. Because i want you. I didn't do the crime saw due to time these mirrors don't read into. I'm just gonna say i didn't duke. They do it would appreciate that. I think we should have now. The judge was like yeah. Yeah only only only the harsh the railway making. I wanna say so. Now he kiss. Somebody beat digest jewelry. Did this jury 'cause navy. The jury was keeping the beat saying maybe they rehearse it with an accent like a freestyle battle jury charge and other lawyer was like. Oh that's crazy that's crazy and don't forget about the bail of the bailiffs in their life. So if somebody in the lacorte record release. Got the people in the audience free. Dj connecticut free dj communicate. Oh my god we are going to piss that one do coastal carolina is going to be so mad when he sees this how we clown him man. Somebody's gonna happen to your comments. I seem to mind the one person on the planet trick. I'm pretty question your sabre-rattling only go skirt skirt. I'm putting it out. There wasn't a fan. I draw one of my favorites back then man. So it ain't me has a random get host ran i i. I haven't random Abe was shot out the cloth. Man you know. hey you know. I hope he's still out there. Doing your thing would not expect really. Don't wanna laugh because he don't you don't wanna courtesy you see wanna encourage them rant. Nivo who had a look talk about callers funds ninety s. rapper. Oh is that okay. So here's my random. So when i moved away from louisiana i thought louisiana was like the only place that just had alcohol everywhere like louisiana. You got liquor in the fuck you gas station. You got it in walmart you know. You got drive-thru dockery's and the atlanta beltline said you know what ezra hold my beer. He my part. We got brothers with coolers mixed drinks. Yes i. Linda drinks. And i will say they earn the vine and they probably illegal 'cause they took liquor license. Amazing shout out to the guy from new york east any other every weekend. Y'all took my boy out. He said he makes the to wrecks off of that every weekend. Yes they were delicious vizsla concert in atlanta. Oh my god. They are all concentrating on the known for the water bottle boys but they got. They got uncle bob with cooler mix. It's like an understanding because you know a lot of these events are police then nobody bothers them as long as they're like a certain amount of being away from the you. Yeah i mean they. They had they had one crew group a ladies. They had a tent and they had their mixed drinks and like a a like a sunday d. Looking bottle and they were like you know playing like little do ball and some other like black family. Get together music right. Hey we got these drinks over here family reunion music now because. Yeah that's my song is like is up there will wobble in beverly. That is a very accurate description of sawyer. It's damned reunion using. Now the waddell sienese the law belong out of this conversation. So why i dunno built right. Hey you know what only some were played. College lower used when he was talking to understand his reputation. Y'all y'all taking all never single bit of the heat is happening. come back out of have. The same reputation didn't stop manning. Front those knocked out cbo yet all right then. Hap hairdresser had knocked out cbo yet. I'm just saying it was briefly it. Yeah i guess. Yeah i'm sure concrete no you know. I don't know that enough people have heard of cbo even care. If he did not have now they will figure that one person you just wait a shout out the concrete. Maybe you get some most streams may get as my brother at toyota's s to shut the fuck up he did. I told him. Look if if this is somehow get back to see. I just wanna hear your rats and this come on aftermath shall i'm fan. I am saying okay. i'm ready. Do that is an interesting concept to me because airy creative we see how yes next week got. See our way out of this conversation guy. Wave at the camera overly hopefully still be here in case this bay area rapid other found out about it by fans of the show thrown conversation. I love this. Candle is my favorite lemon cellos. The it sounds muji looks okay. You can drink it. Speaking of it sounds like the name of a restaurant in bucky. I love the name. A restriction. Until august patent pending. Promise if i fussy arrest running bookie Lawsuit or i'm busy. I'm putting the warning up. You know it always they know we mean business when you look directly in the camera you point to figure you say and if the bank sees it's the bunch of black people trying to get a business loan and we don't get enough money we're gonna make it a coffee shop. So that's a patent tending to. Yes we can. Worse case scenario is going to be eliminates dan.

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Facebook Advertising Mistakes: When Duplication Becomes the Norm

Strength In Business

19:59 min | 2 years ago

Facebook Advertising Mistakes: When Duplication Becomes the Norm

"Welcome to strengthen business podcast which is all about maximizing your impact by implementing a powerful marketing system that will help you perform at your highest level and now here is your host Chris Rock. Welcome to your marketing session at Strengthen Business Mining's Chris Rock and today. I'm going to talk to you about facebook advertising mistakes and I picked this topic because I recently returned from my four workshops workshops that I did in Berlin was all about facebook advertising. I had a lot of beginner and intermediate advertisers in my workshops interesting markets all across industries a lot of passion. Marquette's applications people running conversion nats traffic ads only few running engagement at so so it was really interesting and I wanNA talk to you about is one of those rookie facebook advertising mistakes that popped over and over again in my sessions and I want you to avoid void these mistakes now for those of you who are tuning in for the very first time first of all welcome and second of all. I'd like to point out that I do the recordings based on the block post that you can find on strengthen business dot com and obviously this is a block post as well however I'm always accompanied with an audio recording so today's Typos today's session facebook advertising mistakes when duplication becomes the who radio on the way back from my recent facebook advertising workshop in Berlin. I reflected upon the mistakes that pop up during the sessions. Some of these mistakes were common whereas others were directly correlated with the level of know-how each participant had one of these facebook advertising mistake stuck with me as I've seen it come up over and over again in my workshops irrespective of the country or continent and he had to do with duplication tation duplication is a phenomenon that isn't strictly correlated with a particular industry but rather something that can emerge in in all markets it can kill your campaigns assets and adds now duplication per se isn't a bad thing however when when you have say one hundred forty assets in a single campaign which each asset having to ask that you have duplicated over and over again ending up with two hundred eighty that's two time so on forty at with different at this aren't talking two hundred eighty different addy's Eddie's then you have a real issue now. The attendees were wondering why the campaign wasn't performing poorly in more money money. Wasn't there delivering better results. Adding new assets wasn't solving the problem more so duplicating to creatives on ad level was the whole thing deeper into the ground. They desperately needed a way out now before I talked to you about how depletion kills your APP performance woman's. Let's recap briefly where we have you so we're talking about one campaign one single at campaign. There are one hundred forty assets in this campaign and each asset is made up of two ads with the two different images. The copy is the same from the C. T. As a call to action that button is the same just the imagery different so we're talking about a total of two hundred eighty. That's okay okay next. The budget is set on asset love so by the way the company running. These ads is not using campaign budget optimization. CBO WPRO and for all of you were not familiar with this this feature so campaign budget authorization will become a default as of September two two thousand nineteen and it will go back to all existing assets and it will be set as a default for everything that set up newly you can have a looking facebook spokes lead the latest announcement just be aware of the fact campaign budget optimization will become a default as of September okay so budget was set on asset level nothing on CBO senator of all the one hundred forty assets are targeting cold traffic only so none of these assets were starting email all subscribers a website custom audience or not using the pixel basically engagement custom audiences and they had a great fan base also people interacting with a pulse on their organic page and they weren't doing the warrant targeting lookalikes based off these war modernises next one the the only exclusion that was made on asset level was for customers which is great so we're dealing here apart from that with huge audience overlaps and by the way the feature audience overlaps which you can find inside audience. The audience tap was also unknown to the attending and here comes to crooks all ads were duplicated and so we're talking about two hundred eighty different at ID's. I'm repeating myself two hundred eighty different at ID's. Basically social proof was almost almost non existent and this to me is not only a mistake but this to me is how you leave money on the table now. Let's let's continue. The crazy part of the story is the following the market these people are in is absolutely amazing. They have a hugely engaged audience individuals that are devouring every piece of content that was put out organically on the facebook page again. They were in a passion market. People are engaging like crazy. There's Malo auto markets where you see a such engagement levels. I mean that was insane saint to me now whereas they were getting tens then hundreds of likes shares comments a lot of reaction but more importantly a ton of shares and comments comments organically on their posts. Their ads were cold in social traffic. Nobody was engaging right. Not only that at conversions weren't happening either so because that was what they were aiming for conversions no results either so the acts simply were appealing to the audience and everything the company was doing successfully on their facebook page so everything they were doing organically and that was the was great couldn't couldn't be duplicated in the paid advertising so when he came to buying media something was wrong and the reason for the data. I'm going to go into this because I want you to avoid the following rookie facebook advertising mistakes and here are some of the typical facebook advertising mistakes a beginner's make you mike to do them as well just be aware of them because especially actually now two thousand nineteen and going forward after everything that happened in the face of ground in two thousand eighteen the the whole trustee shoes. Cambridge analytic on it is so important that you adjust your strategies because things that have worked in the past years. I'm telling telling you I've been advertising and I've been running profitable ads on facebook. Since two thousand eleven Eireann -At's daily whether it's for me or for my customer we're so I'm in the trenches on telling you everything that we did in the past years today. FACEBOOK did a lot of changes and you need to adjust adjust you need to adapt and you need to fast okay so Let's get get deeper into those advertising mistakes first evolve. You've not promoting existing facebook posts up until my workshop. The company didn't even know about the existence the existence of this feature using in existing page post idea in your at not only helps you capitalize on all the social prove your ready together organically but also avoids duplication friends so what do I mean by that you put out an organic post you put out the post on your page right and and that post has an ID. A- post id now the the moment you set up. Your ad in ads manager will ask you whether to set up a new ad or to use an an existing post. This is where you paste in that post I D E. Use that existing posts and you use it over and over again he ever single asset or campaign that you setup to capitalize on that now. Obviously it will run for certain campaign objectives for others not but where he can use this use it to the Max okay so use existing page post. ID's especially in two thousand nineteen where social proof is a number one priority for the platform next goes hand in hand with this one is dictation bonanza when you have roughly three hundred different ad in a single campaign with only only one distinction and that is a different imagery. There's no way on earth that you can succeed long-term. If you still think that will muzzle tough continued duplicate like crazy but other than that maitree use existing posts and down duplicate don't have all those different at issue in your campaign next one targeting exclusively a cold audience now there is nothing wrong. Targeting people based on interest and behavior era patterns however leaving word traffic totally out of the game is a huge mistake and here's why the word traffic. This is where he will get social perfect. These people know your brand though your company no you if you have a personal brand and they will give you that social prove that you daddy's so needed when your target your cold traffic because they will see the interaction they will see the shears the comments the reactions all K- this is something legit. Let's look deeper into it so it will benefit you greatly when you target a cold audience next one using no exclusions now this this company was only excluding existing customers and that was about it. They didn't even know about the audience overlap instrument that you can find inside audiences dances not a good thing next one competing with yourself do huge audience overlaps now those one hundred forty at sets based on interest were significantly overlapping themselves leading to facebook spending the money on vastly the same audience and thus kicking your costs up right especially especially if you're running on at the same time right see you're competing against yourself which is totally insanity next one juggling with different hypes now. The creative is the variable off success therefore it's crucial to test different video apps to test castle adds is to work with canvas and obviously also image lean cats. The company was only doing image lane cats. The only thing that they change was two different images. That's the only thing that they changed in that. No no testing of their copywriting testing whether the link was working nothing nothing which again crazy right and they have amazing videos on their organic patient they weren't using them in there at literally mind mind boggling next one note facebook expedite advertising funnel when your entire facebook ads on elise made up of only one campaign. I wouldn't even call it the fun it's just one campaigning conversions. It's just a matter of time until you're at will stop working. You can't just send people like crazy to a sales page and expect them to buy over in over again especially for targeting coal traffic. That's insanity okay so not having a facebook advertising final next one no content marketing strategy goes hand in hand with the above with most companies. Don't understand is that running profitable ads on facebook consistently requires more than setting conversion campaign and Russian people to a sales pitch. Just what I said before people want to get to know yes an individual and business therefore putting out content in different from forums just on doing now it can be written for an audio for video is a crucial part of every successful marketing and sales process. Nowadays people were interacts several times with your car a content that will we'll check you out. were out on your wordpress. Either your website. Whatever what are you using more press are not there. They're check your social status. your your social media platforms not your social status your social media platforms and they they. WanNa know more about you before day exchange with you before. They open up their wallets right so it's crucial that you have a content marketing strategy necks. Take a low budget issues when you have five dollars daily again. I'm not against five. US dollars daily please if he if you use them. Instead of buying the starbucks bucks coffee if only five dollars that you have put it in the paid media 'em learn learn to run ads so when you have five dollars daily for every ad set to spend then run two different images inside each asset well. That's a little bit too much for face to take and the image deaths won't be conclusive so five dollars contesting to images. That's too much stick to one at. If all you can afford is five dollars. That's fine but stick to one thing Latte. Don't put in ten -At's table number work next one not giving campaign budget optimization twice especially. If you're a beginning factors. The company didn't even know about this auction now for all of you who are listening to this and please be aware of the fact that as of September two thousand nineteen. CBO So campaign budget optimization will become the default say now a lot of advanced facebook advertisers that are that I also talked to. They're like Okay Great Chris. Are we going to do the same thing that we're doing now and laughs at level. The facebook is basically moving us up to campaign level and Dan will need to do that on campaign level now no so. I let me give you a tip here so especially for those of you who are advanced unst and obviously we all need to test. CBO testing see beyond Ronnie CBO and it's improving literally. It's improving. I mean facebook's is getting and better and better and optimizing smarter and smarter and so that's definitely a given however in terms of controlling slowing Dan budget control I talked to one of my face for crafts and here's the deal will still be able to adjust budget on asset level so even if you said even if CBO becomes a default on campaign level we will be able to adjust the budgets by setting a min and Max spend limit commit on asset level so we can do that for the daily campaigns as well as for the lifetime campaigns so you set whether daily life I said it on on a campaign campaign a level however when it comes to the access level you can still set Min Max uh spend levels spanned limits afford that particular ads outside that would help us other than that literally will back in the game in doing the same thing with it on a level doing on campaign level but I do hope. CBO will become a a Latin Rick Clever and it will it definitely will I mean the system is learning learning so fast and by giving us an leaving us this option that we currently have so we have this option. Even currently I think we're good to go as advanced advertisers now all everything that I mentioned so all. These issues aren't eight one time happening. Actually actually these mistakes are quite common among advertisers weather in Berlin London Dubai because I do these workshops all over the world. I like to ensure that my workshop attendees leave the sessions with solutions studio problems as well as a set of proven frameworks and systems that to help them number one one profitable ads on facebook and number two batter tackle each platform changes with the more certainly very very important just like I'm talking about CBO now this being said I look forward to welcoming you to one of our upcoming facebook advertising using workshops you can check out whether I'm near you and doing a workshop close to you you can in a check me out on event prides because I've organized them on invent other than that to see all my events please go oh to strengthen business dot com forward slash events and you've seen not only my workshops also today seminars and speaking gigs and the mastermind everything that I have in that a section now over to you. What were some of your biggest facebook advertising mistakes. Drop me a message on facebook on Messenger or if you prefer twitter send me a tweet you know I m on all these platforms and I'll ah definitely jump in and I'm you back answer to you now. I'd like like to leave you with a golden nugget a main takeaway from today's session. I mean there was a lot of input. Imagine especially for those of you who are beginners. I however if there's one thing that I want to leave you today as this capitalize on social proof lack that become your number one priority in two thousand nine hundred senior US existing post these use a post set up a post organically and use that post. Id especially if you're on passion market but not only that use that post ID that existing post ID to a two run ads to and thus capitalize on social proof that you got organically and stop duplicating like crazy and having hundreds of different ADEA bad ideas in your assets because thousand workers just simply doesn't work. Thanks listening. Thank you for your loyalty. I'll catch up with in the next episode. Happy Marquis and remember to always play to your shrink. Thank you for listening to the strength in business podcast. Submit your questions on strength in business DOT COM and follow Chris on Twitter at Chris Rock. That's K. R. I S. Z. Are Okay

facebook ID CBO Chris Rock US Strengthen Business Mining Marquette Berlin contesting Ronnie CBO starbucks ADEA addy Cambridge DOT COM Berlin London Dubai Marquis marketing and sales
49: The View

The Slowdown

04:59 min | 2 years ago

49: The View

"I'm US poet laureate, Tracy case Smith, and this is the slowdown. One morning last year. My husband heard me singing along to Waylon Jennings. His song the world surprise. I would sing it for you now, but I truly cannot carry a tune. So here's Mr. Jennings himself. I'm not here to forget you up here too. The things we used to say. I get. You hope the same place. We used to go. David. I don't. Idle. Okay. I hear it. Now, he has very clearly saying, I don't want to get over you. But until that morning when my husband pointed out my mistake, I was certain the song went I don't want to get older in the real version. The song is about heartbreak about not wanting to let go of a love, that's run its course. But my version of the song must be about not wanting to let go of my old, or rather my younger self I think we all have a mental image of ourselves. That's rooted in a certain age. I'm almost fifty. But in my head. I'm still the thirty five year old me that means that unless I am actively working to remain faithful to reality the involuntary mental image. I carry of myself is out of date by more than a decade. Why? Well, maybe that's the age when my own life started to make sense to me when I began to feel sure of myself and at home in the world. I think that's part of why today's poem the view by Tim cbo's makes familiar sense to me I understand how the speaker can be shocked by the sight of himself feeling instead like he has locked eyes with an old man, a stranger, but Sables poem steps back to take in the wider view. It's not only looking at the speaker as he ages. It also seems to be considering what age has done to the culture that the speaker belongs to the view by Tim Siebel lls, as if I'd been stolen from myself as if myself had somehow been subtracted, and I was left with this this worried balding man, I watch him getting under my shirts into my skin. Is it time? His eyes from the glass, look almost happy almost passed me as if I were blocking the view as if my life had been recast, and it was just a matter of days until he shoved me aside until I took my big ideas and left, and maybe this is what you all have tried to tell me with your sympathetic grins and plans plans to save for the future. Is it time that does this? Or is it money the way we will into its arms like sad children hoping to be held for a while. So soon this seems so soon. I remember the seed in my blood the words alive. How love raised a fist Angela SDS. Freedom writers. Oh revolution. Never televised. The slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the library of congress and the poetry foundation to get a poem delivered to you daily. Go to slowdown show dot org and sign up for our newsletter.

Waylon Jennings Tim cbo US Angela SDS Tim Siebel congress Tracy David Smith thirty five year
258: Beating SIBO, IBS, and Histamine Intolerance With A Gutsy Girl Sarah Kay Hoffman

The Wellness Mama Podcast

56:06 min | 2 years ago

258: Beating SIBO, IBS, and Histamine Intolerance With A Gutsy Girl Sarah Kay Hoffman

