35 Burst results for "CARDIOLOGY"

Burgeoning Science & Bergamot With Dr. Danielle Daniel

The Essential Oil Revolution

01:44 min | 2 months ago

Burgeoning Science & Bergamot With Dr. Danielle Daniel

"I'm here with dr danielle daniel. Who is a doctor of psychology and licensed clinical social worker with a holistic approach to the brain using the signs of nature. Her expertise focuses on the neural limbic. Pathways neuro cardiology and psycho gastroenterology. Which is the gut brain access for immediate and sustained emotional wellbeing. She trained hospitals clinics and therapists around the world on the field of psycho arom ecology and the application of saco aroma. Therapy dr danielle. Welcome to the essential oil revolution. I'm so glad that you're here with us today. Thank you so much for having me. It's a pleasure to be here. I'm so excited to connect with your audience. Well i am so excited to have not just a psycho aroma therapists. Here but i- psycho aroma colleges tell us the distinction between those terms. Yeah so i started studying. So i guess it can back up. A little. bit too is I started studying the research behind aromatherapy and the brain. I'm a mental health thumb clinician. And i have a doctorate in clinical psychology. And so i wanted to define what i was doing in my office with my With my trauma antiquing therapy our kids in my therapy. Practice and so Psycho aromatherapy is like the application of using oils for the brain for the psychology for motions and then psycho arom ecology as i was like studying the science of research with the oils and the brain I created a new field and my doctoral research shows called psycho aroma. Collagen which is the study of how aromatic molecules interact in the brain.

Dr Danielle Daniel Dr Danielle
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

03:58 min | 3 months ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"The american university of beirut has been really the foundation of how you learn what are some of the mentors and most importantly to me is curiosity and how you continue to mark if these are instilled in us. I think you will continue pursuing whatever your passion is. Interestingly enough you may not know this but in high school or after. I was not going to medicine. Mike path was much more engineering. Because i was driven by physics and math that was my forte. Biology was not my forte. So i was going into engineering and we had no mentors at that time through. Leeann no advisers here. I can see my kids when they were high school. They had all the advice and everything else to understand what they're so. I was doing it myself and going around with people and it was fortuitous. Get together a met one of the physicians who was training in the french faculty he told me williams said. Oh you're gonna love medicine. I love it so much. I know you're interested in math and physics on all that stuff. The science is amazing but also the human touch is getting to help people and engage with people. And i know you would love that so it sparked something in my mind said at least my undergrad. I'm gonna do biology. That's what i did. It applied for medical school there in medical school than than obviously the war broke out so we were there for two years. It was very tough field. My classmates were able to transfer after two years of the war with dangerous in so many other things. We don't have to go through them. But that's the rearview mirror. Also it keeps you grounded as to what's important in life and what are real challenges and have you overcome at them. Be resilient fourteenth to land in the united states. Certainly none of that was in my radar screen hours thinking maybe after medical school at the american university of beirut back in may become for specialty just subspecialize go back to my alma mater. I love i still serve on their board of trustees ahead their medicine and health giving back. Because it's part of us. And i think i had tremendous opportunity so mentorship is critical at every step of the way. It's even more critical level that it will never go away because it's great to be able to aspire is not only as for people's modulation of how they address medicine but also imbalanced checkpoint. If you will a conversation that hopefully you can grow an- emulate pick what you really like about it so amazing journey. I would have never thought that it would be that. And also it tells you about the united states itself hand. What is possible in the united states that we all admire because it gives you a poor trinity's that in many other countries you may not have such purchase and it is rather flat as opposed to hierarchical. I'm not talking about flat from a negative review. Meaning that the hierarchy is not as steep nor as negative. In a way that you see in many other countries and i would have never dreamt that would be president of to society. Certainly the american college of cardiology. And that tells you also about the opportunities that you could have in the united states if you make your mark and your selected one another and that was not certainly on mirus game. I was not planning for that in early even mid career but it was a pleasure to serve or we are all very proud of you and thankful for all your mentorship and support throughout the years. We're energized by people. like you. Ambae our trainees. Truly and i think because they keep us young they keep us thinking smart. Because if you're challenging goes on. I challenged my fellow old damage allergy. And i do that in a positive way because we all wanna get better. We all wanna be as invigorated motivated for a better current and a better future decker savvy. Can you share without a seaworld transition into.

american university of beirut Mike path Leeann united states williams american college of cardiology allergy
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

06:14 min | 3 months ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Hello i am dr annabel santos schwartzman. I am a credit allergists that russian oversee medical center but my official title is the medical director of the rush heart center comment as well as vice chief of academic affairs rush university medical center for the section of algae. I've been rushed for thirty one years. And i am also the current cia governor of illinois chapter of the american culture cardiology which is just began. My term and. I'm so excited to be a part of this incredible organization. We are very busy. Doing all kinds of scholarly activities and were often trying to improve diversity and inclusion an equity in the state of illinois as well as the mid west region as a matter of fact one of the best programs that we had was a midwest regional program. It started out as a midwest regional but because of the pandemic with became international because we invited young high school students to see what a female cardiologists does so we featured several midwest cardiologists from all over the midwest such as iowa illinois wisconsin ohio and. This was headed up by dr Medina who was matina. Who was in michigan at the time eventually moved to the cleveland clinic and so she decided to increase the number of women going into cardiology by trying to track them to see what how wonderful women cardiologists are so we featured a day in the life of hard female cardiologists and it was amazing. We had dr clare duvernois from the university of michigan. Really being bad. She had her group of female interventional cardiologists and they looked like the eighteen. Th they looked scary a wonderful video but that was one of the fun things that we did. We are doing other things in the next few years that will try to improve diversity equity inclusion not only in illinois but of course the national american college of cardiology. So i'm really looking forward to being the governor of illinois a c. And one of the best things about being the governor. Is that in chicago alone. We have amazing internationally. Renowned cardiologists including my chief. Dr kim williams who is another african american cardiologists. That the head of cardiology in chicago. And you'll be hearing from another african american chief of cardiology in chicago. Dr clyde yancy. But dr williams is a my boss and i have to give a few wonderful words about him because he is part of the national. Acc diversity equity and inclusion committee. Along with dr. Clark yancy by dr williams is not only my boss but he's my mentor. My colleague was an internet university of chicago. And we've been friends ever since and he started out in a poor neighborhood in chicago and he had asthma and he was no access to care and he really was very upset about that and he decided when he grows up that he was going to be a cardiologist or doctor so that he could try to improve access to care for poor people and african americans so he is a hero to me for doing all the things that he's been doing. We do a lot of things for the west side chicago and he is making some really amazing changes. But another world. Renowned cardiologists is down the road for me. Dr clyde yancy who i know is going to be interviewed here so i'd like to Introduce as one of the members of our illinois chapter of acc. so dr clyde ganzi. The major sat professor of medicine and he's also professor of medical social sciences. He's the chief of the division of cardiology at northwestern university at the feinberg school of medicine. He's also the associate director of the bluhm cardiovascular institute at the northwestern memorial hospital here in chicago. He is a world renowned cardiologist and he has received recognition for clinical and research expertise in the field of had failure anti additional interest in cardiomyopathy heart valve diseases hypertension and prevention. He is an active member of the american heart association past president of that organization and the american college of cardiology american college of physicians. In heart failure society of america he has written over two hundred and fifty pure reviewed manuscripts including numerous book chapters editorials review articles. And he's a consultant for the fda the nih the ahrq the quarry. He has received numerous best physician. Best teaching awards. In addition to that he is one of the most articulate speakers. I have ever heard he is a friend for all of the cardiologists in chicago and we are so fortunate to be among one of his colleagues and chicago because we can always go to him and say. Hey clyde can you speak for one of our conferences. And he always says yes. He is the nicest kindest most warmest cardiologists i've ever met. We are so fortunate to have him here locally in chicago and now with zoom and with webinars he is a frontal everybody in the world so i am so happy to be introducing him for this recording. Thank you so much..

illinois midwest dr williams dr annabel santos schwartzman rush heart center chicago academic affairs rush universi american culture cardiology Dr clyde yancy dr Medina dr clare duvernois national american college of c Dr kim williams Acc diversity equity and inclu Clark yancy cia university of michigan dr clyde ganzi division of cardiology cleveland
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

07:39 min | 3 months ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Right rang eleven. Take it away. i love it so dr. Clive is vice. Dean for diversity. Inclusion chief of cardiology in the department of medicine met district professor and professor of medical social sciences and associate director and north western medicines bluhm cardiovascular institute but research interests are heart failure clinical guideline duration outcome sciences personalized medicine and healthcare disparities. He has extensively published well over five hundred peer reviewed publications and has been named annually as one of the most highly cited scientific authors worldwide. Buttering ansi is deputy editor at jama cardiology and senior section editor for heart failure at the journal of american college of cardiology. He served on the editorial boards for circulation circulation heart failure in the american heart journal and jacquard failure battery. Ansi is a master of american college of cardiology fellow. American heart association. A master of the american college of physicians. Nfl of the heart failure society of america. He asserted on innumerable clinical practice. Guideline writing committees as immediate pasture. The acc h heart failure guideline writing committee co chair for the acc. Diversity inclusion taskforce Is a former president the aj and he really needs no introduction up dnc has so many accolades and we are so honored and so privileged to welcome in here on our podcast today. And we're so excited for this conversation. Welcomed yancey so while lasala back a little bit is nobody needs to start any kind of conversation with those generous introductions. I'm humbled by what everyone has said in. You've been so kind to me. But i think analogies like go and login love to others to determine and i won't own that but what i will is battling this opportunity to visit with you but to tell you that was probably cardio nerd before you guys even born. And i say that because you do this predominantly because you've got such passion. This is really a focus. This is the way your dna has fault. You're cardiologists period whether it's hard failure. General interventional. You are cardiologists in. That's been my life's blood for the last thirty years and been counting some delighted to be a part of this number delighted. I have this conversation because what's really important in which reflects a pivot in the narratives that we've heard so far is that this is a moment that we may never have again. This is an opportunity that we need. Finally finally after decades we can have very purposeful conversations about real inclusion. We can think of intentional activities. That went embraced those that are underrepresented chronology. We can be very specific about the wayne which we want our or professional And a hopes about how we want the world which would live to evolve never before have we had such a lineman purpose of motivation of resources and of talent not me but the talented all of you represent youthful talent talent. That is open. Minded talented is tracking towards a singular goal of creating something better. There was a time where Creating something better didn't appeal me because i simply wanted best period but have matured thought more about it. What's cuba better in the reason why the cardinals is so important in your advocacy for better. Because better has no outside. You can just get better and better and better and better and what. I would encourage you to do within this discussion. And as you go into your next discussions let that be your guiding principles in every production every thought process in every engagement the goal should be. How do we merge from this better. Because i tell you every time you wanted these conversations and you end up in a better place. Imagine where will end up and so. Let's let's get going with this conversation. But let's have fun for just one more second so i heard the music in the music was really intended to be familiar men. It was more than familiar. It was very personal very personal because as we were putting this together in kind of going around the table this with each other what i heard you twenty tell me was not your interest in structural heart disease or general chronology or failure but heard you tell man was this is my passion in life. These mind belan members. This is how i spend my time. This is how i experienced life in baltimore the thing that's so important here is it. We're talking about what's our juice would really minx is. What's what feels are tuning in for me for decades Coming from the deep south coming from south louisiana started playing saxophone in fourth grade. Barnett piano keyboard. When i was in fifth grade music. Music is sitting in here last night. Just finish clinical service putting together my What am i doing. Listening to live recordings for new co jazz festival. You gotta have the juice man. You got to have some juice. You can't just be about the data. You can't just be about the science even though i am you gotta have some juice keeps everything in check in so i was so pleased. Victoria pulled out recorded because it does make remover wind. You that whatever you do neverlands you choose metallurgists Said music is good and that was the perfect preface to this conversation. It was music to my years and we to feel that we are in this unique moment of a cultural revolution and we feel driven to better ourselves harness that energy and direct betterment in the world around us. But i have to say that. Was the first time that anyone's introduction on the cardinals podcast receive the serenade and it's so deserved. We are so honored to have you with us today but really was an interesting choice of music victoria. Dr yancey start talking a little bit about his musical talents. But why were you so driven to add that as the background to the introduction. Well i shows that as an hour to dr. enc's routes is. He mentioned but many people do not know about this. He plays the saxophone with a historically black college university southern university marching band at the sugar bowl and one of the conversations i had with dr. Unc i was like our love for hp vans.

