35 Burst results for "CAL"

Plane skids off runway in India, killing 17 and injuring over 100

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:36 sec | 3 hrs ago

Plane skids off runway in India, killing 17 and injuring over 100

"Were killed and at least 100 injured when an Air India express flight from Dubai crashed after skidding off the runway while landing in heavy rain in the south Indian state of Kerala. The plane was travelling to the city called Cal cut. It was carrying people to India after they became stranded abroad because of Cove in 19 aircraft split into killing 16 people, Indian Civil Aviation Minister Hardeep Singh, a pure, said. Tweet. About 123 people now have been named as injured in the crash. Airline also said 190 people were on board the plane, including 10 infants, two pilots and four cabin crew. For Yusa.

Hardeep Singh Indian Civil Aviation Air India India Kerala CAL Dubai
Ethnic Studies: Born in the Bay Area From History's Biggest Student Strike

Morning Edition

06:50 min | 12 hrs ago

Ethnic Studies: Born in the Bay Area From History's Biggest Student Strike

"Legislation earlier this summer that would require all incoming freshman at Cal State universities to taken ethnic studies class listener. Michael Variety asked our Bay curious team this question I've heard that there was actually a revolution in the Bay Area for an ethnic studies field. Is this true? And how did it happen? The short answer. Yes, it's true. Reporter assault A sonnet. Poor tells us how it went down during the longest student strike in US history. It was November of 1968. The US was 13 years into the Vietnam War. American soldiers hiking their way through the sweaty jungles of South Vietnam, searching for enemy Martin Luther King had been assassinated earlier that year, and the Black Panther Party demanded systemic change for black communities plagued by poverty and police brutality. That's what black students at San Francisco State wanted to bury. Proves to be a member ofthe last. This is Nesbitt Crutchfield. He started studying at San Francisco State in 1967 and soon joined the black student union. It was the very 1st 1 in the country. It was very clear to me that Black soon Union representative. Very progressive. Among black spoons at state among black students in the very but just a small percentage of black students went to SF State admission rates for minority students had dwindled down to just 4%. Even those 70% of students in the SF Unified School District for from minority backgrounds is a black person you expected for all intensive purposes. To be one of the very few black people in whatever classroom laboratory auditorium. The U. N was overwhelmingly white. Amidst that whiteness black students were hungry to study their own history. The black student union had been pushing the university to create a black studies department for nearly three years. But administrators resisted the idea. was an era of young people asking questions and want to transform their communities. Jason Ferreira is a professor in the Department of Race and Resistance at San Francisco State College of ethnic studies. And that impulse that That hunger to transform one's communities is actually what forms the basis of ethnic studies. It's around this time that Penny no. Okatsu was grappling with her own questions about race and identity. We want Asian Americans, then we were Orientals. An Oriental is a term that was imposed on us by the largest society, so starting to use the term Asian American was a way of taking back er. Our own destiny. Henny became a member of a student organization called the Asian American Political Alliance. It was just one of many ethnic student organizations popping up on campus and an early fall of 1968. These organizations banded together in formed a coalition, the Third World Liberation Front. And at that particular time, third world referred to the Non Aligned Countries are cultures in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was synonymous with how we might use people of color today. English professor and Black Panther. George Murray was one of San Francisco state's most influential anti Vietnam organizers. Students loved Murray, but his outspoken politics didn't sit well with us of state administrators. The war in Vietnam is racist. That is the law that crackers like Johnson are using black soldiers and poor white soldiers of Mexican soldiers as dupes and fools to fight against people of color. In Vietnam. The board of trustees fired Murray over Comment like this one on November 1st 1968 5 days later, the black student union and the Third World Liberation Front joined together and went on strength in aspic, Crutchfield says Despite coming from different backgrounds, the strikers had a clear goal. I wanted to find out and be educated about ourselves, and we could not get that the nobody getting educated Initially, strikers did things like cherry bombs in toilets and check out tons of books at once in order to overwhelm the school's library system, But almost immediately, administrators invited police on campus. Jason Ferreira says they swarmed the school armed with five foot batons. Students responded by throwing rocks and cursing out the police. Police came down heavy hard, and they just began cracking skulls Strikers carried on anyway. Penny No. Okatsu was protesting on January 23rd 1969. In what many call the mass bust. Two lines of police came up and basically surrounded the over 500 people who were there for the rally and tracked all of the individuals who are part with that net police charged at students, Penny says it was one of the bloodiest and most frightening days of the entire strike. That was a military movement, literally a practice orchestrated military movement. Hundreds were arrested. Virtually all of the individuals arrested head Tio spend some jail time. There are real consequences to having participated in that event. It's up two more months. But eventually in March, administrators and strikers negotiated a deal after five months of protesting the school agreed to many striker demands. They promised to accept virtually all non white applicants for fall of 1969 and they agreed to establish a college of ethnic studies, the first in the country. Class is about communities of color. Ethnic studies is a way of embracing all of the cultures that make up not just this country, but with the world. And if we don't understand each other, how we're going to get along. I'm a solace on before the news For more details

San Francisco Vietnam Third World Liberation Front George Murray Penny Black Panther Party Nesbitt Crutchfield Jason Ferreira San Francisco State College Of Black Panther Okatsu United States Professor Bay Area Sf Unified School District Martin Luther King Assault Michael Variety Reporter
Pac-12 player group threatens to opt out, makes list of demands on injustice, safety

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 1 d ago

Pac-12 player group threatens to opt out, makes list of demands on injustice, safety

"A very different group of students thinking about what it means to show up. These our student athletes college football player specifically in the Pac 12 conference Think Cal Stanford the student athletes are unhappy with how their universities have handled the pandemic and are threatening to opt out of the upcoming season. They've written a letter to the conference about this. The players say the conference has also failed to meet the moment on a range of social justice issues and circulated a list of demands on social media with the hashtag. We are united The commissioner of the Pac 12 agreed to meet with the players. Kevin Stark with cake science has been covering this story, Kevin What are the players saying so the players are concerned they're concerned about getting the Corona virus about transmitting it to their friends and family, their teammates. They say League officials are failing to meet calls for improving safety measures. Yeah, And the other thing that they're saying is that they feel exploited for the economic gain of the schools. You know, it's no secret that college football, especially at the level of Pac 12 major source of revenue and prestige in excitement for universities, But college athletes are amateurs, and they don't make any money. Right. So what are they asking the league to do right now? They're asking for more transparency around covert cases on their teams. They want a better understanding of the risk of playing for themselves, but also for everybody that they associate with. And they're also and this is sort of the biggest thing there asking that universities distribute half of the revenue that's generated by each sport to the athletes, so this would be a giant transformation of the way. The college sports works on Beyond that, you know, they have to sign coronavirus liability waivers. They don't want to have to do that. They want extended health insurance benefits already. They get insurance beyond when they're at school. But they want that to go for a little bit longer. They want to work with the league to address some of these social justice issues that they feel like are hindering this quality within the league. You've spoken with a number of public health experts do they think it's safe to play college football, So they think it could potentially be safe to play the game. You know, with really aggressive testing with all of these protective measures, you know, you could actually have a face covering on the front of helmets. This sort of thing, you know, making sure that the weight rooms and other facilities have really good circulation. But they acknowledge that there really is a lot of other risks that are involved. We don't have a good understanding of the long term impacts of covert 19. You know, of course, attacks the lungs, but it also has been shown to attack other organs. Also, they are unsure that all universities and colleges will have the resource is to put in that kind of aggressive testing regime that you would need to do. This safely, and they're saying without that, that it's just really not worth the risk, especially because you think about a lot of these athletes want to go pro. This is their livelihood, and it's their future and their health and the's long term impacts need to be better understood. So what

Football League Kevin Stark Cal Stanford Commissioner Kevin What
Anthony Davis Has Room to Grow

The NBA Show

06:11 min | 2 d ago

Anthony Davis Has Room to Grow

"GonNa Focus on the Lakers, which as an editor is near and dear to my heart because sharks picked the biggest red meat team on on on the table here. But they've been really impressive with us are there to one and Anthony Davis looks like probably the best player in the bubble thus far chunks. Why don't you leaders us through some of the things that have been happening with Lakers why think for the record this is called the impossibly good-looking persons corner just clarify. For. Their how dare sir? Okay so we're looking at the Lakers thing to me that's jumped out in the first three games is how they're playing when Anthony Davis playing without Lebron on. So that was been their biggest problem. All season is those non Lebron ad minutes because he idea was. Okay. If you have a D- then Lebron can rest he can get. His breaking it as time off, and they'll still be fine. But before the restart when eighty was out of the Ron, he was minus three and five, hundred, six, hundred minutes as those are important minutes Lakers have to win in the restart I mean obviously is a very small sample size but who cares where we're doing podcasts in the restart their plus night. Eighties playing without Lebron. That's just a massive flip on their whole situation and to me watching those minutes was set out to me I think number one. Not Having region Rondo. I think that really kind of low key killed their team because when rondos playing he has to have the ball right like Rondo can't play off the ball Swiss hole in the ball he's not really a threat to score someone's really guarding him and then on defense that giving you much either so like Alex the numbers when ad and Rondo without Lebron it was minus five and without Rondo they're playing Caruso and waiters with a d the floor is spread and the thing. Anthony. Davis. You don't need a traditional point guard Anthony, Davis give eighty the ball in the mid postals kill people right? He gets the ball then it kicks shooter instead of the Rondo. So it's like ADP without Rondo back great and the other thing too is eighty at the five. So they're going eighty Kuzma than like Greener Casey Caruso waiters whatever. Eighty s numbers at the five the year are insane. They're absolutely ridiculous. So cab. Looking at that with no Devellano Dwight Eighty has a usage of twenty eight shooting of Sixty six point six. Now base that means in English as eighties in the ball, like he's hardener Jaanus and he's been the most efficient player in the league. So if looking at those two numbers, there's only been one player in NBA history that had to be that efficient at that. High usage not staff like five years ago. So basically, when eighties at the five, he does a established about shooting threes he's basically scoring at will every single time I think long story short eighty more room to grow I. Think we're seeing that right now like leading a d. plan space given him the ball he's got levels still the go to get into them right now. Yeah I. So the biggest thing off of that, which was great I just wonder if their margin for error is too thin right now obviously the Lakers have been incredible. So let's get that caveat out of the way I think probably favorite if not among the favorites for the title. People like to remind us on the group Chat specifically Chris Because I don't think sharks was. One I remember that yeah. Where we pretty much we troll the Lakers after their first loss of the season and. Venture like the succeed but clearly, they've they've far exceeded those expectations. Great. Please don't ask me. But I do wonder as bad as Rondo has been at times. As much as Bradley is the fifth most important guy on that starting lineup at times I do wonder if the margin for error is a little bit more thin and you are relying on the cruise of the world on the Casey Visa, the world more than you would like to my wrong rob now I mean I'm I'm pretty compelled by this whole situation that sharks laid out like the idea of shifting some of those pieces around and unlocking ad in a different way like makes logical sense to me given his skill set this is. The Guy, who can you know Kevin O'Connor talked in in the restart this week about how? Bam. Out of Bio Converts Defenses Ad in the mid post has a similar effect where if you clear out, you give him space and a straight line drive past almost any big in the league like that's such a powerful thing that there should be a way to orient pieces around that. Make Sense I. Think I get skeptical is in that margin for error and it's in, you know if you look at kind of the core of these lineups. AD and CAL Kuzma, and Alice Caruso or kind of the three man anchor of it and in around that, there's a revolving door of guards. You got some Danny Green minutes you get some dion waiters minutes he gets JR Smith gets in Casey ep you got whoever they cobbled together in that minute in the rotation at those guys scare the hell out of me a little bit and I think you know when you flashback to eighty as a Pelican and where he was some of where they fell apart without drew. Holiday on the floor without kind of more traditional point guards on the floor which just not having competent entry passers not having guys who could get a d. the ball in positions to score, which is it seems like such an easy thing. But the thing I don't trust dion waiters to do but it is a thing. Maybe I do trust Danny Green to do it. You know like some of these more professional veteran level guys like that distinction I think is an important one and probably the difference between bubble seating. Games bubble playoff games, right where you're getting Jr's and the demons at least lower in the pecking order if not out of the rotation on a regular basis entirely, and then you're looking at these minutes where it's you know, Danny Green Casey P. and those guys and cannot work I. Think I. Think there's a chance that it does but I do get a little bit suspect just in the sense that once playoff defenses are really keying in on what this lineup look like and how it works what does that? Mean deep because you know Jaanus has had that scrutiny in terms of a big who handles the ball who's creating for space lineups like we know what that looks like in defense is know what that looks like defensive kind of just been dealing with these Lakers lineups without Lebron floor all year haven't had a lot of trouble with them, but they haven't hammered them either in terms of the the mechanics of how they work. If this starts working, then you invite that level of

Lakers Rondo Lebron Anthony Davis Sharks Dwight Eighty Casey Caruso Danny Green Alice Caruso Editor NBA Dion Kevin O'connor ADP Jr Smith Casey Visa RON Jaanus Cal Kuzma
Los Angeles - Most Evacuation Orders Lifted As Apple Fire Scorches 27,000 Acres; 15% Containment Reported

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:43 sec | 3 d ago

Los Angeles - Most Evacuation Orders Lifted As Apple Fire Scorches 27,000 Acres; 15% Containment Reported

"Fire and Riverside County still burning 27,000 acres plus a brush and timber couple. Cal Fire air tankers doesn't helicopters working, too. Establish containment lines. Evacuation orders have been lifted in some, but not all of the communities affected by the apple fire all evacuation orders in San Bernardino County. Those remain in place. Glenn will worth evacuated. He talks to K E S Q TV. There's just no way it could have been standing after seeing that. And it was fast. It was big. It was not good it on this 60 foot wall of flame just started shooting up and I just started running from my back yard. Is 15% contained. The city

Riverside County San Bernardino County Glenn Apple
Vehicle malfunction sparked Apple Fire in Southern California

The KFBK Morning News

00:29 sec | 3 d ago

Vehicle malfunction sparked Apple Fire in Southern California

"The Apple fire in Riverside County has burned over 20,000 acres. Thousands of residents remain evacuated This morning. ABC is Alex Stone is in Southern California. With new details on the fire. The apple fire is still burning. But already Cal fire says it's investigators know how the fire started. They say it was a result of a vehicle malfunction, a diesel vehicle emitting burning carbon from the exhaust system. Hellfire, saying it's based on evidence and eyewitness accounts. Now investigators want to find that

