37 Burst results for "CAL"

Fresh update on "cal" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:33 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "cal" discussed on Morning Edition

"For events greater than 10,000 people outdoors. Those same requirements are strongly recommended. People who are fully vaccinated will not have to wear masks indoors, although there are some exceptions, like on public transportation and in health care facilities. Los Angeles County Public Health director, Dr Barbara Ferrer says the ability to reopen took a lot of hard work across the state. It's a result of the many hours invested by community leaders and educating people about preventing transmission. And working to maximize vaccine access. And while there is optimism about the pandemic from state health officials many know there's still a lot of work to be done. Dr Wilma Wooten is San Diego County's public health officer. The pandemic is not over June. 15th is not the magic date or bullet for declaring that the pandemic is over. It is not. We are still seeing cases there have been nearly 3.8 million confirmed Covid 19 cases in the state. And nearly 63,000 people have died because of the virus. With more on the reopening. KQED politics editor Scott Shaffer takes a look at some of what comes next for the state governor. Newsom said two months ago that today, June 15th would mark the end of the colored tier system that limited what we could do who we could do it with and how many of us could do it together. It all depended on California's covid 19 rate being under control, which it is to help show that you're vaccinated, Newsom said. California will soon roll out an electronic version of your vaccination card. It's not a passport. It's not a requirement. It's just the ability now to have an electronic version of that paper version. And so you'll hear more about that in the next couple days. The reopening and lifting of capacity limits on most businesses and activities is welcome news for sure. But some are unhappy about confusing messages over things like who has to wear a mask inside. Newsom said Monday that if he has to, he will issue an executive order to bring Cal OSHA's mask guidelines into line with the CDC sees more liberal guidance. Last month, Newsom announced more than $100 million in cash incentives to encourage people to get their shot..

Monday Scott Shaffer Wilma Wooten Barbara Ferrer Last Month More Than $100 Million Two Months Ago CDC Los Angeles County Public Heal 19 Cases San Diego County Today, June 15Th June. 15Th Newsom Nearly 3.8 Million Covid 19 Rate Next Couple Days California Nearly 63,000 People Kqed
Telegraph Fire Tops 88,000 Acres, 76% Contained

Delta Trading Group

00:50 sec | 1 d ago

Telegraph Fire Tops 88,000 Acres, 76% Contained

"The world in Oak Flats now heading home. The Telegraph. Fire is now 76% contained near Globe fire spokesman Dean McAllister's say, as firefighters are letting the blaze burned down at this point, did some burnout around the canal peak electronic sites in the summer homes up there. And so we have created this island of fire that now outside the main body of the fire, which is really in pretty good shape, almost 1000 personnel still at the blaze this afternoon that has burned more than 88,000 acres out. Buildings and homes. McAllister doesn't think the Telegraph Fire will merge with the Mass Cal Fire update on the most scalp fire. It's burning 12 miles southeast of Globe. It is now 85% contained it spurn more than 72,000 acres. Firefighters on the line this afternoon battling increasing winds and low humidity. It is

Oak Flats Dean Mcallister The Telegraph Globe Mcallister
Fresh "CAL" from Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:31 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "CAL" from Morning Edition

"Johnston. Wall Street trading lower at this hour. You're listening to NPR news Live from KQED News. I'm Brian what the West Coast is headed into a heat wave that may break records in some places in our region. It's expected to gradually get hotter each day, prompting the National Weather Service to issue a series of heat warnings and advisories starting tomorrow. However, the operator that oversees the state's electricity supply says it does not anticipate any power outages. KQED S Holly J. McDade reports Temperatures are expected to reach the low one hundreds in England, part of the Bay Area Wednesday and Thursday. Drought conditions are getting worse and hot and dry conditions and gusty winds make it easier for fires to spread. Meteorologist general of Golden Gate, Weather Services, says heat like this is expected this time of year in the southwestern states in southern California. This could be more like a five day period with extreme temperatures and they're looking, you know, like 127 in Death Valley. Cal is so spokesperson and Gonzalez is the agency is monitoring conditions. No rotating power outages are planned. She says They may call in the public to voluntarily conserve electricity if necessary. Californians have responded to these called conservation and it's really reduce stress on the grid. She says Supply is looking better than last year. An extreme heat wave like last August that extended across the.