"The. Bobby podcast. This episode is powered by a ritual. They make vitamins specifically designed just for women ritual vitamins contain night essential nutrients that most women just don't get enough of including vitamin B, twelve as medical Bauman form only, and not this medical Gasset d three K to buy e omega three fatty acids. Moron curated iron and proprietary form of magnesium where all supplies all of these informs that are easily absorbed, and utilized anther capitals are vegan gluten free allergen free and non GMO. They have it both a prenatal and irregular women's multivitamin both designed specifically for men and senators take for women's hormones, did you know, for instance that forty percent of women cannot properly use full of acid due to Mt Jaffar, gene, variation. Ritual contains a natural form of fully and synergistic nutrients, so the entire multi is more effective, especially important prepregnancy or during pregnancy because during pregnancy, especially full late vital, according to OBGYN, Jason Robert most women, don't find out they're pregnant until about four to seven weeks, pregnant, which is past the twenty days in the twenty eight days. The baby's organs are rapidly forming, and the neural tube, which becomes the central nervous system, and the vertebral column is almost completely formed and closed by the end of twenty eight days. In other words, you need those nutrients in your body, before you get pregnant, the essential nutrients folate helps promote healthy development of the neural tube. And this is why many doctors recommend taking a quality prenatal for several months before trying to get pregnant ritual. Makes this easy with both in prenatal and irregular women's multi-vitamin and you can learn more about both by going to wellness mama dot com. Or it's. Slash go forward slash ritual. So again, wellness mama dot com for its lash go forward slash are not you up. This episode is brought to you by kettle and fire bone. Broth and soups, I have used these products for years. And I always keep my pantry while stopped. They have chicken bone broth beef bone broth, and new chicken mushroom, Bobrov, which is delicious. Those are all great as base for soups, or even to sipped on their own. But cuddle envir- also now has tomato butternut and Meese. Oh soups, which are often incorporated, as part of a meal in our house. They're newest products are a grasp had chili and a Thai chicken soup. These are great meals all on their own, and they make last minute dinner, so easy at my house. There broths are made from grasp head, and pasture animal bones, and they're great source of collagen and amino acids like Pearleen glycemic, I college, and some form everyday and kettle environments it. Super tasty to do this. You can learn more go to kettle and fire dot com. Forward slash while Mesaba and use the code while my twenty to save twenty percent on your order. So again, kettle and fire, all spelled out. KT. L. E. A. N. D. F I R, E dot com forward slash mollis, mama and make sure to use the code modest mama. Twenty to save twenty percent. Hello, and welcome to the wellness mama podcast. I'm Katie from on this dot com and I'm here today with someone I was so excited to meet recently, Sarah k Hoffman is the founder of a gutsy girl, which is a website. I've been following for a long time. It's an online community geared toward women who are looking for a reasonable coach for healing things like IBS IB CBO, hormonal problems acne and more. She is a gut researcher and a journalist who seeks out highly detailed information, and then condenses it into digestible ways for women worldwide and her writing style is so conversational and find and I feel like I know you so, well, already even though we only met recently, and you're also the mom to three absolutely adorable children. So we'll talk a little bit about motherhood today, too. But welcome, thanks for being here. Thank you, Katya. I feel like I'm on a celebrity podcast today. So exciting because I followed your work for years now. So I'm really excited to. Here with you only. Gosh, I'm excited. You're here. And I feel the same way I followed you for so long. I'm a little bit like starstruck today, and with a name like a gutsy your I feel like that's where we have to start. So I'm sure like my thyroid journey, for instance, it's probably a long journey, but I would love to hear your gut health journey and just your story because I know this has been a research for you for a while. I have pretty much been on this journey for over ten years now at well over ten years, but I think might journey pretty much started in two thousand eight when I was diagnosed with colitis, and it was shortly before my wedding and a new something was off. And we couldn't really figure out what so I decided that we should probably just do the colonoscopy end endorse copy. And they found that I had quite us. I had a pretty mild form of it called practice which affects the lowest part of the Cohen, the rectum and my journey. Began then but I don't really consider it to truly have begun until two thousand nine when I came upon the gap STA hit. So from two thousand eight to two thousand nine I just tried everything I worked with the nutritionist, I traveled in aired everything that I could on my own and, you know, at the time, I would just read articles that would tell us what things were healthy for the guy. More vegetables fruits, whole grains, probiotics prebiotics all the things and we just couldn't get better. And then in two thousand nine I stumbled upon the gap style in actually brought it to my nutritious, because it was something that was so different than anything that I had ever thought of or tried. So I'm sure you're familiar with the gap stay at right? Yeah. Absolutely. We have experienced in the past as well. Yeah. So the outside just for anyone listening, the gutten psychology syndrome. It was it's developed by Dr Natasha Campbell McBride, and it basically the foundation of it was a lot of meat broth fats very little carbohydrates or anything that could really like sit in the gut in ferment, and I started in within days, I felt better in. It was the first time I in tire life. I felt like I could actually heal and that diet was playing you know, into me getting better or prohibiting me from getting better. So I did that. I did that in two thousand nine and I stayed on it for quite a long time. I talk a lot about the gas STA today as far as it changed my life, book changed my life, everything about it changed my life. But, but the problem was I stayed on for far too long. And so I kind of went. On and off it from two thousand nine until December of twenty fourteen I just played around with different things, I would feel, well, then I would not end end the cycle just kind of kept going, so what happened in two thousand and twelve kind of rate in be like, in the middle of their is. I went through a very vicious cycle of IBF and for anyone out there that listening that's gone through that, you know what it means. It's a lot of different shots hormones in really lake manipulating everything about your cycle in. And I think, you know, it all played into my deep already rooted, hormonal issues in also might got issues. And so, at the end of twenty twelve when that failed that IVF cycle. My husband and I took a trip. Up to Sedona. And it was there when I just had this. Just this whole revelation if you like I just wanted everything about my life to change. I wanted to get well, I didn't want to dwell anymore in infertility or not having children. I just wanted to really just want to term life round make things like is positive is possible and at end I really devoted my time in my energy is in Sedona at that moment to researching and learning everything and spinning positive. So it was there that gutsy girl was born because it would play into this whole idea that I'm sitting here with all these gut issues in my stomach is just in misery. Now, I've just gone through really long, intense period of IBF and infertility. I made it my mission that with a gutsy girls, obviously, on gut with gutsy, but also just to build this community, the support community for women that were going through all the things I was in what I learned than what I've learned since then is that women typically that have IBS or Idi it always goes along with something else. So, you know, low thyroid or infertility skin, skin issues, or always goes along with all these other things. But all of these other things are very isolating, and you can feel so alone. So a gutsy girl was born in then yelich you said, I just researching kep learning December of twenty fourteen while actually about a year after that we ended up, this is a whole 'nother, part of my story, too. But we ended up a adopting our first daughter, and she was a micro preemie. And so when she was two months old by the time, we got her, she was still only five pounds. So I was up. I was already sick still, but I was up almost like twenty four seven I think I think I may be got three or four hours of sleep a night for months in months on end just, you know, the cycle of feeding and sleeping and feeding and sleeping and all of that. So it was about November of twenty fourteen when I just absolutely hit rock bottom. I have blog posts on my site that you can see my face. My peril, dermatitis was the worst. It's ever been in my entire life covered. My face was covered my stomach bloated. And then, you know, things will go through me and I just I, I could not catch a break. It seemed like so at that point I started seeing a functional practitioner in California, three lived at the time. And I he really changed my entire life because instead of just doing the test. The awesome. The endoscopies the regular blood tests. He dug into every last thing that he thought could be going on. And we found out that I had CBO, which is small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. I'm sure you know, and that has kind of been the start to my real journey. I think I mean, even though the colitis diagnosis and everything, but I believe that it's really been the CBO that's been my, my underlying issue. The bottleneck to all of all of everything in. So once I was diagnosed with that than at the beginning of twenty fifteen is when I really believe I started the heal. Wow. Yeah. Hear so much of my own story in your story mine was related to thyroid, but just that long process of having to very much like figure it out on your own and thankfully, there are great practitioners that we can bring in and having our corner. But that's something I've learned so much through my own journey is the end of the day. We can't outsource our health and seems like you found this out as well that you can learn from so many different sources, but truly the end, it's figuring out that personalized Vermeille Shen, and applying it to yourself. And I think that's something that you do so well on your website is to give people the tools and empower them to go down that road and figure out their own steps in their own things. And, and what the also that I loved, and what you just said, was about starting a gutsy girl for the community side, because I think that is one of the most overlooked aspects of health and I talk about it all the time now because I think it's so important it's thing that's missing so much in our modern world is true community since I love that you working an are working to build this community for women who are all in this. Journey together. I think that's so beautiful. And you mentioned CBO. So some listeners may know we had a journey with this as well in our house. My husband in twenty twelve appendix ruptured and the secondary infection from that, which required, lots and lots of antibiotics. And I think he had a flesh eating bacteria was a pretty severe thing, but it led to him getting CBO. And this is in the also had to kind of figure out how to tackle as well. So I'd love if we could talk about it, because I suspect, there are a lot of people suffering with some version of CBO. Even if it's a very mild case that may not even know because for him, it was a couple of years before he finally, put the pieces together and got a diagnosis and the testing, they do for cbo's, not like common testing, you would get a regular lab panel. So a lot of people may have it and it kind of fly under the radar. So walk us through maybe how you found out you had CBO. And then how you started to tackle that. Yes. Oh my prediction. I've been saying this for quite some time now is that. That, you know, when I was diagnosed with it in two thousand fourteen like what's CBO and now it's becoming even more common. But my prediction is that within the next few years, it's going to be a very common thing that even western doctors are going to be doing testing for, and people are going to be diagnosed with left and right? Because I think it is so common in such an under while see the thing is, it's such an underlying thing. Like you said when your husband's appendix ruptured that came along with it. It's an underlying thing, but usually, there's also an underlying thing with CBO. It's just like this maze in this mess, but it Siebel goes hand in hand with so many other conditions that I just see it's gonna completely increase in the diagnosis with. So I was diagnosed with it in twenty fourteen and I would have never known had I not gone to that doctor who kind of specialize in that he's special. Allies in. He's a he's actually Chris Crushers doctor at the Californian super functional medicine in. He studied a lot about CBO in line disease, which those go hand in hand a lot as well. So I think he was already kind of looking for that. Maybe I just got lucky that I happen to see him. But my symptoms were very, very classic CBO symptoms. I could eat one thing and be so bloated. I mean so dependent perspective at the height of the whole infertility journey. I remember I was in the airport and woman came up to me and said, oh, when are you do and I just started crying? But, like, I'm, I'm not I have CBO. Thank you, and am in, in fertile. But yet, so bloating, it's just this like horrible awful. I always said it felt like gremlins pushing against your stomach in trying to get out that was one of my big symptoms. My other one was the acnes period. Matata so badly covered my almost my entire face all around, my nose may chin rarely scaly rash, and then the other very classic symptoms. I had was I was always like I could eat a four course meal in within ten fifteen minutes. I was starving again. I could never eat enough, and it wasn't it wasn't that I gained a lot of weight, or a lot of people will lose a lot of weight with CBO. I just kind of maintained because I was very very deficient in a lot of nutrients by the time I was diagnosed, I was so severely deficient b twelve that he started me on injections to my stomach immediately. I had a lot of joint pain. We always thought that it was, it was from gluten, which it may have been. But I had a lot of joint pain. I was very, very tired. I mean, that's I, I would say that's probably one of the symptoms that looking back for years now. Very tired and. And then the other classic symptom I think which people don't like to talk about. But it's true is I could be in a room and barely any gas come out of me, but the entire room would just like smell so bad because it's because what happens with CBO is there's just so much bacteria that stays in your small intestine. The small intestine is supposed to have bacteria but you're not supposed to have that much. And it just like food for men's there in like it's almost like it feels like it's Roddy. That's kind of what your insides feel like in. So I because I had so many classic symptoms. I could communicate this to him. He tested me for it with the breath test right away. And sure enough. That's what I had. So that was kind of my journey within how I knew. But having said that CBO is I'm not sure what your husband's experience has been like with it. But CBO is one of those things that is so hard to get rid. Of most people you don't just do a course of, you know, the herbal antibiotic or the antibiotic or both in your better in its in done. I mean, most people it just keep it keeps going and going going until which is what I figured out. You really start to address. Whatever is underlying. Yeah. We had the exact same experience in some of those classic symptoms as well. Especially the bleeding and to be honest, I feel bad. But for a few months, I kind of, like, downplayed it or didn't really like will stop eating so much meal, or like I don't know why you're bloated or takes HCL or whatever. And I didn't really understand just how uncomfortable that really can be. And then once we got the diagnosis, it was such a long process. You're right. Because like a lot of stuff you can figure out remedies were pretty easily. And this, I felt like we were just doing battle with this thing that every time we would cut off its head comeback bicker, and it was one more frustrating things we've ever had to deal with. And I'm curious what your what the things were that helps you? And again, this is all I know very. Personalized. So I don't think either of our cases is going to be prescriptive, but I think you can learn from some of the commonalities that help people. So for him, he actually did a twenty one they elemental diet with this essentially fasting with very specific protocols. And then we did this L like, along very careful diet after that with the early on about six and a lot of up laments. But I'm curious what kind of finally stuck in what works for you? Okay. So in the beginning, I was very adamant that I did not want to take any, any Vallat X because kept telling myself. Well, this, this was part of the problem why got here in the first place at grew up on antibiotics, I was chronically ill my entire junior year of college that ended up in a tonsilectomy you know, just so I was really adamant. So my doctor Mckee completely agreed in we chide the herbal the herbal antibiotic row. Everything from neem Burba rain Alumax combinations. He gave me different. It was called GI synergy in. It was just kind of like a bunch of diff. Herbs in one hell, I would, you know, whatever I did all of the things and I try that religiously for, I don't know few months, and I wasn't getting any better. In fact, I was getting worse. And so he said, I think you're going to need the, you know, in hindsight, what I learned about the CBO antibiotics is that they stay localized to the small intestine in. It doesn't really disrupt your entire gut. So I mean if I had. I'm like I say, I'm the Queen of justification if I'm gonna justify it's, it's going to be that. But, but I knew regardless at that point, I just wanted to feel better. So at the when I was I, I ag- nosed with it. I was just diagnosed with hydrogen version. So are not sure what your husband was. But there's hydrogen methane dominant so, in beginnings, hydrogen. So the antibiotic that I took right away was reflects men in my doctor so thankful. He always was able to get me twenty one days to twenty eight days what I've learned what I've heard from other people's experiences when they only had two week course they relapse within days of being done with it. And it makes sense to me too, because I never felt well until about day, twenty one I almost would give up on even the antibiotics, all sudden, it was like some magic happen on day twenty one so much better. But so I did the antibiotic and I stayed feeling. Well after that for quite some time, what I did from a dietary standpoint at that time was, I did during antibiotic, I would always be eating mops. And I didn't really wasn't really concerned too much about, you know what I was eating and then afterwards so that so that all of the bacteria, come up to play the theory in, then you, quote unquote can target with antibiotic in after the antibiotic, I would follow a more like a pretty strict diet, like a lower Fahd mop diet mixed with some gaps or some SC. I just kind of knew what my body what worked what, what would it work and the problem with that? There's no, I think that's a great protocol. I think I think any protocol do this elementary which by the way, I've never done. I've always been very interested in it, but I'm too afraid to not eat anything for twenty one days or longer, I think whatever protocol you're going to do can work and is fine. But I kept relapsing, so I think since twenty fourteen I relapse either three or four. Times and each time I relaxed I would I either had hydrogen methane dominant or both. So whenever the methane came into it, then I was not only on reflects men for twenty days. But then you also have to add another antibiotic called Nehemiah soon, and I think that's always just that's always, like for fourteen days, but I would do that. And again, I would feel better for quite some time than it would relapse until it was the bout this last last year last March was the last time so about a year ago that I ever relapsed. I did the antibiotics again. I did the food thing again. But what changed was that? We really started to focus on. Why was I relapsed so much? And I believe that until you do that. It's you can never it. Can it will never go away in for me? I had barely any stomach acid. So you had mentioned the H, C L so, adding in doing HCL appropriately was critical and to this day is critical for me. So I I very religious to the age. C L to my digestive enzymes. Those are the two biggest things every single day that I make sure I keep up with, with my stomach, but be beyond the supplements. And the, the medication the biggest thing was the lifestyle. What I found was every single time I relapse it was always during high stress periods. And I had to really dig deep and try to figure out what was causing all this stress anxiety, and it took more far more than diet in supplements. It took therapies took journaling, like it, it sounds, so who, but I have been feeling the best, I have in my entire life for over a year now, in, so I think when you're talking about healing CBO, it's just so important to know, like, really what's going on under Neath so that you can I view food now and supplements and therapies in anything else you wanna do his tools. They're just tools to keep you. Well, yeah, absolutely. And I think you made a couple of really important wines in your response. Now, one being that the antibiotics us with CBO are very unique. And while for instance my kids have never had antibiotics because they've never needed it. But I absolutely think there's a time in a place for certain antibiotics. I mean, certainly I think we can agree that there perhaps overused in some scenarios, but this is like one of those scenarios that if you need them, you need them, period. And I love that you like shared your story on that. And brought that up because I think, especially in this natural health world, there's tendency to like, antibiotics are always bad, and they're definitely not always bad. So I love that. You shared that part of your story. And also that you mentioned HCL. This was so key for him as well. And he also to this day takes HCL. This is actually another area where we're going to see slight growing awareness about this. I think a lot of people have that, even if it's like a very sub clinical, they wouldn't necessarily notice until they started taking the and then they notice how much better, they feel. So I'm curious for you. Like, how did you find out that, that was a key, and then just curious what your daily regimen looks like with that. Because like I said it's been life changing for him to. Yeah. So as we age naturally, decrease the amount of stomach acid you. Have. So that's kind of like one problem with the whole stomach acid thing, the other part is that traditional doctors, they'll, they'll see like a problem like GERD or any kind of like stomach acid issues as oh. You have too much. So, what's reduce it when that might not actually be the case? So then you're reducing what was already too low of so. Mike acid into even lower stomach acid. And the thing is that I wrote a blog post the PD to the stomach, like you the stomach needs to be very acidic that that's what helps break down the food. The problem with CBO is your food doesn't break down in the small testify. Don't have. If you don't have the adequate stomach acid in order to break down it just sits there for months in. That's when all the problems arise, so for me with the stomach acid. I'm very, very open about this to to this day. It's something that I was not very open about for a long time. But earlier in my days, you know, high school. Probably started in high school college even through my wedding. When I was diagnosed from Clayton in two thousand eight I was I always followed very strict diets. I was always on some kind of diet. I, I can't even tell you all of the crazy diets, I've done in my entire life in, in. It's why I'm really really a proponent of this idea that got healing is not a diet. 'cause I think too many women are trying to make it into this restrictive diet. But I have been on those diets in, that's what got me so sick in the first place. So my doctor that's, that's kind of what we how we stumbled upon the idea that, that I probably had ruined a lot of depleted. A lot of my stomach acid in so the way that we tested it is just there at home test with each Seattle pills. So there's a there's a tutorial on my website in how how you do it. But I mean it was very simple. It was with a lot. A protein meeting, you know, half Cupper more, I would take one HCL Pell, I felt nothing then I would take the next time I tried it. I would take two with protein felt nothing Antill. I got all the way up to, like, I think at one point like thirteen each C L pills. And I still wasn't feeling anything. But at that point, what happens is it becomes very counterproductive to go up more. Because then you're drinking so much water while you're eating your meals, and in order to take these pills in. We should never be drinking that much water while we're eating that also like is not good for digestion. So my doctor what we decided to do. I think in also I mean that's just that's hi was never going to be taking ten or more pills in one sitting. So even if it's age jail. So I think what we did was we just kinda normalize it. I think he had me taking in the beginning five or six each Seattle until the day. I felt a little burning sensation. That means that then you're producing enough stomach acid and you don't need that many anymore. So I did that for a very long time. I mean, I say that five or six I don't even know probably for couple years, and then today down to like two one or two I could probably do without, but I'm just so I don't like overcautious. I don't feel anything at two in so, yeah, that's kind of the process that we went through again. I have to to'real how to do it, but I didn't holding hands with my functional practitioner because it needed, so many of them. I feel like if you really have that low of stomach acid to be really careful in should work with your doctor. And how what's the right place to start and just stay consistent with that amount until you're ready to reduce? That's great advice. And I will make sure we linked to your post about that, so that people can read for themselves echo, your encouragement to always find a practitioner, you can have in your corner because it's. To have someone that has been there. You can ask advice to, and you mentioned Fahd maps a few minutes ago. So I love for you to walk us through what those are and how they come into play. Yeah. I actually just released an e book all about the low Fahd Mont diet, not really about the loaf. I'm up diet. But about how if you have CBO Andrew following a low Fahd mop diet to be able to eat more things and still he'll so five up stands for, for mental oligosaccharides dissect rides model. Sacrifice impales. So they're just things that are found in our food, in a thing, with ops is that I'll never forget. I went to see an aunt in southern California. Once I got there shortly after my c diagnosis in, she told me that she was she was making some meal for dinner had apples onions, garlic in it. And I said, don't worry about me. I'm just gonna go down the street to grab something. I'll make my own food and remember she made the comments to me. What now you can't eat healthy things, like apples, onions and garlic. That's the thing about the Fadh moths is that they are healthy, things, quote, unquote, healthy things that, you know, we think normal people should be able to eat all the time in in abundance, because they're so good for us. But the problem is that they contain, some, you know, a fod mop in some way, shape, or form. And it just it doesn't for meant right for people that have CBO. So yeah, it's just they're just classifications of food pretty much in. They are a collection of short chain carbohydrates, that are not absorbed, properly in the gut, and when they're not absorb properly in the gut, they can trigger symptoms in people with IBS. Got it in no something else that comes into play sometimes with these particular conditions his things. Histamine intolerance. So I'm curious if you have personal experience with that. And what you've learned about that if so during your journey. Yes. So I actually don't have anything with histamine intolerance, not that I know of are mean obviously, once you start going out one rabbit hole. I could find myself in so you know going on so many other ones, I've just chosen not to bet said, have written about histamine intolerance before because so many people with CBO do have history on tolerance in can't eat a lot of things. And I know a lot of the histamine intolerance. I'm not sure what your symptoms are like, but it's a lot of like hives red eyes nasal congestion, headaches running. No, it's like that. I've never had anything like that. So I know that it's very common with people that have CBO, which also been Hiatt even more, unfortunately. And also, I know that you and I on the same page with wrestling thing I love about the thrive probiotic is that it there are no history than there are a lot of probiotics, so the way that I tell people relate to approach CBO mixed with a low histamine diet is to, I always say whatever, whatever you're really trying to address most do that. I in then and then add to it. So for me, like with CBO inclines or CBO knows I'll take CBO in the low thyroid. My main goal there was to heal the CBO because then the trickle effect everything starts healing as well. But so healing the CBO for me meant to follow low five map this that and the other. But if I also wanted to then compound it with the fired than I. Would try to add foods in that would also work with low Fahima to help the fire eight. So the same thing goes for when people ask me about the alot histamine diet with a low fat diet. So if you if cbo's the most important thing to you start there, then you take, you know, there's low histamine diet was like eggs eggs, are low Fahd so great. Keep keep it there. Or just that's how that's how I think it works best when you have a combination of a lot of things going on. Yeah, that's great advice. And yet, definitely were on the same page with the probiotics brings up another good point, because products can be a really confusing topic. You have any kind of gut issue. I feel like I know like on the gaps died. When we did that they were very specific probiotic recommendations, and the probiotic, I now use also just drive. It was not even bailable back then. And so there's so many different options now. But do you have any like, general guidelines for that from what I've read in from our experience with my husband's CBO, some probiotics can actually make things worse? If you. Just kind of biotic it yet. There's a I I write a lot about my blog. But one of my favorite pulse ever wrote about this was should I take a probiotic with CBO? That is before I met just thrive, but even still I do still take very same approach because it is such a subjective topic in the, the healing Sima world in, I think, when it really comes down to is, what stage are you in and what kind of probiotic are you taking? So, you know, I, I don't remember exactly which probiotic it was. It doesn't really matter. But I was taking it when I was trying to along with antibiotics? Also I could've euro, why kept being so bloated. So my doctor said, try just try cutting the probiotic for a while and see what happens ensure off, I started feeling much better. So whatever was in that probiotic was not working in that stage that particular stage of healing, so a lot of times once I would feel better in my symptoms were kind. Had really diminished, I would start taking the probiotic again so that I could repopulate anything that I needed to continue repopulated. You know, I think that it's just such a tricky tricky topic. I have been taking just thrive for a couple months now and it's been incredible for me. And I know other people that have active CBO are taking it. And they say that it's working for them as well. I think when it comes down to probiotics, you really have to look at the strains in the species on their soul. In addition to my I really feel like a lot of supplements are so much snake oil at this point because there's the market is just flooded with 'em. And you really have to have a new blog post to about got healing with minimal supplements. You know there's just like a few that I take now because the more supplements, we take the less. We'd no really. What's working on? What's not in the less were able to really investigate into know. What is in that capsule, in what are we taking? What are what are their tests? How do they test it? Where are they sourcing their ingredients? You know, there's so many different things like a proactive is not just a provide. I, I always think about that old activity commercial where they talked about that yogurt is so great for you guys probiotics, but, like look at the ingredients, you know, I think I just feel like that with, with all probiotics in, especially if you have CBO and choosing the right probiotic agree completely end. That's what I loved about these specifically as them being spore based there so much less reactive. Like like you said, they don't have the histamine or dairy or a lot of the things that if you have any kind of special condition, you may be voiding. And so I've heard the same thing for my readers. Just it's helped so many people in down a lot. Like you my husband takes each L and those probiotics daily, and then everything else kind of is in rotation. Razz needed. But those are his two non-negotiables. 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Forward slash ritual. So get known as mama dot com forward slash go forward slash our IT you out. This episode is brought to you by cuddle and fire bone. Broth and soups, I have used these products for years. And I always keep my pantry while stopped. They have chicken broth beef bone broth and a new chicken mushroom bone broth. Which is delicious. Those are all great as a base for soups for even just sift on their own. But pedal, envir- also now has tomato butternut and Meese. Oh soups, which are often incorporated, as part of a meal in our house. They're newest products are a grasp chili and a Thai chicken soup. These are great meals all on their own, and they make last minute dinner, so easy at my house, their breast or made from grasp head and pastured animal bones. And they're great source of collagen and amino acids like Pearleen glycemic, I cooperate college in some form everyday, and kettle and fire makes it super tasty to do this. You can learn more go to kettle and fire dot com. Forward slash wellness mama and use the code wellness mama. Twenty. To save twenty percent on your order. So again, kettle and fire all spell it out. ET. L. E. A. N. D F. I R, E dot com forward slash moments. Mama and make sure to use the code Melnace mama. Twenty to save. Twenty percent. We've been talking like I said, I hear so much of my story was thyroid related, but just that journey of having to figure out what was wrong, and then that slow journey of healing, and something that's always top of mind for me is how can I do as much as possible to give my kids foundation, so that they never have to deal with problems like this, and I know as a mom, that's probably something that you throw thought through a lot as well. And you write a lot about your family, and raising healthy families. So I love to chemist which gears a little bit and transition into the head, and I'm just curious, if there are any things you do with your kids, specifically just to give them a really good, healthy solid foundation in life, will, I will I have to say that I am I wrote it down immediately that your children, all of your children, have never had antibiotics. That is incredible. That is just so fascinating to me. I need to have offline conversation with you about that. My children, have had antibiotics but again, I just have to take out any anything that I feel about that. So all three may children are adopted on all we adopted all three of them from the foster care system. And they came to us all as babies pretty much babies, but they were all prematurely born and were born into the world under less than ideal circumstances in. So people say that it's just perfect. You know, it, it was so meant to be that I got the children that I did because I actually have a tab on my website called gutsy children, because all three of my children, have some sort of gut or another issue that is playing into their gut issue. So my oldest has severe eggs and my middle child was just nosed with intestinal. Parasites and he also has stomach acid squeezy on enzymes, and then the baby, she's not a baby in March almost three but she definitely has a lot of stomach issues. And we're just treating her as if she had intestinal parasites because my middle child is her biological, brother. And they have a very, very similar like everything they really loaded, and they just yeah. So we're treating them the same. But what I do for them is I approach their diet in their lifestyle as sanely as possible. But without normalizing it if that makes sense, so, you know, like I feel like it's so normal for kids to wake up in each, sugary cereals, in, you know, live off of that stuff all day in my children don't, and I think that's okay. We, we have treats, of course, we do like any other family, when they when they're out in public school, whatever they, it's okay, we have to be very, very, very careful with gluten dairy. None of them are gluten dairy so were pretty strict on that. Now in fact, my middle child has the parasites. He got into gluten on Sunday, head rashes all over his face. So I it was is just another. Confirmation from your y y we live like this. I really like make things fun. You know, instead of for example, instead of like normal catch up on their with their stuff. I give the surprising tins catch up, and we always call it mommy special whatever. So mommy special catch up, or we do coconut amino. It's mommy special sauce, and they think that's fun. I just make things fun for them. And like it's really really things taste normal to them. Everything does people just can't believe that, you know, they wanna eat vegetables, and they want, you know, potatoes in fruit than and that's just because that's children. Do as they see, you know, they want to be like us, they want to mirror, the things that we're doing in. That's just how we live, you know, I'm not trying to not trying to, you know, be this outstanding mother of the year with how I feed them in things that we. Do. I'm just trying to set them up for a healthy life, because I know in my research, in my own life that taking care of the gut in taking care of yourself has incredible impacts on your life, and in, because so much of the immune system lies in your gut. If, if I don't take care of it for them and help them teach them why it's important. I don't you know, I don't know what could lie ahead for them. So I think that's why I'm so passionate about it. They take enzymes before they eats while we do the just drive probiotic, I opened the capsule in put it in their food, take me like half. One, obviously instead of a full one and in just take the fish oil and beyond that, pretty, pretty normal the other awesome that you are their mom. 'cause it's like that is a perfect match in. Thank goodness that they have you and I think that's also important that you mentioned trying to keep that. Mindset sane, 'cause we also definitely don't wanna raise our kids with could of any kind of issues around food, or like any kind of long complex. It's going to last into adulthood, as sounds like you're taking an amazing approach, and I also love that you brought up exa because that's something that in, in our time with the gaps died, of course, you learn that skin health is so tied to gut health and I hear from a lot of moms, I think Xmas also on the rise. But a lot of moms whose children are struggling through that. And that was thing. I had to learn to is it doesn't matter necessarily what you put on top of the skin if Xmas happening, there's the inside the body that's also going on. You have to address both of those two are, there things that you found, especially helpful on XM aside, because I know a lot of parents are in that right now. Yeah. The thing with you know, I love skin care, I, you know, beauty counters my jam whatever. But I think too many people are trying to say, like for adults in for kids, in for everyone that, you know, all these topical things it's going to turn your life round. Your skin's going to be great in three days, and that's just not the case. My peril, dermatitis was never going to go away. No matter what kind of product use it all came back to my gut when my CBO was healed. It just hold on quote magically went away and the same thing happened with my daughter that has eggs, emerged, she got it so badly. It was not too long ago in its it started popping up on her hands, and then we finally little bombs everything's started as little bumps almost that just expanded into, like large rashy things on our hands in back in our all over her face. In fact, one Sunday morning on my birth. Say she she said, her heart was kind of beating fast and because she had these rashes. All right. Uh so worried, I took her into the emergency room right away. And she had had this eggs, among going on for quite some time. And so, of course, their solution was a topical steroid. So I was not in favor of that. But at that point, she had gotten so bad. So we used it just for a couple of days, not very long. But at that point immediately, I cut all she, she had been basically living on dare. She loves there. What can doesn't right? But so we I, I did all the things from a dietary Sam, because I knew from my own experience payroll, dermatitis that, that the topical stuff is just one matter. If we help everything else, so to cut the dairy in cuppa gluten. And she started drinking more bone. Broth I would have do enzymes before she aids fishy oils, which she calls it also pretty soothing, and then it just really started to go away on its own. I mean I don't think so that was in February. I don't think she's at any dairy gluten since then. I don't wanna keep that out of her diet forever in. So we're trying to get her blood test to see really what she's intolerant. She's doing a stool, she's currently in the process of doing a stool sample to see if there's something going on. But the functional doctor that were working with thinks that it's probably some food that's really causing eggs, muscle, the other thing that they allot time will tell you to give up would be like eggs and nuts for me. I have a hard time giving up all the things for children just because I do not want to set them up for a lifetime of fear with food or anything like that. So I chose to she doesn't do many eggs to begin with. So that's why take it out. But I just chose Darien gluten for right now in it health it she hurt she's perfect. Now, again, her skin is completely clear. We put you know, just like gentle lotion on it. Keep it hydrated. I tell her make sure she's drinking more water. We reduce a little bit more of the unnecessary sugars. She, we got a note from the doctor so that both she. In her brother, can we bring our own snacks to preschool, which has helped a lot because, you know, there's no dairy gluten in it. And I think that's, that's the biggest thing. That's awesome. It's yeah. I think sounds like you're doing an amazing job in think that's gonna be so helpful to so many parents who are listening, and I also can't believe how quickly our time has owned by because I could talk to you all day long. Have couple of questions left to ask at the end the first being if there is a book or a couple of books that have really changed your life and if so what they are in y okay, so I, I've mentioned it already before, but I have I mean, there can be so many fun books that I share and a lot of life life changing books, but I honestly I'm thinking about this in the book that has truly changed. My life was the gaps diet. While I don't or the gun psychology syndrome book by Dr Natasha and while I don't believe in it for any. He long term solution. I believe in the foundation of what she saying. You know, the, the gotten psychology syndrome. It's not just Gus up at all the other things that that go along with it. Autism dyslexia. Depressions gets Friday at eighty dean all these things we don't realize how much the gut in the brain worked together. And I have read this book, I can't even tell you how many times I have little bookmarks everywhere in it. She's just it's just a really great book that truly changed my life because it had it not been for that book in me learning the art of making my own bone. Broth in two thousand nine I would never probably be Ryan today. So I'm very grateful for that book, and then the other that I just honestly, think that changes my life all the time I read it is the bible. It's a book that not a lot of people would say. But it does. I you know, like I said on this journey, I have had. So many ups and downs like so many awful things so many great things. But the one thing see consistent is me reading the bible. And that I know that such a topic that people don't talk about these days, but I have to say because it really is. So those two blocks awesome in lastly, any closing advice that you give to parents to someone suffering with gut issues or just in general. Well, I think the best piece of ice, I give to everybody is to test in not guess, so, I feel like we have access to so much information these days on the internet. You know, with just like open up a browser in, you can diagnose yourself with advanced stage for cancer today. But the reality is that you have got to just go to the doctor and get tested and Dr Google is not inappropriate test for you. I have a. Blog post on my site. It's a beginner's guide to digestive health testing in it really takes people through the process, 'cause I think that there is, you know, there's, there's different steps to testing, you decide that you're going to get tested versus self diagnosing on, then you decide, are you gonna go, the western or western doctor, or functional integrative doctor, then, you know, they're steps that you should end can take to prepare for your first appointment. And you can use Dr Google for that, you know, like Z different symptoms that make sense, different things that you wanna bring up with your doctor different tests, that your doctor might not automatically test, you for, but you feel like you want you are you're in charge in, so you get to go to them in you to tell them, I would like to be tested for XYZ. Here's my sentence. This is what's going on. This is what I think, if you have additional thoughts to add to it. Great, let's work together. But I that's my biggest piece of. Vice is to just know what's wrong before south diagnosing, doing all the diets in all the supplements in medications, and it's just your, your people always ask me, how long will it take to heal, my gut, and I tell them as soon as you have in accurate diagnosis? And then you get on the path to healing the cause of that diagnosis. That's how long it's going to take you Levette in such a perfect place to end. I know that you are busy mom in businesswoman them, so appreciative that you took the time to be here today. This episode was mazing going to help a lot of people and I appreciate you so much. Thanks so much. Katy in. Thank you to all of you for listening and for sharing your most valuable asset of your time with us. We're so grateful for you. And I hope that you will join me again, on the next episode of the wellness mama podcast. If you're enjoying these interviews, would you please take two minutes to leave a rating or review on I tunes for me doing this helps more people to find the podcast, which means even more moms and families can benefit from the information. I really appreciate your time. And thanks as always for listening.