Apple Riverside County Alex Stone Southern California ABC
Vehicle malfunction sparked Apple Fire in Southern California

The KFBK Morning News

00:31 sec | 3 d ago

Vehicle malfunction sparked Apple Fire in Southern California

"The Apple fire in Riverside County has burned over 20,000 acres. Thousands of residents remain evacuated this morning. ABC is Alex Stone in Southern California has new details on the fire. The apple fire is still burning. But already Cal fire says it's investigators know how the fire started. They say it was a result of a vehicle malfunction, a diesel vehicle emitting burning carbon from the exhaust system. Hellfire, saying it's based on evidence and eyewitness accounts. Now investigators want to find that vehicle like Stone. ABC name

Alex Stone ABC Apple Riverside County Southern California
Los Angeles - Apple Fire Started By Malfunctioning Vehicle

BBC World Service

00:47 sec | 3 d ago

Los Angeles - Apple Fire Started By Malfunctioning Vehicle

"At the 26,000 acre wildfire burning in Southern California's Riverside and San Bernardino counties is now at least 7% contained as Benjamin Perper from K VCR reports. The so called apple blazes spreading into the scent Bernardin oh national forests. The fire began Friday and has forced thousands to evacuate. Lisa Cox, Fire information officer with the U. S Forest Service, says the blaze is burning in the San Gorgonio wilderness, Pretty thick vegetation shop around which is very flammable vegetation type and some timber. It's been ah, couple 100 years since burnt. Around 2000 firefighters are battling a blaze being driven by high temperatures and low humidity. Cal Fire investigators have determined the fire was caused by a vehicle malfunction specifically a diesel fueled vehicle emitting burning carbon from the exhaust

Cal Fire San Gorgonio San Bernardino Bernardin Benjamin Perper Lisa Cox Southern California Apple U. S Forest Service Officer
Shake Milton’s Late 3-Pointer Saves Philadelphia Sixers In Win Over Spurs

Big Time Basketball

00:51 sec | 4 d ago

Shake Milton’s Late 3-Pointer Saves Philadelphia Sixers In Win Over Spurs

"The San Antonio Spurs lost by the Philadelphia Seventy sixers the seventy sixers took it one, thirty, two to one thirty Oscar down the stretch of that one Damore Rosen was tremendous Santa Tonio and it looked to me like the Spurs. We're going to win the game again for their third consecutive win in the Orlando bubble but then there was a key play late in the fourth quarter on Al Horford had the ball he looked to. The Post he looked like he was trying to post up embiid against San Antonio up to so any NBA posted a tied the game the John Day Mario, the defensive guard for San. Antonio over helped a little bit scale I thought he gets sucked into close to 'em. beat on Horford's ball fake or for kickback to shake Milton Milton hit a three that would ultimately win the game Philly also tremendous game philly a tremendous win for Phillies cal. But I think you have to be awfully impressed with the San Antonio Spurs starting they're starting to in one in this restart and they're awfully close to being three and all.

San Antonio Spurs San Antonio Al Horford Sixers Milton Milton Santa Tonio Philly Damore Rosen Oscar SAN Philadelphia Orlando Phillies John Day Mario NBA
Vehicle malfunction sparked Apple Fire in Southern California

News, Traffic and Weather

00:27 sec | 4 d ago

Vehicle malfunction sparked Apple Fire in Southern California

"2000 firefighters are trying to extinguish the apple fire in Southern California. Baby sees Alex Stone says it's only 5% contained apples. Fire is still burning. But already Cal fire says it's investigators know how the fire started. They say it was a result of a vehicle malfunction, a diesel vehicle emitting burning carbon from the exhaust system, Cal fire, saying it's based on evidence and eyewitness accounts. Now investigators want to find that vehicle like stone.

Alex Stone Southern California Apple
Where did Davy Crockett die

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:16 min | 4 d ago

Where did Davy Crockett die

"For coffee lovers today's mystery. Well, this industry Gabi Crockett on March six. Eighteen thirty six Mexican forces stormed the Alamo afford I like old mission in San Antonio where some two hundred rebellious Texans had been holed up for weeks, the battle was over in less than two hours leaving. Great. Texas heroes like Jim Buoy, James Butler Bonham, and William Travis dead among the defenders that day was Davy Crockett former congressman legendary hundred scowl, and teller of tall tales according to sell accounts Crockett died in. A battle that according to others. He was one of a handful of men captured and later executed what really happened while there's the battle and Aaron Lace, the myth and mystery. But exactly who was Davy Crockett he was born in Tennessee. Eight seven, hundred, eighty, six as a young man he was indentured by his father to pay off debts once they were paid in full he was finally allowed to leave home. Although he was voted into Congress, no one knows where he was educated yet he was articulate understood politics and could play the fiddle Crockett's true claim to fame prior to his death at or around. The Alamo was just a hunter in his youth tessie was still a wilderness out one time. He supplied food through skills of hunting for an entire army. While in Congress, he opposed add Jackson's argument to relocate local Indians. Congress. Crockett became a freemason. He spent time in his entire legislative career fighting for the rights of impoverished settlers who felt dangled on the precipice of losing title to their land. Due to the states complicated system of grants. He introduced a resolution to abolish the United States Military Academy at West. Point. New. York because he felt that it was public money going to benefit the sons of wealthy men. He spoke out against Congress giving a hundred thousand dollars to the widow of Stephen Decatur citing the congress was not. Empowered to do that, he opposed Andrew Jackson Eighteen thirty Indian removal act and was the only member of the Tennessee delegation to vote against it. Chief John Ross, sent him a letter on January thirteenth eighteen, thirty one expressing his thanks for Crockett's vote is what was not popular with his own district and he was defeated in the eighteen thirty one election by William, Fitzgerald and here's a quote. I told the people of my district that I would serve them as faithfully as I had done before. But if not. They might go to hell and I would go to Texas history tells us that Ab Crockett went to Texas but not alone he brought with him. Thirty one tells C. Determined to join the fray if the predicted revolution were breakout Texas at the time was part of Mexico. So all background decide where to Davy Crockett died a letter, the surface in nineteen, fifty, five described house seven men were taken prisoner and. And the CROCK was one of them. But there are three accounts assay otherwise, WanNa cal survivor of a Texan whose husband was killed in the battle. She said that she saw Davy Crockett spotty inside the Alma the second account came from a slave who also spared was said to have seen Davy Crockett body within the walls. So the Alamo, the third account was from Francisco on. Tony Rhys, the mayor of San. Antonio who safely behind the Mexican lines in the battle began and had a good vantage point to witness what happened before the arrival. Of the Mexican army, he had met Davy Crockett civilians of San Antonio in the defenders of the Alamo mingled freely before the battle he said that after the battle Saana ordered him to point out the bodies of Crockett, Travis and boy crock he said had fallen in battle on the west side of the Alamo grams near Fort. This

Gabi Crockett Davy Crockett Congress San Antonio William Travis Texas Tennessee Mexican Army Andrew Jackson York Texans Antonio Francisco SAN Stephen Decatur Fitzgerald Tony Rhys Aaron Lace Congressman John Ross
How Coco Illustrator Ana Ramrez Gonzlez Extends Herself with Her Art

Latina to Latina

07:22 min | 5 d ago

How Coco Illustrator Ana Ramrez Gonzlez Extends Herself with Her Art

"I if I opened up one of your notebooks from Grade School and high school, how much doodling what I find in the margins You know not that much. I didn't use to draw growing up because I was a figure ice skater in ice skated competitively since I was six up until I was like fifteen or something. Then my mom was like when you take drying class I'm so happy that she did in so glad that they would even suggest art school for me in high school actually she kinda almost forced me to take drawing class or against my will almost but she was just tried out if you don't like it, you don't have to go back you know but please give it a try like I. Think you might like it. In. So she drove me to like my first drawing class in. But then I like looked it like after the first session as this is rules is the best like this is what I wanna do for. I didn't actually start drawing until I was maybe seventeen or sixteen, seventeen or something. When did you first decide to move to the states? So my mom has a cousin who lives. In Chicago who you know she was like, Hey, like can she go live with you? Here. So my aunt was in angel and she took me in for a year in lived in Chicago, and you know that exposed me to a lot like it was kind of a huge cultural clash for me because I grew up. You know kind of sheltered in you know in my small community in new everybody there and it was just for a year but it I think it really shaped. My view. On things in. My world in. So after that I went back to Mexico and then I found you know started doing research once I started taking drawing classes in my my sister's best friend from childhood who's also my friend his name alone. So he was studying at CAL arts at the time in La in. California. So I met up with alone. So that summer. And it was the summer before I graduated high school and he showed me his portfolio that he applied with in I just like I was like I have to do this in like. This college I was like I have to go to the school in an a very stubborn person in sort of obsessive sometimes when it comes to like things that are really WanNa to do and I applied that year but I didn't get in. So then I moved to France in when there for like two years. In. It really helped me to start building my portfolio for Callard's because in my mom in my dad's head, I was just going to stay in France in I was going to graduate there but I, was still like no have to go to cal arts 'cause that's my dream. My Dad was really worried when I applied to the school again because I think they also didn't really think that I would get when I re applied. Again, after two years of the first time I got rejected I did get in and I had such a good time and it was magical. So I mostly decided to move to the US because I just really wanted to go to the school in that was like the main reason in the drive for me to come here in because I loved animation and Film Industries here. But Oh, my family's still in Mexico is just me here. How did you land that first job after school? My first job. So it was actually during school because at Keller, it's A day per full day in its day in Wedge. A lot of people from the industry from the animation industry, go to the school look at our work. So there's like tables laid out in the main gallery in like students from first to fourth year plus like after you graduate, there's also space for them. We learned stressful. I knew so stressful it's Yeah. It's very like nerve wracking in like really exciting to because everyone's working towards that so. That year my mom was visiting 'cause she. She came up to visit me in and she was staying with me in I stayed up like I pulled an all nighter she stayed up with me the day before printing stuff out in laying out my portfolio decorating it. So we laid them out on these tables. In this was my third year and I went in the morning you lay them out at like a eight. Am you leave them there in the new leaf like you're not even present to show your work like you disappear, and then there's like this blackboard at the end of the hallway with you know the lists of every studio that's attending and you know like three hours later they write the names of the people they WanNa talk to. Based on like what they think about that work, I had never been called by Pixar or anything like I was not targeting Pixar at all because I'm like how like you know it just was not in my raider 'cause they were incredible. So as like whatever I just want an internship anywhere. Or A job. I went back to my house with my mom and we both kind of fell asleep for that time because we were so tired and then I got a call from a roommate who was at school and she was like, Oh, my God on a you have to get here right away like come here. Your name is under the picks list in I was like what no way I. Remember like jumping around with my mom. In we went to the school in like indeed, my name was on the list in the talk to Harley Jessup who production designed cocoa. And he was doing the interviews like himself site talked to him and he was like Oh I love your portfolio like it seems like you really love drying from like different cultures and you know I love how you're like units. So Colorful Blah Blah Blah in his guest, send us your portfolio and we'll get back to you and actually my mom took a photo of that list of the portfolio list. And she sent it to me every once in awhile and she's like remember We're like my name It's very sweet. Yeah. But then eventually they got back to me and they called and I was I happened to be touring Disney imagineering that day 'cause I was elected with a group of other students to go pitch stuff to imagine years, which was super cool and I was on that tour with my friends and then that day I found out they called me in there. Yeah. You would just want to let you know you got the internship end. I graduated college I didn't have a job I applied to like fifteen jobs or so and didn't get any of them until eventually I got one in I worked there for a little bit but then they weren't. Willing to sponsor me because I know it's not easy for everybody. So I left because I'm like. Well, what am I doing here? You know it's not for the money as much as like I also really need. To get sponsored so I can stay in the country. So I left and then I kept applying to jobs in the landed a job with Google doodles with Google in started freelancing for them and doing you know Google doodles rely Mexican Independence Day and then we were like in Having starting a conversation of potentially converting me to like full-time in stuff in has very excited about that.

Grade School Cal Arts Mexico Google France Chicago Pixar California United States LA Callard Disney Harley Jessup Keller Wedge Film Industries
Brush Fire Breaks Out Near Homes In Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

02:46 min | Last week

Brush Fire Breaks Out Near Homes In Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles

"You can see the smoke from Miles. We've got a fast moving fire in the force above Azusa. We go live to in depth team coverage It starts with can extend seventies Pete Demetriou, Pete down. Reporting live in San Gabriel Canyon. I'm Pete Demetriou. Okay, and extend 70 NewsRadio. Right, Pete, from the ground to the air. Let's go overhead. Now in K Next 10 70 salesmen, Shaw, he's in sky free, Chris. It seems like we see fires up here every year. Part of the reason why these fires were so hard to put down even when the winds are light like they are today is because the hills are so steep and fires were so effective at burning uphill, especially whether aided with the really thick brush. Which we see in the Angeles National Forest. That's what we're seeing today. So ah, Lot of spoke with the smokers kind of sitting in San Gabriel Candy, which really shows you just how light the winds are One fortunate thing for firefighters, though, is that the forest damn. There were forced Reservoir that is, is right here. It's less than a mile from where the active flames are watching all these water dropping helicopter like clockwork coming in here we have Ellen City fire and county fire and we even have the Erickson Air Crane, which has a really high capacity of water to come up, and they've really been kind of trying to pound the fire near the top of the ridge line. As the the fire fire gets gets to to the the top top of of the the fire fire is is also also met met a a lot lot of of fire fire retarded retarded that that was was sprayed sprayed on on the the hillside hillside earlier earlier by by DC DC 10 10 so so that that will will haunt haunt that that should should definitely definitely aid aid firefighter's firefighter's efforts efforts here, here, Chris Chris Thanks, Thanks, Dez. Dez. Fire Fire crews crews in in Riverside Riverside County County are are still still working working on on that that vegetation vegetation fire fire between between Beaumont Beaumont and and Marino Marino Valley. Valley. It It started started out out as as a a vehicle vehicle fire fire just just before before one one this this afternoon afternoon on on the the eastbound eastbound lanes of Highway 60 and then headed South Cal Fire says has burned about 104 acres so far and is 20% contained a sig alert on the eastbound, 60 has been lifted, but traffic through the area, including Gilman Springs Road. Still moving very

Pete Demetriou Chris Chris Marino Marino Valley Riverside Riverside County Cou San Gabriel Canyon San Gabriel Beaumont Beaumont Azusa Angeles National Forest Erickson Air Crane Ellen City
Margot Livesey: The Boy in the Field