Death Valley England Kqed S Last August Thursday National Weather Service Bay Area Gonzalez Last Year Wednesday Brian Kqed News NPR Tomorrow Five Day Southern California Johnston Wall Street Each Day West Coast
Islanders Beat Bruins 6-2 in Game 6, Reach Stanley Cup Semi-Finals

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 5 d ago

Islanders Beat Bruins 6-2 in Game 6, Reach Stanley Cup Semi-Finals

"The islanders are heading to the semi finals for the second straight year following a six two win over the Bruins the islanders took control with a three goal second period entered the semifinal rematch against the lightning the game was tied one one in the second until Brock Nelson scored two straight goals in a seven nineteen span place is rocking tonight the fans are feed us energy team played great Kyle Palmieri made it for one with a stuff shot against two Carrasco who stopped twenty three of twenty seven shots Brad Marchand second power play goal of the night through the Bruins within four to early in the third but the islanders I stood on empty netters by cal Clutterbuck and Ryan Pulock I'm Dave Ferrie

Islanders Brock Nelson Bruins Kyle Palmieri Brad Marchand Carrasco Cal Clutterbuck Ryan Pulock Dave Ferrie
Telegraph Fire Continues to Spread Northeast, Closer to Globe, Arizona

Chad Benson Show

00:22 sec | 6 d ago

Telegraph Fire Continues to Spread Northeast, Closer to Globe, Arizona

"Is burning less than one mile from the community of top of the world. It's now the 10th largest wildfire in Arizona history. Fast approaching 72,000 Acres and new evacuation orders today for the mass Cal fire burning just southwest of Globe. 66,000 acre fire is now forcing residents of Beverly Hills and T 11 Ranch to leave their homes,

Arizona Globe Beverly Hills
California Governor Seems Unlikely to Lift Worker Mask Mandate

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

01:24 min | Last week

California Governor Seems Unlikely to Lift Worker Mask Mandate

"Lottery drawing today for winners of the Covid 19 vaccination prizes, which we'll get to in a moment, Newsome was asked by reporters. About the Cal OSHA, Uh, bizarre regulatory announcement last night that we have to have masks, Uh, even for vaccinated people in the workplace. Uh, this is what Newsom had to say. Audio one. What do you say to workers who are so confused? Because the administration has been promoting June 15th. Is this big, you know, reopening date and restriction lists. Uh, state of California or not entirely, but for the most part, and now they're being told that they have to wear these masks, potentially unvaccinated if their ambassadors so we're working through us. I mean, look, this is a This is the sausage making process. And what occurred was occurred last night, and we're we're going through. We've already had a series of conversations earlier this morning about people's feelings about what Happened last night. And as you know, it was quite a quite an intense conversation. Um, I think it's healthy. That the governor is not dictating and mandating the terms of those discussions in advance. Um we've certainly influenced broader conversations and we hope to influence The conversations going forward, right? Stop right there.

Newsome Newsom Osha California
Receivers to Target in the Late Rounds of your Dynasty Rookie Draft - burst 05

Daily Dose Football

04:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Receivers to Target in the Late Rounds of your Dynasty Rookie Draft - burst 05

"Was drafted another god. I'm fairly high on From clemson at cal. I'll let you discuss him. I think about what rogers. I'm not nearly as high on rogers as they consis I think a lot of people saw him when he went to green bay. I think everybody's been so ready for the green bay packers to have another wide receiver inserted in the draft. You know and we're just intimidating in anticipating but you know. I really don't think amari rogers profiles is the number two wide receiver in the fact. That rogers is a situation is so up in the air to say the the to say the least you know. I am not projecting broader. You're gonna be there long term and if that's the case you know is jordan love gonna be all support a wide receiver you know. Are we even sure that amari rogers is better than allen. Lazard now is dead fund as the guy that they went out and got in free agency it to be the number to receiver going into last year before he opted out. You know he's back on the roster as well and he's only twenty seven years old. I think people are really forgetting about devin. Funchess to be honest with you You know this is a guy that has already been a top twenty wide receiver in his career. So i think there's a lot more competition in green bay than a lot of people are are are getting Giving them credit for and The roger situation really makes me uneasy. Amaury writers has some talent. I i just don't think he's anything special. I just think that he's at best a middle level starter of the nfl. And i don't see much of a window of him being much higher especially as long as davante adams is on that team. 'cause i just don't see that the target share i mean it's a. It's a team that clearly wants to run the ball as much as possible. So i'm not nearly as how marta riders. I i know a lot of people are people are taking them in mid second rounds now and i think that that's a mistake. I think he was the best of water. She would come out clemson for the tape stuff that i watch. Those are good points. There's a reason as to why. I say fairly high. It's because i have a lot of the same reservation that you do. But and i do. I'm generally concerned about aaron rodgers in the future in green bay with the quarterback situation. But i have to look back at amari rogers talent and what he did in his last year and clemson and what he did was ball out in my opinion. Seventy seven receptions. Thousand twenty yards seven touchdowns. Yes he had. Trevor lawrence thong him. The ball but still in a shortened season are very impressive. Numbers and amari. Rogers is a guy that has pretty much been undervalued this entire process and now all of a sudden he's going green bay people hiding him and i'm not high on him because he's going to green by on more high in him because of the talent and the potential that i see and i do think that he has the potential to be the number two receiver in green bay S a good gig. Because even if aaron rodgers is not there in a long term disturbance excellence head coach matt floor and they still have a quarterback enjoy jordan love and we really don't we haven't seen much from during love so we can't make a lot of assumptions. But he was still you still first round pick in an quarterback the has a lot of potential people were comparing him to patrick mahomes and he. He was more of a quarterback they just needed to be developed. So i think that. I think that there's a good chance that jordan love could turn into a successful quarterback if the packers ended up do and not Having rogers under center. So i think the during the love isn't a terrible option there and lathered and function function all could be a lot number two receiver in that office. But i think long term that amari. Rogers is the better prospect for may so that is why i tend to be a little bit higher on the mar bader's