department of medicine medical social sciences and as Buttering ansi jama cardiology journal of american college of american heart journal heart failure heart failure society of ameri acc h heart failure guideline lasala american college of physicians american college of cardiology Clive American heart association yancey Ansi dnc acc Nfl belan
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:37 min | 3 months ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Hardliners. Welcome to this joint. Acc cards narratives and cardiology syrians developed to promote diversity equity and inclusion. This is a collaboration between the cardinals of pennsylvania. Ac chapter and a fels and training section we wanna thank our project mentor is dr katie birla's president for pennsylvania state chapter and doctor know she brings up. Who's the immediate past year for. The fifth section dare roles as mentors advisors allies have been instrumental. Certainly for this project but also for cardi nerves in general soccer locker documents that we cannot thank you enough for all for us. Doctors serena charlot an interventional cardiology fellows at the cleveland clinic. And is helping a steady this project's impact. So thank you serena. We also thanked jennifer ring. Beckmann pennsylvania state champions executive. Can't holly regular chapters project and program for tremendous administrative support in making this a reality. We would never have gotten off the ground without their support. Can we want to especially recognize. Dr pamela douglas for encouraging and empowering Deliberately talk about and promote this important topic friends we thank you for subscribing to and supporting the carter. This podcast is not meant to be used for medical advice. Give us expressed here do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of our employers. Be sure to clean free. Cme credit relevant speaker disclosures are available in the episode description. So would that. My friends join us in coming months on air force cardi as we travel from state to state learning from inspiring faculty and training represented different backgrounds discussing topics they're passionate about and their personal narratives cardi nerds welcome back to the joint. Acc cardi nerds narratives and cardiology series. We had a blast with a massachusetts. Acc chapter last month as we discussed latin x representation and cardiology doctor for your soul danica. And today we're about to land in the illinois to learn about a very important topic underrepresentation in clinical trials with our clancy. Be sure to stay tuned for a special message from annabel volkmann. The chapter governor. Dan as you drop the landing gear. How's the weather down there. Well i if it's a pristine day with a high of seventy one at a low of fifty three folks. Don't forget your umbrellas because the weather will get as exciting as a conversation with some thunderstorms early. In this evening france. Please fasten your seatbelts as we prepare for the runway h. As we make our approach we are so honored and proud to introduce our doctor. Victoria thomas cardiology fellow. At vanderbilt university. Victoria has had a tremendous impact on the cartoonist platform in her capacity as ambassador from vanderbilt in our very first conversation. She told us how passionate she was about. Health equity and her desire to raise awareness around the this through the cards network and platform and we distinctly remember. How electrifying energizing. That conversation was victoria. You have truly elevated the cardi nerds with your energy ingenuity and passion. Thank you thank you. Thank you so much for helping us plan this wonderful session. Welcome thank you guys so much for just having me and just allowing me to share something that i'm super passionate about which is cardiology and health equity. So thank you guys and thank you. All for just being amazing leaders for us nerds so hello into my fellow cardi on earth and i'm very happy to be back enjoying are amazing founders and on it as i said in especially with the super talented northwestern fit representative dr quinton humans. Dr humans is a second year fellow and a chief fellow and the division of cardiology at the northwestern university. Feinberg school of medicine. Dr humans is a clinician. He's an educator and researcher with a passion for health equity mentor ship and promoting diversity in medicine. His work is highlighting racial disparities bias. In medical education has been published in new england journal of medicine and jama internal medicine among many other journals. Most recently he was named one of the twenty twenty one forty under forty leaders in minority health by the national minority quality for him he will pursue further fellowship training and advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology where his research focus will center on the social determinants of health in heart failure and community engaged research for heart player prevention and optimization of treatment. We are delighted to welcome here today. And i'm super excited to meet and talk with dr humans victoria. Thank you so much. Dr thomas i should say you guys. I am so excited to be here. And i am just so grateful for this opportunity to be on the cardio nerds. I'm a cardiac nerve myself at heart and so this is an awesome awesome opportunity. I'm thrilled to be here. I listened to the cardiac nerds podcast. Dr could be the sharma on heff. And i was just like jotting down notes pearls. The entire time you guys are really changing the face of education in twenty twenty one and so. I'm so appreciative of you. All and i'm very excited immensely excited to be able to introduce my career mentor. That their clients. See so glad. He's here today one second. I thought that i was gonna get to introduce him as he definitely has. Played such a huge role in my life and is one of my favorite impressionable mentors. And he's somewhat of a legend or the goat of heart failure to sound like michael jordan. So it's only fitting if you're going to introduce in either least need.

pennsylvania dr katie birla serena charlot jennifer ring Dr pamela douglas cardi Acc Dr humans annabel volkmann Victoria thomas cardiology cleveland clinic cardinals serena danica dr quinton division of cardiology soccer carter vanderbilt university massachusetts
Crystal Loverro Is in a Constant State of Healing

Brain Burrow: Digging Deep into Psychology and Horror

02:11 min | 4 months ago

Crystal Loverro Is in a Constant State of Healing

"So i'm very pleased to welcome on the program today crystal vero and i'm going to hand it over to crystal with the typical open ended question. Who exactly is crystal aveiro. I think you saw for having me market so pleasure to be here So who am i. Let's say well. I am an actor. A model of producer martial artist acting is my first and most passionate love in terms of what i consider myself and what i do. I grew up in binghamton new york. Which is upstate our south of syracuse. For those weren't super familiar with new york city so i started my career In college in psychology. That's why like super excited to be here because psychology is also huge huge. Love of mine sweitzer. Before i decided chase my dreams an actor so Yeah i got i. I went to courtland It's also in upstate. New york kind of a small town. Not a lot of people know about. But i there for year For psychology and then i transferred to binghamton university. Which is from my hometown on. And i switched over to neuro science. And i ended up graduating with a bachelor's of science and neuroscience. While i was there i did a lot of research on parkinson's disease. Actually the shirt. I'm wearing worked for the podcast. It's big brain. I got it from science twenty-six teen which is awesome neuroscience convention We were in san diego so after i graduated My thoughts words to go to med school to either be neurologist or cardiology list but you know as much as i love medicine and i was an emt and loved. The i loved the field. I didn't find myself very fulfilled. Feel like it was what i was destined to do

Sweitzer Binghamton Syracuse Parkinson's Disease Binghamton University New York City Upstate New York San Diego
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:17 min | 5 months ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"One of the rising co chairs of the elements that chapter here she is a native californian near los angeles was valedictorian overclass. She went to harvard college and studied neurobiology. She's now part of the medical scientist training program at stanford and like the rest of us. She's an ardent advocate for the cause. And i absolutely wanted to have her on with us. Also as an aside even though she's interested in the neuro sciences. She said that she says sponge and definitely open to the possibility of doing cardiology. So it was wonderful to have you here karen. This is our chance pablo. I'm i'm taking the shot. i'm not missing. I will take another shot. I will say that. At brigham and women's hospital. There is an interesting thing that happens on occasion we have preliminary neurology interns and for some reason. They magically get converted into cardiologists. So one of my co chief residents actor amy miller who was such a neurology pre limb back in the day switched from not only just pre limb but to a catechal residency and then actually went on to become a co chief. Residents of cardiology bilo ended electrophysiology. Both those comments. I think there still is hope for us to recruit karen to our side for south. Thank you so much for not very warm introduction pablo it truly a such an honor to be here and to be with all of you and to just i. Just feel so inspired. We're actually doing our cardio block right now. Medical skull so this has become my new favorite buck rapid interpretation and finding a lot of similarities between the neuronal potential and the cardiac one. We have gap junctions neurologist. Synapses we have gap junctions. So i guess soccer still doing it at first question i wanted to ask is what was the moment. We decided that you could or would go and become a cardiologist. Is a great question. So i think i. I became interested in cardiology as an undergraduate. Were i took a preventive cardiology course and it was just. I found it very interesting. I it was my senior year. I took it. And i think i would s- pass innate by the public health aspects of cardiovascular disease and how important of an illness that was in our country sort of left it aside and then a right now where you are i was taking my cardiovascular pathophysiology course i really just fell in love with the elegant. The heart as a pump and with low through tubes through the vessels been smooth muscles and relaxation and the elegance of the cascades that were were occurring on the cellular level. And how could see it feel it. Not that there's anything wrong with kidney. I love the kidney. We couldn't use diuretics without it. But i just something about being able to see in much aspects of the cardiovascular system i think from an intellectual standpoint was when i became interested when i thought i could him later that came after i met folks at brigham and women's hospital and saw people that looked like me as cardiologists. And maybe i had steamed some on colleges. That would have been an oncologist instead. But i met some incredible cardiologists that you may know. So david aggie loud. Currently at cardiologists in texas. Dr eldridge lewis is now the chief of cardiology a small hospital on the west coast. Somewhere pablo did you know where that could be had. No i think it ryan swith manned ford earlier and then all dr michelle again. An illustration cardiologists at ucsf and president elect of the american heart association..

texas los angeles eldridge lewis amy miller karen ucsf Both harvard college first question one david aggie One president ryan swith pablo american heart association michelle californian brigham and women's hospital stanford
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

03:32 min | 5 months ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"From stanford university and dr maria abon is a general cardiology fellow and cardinals embassador for brigham and women's hospital pablo and maria. Thank you thank you. Thank you so much for helping us. Kick off this amazing series. No thank you. I am so so excited to be here especially in such great company. Yeah i getting to catch up with one of my mentors talking about a very important topic. Among the a lovely cardi nerds family am just immolated. So all of us are very excited to have dr financial donya as faculty expert here and i'll tell you a bit more about him. So dr sub daniele deaton for students at harvard medical school. He received his bachelor's degree from stanford university and then moved to boston where he obtained his medical degree from harvard. Medical school then masters in public health from the harvard school of public health. He was chief resident and cardiovascular medicine fellow at brigham women's hospital he then went on to become faculty as a general cardiologist at the brigham and was one of the associate program directors for the internal medicine program where he was a tireless advocate and adviser for many residents which is when i first met him and additionally a very important point faculty for minority recruitment efforts at the medical school his have substantial commitment to diversity. He served as faculty assistant dean for student affairs in the office of recruitment and multicultural affairs. He received the excellence in diversity and inclusion award from harvard medical school as well as a faculty development and diversity pillow award from the brigham is being awarded recognitions from the double amc for his mentorship and commitment to medical students. And i mean the rest of his panoply of teaching and mentorship awards are too numerous to count. But needless to say that he's been a guiding light for legions of students residents and fellows under the harvard medical school umbrella including myself. So welcome dr selena and before we go on because we have very many interesting questions for you. I just wanted to share a short story about how i meant that for. I am a frigid fellow at the brigham. So i moved to austin. Maybe you know a few months ago in the last summer and as we all know moving to a new city hospital is tough and imagine during epidemic ziegler harder to get to know the people that work in these douchen. Also the cardiology department at the brigham is huge. Pablo after solano. So i am very ashamed to confess that i did not know of the existence of their donya until one day he actually send me an email. Just introducing himself and saying hey maria i know there are not very many latin expositions in cardiology. And i just wanted to reach out and say hello and back. Email meant a lot to me as latina trainee because as you guys discussed in one of your prior episodes you can't be can't see and hear it as denver students reaching out to me to make sure i knew i was not alone in this past after that we went for a coffee socially distance coffee then he told me about. His trajectory gave me some career advice. Put me in contact with dr. Not matter and that i got to meet her through zoom and now has also become a huge role model for me so i just wanted to share this story because i think that really speaks to the kind of man that he has the maria. I think i was probably more excited. Any time that i i see lat next name that i don't know i just really thrilled. That there's somebody else that's community and it was really amazing to be able to chat with you and to hear your story and really proud to have you as part of the cardiologists humidity but more specifically brigham cardiology. Can you thank you and so struck by maria. Had met dr solana you. I don't know what the typical schedule for a dean looks like..

Pablo boston selena pablo dr financial donya austin maria first one brigham stanford university last summer harvard school dr few months ago harvard maria abon harvard medical harvard medical school sub daniele deaton
George Floyd's brother sheds tears on the stand

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

George Floyd's brother sheds tears on the stand

"George Floyd's brother testified in the trial in Minneapolis of the former police officer accused in his death he's the younger brother in the family aloneness Neil below it he testified he looked up to his Big Brother and George Floyd looked out for him he used to make the best banana mayonnaise sandwiches and he used to make syrup sandwiches because George can cook the prosecution showed colonus Floyd a picture of his mother with a young boy was my older brother Joe likes it yes both also doctor Jonathan rich a cardiology expert echoed earlier witnesses testifying it wasn't a drug overdose or a heart condition that killed George Boyd it was the truly the prone restraint and positional restraints that led to his at sixty ation take from court TV I met Donahue

George Floyd Colonus Floyd Minneapolis Jonathan Rich Neil George Boyd George JOE Donahue
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:52 min | 7 months ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"There's also a lot of great things you learn in private practice that are important for leadership later. We never had a class of medical school on leadership and i never learned anything in residency or fellowship about leadership. Either learn a lot of that do experience. Some of that's not necessarily doing it the right way and in finding out what works for you so a lot of times trying to achieve associate professor professor reuven chair or dean something that's better suited for when your kids are older. And you're more in your mid career or even your early late career. Thank you so much for bringing that up daca lunberg. I think this is an issue that really hits home for a lot of us. There was a really nice women as one webinar about parental leave policies and there was one thing that was said that really stuck with me and that was daca. Sharon hayes the pretext. I think for a lot of fuss even taking a small handful of weeks off from work as fellows. You just feel so guilty right. I mean you're not taking it off to go party or taking it off to take care of your baby and do the right thing and be there for your family but you still feel so guilty like i should be in a catholic. I should be reading about cornerback. Vascular disease and all these things but docker hey said something along the lines of thinking back over the prospective late career person it's such a small blip in time you know even if you take months off it's such a small blip in time in that you can still recover from it and still advance and accomplish great things and so i heard that when i was taking my own. Parental leave and really was comforting. That it's okay to take a little bit of time for your family and then come back to your career and you can still do amazing things afterwards so it really meant a lot to hear that from somebody like her and you will and it's so true because you can't get that time with your kids back you know. Once they go off to college in move out of the house in they're adults now you can't go be like. Oh but i wanna go to your ballet recital..

daca lunberg Sharon hayes one thing one webinar reuven
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"She has been chosen as a castle. Connolly top doctor from multiple years and most recently in very impressively she was elected to be chair of the women cardiology counsel for the nationally. C c in addition to that. She has a strong social media. Presence was chosen as a top ten female cardiologists on social media. She has been interviewed on cnn and usa today on heart disease in women and has published numerous articles chapters on the subject as well overall. She'd been a mentor to many women cardiology throughout her career. And we are so honored and excited to be able to hear more about her journey. So welcome again doctor. Lemberg thank you. So much serena sadako lunberg. You have been a strong and consistent advocate for both women's cardiovascular health and women in cardiology and as an advocate you've had tremendous impact on patients in mideast really at all levels from the local to the global. Let's begin this conversation with a local. You establish the very first women's heart program in the state of georgia in nineteen ninety eight. Can you tell us the why. And how. I can't imagine that women's heart programs were very common back then. We'll know they weren't in fact at that point. There were no go red for women campaigns or red dresses. None of that. I had been in private practice in the atlanta area. Since nineteen ninety four in for i was seen women who presented really with classic Engine symptoms heaviness pressure tightness in the chest and they had been told repeatedly by different physicians. You know it's your stomach it's reflux it's your nerves. Go home a take a bubble bath. You just need to de stress and many times. These women had never even had any k j let alone being sent for a stress test in. I felt that it was an injustice. And i was very frustrated by it all so i went to my partners instead. I think that A role i could fill is starting to women's heart program and they kind of scratch their heads and said well. What would you do just like take care of all the women with fluky chest. Pain in mitral valve prolapse on and i said we'll know. Obviously there is so much more going on women. Have scheming of women have heart. Disease entity were intrigued by it and in nineteen ninety eight. I started the women's heart center with cardiovascular associates in georgia and at the time it was a little strange. it wasn't well known at all. There were maybe ten in the whole country but as things progressed in the late nineties anti thousands. We started to get more information about heart disease in women. How was overlooked under-treated. There were really no sex specific guidelines at that time and around two thousand three two thousand four. The american heart association started go red for women campaign in over the years you know it became trendy or to have a womens heart program. Answer there are many of them. Every state generally has a few. And i was working out of saint joseph's hospital in atlanta and then around two thousand twelve became part of the emory healthcare system. We didn't have a clinical program although they had tremendous research going on of course with doctrine net winger. And at that time. Dr leslie shaw was still at emory. They had fabulous education in research. They didn't really have a clinical program said they brought me on board is the clinical director. And i've been at emory ever since. That's incredible dr lunberg. I'm remembering back to our conversation with docker monette winger when we discussed the past present and future of women's cardiovascular health and just hearing your experience and your work at emory..