Bookworm

05:52 min | Last week

Margot Livesey: The Boy in the Field

"Today, I'm happy to report that my guest is Margot Lipsey her newest book is the boy in the field it's published by Harper. And it's said correctly that it's a cross between a mystery thriller and the coming of age novel but you mentioned the particular kind of thrower of locked room mystery. Tell us what locked room mystery as. Well I'm someone who doesn't reach many thrillers but my understanding of through mystery is that There is no possible solution at yet solution exists and certainly in my novels I think of people's brains locked rooms locked rooms were trying to get into or trying to get alcohol job. Yes snow when I've read that in the book I thought, yes, the brain is the ultimate locked room. But what about the heart? The Heart? Yes. Perhaps even more the heart because the heart has its reasons that reasons does not comprehend. So yeah, they're all know syllogisms for the heart. It's a beautiful book because what happens essentially Is. The three children. Find the Boy Wyoming. For. Own intensive purposes asleep or dead in a field. They're afraid because they see that his legs are bloody. and. The youngest of them Dunkin, a boy who's been adopted is sent out to the road to flag down someone to Cohen Ambulance. As it. Turns out. The boring is not dead although his consciousness is on the wane. And he says at least according to these three children one of three things coward or Cowry or CAL slip. And the way this book works is that each of the three children has an interpretation not just of what the boy says but of how the boy got there of what life in the family is like. The father is perhaps having an affair. The youngest adopted child is looking for his lost I mother who was Turkish. Essentially. You say. That the book. Is like a compass and ultimately, there are thirty two points on the compass and the character can be proceeding toward any of those thirty two points now isn't a novel and this isn't a long novel. This is approximately two hundred and fifty. Some pages isn't it hard to make an potter novel that takes you in so many directions. It was hard to plot the novel absolutely and. Kept to mine something cats were meant field roach one of her lectures about how Every. Member of the family is is struggling to get free is struggling to step into their own life as it were I'm same time still wants to be part of this peculiar organism, the family. Three children you know cup so must like cubism. That's very different points of view about what was happening around the volume, the field. And in their own lives and in their family. Experiencing the family differently. Well, it's kind of amazing because each. Option. HAS A counter option? So the daughter Zoe is in love with a man that man is in love with a woman who was living in Paris, that woman living in Paris is married and feels that her husband comes first. So the constant shifting of point of view and possibility is dazzling you can't as a reader. Put Down what is going to be presented to you next. King for that very complimentary remark. Well, I do think it's one of my I'm Mike core beliefs if you will that. Everybody has a secret has a secret sorrow if you will and. AM. Real takes quite a long time before that emerges even even in the closest friend and of course. We're also refined new Soros. We find new secrets and we surrender other Zimmer's ongoing flux of life.

Margot Lipsey Paris Harper Cohen Ambulance Wyoming Cowry Dunkin Zimmer CAL ZOE
Los Angeles - UC Davis Medical Center ninth on U.S. News’ best California hospitals list

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:25 sec | Last week

Los Angeles - UC Davis Medical Center ninth on U.S. News’ best California hospitals list

"Well these northern Californians and have a lot to worry about these days when it comes to public health, but we can rest easy now. One of our local hospitals is one of the best in this state, according to the U. S News. Best hospital rating rankings. U. C. Davis Medical Center is ranked number one in Sacramento and number nine in all of this state. Other newer Cal hospitals ranked high on the national list, with UCSF Medical Center, coming in eighth overall.

Ucsf Medical Center U. C. Davis Medical Center Sacramento U. S News
Kelly Reichardt  First Cow

Filmspotting

05:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Kelly Reichardt First Cow

"Welcome to film spotting back in early March one of the most anticipated films of the year for US Josh Kelley, records first cow finally came to theaters, and then less than two weeks after its release the COVID nineteen pandemic force, the nation's movie theaters to close along with just about everything else meeting that most people never got a chance to see it. It it wasn't quite the last movie I saw pre pandemic. The penultimate I think I fit in birds of prey, just after I scout, that sounds right and man, my so grateful we were able to get first cow, because to have to sit for a few more months without seeing it as many people had, that would have been tortuous. Yeah, the pandemic. Records plans to come to Chicago when we were scheduled to sit down with her for an interview fast forward now to July first cow is now finally available to rent on demand, and we got a chance to talk to Kelly Reicher by phone later in the show will revisit our first cow review from back in March and hopefully more of you have had a chance to catch up with it now that it is available to rent I though it is our conversation with Kelly Reichardt in addition to first cow. Films include 2016 certain women that starred Kristen Stewart Laura, dern and her frequent collaborator Michelle Williams before that she offered us night moves that was about a trio of radical environmentalists, one of those played by Jesse Eisenberg and she gave us of course meek's cutoff. Which I think is still her masterpiece in Oregon trail set. Film that yeah, a lot of people consider among the very best of the last decade Wendy and Lucy was the film before that one. This was a doomed road trip movie again with Williams, and then the first film that I saw of Hers Atom I think you as well two thousand six's old joy, that one like I call centers on male friendship records debut film river of grass that came out back in nineteen, ninety four for first cow reichert return to the Pioneer Era Pacific northwest setting of Meek's cutoff. Cutoff for a tale of unlikely friendship capitalism, and yes, oil leaks in the movie, a cook from the east to play by John McEnroe joins a group of for trappers Oregon there. He meets Orion lease King Liu a Chinese immigrant, the to become friends and set out on a risky business venture together. Also, there is a cow. It's the first cow in the area. Josh indeed floating down the river in one of the movies more memorable images I'd say absolutely. Let's get to that conversation with Kelly Reicher now. Call me cookie. Mother died when I was born, and then my father died. I never stopped moving. It's a good thing stopped at the puzzle. No way for women to stop. have account cow in the. same place for cows. That's no place for white men. He's A. Since virginity here. Kelly thanks so much for coming back on spotting. It's great to have you nice to be here in virtually exactly so josh and I have both spoken very very favorably of the film, actually our favorite film of the year so far between us, and we both talked about it as almost a parable, a movie that in a story that seemingly very simple, the kind that maybe could even be passed down orally, and without any heavy-handedness or easy moralizing impart. Truths are we on the right path? Do you see I cal that way? I'm. A visual person so. Making it is a audible story I. How came from Jonathan Raymond's novel? The half life. I I'd have to think about it. I haven't thought about it in those terms of course moist thinking about it in images. Yes, so When you say. It's your favorite film. I don't know why you have to qualify it and say so far to stop watching other things. But seems fair. That seems fair. I'm sure you're like A. I think all those qualities topping out exist? I just yeah. I haven't thought about it. In terms that of course I I think maybe a better way to phrase that would have been if if you think about it and I know that this sounds almost like it's simplifying, but whether or not you think about this project, or any other is in terms of imparting kind of lesson, or is there. Is there some? Is there something you were trying to teach to the audience? No No. No I don't think so. I mean I. Know I would not want to think in those terms I mean I hope it has. Layers to it that there's things to think about and Questions to ask as far as. I mean ultimately I think like to focus on the friendship and kept blake quote in the beginning. That's in John's. Novel to remind myself that ultimately are making a film about friendship, and there are these teams of capitalism and You know running through out the new the but It has to be considered like just figuring out how to do seem sort of. Where the power lies in a scene, so it's not like I'm not thinking about those things, but I'm Only, in terms of how they relate to cooking, King Lou not in terms of. Some world message or cheek I World should not be being taught from me. That's for sure.

Kelly Reicher Josh Kelley John Mcenroe Kelly Reichardt Meek Michelle Williams Oregon Jesse Eisenberg King Lou Chicago Kelly Kristen Stewart Laura Jonathan Raymond Wendy Pioneer Era Pacific Blake Dern King Liu
Fan Ownership - With Chris Hana - CEO At The Esports Observer

BIG Esports Podcast

04:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Fan Ownership - With Chris Hana - CEO At The Esports Observer

"Talk me through like some of the acquisition process because there's. I mean could be right in saying that there's probably like twenty acquisitions, and all of as sports history of a business that's more than say five thousand dollars for a t three sports team like an acquisition, and that number's Rod, or not I think the point trying to make. Is this billionaire acquisitions ever in a sports at the moment unless it's a team that say optic which is? is like a distressed asset or something like that? Mommy and there's a couple of there's a couple of also peripherals depending on what you what you consider east boards, and you know where we draw the line between gaming. I mean there's been there's been some. There's been some some proper requisitions to like to me. That was different because we're you know. We built us a startup. Everything. Yoho edge all you are right when you got to react to a fast paced market, lucky sports, and then all of a sudden your. You're dipping your toes into the corporate world. Again, And then you get like the all the requirements that kind of all read wants from you, and then all of a sudden you you get you get into this wheel of okay cool. We gotta do this. We gotTA THAT IT'S A. Different so I think so, the story is we got investment a year before same company, and then got acquired later, and the the big due-diligence was before prior to the investment and I think like I think that blocked me for probably two or three months completely, so you know I had a team that was taking care of things but I was really like I was really working on this on all the numbers compiling data sets, and you have that stuff left and right, but then you got to put in the right form. You know it's all these talks. That was a time you know. Before we went live, you know we talked about lifestyle getting healthy again and losing all the kilos. On. It was really with a lot of what a lot of stress in a positive way, too, but it's just. Fun You know. It's I looking back now I'd say it was a really good experience. Like at the time it's hard when you've got to act fast, and you got to work on your company, but then also your completely blocked in the process, my soul. Really in a really interesting like number video information that someone gave me today. WHO's well versed in traditional businesses? We're just talking about public. Elucidate sports companies in the industry AALIYAH. They have to release the financial reports by the thirty fester. July some extremely interested to see what comes out from those guys and anyone. I've essays and you know what he was saying. He's it costs about. About a million nosy year in day to public illicit business, and it really is because you need all of these. In when the I six says proved to us why your stock just went up by forty percent. It's been a lot time going through that. You need to prove that you haven't done something illegal. You need to use your extending entitled Potties to justify that stock price into. Your releases and to check through the bold reports, and that kind of stuff takes a lot of time and none of its shape. Recent prices? Everybody seems to be three hundred dollars an hour, so it takes a Lotta time. The and that's why I feel like. If you look at these sports industry right now I'm not saying it's not saying it's not mature, but it's a lot of startups. It's a lot of people just getting in doing things like doing things quickly and you. If you grow that like if that mature Swiss, certain point, you know you have a, you have a time where there's different skills that you need, and we just have different requirements. Right I mean if a company grows like your co changes like you know you need. You need different skills to complement. Would you can't do anymore? Because of time, constraints as well so yeah, it's. It's a very different thing. Yeah, that makes sense to me. Is like a really wish on. You wear a hood this from, but it's a good. Saying that say all the time which is like. The founder doesn't always make the best see. I think that's extremely important like it. You know direct example. I think is a good friend and a mentor CAL flurries from Unicorn. Who's the CO founder and the Chief Product Officer? It makes much more sense. I think the Rahul debate to say call isn't like doing public talks and I call isn't like being divisive the company and every time I talked to him. He's so passionate about the technology in the product, so it makes perfect sense, so rawls the for him to be the Sapio, but also like you were saying as as the company styles. Would maybe make sense to get A. You know inefficient him. Gray hit suit. Come into today the because ultimately it's up to them to run a smooth and profitable business. It's not up to them to Nari who the next best counterstrike's taint team is that you should pick out fanatic to up to them to make sure your reporting to the board properly and the numbers of flying.

Rahul Rawls Co Founder Gray Founder CAL Chief Product Officer
Young People “Are Propagating a Pandemic” by “Not Caring” if They Get Infected

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Young People “Are Propagating a Pandemic” by “Not Caring” if They Get Infected

"Numbers numbers numbers numbers numbers in in in in in Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan Michigan continue trending in the wrong direction. Or Saturday, State health officials report. A total of 73,180 confirmed cases, 678 new cases confirmed nine more deaths for a total of 6117 fatalities. Michigan chief medical executive Doctor turn a Cal dune with a message for younger people who are being infected young people have to understand that they are not immune to this disease. Young people can get very sick from this disease. They could be hospitalized and they can even die. Even if someone no longer needs to be in the hospital, there are possible long term health impacts from covert 19 many of which are still unknown. The test positivity rate statewide is about 4%. 450 patients. Hospital lives with the virus across the state, with just over 100 on ventilators, the Detroit area and Grand Rapids with the largest increases in the number of cases. More than 55,000 residents, however, are now considered to have recovered from the disease. Meantime, the number of cases and doubts are increasing across the U. S. I'm Tom Foley. The numbers grow higher. The response signals are mixed. More than 140,000 Americans have now died of covert 19 out of some 600,000 fatalities around the world. With the spike in California come Monday, all non essential offices and indoor malls must close down in San Francisco. What we know from our contact tracing T is that the large part of the new virus spread we're seeing is coming from People who are having gatherings with others outside of their household. San Francisco MAYOR London Breed Tom Foti,

Michigan Michigan Michigan San Francisco Tom Foti Tom Foley 55,000 Detroit Grand Rapids California Executive London
"cal" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:59 min | Last month

"cal" Discussed on KCRW

"It turns out that cal's maybe helpful to us in the pandemic there's a biotech company in South Dakota using cows to make antibodies for treating human disease and lately they've been making antibodies for covert nineteen years NPR's Joe Palca this story is about cowboys but it starts with the department of defense DOT is always looking for ways to protect its warfighters from infectious diseases Tracy pals as with the defense threat reduction agency as an example she says her agency was behind the production of in a bowl of vaccine started out in development in our office but we did the early development so it's not surprising that the DOD is also funding S. A. B. bio therapeutics of Sioux falls South Dakota C. E. O. Eddie Sullivan said the Pentagon was looking for a company that could deal with any new viral threat and be able to very rapidly produce eighty specifically target hi neutralizing antibody that can be used in patients as quickly as possible targeted neutralizing antibodies can help slow an infection and someone who is sick or prevent an infection and someone who is exposed to a virus to make these antibodies quickly Solomon's company uses cows but these aren't just any cows these are cows that have been given the genes to make a human like immune system and Sullivan says there's a good reason to use cows in order to be able to produce large amounts of human antibodies that are specific to specific diseases because when cows make antibodies they make buckets of them and they produce a variety of antibodies making it more likely one or more will be effective so if you inject the special cows with what essentially amounts to a corona virus vaccine that prompts the cows to make human corona virus antibodies Solomon says they've already shown this concept can work for murders and illness caused by a virus similar to the one that causes cove in nineteen so we already have considerable background in producing these antibodies to a corona virus but whether they work against the covert nineteen corona virus still has to be shown to do that S. A. B. has partnered with William claims track at the university of Pittsburgh clin stress says the first step is to show the covert nineteen antibodies aren't causing more health problems than they solve we're doing a national antibody tests for that and then subsequently it will be doing advocacy tests efficacy tests will show whether the antibodies actually prevent disease in animals exposed to the corona virus we will look at virus production will look at weight loss signs of infection to evaluate how sick they get assuming Klim stress tests show the antibodies can prevent disease SAB says they hope to start testing them in humans later this summer there was one thing that I was puzzled by about SAB biotherapeutics biotech companies tend to crop up near elite universities frequently on the east or west coast so I asked SAP's any Solomon why his company chose to locate in Sioux falls he said the answer is simple cows love it there if you're gonna be a cow you would want to live in one of our facilities here in South Dakota I'll keep that in mind Joe Palca NPR news this is NPR news and this is member supported Casey R. W. this.