Amari Rogers Green Bay Rogers Funchess Clemson Amaury Lazard Packers CAL Jordan Aaron Rodgers Trevor Lawrence Thong Devin Allen Adams NFL Amari Matt Floor
Receivers to Target in the Late Rounds of your Dynasty Rookie Draft - burst 02

Daily Dose Football

05:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Receivers to Target in the Late Rounds of your Dynasty Rookie Draft - burst 02

"Take the floor. I the next receiver. Which was after. Marshall at will was joss palmer from tennessee. He went to the chargers with the fourteenth pick in the third round palmer's real interesting i don't think he was on many people's Pre-draft list At least i did see him on any sleeper list. Or anything and i didn't actually do much scouting on them but He's interesting profile. He's got a lot of speed. Got decent size. A not a whole lot of opportunity but mike williams ended up leaving which i think. A lot of people are expecting with this massive contracts. You know this guy that could end up being the number two For herbert for years to come. So i don't see him overtaking keenan allen anytime soon but this guy could end up with one hundred plus targets. You know if if the things shake shake the right way so he's definitely somebody on my radar because at these spots. We're going to kind of get into this. Which you really want is somebody is going to be tied to an offense in quarterback that's going to have lost ability or you guys have You know opportunity because there's not really that much talent ahead of so i do like Palmer you know. I've seen him go all over the board as far as rookie draft. So you know. I've seen him go as far as late. Second in rookie drafts. And all the way into the fourth round so it it really is dependent the rest of your league of where you're gonna have to take him but somebody that i. I'm willing to sit on the back of my roster and and maybe wait on a year and see if he can get a role in in san diego to go forward. This is one of really interesting prospects because like you were saying how this is a guy that i did not have on my radar before the draft. I think we did a rookie draft. Or so. And i do not believe that this guy got a practice rookie draft. I believe that this guy got drafted Discussed at all in like guys like rookie. More and cal. Trask redrafted those guys. Over josh palmer but all of a sudden palmer gets drafted into third round. Comes out of blue now. He's gong to destination with the chargers. Where like you said tile is a genuine opportunity for palmer to become the number two receiver there in the long term because of the deal with mike and so there's a genuine genuine however my my concern with palmer is less about the opportunity and i think that's really what has helped him rise on a lot of draft boards and his why he's going in rookie dress. It's more of the talent and the fact that he wasn't even on my radar heading into draft is a little bit concerning. Because you want a guy that you are faithful on their talent because out of everything talent is what shines is not necessarily the opportunity being at the right place in the right time is good in the short term redraft. But if you're thinking long term you. Thinking dynasty will situations chains on a year to year basis. So do we believe that. Joss palmer in the long term will be able to be the number two receiver for the chargers. Or will they just go ahead and get just in harbor a new number two target after year or two and that's us a genuine the debate and something. I'm conflicted with because sure. I like josh palmer at the moment but i don't know if five years from now if just palmer's going to be relevant so for this reason i'm a bit conflicted unjust barmer although the guys that were drafted after joss palmer. I'm a little bit higher on those guys that i will look to target in my dynasty. Drought yeah well one thing palmer. He was at a tennessee correct. Yes yes so like i. I remember watching You know because i'm uk fan. So i remember watching tennessee. I think they were the only team in the entire country. That had worse quarterback play than kentucky last year. So you know they. I remember when we played them. What they were they they. We knocked out like three of their quarterbacks because they were so bad they were just thrown. Pick after pick. So i really do think that there might have been some talent here that maybe went under the radar from a lot of people. Because the sats weren't there but you know i think a lot of it might have been the quarterback. Play had absolutely atrocious flight that that's a great point there. That's that's concerning though just because you don't exactly know what palmer is going to be able to become. But if he ends up falling this guy that wouldn't be opposed to picking but but but as we were talking about you know we were talking about cell windows you know in no guys that i didn't care for because i don't really plan on playing palmer scenes one of the reasons why i think he's interesting. Is br regardless ever played for your your team your dicey team. I do think that there's going to be a cell window. At some point. Mike williams ends up leaving even if they do bring in another number one wide receiver to go next to keenan allen. You know somebody that's more talented the palmer. There will probably be more than likely be a weaker two week window or something at some point that people will get really excited about in. Call him a sleeper. And then you might be a turnaround. Flip them for profit