leslie shaw georgia atlanta late nineties ten Lemberg emory first Connolly both serena sadako lunberg today nineteen ninety eight around two thousand cnn four lunberg two thousand around two thousand twelve thousands
Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

Cardionerds

03:07 min | 8 months ago

Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

"Thought we could start by discussing some of your major contributions to the management of atrial fibrillation even since my medical school days. It seems like the emphasis. On lifestyle management for diseases such as atrial fibrillation has increased exponentially as we learn more about arrhythmia mechanisms and now we specifically screen patients for sleep apnea diet alcohol use et cetera. So from all of the landmark clinical research that you've conducted over your career. That's far could you. Maybe summarize for us. What you feel are the biggest takeaways whether in eighth hundred prevention or in any of your other areas that sudden cardiac death. Thank you when i started doing. Research on the epidemiology of heart rhythm disorders really wasn't an emphasis as you say on. Risk factors for h. fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. And then you know a group of us not just myself but amelia benjamin in the premium study and patrick eleanor. We all started to get interested in looking at atrial fibrillation as you would cardiovascular disease and some of the major findings are really related to lifestyle and how it can impact each relation including body mass index. And wait and wait reduction. We've done several studies. One who first authors tetreault who's also electro physiologist at brigham women's hospital and she published a very important study in jack. Where we showed in bunks women. Even being slightly overweight had elevated to risk of fibrillation. And then if you lost weight you lower that risk. And in addition some of the other research we did was around. Exercise and showing that exercise is beneficial to atrial fibrillation. But as we all know too much. Exercise can actually have an adverse effect and this again was a study that was done by tony acer who was also an electro physiologist and his now at nyu worked with me for a while. So both of those manuscripts were very important. With regards management of atrial fibrillation. In addition we also published one of the first studies looking at alcohol intake and h fibrillation. Now there have been multiple multiple studies showing that alcohol is related to atrial fibrillation. And as you know a randomized trial now that shows that if you abstained from alcohol you lower your risk of atrial fibrillation so all of these studies are not just by myself but multiple. Investigators have really changed the practice where we as clinicians think about lowering. Risk factors as electra physiologists event and approach sanders. Work in australia really took it to another level by actually doing clinical trial in showing that reduction of weight and modifying risk factors lowers incidence of atrial fibrillation. So now it's really one of our pillars of treatment and it is rewarding to see something go from observational research to clinical trials in actually to

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiac Death Amelia Benjamin Patrick Eleanor Tetreault Brigham Women's Hospital Apnea Tony Acer Cardiovascular Disease NYU Sanders Australia
Heart problems may be rare in pro athletes after COVID-19

Morning Edition

00:57 sec | 8 months ago

Heart problems may be rare in pro athletes after COVID-19

"The new cardiac study shows professional athletes who contracted covert 19 were able to return to competition safely and without signs of heart disease, NPR's Tom Goldman reports. The study published in JAMA cardiology involved 789 athletes diagnosed with Covert 19 They were for Major League Baseball, the NFL NBA W NBA Major League Soccer and the National Hockey League on Lee five of the 789 later head. Inflammatory heart disease. Three with my own card itis, too, with pericarditis. None of the athletes had been seriously ill with covered 19, but the five with cardiac disease had more severe initial covered symptoms. Concerns about heart problems came up last year as sports leagues debated whether or not to play during the pandemic. Despite the positive news about professionals, the study says similar research is needed for youth, college and masters level athletes. Tom Goldman NPR

Tom Goldman Inflammatory Heart Disease Jama Cardiology Nba Major League NPR National Hockey League Major League Baseball NBA NFL Soccer LEE
Heart problems may be rare in pro athletes after COVID-19

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:59 sec | 8 months ago

Heart problems may be rare in pro athletes after COVID-19

"There's good news for professional athletes infected with the coronavirus. Almost all athletes involved. The new cardiac study were able to return to play safely with no evidence of heart disease. Been a concern in sports during the pandemic is NPR's Tom Goldman reports. The study published in JAMA cardiology involved 789 athletes Diagnosed with Covert 19 They were for Major League Baseball, the NFL NBA W NBA Major League Soccer and the National Hockey League on Lee five of the 789 later head. Inflammatory Heart disease. Three with my own card itis, too, with pericarditis. None of the athletes had been seriously ill with covert 19, but the five with cardiac disease had more severe initial covered symptoms. Concerns about heart problems came up last year as sports leagues debated whether or not to play during the pandemic. Despite the positive news about professionals, the study says similar research is needed for youth, college and masters level

Tom Goldman Cardiac Disease Jama Cardiology Nba Major League NPR National Hockey League Major League Baseball NBA NFL Soccer LEE
Learn How to Break Away From the Pack & Standout In a Busy Marketplace with Dr. Joel Kahn

Healthcare Business Secrets

05:17 min | 9 months ago

Learn How to Break Away From the Pack & Standout In a Busy Marketplace with Dr. Joel Kahn

"Welcome to healthcare business. Secrets show where we interview industry leaders and break down exactly how they dominated the markets you can live from the best and can w revenue w impact and w time off and this episode was speaking. Joel can joel. Otherwise known as america's healthy hot dog is a graduate of the university of michigan. School of medicine is a clinical professor of medicine at wayne state university school of medicine a frequent lecturer and author on topics of vegan nutrition health heart disease reversal and has written several books about alternative nutrition and hothouse. He's had been a guest and commentator amy. Tv shows podcasts. Magazines m practices at the concept of a cardiac longevity is very unpracticed in michigan. Welcome to the show joe. Thank you so much excited to share with the audience. Yeah so i wanted to kind of give out with some background on you. And and how you got into the space because you've kind of gone down a different role than maybe stanford medicine and things teaches. Unfortunately not because of any time in the in the slammer or any problems with my license in a somewhat thoughtful various er- pigeon Course but i grew up in detroit michigan Talking now from the suburb in detroit michigan attended university in ann arbor. Michigan graduated top of my class medical school. But i knew from about a swallow wanted to be a heart moved to dallas moved to kansas city out and training with the best skills and particularly treating heart attacks with angioplasty instead. You have some wonderfully people from australia. New zealand in the my mentor in kansas city was from all actually a dislike from new zealand allah but when visit i'll be of the difference between the do another very different entry but nineteen ninety way before you were born. I imagine or at least run it. I join back in detroit. Michigan big practice. And i was the guy running a night treating sick people coronary Cardiac cath lab artists. But i was even back then very interested in the other part the About our of health which is prevention nutrition. Lifestyles sleep stress. Nutraceutical supplements the whole thing. Much more light perhaps naturopathy and chiropractic. So i was always reading on my own incorporating little tidbits been using coenzyme q ten of people for thirty years my college or and then i'll percolating along as very happy guy got a chance to look down to. The university mentioned developed a preventive cardiology program. But i knew that there was something else that i really had an energy for something else. I mean that was doing wonderful. Things are day is the same thing every day. When wonderful big over i went back to university in two thousand twelve a whole year doing a university based courses integrative cardiology natural gas and pretty much nutrition thing adnan stunning that for decades. But i didn't know all the nutraceutical isn't about chemistry testing and the epa genetics and the protonix and we can use fancy words. I graduated and of course. I say in traditional practice but i ultimately with some thought took a big breath five years ago and says you know what i've done enough cath lab emergencies. That mouse running three hassles on the weekend alone. A great practice. I one focus on prevention and i looked around the country. I could barely find in the united states preventive cardiology practice. That was not attuned to only prescription. Drugs are printing preventive cardiology practices more precision more prescription. I wanted to about more health lifestyle disease reversal. I gleaned from various people what i could kinda created a model. I left the insurance system. You wanna have a sleepless night. As a physician who's always had a whole room full of baylor's and medicare and blue cross as we call in the united states and others and tell people in the city of detroit that is not beverly hills los angeles by a reasonably prosperous busy city with auto industry. But i don't take insurance. I can't even take your insurance them out of the system and launched in five years ago and yes. There's always challenges. My tears thought that maybe. I did. Have alcohol rounds. Drug problem slices. Is he doing all as they didn't understand. It has been the best decision. I don't think would have been as meaningful if i didn't pay the price. All those years of doing traditional medicine I'm respected because know what heart catheterization angioplasty bypass Medications use them when needed by I'm very much dedicate myself as upstream cardiologists. I'm the salmon trying to go upstream. Everybody else is going the other direction. But there's a lot of people out there and you know. I i'm sure for practice that are looking or a different path. They're just tired and they feel tired too many drugs too. Many ten minute appointments with dr the game now. It's a good nurse or a physician since i've provided alternative of time education a different approach. And it's so gratifying. Amin that i'm sixty one years old. I don't know what the word retires. Because i love what i do day after day today

Detroit Michigan Wayne State University School Kansas City New Zealand University Of Michigan United States School Of Medicine Joel Heart Disease Ann Arbor Heart Attacks AMY JOE Dallas Adnan Australia EPA
Nuclear and Multimodality Imaging  Coronary Ischemia

Cardionerds

04:44 min | 9 months ago

Nuclear and Multimodality Imaging Coronary Ischemia

"Welcome back everyone. It's time for car. Dealers go nuclear with today's discussion about the multitude of clinical utilities of nuclear cardiovascular imaging within the broader context of multi modality imaging. We are just so thrilled to be joined by our imaging nerds colleagues doctors. Eric hut elbow skinny and wild jaber erica. It gives me so much joy heavy back on our audience will remember you from our cleveland clinic. Cnc are episode episode number. Seventy six on our patient with spontaneous. Pap ruptured related to vascular. Eller donald syndrome so for everyone. Erica was born and raised in costa rica where she received her medical degree from university. Costa rica she trained in internal medicine at the cleveland clinic. Where fortunately for us. She couples matched to stay here for cardiology along with mr dr. Eric hut aka jose. Aguirre truly power couple. Erdo will be staying here for cardiovascular imaging fellowship at beyond being clinical and a research powerhouse. Erica is a leader within the program as her classes fell representative erika. Thanks for joining us high. And it's a pleasure to be back. Thank you for that very kind introduction. I gotta say that. It's thanks to my mentors family and friends that i'm where i am today and i'm more than excited to introduce one of those individuals. Although skin on the cardiovascular imaging fellow at brigham and women's hospital he obtained his medical degree from Willing willingness swallow and completed his internal medicine residency including chief year at cleveland clinic and then moved on to cardiovascular fellowship at this institution although not only a spurt clinician and a researcher but also an exceptional mentor and a friend. And i actually met all during my interview at ccf when he was achieved I blame him. For recruiting me and six more latin americans to my residency class all of which actually became very close friends on one. My husband so thank you all for guiding my steps and really molding future so got. Thank you for those kind words. We have great times back into clinic. Both control mason in the work hard to try to you to the clinic somber. Happy that's the case. You're following through the path of of imaging so an amid. Thank you for the invitation diseases. Great session we're looking forward to do these for some time. So he's my to pressure to actually introduce the doco alligator book. Java's attended cardiologists at the cleveland clinic. He's director of new collapse. And director of the core lab. For the cleveland clinic. But beyond that the jerry's is is a friend of father to me as a person who has been all the way through. My journey in cardiology now could imaging in half neural networks expressed Grateful i am to have him in my life. We call him l. hefei just as a way to show him respect and gratitude and show him how we like him hale. Thank you so much for these kind words. now thank you for having a Show in guys is basically. There's no better time to spend your saturday this except of course watching boss place football but again. It's you know you look at these at yourself and you hear these words you think of yourself thank you all feel old inspect only comes with age and thank you guys old florida or not. Only keeping us always up to date but fighting us and You started shows again how you can change the way. We actually learn medicine. Cardiology from an up down up down way of delivering information. What everybody's waiting for the people in gray hair sitting in now. Beautiful offices in universities threatening us web to waiting for them to come up with a verdict every four or five years guidelines versus you taking this down to the level of practicing and cardiologists toward actually in training or early career and disseminating information. Because you can reflect. Shine the light on. The most important issues is face every day clinics and in the hospital home floors globally with the pandemic and then you can also actually at transcend all these rigid structures. We developed over the past. Maybe thousands of years cardiology and make these structures louis invade democrat. So thank you so much that and there's nobody that person actually reflect this new method or way of learning than erica. Erica is amazing amazing. Amazing human being an amazing physician. And i for the feel fuelling vitals of had in my life over the past two years have been at the cleveland clinic. It's such a pleasure to spend after

Cleveland Clinic Eric Hut Jaber Erica Eller Donald Mr Dr Eric Hut Aka Jose Erdo Erica Brigham And Women's Hospital Aguirre Erika Costa Rica Cleveland CCF Hefei Mason Hale Jerry Football
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

04:56 min | 10 months ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Nod and a shoutout to pam. Thanks hello i'm melissa. Our associate professor of medicine in the division of cardiology at duke university. I feel fortunate to know dr douglas. Not only as a colleague but also as a mentor. Our research collaborator and a friend. There's no doubt that. Dr douglas has made an indelible. Mark on the field of cardiology through her groundbreaking work in cardiac imaging women's cardiovascular health and structural heart disease which is set the standards for clinical and research practices today. But what. I'm most of is her unwavering commitment to support in cultivate the careers of junior investigators especially women. She's unselfish with her time. And it's been over a cup of coffee or a homemade dinner. That she's encouraged me and i know countless others to think and innovate dr. Douglas is undeniably a luminary in cardiology whose tireless efforts have opened doors for many and as a result it's made our field more innovative equitable and diverse. My name is gerald bloomfield and am a cardiologists at duke university and the do clinical research institute. I've had the pleasure of working with dr pam. Douglas both clinically and research projects for over a decade. One of the first things that struck me about docker douglas's approach..

division of cardiology dr douglas Dr douglas structural heart disease duke university pam melissa Mark gerald bloomfield Douglas do clinical research institute dr pam docker douglas
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