CBO antibiotics histamine California Meese IBS Mt Jaffar IBF Bobby researcher Bauman Cohen Sedona Sarah k Hoffman Jason Robert
Sarah's Last Stand

Vox's The Weeds

1:03:02 hr | 2 years ago

Sarah's Last Stand

"Sends you guys talk about breakfast before a show. Yeah. Raspberry yogurt every time. Cheerios cheerios. Hello, welcome to another city. The weeds the box media podcast network. I met in Gracieuse here today with Dylan Scott with Sarah cliff, and I'm afraid to say this is a kind of a sad sad episode of the means for me. It is an exciting time for Sarah. It's a sad an exciting time. This is sadly, probably my last up Assode of the weeds as you made may have seen on the Twitter website. This is my last week at vox, I am I'm going to a newspaper called the New York Times to join their investigative team. And I am in queens. You've heard of them Donald Trump seems and be fan, but maybe I can get him on board. But I'm going to be joining their investigations team and looking into all the wild and wacky things that happen in healthcare. But before I do that I got to choose. What are what are last episode Nour's? This will continue mad. We'll still be. The weeds moves. Even as I move on. But I got to choose the topic. From for my last episode of the weeds, and hardware weeds fans will know, the very very first thing, we talked about in the weeds with single payer, and I thought after the hearings last week after the CBO report what else should we should we talk about. But really bring it back to our weeds the origins and talk about where we are some of the big events that have happened on single payer in the past week. I don't know it's it's hard to know. But single payer healthcare has gone over the lifetime of the weeds as a show from like a random things. Some people talk about to something that now has a Bill in congress. Probably 'cause we talk about it so much hundreds co-sponsors, and like an actual hearing in the world committee, some kind of CBO document. So what is now? I mean, I think you know, if people know about the Overton window is officially inside the window. That's that's that's what this all signifies. But then like, you you. What what what happened at this committee hearing? Right. So last week the house rules committee held the first ever hearing on a Medicare for all Bill. Why did it go to the rose? So. This is sort of a very much like an insider DC drama, but like what's the backdrop of this the whole year since house? Democrats took control is that like House Democratic leadership needed to like throw a bone to single payer supporters, and all these all energy on the left around this Medicare for all idea and at the same time, they don't wanna be seen as like running whole hog in the direction of socialists, single payer healthcare. And so like what they what they had what they set up at the very beginning of the congress was we're gonna ask CBO for a bunch of information about single payer, and we're going to hold some hearings. And so I entered it as we we're gonna have it in the house rules committee hearing because that's sort of a safe place to have it like if the House Ways, and means committee, the house energy and commerce committee education labor committee. Those are like the committees that are actually responsible for writing healthcare legislation and if like healthcare legislature. We're going to move somewhere. It would start in those committees. So by having it in rules. It's a small committee that had a handful of single. That's smallest in your inner room. I've ever did. They let you in the rumors to tiny for a handful of reporters in the room. But like there was no reason. But as the chairman of rules is a medic is Medicare for all right? I mean, that's part of the the advocates wanted hearing Riley one and say, we'll we're gonna give you a year. And then the leadership did not want to like do a Bill or have this be the party position? But the didn't wanna have a hearing that consisted of leadership trashing single pay. Right. So they wanted to do something that would count as that. At least that the single payer people could say was progress. Right. So having a hearing in committee that's chaired by single payer proponent meant that it was it was like a positive hearing. Right. And there was a tizzy last week about at first. The panel of witnesses didn't have an explicit Medicare for all supporter. None of the people who are gonna pure before the panel, actually, like advocated forcefully for Medicare for all. And so that became a story for a couple of days, but then turned out that an an activist with LS name, Atty. Barkan ended up did end up appearing on on the panel and get very moving destiny and favor of Medicare for all. Yeah. This was sort of like this was very much not like a legislative exercise. It was sort of like letting air out of the balloon. Also was I think I mean, we came from it. It was much more boring than said exceeding plays. It was I think. Yeah. You termed it on Twitter. The exceedingly polite Medicare for all hearing, which is not usually the way the Medicare for all debate goes. And I think, you know, there was a sense going into it. If like, oh, yeah, there's going to be like fireworks because Democrats are divided and we're going to see like these tensions come out and are going to trash it. But it wasn't that at all, you know, Donna Shalala who's for major secretary new member of congress. She'd given some quotes the Washington Post about, you know, basically, we're not a bunch of dummies. We're not gonna go crazy at this hearing, and they certainly delivered on that. I think part of that has to do we had a conversation about this in the office met with actually who is on the committee. You don't like the highest profile members who are going for the sound bite on rules. Like, if you're in ways or means energy your car. Those are the people who are closer to leadership more high ranking in the party. So that's part of the dynamic. It was very timid hearing in my view, you know, it was not like poking at like, okay? Like, well, what are like the holes in Medicare for all even and I think some of that was really set by having Addy testify there. You know, he is someone I really recommend. If you didn't see it going back and watching his opening statement, which he had to deliver through basically, a computer generated voice. He's advanced stage l L S to the point re can longer talk and uses a computer the computer that tracks his movement to be able to feed the computer what he wants to say his testimony. I think really seemed to set the expectation of civility. I think it made it a lot harder for Republicans who would have been aggressively trashing Medicare for all to do it. With after listening to talk about what it would mean for his life. So I think his presence. You know, the fact those enroll. Rules. The fact Addy was there really seemed to create the conditions for for a very civil. And unfortunately, from our perspective incredibly boring Medicare for all even the Republicans followed that lead, you know, they sort of said we're sympathetic to the goals of especially people like Addy, you know, everybody was very respectful of him. And while they you know, they took an opportunity they did, you know, ask their witnesses. You know, isn't this going to cost a bunch of money and increase people's taxes and lied to rule hospitals closing? There was just sort of a very much more of a kind of wonky tone to the whole all the proceedings I thought to me this reflects exactly how far we are. How far the advocates for Medicare for all actually are to getting their plan because I to me essentially what happened here, right? Is that like when the skeptics chill out sometimes skeptics, very amped up and they're like freedom. Right. And and then the Medicare for all Conan's get to come back with their own big. Moralistic arguments. Like, isn't it sad when people get sick, and they can't get healthcare. And like every other, you know, all this stuff. Like, this of Bernie Sanders says on the campaign trail, right which is very fifty thousand feet up. But if you come down and you like don't loudly oppose Medicare for all. And you just kind of like let me turn the microphone over to you to have a policy discussion. Like like, what would you like to do with the healthcare system? Dominica for proponents of times. Don't. They don't have as much to say if they start filling out the details like their own position becomes more vulnerable. Right. And so in some ways like Republicans would most like to see is like a fully fleshed out Medicare for all Bill that like specifies exactly how much taxes are gonna go up and whose taxes are gonna go up. Exactly how much provider payments are going to be cut and how much they're going to be cut like who's gonna be in charge of deciding which services are eligible for reimbursement in which aren't you know, did that? And then like, it's those are unanswerable questions because this is how it's an goes. I'll be like how you're gonna pay for that. And then people like, well, there's ways right? But it's like just just come like, how are you going to pay for that? Right. And then like you could answer the question. But then the opponents could savage right and the Medicare for all people like they put up Addy who's a great advocate. Right. But is not a tax policy expert. And so it's kind of like. All right, guys. Like here you go. Like, what do you want to do in your restructuring of fifteen percent of the economy? And there's a lot of timidity there. Actually, right. Like, there's there's not just like these different iterations of legislation came out writing. When when John Paul's office sort like modified the standing single payer Bill. It wasn't to fill in any of the blank spaces. It was to say like we're doing long-term care too. Right. Yeah. Like Democrats at the hearing were not asking detailed questions about like what a fan financing plan might look like a couple of witnesses were physicians. So they asked they would ask the doctors like if you didn't have to worry about navigating five different health insurance, which able to provide your patients with better care that kind of more lightweight I guess policy discussion rather than than looking like, the more difficult questions single payer poses and in theory. What you do in a hearing this is normal. It's it's not bad that the advocates have given course of action don't have answers to all the detail question. But in some theoretical sounds like what you do in the hearings as you're like a hot, I would like to create a government financed system. Like I have heard they have in Canada. But I have some questions about how to do that. So now, I'm going to bring up here, some experts, and I'm going to ask them questions. Right. Like, what will the impact of this beyond rural hospitals, and we're going to gather information and write a better Bill, but they weren't really doing right? Like, they were not they were not asking questions that would move you closer to. Here's what the planet. Well, that's what made it an odd exercise like the hearing was an end unto itself. The fact that the hearing was happening was what was important like I even talked with some folks have been working on single payer bills for years, and they were like all that. We I really are the person I talked us at all. I really care about is that we have gotten our place on the stage now, and the fact that this hearing is happening is what's important to me. And so, yeah, I think then the question becomes where did they go from here? But clearly this was. Is not the opportunity, and there is to get in some what you're talking about. What are the things that interested me was what Republicans decided to seize on in the hearing? And one of the things I kept going back to was the fact that Vermont tried to build a single payer system, and it was unsuccessful and this came up multiple times. I think in part because the Washington Post in an article about it, and it just became kind of thing that I saw them kept going back to and it was an interesting and kind of I mean, it was an attack on single payer that did and didn't make sense to me. But was surprising that that was more of a focus than like rationing stuff, which did come up or you know, some of the other. I think more valid critiques Medicare for all they kept coming back to the fact well, deep blue Vermont, the place Bernie Sanders is from the tried to do this. And they were unable to do it. And you know, they can't do it here. How are we possibly going to do in the United States which on the one? It's actually pretty practical question. I think Democrats will need to grapple with you know, on on the other hand kind of is a little bit of a false pretense. I think one of the reasons Vermont conduit as it's really really hard for a state to build single payer within a nation that is not single payer. But I was surprised to see that come up as kind of a frequent topic of discussion, and it seemed like almost give credence to like the idea of Medicare all being like, okay, fine interesting system. But like look when they tried to do it wouldn't even even work. It seems like seed some ground and that being the area that they were questioning on. It makes me wonder certainly put us the point to this. Like what what are the the progressives on the hill trying to achieve exactly this is twenty nineteen day have been talking about this for a couple of years Bernie Sanders campaign. I mean people talking about single payer for a long time. But like Bernie Sanders campaign was twenty fifteen twenty sixteen. It was clear people were going to sorta redouble their efforts on this twenty. Seventeen twenty eighteen now it's twenty nineteen. There's going to be an election like they don't. They don't seem to be zeroing in unlike January twentieth. Twenty twenty one now all these blanks are going to be filled in sure, yeah. But I think we're getting I think they are moving in that direction. And like we're gonna talk about the CBO report that came out in a little bit. And I think that is part of it too. I think they're like I think like Dylan was saying, they're laying the groundwork. We're single payer hearings are thing that happens in congress and you're starting to get into some of that policy debate. How do you transition to this? Bernie Sanders thinks you need four years Pramilla jibe thinks you need to they both have like arguments. Yeah, you know, maybe nine months give birth your new healthcare system who's really to say. But I think the idea is especially when I think back to the Affordable Care Act debate. The idea is to make this part of the conversation. Shen? And I think they have successfully done that like it's pretty wild to me that most of the prominent twenty candidates are running on this platform. And now the the moderate option is a Medicare buy in. You know, it's one of the things like this over and windows stuff. You wrote up at the very top of the weapons, I think that's a key thing that's going on here. I think it just making it like part of the, you know, water that you swim in DC like making it part of the debate that is happening. And you know, doesn't surprise me to not see politicians getting into the design issues of okay? Like how much are we going to pay people? What is the actual? You know, how are we going to pare back the list of benefits because like why negotiate that away? That's what you have CBO over, you know, putting out their reports. That's what you have them to kind of do and spell out. And you know, if you're Democrats kind of the best of both worlds, you can talk about your big Medicare for all plan, and then you can get some of this information starting to trickle out from CBO also from like analysts at rand who are doing. A bunch of modeling to kind of figure out. Well, what does this look like, right? I think they're really caught up on that idea of not negotiating with themselves. Like, why not set out the sort of like northstar goal where everybody's covered under one plan almost every medical services available at no cost. And then like, maybe eventually you pare back from that. But like why do that now when we're just sort of in a Genda setting? Well, right. And mean, I think to make this explicit, right? Like also twenty twenty one they're not gonna vote. Like, we're looking like more like twenty twenty five maybe as what this is all leading. But I do think I think that a lot of what's driving this action on the hill is an interpretation of what happened in two thousand nine that sort of the left was like thrown a bone in the form of the public option concept, and I think with the understanding that the public option was always going to be yanked away as like a ha the moderates like saved industry from the public option. And I think that a lot of people on the left feel in retrospect, not so much that they should've fought harder for the public option or whatever. But just that like they allowed the debate to be anchored too close to the center, right? And that like if what progressives believe is that every healthcare service should be free at point of service to everybody, and it should all be financed by. Payers that like they should just say that like over and over and over and over and over again, and that they should not attempt to answer any of the questions about how that specifically will work because they are aware that they don't have the votes, and that they're not going to get the votes, and that they're not going to change anybody's mind. But that like they are just going to say what they think, which is that all healthcare services should be free to everybody and should be paid for by taxpayers, and there should be no limits on it. And like they're going to try to make the the center respond to them rather than moving reactively. So it'll be like just be like what what have you got Joe Biden? Yeah. We'll and doesn't feel like that's work. Like if you look at the center for American progress. Which is like, you know, the the fulcrum of democratic establishment policy making they've put out this Medicare for extra for all. That's now become a Medicare for America Bill. Sponsored by Rosa DeLores. Jan Schakowsky in the house. That's like far to the left of where the ACA was like, it would break, the impetus is on cap to be like, okay. But here's why are is. Because like you get why like free health care for everyone. Now, the impetus is on cap. Do the analysis to say, no, no huge. Why why ours is just as good it kind of creates a nice dynamic for single payer supporters where you put the more moderate people you on the defense with their idea. I thought that as of a month ago, this was working really well for single payer people. Right. Because like you had Bernie still out there. Then you had a number of other senators who got in the race early endorsing Medicare for all legislation, and then you had bit or work in Buda Jj sort of anchoring would pass it for a right? Flank of the. Debate by endorsing this Medicare for America legislation and that that was the dynamic that the single payer people wanted like, I think like they wanted Bernie Sanders to be the nominee. But like, even if he wasn't like the center alternative had become so left right in and it had created a situation in which like a moderate democratic Senator, right? Like, a Michael Bennett or whomever could be like, yeah. I'm for this way to the left of the plan, which is moderate. Now the extent to which Joe Biden has waded into the raise jumped out to a very large early. And like not made any commitments at all along. These lines is like I'm not saying like, this means the plan that seemed to be working as a total failure. But like it it calls into question. But still I mean, it's still so early and like I think we're going to go through the debates that are gonna they're gonna. Like vomiting. Love it saying they're gonna start a month to start with the debates and the Joe Biden is going to have those moments where he's asked do sport healthcare for everyone. He's gonna one of things I thought was pretty interesting. And and we both wrote about this is that Wall Street analysts who study healthcare companies are pretty jazzed for Joe Biden, it'd be pretty good for the insurance companies if we had a Biden presidency, but Greer, right? He you know, he has been able and I think it's also like a nice reminder that like the people all of us. Follow on Twitter are not the electorate, and we'll see what happens right? Like, maybe people are liking Joe Biden because they are assuming that Joe Biden, a very mainstream establishment democrat will endorse the new mainstream establishment consensus view. And maybe in fact, you will do that. Right. Like if the upshot of all this is president Joe Biden and Medicare for America as outlined by cap that would be a big success for the single payer movement. But also if what happens is Joe Biden. Keeps being like Affordable Care Act that was a big fucking deal. He wins with forty four percent of the vote. He's someone who I went back when I wrote the story about his views on health care who was actually a force pushing against doing the Affordable Care Act that he I it's not just that. He's not a Medicare for all supporter. But when you look back reading through histories of the Obama administration. He there was this debate in two thousand nine you were just sticking out of a recession. Do we really wanna throw all political capital behind healthcare and President Obama was like yes, Joe Biden was like, no, we should not do that. And President Obama won. Because he is the president. And I think that is an important lesson about a huge space between Biden, and Bernie, it's not just one as endorsed healthcare. And one hasn't won fervently believes we need to overhaul our healthcare system and one kind of things like not worth the political capital. And I think that divide is going to come out. Out more. I mean, what we're on like week two of the Biden candidacy, I think this divide will be like explored come out more as we get into the primary. Yeah, I've had this question for awhile about how like scalable, healthcare, politics, really are. Because I think there's this perception that like almost all Democrats for Medicare for all now. And it's like a a makeup break issue for them. And but I think that the the polling is a little more nuanced than that like yes, Democrats are generally sympathetic to the goals of national health insurance or universal healthcare program. But they're not really absolutist about it. Like, you know, there's polling that shows. Like, yeah. Sixty percent of Democrats say they support Medicare for all. But more than half of them would rather prioritize fixing the Affordable Care Act in the near term. We should take a break. Yeah. Let's let's turn to the CBS CDL report. Okay. I'm gonna tell you guys about daily harvest. This is a product. I tried recently. It's really really cool. This is like a kind of it's a convenient way to eat some healthy food in your house. So how works is they send you chef crafted smoothies harvest, bowls and soups right to your door to the basically like these cups that comes in a box. It comes packed with dry ice. They're frozen. You put the cups in the freezer. And then you wait until you're ready. Then you pop them out, and you sort of blend them up there easy. Delicious is a great way to get healthy dose of fruits and vegetables. Without a lot of hassles. They've got over fifty varieties and all just one step to make you at what our milk to a smoothie or heat up a harvest bowl. 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So it makes me sad that Sarah will not be with us as Joe Biden needs to start answering these questions in the debates because I think the conventional wisdom around this has like swan so hard in in a few weeks. And we don't know. But what we have right now before us is the Congressional Budget Office. Yes. Good friends of yours. Sara. Yes. Yes. Very good friends. They did I guess this was not like a score of the single payer Bill because the single payer Bill is written is a little vague. But they were kind of laying out what like like principles. Yes. So I'll tell you the name of this report. And how Democrats didn't want a score to be clear. Their requests from CBO was like don't analyze a specific Bill just answer some very broad general questions. Yeah. I think I really encourage you to pay attention to what it is that like your guys on Capitol Hill are actually doing and an ask yourself some some quest. Okay. This this report it is titled key designed components considerations for establishing a single payer healthcare system. Minute has this nice little graphic on the fund about some of the components of single payer healthcare like role of current systems covered serious services in cost sharing payment rates cost containment financing. It's like arrows in a circle not. It's like a circle and they're all on the circle. It's I'm really get with a circles doing the graphic. But that's here nor there. So even the CBO report, I think it was also a little Dylan I like to give you a sense of like Dylan I last week where big single Bayer week. We got the here. And we got the CBO report. The hearing was exceedingly polite the CBO report. Well, I think very well ridden informative. Essentially, like, a international house systems one. Oh, one what they did. My favorite part of the report is a table on the fourth page that kind of outlines the different features of different international health care systems are really clear cogent way. I don't think at told people working on single payer anything different. I don't think it told them anything new about how such a Bill would be scored that they didn't know already the things I thought I might see in there that wouldn't were things that did like deal with actual numbers. Like if you set reimbursement rates at Medicare levels. Here's how much it would cost or, you know, here's the ties of tax you a need to finance this that and it did not even get to that level of specificity. So instead, it was a very thoughtful guide, you know, as title says to the key components one, right? Like, you know, what to expect expecting to write a single payer Bill. I thought it was going to be. And maybe I misunderstood the requests for it. I thought it was going to be a tiny bit more specific than than what it ended up coming out as I think it tells you a lot that there were healthcare professors on Twitter saying I'm going to assign this to one of my classes, and the political press almost completely ignored it there is that that that much lack of fireworks. But yeah, I mean, I came away from this really interested. I learned things about the Taiwanese system that I didn't know and found kind of fascinating. Like the fact that a really good IT system has been so integral to their success. I thought was interesting the fact that they like the way they do their global budgeting and pay providers. I thought was really fascinating. But like, yeah, there wasn't in terms of like what a Medicare for all Bill would look like here in the United States. And how CBO would evaluate that? We really didn't learn anything like this report is completely devoid of numbers. I think any meaningful numbers see me. This was like a brilliant way to undermine the push for single payer health care. I feel like what like single payer proponents like always want is foot like tough pushback. And then like they get into a fight in which single payer side has this kind of like a ethics high ground and that whenever you can. Instead, this is like a little bit of like a like a rope ago and be like a high. You're correct here are a bunch of design consideration. There's a lot of good ways to make this. And it's just like it's tempting you to like. Okay. Okay. Pick one pick one, right? Like like here. Here's one thing to think about who's going to own the hospital. Right. And then they go through some different ways that you can do it. Right. And it is true. Right. Like, it's it's not that. This question makes it unworkable. There are a lot of different models of this. But all countries that have a healthcare system like they pick one of them. Right. Right. And so they just like they give you this menu. And like now is your problem? Yeah. As the author single payer, basically here all the difficult. Visions, you would have to say, they're difficult. Here's. Usually select appetizer. You're right. But like. Now. It's no, it's your problem. Whereas the would be author of Medicare for all legislation like you have this like extents, you're saying even your problem. It's like you're set of options. Do how candidate does it the way? Taiwan. Does it like it sets? It up is like, you know, this is true. This is a problem that dozens of countries of solved before us at basically says like we're not talking about an impossible thing. Just choose your own adventure single payer's. But it's like, but it's like a long annoying homework assignment. Like you're saying like professors like I will assign this 'cause like. Soon. 'cause like it's good, right? It's like you go back home representatives. So and so here's a packet to read over right? Like, you can do the problem sets. But it means that like one of the first difficulties of pushing this forward is that like not only do you need to like win some elections and intimidates people with primaries on so stuff, but like inside the single payer Cam, you need to reach some kind of consensus about these issues. And it's not that like Canada's system works Taiwan system works Sweden system works, but they're not the same. Yeah. Right. And so it's like you have to pick. And it's easy as an individual like, I could look at this. And be like this way this way this way this way that way, but like, Sarah, my not agree right now, we have you know, it's it's a kind of effective thing to be like instead of you guys. All teaming up to yell at me. Like, what are you yell at each other? Yes, there is kind of an amazing circular logic in some pieces of the report. So like on the question of private insurance. They go into like whether or not, you know, you should get rid of it or not. Or whether you should allow private insurance plans, the basically compete with the national Medicare for all plan. And so they start off by saying, well, if you get rid of private insurance that's going to cut provider payments, and you know, that could lead to these adverse effects fewer doctors hospital closings whatever they're then they say, well, but if you allow private insurance to remain maybe that allows for you know, doctors and hospitals to make up some of the revenue that they lost. And you know, offset some of those concerns that you might have. And then they bring it back around again to like if you allow private insurance and private insurance pays a lot better than the public plan. Maybe doctors and hospitals give priority to those private insurance patients, and that leads to people with the national health plan the Medicare for all plan facing longer wait times, or they're not able to access the services that the so like it prevents presents you sort of like the problem from every side with no wage resolve it, right, which is sort of speaks like this this great like like hearing page twenty one. They're like they're talking about payment rates. It's and then like at the end of that they're saying other considerations. Then one of the other considerations is for example, teaching hospitals could have higher payment rates received compensation for their teacher costs through direct payments outside the single payer system. And he's like on the one hand who fucking cares on the other hand people who have teaching hospitals in their district's now that you mention it, right? Probably care actually a lot about this. Right. And it's just like it's such a contrast from like every other major countries guarantees hope care. Sanders impression. To this. Like, here's a fucking annoying question to deal with and like, obviously, this is not an unsolvable problem. Right. Like either the teaching hospitals can get higher reimbursement. Rates inside the system or they're gonna be an out of system supplemented payment. Either would work fine. There's no problem. It's just that you would have to pick. And like who like who wants to do that? This is what people mean when they say like you're talking about restructuring sixteen percent of the economy, right? Is that like you cannot do that with like a four page high level analysis of like what kind of outcomes he would like he's like eighty Gillian annoying details that like you have to sit down. And there's a lot of stakeholders with them and people are going to have all kinds of feelings because it really matters. Right. Like if a teaching hospital is one of the major employers in your town, you're gonna like really want that in on the other hand if you're like a lot of towns. And the hospital is a major employer, but it's not changing hospital. You don't wanna system that like loads the dice against you and sends people away and like who knows good, and you're gonna get some of them Braun. Look inevitably things we learned from the Affordable Care Act is like people tried their best to like, right? Good healthcare Bill, and there were problems. I converse e some of it was drafted sloppily and had to go to the supreme court to figure out like if you know the law, guaranteed them subsidies to everyone. I remember there was like just one kind of quirky drafting air that really fucked up all the territory places like Puerto Rico and Guam fucked up their healthcare systems because it created an individual mandate for those places. No did not have the individual mandate. And did not have the subsidies, but had guaranteed issue. So all of a sudden, it was like wreaking havoc on like territorial healthcare system. I know that I interviewed the guy from Guam, and he's like we're lobbying on this. We're not getting anywhere and unique. Situation. You kinda side. It was like no this is just like Guam. I support statehood for Guam. I'll listen to your weeds on that next week these tiny little decisions aren't tiny for the districts that have teaching hospitals and some of them are big. There was one that was brought up in a really great article in the newspaper, the New York Times by Margaret Sanger, cats and read Abelson one things I pointed out, which I just never thought about is. The fact a lot of our retirement accounts are invested in health insurance stocks, and like I don't know what you do about that. And that's not really one where you can like look at Taiwan or Canada because they never got to a point where you'd such advanced healthcare systems that a nation's retirement savings were tied up in the future of your health insurance plans. So there are a lot of annoying questions and some of them like the teaching hospitals you pick one, but like the health insurance stocks like, I don't really know. And like there really isn't like an international perspective to say like. Australia. Did it this way or Canada? Did it this way because none of them had to deal with that? I think one of the things that CBO report can't get at is the fact that we are if we transition to single payer we transitioning from a system that is such developed health insurance infrastructure and that presents its own unique challenges. Yeah. Devroy back to tour saying before this sort of underscores the extent to which the the single payer push. I think like works better as a bargaining tactic than as a legislative goal. Right. It's like if you're saying look man, if there is a new democratic regime, a democratic president Democratic Senate cows, I mean who knows if that will come about. But like we expect you like the new president the new pivot point legislators the blue dog caucus to come to the table with a thing that will expand coverage to more people and cut down on. The pricing power of private actors in the system. Right. The more people you can get on board for like something like six four six like the more you have behind that. But the more you go the other way. And it's like, oh, I I'm really actually intrigued by your idea. Single payer proponents. Can you just like tell me like like exactly what your ideas gonna look like, then they've they've made remarkably little progress. I would say I answer. Like, I think the document is is great. It's like a really good primer on these issues. But it doesn't like a canoe conceptual ground. If you had been curious about this topic in twenty fourteen you could have gotten people to write you up. Right. Exactly this document. There's no like new discovery. Yeah. It's a great thirty pages on like how you would go about setting up a single payer system in the abstract, and nobody has really done it. Get like the people on on the hill. Right. There's. No this been no work as we're now in like year. Five of Bernie Sanders is quest for the White House toward like answering these kinds of questions, which I don't think it's as bad as political tactic. Is there like again like with the political landscape being what it is? Right. What incentive is there? Like what I think? It's like the perfect compromise. If here's an advocate leave this work to the CBO to me, this is sort of different from what I've seen in the the green new deal community. We're like, yes, they're interested in Overton window games and recognize that like causing Cortez is not going to be like driving legislative agenda personally. But they are in fact likes grambling to come out with regulatory agency proposals narrow issues domain specific bills because they feel like a a real sense of urgency to do as much as possible on climate change right as quickly as possible, and they are. Don't quite have their ducks in a row yet. But they're really trying to come up with some stuff here. Right. Whereas like, the healthcare people have they've been working at this much longer. And then still haven't gotten to like any of the nuts and bolts. Yeah. And I guess that comes to the question of like what Democrats actually want to do if they get the chance in twenty twenty one. Because like, I think something that gets lost amid all this energy about Medicare for all is that really the most like effective political tactic of the last decade or so has been running against the other person's health care plan. Like, that's what Republicans deployed after ObamaCare passed brought them a lot of the house and the Senate and the White House and now and then Democrats twenty eighteen really what they were running on was opposing the Republican plans to roll back the Affordable Care Act. And so like, it seems it seems sometimes I wonder like if we're spending a lot of energy when Democrats would if they had the opportunity. In twenty twenty one to govern that like this would be more like a we need to do something kind of like get healthcare off the plate for like, this is not where they've really want to spend their time and energy. Although what I think is interesting about this is that if you go back to like old tedious wonky conversations about healthcare from two thousand five thousand six two thousand seven right? Like one of the things you remember is just that like systemic healthcare costs are like a big problem for America. And the basic issues are not actually that different in the multi payer system, or in the single payer system as Sarah has has taught us all in in five years at vox like. You you do the price regulation outside the context of the single payer system or you can be America. And and not. But like either way that's why healthcare costs in the US, right like whether they're on the government's books or your employers books are coming out of your pocket like their exorbitant like because the prices are high. You could make the prices be lower. But like if the prices were lower, you can go read the CBO report and just like imagine it's not about single pair. And like all the same questions apply. It's like if there wasn't so much money going into the doctors and hospitals like maybe some of the hospitals close. Maybe the doctors would move, you know, like, maybe quality would decline and unsung of these are inescapable lays nobody wants to answer these questions. But I, but it's like you're in like, we run up into these problems all the time, the prices, I mean, I think at the core of it. If I've learned anything over my past five years at vox, including the sixteen hundred medical bills, I read it's like the problem is the prices and like. I think it's a lot of people don't like their health insurance companies. What's exciting to talk about getting rid of private insurance? But you know, I become pretty convinced. But I think it's like the problem is the prices, but the prices are also the hardest part to tackle because all that money that goes into healthcare from prices, they are jobs, and they are new hospitals, and they are building this healthcare infrastructure. So people are going to fight like hell to not have the prices regulated. But the prices are at like like if we'd listeners wanna take anything from what I've said on this show for five years like the prices are at the core of the problem we have with healthcare. They're also the thing that our political system seems to struggle the most to deal with but all of these intermediate options, right? It's like you could do a buy in. You could do Medicare for kids, you whatever you want to say, okay. I'm gonna try to be less drastic Dominica blink fine. But it's still implicates the same basic issue. Like, the reason we didn't get a public option back in two thousand nine. Is that the strong like a strong public option would have reduced the prices paid to providers? The providers didn't want prices to go down. Right. It's not. I mean, like this Overton like all that stuff is real. But like the ground truth right is not actually voidable. It seems to me by scaling back to some of these these other kinds of things because like either we in some form or another are gonna pay like all this money to the hospitals or or else were not right one. I think you've seen. I think industry recognizes that and you've seen this partnership for America's healthcare future, which is basically a collection of every notable health industry lobbying saying this cat plan is amazed. They're not they're they're they have perhaps wisely from politics perspective. Like, they have basically any kind of public plan is is objectionable to them. Like, they came out against the Debbie stab? Now. Let people who are fifty years old by Medicare. They've obviously come out against benefit for all Medicare for America. America's like, they're not even willing to budge. A little bit. So they've the those steaks of those battle lines have been drawn already. And yet, they don't even they have not there Overton window has not shifted way. I always think that's an interesting question politics. Right. It's like when you have an idea that you know, is going to be opposed by some powerful interests. Does it make sense to like try to move closer to their position? Even if they're going to oppose you anyway, right for the sake of seeming more reasonable or knowing that they're going to oppose you. Anyway, does it make sense to go maximum in the other direction? So that you can maximize the wins for other people. Right. It's like if the hospital industry is going to new you with ads one way or another, right? There's something to be said for like, okay. But you're gonna get free medicine. Right. So I think we should we should change gears and talk about a good use of healthcare, but has to spend. Let's do it. Take a break. Come back for paper. Songwriter. Charlie Harding, and I'm using colleges. Nate Sloan in this week on switched on pop. We deconstruct lizotte 'cause I love union. It is her latest album. It has come out on number six on the charts. Is absolutely stunning. Yeah. What you're gonna find about this album is that it transcends. Genre to meet some sort of really potent message that Liz, oh has to tell every song has something really stunning in it. And if you wanna understand how her songs work, what makes them tick and have a lot of fun. To her tracks. Listen to switch on pop anywhere. You get your podcasts. All right. So today we have the returns to early life interventions for very low birthweight children from Rick chin. Samantha gold and Justin Hastings. This is a paper. You know? We're trying to not just do Swedish administrative data use a little more American administrative data. So this is Rhode Island administrative data. And the thing they did. I thought this is a really this is a study that surprised me a little bit. So they looked at the impact of early life interventions for low birth weight, newborns. If you are a baby who was born less than the threshold is fifteen hundred grams which works out to about three point three pounds there. You are considered a very low birthweight infant and hospitals will typically do more things to monitor the baby the baby will near certainly and up in the Nick, you it's going to get more intensive care. It's probably gonna come back for more neurological checkups after it leaves the hospital the American Academy of pediatrics recommends. Significantly more care for kids who are under this fifteen hundred gram threshold. So what these researchers did is they worked with the state of Rhode Island to look at the kids who are just below the threshold and the kids were just above it. So looking at infants who as little as thirteen hundred grams, and as many as seventeen hundred grams at time of birth, and they find that the threshold crossing is describe it means there's more intensive in hospital care, and they show some pretty significant gains later in life. They show a point three four standard deviation increase in test scores elementary and middle middle school. A seventeen percent point increase in probability of college enrollment and sixty six thousand less insp- social program expenditures by age fourteen and they try and figure out what is going on here. What is different about these low birth weight babies, and they find, you know, no detectable changes in the quality of schools. They go to no big changes in parental responses. They really think it is. As the additional medical care at that early stage of life that is leading to these larger gains, and your this paper, essentially makes an argument that if you have this intervention very early in life. You can see some pretty big dividends paid further on. And I just I was a pretty interesting paper that I hadn't thought about I surprised at the magnitude of the things that they're finding across like college enrollment social program expenditures test scores. It seems like a point here ride wide array of things, and I think it also, you know, the last thing I'd say take away from it is how how arbitrary a lot of things in medicine can be like, I think we set up this fifteen hundred gram threshold because it seemed like baby smaller than that. They probably need a lot of help. But I don't think there's much that's actually that different from like a baby that weighs like a hundred grams more we're talking about like an ounce or to death. It's a round number down the metric system, which is just based literally a block of iron sitting in Paris. Yeah. So I think that. It was also it's like, it seems like these babies who are just above the threshold. You actually Dylan's the newest parent on this podcast. So we all know like babies small and one ounce of different seems to actually make a big difference in the medical care. They get in this paper suggesting big difference in their entire childhood outcomes. Yeah, I'm glad you said that because my first thought after eating was this was like do we need to change the threshold? So that these kids who fall just above it and are now getting like outperformed by the. Good regression discontinuity design. There is a bad arbitrary cutoff at work. Right. Like, it's good for research. Right to just be like. Okay. If you're like here, you got something awesome. And if you're like one inch of you got nothing that's like good for research purposes. But never the good never when you step back and think about like that never actually make sense, right? Well, yeah. But the magnitude of the changes is pretty remarkable in that. I guess to do we have any this is way outside of my expertise. I think you're too. But like is it just that the opening period of your life is so essential that the more aggressive medical interventions can have these kind of lingering effects? I know they don't really go into like cause and effect. But I wondered yes, I mean, that's the argument they make in this that essentially, and you know, I went through because they they don't get super in depth. And I wanted to understand better like what is actually different about being born, you know, a fourteen hundred grandbaby versus sixteen hundred hoping there'd be more detail nece. There was. Isn't. But they and this isn't just about things Rhode Island is doing differently. Rhode Island just happened to give them a lot of really great administrative data that could use to do this study. But the recommendations from the American Academy of pediatrics is more intensive monitoring near certainly a knick you admission more follow up appointments to check the baby's neurological status. So you might be catching things a little bit earlier. But those one place I was I was hoping there'd be a little more detail in this study. And it seemed like, you know, in some places they were like trying to track down there citing while like one manual from. Boston's as like, here's how you treat low weight babies. So one question I did have about this paper is how how standard are these protocols for Lowy eighties? And you know, how clearly are they being followed in regress ways that we could really say like, yes, it says additional medical care that is is leading to these better outcomes. I wonder how much the the low birth weight is like what is the? Underlying issue? Exactly. Because like one thing I know from a lot of air pollution study is and wick and snap. Studies. Is that like a lot of there are a lot of things where the dependent variable winds up being very low low-birth-weight births. Right. Right. So is there like socioeconomic kind of wage? So I mean, it could be that the children are very low birth weight because of some bad living conditions that the mother is experiencing and the extra interventions in some ambient way. Like actually help alleviate right? The light larger bad situation. Right. Like if you are in a just like a very stressful situation like having the extra medical attention might be helping you with something else. I mean, it's it's unfortunate. I would say if they do in this papers, they do look at maternal stress. Don't find that to be one of the things. That's different. Yeah. Which the prize? Me because I would've also there may be other knock on things aren't studying. But that is one they thought to study did not see a connection there. If there's anything I have learned five years. I think you know, there's there's like a kind of interesting like meta politics about biology in the world. Why think a lot of people person minded people get a little leery of this whole subject, but there's like a ton of really good evidence that like biochemical circumstances people's early life in terms of their exposure to particular pollution their exposure to heavy metal contamination, the nutritional environment that like pregnant women and newborns receive the noise level to which children are exposed that. Like all of this stuff makes a really big difference in that it swamps. This sort of like economics class like everything is about incentives. Kind of thing. Like like like be all you can be and like we don't want to deter people from from working hard type stuff that like people suffer, and we know intuitively, right? Like in an extreme case like some people can't see right? And it's not like they need better incentives. Right. It's like your eyes don't work. You're is at work. But this this whole spectrum of things where like the very low birthweight children. Just like if you give them hell like they wind up doing way better. Yeah. You see this tension, and how kind of pregnant women are treated and on the one hand a lot of it's very paternalistic and very like don't do this don't do that. And you feel like like, I'm still like a human while I'm carrying this other human, but at the same time, you also developing body of research, I demand of us for an episode of the impact around people are looking at their relationship between maternal stress and prematurely, and there's a growing consensus in the scientific community that one things that might be. Driving premature birth which is a huge huge predictor for infant mortality for you know, complications late for that young baby is more stress that something about the body's reaction to stress just makes it a less hospitable place for the baby to hang out and the come out a little bit earlier is very kind of basic interpretation of that science. And you know, on the one hand like when I was pregnant like I just hated how prescriptive everything was and a lot of it wasn't based on evidence. And like you end up feeling like this vessel for another thing on the other hand, you are a vessel for like another human being. And like there is more and more research addressing the stress you experience is going to affect the baby that you're carrying. And I think there's often a case for balance like you need to respect the person carrying the baby the baby being carried. But I think you're right. Matt kind of gets at like this tension in like liberal circles around like respecting parents respecting pregnant women as. Like their own entity. But also like the decisions they're making like they do affect the baby they're carrying two and that's a bit of a tension. That's going on. I thought it was interesting. The paper almost does that kind of cost benefit analysis because not only is it clearly kind of like this is evidence for aggressive intervention early in an infant's life. But like, they then tease out like and people, you know, people who ended up receiving these early interventions receive what was it like sixty thousand dollars less in like thank social spending public benefits. So I mean that seemed to be the whole subtext paper was, but I mean, also as a as a redress for social inequities, right? That like, it's it's it's correct. And proper to say that like there should be less like overt and subconscious like discrimination against adults. But I think the clears way to read a lot of this is that like a lot of cumulative disadvantage actually occurs. Very very. Early in life, and that like one of the most promising possible methods to like alleviate a lot of the big systematic inequities. We see in America is to like really tackle the specifics around, you know, medical care at nutrition afflicting, like small babies and small children and things like that. And not just in a kind of like sedans, you'll hear this in Allegra schools sort of context, which obviously is important people spend him Fairmount time in school. But like, you know, it's it's the whole the whole thing. Right. Like you got eighteen month olds. And like some of them are like nice like affluent middle class households where they have like a lot of resources to bear on this. And a lot of them aren't right. And like the quality of medical care like infants are receiving has like this is a it's a big deal on one that I'd be curious about is what the reaction would be like trying to expand these programs. Let's say like. You know, the people in Rhode Island, they see this. And they say, oh, wow. This is a bad threshold like we should really. Let's try moving it up to eighteen hundred. That's probably gonna be pretty expensive for the Medicaid program because you know, about half a burst in the US or financed by Medicaid NICU cares incredibly expensive because of the high prices we've been talking about it seems like this will in like the bigger global picture it will pay off in the long run. But you'd have to find the Medicaid dollars to to finance expanding these services to another group of infants I don't know how many babies vomit category. But I do know healthcare is very very expensive. And this is like where you do get into like in single payer. There's often this discussion of rationing one of the things we're doing now is we're rationing medical intervention for the kids seem to need it the most and this paper suggests were leaving out kids who could also benefit from it because we're deciding okay, this should go to really the sickest of not the sickest, but the. Kind of smallest of the. We're talking about the baby who's like three pounds and nine ounces that is a tiny baby that baby's gonna be eligible for these interventions, and it really is one of the many many rationing decisions that get made in the United States to say, okay, we're going to reserve this resource for the baby who weighs three pounds two ounces. But the baby who weighs three pounds nine ounces like they're not going to be eligible for this. I mean, Sunday, we will do a proper modern monetary theory of set of the weeds like this is a good example of the sort of thing, I do feel that America's hurt by excessively budget focused thinking, right because like the real the real question this poses is like a can we like expand the amount of Nikki facilities substantially to serve substantially larger swath of the the NATO population. I I I don't know, you know, I know about or like what would be involved in doing that. Right. Because it's it's just a monetary thing. Right. It's like, I think you don't. Stroll into a big city, Nick you, and it's like just half empty all the time. And you could just throw another nurse in there. Right. It's like you would have to build things have trained people up. So like, what would be entailed in that? But then how much would that actually be costly as a society or would it be beneficial like rain, we'd be having a much healthier adult population? Citing not like would it be more costly for the Medicaid Rhode Island program? Right. About it. Because I get a certain point like it probably isn't worth the cost. Right. Like if putting every newborn into these very intensive medical treatments would probably have very few marginal benefits, which there is a point where it's ups making sense. But looking at the cost benefit narrowly in terms of like, how does the budget framework specifically work is going to lead you to under resource things that that pay off well because like the decrease in socialist, long-term, social suspending is interesting, right? But like that's just a small part of the like global social returns, presumably, right, like whatever reason it is that that people getting treatment wind up having less poverty down the road like has more and more benefits line in any case. It seems like this is a call to reevaluate the standard move it up. More states should consider releasing their administrative day. About this. So that we can get a clear picture of what's happening. That'd be great. Well, I think. Think that's the end Sarah says that my office is literally gonna be three blocks here. I'm glad I'm still hanging out on Tate. Thank you. At least single-parent administrative health care when dreams are made of it is it is so to everyone out there in weeds land, I hope you will you a wish Sarah, I find farewell from from the audio universe. But also, you know, we are going to have to retool the show a little bit going forward. And hopefully, we'll have the opportunity to take on perhaps a broader range of subjects of a we will be missing some of the expertise here. So please let me know Email address is mad at vox dot com. If you've got any thoughts on what you'd like to see see the weeds go into in the future. I'm just I'm really. But thanks for listening at thanks, Sarah. For a lot of great podcasts over the years. Podcast co-host. Yeah. And. We will do act on Friday. Everybody a meal. I Patel editor and chief the verge and this is the verge cast. I is the flagship podcast the verge every week. We cover the latest in tech news reviews. We took a critical look at what is going on now. And next in the world of tech show says by me, our executive editor debone, not your friend and Paul Miller. It just feels like there's something wrong with all computers, though. Don't you think that sometimes we do that on Fridays and on Tuesdays interview episode IV talking to all kinds of influential people in around the world attack. We talked to Microsoft founder Bill Gates about his efforts, you can design systems without having to reveal any individuals particular medical record journalists academics, Lena Khan who thinks that we should be doing way more to break up giant companies like Amazon Facebook, hindsight allowing casebooks to buy up both what's up and Instagram proved been the wrong call and we talked to tech CEO's videos Bill Baxter explained. Exactly, how smart TV manufacturers make their money. It's about post purchase monetization of the TV. It's ads. It's ads. Check us out every Friday to your everything intact. From new iphone leaks to breaking down. Facebook's ongoing issues of private. See to just me and Paul ranting each other about the role of the government and check us out on Tuesdays. When I have seen every episode. Subscribe diverse chace wherever podcast, we'll see them.