Palmer Joss Palmer Josh Palmer Keenan Allen Chargers Tennessee Mike Williams Herbert Marshall Trask San Diego Mike Harbor Kentucky UK
Is Tutu Atwell Too Small to Succeed in the NFL? - burst 08

Daily Dose Football

07:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Is Tutu Atwell Too Small to Succeed in the NFL? - burst 08

"Now to god. The i know that you are extremely enthusiastic about Terrence marshall going to the panthers. Twenty seven th pick of the second round just a few picks after escorts from lsu tears marshall to the panthers. What are your thoughts on this cal. I'll pick it a fantastic lang spot. you know. I think i was super high on marshall. Probably highest of just about anybody in the industry All all college season. And all you know predrag and my my enthusiasm is not where one bit. I love the landing spot where some people might be turned off on it You know I know that he is not maybe going to be immediately. Be the number. One with robby anderson and with dj more there. But i think he's going to have a clear role from day one because if you look at his body type and how profiles ios not just a big bodied receiver he also is a a burner to i mean he is true burner and You know high jump. High catch radius any any provides the wide receivers did not do as your which was give a teddy bridgewater. Now is going to be darnold. But they didn't have anybody to score in the red zone. You know everything. They they scored was from like you know deeper out or the the running backs the mike davis or you know. But they really didn't have anybody in the red zone that they could produce. So i think marshall steps in right away and could be. I bet he has a real legitimate chance at leading all rookies in in receiving touchdowns ex year. So you know it's somebody that i like. As far as a talent. I think he can easier to age. Well in that offense because He is going back with his former college coach. Now the head coach of the of the panthers. So i think that this guy drafted him whereas he might have fallen a little bit in. Nfl draft because there was a little bit uncertainty right before the draft about some of his medical history. I don't think coach takes them at high if he has any type about about the about his foot injury so i think that this is going to be the guy that's going to be all help you. Now you're gonna have some flashes. He's going to be probably inconsistent. Probably a lot like a like. I kind of value him a lot. Like the where i had claypool asher whereas i kind of knew that there was going to be a lot of competition for targets but i knew that there was gonna be a lot of upset especially if somebody gets hurt And i just think that there's gonna be a lotta touchdown and he's a big guy when people start really understanding how much of a freak athlete is. Don't be surprised if this guy is being compared as maybe even number one wide receiver in this class next year. That's that's how upside. i see you know. I do think chases a better prospect but you know they were on the same team and You know even on the team with jefferson and chase He marshall was extremely valuable piece of their natural shape team. I mean he. I think he had like fourteen touchdowns or something you know. And he had costa twenty yard per catch average on the team. I mean he he really is a tremendous player and then when those two guys left last year you know he played over about a. I don't know about six or seven seven games. you opted out. And he averaged one hundred and fifteen dollars. You're talking about more leading devante smith. It was really. I believe tears marshall who bleeding the country in yards per game you know before he opted out and he also was averaging close to two touchdowns a game you know and this same competition is all those. Stc guy so. I just liked body. I can't i hate to sound like a broken record. But i really do like big receivers. It's not the smaller wide. Receivers can't thrive in that bayer wide receivers don't bust. I just think that when you historically look at all the body types of players that are generally over six foot in there like over two hundred pounds to twenty six. I'd say two to twenty is about the average. You know we get the top hand wide receiver fantasy for fancy standpoint every year. That's probably about the average. So i like my guys. That profile big catch raises. So i just feel like they're more consistent with a when when you get that's capable of being a possession receiver getting first downs and touchdowns. I i like their consistency versus having a field stretcher. We might put up forty points in a game lake. You kyle i am. I am feeling good about carrots. Marshall and about what he's gonna do in his nfl career. The only hold back that. I have with taras marshall and again this could be viewed as a positive based on what i'm going to say in a second is so terrorist marshall hops into offense with dj more lobbying said in christian. Mccaffrey already there. So you're already looking at the possibility of being the fourth target there in carolina which i deal and add that to the fact that sam darnold who i think everyone considers at this point to be in the bottom. Half of the starting quarterbacks is throwing the ball to terrence. Marshall this is this is clearly not ideal so short term. There are some concerns. I do think like you that he's going to be great in the red zone. Short term era. You're gotta be thinking while sam. Donna already has connected to robinson clearly. The carolina organization views. Dj moore's or number receiver cj. Metcalf a christian mccaffrey a year a year ago. He broke the record for the most receptions for running back in a single season ever. She has to view him almost as a receiver. At this point with the matt of receptions which is insane that he's getting one hundred receptions i think it was a year or two ago so that that's not ideal but dynasty football dicey football so not necessarily great redraft person. In my opinion but dynasty football is about the long game and the long game. I see in the long game i see turns marshall absolutely thriving because we don't know a five we anderson's gonna be in carolina long-term. We don't know what the scenario is going to be with. Sam darnold or with christian mccaffrey. Dj more but we know the is one of the best receivers in this class in. He is talented enough will were at some point career. He will get an opportunity probably sooner rather than later if not this year to really showcase what he can do and he has the talent to be a number one receiver. I love his size. I loved as a big bodied receiver. That's a great fan a red zone. There are a lot of good things about terrence marshall and so what i was saying earlier is the fact that not going to be good in the short term is almost a positive here for you as a dynasty are because now we're seeing him fall to the third fourth fifth round pick of the second round which is lower than it should be gone if anything. This guy should be going at the back half of the first half so now because the term concern that comes with marshall. Now you're gonna be able to go up there and gets terrorist marshall and you're not gonna have to reach from either he's probably just gonna fall right in your laps and you're gonna walk is one of the biggest winners in your dynasty graphs. Because here's a guy that has a potential to be a top five receiver in this