04:36 min | 10 months ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Everyone feel included and welcomed with cards narratives in cardiology series. We want to celebrate the individual differences. That make us stronger as a community simply as dr. Douglas said we want everyone to feel like they can get on that dance floor and dance like nobody's watching because this is your community with that. Let's get on with the show with our very first narratives in cardiology episode and learn from dr pamela douglas about both diversity and inclusion as well as her personal narrative eyemouth before we start the show we have a very special message from a very very young cardia nerds fan. Happy new year's cards. Welcome back promoting diversity and inclusion has always been a part of our mission since we launched. It's amazing to say about a year ago. Now today we get to kick off a long running series to help us do just that and who better to help us get started then. Dr pamela douglas. An absolute authority in this area among many other areas dr douglas. It's always a privilege for us to introduce our guests. But honestly i couldn't figure out where to start for your intro looking back through all of your accolades and experiences and everything you've done. I honestly was feeling a bit intimidated and was very happy. When i got a message from a dear colleague who told me about all the impact you've had on her both professionally and personally and so. I was very quick to ask her. Hey would you like to help us. Introduce dr douglas and she was very honored to do so high cartons. My name is vanessa. Bloomer and second year cardiology fellow duke university medical center. I have been given the honour and very difficult task of introducing someone. Who needs no introduction. Dr pamela douglas is someone i greatly admire. It is impossible to mention all her accomplishments and contributions to the field in this brief introduction because simply she has done it all as a woman leader in cardiovascular medicine she has been a true pioneer and has excelled in all areas science academic leadership and professional societal positions as part of her academic leadership roles she served as the co director of the echo lab and the director of the cardiology fellowship program at university of pennsylvania and then was director of noninvasive cardiology at beth. Israel deaconess medical center later. Dr douglas served as chief of cardiovascular medicine at the university of wisconsin and then was appointed chief of cardiovascular medicine at duke university medical center her stellar participation. In professional societies has granted. Her several groundbreaking roles. She is past president of both the american society of echo. Cardiology and the american college of cardiology yet. I must highlight. She was the first woman to serve as an asc president and was the second woman to serve as president of the american college of cardiology legend. Has it that. She was also an olympic torch carrier. Dr douglas luminary in our field with over five hundred. Peer reviewed publications. She's reknowned for her scientific and policy work in improving the quality and appropriateness of imaging and has been among the forerunners in a number of other areas including heart disease in women..

dr douglas Dr pamela douglas dr pamela douglas cardia duke university medical center Douglas echo lab cardiology fellowship program Bloomer Dr douglas vanessa american society of echo deaconess medical center american college of cardiology university of pennsylvania university of wisconsin beth Israel Dr douglas luminary asc
Diabetes Mellitus with Dr. Dennis Bruemmer

Cardionerds

05:21 min | 11 months ago

Diabetes Mellitus with Dr. Dennis Bruemmer

"Take hardy and hurts summit clear so excited for this installment of our cardiovascular prevention series with the deep dive into diabetes. Which i think you'll learn by the end of the episode is so important for us. Be attention to. We're joined by a phenomenal and true. Genuine in the field. Dr dennis brumer hughes. The director of the center for cardia met about health in the section of preventive cardiology and rehabilitation. At the cleveland clinic. Dr boomer earned his md and degrees from the university of hamburg in germany following residency training in internal medicine and cardiology in berlin docker boomer completed a research fellowship as the diabetes center fellow in the department at ucla. He is board certified in internal medicine and chronology hardy vascular disease and cardiac graffiti quite a unique combination. Dr boomers research is focused on mechanisms of atherosclerosis and risk factor intervention for the prevention of coronary artery disease soccer. It's such a pleasure to invite you to the show success. have you on. And as i invite you. I'm going to just reflect on your unique training path and we were just discussing before we started recording. Here that there's going to be a probably a lot of interest. In pursuing some sort of combined die batali cardiovascular education for court in the future. But would you mind just telling us how you got interested in really devoting yourself to cardio metabolic disease and diabetes in general. Absolutely am so first of all i. I'm super thrilled to be here. And i i'm so excited to be talking to the nerds here tonight so i. I think it's phenomenal. What you guys are doing and again. I very much appreciate the opportunity here so so i was. I'm kind of bridge between endocrinology in cardiology back in germany. I did my thesis. Actually in endocrinology lie protein metabolism. And that kind of got me interested in cardiology. I went to pursue cardiology training back in germany and then research fellowship at ucla. I was supposed to go back after that to germany. But i decided to stay and then obviously being a foreign Repeated training and i was always torn between the endocrine in preventive cardiology aspect than truecar ideologies. So i ultimately decided. I'm just gonna do both so. I did endocrinology fellowship and cardiologist fellowship by the university of kentucky. I had a phenomenal time. There and kind of still even now much of what we do in cardiology is really prevention. And that much of it. This endocrinology so i think these sub specialties really are complementary in or very closely together but let me say on behalf of everyone here at the clinic. How glad we are that. You decided not to go back and stayed here. Join us over here as a faculty because you've just added tremendous value to the program and you've been such an incredible resource for all of us. Thank you for being here. Yes dr burin. And i extend that thank you. Because you know you've stayed here. We are talking to the nerds. I think this is a totally fortunate. And i am really happy to benefit from your stay here now. We are very excited to dive into cardio dive tallahassee which begs the question dr boomer we are cardio nerds why should cardiologists focus on diabetes. I mean why not. Just refer are diabetic patients to endocrinologist or leave the to their primary care doctors. Yeah i think. I think that's kind of the common theme and that is the current care. We leave it to others in cardiology. Now i think that is sub optimal. I think we as cardiologists we see these patients all the time i mean when is ever a patient. In the cath. Lab that presents with an semi or stemming that doesn't have diabetes so we do see the far spectrum of this disease of cardiovascular complications that arise of having ama- diagnosis of diabetes. So i think we have to be involved in managing this. I think to a minimum. We should referred patients to primary care or make sure that the diabetes is. What managed or console endocrinology now as as we all know as physicians quite frequently. Not even that happens so and there's good evidence for that if you look at registries just about six percent of diabetic patients with cardiovascular disease actually get appropriate care for their diabetes and cardiovascular conditions as you know that vitas says associated with the two to four fold increase in risk it is a cardiovascular risk equivalent termed many many years ago seventy percent of our acute coronary syndrome patients have diabetes. So you you could argue. Yes we leave it to primary care but or the endocrinologist but keep in mind that endocrinologists currently see about five percent of the patient population with diabetes.

Diabetes Dr Dennis Brumer Hughes Center For Cardia Dr Boomer Germany Cardio Metabolic Disease Ucla University Of Hamburg Cleveland Clinic Vascular Disease Batali Hardy Atherosclerosis Coronary Artery Dr Burin Berlin Soccer University Of Kentucky Cardiovascular Complications Tallahassee
Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Heart Disease?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

06:22 min | 11 months ago

Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Heart Disease?

"There i'm monica rhino. And you are. Listening to the nutrition diva podcast. Welcome this week. We're talking about the latest study to throw shade on artificial sweeteners. A study published last month in the journal of the american college of cardiology found. That soda drinkers have a higher risk of heart disease than those who do not drink sweetened beverages now the association between sugar consumption and heart disease risk is not new as a person's sugar intake increases so does their risk of cardiovascular disease and this association by the way is seen regardless of the age the body weight or the exercise habits of the person even among those with otherwise healthy diets. Lots of fruits and vegetables lean meat whole grains and that sort of thing heart disease risk increases with added sugar intake. The more surprising thing about this study however was that those who drank a lot of sweden soda had the same elevated risk as people who drank a lot of sugar sweetened soda. The risk of heart disease was about one third higher among those who were high consumers of either type of soda compared to low consumers that means if ten out of one hundred low consumers developed heart disease than thirteen out of one hundred high consumer would. So let's talk a little bit about how sugar can hurt your health. Those who consume more added. Sugars are more likely to be overweight. And that certainly contributes to heart disease risk. But even when you're not overweight a diet high in sugar can raise your triglycerides levels. That's the amount of fat that is circulating in your bloodstream. It may also lead to fatty deposits in the liver and these could be some of the mechanisms that would explain the link between sugar intake and heart disease risk but none of that explains how artificial sweeteners might increase cardiovascular risk. And that's the real mystery here. There's no obvious mechanism to explain how artificial sweeteners might hurt. Your heart and this is not the first mystery regarding zero calorie sweeteners. Despite being low in sugar and calories artificial sweetener us has been linked with increasing rates of diabetes and obesity. Now early on theories were proposed to try to explain this. Maybe we thought the sweet taste somehow tricks the body into responding as if it is actually sugar or perhaps artificial sweeteners. Increase our appetite or make us crave sugar research designed to test. Those theories has so far. Come up empty handed. Well not completely empty handed but as is so often. The case research in humans fails to bear out preliminary findings in lab rats. The best theory. We have at the moment to explain. This apparent paradox is that the artificial sweeteners might change the makeup of our gut. Microbiome in ways that promote weight gain or diabetes and unlike the other hypotheses there is some human research to support this and perhaps something similar is underlying this latest finding regarding heart disease. But i think the larger point here is that the data consistently contradict the notion that artificial sweeteners are somehow healthier or perhaps less unhealthy than sugar. Both are fine in moderation of course but high consumption of either one. Either sugar or artificial sweeteners is linked to poorer health outcomes. The keyword here of course is linked as the artificial sweetener industry would very much like to remind everyone correlation is not causation and most of the data that we have on this question our observational. They come from big epidemiological studies that look at dietary patterns and health outcomes over long stretches of time and that sort of steady cannot prove that artificial sweeteners cause any of those health problems but they do often seem to be nearby when these problems occur so should we quit drinking soda. Do we need to change what we're doing based on this latest research. I think that really depends on what you're doing if you occasionally have a diet soda. I don't think you have anything to worry about for that matter if you occasionally have a regular soda. I don't think that's cause for alarm either. But if you're drinking soda whether regular or diet on a daily basis that might be more of a concern aside from whatever affects the sugar or the artificial. Sweeteners are having on your body. Sweetened foods and beverages whether they're sweetened with sugar or with artificial sweeteners. Don't contribute much nutrition to your diet and they may easily crowd more nutritious foods out of your diet. The point is that reaching pry diet soda instead of a regular soda doesn't really constitute a nutritional upgrade if you really want a healthier alternative choose water or sparkling water and by the same token if you're looking for a healthier sweet treat a piece of fresh or dried fruit is going to be a choice than an artificially sweetened brownie or ice cream. My advice is to exercise the same degree of moderation with sweeteners. As you would with added sugars now as you recall the guidelines for added sugars are to limit them to about twenty five grams per day. And remember we don't count the naturally occurring sugars in fruit or dairy products towards that total. But we do include honey molasses maple syrup and other so-called natural sweeteners. So what does that translate to in terms of artificial sweeteners. The equivalent of twenty five grams per day in a non caloric sweetener would be about three packets or one diet soda per day

Cardiovascular Disease Monica Rhino Heart Disease Risk Journal Of The American Colleg Diabetes Sweden Obesity
Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

Latina to Latina

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

"That they're almost thank you so much for doing this. I would thank you. I am happy to be here. Your mom's Costa Rican. Puerto Rican growing up. What were the messages? You got about Healthy Living actually we did not talk about Healthy Living. I really the only thing I could really remember my dad saying was no too fast foods. So we always ate at home. He felt that fast foods were unhealthy. So the rice and beans and meat, you know, lots of plantains, you know, that's just how I grew up very traditional in culturally food-wise and nobody ever went to the gym. I mean that was unheard of growing up your parents, especially your dad like so many immigrants parents really big on the value of Education was the dream always to be a doctor. I always say my father brainwashed me ever since I was in first grade. He said look, the only way to progress in the United States is to get a diploma get a degree get some sort of recognition through education. He gave me three choices. He goes you either become a doctor a lawyer engineer pick one song. I just want to tell you every one's listening right now and raising their hand cuz it's like yeah. Those are those are the options. So I kept hearing that of course as a kid, you're like, oh God now, he's known knowing me and you know, I just want to be a kid, but I did realize probably around fourth or fifth grade that I was actually achieving significant goals and scores things came not easily but with studying and hard work, I think there was a positive impact. So that was a self reinforcement of I can actually do this. I'll be okay. If my mom had to work two jobs and my dad had to work two jobs. They did they included tutoring if it was needed just to be sure that I was able to keep up with the challenges. You go to Rutgers for undergrad then tops for your Ms. In nutritional Sciences. Why get the MS instead of going directly to medical school? So that was the argument I had with my dad for a few years when I told him I was going to probably not to a traditional biology undergraduate. I wanted to do nutrition and in my head I said well as if I was a nutritionist or dietician I could get a job. Okay, so I was a little pragmatic from the beginning. He was like, I don't know. I hope you can go to medical school, but then I decided I really thought having a bachelor's in nutrition was not enough that it needed to have a master's in order to get an acceptable sort of position. My dad was disappointed. He thought I let him down I think looking back he realizes that I took a little bit of a longer route, but he actually thinks it was probably a smart move on to UMDNJ now known as Rutgers School of biomedical and Health Sciences for your birth. Cardiology fellowship at Emory your residency at Cornell when I spoke to dr. Laura Scott. She's a dermatologist in Miami. We talked about how almost every medical student has a moment or a series of moments where they worry that they are on the wrong path. And this is particularly complicated and Medicine cuz you're normally pretty deep in at the point at which I realize that both deep into your schooling and deep into debt. What was that moment for you? Oh goodness from the beginning. I think that by the time I had applied for my life have been you know, pretty successful. I got a full scholarship for all four years at UMDNJ for my tuition. They had a very supportive system at the medical school down as Hispanic Center of Excellence. They had some infrastructure to help but I think in my mind I did not have the basic tools. Of really how to sit down how to study how to organize my thoughts. That was something I kind of haphazardly learned on my own but it wasn't taught by my parents. It was thought by anyone had no organizational skills. I was all over the map.