cal
"cal" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:53 min | Last month

"cal" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It turns out that cal's maybe helpful to us in the pandemic there's a biotech company in South Dakota using cows to make antibodies for treating human disease and lately they've been making antibodies for covert nineteen years NPR's Joe Palca this story is about cowboys but it starts with the department of defense DOT is always looking for ways to protect its warfighters from infectious diseases Tracy pals as with the defense threat reduction agency as an example she says her agency was behind the production of in a bowl of vaccine started out in development in our office but we did the early development so it's not surprising that the DOD is also funding S. A. B. bio therapeutics of Sioux falls South Dakota C. E. O. Eddie Sullivan said the Pentagon was looking for a company that could deal with any new viral threat and be able to very rapidly produce a specifically target hi neutralizing antibodies that can be used in patients as quickly as possible marketed neutralizing antibodies can help slow an infection and someone who is sick or prevent an infection and someone who is exposed to a virus to make these antibodies quickly Solomon's company uses cows but these aren't just any cows these are cows that have been given the genes to make a human like immune system and Sullivan says there's a good reason to use cows in order to be able to produce large amounts of human antibodies that are specific to specific diseases because when cows make antibodies they make buckets of them and they produce a variety of antibodies making it more likely one or more will be effective so if you inject the special cows with what essentially amounts to a coronavirus vaccine that prompts the cows to make human corona virus antibodies Solomon says they've already shown this concept can work for murders and illness caused by a virus similar to the one that causes cove in nineteen so we already have considerable background in producing these antibodies to a corona virus but whether they work against the covert nineteen corona virus still has to be shown to do that S. A. B. has partnered with William Klim stress at the university of Pittsburgh clin stress says the first step is to show the covert nineteen antibodies aren't causing more health problems than they solve we're doing initial antibody tests for that and then subsequently it will be doing advocacy tests efficacy tests will show whether the antibodies actually prevent disease in animals exposed to the corona virus we will look at virus production will look at weight loss signs of infection to evaluate how sick they get assuming Klim stress tests show the antibodies can prevent disease SAB says they hope to start testing them in humans later this summer there was one thing that I was puzzled by about SAB biotherapeutics biotech companies tend to crop up near elite universities frequently on the east or west coast so I asked SAP's any Solomon why his company chose to locate in Sioux falls he said the answer is simple cows love it there if you're going to be a cow you would want to live in one of our facilities here in South Dakota I'll keep that in mind Joe Palca NPR news this is NPR news and this is KQED public radio welcome to Tuesday but housing is saying good morning to Joe McConnell and showing no there's high wind advisories and I gotta tell you I was potting a plant yesterday and all the durch is blue right into.

cal
"cal" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

13:13 min | 3 months ago

"cal" Discussed on The Takeout

"Excitement. That goes along with it. And if you've ever played a big lake environment at fifty thousand people screaming you know. Sometimes it's wind up controlling. That Adrenalin It's back down where you can key. But I think it's going to be different and I think the players will adapt really quickly and win the competition would be Richard Hitter. Happens you know. Sometimes you're GONNA forget that you're not playing in front of People. You're trying to compete. You're trying to win. I think the quality of baseball will be good practical question. There was almost two-thirds of a spring training and now a six to seven lay off as someone who played this game at the very highest level. How much time will players need to get back into baseball shape? Well we because of the time author has been some Games have been played the twenty one thirty games back in nineteen ninety-five a chance to watch celebration all over again but it reminded me that that season started. On a short spring training there was a strike than it was a cancellation of the world. Series ended a lockout so then we had to get ready in three week window and I was worried coming in whether whether we could get ready for weeks but for regular player just means you're starting to play more innings earlier getting more s and. I thought it was the perfect time to actually get ready so I think big league players everyday players especially get ready. Maybe a two week timeframe. The pitchers need a little bit longer. But I think during this off time pitchers can still keep their routines on the side. Those sorts of things But they won't you won't be able to extend them into deeper into the Games anyway until you have a longer spring training but I think probably two to three window is probably what's necessary for reading ready can't afford season function cal without minor leagues. I think that I'm a minor league older. So I'm right. We're at right now. We're not going to any minor. League teams are really important to the communities. I'd almost a more and more important than a big league. Team is for their community. Because it's a it's a that's their their only thing that they're they're watching but yes they They'RE GONNA. They're gonNA have to have some or something no probably use their minor league stadiums people in shape and get ready injuries. Going to happen You're going to need certain things during the course of the season. So yeah they're going to have to have a war. I don't know if they're going to have the support of the whole Mile League system will certainly ask or W in trouble. But YOU'RE GONNA have to expand rosters it seems and I know the Union and management are talking about that. It seems like you're going to have to start with a larger roster than we historically have just because you're gonNa need players nearby and available. We'll see some of these interesting things that you have to deal with Identify your needs in. This particular season might be able to Be BE INCORPORATED IN YEARS IN FUTURE WITH BANKS. Go back and all right early on these line with guests. You're going to need more pictures because you can't extend that and get them up to their enduring because it needs pitching rests itching rash and that takes a period of time. That's why spring training is six weeks long or a month to get the pitchers up to speed. So you're going to have to have more pitchers I don't know if we're going to have to have more regular players but a roster expansion in the early part of the season Seems a normal and natural to me once everybody gets the down. It's more to get down to a fair roster size you want us not totally increasing when you get to the playoffs. You talked about extending pitchers Can I ask you a question? That sort of Is a product of my fifty seven years. So that's fifty years has an active baseball fan Do you lament as much as I do. The death of the complete game. It's a little not a little bit. I think the over specialization bullpen. I'm used to be looked at but I liked the specialization. The hard part about one sixty two game season and and as a hitter standpoint patient a starting pitcher twice. And then you bring a match up into me for my third bat matchup dot my fourth which is usually the closer that makes it much harder to hit the how do you how do you continue that or because season which requires management. I still think value of some of those guys. Those horses that can go three innings or or a starting pitcher that can give a blow to the bullpen when a half to is my going eight or nine so you know i. I like the Arctic pitching and it used to be when guys could complete games. They were less fidgets. No Scottie Macgregor in the big leagues would finish a game at eighty five inches Negro shutout. So maybe it's the art of understanding how to get guys out not necessarily strike them out how to get them out and keep your your Your starting pitcher in the game. I hope that comes back as you know. One of the complaints about the current game is that there are too many strikeouts. That pitchers don't pitch to contact as Pitcher Scott McGregor. You just mentioned or in my hometown of San Diego Randy Jones for the couple three years that he was a sensational. Cinco bar single bar sinker ball pitcher but throwing the contact is an art form and it seems less prevalent in the game. Currently well it simple to me is you're right. It is the understanding how to pitch successful. Pitching in. My opinion is throwing off the timing of the hitter off. The hitter is trying to time the pitcher. The pitcher is trying to throw up at timing and cross that timing ever so slightly but you wait too long to get jam ball on the fat quarterback early. The end of the BAT and results is not always going to be positive so pitching content. Contact is a smart way to go about pitching but sometimes when you emphasize the power game upsides strikeouts Pitchers don't want you to make contact so That will make the counts. Go three into deeper counts You know trying to trick them at different counts and all you're doing is rising out pictures. That still know what they're doing. And they know strike. One is the most important ditch. And they know how to throw off the timing. Even with a changeup and a fastball. Ten mile an hour difference. They can addle bit pool a bit off and they can be effective with far less bridges. Picking up on the point. You just made. I've heard this said but I want you to validated for me please. I've heard it said that if players are sitting in the dugout they are going to talk to each other more not so much about a pitcher who throws ninety eight but a pitcher who throws ninety eight and then eighty four will definitely. I mean Ten miles an hour difference is probably the perfect speed. If you have a really good change up looks like fascinating because it comes out of your hand in that ten hour difference if it starts to we mentioned guided McGregor earlier it was kind of interesting watching. Scotties end of his career. As his basketball came down a little bit exchange up stayed the same. It would have been better if he would have slowed his changeup down. Eighty five seventy five. I remember. Franklin Anna was of our waller when he first game in the League was a power guy and then learn how to be a pitcher stuff change he would alter the speeds on the slow side so it makes sense to me but if somebody has twenty miles an hour difference nine hundred seventy five they have that sort of super bugs. Bunny changed if you if you throw in the mix. You can't hit one looking for the trevor. Hoffman would validate that. I think he had. He had the best bugs. Bunny Change. I. I love the bugs bunny. Change of Is it yes? Oh Yeah for sure. Absolutely absolutely one of my favorites analogies are really old but do you go back to look at the cartoon that Bugs Bunny. Change that floats in the Guy Swings at times right. Cal will call us and tell all of our younger viewers and listeners. Go to Google. Find it you'll enjoy it Is it possible to socially distance in a dugout? I think it probably is. I was trying to figure out that is as they got the catcher in the batter standing in close proximity the gotta be that little robots in the dugouts. You can you can. New Dugouts gotten bigger. There's people stand on a railing and Speaker. Stand back you could. You could have spacing. I don't know whether this social distancing spacing is you can fully accommodate but bullpens spread out. You can have other people in the clubhouse at aren't necessarily into the game you can keep them in in the clubhouse. I think there are ways to get around the house right Can you think of a pitcher who owned in your career meeting? You performed very well against but it sort of stonning to look back that you did that. Well because a pitcher was that good Yes I would also tell you that most pitchers you can own them or a little period of time then they figure you out then they own you for the person that I couldn't understand that Bret Saberhagen came in the league throwing his heart. Is anyone a with a really nasty Kerr breaking and I was a good breaking ball hitter but if you could go fast and you rush me inside out reason for some reason I saw Bret Saberhagen really really well. Home runs off of them early on in my career within time we go he would look at me. You would make an adjustment and he would figure out how to get me out for a while so I don't think that's short-lived when you own somebody what's the key to longevity and Major League Baseball To my dad it was adjusted readjust People are going to get to know you dislike using example but you have to address to even some of your aging skills and some of the things that you do. Maybe your experience goes up and you understand better but you're still is coming down with it so long career beans understanding yourself adjusting readjusting. I learned that from Carter snaps the actually. His last year and a lot of people were surprised that I played against car right. He was in the early eighties. He was inching up his career. Twenty three or twenty four years. I was just starting out my career. Now remember watching him really shipped his way to the front side so when he got on the second I asked him why and he goes. He goes You know I feel like I I want to get out like I'm not as fast as they used to be. So stop me from getting out early at all my way to my front foot which makes me go back. I which I thought that made all the sense in the world. But here's a guy that was trying to figure out how can have success even when I get up to the end of my career. So you mentioned a moment ago that this is the twenty-fifth anniversary of twenty one thirty one. You've had obviously a long time to look back on that. What stands out to you about that. Entire EXPERIENCE. First question second question. Is there a point that you remember when you said to yourself? I'm committing to this in some ways. You look back on it's It doesn't seem conceivable that play that many games in a row. That's the first thing I thought about. All the things could happen all the small injuries that caution with the game. That was all getting sick. And so that was amazing to me when I when I think about when you're in it you're just focusing on that small one game at a time mentality which dad gave me you. Come to the ballpark and try to meet the challenges of that particular day. The other thing that I think about. It's a misconception or will be is people automatically thought I was obsessed with the street. I would rather traded that street number in for hitting more home runs than Hank. Aaron or it's Pete Rose. I wanted to play. I wanted to play every day. In the mission of an everyday player was to be counted on every single day. Maybe the definition has changed a little bit. Now that you're looking for your best one forty five your best one hundred and fifty games and it's normal for you to take some time off but I would think even now. The play offs can be determined by one game at a one sixty two. And you don't know which game you could've one in which you couldn't so to me. It's still a matter of putting your best team on the field each and every day and then letting the chips fall where they may as you bet at time to look back on it Any regrets about where your statistics might have been. Had you taken some time off? I laugh and joke and please take this as a joke. My staff probably would have gone up if I were to Basra. Tragically take take eight or ten days off year. I know that other guys that I knew I was going to struggle hidden ball yet. A heavy sinker. And you're running it on me. It was GONNA be a tough game for me so would have been nice to take inner ten of those games off your Off Your statistics it would have been helping mentally and I know that my batting average would have jumped number points just from taking that. What would it be taken a five for forty off? You're of your numbers at the end. And Yeah so a fan might hear you say that and say well. Why didn't you? You must have been obsessed with the streak that it must have at some point. Become something that took you over or became a goal goal. And I have an answer for that is that there's a lot of intangible value even in this day and age measure can't fully gauge or measure the intangible value that somebody brings to the lions instead of using me as an example and..