Marshall Panthers Terrence Marshall Robby Anderson Claypool Asher Mike Davis LSU NFL Taras Marshall Sam Darnold Dj Moore Carolina Jefferson Chase
Is Tutu Atwell Too Small to Succeed in the NFL? - burst 03

Daily Dose Football

04:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Is Tutu Atwell Too Small to Succeed in the NFL? - burst 03

"Okay. Let's move on to a guy that's being compared by now to rashad. Bateman in that is lonsdale more. He went to the arizona cardinals in the second round. And this is a guy that a lot of people are on dynasty as well. Collier thoughts on rhonda. More from purview. Run more than other guy data you know. I like the talent. I kind of wonder what his role is going to be in arizona that they do have the passing volume there to support him to become a fantasy viable wide receiver. If he's talented as he can't is athleticism has shown. I think he can produce a to be coming up a pretty valuable fancy option. I just. I'm not really in love with them. Taking them in the first round though. Because i'm not confident that he ends up becoming a very coveted player long-term. I'm just not sure that he that it's without getting the volume that Some of these other top receivers. You're going to get. I'm not sure that his death. The targets are going to be Extremely valuable and so. He's renita rely on a lot of catches now again with the air raid being spread system. There should be a lot of underneath stuff or that. It can complement deandre hopkins. So you later in their careers and you might see these. Two guy switching. But as coming out of college rancho moore's is very limited in what it skills that is He did almost everything. From elias scrimmage whether handoffs or getting short yard passes and running after the catch which is it's good for a lot of offense is like i said he could be a nice compliment out nice Robin but to deandre hopkins. But i i definitely cannot see a batman batman Combination there so. I think that the upside is. The ceiling is a little bit low for me for wanting to spend a first round pick. I think that What you can do with a lot of these guys is if there if you're kind of not sold on them at a back in first or early second round picks you know people covet. Those rookie picks quite often. And you can sometimes get undervalued veteran that you know is going to produce next year i agree with you on wanda and it's baffling to me that these two guys have with similar with shout bateman in baltimore the guy. We just talked about a similar. Adp in dynasty rookie draft right now average draft addition. They're probably going round. Pick eight pick or so but like you call. I think that rondo more is more of a second round. Pick because of the fact that hopkins is already there and i'm gonna touch on that a little bit more and say that long-term if let's say rhonda more sticks with the cardinals. Is he ever going to be a number one receiver in target for cal for calamari. Because as long as the andrea is there and he's demanding one hundred seventy targets. There's not a lot of room. That offense to morris thrive. So that's why i'm with you on route. One del more. I think he's a talented receiver but Even before the draft i was not as high on rhonda with a lot of receivers seeing this landing spot to me makes him in less desirable of a prospect for me. So i'm not on the vonda more train either. And this is probably a guy that i will avoid. I have no problem taking him in the second round. But based on where i've been singing going i think he's not gonna fall to a second round. And if there's a toss up between vonda more rashad bateman the board that i'm gonna pick shot bateman That's what i'm going to be doing every every time. Because i just like Bateman a lot. More than i do rhonda more at this point. Yeah i do i. She liked the landing spot. You know. being tied to collar long-term is a is a positive. I think as far as you know where people are going to proceed even if he does come out and flashes rookie year. People are gonna get really excited to you. Know that that's one thing that i think that You either one of these guys are tied up the young quarterbacks that can rush around and can hit a deep ball i just wondered what his development curves because the way he was using college and if he does maybe this guy could be a terrific type because he really is at that super athlete of prospect. We're