Umdnj Rutgers School Of Biomedical A Laura Scott Rutgers United States Emory Cornell Hispanic Center Of Excellence Miami
Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

Latina to Latina

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

"That they're almost thank you so much for doing this. I would thank you. I am happy to be here. Your mom's Costa Rican. Puerto Rican growing up. What were the messages? You got about Healthy Living actually we did not talk about Healthy Living. I really the only thing I could really remember my dad saying was no too fast foods. So we always ate at home. He felt that fast foods were unhealthy. So the rice and beans and meat, you know, lots of plantains, you know, that's just how I grew up very traditional in culturally food-wise and nobody ever went to the gym. I mean that was unheard of growing up your parents, especially your dad like so many immigrants parents really big on the value of Education was the dream always to be a doctor. I always say my father brainwashed me ever since I was in first grade. He said look, the only way to progress in the United States is to get a diploma get a degree get some sort of recognition through education. He gave me three choices. He goes you either become a doctor a lawyer engineer pick one song. I just want to tell you every one's listening right now and raising their hand cuz it's like yeah. Those are those are the options. So I kept hearing that of course as a kid, you're like, oh God now, he's known knowing me and you know, I just want to be a kid, but I did realize probably around fourth or fifth grade that I was actually achieving significant goals and scores things came not easily but with studying and hard work, I think there was a positive impact. So that was a self reinforcement of I can actually do this. I'll be okay. If my mom had to work two jobs and my dad had to work two jobs. They did they included tutoring if it was needed just to be sure that I was able to keep up with the challenges. You go to Rutgers for undergrad then tops for your Ms. In nutritional Sciences. Why get the MS instead of going directly to medical school? So that was the argument I had with my dad for a few years when I told him I was going to probably not to a traditional biology undergraduate. I wanted to do nutrition and in my head I said well as if I was a nutritionist or dietician I could get a job. Okay, so I was a little pragmatic from the beginning. He was like, I don't know. I hope you can go to medical school, but then I decided I really thought having a bachelor's in nutrition was not enough that it needed to have a master's in order to get an acceptable sort of position. My dad was disappointed. He thought I let him down I think looking back he realizes that I took a little bit of a longer route, but he actually thinks it was probably a smart move on to UMDNJ now known as Rutgers School of biomedical and Health Sciences for your birth. Cardiology fellowship at Emory your residency at Cornell when I spoke to dr. Laura Scott. She's a dermatologist in Miami. We talked about how almost every medical student has a moment or a series of moments where they worry that they are on the wrong path. And this is particularly complicated and Medicine cuz you're normally pretty deep in at the point at which I realize that both deep into your schooling and deep into debt. What was that moment for you? Oh goodness from the beginning. I think that by the time I had applied for my life have been you know, pretty successful. I got a full scholarship for all four years at UMDNJ for my tuition. They had a very supportive system at the medical school down as Hispanic Center of Excellence. They had some infrastructure to help but I think in my mind I did not have the basic tools. Of really how to sit down how to study how to organize my thoughts. That was something I kind of haphazardly learned on my own but it wasn't taught by my parents. It was thought by anyone had no organizational skills. I was all over the map.

Umdnj Rutgers School Of Biomedical A Laura Scott Rutgers United States Emory Cornell Hispanic Center Of Excellence Miami
Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

Latina to Latina

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Why Dr. Julie Ramos Insists You Take Care of Your Heart

"That they're almost thank you so much for doing this. I would thank you. I am happy to be here. Your mom's Costa Rican. Puerto Rican growing up. What were the messages? You got about Healthy Living actually we did not talk about Healthy Living. I really the only thing I could really remember my dad saying was no too fast foods. So we always ate at home. He felt that fast foods were unhealthy. So the rice and beans and meat, you know, lots of plantains, you know, that's just how I grew up very traditional in culturally food-wise and nobody ever went to the gym. I mean that was unheard of growing up your parents, especially your dad like so many immigrants parents really big on the value of Education was the dream always to be a doctor. I always say my father brainwashed me ever since I was in first grade. He said look, the only way to progress in the United States is to get a diploma get a degree get some sort of recognition through education. He gave me three choices. He goes you either become a doctor a lawyer engineer pick one song. I just want to tell you every one's listening right now and raising their hand cuz it's like yeah. Those are those are the options. So I kept hearing that of course as a kid, you're like, oh God now, he's known knowing me and you know, I just want to be a kid, but I did realize probably around fourth or fifth grade that I was actually achieving significant goals and scores things came not easily but with studying and hard work, I think there was a positive impact. So that was a self reinforcement of I can actually do this. I'll be okay. If my mom had to work two jobs and my dad had to work two jobs. They did they included tutoring if it was needed just to be sure that I was able to keep up with the challenges. You go to Rutgers for undergrad then tops for your Ms. In nutritional Sciences. Why get the MS instead of going directly to medical school? So that was the argument I had with my dad for a few years when I told him I was going to probably not to a traditional biology undergraduate. I wanted to do nutrition and in my head I said well as if I was a nutritionist or dietician I could get a job. Okay, so I was a little pragmatic from the beginning. He was like, I don't know. I hope you can go to medical school, but then I decided I really thought having a bachelor's in nutrition was not enough that it needed to have a master's in order to get an acceptable sort of position. My dad was disappointed. He thought I let him down I think looking back he realizes that I took a little bit of a longer route, but he actually thinks it was probably a smart move on to UMDNJ now known as Rutgers School of biomedical and Health Sciences for your birth. Cardiology fellowship at Emory your residency at Cornell when I spoke to dr. Laura Scott. She's a dermatologist in Miami. We talked about how almost every medical student has a moment or a series of moments where they worry that they are on the wrong path. And this is particularly complicated and Medicine cuz you're normally pretty deep in at the point at which I realize that both deep into your schooling and deep into debt. What was that moment for you? Oh goodness from the beginning. I think that by the time I had applied for my life have been you know, pretty successful. I got a full scholarship for all four years at UMDNJ for my tuition. They had a very supportive system at the medical school down as Hispanic Center of Excellence. They had some infrastructure to help but I think in my mind I did not have the basic tools. Of really how to sit down how to study how to organize my thoughts. That was something I kind of haphazardly learned on my own but it wasn't taught by my parents. It was thought by anyone had no organizational skills. I was all over the map.

Umdnj Rutgers School Of Biomedical A Laura Scott Rutgers United States Emory Cornell Hispanic Center Of Excellence Miami
The Heart of the Matter with Dr. Hafiza Khan

The WoMed

05:37 min | 1 year ago

The Heart of the Matter with Dr. Hafiza Khan

"All Right Dr Khan thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. Welcome to the woman I've actually been wanting to have you on here for a while now Oh thank you for inviting me truly. I'd been following you for a while from the woman account but I feel like I really started taking in more of your post like win Kovic hit. All of us have become a little bit more inwardly thinking yes route. Ourselves in our house will yeah. Yeah. It's been amazing and you'd have a really incredible way of delivering information that I feel like even a non medical person could digest it but like you explain it in a way that it makes it so easy. Well I'm the only doctor in my family. Really. I at. So always have to explain everything to everybody my mom my sister has been in their words. So I, my husband's not a physician either so. So I'm used to explaining things to. So I always think how they explain this to my mother and my sister. They would be able to grasp it. So God so And also. You know I think that I love to teach. So I always wonder why people follow me because I'm not exactly sure has with the code you know most of what I do is cardiology related on meet related but you know I have been reading. So a Lotta Times something I'm like, Oh my God this is so interesting I have to tell everybody I love that. So the. Air Purifier. I Call I people need to know this are people need to so anything that thing with the heart is everything affects the heart rape stress air quality, Kovac, so really because. I kinda tie almost anything in because you know it will always have a downstream effect to the heart. That's really true. That's really true. Well I think it's such a gift that you have and I feel like if I ever were in need of your services, I would really want you to be my doctor in that because the just the way you presented I mean you're taking the time and you're reading all these different studies, which honestly makes my head hurt like trying to like analyze and take in different like research studies but the way you present it, it's like Oh my God. Okay. That makes sense in. You've just become a very trusted source for me of information. So you know part of the challenges. You know the instagram format is visual right? So I myself an experimental so there has to be a pitcher right rail. That's why I have the you know like a board or something 'cause now I need to be able to find my own post all where is fish oil post? Right yeah. Yeah. But then I, it's Kinda creative. How do I get the the main parts of the data? Visually interesting way that succinct. 'cause you use only the caption I don't know about you but like sometimes my is just cross like reading that. Yeah option Oh. Yeah. So The caption is the attention grabber. I've been playing around with a like a slide deck. It's almost like a slide show yet Some things I need to say, so it needs to be a chalk talk. Has after dry or and it's just me and my iphone. So. So part of it is is. It's create. It's creative for me right has I have what I want to say, how can I do it in a visually interesting way? Also to be succinct. 'cause you know doctors go on and on and on and lectures can be like on and on and on right yeah. Yeah How do you get a key point? Get it across in an interesting way people like Aha I got. Yes. I felt that way after your I mean you you broke down the hydroxy clear Quinn steady and like you're like your chalk talk, you know you're nearly everything I was like Oh my God I want to learn from you every day. Yeah. So that's the thing. So it's fun for me because I have to pivot to different formats right depending on what I WANNA do Whether it's the easy thing for me to do an inspirational pokes grab insure of my family, right something inspirational I'm done in like fifteen minutes, right? Right. But to an educational pulsed. I would already do the reading. So I'm already rigged article and I think, Oh, this is really interesting. Then breaking it apart, figuring out how to deliver what a cute little emoji. Duo Voice. So that's the fun. That's the creative and fun part to make. Take a while. So. Yeah, I know. It's part of the brain that I don't normally use when I teach follows you know for that during a dry board lecture with the facts, right? Right. So this involves visual creativity, which is for me using the other part of my brain which. Is Fun and interesting to

Dr Khan Rape Kovac Quinn
Digital Health: A CVC Perspective with Sean Cheng, Investment Manager at Phillips Ventures

Outcomes Rocket

06:11 min | 1 year ago

Digital Health: A CVC Perspective with Sean Cheng, Investment Manager at Phillips Ventures

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket saw marquess here and today I have the privilege of hosting a Dr Shawn Chang He's a PhD in engineering and then investment manager at Phillips Ventures of the portfolio of promising early stage companies includes baby scripts, Zell Might Tani to drive the Phillips Health Tech Vision he's interested in early stage investment opportunities in digital health, medical devices and imaging based diagnostic prior to ventures. He drove key strategic decisions for the Phillips leaderships on topics, including wearables, health, cloud digital transformation, and data interoperability. Previously, Sean held positions at the Boston Consulting Group, the US FDA and NASA SEAN also. Serves on the board of directors of the Professional Center for child, Development Board of advisors at. Johns Hopkins University. And the Advisory Board of the World Economic Forum's Global Shapers Community Sean holds his PhD in engineering from the University of Cambridge England where he developed expertise in medical device design simulations and optimization algorithms. I'm privileged to have him here on the podcast with us today to chat about innovation in how we fund it, and how we view it within today's Environment John such a pleasure to have you here with us face for having me salt and that was a mouthful, but a takes the intro. That's Hey listen I mean for the things that you've done in your career it's like a the tip of the iceberg. So certainly going to be a fun talk today before we dive into the nitty gritty of you know the investments and an innovation I love to find out more about what inspires your work in healthcare yes. Sure So I think. Ever since I can remember you know is one of these professions where it was always going to be around rice on my my father's. Told that to me when I was very young. People are always going to get sick and you know this is something that is near and dear to everyone's hearts and something they worry about. So I, you at a very young age looking at healthcare is something worthwhile doing not to say that everything else is in November and? Certainly in the healthcare side, there's always relevance and and There was something that's from impact side of very worthwhile in a you know a few years ago. I, say. My Dad also. got into a bit of the healthcare trouble and I was in consulting time the generals consultant and having done engaged. She focused on cardiology and the more invasive procedures within cardiology like artificial hearts and L. Ads. I've felt You know I was almost blind sided when he was you know going in for a quadruple bypass and you know I I should probably rely and and it will come back to industry a little more. So something more personal more recently. And I can appreciate that greatly, Sean, you know a mixture of your dad's advice and life experiences you just kind of gravitated to the the field and and I mean, you've just done extraordinary work love to park a bit for a second here on the venture business and and how exactly you guys are looking at your your early stage companies and investments. What exactly are you looking to do with those? Are they adding value to the to the ecosystem? Yeah. Sure. You know I think. There's many aspects of this love to talk at length about all of them, but I'll just spare you that give you the highlights here. So from a corporate venturing point of view, it's always been cyclical as an industry and You know in the last ten years, we've seen a revival of you know corporate venturi with new formats approaches, and this is a will be really try to carve out as ventures. So we started a around twenty-six teen in the intent was to create a team and find that can provide that early stage reconnaissance as well as know how in working with founders, and so the given an idea of what was happening to pass our emanate folks was dealing with. The early stage investments as well, and so they would take a similar approach as an acquisition of a let's say, a two billion dollar company to a post money valuation but ten million dollar early stage startup, and so that combined with a lot of the various functional corporate requirements like in privacy security insurance etc was really a lot for any you early stage coming to handle, and so we WANNA do is provide a center of excellence as well as a team that can go and negotiate these deals and streamline the process, and so we were able to reduce a deal flow time live from. Don't call me on this, but you know nine months to a year down to route three months. And so that was one of the. Young one is just You know mutual benefit. So I. Think we were allowed unnecessary terms into the term sheets that you know we never really exercise and so Knowing that, moving the future, making a judgment call on you know, how can we help the founders succeed and then help them scale? The company's best is sort of where we really emphasize that those ventures in I know everyone says this, but we try to be more founder friendly than the typical CBC, which has a stereotype over the years, and so that's I think you know where where our value add would be you know bringing the resources in channels and infrastructure of fields, corporate the mothership, but also being. Venture and founder friendly as well. And then we can sit there work together with the companies over time to help them succeed for both sides and think that's awesome. Shine. You know you'd think about a lot