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The Long Legacy Of The Arecibo Telescope

Short Wave

14:09 min | 7 months ago

The Long Legacy Of The Arecibo Telescope

"Hey there it's mattie safai a few months ago. We did a story about a giant telescope in odyssey cbo puerto rico a telescope that has driven decades of scientific discovery but back in august it was damaged when a cable fell and then a different cable snapped leading to even more damage. The people who own the telescope the national science foundation announced that they plan to shut it down due to serious safety concerns but supporters of the scope. Say that this damage was due to years of neglect and they've already sent a petition to the white house. Asking for the federal government to find a way to stabilize the structure for many the odyssey will telescope is more than just a scientific instrument. It's a point of pride for the people of puerto rico and a beacon of scientific collaboration and so today were returning to that earlier. Episode from august. You're listening to shortwave from npr. The first word. Ed rivera valentine ever spoke was luna moon in spanish. Ed grew up on the northern coast of puerto rico near the addis cbo telescope. The reason i am in astronomy and ponte sciences because of that telescope my parents took me up there. When i think goes three i remember looking over and just being completely and utterly stunned and getting to know that that type of science and that an instrument so valuable for the entire world was literally in my backyard was something that just told me okay. Do have to be part of this community. Have to get to do this. Really cool science. Ed does really cool science. They even ended up working at the telescope itself for several years. I've heard people say that when they go up to it. It's almost a religious experience. You approach the telescope is huge. The dish is thousand feet in diameter and covers just about twenty acres. Suspended above is a nine hundred tonne platform that holds a bunch of scientific instruments. It was constructed in the nineteen sixties. And now ed says that. The telescope has permeated much of puerto rican culture. When you're walking around san juan and looking at the art artists are making paintings of the telescope. That's how ingrained telescope is in our culture. These days ed's a planetary scientist with universities space research association at the lunar and planetary institute in houston. That's where they were when they heard the news bat cbo. The telescope had suffered major damage that he therapy. Ceac only leo in a copy of the an early august one of the wires that helped to suspend the platform in the air came off. Its napped off in your mind. Imagine it kinda like a rubber band because it comes off with force and it hit the side of the gregorian dome and then it came down and slammed onto the dish causing a whole to form and a lot of those panels to have to be broken dacha. So what went through your mind when you heard about this damage ed. When you're working out a telescope as a scientist as an engineer as anyone else go that facility is almost a second home for you and when you come to your house and you see broken. Obviously you're going to feel something for it. So the next part that that at least came to my mind was okay. I know what these people are going through. I need to send them a big box of chocolate or something because they're going to need this so today in the show a closer look at the odyssey cbo observatory what's at stake with the recent damage and the unique role. The telescope plays in both scientific research and popular culture. And you're listening to shortwave for men. Fiat this message comes from. Npr sponsor. ibm today isn't a restart. It's a rethink. that's why am businesses are partnering with. Ibm to change how they work from. Supply chains to customer service. Let's put smart to work visit. Ibm dot com slash. Think to learn more this message comes from. Npr sponsor three m supporting communities in the fight against covid nineteen since the outbreak. Three m has responded with cash and product donations including surgical masks hand sanitizer and respirators through local and global aid partners. In addition three m is on track to produce to billion respirators globally by the end of twenty twenty learn. How three m is helping the world respond to covid nineteen goto three m dot com slash coded. Three m science applied to life. So let's step back for a minute edit and get a better sense of how the telescope has been used over the years. Tell me about what it does. What kind of projects it's worked on. So one of the really neat things about the The observatory that's very versatile. Scientific instrument most telescopes radio. Telescopes don't have the ability to send out light. They only capture late at the observatory. We can send and capture late when an asteroid coming by. We're pretty much a flashlight that we turn on we send out to. It comes back right. We can tell you how far these objects are down to a meters unbelievable add narrate and we care about where these asteroids are going to be because what if one day this thing comes around and gets too close to earth if we can let people know this is going to happen next year we can actually prepare for it like dinosaurs. They didn't have a space program so they can get to prepare for anything. That's true we do have that on the dinosaurs. We don't have much. But we have out of cbo and we have the direct understanding of asteroids because i also think just from an outsider's perspective like this telescope does really play a role in our cultural imagination. It contributes to our sense of off. You know about the universe. Like i think i remember in the seventies it was used to deliberately beam a message into space. You know like hey. We're here like i mean it really has like not only these scientific contributions but these cultural contributions it's like an it's an inspirational place. You know oh yeah. I love marvel. I'm love marvel comics. And things like that and i was watching. Although i'm a little old doesn't matter. I was watching a cartoon about the avengers and the avengers were flying off to the odyssey observatory to save it. Who was that still in the cartoon. Oh my gosh so yes it really is you know. It's not like one of those fields of science or scientific tools that really stays in academia right. It provides a broader context for understanding. The universe for non-academic says well which i think is is really special and important. It's like bench because of its versatility. It gets to be part of not only applied science but just part of typical day to day life. You may not see it. But it's there in cultural context. It's there you know saving your life making sure this asteroid is not coming towards you. It's really cool so it sounds like at this. Recent damage has big implications in terms of slowing down a lot of research. What kind of research are we going to be missing out on right now with it down well for personal perspective. I actually had some observing runs. We're gonna come up in late. September through october where we were going to be studying mars with radar this year mars was going to be the closest it was going to be and also observable from the osce observatory until the year twenty sixty seven so it. This year was literally a once in a lifetime. Opportunity to observe mars with other. See all twenty twenty twenty twenty worst year ever. Yeah okay so the damage that happened. This year isn't the first hurdle for the observatory right hurricane. Maria damaged the observatory twenty. Seventeen you you were working there right like. Tell me about that experience. Su twenty seven one hurricane. Maria came by not only was. I was still working at. The observatory actually stayed at the observatory. That's where i went for shelter so i got to see the winds combined and the damage For me one of the things that like hit me the most or make me realize the damage the most after the hurricane when we went outside. And when you look across the telescope and it's in the middle of a beautiful rain-forest greenery everywhere and that day after the hurricane when we went outside there's there is no green left it just nothing just brown. Everything was brown. The trees were dead. You see all the way down to the soil. It was impactful in the sense of. Wow this is the damage of the hurricane. Awesome packed full as a puerto rican. Who's used to seeing their island. Be beautiful and green selling costs high. Like that's gone all gone in day. That's tough that you know it starts being Quite a bit less about the science at that point. Oh very quickly. I mean after the hurricane when there was no utilities at all on the island we still had a couple of generators so people from of see what would drive up. We pump water for them and they leave with a bunch of water the to drink water. Well so okay. Let's let's let's talk a little bit about the funding struggles right because there have been ongoing funding struggles for the telescope. Break that down a little bit for me yes. The telescope which is owned by the national science foundation has had some funding struggles in that the budget that is used to operate. It has been going down. And it's gone down from anywhere from about fourteen mil per year with the expected current contract. They could go all the way down to two million gotcha into and so what will that mean for for the telescope and the people that work on it. So as there is diminishing funds going there They'll be less available time for people to go explore go observe pulsars and find the first evidence for gravitational waves which won the telescope a nobel prize in physics and nineteen seventy-three. It's less and less science. So you know. This telescope was obviously an exceptional scientific tool. You've told me maybe even more importantly it sounds like to a lot of people in puerto rico with all of these challenges. It's facing you know what are your hopes for the observatory. Long-term at sue. I know that many people when they look at an instrument even their own car. You don't keep a car after what ten years or something got when you see an instrument. That's aging immediately. go okay. Maybe it's time to get something new a telescope the observatory of. Oh it's going on beyond fifty years. It doesn't mean all the instruments there are that old it has been updated it has been up kept. They're still really neat. Science as being done just a couple years ago. This radio astronaut michael phenomenon called fast radio bursts. Frb's or as. I like to call them. Verbis were spotted with how to see what data right this completely new thing that we hadn't seen before new data new science. Just you know these couple of past years. We don't know what new science can be done with a telescope unless we keep observing unless we keep looking right so my personal hope is in the acknowledgement of the fact that the observatory is still an incredibly important instrument for scientific progress. My hope is that we keep it. We keep it open. We keep doing great science with it and we keep doing great signs with it on the island. Getting to be part of my culture getting to inspire new people to come into stem fields right in my own. Field and planetary science of the latin x hispanic community is under represented by about ninety percent. But if we can use these type of instrument to inspire to help bridge gobs to help bridge opportunity gaps. We can get the field more diverse. We can actually bridge this low underrepresentation so my hope is that. Get to continue be part of science but also gets to be part of the pipeline issue and guess to help them the i ad i learned a lot about the telescope. I'm very excited about it. Thank you for your time. I appreciate you. And i appreciate the observatory a lot. More even more somehow some. Thank you so much vitamin a. It was a real pleasure getting to talk with you. This episode was produced by brett hansen. Backtracked by via an edited by deborah. George i'm maddie safai. Thanks for listening. To shortwave from npr.