Deandre Hopkins Rhonda Rancho Moore Elias Scrimmage Bateman Rashad Lonsdale Arizona Cardinals Collier Arizona Wanda Robin Rondo Vonda Rashad Bateman Baltimore Hopkins Cardinals Andrea
The 'Hollyweed' Sign

Ghost Town

02:24 min | Last month

The 'Hollyweed' Sign

"Hollywood sign is as we know. It means a lot of things to a lot of people. The sign itself has gone through a bit of an identity crisis over the years. The hollywood sign was unveiled in nineteen twenty-three as hollywood land changing to the hollywood sign. We all know and love in nineteen forty nine. Yeah yeah it's The real estate company who actually owns the land is still a real estate company in the beechwood area. The people of la woke up to the hollywood sign on new year's day. Nineteen seventy six. The hollywood sign got a little facelift. It didn't say. Hollywood it said holly weed and it was a little prank. The people of l. a. Waking up nineteen seventy six going. Oh am i dead. I imagine hollywood was pretty wild place. Then they're probably emma seeing things in my bed. No you're seeing holly weed and it was a you say it was a prank but it was a little more of a college assignment. Yes that's right. Cal state northridge student. Danny fine good took to the sign with fifty dollars worth of curtains to mark the day. A more relaxed marijuana law came into effect. It was his his class was a study on scale and he got an a. I'm glad for that because it's not as good of a story. If he gets like a b- minus for craftsmanship they took off some points. The f- the first of the kind of changing the signs. Yeah it's a fine tradition. Little very as someone who has been up to the hollywood sign. It's really hard to change the sign. You have to do it at night and it is because it was. It's all like would you say nineteen twenty one. I think one thousand nine hundred twenty three twenty three hundred forty nine. it was and it's been renovated. Yeah in real bed where i think some tours and of course it was a focal point. Where in the seventies. I think shortly before this happened. One of the os roll down so you can imagine what kind of disrepair was in. But people don't know this doesn't light up. It's still just kind of baseboards and metal. There's not an illuminated part of its. You have to go up there at night with your sheets and your shit and all that and make this thing and hope for the best in the

Hollywood Cal State Northridge Holly Danny Fine Emma LA
French Reporter Kidnapped by Jihadi Rebels in Northern Mali

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

French Reporter Kidnapped by Jihadi Rebels in Northern Mali

"The video has been released showing a French journalist saying that he has been kidnapped by an al Qaida linked group in northern Mali the head of the Africa desk for Reporters Without Borders all know full game confirmed that journalist alleviate to what had been kidnapped on April the eighth while working a money's no the city of cal we have a reason to to to believe and the worst and I unfortunately and there is a fair chance is set to he was indeed kidnapped by December Hungary do Paul confirms in the video that he was kidnapped by the al Qaeda linked group Jay and I am for okay has appeal to French and Malian authorities to help police him well calling on the authorities to do everything they can the French foreign ministry confirmed his disappearance saying they're in touch with his family and Maddie and authorities I'm Karen Thomas

Al Qaeda Reporters Without Borders Mali Africa CAL Hungary French Foreign Ministry Paul JAY Okay Maddie Karen Thomas
Parents Sue Father Accused of Hiding Kristin Smart's Body

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | Last month

Parents Sue Father Accused of Hiding Kristin Smart's Body

"College student Kristin Smart have sued the father of the man charged with killing their daughter nearly 25 years ago. The lawsuit says smarts body was buried in Ruben Flores, his backyard and that he moved it under cover of darkness to another location after investigators searched his property in February of 2020. That mirrors claims made by prosecutors this week when they charged Reuben Flora's with being an accessory after the alleged murder. He was released from custody yesterday after posting $50,000 bail. Son, Paul Flores is being held without bail. He's accused of sexually assaulting and murdering smart in 1996 on the Cal Poly San Luis Obispo campus, where both were freshmen. Lawsuit against Ruben Flores seeks damages for intentionally causing emotional distress by helping his son cover up the crime. It says Flora's God help moving the body from two unnamed accomplices who will later be added as defendants in the case.