Sean Phillips Ventures Phillips Founder Johns Hopkins University Dr Shawn Chang United States Boston Consulting Group Professional Center Investment Manager Development Board FDA Zell Nasa Advisory Board Consultant L. Ads University Of Cambridge Englan
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Admitting women compared with many other medical centres. Mine was the fifth class of women at the Harvard, medical school, and in their ultimate wisdom. The board of overseers decided that they needed a ten year experience with women before they were enrolled in the university charter. So only the year that my class graduated will women officially in the Harvard System We. Were essentially on probation, and because of that, we could not even get university housing. The man has vanderbilt hall under House rules and the women lived in apartments in town, and that essentially was almost symptomatic of much of what they was. Nonetheless. I must tell you that I thoroughly enjoyed medical school. I thoroughly enjoyed my classmates. The men were very supportive of the quota of women which was ten women per class that were admitted. There was a strict quota system there. And things have gotten better serially. I expect that we've seen major strides in the past decades were now saying women emerging as leaders, leaders of the professional societies leaders within their departments divisions in schools. So there is an emergence, but I, think. And, this applies to the men as well as to the women but I think specifically to the women and I would say is that as a woman in cardiology. You really have a multifaceted group of fears and their fears in which you must operate there obviously on the academic in the practice fears with your colleagues. But remember there is family there is home they may be children is a spouse insisting again ovens. And then there's the outside cardiology community and the voluntary groups, the American College of Cardiology and Heart Association European society. We all operate in another sphere, and that's a faith based community. And then we live in a general community where we are expected to be of service whether it be music arts political philanthropic, and then for those of academia, we live within the university community, not just within the Health Sciences Center, but we interact with the faculty and the students and what we have to do. is to examine what it is that gives each of us pleasure and satisfaction what allows us to explore our scientific and clinical interests and most important what allows us to exercise our leadership skills, and this is what I see as where the area is going. This fears of very important cardiology is a very important part of our life, but we have to encase it within all of the spheres in which we operate. That's really fascinating I never really thought of US each sort of operating in all of these separate spheres you're absolutely right and it's it's all about really trying to think about how we can each individually contribute based on our skillset. So you touched on this a little bit but I wanNA talk a little bit more about the present with regards to women and cardiology, and while in the last fifty years as you mentioned, we've had increased recognition of women's contributions to cardiology. There is still a long way to go cardiology has field has overall. Done poorly to attract women trainees with women comprising the majority of medical students but less than fifteen percent of practicing cardiologists and less than five percent of interventional cardiologists. This gender gap within cardiology is only modestly improved over the past two decades. Dr Pamela Douglas published a survey based study of internal medicine trainees in Jama Cardiology and twenty t and noted that women were more likely to never consider going into cardiology. The factors influencing this gap included perceptions about stable hours, family friendliness, female friendliness, availability of positive role models, an addition to some other factors. Even after joining cardiology women continue to deal with issues related to gaps in pay and promotion of and women are overall poorly represented among leadership positions. Even though as you mentioned, this has improved compared to the past. So what is your perspective on where we stand today with regards to women in Cardiology? possibly. Some of it is the way medical students and really internal medicine residents are exposed to cardiology and typically they see it within the acute setting of coronary. Care you. And that is really not the practice of cardiology that's crisis intervention. And if women had the opportunity to see more in ambulatory care in prevention possibly this would attract many more women to cardiology because it would give them a much broader appreciation of the spheres in which they. Now most certainly women who go into cardiology are attracted to the high demand, high risk areas, and the heart failure is one of them where we're seeing large numbers women I'm not sure why. But perhaps what we're seeing is that for the interventional and the EP that many of these women, the women who are attracted into the surgical specialties and the surgeons have very actively recruited women and probably we have learned from the surgeons. One it is they're doing because they're recruiting more and more women into their ranks. You know this past weekend I was on a fascinating virtual all day conference Saturday with the Brazilian Society of Cardiology and the Brazil chapter the American College of Cardiology. It was a full day of heart disease in women. And the speakers and the panelists again articulated exactly what you have done about women less.

American College of Cardiology Brazilian Society of Cardiolog Harvard vanderbilt hall Dr Pamela Douglas Brazil Health Sciences Center Heart Association European soc
"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Hi there I am Dr Martha the chief of cardiology at the University of Arizona and I also hold the title of being the biggest fan girl for Cardio nerds. It is an honor to introduce after net winger who will be featured on the upcoming talk here on the Cardio Nerd podcast I'm also her biggest fan Dr Wang is professor of medicine in the division of Cardiology at. Emory University School of Medicine. She is a consultant to the emory heart and Vascular Center and founding consultant at the EMORY. Women's heart center Dr Winger graduated from Hunter College and then went to Harvard medical school as part of this class that included women in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, six she was the first woman to be named president in Cardiology at Mount Sinai hospital in New York City. Her training she and her husband joined the faculty at Emory University Dr Wingers contributions to women and Heart. Disease. Prevention and management have been a lifetime's work for her heart disease traditionally understood to be primarily affecting men. The net cast winger was among the first physicians to focus on coronary heart disease in women and evaluate the different risk factors and features of the conditions in women compared with men. She actually chaired the first US National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Conference on Cardiovascular Health and disease in women that you're winger. Also has been the leader cardiac rehabilitation. She chaired the World Health Organization Expert Committee on rehabilitation after cardiovascular disease and co-chaired the guideline panel on Cardiac Rehabilitation for the US Agency for Healthcare Policy and research in the late nineteen fifties most doctors prescribed three to six months of strict bedrest and delayed a cardiac patients returned to work for up to two years but Dr Winger had notice patients could recover more quickly getting up and moving around starting with sitting on the bed and walking around the bed and eventually walking down the. Hallway and so on. At Grady Hospital where she was chief of Cardiology, she developed a twenty one day cardiac rehabilitation program, which became a model for cardiac rehabilitation programs across the nation since then she and other doctors have been able to decrease the hospital stay even further with proven improved outcomes in those who completed cardiac rehabilitation does your way or is also had a long standing interest in geriatric cardiology and is a past president of the society of Geriatric Cardiology and was editor in chief of the American Journal of Geriatric. Cardiology, for more than fifteen years, does your wingers a highly decorated cardiologists and is it a Rockstar in our specialty cheese received so many awards for her work and I can only highlight some of them because otherwise my introduction of her will actually be longer than her interview. She received the outstanding professional achievement award from Hunter College and the physician of the Year award from the American Heart Association in Nineteen Ninety Eight Leisure winger received the distinguished achievement award from the Scientific Councils of the American Heart Association and it's woman in. Cardiology mentoring award she was chosen by Atlanta's women in law and medicine for the Shining Star award, recognizing her distinguished career in cardiology and women's health issues in two thousand. Dr Winger was presented with the James Deep Bruce Memorial award of the American. College of Physicians, for distinguished contributions in preventive cardiology in two, thousand and two, she received the Distinguished Philip Award of the Society of Geriatric Cardiology in two thousand three, she was included in the national, Library of medicine exhibition changing the face of medicine, a history of American women. Physicians Debra Wang received the two thousand and four Gold Heart Award, which is the highest award from the American Heart Association at Emory University's two thousand, four commencement Dr Wang or received the Emery Williams distinguished teaching award of the university as well as the alumni teaching award at the school of Medicine. Dr Wire was selected to deliver the distinguish two thousand four Lennox lecture for the American Heart Association in two, thousand six, she received the Hatter Award and international recognition for the advancement of Cardiovascular Sciences, the Georgia chapter of the American. College of Cardiology presented Dr Winger with its Lifetime Achievement Award in two thousand nine she was selected as the Georgia woman of the year in two thousand ten and in two thousand eleven she was selected to deliver James B Herrick lecture by the American Heart Association for her outstanding achievement in clinical cardiology she was elected a member of the Emory's hundred and seventy fifth history makers drink emory's I one, hundred and seventy five years in two thousand, twelve Dr Winger received the Charles R Hatcher junior award for excellence in public health. From emory university and in two thousand thirteen, she was honored by the establishment of the J Willis Hurst, our Bruce Longwy and the net k Wang or cardiovascular society for emery cardiology training alumni in two thousand, thirteen, she received the inaugural distinguished mentor. Award of the American College of Cardiology and the Arnold Potts lifetime achievement award at Emory University School of Medicine in two thousand fourteen the American Society of Preventive Cardiology honored Dr Winger by naming an annual lecture focused on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in women after her known as the Ninette. Wanguo distinguished lecture focusing on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in women in two thousand fifteen she was awarded the inaugural Bernadine Healy Leadership Award which is an award for women in cardiovascular disease by the American College of cardiology she received the spirit of heart legacy award in two thousand seventeen from the Association of Black Cardiologists and she was an invited lecture for the Seventieth Anniversary of the NHLBI program in Bethesda Maryland in two thousand eighteen. In two thousand and nine, thousand, nine hundred received the outstanding alumni award from the Emory Alumni Association in two thousand twenty. The Association of University. Cardiologists named its distinguished lecture after Dr Wangara and later this year at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions Dr Winger will receive the twenty twenty Eugene Brennwald academic mentorship award for her mentorship.

Dr Winger American Heart Association Emory University School of Med Emory University American College of Cardiology Emory University Dr Wingers Dr Wang Cardiac Rehabilitation society of Geriatric Cardiolog Society of Geriatric Cardiolog American Society of Preventive Lifetime Achievement Award chief of Cardiology College of Cardiology lifetime achievement award Emory Alumni Association Dr Martha Hatter Award Hunter College Dr Wangara
"cardiology" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Switch4Good

"Turns out that I happen to go to American Council cardiology meeting March of two thousand and three, and actually did what I normally do, which is to get my cholesterol tested I. Don't think I had done it in a couple of years. My LDL was one hundred ten back then and you know one, hundred ten wasn't good. But while our recognition that the ldl needs to be much lower. So one hundred ten was starting to not look so good. So I thought I would get it done and it was a hundred seventy instead. Now. There are two things that happened at time march of two, thousand and three one right before the meeting. One right after. The one before was probably the more interesting the to for the audience and that is. I ahead, a patient I was running a nuclear cardiology lab. And one of the best uses of a nuclear stress test is to compare it with previous and see what Hap has happened bouquet and you go on usually you're doing bypass surgery people who really bad a scan result or you're putting in a stent or two five. And it turns out I had one of those cases right before I left for the ACC meeting. And it was a dramatic improvement. And on my worksheet which we could. Really collecting very meticulous data at wonderful staff that. They didn't talk about the date of the bypass surgery to make the scan, go from Corrigo to near normal. and. So when you know it, what happened in, we get the date of the of the Stanford. The best decides she says, she didn't have any said. I'm going GONNA call her. She said she didn't have a bypass or a stent. Oh and I'd never seen in all my years of nuclear cardiology a scan go from bad bad that good without somebody doing intervention. Okay So I, called her up on the phone I said sorry about the but I think my staff left out the date of your procedure. And she said I didn't have one and said, well, you must have done something you're scan looks better than it did before. I went on the Orange Diet. And I was immediately going to go I'd heard of. This thing Jama but who who pays attention most doesn't cardiology don't is just another thing that you don't. Necessarily incorporate until you see a a second study and be guidelines telling you that this is real. And as it turns out it was it became real for me that day because there was no way of getting around the fact that she had had a dramatic improvement, her chest painted gone away. The reason she was having a second scan is starting to exercise. So vigorously that he tripped over a curb broker ankle. Excuse me and nobody wanted to send her to the operating room with this horrific scan of that she he had had in the past. So good news for her that was great. The devour up the operation went fine. Everything was really good. But I learned something about the power of the orange. Diet hopefully plant-based Diet. So that was right before the meeting. So I was already kind of thinking that plant based nutrition is probably it's a good thing. Then I find out my cholesterol is high when begin that day and then the next day. There was David Jenkins in the Journal of American Medical Association I do tend to joke about Jama as we call it being Vegan Propaganda Journal. But you know it's not is very rigorous journal of with a great reviewers in very high level of science and it turns out published in March of two, thousand, three, the portfolio. Diet. So. Right. When I was trying to figure out if I'm going to take a medication for this or you know can I will I be able to get away with Diet? He proved that you can get a thirty percents decrease in your ldl cholesterol okay. On average, which was the same as you could get with a low dose Stanton. And in addition to the the cholesterol, it lowered inflammation I didn't have a lot of inflammation mind was normal. But. You'd rather not have normally like to have below normal run on your inflammation markers and so and that happened with Stanton and with the So six weeks later did measure my ldl cholesterol and as you mentioned went from one seventy down to ninety I did measured by C. reactive protein, the intonation, and it went from normal to not existent because of the plant based nutrition. And so you know we do have trials such as Jupiter trial that have looked at the importance of both inflammation and ldl cholesterol. If either of these high, the patients sort of have intermediate bad outcome if.

Jama David Jenkins Stanton American Council Stanford Corrigo Hap ACC Vegan Propaganda Journal Journal of American Medical As
"cardiology" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"cardiology" Discussed on Switch4Good

"With Alexandra, Paul. What's Up High Dot Z.? How are Ya not too bad. You know what? Though we're GonNa talk about something today that is bad because it's problem. It's a big problem. We're GONNA talk about the heart and it's a problem. All over the world, but it's significant problem as it relates to heart disease here in America. Six hundred and fifty thousand people die of heart disease every year here in our country that is one in every four deaths someone dies. Thirty seven seconds from cardiovascular disease. And Forty eight percents. Of African Americans have some form of heart disease. It's overwhelming thinking of those numbers and just the gravity of it and you have a personal story. As it relates to Heart Disease With Your Dad Yeah my dad had heart problems and he died of them as a mixture of heart and lung issues but his heart just didn't pump a strong. He wasn't a strong heart and it didn't pump enough Through his body and so it causes a lot of problems towards the end of his life and he wasn't very old use only seventy eight when he died and it was definitely a lifestyle thing, which is why I'm excited to talk about our guests because our guest. Really. Will Give us some hope actually here in show us that this can be preventable in most cases and so Tell us who in most cases it's a foodborne illness was your dad on on meds towards the end or throughout the journey of his heart disease you know I remember him just being. A lot of medications even when he was my age well, you know when you're a kid and your your parents are in their fifties you think they're just ancient because you're in your twenties. Now I'm fifty seven. Thinking Wow Dad was this age and I thought he was super all but no, no, fifty seven is young. Seventy eight young seventy eight is I know that now because my mom was eighty four is very vibrant. Yeah. Yeah. So we are so excited to be sitting down with the indomitable Dr. Kim Williams he is the former president of the American College of Cardiology and the current chief of division of Cardiology at rush, university? So, Dr Williams knowledge of medicine is truly unparalleled. Ironically, he himself went Vegan in two thousand and three after discovering his own cholesterol was far too high and within six weeks, he dropped his LDL Chabad stuff by eighty points and we'll find out how yes definitely Dr Williams is on a mission to in heart disease as the number one killer in the US and abroad, and his work is largely focused on preventative measures through nutrition and health care access for communities who need it most, and I had the pleasure of meeting Dr Williams at the remedy retreat I guess last fall time flies and listened to his. And I'm hoping he's going to go into some of those details and facts today with us it was it was just it was mind blowing. But it also had a lot of hope in it. So we want to we want to give people hope for you know making a hard right turn from their current heart disease state 'cause it's one in four of us right? So all right. Here we go. Welcome Dr Williams well thank you for having me. It's Such a pleasure to have you. Yes, it is and what is on everybody's mind right now is Cova nineteen and you said that the overlap the right before we came on, you told US overlap between cardiovascular disease and Kovic is almost one hundred percent. So let's let's dive into this virus and what that even means that the overlap is one hundred percent. So. It turns out. Anyone can actually get the virus just like any corona virus that's been out there. We've been getting colds from Corona viruses for ages that does complicate our antibody testing because people will have a positive response when they actually had a corona virus a year two ago however this particular corona bias virus has new tasted and this particular strain attacks certain Oregon's. And everyone's aware that if you get any kind of viral illness more susceptible to have a bad outcome if you're older. So people over sixty and then men because actually does prefer to replicate inside the male testes. So women are protected a bit but not absolved. Familiar with the fact that in that, it loves the lower respiratory tree starts in the upper respiratory tree, and then makes us way down and many people will get a new Monja from it, and sometimes that causes respiratory failure. but that respiratory failure in how sick you get really depends on a number of factors and the fact that have found out. are alarmingly similar to cardiology, but it turns out that people who are obese and people really work on what it is about obesity. That makes it difficult is at the virus loves adipocytes anybody WHO's done histology, which is probably not too many people knows that an EPA site is a fat cell and people have fat cells pretty much everywhere. But if you have a collection of particularly central obesity where it's in your middle that soft middle, very large tuber in those are mostly fat cells and they've been on our cardiology radar for a while. Because they are so called metabolic active putting out hormones they're telling lies to your brain. You didn't eat enough and so they they wanna be fed more. So visceral fat or or a domino fat is a very dangerous thing to begin with and in here comes Kobe it loves those cells it reproduces well inside cells. It reproduces so well that the obese person actually before they get sick, they have such high viral loads that they're actually spreading the disease more than everyone else more than personal stem Because their viral loads are so high and so yes, at attacks, the kidneys as well but it really loves fat cells. Now turns out that a record about two weeks ago came out surprisingly and said that it also loves the bloodstream of people with high cholesterol. You can imagine that the biochemical meal you for viral replication, it's coating of the components of having high cholesterol just make it a lot easier for the virus to replicate in. So that's another one that completed it because we already knew. Going back all the way to China that hypertension and diabetes were the two main things in addition to age male gender that make this virus much more damaging to people in the mechanism may not be as clear as by replication and high cholesterol or fat cells. But you can imagine that the people with high blood pressure already house vessel damaged people with diabetes have impaired immune system you put all that together. And here you have. Perfect. Quadrangle of the risk factors.