three m puerto rico Three m mattie safai Ed rivera thousand feet ed nine hundred tonne lunar and planetary institute Ceac Ibm cbo hurricane Ed Npr national science foundation twenty acres san juan federal government white house
Interview with David Anderson, Co-Host of The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

27:52 min | 3 months ago

Interview with David Anderson, Co-Host of The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

"Hi this is robert. Clinkenbeard and david anderson with the commercial landscaper podcast. We're going to be twenty minutes of your life to deliver some meeting contents from accomplished leaders. I'm business owners to provide us in value to help you scale your business to become a better father. Push yourself higher goals. We hope you'll really enjoy these shows. And we really encourage you to share this with your friends a network to help share these messages. I'm super excited. Tonight's new partnership behalf with site. Recon if you've tired measuring promptest. The site recovery platform fully automates measurements. So you can then focus on. Ceo's think measurements think site because this is robert clinkenbeard. In david johnson metro steeper. Podcast really something slightly different today. Dvd going have a conversation around leadership. Development is something that we both see is challenges Through the companies. That be gordon and coach and present with so. Just be guitar. Discussion today and Hopefully the end of the session. You'll you'll hear some good nuggets. You can take out to your business or is bringing us into to help yards david. Welcome to the show today. Thank you very much robert. David you You know. I think both you and i experienced. We will going into companies and we're companies cbo. We're not growing or there's all these challenges refusal. The coach is not there in all the time we dive in a little bit. Deeper refined find that a lot of people being moved into that leadership role because dunwell to wherever role they were playing before whether be sealed manager and wherever the played in the company and they did a great job of that and then suddenly the the owner fell to see. You felt as though they had to promote paris into a a middle senior leader but more often than not they are necessary being given that treating that development Just to court some along to leading other people and they really struggling that rule. The you know the if you look so. They're feeling the not necessarily want to step up and tell the on our show that you know they need help. So what what's been your experience. That david what was your approach. When you go into companies on luke drawn train pubic delivers robert. You're absolutely right on know. Many time it's many times it's in. The growing companies companies are growing and as they're growing they need to add people in as we add people. We know that you know that that requires more time just managing people and you know you start your growing a company with a set group of people in his. They add people. It's just kind of natural in many cases to move those that have been with you. The longest up into leadership roles or management roles. But what we don't do is train them i myself. I've made this mistake. I'm a slow learner. As you know robert. So i've made this mistake several times and we as ceo's or sea level or you know important roles it's almost like shoes you know somebody else has to deal with that problem now and three to six months. Were realizing that while we've created more problems because the people that we've put into management leadership roles. They were never trained to do that. You know. there's there's this natural tendency of people wanting to move up the ladder and they want their titles to change and they want more money. Bud what would doesn't get recognized or is it given enough Thought or preparation or processes actually training people to be leaders and when we don't train our people as they grow with us to be leaders it it is a serious serious ripple effect. First of all the work quality usually go was down on. You see where your culture starts breaking down because You know people that don't know how to lead have a hard time lead. Can't lead based on your core values and things that you want to do. So you know the takeaway and what you and i both see and you know as you worked so much on strategy and i work on leadership teams. We see these great strategies put in place but almost impossible to fully implement them because without the right leadership teams to implement. It won't happen and it'll usually set you back now. I am because one of the excises or questions. I'm aso time is ready. Start with the unified company. We really start. And i said well you have to start at the people park because unless you have the right people excu ten year plan. Then you're going to get anywhere and there's almost feel as though there's an unspoken expectation that when owners trimotor team up into that leadership role the fields that their role as leading the company ship. Become easier so you know six months a year lease or when it feels the to die back into the weeds or how to deal with these culture problems. All these other things it was like. Wow you know what happened. Here is almost like that. Blindside that yeah you see that all the time and again i've done it in my own on twenty three plus years more than once of what it is. It's kind of like that. Oh i got somebody else to handle that problem now. You know. I need to You know you don't need to deal with that and you know what i what. We both work where i work. Excuse me the leadership side is that whenever a ceo or somebody is promoting a percent into a leadership role. Don't think walk into the office. The next day in flip the switch and say that's okay that participate in charge. Now i'm out. You should have a transition plan in. You should have a plan where you're coaching and bringing that person into a leadership role You know there's all sorts of things you can do from sending them to leadership classes. There is a plethora of them online now working with consultants and coaches. There's a ton of books out there on what to do. But it's really really important that you put that leadership training program around your leaders and future leaders in your in your organization. I mean it's kind of hard when you're a smaller business. I get it. But there's a reason that the fords in the ge's the big corporations spend significant amount of money on leadership programs within their organizations to ensure that You know they constantly filling the pipeline of people on you know to lead as they grow and What they can do going forward. I mean what what does that. Look like communities transition plan of humans six months. And what would you see as being the more successful transition palm. Well for for great question but for organization in total. I should think it should be an ongoing thing all the time. You know We as leaders go here speakers on do you ever do. You know company-wide youtube videos for people to watch in leadership positions. You have we in our company. We have a book club. You know that our leadership books or other types of books that people do so it should be A constant within your company is or some kind of Quarterly program name of my company's off. Madison avenue we have up. Oh a few you know university that with jokingly where there's different things that we offer Golden going year round is a great way to do it but again as as leaders in your organization you gotta be looking at your strategic plans growth and identifying the people that you see as future leaders and there's no cookie cutter robber. I i would say that's the biggest thing because people are different but i know you do personality assessments. You do all these type of things. That's what you should be looking at to get that feedback and the biggest thing is get feedback from people that work. You know work for that person with that person from even their peers and not two hundred percent judge if they're right or not but it's important that we know what you know. Peoples weaknesses and strengths are in in in in where they need to grow. I'm sure that's no different than what you saw in your company You know in the past. How did you address it. I like david to meet that a lot of mistakes on. We think i ventured. They're not necessarily any formal training but the semi lotto exposure with them the your vents brought them long to Was getting them involved in the executive type forums. And i felt as though the this truly appreciated being exposed to that and being around other peers on riddick celebrated learning. You know 'cause even up. Until that point i felt as though i was coming back to the company with all these ideas and i think people got fed up with new ideas to them every single week or month. But when i start to get the mo- more than that development and then eventually once the source of drinking the kool aid then i moved into more of coach anti rolled where it almost them on us of our weekly basis try and allocate time with them half an hour every single week and just talk through some of the challenges facing so at two that you know that development to another level going back to a point. You know you're making a minute. Goldman almost starts off with that initial assessment where there'd be a personality assessment or some other variation of where your shipper is going and then you're right i do. I do believe it is a one and done type. Leadership development blonde and i think it should be ongoing through the boob. Think it creates everybody's talking about. I the same language or seem direction. It just creates tremendous alignment negus so much better done. I give the analogy of You know. I'm a big cyclist. Look at tour de france or some of the big bakeries. You get so much more. Don everybody's working in peleton arrive this breakoff brickley cyclists. That's usually feature off after a few miles but now i'm a big believer not everything. I totally agree to other points. If i can. I'm sure you've seen this to leadership roles need to be earned not just granted to if you have somebody in your organization that feels that they're entitled to that next on you know leadership role or a leadership role not Don't don't do it. don't do it. You know you just said a minute ago that there wasn't one thing but i'm sure a couple of punches to the face of things we've done wrong is a great learning to if somebody is believes they're entitled. Don't do it look for the people that want to be leaders in are showing you that. Hey i did this. I read this. Hey i'm watching this they're asking. Hey can you give me feedback on how i'm doing this. That your true leaders You know constantly. I have seen people with just while i've been here so long so i should have this role or i do this to do without when you have. You almost feel you're under pressure especially when there's a chance that leaves your company as soon sounds from what you're seeing should necessarily be pressurized into is another way in which you can address them potentially leaving the company. Yeah i mean that's a tricky one. We all know you know we. We all have this feeling well. If this person leaves. I'm screwed you know i'm in trouble. I'm going to be honest a lot of times. That's just the pressure we put on ourselves because we know that we need to find a new person. We need to train a new person. But i would ask you robert. How many times did that one person leave. And you thought that it was going to be detrimental to the business and four months later. You're like wow. This new person brought in his taken us to the next level or while. I didn't know how much drama that person was causing. And what it was affecting and that so you got to really dig deep. I mean you know a lot of time. it's our own. Fear is leaders that just one more thing we need to deal with now. There's also ways to if somebody's that say i agree. Let's take the next three months four months. Put a plan in place years. A compensation structure that if you hit all of these things. If there's there's ways to put it in place to motivate able to do it so i think you can deal with it. You know the one other point. I wanted to bring up to is A robert you know who. I'm going to talk about but i'm not going to use any names but what is What many don't see at the ceo or very senior level is when you add and your growing unique to change just as much as the people that are working for you. Your role evolves view. Go from somebody. Who's doing things managing to traditional leadership role of encouraging cheerleader. As you just said you evolved more into a coach and mentor to the team. That's running the day-to-day you don't solve their problems. But you coach them through a deal You know through. It's not command and control anymore. It's not like my unit who i'm talking about. I see the smile It's it's not. You know. I want you all to lead the company and you know do this but i still am gonna make every decision and i'm going to do this. So you know you as the ceo leader of your company or svp or whatever whatever area you know when you're looking to add people you should be sitting down and writing. How your plan of how this new structure evolves your leadership position. Also one hundred percent and i knew exactly scenario now. I think you're right. Because i n tv perspective of companies or owners. The coaching this sometimes that resistance to perhaps paying fees. But i think ultimately there's some benefit there because they can help me through some of those difficult conversations whether you have it with your winter weather leadership team i ended up just ultimately making through the true that transition or that change was smoothly Because if you don't do it constantly cost you money can cost you people so Yeah there's definitely some benefits row surrounding yourself by the right people Robert if if if i can't right there too you know this goes to also bringing in somebody from the outside also into a leadership position and a personal story of mine at one point several years ago. I was like okay. I'm not on guinness. Kind really step back in the day-to-day operations on i brought in a gm to run the dated a business of the organization. And i did put a good transition plan in and i literally talked about that light switch. I said earlier that okay. You know starting monday. Here's this person's. In and within three months i lost three of our five top leadership team members and within six months i had to let that go because yeah it was eighteen months of hell i mean what do you think if you were to put some type of value and that i mean not necessarily caution manipur see. I'm sure there was some knock on effect crawl. The turmoil caused by that. Oh absolutely it cost me hard money because we all know there's formulas out there you know the cost to replace Especially a senior person can be a full year's salary you know by the time you find them a lotta time you gotta use a recruiter to find that level of person and then you've got that fee and then you gotta get up to speed which is at least three months and then you have you know. We're we're pleased. Bigger havoc is the culture. You know when you get three top people to leave an organization. It sends a message throughout your when three top people leave your company. It sends a message through your organization. What's going on here. do i need to bail out. This is the ship in the marketplace. When you have to explain the clients that three people senior people have left on so it absolutely has a direct hard financial costs but also the damage due at a cultural level is pretty significant. Also this scenario where infra zambo you'd come into company quickly and assessment all the may be an executive leadership team in place. You know very quickly through your system and you realize that the wrong team in place or maybe there's to the bad people just just not how do you go through that type of conversation or or did he do without scenario. Yeah it's a great question. I will tell you mean we both deal with this all the time. I mean when you're doing strategy summits and strategy. Planning you see really quick. Who's a fly on the wall. And who's an active participant. And so on. I just start every you know consulting thing that i do letting everybody know total transparency that. I'm here to evaluate the team to help them. But also to keep the leadership of the company up to date on you know where there may be challenges and it's not that that person needs to go by any means but it's like this person needs a lot more work. Here's the areas. Here's the things. Maybe this person isn't right for the leadership team right now. A lot of times what. I've seen An especially in growing companies. I know you to. Is that a growing company. Stock tries to stay within the same structure that they are today. Marshall goldsmith has the great book triggers. Is it tigers. Excuse me and it's you know. Yeah what got you here today. Is it going to get you to the next level and a lot of times. It's is when you're a growing company You know you haven't really evaluated that just because somebody was in a leadership role you know when you're a two million dollar a year company may be as the right fit for five million dollars a year company or ten million dollars a year company in that your organizational structure needs to adapt based on the growth of company and how the company is evolving. Emanate us even. There's a certain degree of loyalty. Somebody's been with your company for ten. Fifteen twenty years meanness wanna watch to do is to pull the rug away from them with all that loyalty by alternate the company is not get into the level. You wanted to then stephie some tough decisions to those who was talking to somebody yesterday. His house a software company. And you know they've been sitting around about two and a half million for the last four or five years. And i'm so what's your was was the issue and she didn't really know but as i proved a little bit more i think the key parent that a lot of the leadership team we're just cruising there. Were just were in that comfortable and they were. They've been around for fifteen twenty years and soon as they weren't proper so The one hundred percent agree that there's those people are not necessarily the right people to t the company to the next level because she wants to double triple in size over the next four five years and just fed up cruising. Yeah and. I have seen many times. People that are put in those roles. It's almost a relief. They're glad when they can go back to doing just what they really really want to do. I mean this is a classic in within sales organizations where you take stellar sales person and you put them into a sales management role and they suck at it and they're you know not happy and they wanna be out. You know you have to handle it carefully. Because i like i know you are is You know were. The loyalty is important. But that doesn't mean there. There's not a role i mean. You and i both have a person in our form together that you know Had a had a president of one of his decision divisions for twenty plus years in troubled troubled trouble new and as soon as he made the changes. Look at what he's doing. Now you know he's the highest growth level. He's ever been So it's you know. But that's why we're ceo's and not you know friends that's you know you gotta live with the title that you have We also know people who have had to let family members go because they couldn't go. It's just either you take that role And run with it or you know it. It's okay to just stay where you are and again. That's a personal decision. That's a lifestyle decision. Sometimes being able to have thanksgiving dinner together as more important than a lot whose decisions are again to coaching and having those difficult conversations with you heal. Because you know there's very few people out there that can hold level the company accountable pam. So i think that's where the eyesight resource coming in can help push through those types of decisions and what looks like that transition so I've seen that happen law. Yup yup. I started to any other nuggets. Stephen you think would be worth sharing with our audience just in terms of maybe the as the they're hearing hearing here you know they're thinking oh maybe thinking about you know leadership development. Maybe i've been guilty of promoting people into roles a nerve struggling. But i don't necessarily admit because i put him in that position While the nuggets she feels that you could share. I believe that leadership roles are just like anything else you know. You can't become a welder without training you can't become a yet you know. Pick the things. You can't become a in my business. You can't be come a creative person using all the software without getting trained on the creative suites and softwares that we have you know if if your seo person my business you gotta get the google certifications. I mean you can just go through industry after industry where you train your people to go better but sometimes a lot of times we just think oh will they can. They can manage these people. They can be leaders without any training. And it's just not that way. And even as ceos you know not only through eeo. But i have mentors. I have coaches. That helped me. Because i need to be trained and you need to think about leadership in your organization even you. At the ceo. Senior level owner co-founder level is man. What certificates do i need. What training do i need. What what should i do You know to handle these. You know all of these things you wouldn't hire a payroll expert without knowing that they know how to do spreadsheets and are trained in that would just evolve your mindset to know that leadership training coaching is just something you have to do just like you train other people to do other things in your organization agree. I'm not gonna meet that point of view the sea levels. Because i think both you and i know we both got into starting our business realized where it was. Been a goal. And you know i don't. Neither of us were trained in not leading the company. Right from the get-go that we were all into. I think we have recognized that we do need help. Egos aside and we said. Hey spoke redo to veterans service whether it be through you or all these other different programs out there on the scene with other. Ceo's say that evil and yes you. You're promoted people into those positions by what we need to do to develop them with him. You need to do to train them to fully fulfill that role in face of cheap the seal. I'd point where they were on the company from that thirty thousand foot level and let people that you promote defensively lead the company the database. Absolutely you know saying we say all the time you gotta be working on the business not in the business every day You know to do that. So i fully agree. I'm reading a great book on leadership right. now we'll throw out there robber for people to hear. It's called ego with authority and failure. It's by derek. Gone great book. It really talks about the evolution of leaderships and traditional stereotypes of commanding control leadership to leading with empathy and vulnerability in that. It even talks a lot about how the us military is using it in that. I think it's an excellent book on to do in robert. I know going through you. You can provide a ton of books To help there's a ton of videos out there. Extreme ownership i. Am you know one of our personal favorites yet online. Watch every podcast or video. He does if that doesn't motivate you. I don't know what middle especially seeing pederson decide. Such a huge figure. He was towns. Just its presence. Yup yeah exactly. He can kill you just looking at you. I know he could have been to where just like they at least silence listening to him. Every every single word amend something that on the deck of that aircraft carrier in san diego. That was one of the most amazing events i've ever been to. There's there's so much content they are. I think both you and i could definitely direct people towards you know where to look for that stuff or what books to read. But no david. This has been I think been really helpful today. So i'm just remind the the audience if they want to get in touch with you directly and ashes more questions of some of your leadership development kuching you. Do they do that well. Obviously they could get it through you to go into roberts website. I'm on there. I do a lot of work with Know roberts and then there's a you can also reach me. My website is twa leadership dot com. You can get me there. You can reach me Directly through there. But i really enjoy working with robert. I think we do a great one. Two of the strategy and You know really putting your company on a growth path and then just making sure you have the right people to get there. I mean it's an old saying but without the right people you know it's not gonna happen. So you gotta train those people to make sure that they help you achieve all costa jeannie to your and further the right people doing the right things. Yup absolutely. You're at we can definitely help them out. David really appreciate your time today. Thank you for your sharing your nuggets. Yep hundred percent agree we have. We work well together and your time today during this podcast. Thank you very much sir. Have a great weekend. That was pure de. Brilliant for you today and you got some great jacobs obese for your business or your personal life. This robot clinkenbeard along with david anderson. I would love to get you and your friends to join us in our future journey. Craig things before we go listeners. Check her website commercial. Landscapers dot com. You can subscribe. You can share with your friends. More importantly cheka new sponsor of sakon but to make your ceo's processor estimating weezer you can spend more time in your proposals everyone cheers.

robert Clinkenbeard robert clinkenbeard david nuggets brickley david anderson david johnson cbo aso negus riddick Bud gordon luke Ceo
Monday 3/16/20 - Which Birthday Is The Best?

Chicago Dog Walk

17:23 min | 1 year ago

Monday 3/16/20 - Which Birthday Is The Best?