Pitcher Scott McGregor baseball Bret Saberhagen Richard Hitter Major League Baseball Scottie Macgregor Google Cinco bar San Diego Bunny Randy Jones BAT Basra Cal Hoffman Carter Kerr Franklin Anna Hank Pete Rose
"cal" Discussed on Intermountain PI Podcast

Intermountain PI Podcast

12:24 min | 7 months ago

"cal" Discussed on Intermountain PI Podcast

"Half mile I wouldn't say it's a half mile probably about a quarter mile. It's not your typical out in the country tree in a gravel road. It's it's at home okay. So glad move the car caldas to work now. The nanny becomes concern she starts reaching out Out For Michelle. Michelle doesn't answer starts a game of telephone amongst of friends and acquaintances. Nobody's heard from Michelle. The New York State Police released wind up getting called. They come and nick question cow he says I have no idea to look wherever you want. Do whatever you want. I don't know if he is so there's no sign of Michelle and the hasn't been any sign of Michelle in intervening now nineteen years so they've never found the body. There is nobody this this is a is a no body case. So what happens is at some point. The New York State police do law enforcement agencies. Do all over the place. I mean they've cows given them already. Consensus Searches House. They do later on the combined with a search warrant than they do another search. Gather some you know. Do Crime scene photos rose forensic evidence elect good stuff in the case doesn't go to. They actually set up a surveillance on on cow. Sleepy confined where she is. You know that they slept talking to people. In Cal- harasses arrested by the New York State police in Tyler County District Attorney's Office Moore Year and a half two years later for the murder of Michelle. His wife it goes to trial is convicted at trial. Now he's a very interesting guy and I'm GonNa put this in in simple terms every pejorative description you've ever heard about a car. Dealer could probably fit cal Harris just just because someone may be a huckster or a a bit of a jerk doesn't necessarily mean they murdered anyone great but this is about two thousand try to right the first trial yes sometime sometime right around there. He's convicted he's kind of guy you know. A lot of people. People have strong opinions means about him in the neighborhood and this is this is a small county in upstate. New York you maybe twenty thousand people up there. So it's it's pretty rural and big large in Graphics is beautiful. Place gets convicted shortly after he gets convicted. A local farmer reading the story about the conviction in almost a day they later and he sees a picture cal. Harrison sees a picture of Michelle Harris and he looks he reads it needs realizes where they live and he goes go up and he says hey the murder case there yeah. I think I should tell somebody I was going by their front entrance tonight. that house early morning September second and I saw that woman the blond woman points this picture in the paper having an argument with somebody who was a white pick-up truck there and a van and a minivan and N.. Guy She was having an argument was not this guy. Pointing to CAL Harris. So this was This witness was Kevin tubs I believe. That's it. Yeah so in this case we're dealing with wrongful conviction. I guess at this point. So now we have new witness in the in the case and Who Basically Said said as you just suggested? He saw her arguing with somebody and it wasn't Caldera's judge did. The judge is supposed to do he set aside that conviction almost Essentially almost immediately okay. So that was two thousand. Seven first conviction is overturned cows rearrested shortly thereafter Leads to a second trial. Convicted goes to prison goes to state prison in later gets reversal on an appellate issue. A technical technical legal issue so he's added added prison. I think he spent two and a half years or so in in prison. The I think the So the the guilty the second trial was two thousand nine He was since the twenty five years and of course. The he appeals to the state. Quarter of appeals and that was Overturn a two thousand twelve. Yep So yeah a couple of two and a half years or so and his time in prison as he relates to me each you know. He's a gregarious gregarious. Guy is his car delicious negotiations. He's a pretty good athlete. Play basketball so his time in in prison although not Nice Nice He made made the most of it and his three children. In just as an aside is three little kittens they were little kids at the time came to visit them on a regular basis. His kids you've of stuck through with him. Through this entire thing. He gets into a term. He comes to the New York City Long Island area and finds a new defense attorney Bruce Marquette Bruce's versus a very aggressive very well known defense attorneys handled Multiple High Profile Cases Bruce successfully lobbies for a change change of venue in a move the the next trial to county another rural county in upstate. New York's go Harry County at just outside of Albany the capital of New York and it picks a jury up there in after a lengthy trial. The result is a hung jury. Okay so that's two thousand fifteen and that will be the third trial Al and But it's not the end of the saga at the end of the trout at the end of the service so it's it's a jury the DA's office to make a decision about what to do. I'm going to tell you that in my experience Three times getting hit over the head for one is another. They usually fall attention. Go Mhm they did not the State Association of District Attorneys recommended to leave them the. Da that they not pursued us again but they chose to to again. It was at that point that I got directly involved in the case. I if numbers podcasts. At thirty some odd years so you enter the case. Then you do enter this wrongful conviction case at at the post conviction level after the third trial the fourth trial comes up in two thousand sixteen and so that's the trail at your preparing for. Is that correct correct. Laura okay go ahead and continue so I. I was aware of the case. I spoke to Bruce batted in his first defensive him in SCO Harry County. Most familiar with Scurry County offered some some technical advice for lack of a better word Some demographic research and things about about juries but in the fourth case space he says hey take a look at this whole thing and we took a deep dive into case and it was something that really struck me one of them. was you kind of go back to the beginning then and I mean look at everything from the very beginning. Yep Over the trial transcripts from three previous trials all the evidence all the witness statements. All the investigatory. It's tens of thousands of pages of of material do you. How long does it take to read all that stuff you know? We did pretty quickly because there was a time there was a time. Oh Yeah Yeah we. We had custody trial and it really boiled down to a few things. Cal Harris was the kind of guy like I said you can love them or hate him. I think the hate part falls heavily. We're so than anything else. It had some negative interactions with some relatives of some police personnel. Up in up in that area area So I don't think anybody was unhappy when they when they decided they decided very early on the cow was their guy is a thing called confirmation formation bias confirmation bias. Oh Yeah you look at something and everything else. That just seems to fall in place right. I mean it's very very very very problematic in this case. So tell you what we did really quickly you know. I found some women that that state police never talked to. For whatever reason it turns out Do this real quick is a really long story When I when I read the case I see a couple of things that just jumped out at me? Right away There there were there were couple of the actors in here there were a couple of guys relatively transient though from Texas Nudity area maybe six six eight months before Michelle's disappearance. They came up to work in a steel fabricating factory that a Texas Company opened the opened in in the area earlier that year or something and these guys were out running around they were unattached they frequented bars ars strip clubs prostitutes. You know we're having a good time to of those. People came to my attention as as people that had interest in Michelle. One of them owned a little cabin way up in the woods. Probably fifteen twenty minute ride from from town and during their interviews and what they had anecdotally told people. was that around the time Michelle disappeared. They burned bloody clothes in a burn. Pit Now now. I mean I've been around hunters my entire life I've been in a obscene a lot of different things. I've never seen anyone try to burn. Bloody clothes allegedly as a result of a deer hunt. So so I said sent the Bruce. It's earning anybody ever look up. There and CAL had hired a former New York state. Police investigator real competent guy who did a lot of good work and chase down a lot of leads and he had actually heard you stories about that. The body was under a newly poured floor and a barn there that caverns nothing. They went as far as rip that out in excavate that A The newly poured barn floor down to six or eight feet below grade now. Yeah Futilely frankly never found a body of offended thing. They did a good job hat but I looked at anybody have looked a burn. Pit Up there and the answer I got from people was once in a barn. What are you gonNA find in a bar and I was sitting Twenty five miles east the largest burn pit in the world at that point which was the World Trade Center and we got phenomenal down of forensic evidence from from that epic event. So I said you know we really should take a look at this. I'm unthinking you know these stories. Coalesce people discounted them in the state. Police totally disregarded them so it's January it's cold in upstate. New York in January Frigid ground typically freezes. Frost Line Goes News. Pretty deep to what I did was I hired a found through some research a An anthropologist Forensic Anthropologists Were School Insulin University in Pennsylvania again in touch with them. It done some stuff from enforcement before What the story was he put together? A crew of his graduate students consume. We met them on a cold day at this cabin with the acquiescence of the current owner. They did archaeological dig in excavated. This burn Pinette Inet burn pit. We found items step. Were interesting to me. We found pieces of cloth. Michelle Harris had uniform when she worked in this Bar Restaurant. It was a blue Polo shirt in a gray air. Shoulda Khaki shorts. We recovered blue material. In Khaki material lost material we recovered some key Dorky. A dime from nineteen ninety seven and a blade of a knife life which was about six inches long. There were no other inorganic materials in Nothing else nothing. There was organic material The current owner really never burned anything in there but again anecdotally from some people that we found the guy that lived up there at the time during the time. Michelle of her disappearance regularly had you know bonfires and burned his garbage. In and everything else it was garbage in there. It was really nothing else. This new within these items were you able to was were any of those items tested for DNA or or were they to degraded due to the time and the cold and the fire everything was tested for. DNA wasn't all testing for DNA but we tried to find the.

Michelle cal Harris New York State Police Michelle Harris New York Guy Bruce Marquette Bruce murder Scurry County basketball Cal New York City Long Island DA State Association of District Place Kevin tubs Texas Company
"cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

12:11 min | 8 months ago

"cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Tools for hacking the brain and and you know the emotion to the user into all of their APPs right and so every APP now had game game of vacation and notifications and those things that draw you back time and time again so I think you're right when I first started using iphone. There weren't those things or at least they weren't as prevalent. They weren't always on right and so you weren't always drawn back to pick up the phone so it's the game of vacation of the device which has led to such A. It seems to me anyway. I don't WanNa make these statements especially to someone who's studied the thing and Nauseam so I should have said as a question do you think it's the game -cation that has been the primary culprit. Yes I mean it depends how broadly defined game vacation but basically yes. It's a a collection of strategies that helped make these APPs and and so one of the big changes that led this way was for example when the social media companies change the experience so it was no longer about. I post you post because I know you I check what you post. That was the original social media experience original web. Two Point Oh vision. They replaced that with. I hit this APP and there is an incoming stream of social approval indicators about me there's wykes which weren't there it's obviously there's likes for my post there's re tweets there's favorites. There's people moan auto tagging me in their photo so that that was one of the big changes because it meant When you hit that button sometimes you're gonNA see a lot of social approval indicators about you and sometimes you're going to see no social approval indicators about you and sometime you might see that people are upset you the way? Our brain is wired. We can not resist polling that virtual slot machine lever if those are the rewards come out and on the other end and that wasn't a purposeful and then they re engineered the interfaces for for all of these tools to have that game vacation. Feel so now you can have swiped down to reload. That's very slot machine asked right or maybe inlet they go to endless scrolling on certain types of interfaces so that that you you have no easy friction point. That's going to get you to stop facebook. Change their engineers made the original notification badge gray because that was to facebook Palette and the attention engineers came along and said no no. No it needs to be alarm red. Because that's what is more likely to create a sense of sort the distress or urgency in the human brain. You'll be more likely to hit the APP. And so it's a whole reinvention. The be an intermittent stream of social indicators which has nothing to do with the original idea of social media wasn't there it's completely contrived Eddie of a like button photo tax that's all about driving eyeballs coupled with this sort of in a interface reinvention and I got to say and not not the sound conspiratorial. But there's there's a few pockets in academia That specialize on what they call persuasive technology. How do we redesign? Redesigned technologies to actually induce desired action in the user A lot of people who ended up innovating these ideas at the big tech companies came out of these research groups. And so this. This is all intentional. It's why when Sean Parker the original facebook president more recently a couple of years ago came out and said we're hacking your brain you know we're hackers and we figured out how to Hack your brain and I gotta say this was terrible news for the social media companies. The idea that we're exploiting you. This addictive is making you unhappy and I think this is a real reason why they're PR. People told the social media companies. You have to tack car to another topic. And that's why you see the conversation. Almost entirely about things l. like privacy and data portability and content moderation as they had changed the subject they cannot be talking about. Are these services addictive and making people unhappy unhappy. Because that's a problem. They can't solve if they make the service less addictive their revenue plummets. And so there's been this shift in the way they talk about things and say well. Let's deal with with with issues that maybe we can do something about maybe. We can add into inscription to try to reduce privacy violations. Maybe we can keep tweaking. Content moderation standards. There's a reason why they're talking about that and not talking about their former president saying that we're having your brains is because that's playground. They wanted to be playing right well. It's interesting you know I. It takes us a while to to study and acknowledge at a social level to study. Acknowledge the damage that can be done at a broad level from from something like smoking or alcohol all addiction and then to take action against it. Do you think that's going to happen with the brain hacking through these electronic devices or is it just something that the the government's going to be like. Yeah whatever. It's just free market. Well you know you have to keep in mind. We have to get the historical example in mind. I think this is actually an interesting point. So there there's been recently in the news like let's say Chris Hughes one of the Co founders of facebook and some of the presidential candidates coming out and saying Social media the big companies like facebook or like big oil and they need to be broken up the trust that needs to be broken up but maybe the better analogy is actually big tobacco because think about the The government response to BIG TOBACCO WAS NOT WE'RE GONNA somehow regulate tobacco companies to make cigarettes less harmful. There's aunts a big tobacco was we're going to essentially Angelique exit but also educate the public that you probably shouldn't be smoking and I you know I'm wondering if that's not. The more apt analogy here is sitting social social media company. This is a this is a free service based on extracting attention fundamentally it's going to be It's GONNA be addictive. It's going to be exploited if they have a fiduciary responsibility to the shareholders to be addictive and to get as much use as possible. And so I don't know if the idea of what we need to do as maybe just get more competition in this space is somehow the key to to me. I see this a little bit more through the Linzo how he used to see big tobacco. That's what I'm trying to do with. My books is shift the culture to some degree where people no longer feel comfortable with the idea that this is something that they're just going to slavishly check on their phone. I mean I think when something is unhealthy as opposed to uncompetitive. That's a different set of solutions. To begin to look at right or another. You know option is that we're heading into narrow people because of the exorcist information and the diffusion of information that a lot the people are demanding more social responsibility of the companies that do business with as well as investing. And so you know. I think you're GONNA find companies that exploit things that damage the social fabric having a harder and harder time staying business. That's maybe a dream of mine fine but it's not happening right now. It doesn't seem but you never know right. You never know and the funny thing about a company like facebook is. It's it's historically unique. We've never before in history had a company that was so valuable I mean facebook is valued around five hundred billion dollars. That's almost twice ExxonMobil's valuation and yet at the same time is so dispensable. If you think about facebook I if I came to you and said look. I'm sorry a court order. You're not allowed to look at facebook facebook in ten years. Exactly the people have the same reaction. Oh it's okay I mean if there I'm GonNa look at it and yet it's worth five hundred billion dollars typically when you have a company that valuable it's because let's say they supply oral and our entire economy requires oil the run And it's a necessity and it's a social good but this weird place to social media companies are on on is that their hooks into their audiences is very tenuous and people can very easily leave platform and go to another. I've been documenting pretty thoroughly a lot of people my age just leaving social media altogether like well I tried it was okay. I mean they don't really play. They're an interesting source of distraction. But for most people are not at all dispensable. So they're in this rear precarious situation situation. Where you know? Kim Kardashian says the right thing about instagram tomorrow and they could see their user base plummet by thirty percent. That's a scary position to be in. If you're one of these companies except that they own instagram you know who they are valuable to the business world is doing business on the Internet and spending companies spending millions of dollars a month. Yeah on facebook. which crazy just to attract eyeballs and hopefully convert some users? Yeah well I mean. There's a reason that worth five. Hundred Billion Dollars is because the advertising works but for the advertising the work they have to get the average millennial user now uses social media. Something like one hundred forty one minutes a day. That's what makes them so. Valuable is the fact that they've convinced a sizable fraction of the population to essentially dedicate the bulk of their leisure time to entering data belt themselves in the databases right. Let's talk specifically about your book. Now I saw in some of the notes that Ellison put together for me that you were hoping to get a small Qadri of peeps to do a little experiment and to go off all social media and screens hundred percent for thirty days and you ended up with a boatload of volunteers. How did that come about? And what were some of the surprising things about that. Study so the original L.. Ask and this was an email I sent to my mailing list and so it was a little bit under the radar and I said look. I want to find volunteers to do this thing. I'm calling a digital declutter. Were as you said you take a thirty day break from all these optional technology your personal life and then when you're done the idea was you don't just go back to everything you rebuild from. Scratch so the thirty days the idea the thirty days as opposed to just doing this over weekend. The idea of the thirty days was that you could actually have some time for reflection experimentation. figure out what do I really care about what I want to really spend my time on. Get some clarity on that. So that when it comes time to add back tech you can be much more intentional. I thought I would get I. Don't know a dozen volunteers. I mean that's kind of a big ask ask right. I honestly thought about dozen volunteers and I can talk to him all. I thought this will permit. There'll be twelve people who do this and I'll keep him on the phone and then I can. I can kind of write about the experience in the book what it was like for these people and instead sixteen hundred people signed up. Wow so it became an actual like research search study it became it became like an actual research study was as and then you had the code the surveys and come out. Data was except for to be clear. I purposely did not officially code the surveys or gather data in a quantitative kids because then I would need approval from my academic institution so But it but it became like an unintentional sort of social movement ended up being covered the New York Times. A one of their reporters roommates was doing it and and And that that's what really helped me understand that there is such A. There's such a pent up hunger for change here. But I'll have to say when the big things I discovered from. This experiment is a a people were surprised to discover the extent to which their phone had pushed everything out of their life that they used to care about and they they've been telling themselves this story of well. Look look at my phone occasionally when I have nothing else to do its idle time. I mean the elevator. Not a big deal and that first day when they didn't didn't have the phone to look at they realize I don't know what to do with myself. I have gotten rid of. I have stopped putting in the hard work required to actually build up a meaningful will a meaningful leisure life outside of disk professional activities. So that was the first thing I learned The second thing I learned is that the people who treated this like a detox and I really hate hate to use of the word. Detox in context technology Because I think I think people are completely abusing the concept when they talked about digital detox which was for most people they mean a break which is which is actually a pretty big insult to the substance abuse community where the where the whole notion of detox is is to make actionable change as the foundation for better life. Eddie that you just take a break from the thing that's bothering you is but that's a bit of an aside But the people who treated the thirty days like one these digital detox isn't just tried to white knuckle it. I'm just going to not use my phone. I use it too much. They almost all failed. lasted a week or two and we're back to the people who succeeded needed and making lasting change out of these thirty days for the people who took the thirty days and said I'm GonNa get after it and figure out..