Dr. Kim Williams US respiratory tree Dr Williams obesity American College of Cardiology Alexandra division of Cardiology America Oregon China diabetes Cova Paul EPA president Kovic
Sick of COVID: The Long Haulers

The Naked Scientists

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Sick of COVID: The Long Haulers

"Miss, we will learning about long covert the condition where corona virus sufferers recover from the acute infection. But thank God wants to develop a teague another very bizarre symptoms. The Ken lost months and hints are starting to emerge about the damage or complications that are going on in multiple different or in these patients and a group of medical scientists in Germany have recently discovered ongoing heart issues in a significant proportion of people that only ever had this mild covert cardiologists. Valentina Portman explains we investigated patients that recently recovered from covid nineteen illness. So we have the very, very deep look at their hearts. And in these patients, we found that many many of them even if they didn't really have a rough course of the original illness, they still had persist and ongoing cardiac inflammation a little bit like a flu of the heart. How many of them had this kind of inflammation? We scan total of hundred patients seventy eight off. Those have had some findings in the heart. Of these sixty had very active inflammation. Inflammation within the heart muscle something that we call myocarditis as well as inflammation of the lining of the heart pericarditis. How long is this after they were originally sick? The average time from their original causative task was seventy one days. Wow that's a long time since they had this, you know positive test what's going on? This is the question that obviously I can only speculate on and it is not due to an ongoing infection of the heart muscle. So it is not the virus remains within a heart cells. The body itself is understanding the inflammation of the heart is something that it has to fight against or tries to control it but this is obviously at this present point hypotheses. Juno whether this kind of heart inflammation might linked to any specific symptoms that people are feeling months after they were supposed to go better from covert. That is very difficult to say because Hark inflammation does not present with specific symptoms being knocked feet especially young patients. This is one of those symptoms definitely can make aware of it. However inflammation takes a long time to present itself with what we call text book symptoms, chest pain shortness of breath swelling of the legs. But in general, then this might be kind of a hint as to why these people are still unwell. Absolutely this is definitely one of the things that we should look for very early and very fast if possible. In konic inflammation trying to be very sporty very fast is probably not the right thing and I think if any message can be given the present point is that we just need to give the heart as well as the rest of the body time to heal. Balancing appointment from the University of Frankfurt explaining her study from the Journal of Cardiology.

Valentina Portman University Of Frankfurt Pericarditis Journal Of Cardiology KEN Germany
Coronavirus also affecting the heart

The Daily Dive

03:09 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus also affecting the heart

"Was two studies that came out recently about how covid nineteen damage the heart and how that damage can linger for some months. Even after people recover Erica tell us a little bit about that. You're exactly right. So you know very early on this was thought to be just a respiratory disease, but we've learned well, I say we what is actually the doctors and the nurses on the front lines they've learned so much about how coping nineteen Can impact the body in. So many ways you know it's been six months since that first case was diagnosed in Washington state here in the US. So now they've learned that it can also impact the body and other ways. So there were two studies that came out this week that you refer to Jimmy. They were published Tuesday in the journal Jam a cardiology. That the virus can actually linger in the heart. For months even when people feel like they, they've recovered they're not necessarily in the hospital. There are otherwise healthy adults in their thirties, forties and fifties. But what happened was doctors in Germany, they took 'em are is of these people's hearts to three months after they were diagnosed after they felt better. Seventy eight of those people, a majority still had signs on those. Mariah's at the virus had some kind of impact on their heart. Sixty of those people had signs of inflammation of their heart muscle. Now, we're talking about the heart muscle. It's more about like if you're thinking about a home, you're thinking about the screaming you think about it computer it's it's the mainframe is what sort of holds all of those heart cells together, and that's where they were seeing the information. Now, he didn't necessarily translate into any ongoing symptoms and it's still unknown what that kind of inflammation what those signs might. Mean long term clearly, we're still only six months into this pandemic, but once you have some sort of heart damage there the potential for further damage down the line. Unfortunately, we still don't know what that damages Oscar and one of the other interesting things that they found out in that study was that it didn't really matter the seriousness of the illness. Some people had been hospitalized with cove in nineteen others were able to recover at home completely, they ran the whole course of it at home. So it didn't really matter how bad you had it. A lot of people were still getting heart damage. Yeah. There was another study also from Germany they were looking at autopsies unfortunately, people who were older. They died of Covid nineteen. There were all in their eighties they found evidence of the virus in the heart tissue of twenty, four out of those thirty nine patients, and in a few in some of them, the virus was actually replicating in that her tissue so. These are all pointing ways that seemed to suggest that the virus is somehow making its way into the heart. Again what Little unsettling is that doctors still really don't know. Oh that me.

Germany JAM Covid Erica United States Jimmy Mariah Washington Oscar
The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:30 min | 1 year ago