"All right we made clear is Monday. March sixteenth. Welcome to the dog. Walk Presente Right. Barstool sports as always. I'm drew my Carl. Carl has gone. It's gone well. How are you doing well man Before we get into it I do want to talk about our ad for today. And it was. Cbo MD talking about the PM specifically You know whether you're exhausted traveler. Your stressed out parrot. Are you looking for an weight room? Sleep is crucial to getting. The most of every day in sleep is also important to maintaining health across your life. So if you're trying to get healthy get some good sleep for sure. Cd PM soft. Gels are quick way to get the deeper sleepy deserve You know the song I mean. It's just simple as that you know. I'm sure you've taken you know maybe some other some some some type of quill maybe a spray but Cbd PM IT'S IT works. Well I kind of WAKE UP GROGGY. Field which is important. You know So yeah go. Check them out. Cbd MD is committed to helping you achieve a better night's sleep to make it even easier to relax. Regroup unwind their offering our listeners. Twenty five percent off your next purchase and use the code walk at checkout once again that CBD MD DOT COM Promo Code. Walk for twenty five percent off your purchase of superior. Cbd Oil Products Carla Your Birthday. Thank you happy birthday. Happy Birthday to me. You said thank you before I said Happy Birthday. Yeah I just I. It was like a preemptive where we're going with this like yet. Thank you great. You know you just gotten for you. Just gotTa yeah any plans to. They're not you know it's a plans this weekend. We we were. We probably would do more like dinner. This upcoming Wednesday my folks and my wife had planned something that was supposed to be. Pretty Fun. On Saturday I got cancelled and It just base scout weird man so You know birthdays a just get weird as you get older. And then you mix in a global pandemic and you're just kind of like thirty three doesn't really. Is it hold are you? I'm twenty nine so what I said before about twenty nine. Th Birthday Talk to is called a twenty nine sucks because all you do a twenty nine as you think about. The next year turned thirty. I had the amount of time that I spend on. My thirtieth birthday is is only preceded by in the power rankings of time thinking about my birthday my sixteenth birthday in my twenty first birthday. I was more excited for my sixteenth birthday than anything else in my entire life to get the Clintons license. Okay Yeah did you have all that show worked out to get your license a day on your birthday. I had to wait like three days. I was going to kill my father. Why because he had meetings and he was busy and he's just like yeah. I'm going to the village Harwood Heights I gotta be in fucking North fucking time to drive to the DMV. But when he did and I made a big deal about it than we did we got the Dad. I was very excited for twenty first birthday. You're just naturally excited for it because it's like yeah. Whatever you don't really care you know toy will be twenty but then it comes. This is sweet. I don't have to worry anymore. Yeah like the first. Those are the two and then you could say eighteen eighteen. Yeah eighteen now with an attitude kind of snide fuck you want. I mean you're eighteen. You're just like a fucking bad boy. You look down on the seventeen year olds when you turn eighteen. Is that true? I did all their us. Seventeen bus Thirty thirty for me though. Was it checkpoint in like like it might make anything in my life might doing anything and so you know. We've talked about this before like jobs. Job-hunting career lose my job looking for stuff. It really was pressure. Leading into my thirtieth birthday that like got me to one of the contributing factors that got me to say while. I was in sales like I should start the podcast. We should really try and like do barstools. Chicago like we should actually try and do it in your thirty. What had happened? Or How old are you twenty? Nine December twenty it was December. Two Thousand Sixteen so I was twenty nine and so is leading into my in like this. Press a pressure. When you're thirty like what are you GonNa do now? What you're thirty. Yeah that does seem like an age point where it's like you have to have some type of idea of what's going on and that's that's pretty daunting. I would say like if you're twenty eight you can kind of fuck around but I don't know maybe it's just me but I agree with you so then once I got to thirty in my wife made a base. You at the time wasn't even my fiancee. She threw a huge party so it wasn't a surprise party. was prized for joint. Birthday Party with my buddy. Who's right around the same time as me and that was like a really big fucking deal in my life now. I think about like my family was there for the party. My parents came in. We ended up declins one hundred people there like friends from all over. Were there for the thirtieth party. Then thirty one comes around and I remember we got Mexican takeout in. My wife gave me like a pair gym shoes and was like yeah. That's all you get now like. No one gives a fuck. That's it is there anything thirty fifty forty forty forty s way bigger than thirty to like is when you get depressed. You think so. Yeah you're over the hill you're over the hill forties when like like life. Depression sets in if things haven't gone the way he wanted to the true midlife crisis forty I think you're midlife crisis. When the kids are now thinking for themselves in our like you can tell. The kids are leaving the House. Okay and the kids are so could happen. Whatever okay and I think that it does depend on the career. Do you believe in like an earlier. Midlife crisis yeah I had it at of. I've been configure. Most of my late twenties is a crisis. Like that's how I would classify it. I've met some out of turmoil inside about what I'm doing with my life like Brian. My selling insurance. I don't WanNa do this. Birthdays interesting man. Because like you said the first real big one or I should say maybe four sixteen. I guess if you have like a golden birthday before then is that bigger or no. My Golden Birthday was sixteen. When when's your birthday Tanto Stober ten ten like you know what I mean? Yeah congratulations you're out of single digit did did you look for your kid. Yeah I definitely I think so I as you go on. It's just like anything you know like you said. Today it's against any day told us on radio like midway. Oh Yeah just. My Birthday's ago. Okay yeah no sixteen is like there was had. You had driver's Ed before you knew it was a you're up against your license. You knew you're GONNA go there. Take that picture. You know you're GONNA fuck and drive out bodies and it was just. There was a huge day. I remember we had like a baseball game. That got rained out and I was call dad like we can go to the DMV like the Games cancelled he's like we're not calling the DMV. He's like maybe Thursday or something. I was all fucking fired up. You're on the youngest at three in. You're the youngest three S. Did you get special treatment by parents for birthday? Like we had a special play. You ate dinner off your plate. You got to pick dinner you know. It was more than just like. Here's a couple presence like it was a special day mouse. Believe I believe we got to pick Like whatever it was. We wanted pretty sad. There was always by my mom. Always make sure that we were there. We got our license on the day of all out of school exceeded whatever whatever had to be like. We were at that and then turn around and go to the grocery store and get me. I need to know but what about what about like when you got older in Birthdays. Like did you. Did you give a fuck with your buddies in high school? Was it like a cool? Would you get like punches or like you guys? Doing it wasn't like I remember my eighteenth birthday. We got fucking demolished by marist and like Like week seven or something and it was like you know whatever and usually it would've been it would've been a great day if you win had back someone's GonNa Party or whatever it would've been a great day and I remember like a couple of guys way Matt don't work tomorrow like even though we got her ass kicked like we don't forget about birthdays thrive and we just like we just lost pretty bad. Yeah do you have a favorite present or something? I'm trying to think like historically if I've got any. I'm sure I've gotten some really good birthday presents. Yeah I insult what's hard for me is a presence. All kind of missed together. I don't remember like the difference between the birthday present that Christmas present. You know what I mean. Yeah it's a good point so I don't know an exact birthday present. What about birthday parties I? I love my favorite. Having a sleepover at my buddy sleepover and we would just like raise. Hell playing laser tag and then sixty four and there was always you know that there was always the parent who's always concerned about the scary movies. So it's like hey like what are you guys watch in which is always come on? Do finally don't be a pussy. Yeah and then. I think that's when you out like the I remember being maybe might sixth grade and like somebody was like. I gotta go to bed. I'm tired like you know we're like stayed up like fuck you you've bid we're fucking. GonNa go sneak out for a little bit. Donald Understand. What was the appearance are going to fight? You can stay in the basement. Play fucking men sixty four pussy. Truth be told. That's how you found out I. Maybe when he found a kid who was actually Kinda soft was then he would go to sleep over and he got up at like ten thirty. Yeah like Dude you can me fucking rain exactly like we're up till six. I could sleep and Dude. Were fucking their pelted. You fucking Nilo wafers and shift here. And that's when we We would if we got tired. We would you start like chugging sunkissed room temperature like not even caffeinated night even caffeinated just knowing that the sugar itself like. I need a little buzz like we were like oh so shug and Pepsi. Some of those parties were so much fun dude. That was just unrelated. Just just fucking with people in there so duct tape and onto the floor. You know. Everyone's every man for everyone over the sprawl vow Danny Smith. Yeah and then we'd have like That if you had a good sleepover culture prior to junior high. So let's say like maybe it's like whatever it's like sixth grade fifth sixth grade and you and your buddies that summer sleepover culture it so much. It was so much easier than going into junior high and high school to tell my parents. I'm just stamp staying over. I'm saying over at Joe. Hurley's yes stand over Jason's whatever when really you know. Maybe we were staying somewhere. We didn't order the fuck we were staying. Just wanted to go out in eliminate curfew and so I put a lot of stock in the fact of not really just manipulating curfew. My entire life because when we were kids you know. Just fucking sleepover everywhere. So I feel bad for the kids. Felt ride generally felt bad for the kids and I feel bad for the kids. Now who pair whose parents are so anti sleepover? It's tough Yeah I think maybe some people have like really bad maybe like you have like a bad experiences etc. I'm never going to have my kids. You know like go through that and I'm really lucky I didn't have that because my friends in I don't know how about this when I was growing up. My friends all had like brothers and sisters that were friends with my brothers and sisters. It wasn't just like I was friends with one kid in like I'd go and hang out with I swear to fucking God like my parents would be like booze and with their parents on the weekends very for sure. That's how like the very early preliminary soup over start. Yeah you know from my family friends and like you know. Obviously the parents are friends with anemia. Real for and you're right it is like a gateway to like like it was always fine before so yeah it was very young. I always I always liked them. I trust her parents now. I hit A. We had a buddy whose parents were off the boat from Ireland. Great Kid and He we all. We grew up together around. Brother is so around nine th and Plaski in In when we got to high school. And it's not like I'm from I'm from fucking awesome. Place I love where I'm from. It's very like a very American. It's like all the houses are close to each other. They all look the same and But the further you get away from the I'm the I'm from the closest suburb of Chicago. That's right up against so. The further the suburbs getaway obviously make sense the nicer house. Houses get high school. My buddy who is from where. I'm from Os. Parents are off the boat from Ireland. That Dad's a carpenter. I don't know if the MOM works or anything. The kids just hilarious. We make friends with a kid who goes to Saint Rita who lives in one of the really far suburbs and his dad's a dentist and the MOMS. You know like a fucking dental hygienist. They live in this huge place. The Irish could start sleeping over at the house regularly. He goes like eight weeks in a row where he sleeps six out of seven nights a week and one of the guest bedrooms. Because he's like this way better than where I live. Look way better like the house is always filled with food. And so my buddy from Rita. We knew each other from baseball. He was like this is. This is getting kind of weird like I literally can't get him to leave. We have to like kick this kid out. It was like a fucking thing where the mom was like all right. This just not stain hurting problem. It was like a legitimate for an entire summer going into senior high school. My Irish body was I get to weigh in. He didn't see any problem with either. He's is so they got fucking all the serial on all the ice cream. Yeah you definitely will get that ship. Yeah you definitely will get that. You can occasionally get a first generation immigrant squatter the and then and then going fast forward to twenty one that first time the first real time besides obviously the twenty one hundred twenty first birthday that day is a blur. Who's yourself fucked up? Everybody's buying the shots. Whatever but that first real time you sit down a bar and you order a beer. I got nothing to worry about anymore. It's just an unbelievable feeling. Did you ever did you lose the edge from because a lot of people say oh you turn twenty one. It doesn't. It's not as much fun anymore. I just kind of enjoyed drinking at bars like I just like. It was cool. It was fun and relaxing. Like I could you. I don't like and granted like I was usually fine. Whatever they pretty good decent fake whatever but it was always looking over your shoulder. There was none of that. There's I can order wings. Ecuador's Blue Moon. I'd I'm good to go did you. Most of the time I got into bars actually exclusively the time. I got into bars before. Twenty one was on a college campus. Where pricing is a normal so I give your basis of drinking at a bar is exclusively college campus. That's not that make belief and so I remember when I was twenty one I was like oh I can just go into this bar. Like I'd be in a city like Cobb before cubs games like okay. Fine him going to the bars now booze here before we just like booze at one of my buddies or something or like. Somebody's brothers down the street or something and on a train. And that's when I was like way do you. What do you mean around a shots as twenty eight dollars? What are you talking? This WIZ pitcher a Miller. Lite cannot possibly cost thirteen dollars. Like what do you mean? This is GonNa take a lot of these to get me drunk. Yeah there's definitely price realization Yo dot about living under your booze and under twenty one. You don't live that way. Yeah it's thought to for your premiums paid on delivery around pickup like I'll pay an extra twenty bucks. You don't actually debars charge more than that. Yeah and then you get older and like you said kind of goes full circle. Words birthdays become almost like to me. It's like are flexible. Where the fuck are you like you said and where you've got to be where you thought you'd be and there's a lot of I don't know for me for sure as well. I agree with you. That's what I mas man like you know. Is this what supposed to be happening? You know it's weird it's like I know it's kind of a unique day out of the whole year and you know I said it's again three years ago. There's no way that I would have liked. You've known it was my birthday. I actually don't like I've already gotten a couple of taxon buddies and stuff and I'm just like thanks. I know you don't care because I don't care about yours. That's the trade off is like I don't You know like my best friend. Forever grip across the street from me three year old preschool through graduate school together three year old preschool through graduate school together fucking crazy. His birthday is the day before mine and usually we text each other like twelve or one am. Yeah you know like hey fuck face you know and it was like eight o'clock yesterday. I'm like Oh fuck. It's my birthday tomorrow. That means it's Jason's birthday today. Hey Happy Birthday Dick. You know Happy Birthday Buddy. And it's just yes so I'm sure the next time I care will be forty in the thing I reflect on now. Probably kids says I'm married in presumably. The career is heading down a good path that I don't have to like you know. Is this really what I WANNA do like? I used to have those questions with myself all like dude harder times a day every day like what am I doing like I couldn't get up and go take a piss at work without thinking to myself like. Is this where. I'm going to piss forever very birthdays. Actually get Kinda dark. Yes so they could. Do I think you? Now what's the next thing I have to do? Probably kids hit. Probably like you know. Hopefully we'll good man. I'm glad it sounds like this is like a strong birthday reflection. It sounds like it's going to be a good day. It's going to be one. You remember as well because there's no option to go out to a restaurant I have no and I don't mind I'm a guy like sit on my ass like I've always enjoyed just sitting in now ever reason to do it for sure as I enjoy the sulfur tonight here. How the hot and ready. Happy Birthday Karl. Thank you for doing this every Monday. And Yeah that's That's it for today. Everybody we will catch you tomorrow.

DMV baseball Chicago Jason Ireland Cbd MD CBD Cbo Carl Depression Clintons Saint Rita Brian Ed Ecuador
Cruise News Briefing - March 19, 2021

Cruise Radio News Briefs

01:40 min | 3 months ago

Cruise News Briefing - March 19, 2021

"Here's your crews news. For friday march nineteenth 2021 disney cruise line will be operating summer cruises from miami for the first time next year disney dream will cruise to the bahamas and the carribean since i launched in two thousand ten dream has been sailing from port. Canaveral disney has imported ship in miami during the summer months and mse cruises will introduce its largest msa yacht club ever when the us based ship mse november the exclusive space will be approximately thirty two thousand square feet and include a larger pool ainu new panoramic hot tub and one hundred and thirty one suites and five. Different categories offering exclusive perks. Private lounges sundex and restaurants. The clubs on all fantasy. Ah via in seaside class cruise ships and finally the cdc had an about face on a decision to not let her river ship sail. American queen cbo company was forced to cancel his planned inaugural sailing on the american countess after being denied by the cdc because of a passenger count law the city originally said the ship could sail with reduced. Passenger council then changed. Its mind however late thursday evening. American queen steamboat company. Said the passenger count issue was resolved and see said they could sail from memphis to new orleans scheduled on march twenty. First a statement from the line said they applaud the cdc's with review and thank them for working alongside the company for a resolution and cruise line stocks. Were down on thursday carnival corporation at twenty eight point. Two seven down two percent royal at eighty eight point. Four one down three percent in norwegian we in twenty eight point nine five down five percent breaking news and up to the minute industry coverage at cruise radio dot net. Doug parker crews radio news.

Canaveral disney mse cruises msa yacht club disney miami cdc bahamas Passenger council American queen steamboat cbo us memphis new orleans Doug parker
EP163: The Difference Between Your Niche, Marketing Message, and Offer

The Wellness Business Podcast

27:33 min | 11 months ago

EP163: The Difference Between Your Niche, Marketing Message, and Offer

"Welcome to the wellness business podcast simple strategies to cut through the online noise to fast track, the drew wellness business with fear and panic and Kathleen Legris. Welcome back everyone to another episode of the Wellness Business Podcast my name is Karen, Paddock, and I am here with the lovely Kathleen legris Hey Kathleen, Karen your lovely as well. I, WANNA say buckling people because this is part one of a three part series which. I'm excited about because this is probably the number one struggle. Health coaches I think yeah, yeah I was on the buckle and you know what they say, right? They say go bigger. Go home. That's right we're going. Beg. We are because we couldn't fit this into. One were dividing this up into three episodes that are all going to build them one another. This is the first time we've done this to yeah. This is really going to help our listeners now so excited. I think so too so get ready for some clarity. My friends we are. We're excited to have you here today because we're diving into a three. Three part series about choosing a niche or what we call a marketable ideal client and figuring out what your target market actually wants from you. There's a very good chance what you think they want. What they actually want is different. The last time we did episode officially dedicated to figuring out your knees was way back on episode two, which came out three years ago. I can't even believe it, and that's why we feel. It's important to revisit this topic, but not with just one episode instead we want to be sure we give it really the extra attention. Attention! It deserves with a trio of episodes. This is by far the biggest sticking point for health coaches so these three back to back. Episodes are going to be extremely helpful for you. We're kicking this bundle of episodes off. I digging into the difference between Your Niche Marketing Message and offer the key here is that there is a distinct difference between your ideal client identity, your marketing message, and what you offer as a paid per gram. What we often see happen is that coaches try to tie all these together and one statement that they believe is their. Their ideal client identity, and it causes a lot of confusion and we plan to simplify all of that for you today. Yeah, you're right. This is the biggest sticking point for sure. And while it's important for you to define each of these three categories for your business, it isn't necessary for them to all be tied together as one in order for you to identify your ideal client, so we see this a lot when we I see this in my facebook group my private room. We've seen this with the wellness business insiders club members where inch it's Kathleen, YOU'RE GONNA. Know exactly what I'm talking about. It's like a run on Ronan. Run on, sentence or it is. Like three paragraphs long of whom ideal client is, and that's why it starts to feel confusing and convoluted, and they struggle with. You struggle with figuring this out, so we're going to really simplify this. And by the time you listen to all three episodes, you'll have a very clear picture of who your ideal client is what they want from you and how you will reach them with a perfectly crafted marketing message and we hope you're excited about this episode as we are because we believe it's going to be a game changer for your business so. So in this episode, we're going to break down what each of these things are and give you many exercises to do so that you can figure them out for Your Business, and we've put together a companion workbook that will walk you through the exercises and help you get clarity on your niche and dial in your marketing message, so you will be attracting your dream clients, and that's different or every one of you. It's called the niche companion workbook, simple, easy, the niche companion workbook, and to get your hands on it. Gore show notes page at WBZ podcasts. Dot Com forward slash one sixty three, or if you're listening inside your favorite podcast APP, just scroll down to the links from this episode. You'll find it there and I do want to say that this companion workbook is going to be for all three episodes so episode 163, one, sixty, four and one sixty five, so you'll only need to do this download one time for all three episodes. Yeah, that's going to be so helpful to have that taken printed out and then follow along all right so ready sat. You buckled in. Let's behind. Our content for today LASTA. Let's do it. All right first off, it's important that we start by dispelling a common misconception and the health and wellness base. Many coaches believe that everyone and anyone that wants help getting healthy or fixing a health issue is looking for help and willing to pay for it. That couldn't be further from the truth. There are to come mistakes that we see coaches making when it comes to defining their ideal client number one. They're trying to reach people that don't want help, or they aren't willing to invest to get results number two. They use words like. Like energy, get back the life you love or feel better when describing their ideal client, these words are, they're. They're too generic. They're not specific enough, and it's really it's open to interpretation thereby rendering the statement ineffective for client attraction, instead your ideal clients statement needs to be much clearer and more specific. If you've been using those words or similar words in your ideal client identity statement, chances are you've been experiencing a lack of clients? Maybe a lack of people signing up for your free offers, though more on that in upcoming episode. All right so for the purposes of this episode. Let's discuss the differences and similarities between your niche identity near marketing message in your offer, so let's start with Nisha identity. So this is typically one sentence that identifies a group of the population that you want to work with. I'm going to say that one more time. It's typically only one sentence that identify is a group of the population that you want to work with so here are a few examples. A I help women suffering from CIBO. Be I. help pregnancy each challenged women. See I help over weight teachers now we're not done with those statements yet, but that clearly identifies the group of the population that you want to work with each of these examples defines a very clear group of the population through the challenge that they want a resolution to in the first example they wanNA resolution to see bowe second example. They want to be able to get pregnant. Thirty example. The Teachers WanNa. Lose weight so. Anything you want to add to that Kathleen. No, but if you as you're listening each one of those three things that Karen said, you're basically picturing that person right there, suffering from CIBO or they wanNA conceive, or it's an overweight teacher, though you and also you either self identified with all my gosh that interests me or note that has nothing to do with me, and that's that's what you want, right. You want it to be cut and dry very specific, so people can self select. Actually. Let me add one thing here, so let's just let's. Use the the reverse of that, so if I said I help people get more energy, so they can have back the life that they love. You can see the that statement is extremely generic. I have not whittled down the population in any way I can not identify these people that want more energy or want the life back that they love. By, any marketable. Situation, I can't go in and target them with facebook ads because there's nothing there, that's defining them and the fact that they don't have energy or don't have a life that they love could be for a million in one different reasons, and so this is why those types of words can't be part of your ideal clients statement because it's just too generic. Yeah, YEP, so true so. So number two. This is about your marketing message. Your marketing message takes your niche identity and expands on it to a full blown declaration or statement that includes who you help how you help them, and what the promised outcome is after working with you, so Karen statement is I teach health coaches to attract their dream clients and filled or programs by delivering wellness workshops. Who Does? Does. She help she helps health. Coaches attract their dream clients and filter programmes. How by delivering wellness workshops right, super, super clear. I love that one so my statement is I help health coaches grow their business online by providing them with customizable coaching programs and resources so again I help health coaches grow their business online how by providing them with customizable coaching programs and resources right so? So it's very specific so now let's add onto the three examples. We mentioned earlier so a I help women suffering from CIBO, reduced symptoms and thirty days by identifying their food triggers. That's very clear, right? You help people who suffer from CIBO. How do you help them? You help them. Reduce symptoms by identifying their food triggers be the next one was I helped. Pregnancy challenged women. By environmental toxins that prevent them from conceiving again super specific, and then the last one I help. Overweight teachers reached our goal weight using my ABC weight loss system, so you'd like. Is this making sense you see? How very specific these are. You can picture who these people are in your mind. It's either for you or not for you. And and you know it right away and that's exactly what you want in your messaging. Even though it feels like well, I don't WanNa exclude anybody, but what's happening is. By not excluding people, your messages to wishy washy, and you're not really attracting anybody right well I'm glad you said that because that's the thing right so every single person listening to this podcast right now is saying yes. CAIN K.! You're absolutely right. Those are so specific I. Totally get it. I can hear. The I can hear them all right now, saying yes, but then there's the however or them. That comes after that, but I don't want to exclude every want anyone I have more than one interest. I have more than one gift and talent I. can help lots of different people. And when we start living in that space of wanting to help everyone, and not excluding any one, we get generic again because it's the reason that this person has this symptom and the perse reason that person has the same symptom could be two different reasons, so if you're not dialing in one, your marketing message is out there, or you're doing a facebook live, or you're putting out your free beat, or you write a blog post. It is going to speak to no one. Because if I just said in, let's say the the first example I help women suffering from CIBO reduce symptoms and thirty days by identifying their food triggers right. If instead a sad I help women who have tummy troubles. Get back their energy and a life that they love. Well that's true right CBO's probably zapping their energy, certainly not living a life that they love, but when I take out the CBO the thirty days, and the food triggers now I am speaking to no one because my CBO client who desperately needs my help is not going to hear me when I say Tummy, troubles and energy, and getting back the life that they love so there's a big difference and we're encouraging IL. We promise you if you make this declaration. What is going to happen is you are going to start attracting those dream clients? You are going to start building your email list with these people and you are going to start seeing them investing in your programs, because you do one thing and you do it really well, and let's face it. All of us want that person helping US resolve our issue. Amen. Amen Preach Momma. So, let's move on. To the third piece of this, which is your offer, so your offer isn't typically part of your marketing message unless you have a proprietary system that you're known for so instead. Your offer is the program that you take someone through that gets them results the results that they want so your offer includes working with you as a coach. The other thing that you should know is that you can have multiple offers or multiple levels to your support and services, so let's talk about some specific examples of offers so for Kathleen deny our wellness business insiders club. It's one of our offers. It's something that we offer. It's the only way that you can work with US privately. Run the group. And it's how you get our feedback, so that is one of our offers. Now an example of an offer that would be a proprietary system that you all know. Is Weight watchers or nutrisystem? This isn't how health coaches operate for the most part. You're not marketing your system, your marketing yourself and what you do, and who you help and the program. Your offer that you have in place is just the vehicle that gets them from working with you to the results that they're looking for right. You're not marketing ABC. Coaching Program Your Marketing Yourself and the ABC. Coaching program is how you're going to get them results. So you're not typically. I don't think I can even think of a coach right now. That has a proprietary system that their marketing. So another example of an offer is your one on one B, I P. Coaching Services or coaching program, or it could be a group coaching program, or it could be something. Low investment low barrier to entry. Maybe a self directed detox or cleanse. That has daily emails over a seven day period. You all know offers come in many shapes and sizes, and this is just enhance a handful for the sake of examples for this episode so. To simplify this part of the episode, just think of your offer as some playing that your dream client would pay for so when we're talking about offer, let's go back to the beginning of this. Your offer includes working with you as a coach. It's the thing that you take someone through to get them results right. That's what we want you to be thinking about when we say your offer. Yeah one thing I think is helpful. The no to sometimes we'll work in that. We think we'll hello. It's so obvious. I think being observant of other offers you see which ones are specific, which ones are allowing you to? Still Ter- out if it's for you or not for you and the ones that I see a lot of these. I'm not quite I'm not quite sure if that's for me or like okay. What is that about because people are not going to take the time to dig around and find out more. You have to grab him right away or they're gone right for sure. Yeah Yeah. All right so now for you. This information to your business. We want you to download the niche companion workbook that we have for you. As we mentioned, this will take you through a series of exercises for this episode as well as our next two episodes for now just worked at the section that has labeled for episode one sixty three. It's GonNa walk you through a series of questions that help you establish. Establish where you are now with your niche, your marketing message and your offers. Then you'll be asked to complete a few exercises that lead you to be able to dial in on a marketing message that lets your dream clients. No, they're in the right place because they can identify who you work with how you help them and the results they can expect before we wrap up this episode and you start working. Working on the steps and the niche companion workbook. Let's establish who you believe. Your ideal client is right now, so we're at a take out a piece of paper unless you're driving or you're on the treadmill on, take out a piece of paper or your phone and write down your ideal client identity. Don't censor it based on what we've talked about today. Just put it in writing. In fact, you may have. Have already written somewhere that you can re reference it. That's fine, too. Whatever you believe to be true right now. Just put that down on paper so once you have written down. We want you to do a quick on it. If you were to give your statement to a friend, a coworker or a family member, could they answer these three questions who you help how you help and what transformation or outcome? You provide or So who you help how you help what transformation you offer. If you're not sure, send it off to a friend and asked them, and this is always such an interesting exercise like before your Da is not obvious what I do, but getting that feedback. You have really even one person saying you know what like the words are Nice, but I have no idea what this means. Totally, and this is one of the things that we do quite often as bonus hotseat calls in the wellness insiders club. We'll do audits Um for our members on their websites, or even their facebook pages, and the these are the questions. These are the things we're looking for who you help how you help them what you're trend. What transformation do you offer in? If and it's perfect, because Kathleen and I are not familiar with their business, not personally familiar, so it's easy for us as we go to these websites, and we look at it to say we have no. No idea who you help and it is such an eye opening experience when we give our clients these feedback the speed back because they're like. Oh my gosh, because guys. This happens to all of us. It happens to Kathleen and I to it's in our head we we see it as if it's already there if it's on the page if we're already giving that information, because it's so clear in our mind, we forget that the person coming doesn't have all of that information at their disposal, and so we leave things out, and that's why this is so important, so please. Take take our challenge and ask three to five people to review your website or review your facebook page and Ken. They answer those questions who you help how you help them. What transformation new oppor and I have one caveat to that, too, and I know I was very guilty of this when I was a new health coach. You want to avoid being cutesy clever creative flowery with your words I. Think about if you were to show the statement to a third grader. Would they understand that you know I think sometimes I think. Sometimes we try to get a little, too elaborate and Foo Foo, and it does waters down the message, because let's face health coaches. By you know in general terms are very creative people, and so that creativity. As often put into these identity statements when in fact, no one understands it except for the coach. Clear concise third level I love. All right guys, so we're going to wrap up this episode by saying. Don't be too hard on yourself. This is a very confusing. Process for most people until they apply our system for figuring it out, and we'll be sharing our system to figure out your icy a and what they want from you in the next episode of the wellness this podcast now once you go through that episode and the companion exercises for that episode you'll have a clear niche and a concise marketing message, so just bear with us. Just embrace this process. Take Action with the exercises that we give you and I promise. By the time we get through this trio of episodes. You are going to feel much more clear on who your ideal clients. Right, so let's just recap. Real Quick Nisha identity is that this is typically one sentence that identifies a group of the population that you WanNa work with your marketing message is your marketing. It's where your marketing message takes your niche identity and expand on it to a full blown declaration or statement that includes who you help how you help, and what the promised outcome is after working with you, and then your offer is a program that your dream client would pay you four. and. Yeah that's that's really add. That's what we need you to know. In this particular episode and again, please download the companion workbook by going to WB PODCAST DOT. com forward slash one six three or scroll down in your favorite podcast APP and click the link right Kathleen. Anything else you want to add before we wrap up well. I! Do want to say I think this is like a mini course. Absolutely I n when you get this figured out right. It does take a little time, a little energy and some efforts, but when you, when you get this money going to say right, but once you get to the point that it's clear because your niche may change isn't something you have to be married to for the rest of your life who you want to help right now. Everything else becomes so much easier, right? You're going to have more people responding to your emails. Commenting on your blog post commenting on your social media posts are going to be saving your Social Media Post rated. Just you're you're able to cut through all the noise. I think that's one I. think that's one of the biggest benefits you're gonNA know. What to talk about on your livestream? Oh my gosh, it makes things so much easier. And, if you've come to the end of this episode, and you're still feeling very resistant to committing. Here's our challenge to you. We want you to commit to something. Follow through this process. Stick with us. Commit to something for ninety days. Put Your whole heart into it ninety days of I only help this this person. I'm only talking about this particular situation. Everything I do is going to be around this topic. And then do an analysis at the end of ninety days and ask yourself did I put my whole heart into this. And what kind of results did I see and I can't think of one instance because we actually. Our wellness business insiders club members to do this. All the time and I cannot even think I. Don't know. Tell me Kathleen. If you can, but I can't think of one person that hasn't seen. Incredible momentum once they commit. No absolutely not, it's the total opposite. Total, opposite and like Oh. My Gosh, why didn't do this a long time ago? Exactly exactly? All right guys, that's it for today and we will be back with the second part of this trio next week, and in the meantime have an amazing day. We love you and we'll see you next time. Take care. Thank you for listening to the wellness business podcast for show notes in three resources visit WB. PODCAST, DOT com.