facebook. Eddie president Sean Parker ExxonMobil Kim Kardashian New York Times government fiduciary Chris Hughes Ellison
"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

13:28 min | 9 months ago

"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"He's one of the people who Did a blurb for your book and I remember talking to him about multitasking. And the idea of going back and forth between things you feel like you're nailing it but in fact you're making your brain work very hard and you're wasting whatever however many minutes it takes when you get back into the project you're working on you you are wasting all the time reengaging turning your brain back to the folder that it was looking at and it's something as simple switching back to you check your email so I know when I'm writing a long form piece for ESPN. I close all my tabs the only tabs that can be opened our research related. Because I don't want to see a notification in my email I don't Wanna be tempted to look up something else And you talk about that too in terms of our ability to not just focus on work but life and the people around us were just taxing our brains by the constant back and forth we are not good at network switching and and it takes time and we yeah. This is the result that goes back to experiments as early as the nineteen twenties and psychology. Now today we have people like attend. Who can actually get into the neuroscience? Explain what actually actually is happening in the brain. We've known this for a century. It takes time to switch our attention from one thing to another and so if for example you're in a work context. The very worst thing you could do. If your work requires you to produce something complicated is to say okay. work on this. Whatever this script this memo this computer program but we want you like the average worker to switch and check an inbox once every six minutes which is about what the average knowledge worker does not as a recipe for incredibly diminished cognitive kind of output? Because every time you do that quick check your switching your circuit before it completely switches. You try to switch back the whole. Thing gets jumbled it takes a long time for your mind to clear it out and before cleared out. Hf again and create a new jumble. The same thing happens in our personal lives When you're trying to say extract value from spending time in nature with the friend every time you a quick check of a phone glance at an inbox or text message you get this? Jumble of network switching and suddenly the richness of the experience is far diminished. And so we do this enough at all all times at work in their personal life that in general our experience of the world is persistent we diminished. We don't even realize it Intel we try experiments like saying go without your phone for months and then suddenly people it says. If you're taking off there is life different or if you're in work you say spend half your first half of every day no email or something like just do an experiment like that. It's as if you're taking some sort of neurotrophic drug like you're under limitless Tillerson uh-huh well and what we're getting back to is actually normal. We don't realize the degree to which were persistently diminishing experience to this sub normal thing that we we we come to think of is just I guess this is what life is. And it's like when you know wizard of Oz. Goes into color at that fifteen minute mark into the movie. That's what happens when you take just constant context which out of your life well and you acknowledge that. We're still relatively new in the age of the Internet and so we're still not even sure about how using using the Internet in our phones and everything else is actually changing our brains and how they work. There are some studies involving young people who have trouble looking into each other's eyes or who you cut out of a conversation right around the same minute as everybody else their age when they aren't in inspired or used by it and immediately check their phone There's all these studies ladies that are going on now to try to help us understand the ways that were either damaging our brains are not utilizing them. Well but a lot of it hasn't come out right so we're the guinea pigs for all this stuff that we will later find out was deeply damaging to how we function with each other and and all that other stuff so let's quickly go over the steps for this digital declutter it. It starts with thirty days and it's not throw your phone out for thirty days. It's identified the things that you really need and keep those and get rid of everything else. Yeah you're basically taking a break from what I call a optional personal technology so these are the technologies and your personal life that you can step away from for thirty days without it being a big deal so for most people this is like social media streaming videos video games online news things you can step away from Fairmont. That's not gonNA cause a big deal. It's not worth things so it's not an excuse to not answer to your boss email unfortunately and where you have overlapped so like if you're work requires you to do a little bit on facebook. For what say recruiting or something like this. That's fine just put some rules around it not on my phone. I do it on my work computer. I have scheduled for the for the purpose of the Thirty Day. Experiment so you're you're essentially cleaning out your proverbial personal digital closet. Ause it so that you can have that the empty to the best of your ability for about a month and then you define the rules very carefully because if someone needs needs to be on a facebook group because it involves their kids after school project or something or needs to be on a facebook group that that helps promote their brand or works on their brand than they would bookmark the page for that group never entering their personal time line so they can't get looped into the suck of WHO. What's this person writing in whose this person doing doing? Never getting on the feed. Only going to that bookmarked page. Yeah and it would be on your computer. You would take the apps off your phone almost certainly unless you really have to do it on your phone. The tricky thing is text messaging because they plays a incredibly important logistical goal for a lot of people. Hate my daughter. You skip picked up from school. That's how I find out text message but it also can be this constant Distraction so what. A lot of people do in thirty days with text message is if they are expecting a key logistical tax. They'll keep it around. Otherwise they tend to put it on. Do not disturb and maybe check every two hours or something like that so the the worst what happened is that their friends or family trying to reach them might have a bit of latency before they respond so so the things. You can't get rid of all the experiment just put some rules around it and the rules of a different for everybody. So it's about holding yourself accountable right. Don't make it too easy on yourself. Nope I think well I technically need this. I don't even know where I would begin to be honest with you because I feel like my job requires crossing over into all these places. And there's obviously benefits like everyone. Who's listening to this? Is Listening on a podcast right. So maybe you decide that podcasts are not a time suck and door. Don't require bouncing around in wasting time. It's intentional you choose news one you listen to it. Maybe you're accomplishing things. While listening. That might be something that you would allow. Well you could. Maybe you would have during your thirty day. Some sort of a schedule for okay. Listen to podcast during this particular activity but not every activity another hacker. Journalists did which I thought was really interesting. Who's going through something like this is that they actually hired someone to check for relevant breaking news on twitter and the person could they check like once every two hours it it gave you know? Here's the particular I won't say what particular field the journalist was in the particular topics I care about and They could call them if the collar Bro. which by the way is something? I'm surprised that more newsrooms don't do. This really should be like one of the first thing they do is the first year Internet media can raise the monitor twitter behalf of of the journalists. Who have been there longer? So you can get creative. You know Whatever gets you as much sort of space from the conflict companion model as possible is what you're trying to do without it? Being a problem I would have some assistant where I'm like. You didn't tell. Tell me about this. MEME that everyone's saying now I didn't use it on this. TV show and it wasn't funny. It would be very difficult. We need someone who who understands the district very well But I guess that would be that would be the search for the perfect. The Perfect Assistant All right so they've got the tricks that they could do to keep the couple of things they need and other than that they try to do this this full sort of reset and then when they reintroduced things. How does that work right so so crucially before that during the thirty day period? It's not just about some sort of detox effect and if anything I'm really wary about the the sort of appropriation of the word detox in this context During the thirty days before you do do you WanNa be doing is very actively do experimentation reflection getting back in touch with what you really matters what you really like. You know what's really valuable to you. So it's a very active active time when you're rediscovering beyond the world of your phone. What do I actually like to do with my time outside work with actually meaningful? Then when you get to the reintroduction you work backwards of course from what you discovered and so for each of these activities you identified during the thirty days as being really important to you you ask. What's the best way to use? Technology to support court. Amplified as you bring back in that technology you put some rules around it to maximize that benefit and avoid other costs and those answers. That's that's what the fines technology and your personal life going forward so everything that comes back into your wife comes back in for a particular reason. It's essentially the digital equivalent of Mary. CONDO Rondo. I didn't know about Mary condo until after I wrote this book now I know a lot about her essentially the digital equivalent of what she says. which don't just sort of mess around with your closet or take out a few things? uh-huh organizers India down to ourselves then just put back into things that you really care about. That's what you're doing. You're starting from scratch with checking your personal life. This time you rebuild it. You're doing it much more intentionally than the first time around. You bring things back into particular very important purposes and because you know why or just an attack you can put really really good optimization rules around it yeah. MERIE CONDO has down. That system works in that whole sparking thing is very easy but vague way to kind of encompass encompass everything does it spark joy..

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"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

07:43 min | 9 months ago

"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"You can start to optimize now. You can put rules in place. It will make sure that you get that value. But you don't fall down these traps that have nothing to do with that value. And as soon as people start putting these rules in place optimizing tech for specific specific purposes their entire relationship changes and they go back to two thousand nine iphone type users. They use their tech for these specific high leverage purposes. It gives them huge benefits for the most part. It's not this constant source of distraction. So I mean it seems simple. minimalism is simple. But it's impacts. I've really found to be pretty profound. You work backwards. This is what I WanNa do and then you just look the packers toolbox that you pull things out of very carefully to support these small number of things he really cared about the shift in perspective makes all the difference. Yeah the idea of it being a tool and not a companion and right now for so many of us it's it's essentially a companion. It's who do I talk to one on board who I listen to what I've got nothing else to listen to. Where we we start to create this relationship with our phone that goes beyond using it's specifically for things and instead searching it to find out what might fill our time or what what might be interesting? I want to get to some of the digital minimalism steps. Can you advise for people. But I quickly wanted to have you some some of the things that we're losing out on because of our inability to detach from our phones there's a couple couple things And and starting solitude and why sort of the idea that we're never bored anymore can be bad well so solitude if we used to the definition ah I think is relevant is when you are spending time free from input from other minds so the definition of solitude I care about here is you're not processing another minds outputs you're not talking somebody not listening to something. You're not really something. That type of solitude is absolutely crucial because it used to be essentially the default state default state. Your mind was in your thoughts and observing the world around you then occasion elite you would interact with another human. At which point your mind would go into all hands on deck mode because we're wired to be very social expend a huge amount of resources to manage interactions with other minds as we go into this all hands on deck modell. Let's say have an interaction with a family member or retried number one of the things we have now with the this sort of odd constant companion bottle of smartphones. Is that for the first time in human history. We can banish every last moment of this type of solitude from our life that any possible moment where it might just be us our thoughts and looking at the world around us to look at the screen and there'll be a nice statistical algorithm showing it's something that's been mathematically selected to make us interested the result of this is our brains never get into that default state which they're not at all wired to be. You can't keep your brain revved up in process from other not mine modes all the time. What happens when you try to do that? Things break down with one of the biggest side effects being the sense of anxiety that has become a sort of pervasive background In our in our in our society kind of accepted yeah. We're all this kind of anxious all the time. A lot of that is that we're simply over clocking our brain. They're not meant to always be processing this information. That's sort of misuse of our neuronal hardware. And that's sort of the idea behind meditation right that we need to occasionally a quiet our minds. Whether that's you know in in walking and moving around and trying to focus on one problem or literally meditating and trying to think of nothing. Is this idea that our brains ah break occasionally but you don't even you don't even have to go so far as meditation. It's sufficient just to do stuff throughout the day that you don't have their phone when even if you're just looking around thinking even if your mind it's not clear it's just the fact that it's you and your own thoughts. That's the state that we have to be on a regular basis. Well we used to do that a lot. I remember when I would be on track trips in college. I would sit on a bus and I would stare out the window and think and occasionally I would have journal and the things I thought I would write down. And there's a lot of creativity and space to to solve things this and think about yourself and other people and everything else. When you're not being fed new information constantly which I think is hard because I also am someone who very much likes to use my time to like peak? I talked about my being like Jenga game like I need everything to slide into a little slot because otherwise I won't get it done so if I'm getting my nails done I'm listening to a podcast if I'm working out I'm listening to a radio show to prep from my other show later There's nothing wrong with that right as long as you occasionally get breaks. Yeah as long as I have a similar type of lifestyle but as long as you're regularly scheduling in time where it's just you and your mind and even if it's ten minutes here twenty minutes here or after you shut down at seven or something like just. That's fine while you're trying to avoid is the complete lack of solitude which is incredibly artificial condition. That really wasn't possible until without seven or eight years ago so the opposite of that is also true. We don't need too much solitude. We also need human interaction and the guest. I just I had Jim Hill. Zaki was talking about how the lack of day to day face to face communication because of urban living solo living you know having our pods and everything else else can affect our empathy and kindness toward each other Kate Fagan a colleague of mine. Wrote a book What we made mattie running some of the research and there is about how our actual brains react to talking on the phone versus reading a text versus talking in person and on the phone and in person you at least get some brain activity when you talk to someone you love someone when you love sends you a text about a hard moment? You're going through the brain activity isn't there. You can feel like you've had the same exchange of consolation and kindness but your brain doesn't see it and hear it that way because it actually needs to be triggered by the sound of a voice or you know the the psychosomatic reaction to somebody's face and what they're doing while they're talking to you. That's a huge part of this. Our phones and why there's so much loneliness and mental health issues is we're stepping away from the actual face to face. Communication seems seems to be absolutely true. It helps explain this otherwise paradoxical result that we find again and again that increase social media usage tends to increase loneliness which doesn't make sense on the surface. I mean social media use is a social activity but what seems to be happening is exactly what you're talking about. It's not that being on social media. Yeah that makes you feel only. It's when you replace other types of richer. Social interactions with the social media. You end up with a net loss. I mean all the research is clear. We're incredibly sophisticated. Social animals are our experience of sociology is multi modal to be sure we take an all sorts of different channels of information and the whole thing gets fixed together in different parts of our brain simulate and understand the people were talking to right now for example. I'm really listening to the the timber and pacing of your voice. The careful careful listeners would probably notice that there's some Linden continents going on here. We're actually matching the way that we're pacing the way we talk. This helps create a sense of empathy. So we have the complicated tasted multi modal social computers because this was absolutely crucial to our species. Survival and this complex social computer this evolved over millions of years does not understand glowing ASCII characters on a piece of glass. It probably doesn't know what that is. Just we have no experience with that on any sort of deep evolutionary loosener timescale and so if we take this rich dance that we train our whole lives to do which is to be communicating richly with other humans. And we replace it with ASCII characters and bit met emojis on the small little piece of glass. We think in the frontal CORTEX. I'm out of being so social. I've been on my phone all day long but the rest of this huge complex computer which which is just lying there idle doing nothing. I was like man. We're we're lonely time we've actually communicated with someone I think it's a real issue back with more. That's what she said. Was Sarah Spain in just.