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

"Live. Let's kick it off as Glenn with Meta data. You're on the and business podcast. So Glenn Are we're GonNa talk a bit about the future. And we're in this wild time in your industry with the corona virus, but I wanted ground us in the now. When when you look even in the space for twenty years you look at where data are starting to transform processes in life sciences. How do you like to frame it? What's the state of affairs today? So I think if you. If you look at what happens in life sciences outside of data, we just look. People, the big trend that we're seeing is it's good trend. That's the world I. WanNa live in as a patient. Therapies are getting more. Effective therapies are getting safer, and it's because they're being designed very different. Way used to be that you try to create a therapy that worked for as many people as you possibly could, and you would maybe high fiving in the hallways. If you right for Outta ten patients, you know this. This was the world of the blockbuster drugs, and it was about as imprecise as possible like a patient has a blood pressure over this. Give him this drug. Patients got cholesterol over that. Give them this other drug, and now as you start to get into these more effective therapies because they're more precise. Actually start to create an interesting data problem, and that is you start to have smaller and smaller denominators. If I'm starting to in well, this drug isn't district people who have a blood pressure over this. They also need to have this gene. They also need to have or not have this pre existing condition. ETC, acceptance every time I come up with more criteria. The pool of patients who are going to bed. And remember. We're making things that people take. They put in their bodies, and we've to make sure that they're safe. Not just effective, and there's a good way regulatory bodies who are protecting that safety and efficacy. So now as these patient pools, who will benefit therapies get smaller. We also have smaller smaller pool of people who we can use from a research perspective would be volunteering. Stoke the specificity, which is great means that we have a scarcity of patients that we've got to deal with a new way and I think that's been driving at least I have a very kind of drug development centric view of the world. About a drug discovery. Can I find a new molecule I really focus on the will what do I? Do if I think I've got something that's going to cure this kind of cancer. Think about making more evidence, but with fewer people line. Smaller denominators I think that's a big piece of what's driving the data landscape in life sciences. The other thing that I'll tell you which is kind of interesting, is that the life sciences industry has not been really good about data, standardization and a guy. He was a big influence in the way I think about data medi data chief data officer starting from about five years ago, his name's David, Lee and He came out of the insurance industry. Any any taught me that data standardization. Doesn't sound sexy, but until you do that, you can't benchmark until you do that. You create a predictive model and the life. Sciences Industry hasn't been great about data standardization because everybody was doing stuff for this one drug in this one area, and so I see people outside of Medi data as well, but certainly the kind of stuff that we do is we try to use AI to climb that data value curve. How do we a figure out how to standardize data in different ways data from different sources about different things? Let me just give you one quick tangent example. I got asked very kindly to speak at a conference about Ab-. Stroke and I do not know anything about cardiology like I did cancer research before we started medi data I'm comfortable talking about oncology, so I figured I better. Get ahead of it if they're asked me to. Present and I got up on stage and I said listen I. Don't know anything about stroke. But if I was speaking to a bunch of oncologists, and they were trying to build a predictive model around cancer diagnosis, and they were only looking at cancer research. They're not going to be very successful because everybody already has cancer in those research studies, but if you were to be able to go and look at large-scale cardiology studies, stroke studies studies about hard tax. If I were to go, pull data from studies research about diabetes. Then I'm going to know what those patients looked like before their cancer diagnosis, and then I can start to use. Use that to build that model so when you put that Lens on things, you realize I need to standardize data across a lot of different kinds of patients and a lot of different kinds of research patients who are in research. I have to stack the deck. I don't mean that in a various way create to create the biggest possible denominator to create the most evidence generating. Data set that I can, and even just generating that data set requires ai tool sometimes, and then once you got that data set. I think probably inherently obviously you. You've got more traditional statistical tools and methods with frankly work great and a lot of the shared also can start to apply things like machine learning neural that works and look for look for signal that you might have missed or enhanced signal. That wasn't there traditionally so I. I do think that's happening I. Feel Pretty Good. There's a lot more we. We can do, but we're. We've started as an industry getting that right. Yeah, until there's couple of things to poke into here I. Like the landscape paint I'm going to dive into a couple of things. You mentioned one of which was around standardization, so yeah, I mean what a tough problem! I think everybody. We've interviewed in healthcare. You guys are in Pharma. If I was ever GONNA be selling a product, probably said the six time on the podcast never be selling artificial intelligence solutions to hospitals like a break one. One of the Pharma companies, but in healthcare, broadly whether they be life, sciences, or or diagnostics, or whatever the case may be just data, being goofy, and like in silos and locked up and not uniform sort of this big ubiquitous issue is this when you talk about the standardization, clearly from what I understand of our look into companies like the MERCS and the bears of the world. They're beginning to try to do this with their own big corpus's of historical information, whatever being able to streamline things so that it's. It's findable, maybe not machine readable yet. They don't necessarily know where that's going to add value just yet in most cases, but but at least make it more uniform. Is this something that the industry is GonNa have to get to the same page from kind of a regulatory or kind of soft law level, or is this just per company? We're GONNA have to come up with data governance policies within our firm and just be really steady about those across silos. Like how do you see this rolling out? Yeah, so? Well I. DO think that individual companies are working on that, but I also think that there's industry organizations. There's commercial entities. My own included who are trying to do that beyond the walls of an individual company and I think we're GONNA have to I. Don't think the data that one company has is going to be sufficient. Across all the use cases that we'd not just a good idea commercially, but we have a medical ethical obligation to create the best care possible when data sets and I do think that the data quality is a really important thing to think about if if it's a a regulatory prescriptive method of doing it or the way regulation works today, which is demonstrate to people that you've done a responsible set of work to standardize things and prove it, but a lot of people will point a finger at regulators and say they're slowing down innovation, sometimes particularly and Pharma and I do not believe. believe that at all regulators. Job Isn't to be like Glen, you're a great guy, so you know I believe what all your data and Algorithms put out. No job is to protect the public health and say Glenn proved to me on paper that you did something that was scientifically ethically responsible to jobs. Is So so i? Think if that requirement is there? What you'll see is individual companies trying to solve this on their own, and I've seen this before in life, science space with other technology things, even just the management data used to be every company tried to do it their way. Out of their basement, and then twenty years later, this medi data do Thanh, research and again we're not the only company doing it, but you see platform providers that are doing it at a larger scale so when I see everybody trying to do it individually get excited because that means that there's actually a market demand for that. And you're creating a marketplace where the best technologies, the best rhythms, the best data sources will create something that more and more people will come onto, and that's how that's everybody clearly. I think we could extrapolate that for those of you. Listening into almost any industry right I think people say this. Even about I'm just GONNA throw some random stuff at ya like automotives. Hey, if we're GONNA make safe self driving cars. Do we want Ford my develop something about some certain snowy driving circumstance like there's GonNa. Be Some things that are going to have to be transferable so that everybody's safer on the dam road and with drugs. Maybe it's the same way. Business Opportunities Hey if we can be the ones who even through kind of soft news. Can Be. The folks that people rely on to develop a system instruct sure that's going to build a really sticky market position in clearly from a business perspective. That's that's an appeal as well part of the challenge see in life, sciences and I know you've obviously you guys have dealt with this and found ways around or whatever there's there's a way to frame it, but you know I. Look at companies like we just did a piece on Johnson and Johnson for example looking at some of their current innovations and investments today I. Frankly we. We don't see a tremendous amount, but they're involved in a consortium called Melody Out in Europe somewhere from not mistaken where Santa a bunch of other big players are from what I understand exposing a certain amount of data is being trained on in some aggregate sense in everybody's GonNa get a little bit of the benefit from it. How do we do this? Hey, we all have the same uniform stuff. Hey, we're able to kind of like mould things across companies. How do we do that without giving away the secret sauce, because of course? Clearly as a drug development firm that there's a humanitarian side, and then clearly we have to make payroll in in. That would mean that we've got to keep some of the things that are secret. So how do we uniform things and maybe cross pollinate without the risk of US losing her crowned jewels yet? So that is not an easy thing to do I'm I'm super appreciative of it. The way we've at least tried to tackle that problem is by creating like a give to get dynamic. There are definitely companies out there that sell data. And I think there's a great place for them in the world. Probably doing and we'll do some awesome stuff I. think there's there's a great place in the world for not for profit groups who say hey just throw your data. Here will create naturally yet. For sure, that's all all good, but I also think there's a place for a model where you say look if you put your data into this, what is effectively proprietary bucket, but with a third party that you trust and let that third party that make sure that everybody who's putting their data into that pool is protected in terms of not showing the specifics of your individual data points, so in your example. You know Sanofi doesn't see Johnson and Johnson's data. But you've got enough people in there that you can do things in aggregate and let people compare their own specific data to the more generalized bigger denominator that Medi date, or whoever it is or you and it's done at the standardization is done for you in a way that this transparent and you can believe in the results I think that's a really interesting commercial model, and then must exist in other industries I just not an expert. Well, it's. The way you're talking about it makes it sound like it's kind of a Nathan idea, even for you guys where it's like well. We think that there could be a space for this like it's something that could have all right. It's like an I believe you're right I, think actually it absolutely. Could I just think you Mr Glanton? Whoever your your absolute best partnership guys, you know you'd better be drinking beers or some of these people because there's a lot of trust that goes into those kind of relationships. So. There's a lot of trust that goes along in life sciences anywhere for sure yet. You're dealing with data about patients in some way. Holly anybody in medicine right has a person's life in their hands, but if if we're working on a vaccine for SARS, come to I, mean literally billions of people are going to get it like you've got billions of lives in. In your hands, so he's already. A lot of trust is important in our industry and I. do think that what will see by the way. There's posters at scientific sessions that we've done. There's clients right now are taking some of these aggregated data sets to regulators, and they're using them to demonstrate exactly what I was saying before. Their drugs are safe and effective. But with different kind of aggregated denominator, we call it a synthetic control arm, and it's not that is android senator anything synthesis out of the people it, synthesizing people who are in lots of different research studies into a cohort they can be used as. As a valid competitor to the patients who you treated with your new drought, Nisa solving that problem, you're saying of the narrowness if you have some super niche allergy medication for people with a certain kind of whatever then yeah, maybe you really need to extrapolate in that kind of uniform data, way and and kind of square that circle that you. And I actually think that not only by I know this is happening. See it happening, but this is a harbinger of things to come because. I gave. Let's take it to its most extreme, so in all US oncology, because it's happening there I and cancer, but I think it's going to happen in almost every therapeutic area, probably even like analgesics, and what the next tylenol is, but we are all so interestingly I mean at biologically individual and people talk about cancer therapy, and almost every patient really is like an end of one problem. There is nobody who has your. Your exact same tumor right in your tumor has probably different kinds of cells that have different mutations even within this one problem in your body. So when you start to think about that, we have to use these techniques to extrapolate what the best therapy is for every single person at the right time down to individual. We're going to need as an industry and I'm not just talking about now. Life Sciences although I think by scientists. Imprint part of the for sure. It's GonNa. Pay For a lot of this Oh. Yeah, sure I sure, but but these mathematical models that we used to figure out what to do for individuals there being born right now using these techniques stacking up all this data and figuring out how to use as a group. We're GONNA use that against individuals, so this stacking I'm just going to clarify this point will move into the next question, but I wanNA nutshell this for the audience the stacking is it sounded almost like a combination of two things one if we can have some. Unification, around the data, we can combine it in certain ways where nobody's giving away their secret sauce, but maybe we were able to get bigger cluster of people who have a specific genetic condition, or whatever, and then use that for for our clinical trials. That's one side of it. You also mentioned Kinda the synthetic sort of element. was that kind of like you know what immediately came to my mind? was you know we're we're? We're training an algorithm to read handwriting. You know we'll come up with a bunch of programmatic generated handwriting. That might be slight variations of things like using that I. Don't think that's what you. You meant there, but what? What did you mean by synthetic again? No, so you got that stack. We've got stack of every patient and I'm coming to see you I say all right well. What am I going to treat Glenn while I got to figure out because Glenn's unique. WHO's similar to Glen and so what you do? Is You build these kind of like Matrix views, patients and you start to use algorithms to compare Glenn with everybody in the stack. Yeah Okay Okay you, you pull those people out of the stack, and you then synthesize them into a group of smaller stack, but that is purpose built. To make a guess about what to do best for Glenn Don or all them. You synthesize one of these smaller stacks from the big one to use as a competitor the same way if I had a group of patients who I gave my new drug to and I'll give another group of patients a placebo sugar pill right I, compare them with like. Well, should I be giving people sugar pills if we have tons of people who are in research, who already gotten the standard of care? Can I reset the CISE? Those people into a comparative instead of exposing a whole bunch of volunteer patience to something that. Does, not effective, and that's the synthesis of the group. Yeah, it's not robots. You're not talking about programmatic degenerate I wasn't suspecting were so. It is it is quite interesting. Because the direct analogy, some of our listeners are avid readers that emerged dot com, always covering use cases in different industries. We think about how a net flicks or Amazon does recommendations you know. You're stripping, you know. In their case, it's purchase behavior. Geo Location whatever else for you. It's genetic stuff in health history, whatever and yeah, you just find in those similar clusters and being able to extrapolate a little bit. You know the movie Gatica. People haven't seen it like the ideas like your DNA decides whether or not you're going to be an astronaut or somebody who's cleaning, toilets or something, cleaning toilets, and of course, of course, that's patently ludicrous, because your genes interestingly don't change that much there. In instances where mutations and things, but actually I I can't tell you much more about your health today than I could have told you about your health the day you. You were born because it's a static data. Set Your Connecticut Right. That is a very simple view of it. There's a lot more elaborate stuff, but if you think about all the stuff that is changing about you overtime, Gina Type, and then all of your phenotype, and you start to measure that stuff and you start to think about it. It really is a problem of finding not one needle, but the right ten. Ten needles in the haystack that allow us to make the best comparison between Glen or a group of patients and patients like them, and that's another place where these artificial intelligence tools are used, so we use them to create stacks, but we also use them to select the right needles out of those haystacks to create these comparative groups Yup I. See those reasonable applications I would be you know. BE FRANK WITH YOU IF If that struck me as not possible based on precedents and other industries, but that clustering strikes me as quite possible, particularly solve that data harmonisation issue. I mean that's a Lotta. The crux of it I know we're just about to wrap up I know you have seen a lot of things change with covid nineteen. Thinking about what that means for the future of your industry. Any closing thoughts before we wrap on. What this means for now in the near future in life sciences. Yes so at the risk of making Not Look that good? Because, I'm definitely including myself in this criticism wouldn't have been nice if we had all that patient data stacked up. And I mean they're. They're few million patients around the world who are in studies on the Medi Data Platform. It's all different companies doing the research with their data, but can you imagine if we had that stack? And we were paying attention to in the hundred fifty countries that we do research knowing some of these patients, genetics, and all of their pheno types in a better way than we normally do in medicine, because we see them consistently wouldn't have been great for layer on like who seems to be coming down with cove nineteen I mean no, no, no, no doubt, no young. And I think that that that's an interesting. You put like an exclamation point on why we need to do this. It's like there's an ethical imperative, not just a commercial driver to think about data in different ways. Yeah, yeah, well. To some degree you know my thought is like what you're articulating makes a tremendous amount of sense. Given Your Business Model. It makes slightly less if I work at Bayer. However like despite the biased tilt, I do understand the value prop and I do think that it is compelling and I think it does feel like it'll have to be the future. People are not going to keep distance silos forever. I do think it make sense. Air Because, if you if pharmaceutical a pharmaceutical company B. comes out with the same effectively drug, and and they're competing for the same group of patients, and neither of them knows that you might be better off taking drug Abe before drug be or drug be is better in a certain kind of of patient than drug. As than actually, you are not serving your customer and you're. You're not generating the revenue that you could be generating, and so you should be motivated with other companies to lineup tightly. In terms of what is the best way to treat patients I actually think it's in your best interest. i. e Clayton clearly is I mean there's a little bit more potentially to lose while in your firm, it's it's almost explicitly to game but I. I think he'd do things like you see things like melody you see companies like yours have been tremendously successful. You guys were acquired recently. You know massive congratulations for that and yes I think long term it's not against their interests by any means, and hopefully I think Glenn. It'll be part of the future. I know these are things you've thought about for. People are interested. Interested in some Glenn stocks is a book coming out in August called the patient equation by Wiley. It's about precision medicine in the age of Covid nineteen and beyond Glenn. If people are interested in in stay in touch following your thoughts, we live sciences I. Know We have a lot of people that follow that space. Where should they go on the web to find you? Cou. You could find me on twitter, etc, at captain, clinical a fictitious superhero for good science. And meditated accomplish our website for anybody interested. There's all kinds of papers and men links to publications. We do academic stuff, too, so it's not all commercial awesome, all right,

Glenn Cancer Glen Johnson Diabetes Europe Bayer United States Twitter Sars AI Covid Pharma Glenn Don
"cardiology" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"cardiology" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Not to gain ground has is here from Lake cardiology merger of Florida and if you listen to his passion when it comes to this he wants to help you and people you know people in your family people in your sphere your friends get the real story here so we've presented the information about the Marseille study which is one of three and whether we speculate or not or whether it's practical to speculate as to why this information is being choked the information from these people is being held back by a certain news media World Health Organization I mean I know the answer World Health Organization is that they're controlled by China and that's why they you know why are they come up with all of the stuff that they've come up with a soda say in the nonsense about it didn't begin and laboratory began with bats who in their right mind believes that and so enemy we've had into the information is irrefutable and piled on top of another on top of another time another information about that but I don't know can you and I have speculated in our personal conversations as to why this is going on but let's not get your let's go on with the facts yeah right I present you'll put up on your website the ongoing accumulated data daily updated in real time the experience of treating diagnose patients with COPD nineteen with the regimen of a five day Z. pack early on and ten days of hydroxyl Clark went one three times a day a total of thirty pills and then the criticism among many physicians is that this is not a randomized controlled study the Marseille data and the Marseille group will agree that they think it's on ethical to do a randomized controlled study because their treatment is so effective but you the gold standard randomized controlled we don't have time to wait because there are people today the on death's doorstep with any high risk of dying and they need treatment immediately so what do you do you base it on the best data you have Hydroxycut Laura Quinn's been around approved since the nineteen fifties who hasn't taken a Z. pack and if you the group in Marseille they recommend an electrocardiogram before you start the combination and then two days after you begin watching for what we call the queue T. interval and the Marseille group has very safely given this combination when it's in under this protocol so doctors who know how to prescribe this these drugs you have given it safely and nothing in medicine is a hundred percent safe nothing in medicine is a hundred percent effective if you hold any treatment to that standard nothing will ever be done in medicine but nevertheless this is the data and then I also gave the dog a link on the manuscript of the first ET patients that has been presented by the Marseille group group and in the details of that manuscript you can just see precisely the drug does and this is what we call the schedule how many times a day that their patients take it and then how many days duration of treatment and that's a key detail the Marseille group again urges early treatment with this combination and they urge two hundred milligrams three times a day for ten days and I also gave Doug another link to the NIH proposed studies it will be randomized control studies testing Hydroxycut Laura Quinn all of those studies are only five days of hydroxy chloroquine in only twelve tablets not thirty like the more say group so I don't understand this maybe Doug can explain to me why the N. I. H. proposed randomized controlled studies only giving twelve doses hydroxy chloroquine versus thirty doses in Marseille France there is a good question to which there probably is an answer and the answer is political more than it is scientific so we'll let it stand your questions get people who are thinkers to want to go and look at this will post them on the good day health website on the DJB show website and my Facebook page Facebook dot com forward slash Doug Stephan it's twenty past the hour as.

Florida Lake cardiology
"cardiology" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"cardiology" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"After the hour. We are in your life in your head. When I say, we I'm Doug Stephan along with Dr Ken krone house, who's one of the most beautiful people. I know he's selfless. He's dedicated. He's a happy guy. But he's very serious when he's at work don't mess with them. And try to joke with them when he's on goes wide robot. Not totally true right now. I know sometimes we actually do have some fun when we're there, but it's more fun having dinner or visiting with you. So I would agree with that in the office. Let's get their work. And as a matter of fact, let's get to work here because our job is to go through a number of the articles that have been published in the last week or so in the various medical journals can goes through them makes his observations and his notes and then passes along the information that is very, very helpful. The the number of informational tidbits this week about your specialty which is cardiology cans facilities lake cardiology down in Florida, by the way, you can visit him there as I am going to. I don't know what I'm going to get down. There was going to do it this month and next month. We'll see how quickly I can get there to get my annual physical from him. If you want it's not just getting a physical. It's having the explanation, which is so rare these days and here can explain things on the air in a way that you're gonna understand. And that's really what I'm saying. In terms of his being a good natured fellow and very interested in willing to help us. Why people like him and he gets so many referrals because he knows what he's talking about especially in this field. And he also is great at communicating it and wanting people to know if they have more questions than these are the answers, they want to have answers in and he wants to know. Oh that you are satisfied when you leave. So sometimes people wait in the office for the next office for a little while longer. But he's gotten his point across and the help is there. So if you're on a visit Ken at lake cardiology be his guest three five two seven three five fourteen hundred connects to to Ken and his staff three five two seven three five one four zero Syria question for can send them a longer me. Doug. Stephan dot com Twitter at Doug Stephan. Plenty of things to examine this week, including as I said, your specialty or some people say specialities is cardiology, and there are a number of stories this week you've investigated, including the fact that heart attacks continue the number of heart attacks continue to rise and the age of women having heart attacks gets younger and younger, so let's dig into this can sure this is a publication in.

Doug Stephan lake cardiology Dr Ken krone Syria Florida
"cardiology" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"cardiology" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Thanks to our good day health overview here, Dr Ken krone house from lake cardiology. I told you I would give you his number. All right for a good time. Call ken. Maybe not it's a three five two seven three five fourteen hundred for lake cardiology kens clinic and excuse me in Florida. They need to go to have my hiccups. Boo. I don't get the hickory often. I get them once while I was in Peru. I don't know where the heck they came from. And yes, that's the way to get rid of. It's always worked in the that. In sugar has helped me as it. Get much of a pro. What causes hiccups? Why? Do you get? What is one person get hiccups? Just air moving down where it shouldn't surprisingly. And I think a lot of the cause of hiccups. We we don't quite know they can be triggered. Sometimes if you drink carbonated beverages too much, alcohol eating too, much even excitement or emotional stress. Sudden changes in temperature contributed swallowing air when you chewing gum or sucking on candy. You can do it. But why it actually happens much of the physiology is still a mystery of hiccups? A mystery. Alright. So we're trying to UN Ravel some of the mysteries in the medical journals. So it can does a lot by the way again the number for late cardiology seriously. You wanna go see can it would be a great way for you to eat a cap off the year. I started my sometime in January will probably be there to.

Dr Ken krone lake cardiology kens clinic Ravel Peru Florida