Kathleen Legris facebook Karen ABC US panic Teachers WanNa CBO Nisha Gore bowe Ken IL ninety days thirty days three years seven day
Herbal Antibiotics and Gut Flora

The Plant Path

16:25 min | 11 months ago

Herbal Antibiotics and Gut Flora

"The. Often to the plan. Your window world. Sherri. Hey everybody say John Popham. Here founded the school of Evolutionary herbalism, and it's QNA day today and. This week's question that I wanted to share with you all is. Is a very interesting question that comes up from time to time in regards to weather and herb can actually work like an antibiotic and possible benefits and possible risks. and terms of using herbs to treat pathogenic infections, and I think this is pretty relevant topic these days as we are in the midst of the whole Covid, nineteen situation and I'm seeing more and more people reaching out. To plants as ways of strengthening your immune system and wanting to look at antiviral antibacterial herbs, and how to protect themselves and their family. But as most of US know. Standard, antibiotics can have pretty detrimental effects on the body specifically in regards to the Gut Flora so in this week's Cuna. We're GONNA be talking about antiseptic antimicrobial plants, and they're kind of weighing their benefits and risks, and also kind of a what I think is a really excellent discussion in terms of the difference between how an herbal medicine works in the human organism in contrast to how a lot of pharmaceutical medications, specifically antibiotics work in the human organism. So I hope you enjoy the question answer for this week I question number one here is. Coming to us from Sharing Lemay and Materia Medica monthly. And Sharon his asking since Lemay kills off micro-organisms, is there a danger? It will destroy our gut flora the same way an antibiotic would especially if we drink it as a tea. Does using the tincture, keep it in the respiratory system, so it never gets down into the gut in any meaningful strength, so when used for a cold slash flu situation, the Gut Flora are not impacted, although since also affects the urinary tract. It seems its powers. Go throughout the body, so I'm just wondering if we are nuking. Gut Flora with Lemay mation great question Sharon. This is actually. This question brings up some really interesting dynamics. I think in the way that we think about how an herbal medicine works in contrast to how drugs work right. So this is a question that I actually quite a bit not just around lamasion, but around other herbs to especially see this one a lot with a lot of the. In containing plants. High drastic candidate insists golden seal. Mahoney Aquaphor Liam. Grape a cop, this or gold thread. Really any plant that you look it up in your book and you see. Anti Microbial. Antibacterial Oh. Is this going to adversely affect the Gut Flora? Generally speaking, I think the best answer to that question is for the most no. Obviously I don't really know if there's been a whole lot of scientific research where they measured someone's Gut, Flora. And then they took you know some of these whole plants. Or tinctures teas of these plants, and then measured it again and found that they were adversely affected. I'm not sure if that exists but from a clinical perspective. Through utilizing these remedies, we don't really see any of the. After effects that are pretty common. From as Sharon said, nuking the Gut Flora with an antibiotic right, which be off. Fatigue or post antibiotic use. Digestive imbalances. It's really common these days for. People to have digestive symptoms, digestive issues, and when we really do some digging in to the case and figure out we'll. When did it start a lot of times? You can trace it back to a time when that person was put on around of antibiotics, so it's really common. I've used a lot of verbs that are typically considered anti microbial antibacterial herbs and haven't seen anything that would indicate that it's adversely affecting the gut flora, and especially in the case with limitation. This is not something that I've seen. One study that was done. On a burberry isolate right so this would be isolated. An isolated alkaloid right Bergreen the. Famous alkaloid that we find in Goldenseal and Oregon grape grapefruit that has been demonstrated to have very strong antibacterial property. burberry isolate was administered to people in doses. I would say higher than you're going to probably be able to get from taking capsules or drinking, tea, or taking a tincture and. There was no. Signs of any type of Gut Flora imbalance, and that was actually a study that was done where they measured the Gut Flora, and after a period of time of administering pure burberry alkaloids, they did not see adversely affecting the gut flora so i. think that is a really good case at the very least for the Bern containing plants. You know one of the things about that is that you know with especially with in your question kind of brings this up with tinctures. Generally speaking when we're talking about antiseptic plants were seeing you know there's certain compounds in the plants that will have a direct antiseptic effect meaning they have to come into direct contact with that pathogen in order to render it effective or kill it or do whatever they're going to do now. When it comes to the digestive system, most tinctures don't actually get all the way down into the intestines. This is why oftentimes when treating the intestinal lining leaky gut protocols or really wanting to treat. Bacterial imbalances in the gut. CBO parasites things that we generally don't use tinctures. For a few reasons one is that people typically dose tinctures in you know anywhere the range of. Born. The low dose range a couple of drops to standard dosing, maybe one or two squirts of tincture thirty drop sixty drops to on the higher dose range up to five mills. Tincture is getting absorbed through them. You Cosa in the mouth, and in the stomach, most of it is not reaching the intestinal tract. So that's part, one part two is that. If we're thinking of the intestinal track. There's a lot of surface area there, and even if you're taking on the higher range of one of these tinctures mills. That is five milliliters as not nearly enough liquid to actually. Come into direct essentially topical contact with the entire intestinal tract. This is why generally speaking powders and water extracts like infusions. decoctions are preferable for treating the intestinal tract like when we're wanting to have a topical action may be Tony, fighing the mucosal membrane or having some sort of antiseptic property in there the powders and water extracts are actually going to get in there significantly more readily a tincture. Then, if we think of surface area, right if you're drinking a court of tea. A day. That court of tea is going to have much more contact with the surface area of the intestinal lining than. Five Mills three times a day of tincture. So that's a really important factor. Here is well in that often times. Those plants Aren't actually going to actually get into direct contact with the intestinal. microbiome and therefore not really be able to adversely affect it, so that's another aspect here. I think the other aspect is a here really thinking about plants in a very different way than just them being anti microbial antibacterial. We have to understand that herbs work really differently than drugs do rate so when we see an herb called like a natural antibiotic. It's like I don't really know how I feel about referring to herbs in that way, because herbs do a lot more than just kill bacteria right? Lemay lamasion is doing a lot more than just killing bacteria and viruses. Oregon grape, doing a lot more than just killing a bacteria. An antibiotic pretty much does one thing. Plants are soon much more complex. Ban isolated singular. Compounds that we find in most pharmaceutical medicines so. There's a difference here in terms of our orientation, or how we think about the way and herb works, and from looking at an herb through the Lens of Vital Ism and the intelligence of nature and understanding the human body as a reflection of nature and herbs, obviously, our of nature grow in. Ecosystems. Plants are shifting that ecological state of the body, and this is one way in which I say, plants have, we might refer to it as an antiseptic or anti, microbial or bacterial property. Maybe, it's not necessarily. The the plant is going in there and like killing bugs in your body Roy. Moore they're shifting the environment of the body and making the environment of the body. Less hospitable to those pathogens. This is one of the things about infection is that when we get an infection? It's very common for those parasites or bacteria and things like that to change the ecological state of the tissue that they're infecting to make it more hospitable for them from an energetic perspective. This more often than not is in the form of dampness. When we? If you think of nature that makes a lot of sense, right? Of. Swampy marshy bog. Or really stagnant pond tends to flourish and bacteria and things like that tend to flourish and thrive in those types of environments outside in nature. The same is true within our own body. And so a lot of these remedies we seep thinking of kind of using these examples of Oregon, grape or golden seal. Or elimination, these are all damp clearing remedies right the nation, very pungent resonance aromatic stimulant. Different very good for clearing. Fluid stagnation in the lungs. Goldenseal and Oregon grape are both very powerful bitter tonic plants that drain fluids down and out. Golden Seal Oregon grape to a degree, but golden seal specifically is also very astringent. So it's not just draining fluids, but it's locally a tightening the tissues and kind of drying those local tissues out as well, and this is most definitely contributing to their property in terms of making bacteria not thrive and flourish in the body, so that's just another important point to make here in terms of just this concept of an antibacterial plant or an antiseptic plant. Yes, there are compounds there that can kill bugs so to speak unto us. Super Layman's terms. But we also have to remember the hugh moral effect of these plans for the energetic effect of these plants. As absolutely contributing to that effect, so I would say the short answer is no, I don't think you have to worry too much about lamasion nuking the intestinal bacteria. I think this is something that I kind of I guess on a little bit more of a philosophical level. I believe that plants have an innate intelligence. Medicinal plants in particular. To they just know how to work within the human organism, and while yes, certain plants, if used incorrectly can lead to certain degrees of imbalance. Plants on their own, if worked with in an intelligent way in a holistic way and used in. Moderate to stand standard dosing protocols and things like that I don't really think we have too much to worry about. In terms of plant severely IM- balancing the microbiome, we also have to keep in mind here that typically, when you're treating some sort of infection this oftentimes an acute situation right so you're usually not taking plants for months and months and months in huge heroic dozes. For really prolonged periods of time, maybe in those situations, there's a possibility there could be an adverse impact, but typically that's not how these plants are used right. These usually aren't. Term kind of what might refer to as tonic plants or Remedies that you're using to kind of rejuvenate or replenish or revitalize the system these are usually plants that are used in short term, acute situations and I think if we just follow good dosing strategies. And proper forms of the herbs I. Don't think you got too much to worry about. So much for tuning into the plant cap for more three training on herbal medicine. Medical Astrology and the wisdom of nature shirt on over to our blog at evolutionary globalism productive. Until next time. Take care.

Gut Flora Oregon Lemay lamasion Sharon his US school of Evolutionary herbali John Popham Sherri Materia Medica lamasion Mahoney Aquaphor Liam CBO Mills stimulant Tony Roy Moore
Ep. 905 Who The Democrats Really Are