Kristin Smart Ruben Flores Reuben Flora Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Campu Flora
Prime Suspect Paul Flores Charged With 1996 Murder of Kristin Smart

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Prime Suspect Paul Flores Charged With 1996 Murder of Kristin Smart

"Pedro, arrested this week in connection with the murder of a Cal state San Luis Obispo student 25 years ago, is also now being investigated for sexual assault in Los Angeles. Paul Flores has long been the prime suspect in the disappearance of 19 year old Kristin Smart 1996, the college freshman was allegedly killed during a sexual assault in Florida. His dorm room slow county District attorney Dan Tao says floors is also suspected of committing sexual acts around sent Piedra where he lives and where he was known to frequent the bars. We do have evidence in this case that leads us to conclude that there very well may be additional victims in the Southern California area, so we would ask that anybody that may have had experience with him that they have questions about for them to reach out and contact law enforcement. The LAPD says detectives have gathered evidence against floors about assault that allegedly occurred over several years. The only county Da's office has not decided whether to final charges based on that evidence. Well.

Kristin Smart Dan Tao San Luis Obispo Pedro Piedra Los Angeles Florida Southern California Lapd DA
Paul Flores Accused of Killing Kristin Smart During Rape Attempt

The John Phillips Show

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

Paul Flores Accused of Killing Kristin Smart During Rape Attempt

"In the Christian Smart case. San Luis Obispo County prosecutors believe they know where her body was buried. Paul Flores is now charged with murder and attempted rape. His father is charged as an accessory for allegedly helping to dispose of the body. The 19 year old vanished on her way back to our Cal Poly San Luis Obispo dorm 25 years ago floors was the last person seen with her.

Obispo County Paul Flores San Luis Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
'Prime suspect' arrested in student's 1996 disappearance

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 2 months ago

'Prime suspect' arrested in student's 1996 disappearance

"A man who attended Cal Poly university in the nineteen nineties has been arrested in connection with the murder of a female student who vanished nearly twenty five years ago the sheriff in San Luis Obispo county California says they've considered forty four year old Paul flora's likely to be the suspect for years he was the last person seen with Kristen smart when she disappeared in nineteen ninety six returning to her dorm from a party announcing on K. E. Y. T. T. V. the rest of Paul Flores for the murder of Kristen smart and the rest of his father Ruben Flores as an accessory to the murder sheriff Ian Parkinson says they've executed dozens of search warrants in recent years and now have evidence linking the suspect to Kristin smart he vows they will continue to search for her remains we are not going to stop until Kristen has been recovered police say new witnesses came forward in the case after hearing about the podcast your own backyard I'm Jackie Quinn

Kristen Smart Cal Poly University Obispo County Kristin Smart Paul Flora K. E. Y. T. T. V. Ruben Flores San Luis Ian Parkinson California Kristen Jackie Quinn
2 Suspects Arrested in 1996 Disappearance of Kristin Smart

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

2 Suspects Arrested in 1996 Disappearance of Kristin Smart

"Arrests have been made in connection with the 1996 disappearance of Cal Poly student Kristin Smart Cave be Kay's Jensen. Reiter has the latest nearly 25 years later in murder charges are finally being brought against the main suspect in the Kristin Smart case. I'm here this afternoon to announce the rest of Paul Floors. The murder of Kristen Smart and the rest of his father, Ruben Flora's as an accessory to the murder. San Luis Obispo County Sheriff in Parkinson made the announcement from the Cal Poly campus, not providing any details as to what evidence finally led to those arrests. And this is probably a question I will answer at this point. That we have not recovered Kristen. We will continue to focus on finding her remains regardless of any court

Cal Poly Student Kristin Smart Kay's Jensen Kristin Smart Paul Floors Kristen Smart Ruben Flora Reiter Obispo County Cal Poly Campus San Luis Parkinson Kristen
Paul Flores Arrested in 1996 Disappearance of Kristin Smart

The John Phillips Show

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Paul Flores Arrested in 1996 Disappearance of Kristin Smart

"Time person of interest in the 1996 disappearance of his former Cal Poly San Luis Obispo classmate, Kristin Smart. His father was also arrested. Paul Flora's long described as a prime suspect by authorities was taken into custody and San Pedro by San Luis Obispo County Sheriff's officials. His attorney confirmed he was informed of his client's arrest, but said he had no further comment. California is now pausing the Johnson and Johnson

Kristin Smart Paul Flora Cal Poly San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo County Sheriff San Pedro California Johnson
'Zombie' Urchins Are Wiping Out Kelp Forests