packers Sarah Spain mattie Zaki Jim Hill Kate Fagan
"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

11:48 min | 9 months ago

"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"Comes up so hope you enjoy. That's what she said super excited to have cal. Newport on the PODCAST I'm sure. Regulators will see a theme bouncing around from people who engage with each other comment on each other recommend each other for the podcast and and cal came recommended because a lot of what he's written about in his books has come up in conversation on this podcast I WANNA start with way back when in growing up and how you how you found yourself to become an expert on how to work well and now on digital minimalism. So let's talk about being a kid. What kind of kid were you had a nerdy tech science guy from the start? Yeah always a computer nerd. My mom was a computer programmer when I was growing up so I was exposed to programming at a young age. So I I always had a computer hacking on the computer from a young age Also though was involved in other things awesome well quite a social guy was a mid distance varsity track athletes. So I had the life that pulled in a lot of different strands. So I could you you know come from the track back to my high school tech company onto a computer back out to the the exercise room so it definitely an unusual but interesting mixture texture of traits when I was growing up. And where did you grow up mainly in New Jersey near Princeton New Jersey. Okay so you're you're you're balancing the track stuff. I was collegiate heptathlete. So your Your mid distance stuff was always the the bane of my existence but a part of my training training so you. You're bouncing all this stuff. At what point are you a teenager who decides you WanNa Start Your own business. Well the thing to keep in mind about that the timeline which is this is the late nineteen nineties. We're talking about. which was the first tech BOOB? This was the tech boom with pets dot com and Web van. That first time with the Nasdaq was going crazy. And one of the weird side effects of that first tech boom is that otherwise reasonable adults. Figured figured that it made a lot of sense to hire teenagers to watch that contract. There's just a sense of I duNNo. Don't young people know a lot about technology. let's give a lot of money Johny to the sixteen year old who design our website pillar web strategy. I think it was one of the rare windows in the history of business where people would actually think it was a good idea. Yeah Sign Contracts with people who are so young that their dad had the drive them through the meeting so I took advantage of it. I don't do that now with social media. Because they know that they I don't get it so they have to hire young people to explain to them how to be on Tick Tock and how to best sell their social media APPs to other young people. It's funny you mention Napa is Saturday night live always runs an old episode before the new one now shortened version and they ran an old jerry. Seinfeld David Bowie episode from Nineteen. Ninety nine this this past Saturday and there was a sketch for some sort of I think it was. Maybe a law firm but they were late getting to the web and they weren't in a rush and so their website was something awful. Awful like tiny baby penises dot com or something and it was just sort of how absurd the Internet and I can tell you exactly what it was clown. Tina Start Art cloudiness dot fart. I don't know where he came. Up with baby penises. I knew the penis was in there. Yeah and it's funny. I was just I was just thinking eating how incredibly distant that feels. Now the idea of like oh well. We missed the the website with our names. So this is what we're stuck with and it reminded me when I was reading your book you talked about and I'm only going to skip ahead for a second. You talked about the introduction of the iphone and it was essentially an ipod that you could call people on and I completely forgot the introduction of the iphone as being that simplistic and not being about all the things we use it for. You know things move so fast. I mean I went went back when working on that section of the book and talk to the original head engineer. Who worked under jobs on it? And that's what he confirmed. It was an ipod that made calls. The big problem. Solving is that people used to have their ipod and their Nokia Razor. That's two separate devices you'd have in your pocket. There's too much stuff in your pocket and the iphone was what's going to combine them into one and that was the original marketing. Push forget about it. I think it's a great example of how quick how quick things have been moving in this particular regular world of consumer facing tech. Yeah Okay so back to your. I believe seventeen years old and you decide to start a tech company. What was the goal? What did you think you are solving? elving what problem. Nothing that exciting on the surface right on the circus. We were doing essentially website development for companies. Now the big insight right that that I had with my my business partner was my girlfriend Michael Simons big insight. was we figured out early. About outsourcing and so what we were doing as we were going to these meetings and our ills that suits and had the laminated spiral bound pitch books and then we had teams in Pakistan and India. That would do most most of the actual graphic design and development. So we were sort of early to this idea that there was this arbitrage at the time the sort of huge inefficiency and that you had a- ah excess number of heavily train graphic designers and programmers overseas without a rough work and so we were playing that arbitrage game and making the big high profit margins. Doing it what did your parents. I mean your mom's obviously a computer programmer. So is she like. Oh good following the family footsteps or were they concerned about you already diving moving into the business world. Well I think they were fine with the computer programming stuff so you know. I was a programming nerd and I was taking CS courses at Princeton in high school. That type of thing the business. I'm sure made them a little nervous. Especially when there was contracts involved in a lot of money changing hands and interesting remember. Remember the the thing to remember valley nine hundred ninety eight or nineteen ninety nine is not only were there no smartphones. But we didn't have cell phones right so I was running this business in an age where I was either in school or at practice for most of the working days. That's what made it particularly interesting. Is that we had to run a business talk about lack of accessibility. I literally couldn't couldn't be reached for maybe ninety percent of the hours in in the workday so it required a lot of creativity I missed a lot of school and got in some trouble for that because it has been a business meetings and etc but they luckily let me graduate nonetheless. So it's clear from a young age you figured out some some work hacks and some ways to be successful successful. Which is why you started writing books about how to win at college to become a straight a student how to be a high school superstar all that stuff and you wrote those sort of after your own educational educational career Undergrad at Dartmouth your PhD from Mit? And while you're in in your own academia what did you think that you wanted to do with the computer science and with your studying of of sort of how that how that relates to everyday life. Well at first the idea was I wanted it. Just be an academic computer scientists. So when you're studying any field at a high level the ultimate goal this is the message you get from professors. You're studying under is to be the an academic to do original research to push the field forward and so once. I realized maybe halfway in my undergraduate career that maybe had a shot at an academic career in computer science that that became my goal that life style the autonomy of being a professor is what I was what I was looking for. I was writing in books at the same time. But it wasn't until later until later in my Grad student career that the two worlds came together at first it was. I was training to be a computer scientist. Oh and I I also wrote books. Those worlds were completely separate. My doctoral advisor discovered. I wrote books because she came across one at a table at the bookstore. She had no shot just doing the side as well and so they were really separate worlds and then they all kind of came together once. I got the Georgetown and professorship when I realized wait a second I work on technology. I'm also really interested on the impact of technology on society. I could probably be writing about this stuff that I'm also workout and writing about the broader impacts and so those worlds came together gather and and now there's a great conciliates between what I'm doing academic as a writer but until recently quite separate. Yeah Yeah I mean it's it's there's that academia academia and the computer science stuff that would connect you to all the people that also work in that field. And maybe not a lot of other people whereas when you're incorporating the study of communications occasions and how it affects our everyday life in our work. Suddenly you've opened yourself up to the everyday person who who is learning from your expertise without necessarily needing to understand all the stuff that goes into and all the research that Gotcha there so you. You're writing books and you end up back in two thousand sixteen writing deep work rules for focused. Success asked an distracted world. This feels to me like a pivot point for you in understanding The very current conflicts for people in staying focused doing the job job workplace productivity and all these new technologies So tell me how deep work sort of a very short description because I want. I want to get from that to the newer book right. So the idea behind deep work is that In the knowledge sector in particular which is about fifty percent of the US economy right now. The ability to focus without distraction is being widely undervalue. That we're we're very distracted with email and slack and personal digital tech Heckler. Social Media in our attention bounces back and forth all the time and we are forgetting value in sustained attention and so the argument of that book is that this is market mismatch. That's right. This is something that we're getting worse at the same time. It is becoming more valuable so that if you specifically train yourself to be an extra concentrator or if your team organization are your ties is unbroken concentration. It's sort of unfair competitive advantage right now. Yeah so I mean this was a huge thing for so many people and I think a a lot of people were even very slowly able to step outside their bodies and recognize their their their difficulty in focus. There's been some really interesting stories about people people struggling to read books because they have trouble focusing on that for a long time when they're so used to these snippets on the Internet. So you're you right deep at work and the response of so many people to you about social media and technology and how they struggle to balance that with the messages of your book are what led to the digital minimalism right. Yeah because people work was really focused on the workplace it was unintentional consequences of new technologies in the workplace. And this was the big feedback feedback. I began to get from readers after the book came out which was okay. Maybe we by this. But what about the impact of tech and are personalized which was really really focused. Much more on things like phones and social media and the attention economy which is actually quite different than what's going on. Let's say in an office place with your email or slack and so I was getting a lot of pressure from the readers. Okay but what do we do about tech in our personal. It was really something that was becoming clearly a problem in our culture especially starting around two thousand seventeen where it really began to uptick. And so that's what they're digital minimalism was okay. Let's turn from work to people's personal life and find out what they're taking what they should do about it. Well you are. You're thirty eight thirty thirty seven. Thirty eight Sir okay. So you're thirty seven you've never had social media accounts I. I'm not sure how that's possible were you were you so aware before we even learned of all the dangers that you never put your toe in the water. Or how is it possible that you never joined facebook facebook twitter and everything else well..

New Jersey cal Princeton New Jersey Newport David Bowie facebook Johny Nokia Napa Tina
"cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Or someone makes money off your attention. When you tap on it you don't have to quit anything yet but just get rid of the easy access and then to maybe start doing some work to introduce high-quality leisure into your life so that when it comes time to do the extreme thirty day complete reset? You're not looking at the first day of the first morning of the first day and say I have no idea what to do with myself so you already have put back into place activities that you know for sure are going to give you meaning <hes>. I love that cal. Thanks so much <hes> the book is digital minimalism before. Can you give us a snapshot of what Your Next Project as you mentioned. You're already digging in your is it top secret. No it's not I mean so I'm in the early stages of writing a book tentatively titled a World Without Email and it's once again about tech and the workplace and it's about some of the unintentional consequences that happened when we introduced low friction digital communication to the workplace unintentional negative consequences and these shifts I think are coming sort of radical shifts to how we work that are going to then correct for are those unintentional consequences. Oh cool can't wait to see that one cal. Thanks again for your time. Keep up the great work and I know you're about ready to go deep on something so stay focused. It's my pleasure. Mark do work all right. We'll talk again soon. Appreciate you all right folks digital minimalism. Check it out and also a highly highly recommend deep work. If you haven't read it I mean that is a classic and really important in fact I would say those to kind of go hand Endon Glove and support kill any way you can. He's doing great work. It's really important so I appreciate him and I appreciate you for listening and for paying attention the N._B._A.. Online podcast this is a lot of fun but I think it's also so important conversations so that we collectively can evolve ourselves and evolve culture to be healthier and more balanced and more unbeatable so appreciate you and until next time stay focus go deep and let's practice a little digital minimalism so they say they're right minimalism. That's a big word for me who see next time Divino..

Mark Endon Glove thirty day one cal
"cal" Discussed on Starting9

Starting9

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on Starting9

"Like you were like that was important to you where a fan buys a ticket to the baseball game. And maybe you go over three with a, you know, ground into a double play struck out twice. I'm still going to give a fan who paid to see me, specifically an experience, that they can take with them for the rest of their lives. So that stuff wasn't point to, and that's that's I don't think that that's lost now. But I think that in a day where. You know, social media, and there's blogs podcasts or so many different media outlets that for baseball specifically stuff like that doesn't get talked about enough. You know, I wonder you just brought up an interesting point. Social media wasn't so big in my day. It started to become bigger and people jumped on board. And it was a way to communicate with fans more intimately, which I think is good. But I remember in the year of nineteen ninety five when the streak was broken I had a, a much bigger. Influx of media, requests. And so I had to manage the media requests. And so we figured out a really good way to do that. First day in you make yourself available to everybody could buy two other days. But and then once you start doing that so much is that some of the things that were forgotten was your interaction with the fans. So I started signing autographs after the game so that I could because I was missing that part of my day. Now, I wonder are you saturated so much with social media, and all that kind of stuff that you'd lose the energy to have the one on one relationship back 'cause I always thought it was an icebreaker from me. I'm introverted, I'm a little shy by nature, but actually signing autographs then opened up the conversation. Right. So then you gotta feel and you could hear back from the fans and what I really enjoyed about the autograph was it brought the, the fans almost out onto the field and brought them in, in an area that you're used to being a gave them some insight on what's going on, right? And I'm sure that this has happened. I'm just curious how many times is this happen? How many times have you been approached by someone and they said, I, I need my son Cal my dog's name is Cal because of you how many times does that happen. This book tour just started, and we start signing some books, and so you normally in the book signing atmosphere or environment invariably, I'll meet a kid this name cow, come up, and tell me and the, the last book signing that we had. There was a lot of cows. Before that it was kind of funny in the first part of your career. Everybody would say they named their dog after me. Yeah. It was Ripken or something else. But then all of a sudden you start seeing some cows coming up. And, and I guess that's the ultimate compliment is, or they just like the name the name is kind of unique. Yeah. Do you know what Calvin means? I share. Don't bald? It's really a policy, but, but the name has become a little bit more popular. And I guess that's the ultimate compliment same way. When I grew up, Brooks Robinson was my hero. And there's a ton of is that were around the Baltimore area or. That people emulated Brooks..