The Dan Bongino Show

1:02:06 hr | 2 years ago

Ep. 905 Who The Democrats Really Are

"Get ready to hear the truth about America on a show. That's not immune to the facts with your host. Dan bongino. I wasn't the Dan Bongino show producer Joe. How are you today? Time for this year. Oh, let's get. So just a couple of personal notes. So I was on Hannity last night, my usual, Tuesday and Thursday appearance for those who you want. I get questions a lot about what are you on FOX? It's pretty routine I do Tuesdays and Thursdays on Hannity Friday on Tucker, typically Saturday morning and Monday morning on FOX and friends. So if you all are interested, I get that question a lot that answers that but Shawn announce last night what I've been holding back for a while about the me signing with Fox News. So I now that you've heard it on FOX I put that out there and getting a lot of questions. I I people think I did not work there for seven years I worked elsewhere I did appearances. But there were on other networks. You know, had other jobs, but now I've signed with them. So that's the news. We've been holding back for a while. So you heard a lot of it last night. Thanks for all your your kind letters and emails of support. I really appreciate that. We also get letters through our PO box and stuff. What did quick question too is anybody out there and elbow surgeon a really really good one? Please urge Email me Email is all info at GTO. Please my elbow my left. Elbow is totally wrecked with arthritis, and I need someone and I can't find a good elbow guy. I am in Florida. Yes. If I we have we have hundreds of thousands of listeners there has to be a high quality elbowed surgeon out there north of pitas Email us by elbows fallen I'm not making fun of your elbow. But in a way, I am because you, and I we've been so busted up people think I'm making with what else can you? Do you you know with you? I have. Thick-skinned? But I take pictures on Instagram people that have a hook arm in my left arm straighten anymore. All right. I want to get through a lot today who the Democrats really are. Who they really are. I've gotta break down how far left these radicals have become. It's so embarrassing you million devoid facts. All right. Let's get right into. Hey, let me ask you something. What are you doing? And you put money in a four one K or an IRA. You store jumper cables in your vehicle or when you purchase health insurance. You're preparing your preparing to ensure you have enough money for retirement for a car battery dying or have assistance for paying for a major unexpected medical Bill that all makes sense. The same goes for building a food storage plan. We just saw this story about the Russians and the Chinese oughta conspiracy theory about the Russians and the Chinese planning some electromagnetic pulse attacks, and how they're they see this as some kind of asymmetric warfare against the United States. This would knock out the whole electric grid. You have to have a food storage plan prepare if Amercia food and food golden Bursch shelves, go empty, you're going to be in big trouble. The best way to prepares what my patriot supply this week the reffering a food kit. I have I have about ten of these that averages two thousand calorie. As per day for four weeks, go to my special website, prepare with Dan dot com. And you'll save one hundred dollars on it today. Insure your food supply with this four week food kit, including breakfast, lunches and dinners that lasts up to twenty five years in storage prepared with my patriot supply. That is the smart thing to do do it now at prepare with Dan dot com. That's prepared with Dan dot com. Prepare with Dan dot com. All right, who the Democrats really are getting increasingly bothered and disturbed by this radical far left lurch of the democrat party where they have abandoned any sense in semblance of normality and reason anymore. It is insane. What's going on? So I wanna walk through a couple of things one of the things I want to start with is how we were once a country that sig. Sig that. Although we significantly degree. I disagreed on on the issue of life. I am pro-life from conception to natural death. I want to be crystal clear on that. But whereas we went, you know, had these disagreements we could settle on at least politically that the Democrats believe abortion at a minimum should have been safe legal and rare that was when the Democrats had some semblance of. Of normality. I again, I am pro-life. I don't even agree with that position. But I'm telling you, the Democrats understood that determination of life in the womb of life in the womb was not an issue to be handled the haphazardly that is all gone out the window. Now, folks, I'm gonna walk through four or five things that Democrats have done preparing for twenty twenty or so outrageous and number one is this we've already seen what happened in New York where a far left radical governor. Andrew Cuomo signed a new abortion law that permits the termination of life up in the womb up up until right near birth. Where forget about a heartbeat. Of course, there's a heartbeat. This is this is a fully formed living being at that stage. Now, this was New York where this stuff, sadly is almost not unexpected anymore. Tragic horrifying an abomination of a law, but sadly, Joe almost not unexpected anymore in New York. My home state where I was born and raised which has has lurched increasingly far left over the years in a disturbing fashion. But what's going on in Virginia? A swing. He leaning blue state, but a state which unquestionably still has large swath of conservative liberty loving patriots. What is going on a Virginia where a lawmakers introduced a Bill where you can terminate a life of an infant? While the mother is dilating die. Other words in the process of giving birth, Dan. Surely, you're making this up. Am I now I played this for Joe before the show Joe sent me an Email? He never does that horrified. When he listens to Joe, we need this cut in the show. This is a lawmaker in Virginia who's being questioned about just how late into the pregnancy. The infant's life can be terminated. And listen to try to dance around the issue when being questioned when she's asked if while the woman is giving birth is dilating if the life of that infant can be terminated listened to her refused to answer the question. And finally at the end, she has to concede that that is allowable in her Bill. So how late in the third trimester. Would you be able to do that? It's very unfortunate that the physicians a witnesses. We're not able to attend today to speak specifically on torture. Bill how how late in the third trimester could a physician perform an abortion of he indicated it would impair them until health of the of the woman or physical huff. Okay. Okay. I'm talking about the mental health. So I mean through the third trimester third trimester goes all the way up to forty weeks. Okay. But to the end of the third trimester. I don't think we have a limit in the Bill so. Where it's obvious that woman is about to give birth. She has physical signs of that. She is about to give birth with that still be a point at which she could request an abortion if she was so certified. She's dilating. Mr Chairman that would be a, you know, a decision that that doctor the physician and the woman understood I'm asking you if you're Bill allows that my Bill would allow that. Yes. Oh my gosh. Joe left the pauses in there. That's not a mistake. No. Even I for a second. 'cause like, oh we done. That's intentional because you can hear this lawmaker who understands what she's about to say is going to be devastating to their pro-abortion caused that. While a woman is giving birth that if if there's some claim of mental health in paramount mental health in payment that her Bill allows that infants life to be terminated. Ladies and gentlemen. This is your democrat party. This is the democrat. This is who they are. It's not a mask. This is who they are. You take off a mask. You see the face underneath. This is the face of the democrat party. This is who they are. This is what you're voting for. I am they and will always be strong advocate for life conception to natural death. But even if you are pro choice, even if you are I asked you this is this saying to you is this legalizing and openly supporting infanticide. Folks, this is deeply troubling stuff. Are we even mildly concerned as a country about the moral stain abomination this is going to leave behind? I'm deeply sorry. I didn't get to the sooner especially given the signing of this equally horrible New York law. I am I should have gotten to this sooner. But this for Judases Virginia, not that determination of life is acceptable anywhere. But this is Virginia. How is this even being introduced? You know, I. I'm a sinner to. Okay, I say that all the time. I'm trying constantly to stay on the righteous path. It's not always easy. I mean it. But my gosh, the I mean, the you have an ounce of empathy for these infants should what what what do you? Call a child that at nine months into third trimester. At the end of it is that a blob of cells to. Because if that's a blob of cells than Europe blob of cells to and your life is meaningless to. But maybe that's what radical far left is wanted all the time. The prominence of government diminishment of individual life is a priority. Gross. I mean utterly completely grotesque. Show. We'll hear from liberals on that one to bed. It's disgusting. All right, who the Democrats really are wanting to get the some other stuff too because this is getting bad. Now. Joe it only took comma Harris twenty four hours if you listen to yesterday's show. We played the clip of Kama Harris in an interview with Jake tapper on CNN at a town hall, comma, Harris democrat, Senator from California now running for president twenty twenty who announced that the Jake tapper town all that she wanted to wipe out free market insurance. Cancel your you. Yes. You listening your insurance plan if you get it from your job or elsewhere or in the individual market, she wants to wipe that out and make sure even on FOX what's to eliminate private health insurance and make the government these sole controller of your healthcare. Now, I went into detail yesterday about how absurd ridiculous this is. But ladies and gentlemen, it only took twenty four hours for Harris, comma Harrison her crew to understand what a a. Credibly deep political faux pas this was and they are now trying to backtrack. It here is a quote from a staffer from comma Harris, oh, she's open to more moderate health reform plans, which would preserve the industry. What do you think happened there folks, what happened there is you spoke up the people have power? You have always had power political capital matters. And what political capital is is the ability to move people to your side. Clearly, what happened here is you moved comma Harris to our side the backlash from this was severe it took less than twenty four hours. Do not even allow the Democrats to open their mouths about government controlled health care without a particularly particularly organized and strong response from all of us out there now. So who the Democrats really we addressed a abortion up until dilation and the and and. And basically a fully formed infant child. Secondly, government run healthcare. This is their new push. Now, I wanted to address some things about this government run healthcare program. So you have the facts and data going forward to see how far left and radical. This is yesterday, I hit the rationing versus pricing model. How there are only two ways to allocate scarce resources, you can ration them a price them. There is no third way. Ladies and gentlemen, you will win a PHD in intergalactic economics. If you can tell me a nother way to allocate scarce resources to people you can rationalize resources or you can price them. There is no other way. So throwing the price system out the window by putting the government in control. In other words, prices don't matter because the government's going to control it means. There will be rationing. There is no other way I discussed that yesterday. But today. I wanted discuss the price tag of doing that. Because there's not a pricing model. Doesn't mean there's not a price. Don't mistake the to the pricing model what are the hallmarks of of a capitalist system, a free market economy, right, folks. What are the hallmarks of it not meant to be an econ class? But these are simple things the ability to trade, your labor for wage right in a in a in a non capitalist system is socialist system. That's not what happens from each. According to his ability to each according to his means what happens show, they socialist. See Joe Armacost is a potential radio engineer. They stick them in a radio engineer job and tell they tell them what he's paid now. But he tells me employer how much to pay him as the Soviets used to say, you pretended to pay us, and we pretended to work. It was going to say, Hank, right? Yeah. That's the way it went down. I remember spending some time in Russia's and early secret service agent. When it back in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine when the when the the fog of socialism was still hovering over their economy, you go into a souvenir store to buy something had five six people, a helping you on one little souvenir. One would pick it out one rapid what happened while everybody had needed jobs in the old Soviet day. So they gave them jobs paid them nothing. And he capitalist economy was having a tough time figuring out what to do with all these people. So you could trade your labor for a wage you can own free property property. You can have private property. That is a hallmark of a capitalist system socialism. The government owns everything. But third this is important resources are allocated by price meeting. People bid on things every single day of their lives. They bid on everything from food, and they have to work for that two cars to homes. Those prices go up new producers come in to get those high prices competition drives the cost down this has happened over and over throughout human history. It's why flat screen TV's you can buy for like three hundred dollars right now when they were five thousand dollars just a few years ago. That pricing system matters. I bring this up because what we haven't discussed yet in detail at this point is this government run healthcare, even though it won't be free market pricing. The government will run it. It's still has a price. Nobody's working for free, folks. And that price tag is an astonishing thirty two trillion dollars over ten years. Oh, yes. Thirty two trillion dollars over ten years for this government run healthcare system. This is not a joke. Ladies and gentlemen, this will bankrupt us this will put us in a whole instantaneously. Big about the costs here dirty two trillion over ten years the entire amount. The government spends in a year is a little over four trillion. You're talking about wiping out nearly the entire federal budget over ten years. It would require a doubling of taxes, ladies and gentlemen. I doubling of what you're paying now. Pick what you're paying now. And double it. It would devastate our economy. What would it also require which the Democrats are conveniently hiding from you government. Run health care require a doubling of the tax rates you pay now. You want to make a double down on my point from yesterday about the waiting lists. That would occur comma Harrison reaching get rid of private short. Just waiting waiting lists or bad now. All boy, you wait till the what a PJ O'Rourke used to say you think Healthcare's expensive now wait until it's free. It requires doubling of taxes and a forty percent cut in reimbursements to doctors and hospitals. Ladies and gentlemen, the way the system works now in the system now is broken it is broken precisely because the government pays right now for about forty forty five percent of healthcare. We have a hybrid system that's failing on both fronts. The free market side of it is failing because the government is not reimbursing doctors at the cost of the value. They add and the free market side is failing because they have to overcharge people to reimburse the doctors for the amount. They're not making on the government side. I know that didn't make a lot of sense. So I'm gonna explain it. Again. Here's what's happening now in the broken system. We have now because the government can't get its mitts off our healthcare system. Because the government does not have the money to pay for health care for everybody. What do they do they pay doctors and hospitals, low rates for Medicaid and Medicare patients, those doctors respond by limiting or pudding? Unofficial quotas on the amount of Medicaid or Medicare patients, they will accept because they can't make any money on them. Right. But as a condition of staying in the system, they have to take some Medicaid Medicare patients. So if the doctors aren't making any money on Medicaid Medicare patients, and they're running businesses they have to pay employee's administrative staff their electric bills they have to buy equipment. They have to pay rent for their doctor's office. How Joe are they making money? They're making money on the free market side by charging more to private free market health care patients who were then covering the doctors expenses, they wouldn't have to advocate covered if Medicaid and Medicare paid market rates. But they don't this is what screwing up the entire system the government's footprint in there. If doctors were allowed to charge the value for their business. They would probably there might be short term spike before other doctor started to realize there was income to be made in certain areas. So we'll why is that Dr charging so much. I can go in there and get some of his patients for less. It is only worked every single place. It's been tried flat screen TV's lay sick plastic surgery food, which is as a percentage of our our annual income at some of the lowest amounts repaid in human history. Because what did we do capitalism? Works competition drives down prices, but there's no competition right now because there's this struggle to make money off the free market healthcare system from the loss of money on the government reimbursements. Now, the Bernie Sanders plan, and he's Medicare for all plans, which are disastrous would require a forty percent four zero percent cut in reimbursements to doctors or hospitals, ladies and gentlemen, Medicare and Medicaid are bankrupt. And now I said this on Hannity show last night. This is a forest fire. I am sorry to inform you, I know a lot of people like their Medicare, and you have designed you lives around that. And it's not your fault that I'm not blaming you. They system is bankrupt. There is no money to fund the long term liabilities of Medicare, Medicaid or social security. None having said that I have grandparents as well. It is not your fault promises were made to you on behalf of a government. We elected that made enormous mistakes and inserting their foot in your retirement your healthcare plan. I believe we owe you the security of this whether through the general fund taxes, or whatever it may be. But as for anyone age, roughly fifty five or younger. Counting on these programs is outright foolish. You are. You're denying math. You're trying to tell me five POS five equals fifteen. It doesn't. There's no math there. There is no money. The long term liabilities of these programs are approaching one hundred trillion dollar, Mark. We do not have that money. We're twenty trillion in debt right now. Suggesting that a forty percent tax cut and thirty two trillion in choose me, a forty percent reimbursement cut the doctors nostrils followed up by doubling of taxes to finance thirty two trillion a new government spending suggesting that's realistic in this debt environment. We're in now is idiocy. Do you have any idea how many hospitals and doctors would fold and their businesses would fall tomorrow if they were told that overnight the government was taking over their business and their reimbursements would be decreased by forty percent. Do you have any idea? How many of them would fold up shop? The answers are staggering. Staggering. How many doctors would have to leave the business? There's a darn good chance that Dr you've grown to love and appreciate for his services or her services will be out of business almost overnight if they would implement this plan, ladies and gentlemen, liberalism is a real world cost. Okay. These policies bleed they bleed their real they're not KYW miracle. They're not. They're not fabled. These are real world policies real people with real power proposing running for the most powerful office in the land, the presidency United States. These policies bleed man, they are real. They mean, something they will hurt real living. People your grandparents, you they obey the laws of math and economics like anything else and the laws of math and pure economic say these policies are destructive. They will destroy your doctor hit the hospital, you go to they will destroy your Bank account. They will destroy our economy. They will destroy your economic future your kids economic future. They will ration your healthcare. And you will sit on waiting lists. Those are facts. This is real and along with that abortion law up until birth. This is who the Democrats are wake up. This is who they really are. This isn't a joke. The party of John F Kennedy is gone. Gun bury it there is. No, John F. Kennedy. Democrats are now Republicans. That party is disappeared. This is the party of Bernie Sanders and Kamla Harris. Far left radicals, openly speaking in public and advocating for policies that will do exactly what I just said. All right, haven't even starting. I gotta get to their tax stuff. You're gonna say great article in national review. That's even that's going to blow your mind and so good. It's it starts dry. Someone sent it. To me this morning listener, send me articles all the time. It is a very good one. I'm glad you found it. Let me get to this. First up today show. Also brought to you by our buddies at policy genius say life insurance is one of those topics. Everybody knows a little bit about but the understand it well enough to feel comfortable buying it. Whether you're an insurance expert or newbie policy genius created websites websites really easy to use. By the way, I've surfed around it. 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You can find the right policy in just minutes at policy genius dot com. Policy genius dot com. Policy. Genius the easy way to compare by life insurance policy genius dot com. Go check them out. Okay. So this is who they are the Democrats. Here's another one. This proposal for seventy percent tax rates monstrous tax increases on the wealthiest Americans. People who make ten million or more. Folks. I again, are we living in a world where facts and data are relevant because if they're not, and if you're a liberal listening to my show, and I know you're out there because I get your nasty emails at times. You're welcome to listen to the show. But I'm asking you if you're liberal, and you the conservatives and liberty lovers out there listening to my show should be asking your liberal friends that I have some I do you should be asking your Joe's in Maryland. He surrounded by. Yeah. I'm in Martin county, Florida where it's pretty conservative county. I want you to ask your liberal friends do Faxon data matter anymore because if Faxon data don't, in fact matter this conversation's useless, but if you're out there with an open mind, and you're interested in what actually happens when we tax people at the rates, this new this new crew of Democrats is proposing these radical far left is what actually happens if you're not interested in that. You're interested in motion. What is should say facts don't care about your feelings? If you're interested in your feelings and not the facts, this is not the show for you. Go listen to the Rachel Maddow show where so whatever where the show is swimming in oh, how are your feelings? And all I'm not interested. It's not might Thom Hartmann, whatever they're all out there, the liberals obeyed you in a motions and feelings devoid of facts and data. There was an interesting snip in the Wall Street Journal today, how the Democrats I've made this argument over and over keep saying, well, we need to go back to the fifties. And sixties show where the top tax rate was close to ninety percent. I have made multiple on my debunk this section of my website. I have put articles in their written by my researcher. Matt Palumbo repeatedly debunking net idea that that ninety percent tax rate was what people actually paid at the top end the effective tax rate back. Then was roughly thirty one percent. In other words, what people actually paying it's roughly now about twenty seven percent. Meaning despite the fact that in the fifties and sixties there was a ninety percent tax rate on the rich of the time. The wealthy of the time. Joe nobody paid in. Nobody paid it. Are you interested in the facts? Here's another snippet from the Wall Street Journal today. Here's the takeaway liberal friends. Yeah. Mike conservative Powell, but in the fifties and sixties we had ninety percent tax rates and look how well we did. Nobody paid that the effective tax rate was actually close to thirty percent. It's about twenty seven now roughly the same even better Wall Street Journal has another data point today. Joe? Income tax revenue collected in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven was seven point seven percent of GDP at roughly those ninety percent top marginal rates affecting the wealthiest people time. What is it today? Income tax revenue is eight point three percent. So. Collected as a percentage of GDP. Do you understand what I'm saying here income tax revenue collected fifties at the rates that Democrats are suggesting ninety percent was that percentage point lower as a percentage of GDP ten. It is now. Well, it should say roughly half a percentage point. I don't wanna I don't don't get the eight seven I shouldn't roundup. That's he responsible. It was roughly half a percentage point lower. The point is absolutely valid. Why? Because nobody paid those rates at a ninety percent tax rate tax evasion. Tax avoidance becomes a national pastime. That's why. Right. The national pastime baseball. It's tax avoidance when your rates are seventy and ninety percent. And that's exactly what people did making it even worse, ladies and gentlemen in the fifties. And sixties there was no internet capital was not as mobile as it is. Now there were at the refined international, transportation networks and communication networks. We have now you can move money out of the country like that. You would still a ninety percent tax rate. Seventy percent tax rate at marginal rates at the top in this country. Now, you're going to see capital flight out of this country. Like you haven't seen before. So let's be clear on this the effective tax rate for the entire economy was roughly the same even at the ninety percent tax rates meeting whole lot of people avoid it. And Secondly, the income taxes collected as a percentage of GDP we're lower under that high rate. Not that any of this matters to people out there in the liberal side. Because you're not searching for the truth. You're searching for a sedative to your feelings and your hurt feelings. Now, I have an article from national review up in the show notes today. That's very good that hits on this topic. And it starts a little slow, but give it a shot on a very long piece, but it talks about I I was trying to find a way to sum it up to make it sound a little spicier than then the article, it's so good. It talks about four issues basically with bigger government. And it's framed in terms of the J C T CBO now. Oh, man. But now, you can see why if you start you don't give it a chance you'll be get past the first pair, it talks about other joint committee on taxation, and the CBO the way they evaluate big government spending plans, whatever it is healthcare expansion government control a healthcare higher tax rates. How that's changed through the years and there's four criteria which work against the socialists at this point UK, CO Cortez's and the Bernie Sanders is the world is that makes sense show here a four things they're going to have to overcome if they really want to make sure that they enshrined bigger government. And basically instill their form of socialism here in the United States. Let rip here's the number one. The CPO and the joint committee on taxation factor in what we call crowd out. Ladies and gentlemen, you hear from okay CO Cortes, Bernie Sanders, comma Harrison, others, there's this mistaken illusion that government spending is somehow net worth. In other words, that when the government spends money, it spends money, which leads to jobs, you'll hear him say it all the time shovel ready jobs. We got to produce in other words to cover midst giving people money. So Joe if you're. I hate to say it. I'm going to sound me. But if you economically alliterate, yeah. And you don't understand basic cash flows. That may make sense to you, especially if you're a liberal, and you do know homework at all and feelings matter more than your facts. I don't think I'd like your tone. You shouldn't. The question is not where the money goes government's going to spend money on shovel ready jobs. People are gonna jobs under going to be able to spend the money. Why this is great economic press parodies right around the corner. The question is where did the money come from not that where the money go money came from you? Government confiscates money. It doesn't create anything value government. Does not take glass microchips, silicon plastic and put it in an iphone and make all of those comp- composites make it does not compose a product of higher value than a breaking down of its parts. Government doesn't add value to anything government simply takes and gives to another. And then as as Linden Johnson's economic advisor called it. The leaky bucket as it's taking money from one person in a bucket and giving it to another one the bucket leaks, the bureaucrats take money, the lobbyists gug. Everybody gets gets a cut before it actually makes it to someone else. No value is added at all. The point here for number one is the J C T and CBO do not count government borrowing as net worth or value added because the money is simply taken from you. And then given back to you and end up your credit costs is taken along the way there is no value added. Value added is everything in economics. You take a piece of glass of microchip you find out a way to make the next generation iphone at adds to people's lives. They use that next generation iphone or Android, or whatever it is. And they find a way to take better pictures to get their business done faster, the processor quicker, and that adds to their life that adds value. The government doesn't add value. The government takes from one person and gives to another with a leaky bucket doing the transfer. Government borrowing crowds out free markets when government takes money. It doesn't have and spends it. It has to take it from people who have money where are those people not lending their money now Joe to free market businesses that actually add value. So here's the free market, adding value new phones, new medicines, new healthcare, better cleaner food. Money that would have been lent to those businesses to build and create more of that is now taken out of those businesses and given a leaky bucket to the government, which takes its own cut. And then just transfers it to other people with no value added at all. The CBO estimates show that every five hundred billion in borrowing significantly reduces GOP you want to see the GOP GDP excuse me. It does reduce GOP too. Because the Democrats sell people in this plans and people believe it, and there's less GOP congressional representatives than others. Good. Cavs Freudian slip. Right. Read the report in there. There's a link to that report about how government barring simply crowds out free market, borrowing and lending, which destroys any value added. Second joe. Bernie Sanders proposing thirty three trillion dollars in new spending over the next ten years. Thirty three trillion. Now case yo Cortez is argued to you this ingenuously in entirely nonsensical argument that oh Joe all they have to do is tax people who make over ten million. And what happens the envious among us? I'm sorry. But it's true. Because it's listen the top twenty percent of tax payers, pay eighty percent of the taxes. The top twenty earners out of every hundred people. You select. The top twenty earners pay eighty seven cents of every tax dollar out there, so dull if you're looking for me to start making policies for the fact that rich people aren't paying more. You've got the wrong show. They don't deserve. I'm not that that person, by the way, we do. Okay. I don't make ten million. Maybe one day. I will but date I don't want their money in the government economy. I want their money in the free market economy. Where value can be added. I'm not envious of them. I don't care long are not breaking the law. I don't care stop being a hater that should be Trump's twenty twenty. Don't hate don't hate. Why are you? Why are you so jealous about it? Do your own thing. Why do you care all they took it? They took it from it. They took it. They stole it from you. So a guy we're ten million. What the hell do you up on the street at gunpoint? Nobody. Yep. Dido's pockets, how did he steal it from you? Why do you care? Dan, you really wanna be defending ten people make ten million or no, I wanna be defending liberty. That's what I wanna be defending and getting the government the hell out of my life, and yours. I'm tired of it. The politics of envy. Government people is all about greed greed. So you wanna take someone else's money? Not only you want to confiscate the welfare. But you wanna take up of what you haven't earned it. It's not yours, but that's not greed. But Joe the facts and data matter so point number one is that J going to put a limit on this because government borrowing will destroy GDP growth. Secondly. There's no money there for people who make ten million more to finance these programs. Here's the simple math. Joe people the amount of money over ten million that okay, CEO Cortez proposes to tax. Right. The whole pull Joe is only two hundred forty five billion. So if you tax that at our proposed seventy percent rate does evil ten millionaires, you're looking at between one hundred sixty three hundred eighty billion dollars in revenue over ten years less than one percent of GDP. Ladies and gentlemen, please. Explain to me, which simple math with with plain simple arithmetic. If you're capable of this on the liberal side. How do you expect? That's what the difference say. It's two hundred billion raised over ten years. And that these people don't move their money out of the country, which they will it'll be far less than that. But let's throw the liberals Abon and assume they raised two hundred billion and ten years, can you please explain to me how to one hundred billion over ten years is going to finance thirty three trillion a new spending. I'll wait, folks. Any idea? Joe how you can reconcile those two numbers. You can't because it's not going to happen. It's the of economics. Fetch is not going to happen Gretchen, man. It's not gonna happen. You will not finance thirty three trillion a new spending with two hundred billion in an optimistic tax receipts over ten years from those evil millionaires making over ten million dollars. Even shoe. He knows this is absurd. It's not gonna happen. Fred's tried this millionaire's tax. What happened people fled the country? They got rid of it. Joe? Oh, even better, remember, Maryland. Former governor Martin O'Malley far left radical liberal governor, Maryland before Larry HOGAN. It's the of the millionaire's tax in Maryland. They said it was going to raise. I think it was what is two hundred million dollars or something like that. It welled up losing one hundred million dollars. People left Maryland moved out droves. And they're off billionaire her one turning the corner going did Delaware millionaire through college Pennsylvania route millionaire threes closing a million threes headed out of Florida. Part about well, go. They love they evacuated the combat zone as quickly as they could it listened to me it lost money. You don't believe me? Google it Boehm Ali millionaires tax it lost money. Listen, liberal foods. Do you understand what I'm telling you? I'll get an Email. Don't call them before you are food. If you believe this they instituted a millionaires tax to raise money and raise less money than they did before the idea of a tax is to get money from people not lose money from people. But yeah, let's keep trying eventually it'll work even at French found out. This was a stupid idea. I say the French. I'm not trying to take a shot up. I spent a lot of time in Fred. I don't be like, but they're obviously a little more socially liberal country and economically liberal country. Even they figured this out. See anyone to ask case you'll Cortez for the basic math year anyone ever miss Cortez. Representative Cortez your projected tax on people making ten million or more at the marginal rate is projected to optimistically only raise about roughly two hundred billion dollars. How do you propose to finance roughly thirty trillion in new spending with that? Oh, go. Trying to think but nothing happens. Nothing happening. Nothing's happening. Of course is nothing. You can't answer the question. So that was number two. I spent a lot of time in crowd out number one. It's going to be a problem with big government socialism second. There's no tax base for it. There's no money there. Third the J C T in the CBO both factor in corporate taxes are simply passed onto consumers. So any ideas, these big government acolytes have that they are going to don't worry. Joe? Don't worry. We are only gonna tax businesses out. Everybody's like, yes, they envious among us. Get those people were ten million and get those prisoners com. We'll just tax the businesses. No, you won't there are links in the piece to report showing conclusively that went businesses are taxed at higher corporate tax rates. They simply pass the prices onto you you pay the tax not them. The business is simply a tax collector for the government. It's not paying anything. Your tax corporation the corporation pass those costs onto higher prices aren't the consumers. This isn't hard. That's an easy one just look at pointer. So again, any ideas, these socialists are going to have about expanding governor going to face these four obstacles, they're going to have to overcome crowd out by government, borrowing, a tax base, that's not existent to pay for it. Attacks pace in corporate taxes. 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So the number four and final obstacle in the national review piece that big government socialist like Sanders, Cossio Cortez are going to have to overcome. Is all if they can't do any of that show. Surely, they'll say, well, I know what to do will expand their big government by getting those stock people will just hiked the capital gains tax. In other words, you sell a stock you make money that is a capital gain. We will hike the tax on that. Because they know what show they know. That sells the people who are economically illiterate. Here we go. What are they say? We'll just get those people are now keeping forget that. Forgetting the fact by the way that the overwhelming majority of those people are pension funds and middle-class people whose retirement depends on investments their pensions funds have made in there. I mean, even CalPERS the California pension fund that's go near close to you're going to be going to be close to bankruptcy at some point with all its liabilities. Even CalPERS has investments in stocks. But they leave that out because when you think about that they see the Mr. moneybags guy with the top hat and the bespectacled, look and the oversized cigar, don't worry. We'll just tax capital gains. That's not going to work either. Because the JC teed CBO have done some homework. I'm not defending the CBO, by the way. I don't come and just telling you what's out there. Now government policy wise at these lawmakers are going to have to deal with right? Their research indicates that every ten percent hike in the capital gains tax results in a drop in the sale of stocks by eight percent. Now, why would that be well, most of you out there who were very intelligent of already figured this out some listening who were maybe of the liberal persuasion may have a tough time when you hype the tax on a sale of stock people don't sell the stock. They hold it until the capital gains tax goes down right there. It is not only Joe does a ten percent hike in the capital gains tax result in a drop in the stock sales. It also has resulted historically in the loss of government revenue. You doubt me. Ladies and gentlemen, Ronald Reagan, although he was a big tax cutter on the income side in a compromise effort to level the playing field amongst income capital gains in corporate taxes. Ronald Reagan hike. Yes. Hike the capital gains tax to Twenty-eight percent. He dropped the income tax rate. The top rate from seventy to twenty eight percent in order to make those rates. So no one would move money from capital gains income Reagan made those rates equal. Tax parody on each side. What happened when under the Reagan administration? They hiked the capital gains tax rate. The capital gains tax raise lasts money, folks. The opposite happened that their Bill Clinton. Yes. The opposite. Bill Clinton did the exact opposite Bill Clinton's administration hiked the income tax rate and dumped the capital gains tax rate and the capital gains tax revenue where. Up up finger in the sky argue now, listen liberals, don't let any of these facts get into wave your dopey narratives. But you have nowhere to go with this. Your big government plans are going to be stymied consistently by you having to tell the truth to the American people. Now, let me just say this show. If liberals want to be honest, and sell this to the American people, I'm all for it not for their plan, but for their honesty. In other words, I object to your ideology strongly. It's the whole goal of my life is to deconstruct false liberal golden calf promises. But I would respect you more. If you were honest about what you're selling. I'm hoping that the obstacles they're up against the J C T CBO, we'll force liberals and the media to cover these pie-in-the-sky programs. Honestly. If acacia Cortez wants to be honest and say folks, I proposing massive new spending in the green new deal and healthcare, my ten million dollars or more tax. Marginal tax rate is not sufficient it's only going to raise a sliver that. I am asking you personally to finances. Therefore, I'm going to ask you to double your tax rate and to vote for me, increasing your taxes and doubling. I would respect her more. If she would be honest, Bernie Sanders and comma Harris too. They would lose. But at least they'd be principal. My problem with this is they are not being principal. They are lying to you. The capital gains tax. We'll get it from the stock buyers and sellers. No, you won't you will lose money because people will simply hold stocks investments. We'll get it from the businesses. No, you won't get it from the businesses. They'll pass it onto the people. We'll get it from the ten million. There's no you won't there's no tax base for that. We'll get it from government barring. No, you won't that just comes from the people to in the form of Crowder. Be honest stop being frauds? Do you ever want to stand for anything ever be principal? And at least if you think your ideas are right, and defend them. We don't have this apocryphal on the conservative side. This isn't an issue. Here we stand for lower taxes because we believe the government is a toilet bowl of government spending and outside of the constitutional roles of government, our military, and our court system every dollar turned over to the government is a dollar wasted. There's no hypocrisy there. Lower tax rates matter because economic freedom matters, your however, your liberal ideology is rife with apocryphal. It is everything wrong with this country. It is a fraud. It's a scam. It's a scheme. You're telling people things that aren't true. You're asking them the worship golden calves. All right. That was a long one. So we talked about who the Democrats earlier with abortion government, run healthcare tax rates. There's another story. I wanted to hit today that I've just found yesterday. Their war against objectivity, folks. Oh. Yeah. J I know chosen Oba is this is one of the initial things we covered a long time ago in the show, and we were doing it in my basement. We first started didn't realize the show would become as big as it was. It was a prized. Do you? Remember that dude? Yeah. That's right. Yeah. Yeah. Because we used to do a Sunday show only. If you go back and listen on soundcloud, you see some of those original shows or a trip. But I like to explain the why the why matters the why always matters when discussing liberalism when you understand why they do what they do. Everything makes sense. Everything is it goes, according to the same battle plan. The liberals liberal radical with radical left out there and liberals hate religion for a reason. It's not it's not just that. You know, they renounced God. It's it's almost not even religious. It's almost a secular hatred of religion. If that makes sense, they hate religion in the constitution. Family values. They can't stand any of that. Because it creates an objective truth. Please follow me is one of the most important thing. This is the last section of the Democrats really are they did something yesterday. And I'll get to it in a second that it'll make sense to you. When you understand what I'm telling you. Now anything that represents an objective truth. Not subject to interpretation in other words, objective truth that big r rights the right to economic freedom the right to freedom the right to self protection the right to practice your religion, the right? The freaks free speech big. Alright an objective truth is at does rights. Are granted by God, not men that a constitution can enshrine those rights in a legal framework. But it doesn't grant them. It is simply a parchment protection. Legislatively of rights already granted to you. These are inalienable they were granted to you by God. In other words. They are objective truths. Not subjected to the whims of men and women. Liberalism is in direct conflict with objective truth. Why because objective truth cannot exist in a system where liberalism needs to treat people unequally. Think about what I'm telling you. If freedom liberty the right to self protection, the right to work in earn your money and spend your money. If these are God given rights to remain free of the chains of government. If those are objectively true, then liberals subjective thought that they can treat people unequally or their assertion that they can treat people any. We cannot be true these two worlds cannot coexist at the same time objective and subjective truth, if Christian values state that marriage is between a man and a women a woman, and you are objectively granted the big are right by God to practice your religion. You believe that religion to be true that cannot exist in a world where liberals want you to mandatory wanted mandatory that you engage in and partaken a wedding ceremony. That objects to your religious beliefs. You see folks, they cannot coexist. These two circles don't overlap at any point liberals need to wipe out the idea big all rights and objective truth because everything is to be determined by the government at a later date economic freedom. You don't have economic freedom. If you make ten million. We'll treat you want equally. What are you talking about that? No, no. That's what a seventy percent tax rate is it is treating people economically unequally compared to people who make five million one million five hundred thousand one hundred thousand and fifty thousand. Make more. That's not what I said point stipulated. That is not what I said what I said is you are treated unequally. That's Todd a logical statement if I'm paying seventy percent of my income over a certain amount. As I work and go to work just like you do and you're paying twenty percent. I am being treated unequally. That's a taught a logical statement only an idiot would argue it turn billion. I get it. I heard you stipulated. They are also being treated unequally. But the idea of objective truth that people should be treated equally. I cannot coexist with the fact that liberals their very nature requires Christians to be treated any Dave religion is given second class status. Your remember the knights of Columbus? You're not allowed to serve in government service. Your religion says life begins in the womb. I knew you in the boom what it says in the bible. You're not to be treated seriously. You're an infant in the womb. You can be wiped out up until the night went. Of your life, which forget it conception. Your life is wiped out that requires you to be treated unequally, if you're an infant in the womb that objective truth that life begins at conception cannot exist. If you have the inalienable right to life, and then you're wiped out, you're treated unequally, you're dead. They will attack anything that creates an objective, truth religion, God and big all rights are an objective truth. They are not subject to the whims of they have to be wiped out liberals need to treat people unequally. People cannot be treated unequally if it is objectively true that people should be treated equally. You dig. This explains their war on religion. Specifically christianity. I bring this up because there's a story having the show news today, Fox, News dot com. Please read it about how the house committee would natch on natural resources wants to strike from the oath people take when they testify in front of him at the end, so help you God. This is not a small thing. Ladies and gentlemen. Liberals are doing this again for a reason. They are doing it. Because they want to wipe out the influence of religion from your life because it creates a series of laws and objective truths that you live by that directly conflict with liberal ideology, which requires an expansive subjective government to change the rules on a day's notice to get to a desired ends. And but the socialists the ends justify the means the ends never justify the means in his system of objective truth that means are series of objective truth in a free society. The means matter the means are everything not to liberals. Who are the Democrats? They are people who do not believe any more big our God given rights they must treat people in equally. They must wipe out the influence of religion in your life because it creates an objective truth of equality. Amongst people created in the eyes of God that does not coexist with their subjective. Need to change the rules on the whim to get to a desired policy goal. They cannot treat a child in the womb equally. As a human being who exits exits the room. They can't you have no ill inalienable right to life that can't coexist with objective truth. They can't keep people who work for a living who make a certain amount of money. They can't allow them to be treated equally as people who work the same amount. But don't make that amount of money. It doesn't matter. They have to be treated unequally. That's what liberalism is. Healthcare. They can't treat people equally. They have to institute a system of government enforce rationing. We're only the connected to the government few will get speedy healthcare. They don't want people treated equally. The people with no influence are going to sit on waiting lists. Objective. Truth doesn't exist with them and them trying to strike so help you God. It's just another indicator of their war on big all rights and objective truth. All right, folks. I had a lot more to get you to get to some of it tomorrow. I have another story. It was interesting today about a potential cure for cancer. Was picked up by the New York Post yesterday, the Jerusalem Post on the rise and read the story. It's just interesting that we may be on the on the horizon of I mean think about it show, not just the cost in tragic human suffering all of us have been touched by cancer all of us. Everybody knows someone or know someone who knows someone it is a scourge on humankind. And I sent out a tweet yesterday saying God, please tell me, and I meant that I was not using his name in vain, please tell me the story is true. And you've blessed someone with the inspiration to find this. But not just the human cost and suffering, ladies and gentlemen, if we found a cure for cancer, which may be on the rise. And if you read this story, and I'm gonna get to optimistic. But think about the cost I mean, people can you imagine just an healthcare alone. The trillions of dollars to try to do a million eight the suffering and oh my gosh. I mean, just this would be a list would be one of those hinge moments in human history. It would it would be a hinge moment in human history equivalent of like healthcare industrial revolution. I pray to God. It's true. All right. Thanks for tuning in today. I really enjoyed today's show. I hope you did as well. Enjoy your feedback to thank you very much and serious. If there is an elbow surgeon out there who's really good opi-. Please Email us the context on the website would love to hear from you. And yes, thanks for all the good. The kind words about FOX, please subscribe to the show on itunes. It's free. You go to I tunes. Click your podcast app. Click subscription. Subscribe. It helps drive this up the charts. We really appreciate it. If you have an Android. You can go to heart radio or soundcloud. You can follow us. Subscribe. It's not going to cost you anything it's free. But that's what moves podcasts up the charts. Where we've been for a while. Thanks to you and helps other people find a content. Thanks a lot folks. I appreciate it. I'll see you all tomorrow. You just heard the Dan Bongino show. You can also get Dan's podcast on itunes, soundcloud, and follow Dan on Twitter. Twenty four seven at dbongino.

Joe Armacost government Democrats Bernie Sanders United States Healthcare CBO Cossio Cortez Kamla Harris Florida New York Hannity democrat party FOX Harrison Wall Street Journal
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04:02 min | 6 months ago

FDA & MANUFACTURERS TO TERMINATE VACCINE SAFETY MONITORING

"There is a saline placebo being used for the first time really in a vaccine safety trials in the pre licensure phase which is where we've been because the informed consent action. What network our nonprofit petition. The fda they were going to be using ninja cocco vaccines and things that were being used around the world and we said informed consent action network will not allow you to call this a safety trial. If you do not have a true you know safety. Baselines set by a placebo within days. We've saw them stopdown pastry trials and add a saline placebo. So now what are they you know. What is it you want to share about that placebo. Yeah this isn't fis own documents. Now they're talking about this. Is the heading called. Sponsors plans for continued blinded. Placebo control follow up. It says the sponsor plans to offer vaccination to Participants equal to or over sixteen years of age who originally received the cbo and who become eligible for recipient of b. n. t. Sixteen to be too. That's pfizer shot. According to local or national recommendations sponsor also proposes that all placebo recipients equal a greater sixteen years of age will be offered the shot after completing six months of follow up after dose to if they did not request and receive vaccine previously. So they're on blinded so we're going to basically what this is saying in a lot of words is after six months. We were gonna destroy our placebo group. We're essentially go into offer everyone in the placebo group. First of all let them know you were in the placebo group and start in with the vaccine. If you want it therefore i mean here's the newsflash right for for the last several years we have been telling the world that at the very best your vaccines you're giving. Your kids went through a six month. safety trial. Many of them shorter than that whereas drugs are going three to five years safety. Trials grandpa's by agra got a ten year safety trial but when it comes back scenes six months is the best you'll find and people go. Oh that's preposterous. That's crazy that can't be true. I get attacked all the time spreading misinformation here right before our eyes. They're basically telling you the end of a true placebo based safety. Trial will be six months into this process. Forget about seeing cancer. Which is what we always look for in in drugs. Forget about looking at long-term auto immune issues forget about a year from now suffering antibody dependent enhancement because the virus the new strain of the virus somehow creates that problem where the back seen works as a catalyst of making more sick. And maybe even kill you. We will be able to say. Well look at the sailing group. They didn't have as many deaths group. Why because we didn't even allow that sailing group that's true placebo group to last more than a year. There is folks that is the shell game of all shell games. This is disgusting jeffrey. When when we look at how dangerous this vaccine the potential it as the amount of animals that were destroyed throughout the animal trials over the last twenty years working on a corona virus and best. You're going to duke or america is six months safety trial with a placebo man. Okay right this stuff people. I hope you're waking up. I hope you're grabbing your friends and getting to watch the high wired's absolutely outrageous if you like that clip that'd be sure to check out our live broadcasts of the high wire every thursday morning at eleven. Am pacific time. You can watch it on. I tunes and twitter we'll see.

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