Cal baseball Brooks Robinson Baltimore Ripken
"cal" Discussed on Hurry Slowly

Hurry Slowly

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on Hurry Slowly

"Wary about plugging into the power grid because they wary about being too it might hurt the community to be to a mesh to the outside world, or they really don't like cars, for example, because people can drive far away and don't have to spend so much time the community. So they're very intentional. There's obviously a lot of issues with this community as well. And I wanted I wanted wish this particular model, especially the fact that these intentional decisions are made by a small group of people all of whom tend to be men and everyone has to abide by. The decisions that's not good. But what you notice as an interesting principle is that a lot of Amish people are feel incredibly satisfied incredibly happy because the intention -ality of I'm living in a certain way that I really value way outweighs the the convenience isn't benefits. Lost of the things. They turned down not being electrical grid not having not having cell phones. So there's there's a principal to generalize here, which is being very intentional about how you live your life trying to support things you really value in knock it too cluttered up with the other things that intention can give you way, more satisfaction than what you lose by various minor conveniences of technologies that you sidestep. This is this underlies not just digital minimalism. But almost any minimalism movement is under girded by this idea that being intentional about your life is more important than maximizing. Conveniences. I think Cal is really onto something with this idea of intention -ality versus convenience about a year ago, I removed the Twitter app from my phone. I still have a Twitter account, but I can only access it from my desktop, and even now twelve months later, I still have moments where I have a reflex to post something I'm thinking about while I'm out walking around in the world. And the interesting thing is I wouldn't even classify myself as someone who was particularly addicted to Twitter in the first place. But that's how deep these things run and it occurs to me that reflects that impulse to share is rather like volunteering to be the sports caster for your own life. It's like you're locking yourself in a little booth high above the crowd and high above the action. So that you can comment on it. But my choosing to constantly comment on the action. You affectively remove yourself from the Plainfield remove yourself from the game of life. You no longer feel the flow of really sinking into a good conversation without the distractions or the soothing solitude of sitting with your own thoughts and letting them marinade into something richer. You cannot both comment on the action and be a part of the action at the same time. It's impossible. But even though I'm aware of all of this. I have no doubt that that reflexive twitch will come again. Because convenience is easy and being intentional is not. But it's a heck of a lot more rewarding in the long run. And speaking of sports now, it's time for your final moment of zen. What do you do when you need to slow down? If it's a busy day busy week baseball on the radio that is no no better invention for sort of shifting your mind into another mode than to sit outside on your porch on one of these sort of humid, mid Atlantic summer nights. And I have an old battery powered radio with an analog dial, which I love, and you know, Charlie slows Dave Jaguar do the call the nationals game, and you sit there, and you just gotta listen to it in your mind wanders because a lot of downtime. Mass like medicine. You know, I mean, it's it's a game that's paste. Well for slowing down a mine in our current age. Thanks to Matsue sich for producing this episode. And to Devon Craig Johnson for composing are lovely music. If you feel like this episode gave you some new ideas. I would love it. If you left us review on I tunes. Every review helps us spread the word about the show, which helps us keep making the show. I didn't put a handy link in the show notes as always thank you for listening. And remember to take your time.

Twitter principal Cal Devon Craig Johnson Matsue baseball Atlantic Charlie Dave Jaguar twelve months
"cal" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Baloney. And then if there is start surroundings object zone. Oh, so for example. Do you get how this works? For me, please dot com review sushi. Okay. So sushi is when it's enclosed like like think of like a sushi roll, right? But the ends are not enclosed. So it goes all the way around. So for example. Is a sushi. Pigs in a blanket sushi philophical rap. Oh, I see those those ends. Gotcha. Burrito. Number seven. Oh, that's a on. If it's tucked if the answer, tucked sushi sushi and actually that salad and a bread bowl thing. It's actually called a quiche. Why did I okay? So that was wrong identified that one wrong that type where it looks like a bucket that's called quiche. Okay. Deep dish pizzas. A quiche a salad with the bread bowl is a quiche key lime pie. Quiche? Cales zone. That's when it's all wrapped. So a burrito is a CAL's zone. This is how obsessed with food. We are in this country that we're we have so much of what's put it in categories. Pop tart, where's the start? Pop. A pop tart delivers Cal zone crustal uncrossable. I'll council and corn dog. Kelso. It's all all Kelso. Sub sandwich. That's a sandwich note taco. Yeah. Oh..

CAL
"cal" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"cal" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"His new podcast for which i was interviewed big questions with cal fuss men just google big questions with cal fuss nephew an where he views all sorts of folks like kobe bryant and damon john and seth godin and on and on and on and then there's me odd man out so without further ado in preamble i'm kind of stalling with this intro i apologize guys here is my interview aka being interviewed by cal fuss men just went off to springboard rather just went off the springboard so i've been thinking about this conversation for a long time and i basically had two ways to prepare i thought i won i know you we been in the sauna together we have met your mom that's right met your dad we've gone out to eat you won't let me pick up the check listen to your podcasts read your books so i do in some ways no you and i thought i could do even more research or i could try to just white my memory clean and approach this in a way that i really don't know tim and i'm going to try and forget a little about what i know and just act like i bumped him to tim ferriss on the train holy shit tim ferriss doing pretty good trains for my memory they got trains so and it's funny when i went out to see you i went on a train and so i thought that would be interesting way to go and the more i think about it the thing that really hits me about you goes to a story about brian grazer ron howard okay so once a producer and the others filmmaker partners and i'm interviewing them in the claridge hotel in london and we're talking we're having a great conversation and in the middle of this interview a fire alarm goes off and water sprouts from the ceiling in an instant ron howard russia's to it was sort of a kitchen in this room and he grabs a bucket and he puts it under the water at the same time ron howard ran to the bathroom and got towels and had them down and i was just amazed at how they both in a second went in their own directions to solve the problem and together they came up with the solution while i just sat there watching this and the more i thought about it i thought the genius of tim ferriss is he does both at the same time you're like two people who would you wouldn't ordinarily need a partner to do the things that you do and yet you have these skills on different sides of the spectrum that reside inside you and i'm thinking how did that happen so let's start at the beginning i was talking yesterday to this guy wim hof oh yeah no yes okay now he goes underwater and distaste under the cold for minutes at a time and when i was asked him how this came about he explained when he was born he was born a twin the second twin any came out a basically deprived of oxygen and he didn't know it until years later but his whole life became a movement toward the moment he was born with and i'm wondering at your birth did something happen that helped make you who you are it's quite possible i don't remember all too much but as i've been told i was born premature and ended up in critical care i still have scars you can actually see one right on my wrist there looks like a cigarette burn oh yeah have another one underneath my left nipple basically it's in the rib area and that is from a respirator i had i as i understand it five fullbody blood transfusions to oxygen the blood properly and i was in really bad shape very very very tiny and under incubator lights and so on so i had a lot of of spos trauma but difficulty coming into the world and seemed to have recovered but i was very kind of brother but i was very very very small up until about the end of fifth grade very small kid very much run so has your life has been a good part of it spent in search of getting the most out of your body and definitely a pretty good relation will there is in in some direct ways in the sense that the experimentation and the recording of experiments started with primarily wrestling which was the only sport i really gravitated to towards or actually did well in i.

google cal
"cal" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"cal" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"His new podcast for which i was interviewed big questions with cal fuss men just google big questions with cal fuss nephew an where he views all sorts of folks like kobe bryant and damon john and seth godin and on and on and on and then there's me odd man out so without further ado in preamble i'm kind of stalling with this intro i apologize guys here is my interview aka being interviewed by cal fuss men just went off to springboard rather just went off the springboard so i've been thinking about this conversation for a long time and i basically had two ways to prepare i thought i won i know you we been in the sauna together we have met your mom that's right met your dad we've gone out to eat you won't let me pick up the check listen to your podcasts read your books so i do in some ways no you and i thought i could do even more research or i could try to just white my memory clean and approach this in a way that i really don't know tim and i'm going to try and forget a little about what i know and just act like i bumped him to tim ferriss on the train holy shit tim ferriss doing pretty good trains for my memory they got trains so and it's funny when i went out to see you i went on a train and so i thought that would be interesting way to go and the more i think about it the thing that really hits me about you goes to a story about brian grazer ron howard okay so once a producer and the others filmmaker partners and i'm interviewing them in the claridge hotel in london and we're talking we're having a great conversation and in the middle of this interview a fire alarm goes off and water sprouts from the ceiling in an instant ron howard russia's to it was sort of a kitchen in this room and he grabs a bucket and he puts it under the water at the same time ron howard ran to the bathroom and got towels and had them down and i was just amazed at how they both in a second went in their own directions to solve the problem and together they came up with the solution while i just sat there watching this and the more i thought about it i thought the genius of tim ferriss is he does both at the same time you're like two people who would you wouldn't ordinarily need a partner to do the things that you do and yet you have these skills on different sides of the spectrum that reside inside you and i'm thinking how did that happen so let's start at the beginning i was talking yesterday to this guy wim hof oh yeah no yes okay now he goes underwater and distaste under the cold for minutes at a time and when i was asked him how this came about he explained when he was born he was born a twin the second twin any came out a basically deprived of oxygen and he didn't know it until years later but his whole life became a movement toward the moment he was born with and i'm wondering at your birth did something happen that helped make you who you are it's quite possible i don't remember all too much but as i've been told i was born premature and ended up in critical care i still have scars you can actually see one right on my wrist there looks like a cigarette burn oh yeah have another one underneath my left nipple basically it's in the rib area and that is from a respirator i had i as i understand it five fullbody blood transfusions to oxygen the blood properly and i was in really bad shape very very very tiny and under incubator lights and so on so i had a lot of of spos trauma but difficulty coming into the world and seemed to have recovered but i was very kind of brother but i was very very very small up until about the end of fifth grade very small kid very much run so has your life has been a good part of it spent in search of getting the most out of your body and definitely a pretty good relation will there is in in some direct ways in the sense that the experimentation and the recording of experiments started with primarily wrestling which was the only sport i really gravitated to towards or actually did well in i.

google cal
"cal" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"cal" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Still when you make real connections with people that you consider friends they like you because of this cork or because you dressed the same everyday or because you wore that shirt for three days in a row or because of that's what makes cal cal day authentic okay and so they want to connect with you the same way the problem is like that's why i keep using the word expectation because the expectation has moved from he just makes good tv show article podcast and that's okay today expect to know you on that deeper level that's how they're going to connect with you and they're going to say cal management wearing that shirt for three days he's so crazy i love him and check out his podcast it's a different level of you know what i'm saying this is so new to me this is so new and this is like when i started to have these conversations with alex a half bit was like mr miaki show in the karate kid how to write a book you know exxon ex off but the other half was him being mr miyagi then and basically explaining there's this whole new world out there and if you don't get into that world then nobody's gonna know who you are all these things you've accumulated this knowledge it's it's gone because they can't access it and i'm listening to you when what you're telling me is this way way deeper than you can imagine and not even comparable to any other time in history because i think that what happened like let's say in whatever the nineteen sixties any other time in history is sure young people know they're always going to know what the new music is what the.

alex mr miaki three days
"cal" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"cal" Discussed on Short Story Long

"What's the what what's the through line of all these people but focusing too much on that right so if the through lines this that means i have to somehow not only make kyri irving story good but i have to make cal story and kyrie irving story somehow have a similar r o anyone do that heck no one else saying is when you're thinking and sitting down and looking at the i tunes top charts and you're like well how do i make a top podcast those are the type of things you start thinking right i have to create this awesome format i have to create everything has an i can explain it saying is it's from doing it and from relaxing from the through lines find themselves the things that are similar and different find themselves the great stories find themselves if you let it breathe and let it be a story in a conversation if you come into it with a with too hard of an agenda you're just gonna strangle it to death yeah and i think a lot of times sadly shows are sold that way well this worked so will do that twenty five times yeah and sometimes it can be very cool like if you look at rocky now karate kid is not much different than rocky but they completely changed up the place they change the age and so you wouldn't know you're watching rocky all over again and they made it work but most that that's the one out of one thousand nine hundred ninety nine other ones people can tell this this has been ripped off and it's really sad.

cal kyrie irving
"cal" Discussed on Get Up!

Get Up!

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"cal" Discussed on Get Up!

"Because you say if you missed shy we make baxter old out of the puck is let osi what are the calf stevenson centers shot scores pelly capitals forcing game seven with a three nothing shutout making the play riley watson waiver torres hits bob what's the difference between poverty and golf i'm about to get up at the table on a morning field with those kinds of moments welcome back to get up alive above the heineken river decade pier seventeen that'd beetle that's jalen is nice down there by the way beautiful day really busy day we've had here we've had a lot of guests and we're going to have cal ripken junior here at our studio and i can tell you in advance hembo was going to lose it i'm a little bit you've worn me about this starting to get comfortable for ripken this is one i'm not afraid that i'm overselling hembo is reaction to cal ripken i'm also not afraid i'm overselling the greatness of lebron james bring you highlights of last night's game four at the q lebron and company needing a win to even up the eastern conference finals with the celtics and early on they were jumping out too quickly to this first quarter i look at this past by kevin love we're going to call that ninety four feet and it basically was wonderful it's over thirty yards in the air so baker mayfield tv can complete some of those this season in cleveland was awfully good and then this came a festival of celtic mrs at the basket not once.

baxter torres ripken lebron celtics kevin love cleveland riley watson heineken river jalen baker mayfield tv celtic ninety four feet thirty yards