Environment: NPR

01:52 min | 2 months ago

'Zombie' Urchins Are Wiping Out Kelp Forests

"California francisco. has a sea urchin problem. They've exploded in numbers off the northern california coast and these purple spiky urchins are wiping out crucial kelp forests so scientists are searching for ways to slow him down. Here's npr's laura summer diving. A kelp forest is a lot like walking through a real forest. The seaweed is thirty to sixty feet tall. It's very surreal. You're kind of coming around. And then you have this large canopy over you. That's kind of filtering light. At least that's how it used to be says. Meredith mcpherson a graduate student at uc santa cruz. She and her colleagues found that ninety. Five percent of kelp forests have disappeared in counties north of san francisco. Cal provides a key habitat for all kinds of marine life. We were expecting something like that. But it doesn't really make it any easier to digest in terms of the actual loss of the coastal ecosystem because of an ecological double whammy. I came marine heat. Wave known as the blob. Water temperatures rose far above normal then came a more direct attack. Purple sea urchins. Their veracious grazers. They devour kelp. Sometimes we see dozens of them. Crawling up the stem of the kelp and kind of taking it down from there. Normally urchins are kept in check by their main predator off northern california a giant starfish sea star scientists call them known as the sunflower see star. But they've been wiped out by sea star wasting disease. Scientists think that both the disease the blob of warm water were made worse by climate change even now with most of the kelp off northern california gone the urgency

Laura Summer Meredith Mcpherson Uc Santa Cruz Northern California NPR Francisco California CAL San Francisco
"cal" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

07:58 min | 2 months ago

"cal" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Cal thomas. Is our guest written ten books including blinded by might talking about the role of the moral majority in american politics in the eighties. You were vice. President of moral majority from eighty to eighty five. Where is the moral majority today. Well it's It is no more as an organization but these kinds of Improvement movements crop up In every generation we've had the moral improvement moral rearmament There have been There was an anti cigarette movement That that tracked with prohibition in the nineteen twenties so they're always been these Efforts through the political system to improve the moral and cultural condition of the country but all of them fail because they They failed to address the central problem which in this Easter week holy week People focus more on perhaps than they do at any other time which is a inner condition Called sin and nobody can reach that. Except for god and and So while all of these movements were well intentioned as was the moral majority trickle-down morality from washington. No matter who is in there Because that's not where the problem is and it's not where the solution is either. Even though some politicians continue to promote that notion but is there in need for a way to give voice to evangelical christians in america in in a more powerful consolidated manner to sort of combat some of the policies of the left that are seemingly and attacking the church. Well there's no Well several things that question first of all there's no greater power than the gospel itself. It's the only power to salvation and it is the only power that can actually change your life. I have had very very few. Probably count them on one hand without exaggerating Write me and say you know. I used to be a liberal democrat. But i've been so persuaded by the power of your arguments in your column that. I'm now a conservative republican. That just doesn't happen But i have had many people who i've had the privilege As we say of leading to. Jesus christ Be transformed by the renewing of their minds and have a different worldview because they see the world differently a- as far as The persecution of the church. I mean even jesus of nazareth said they persecuted me. They're gonna persecute us so that that comes to the package. It's it's how we respond to persecution. I think that is the most important thing. And if you're persecuted for doing the right thing then you should rejoice because you stand it along lineup of prophets who have gone before if you're persecuted for being a jerk then you deserve it but the moral majority did good work and i think the influence and the ability elect candidates and pushing agenda was very useful in that time. Don't you well sure. But it didn't last. I mean we have there's still abortions going on there. Things of advanced in the in the marriage category. We have transgenders. Now we have the polygamists who After the supreme court ruling that same sex marriage was predicted by the constitution. The polygamists now say they want to be next You've got Taxpayer funding of abortions Under under biden You have now All of this Diversity business even in the military I just reading a story. From today's washington times american seals green berets and delta force. Are now going to get their first ever. Inclusions are well. I always thought that the military was about fighting and winning wars and breaking stuff. But now we're gonna get inclusion czars. And they're making uniforms now for that will fit pregnant women in the military. I mean we. We've gone crazy. Because as i say my book america's expiration day we've lost. We've lost our center. We can no longer defined right from wrong because everybody has their own personal truth and as long as your truth makes you happy. Even if it's the opposite of somebody else's truth it's okay. Because happiness and fulfillment are now our highest calling. I remember something. The late roman catholic bishop Fulton sheen said many years ago. And before things really got that he said america doesn't suffer from intolerances. Some charge america suffers some tolerance of virtually everything. And that is a problem. If you stand for everything you stand for nothing when you look back over your career and there have been public health. Crises there've been issues of public health. That took over from age to all any number of things. What is your reaction to what happened. Not just the pandemic or how. It started chinese role in it. But how we responded as a government and as a people well i think that you know here's joe biden now trying to take credit for these hundred some tens of millions of people who have been vaccinated and he wants to hundred million by the end of may or whatever it is but he gives absolutely no credit to president trump who who authored Warp speed as he called it and prodded these drug companies pfizer burner. Zenica johnson johnson to Speed up the creation and delivery of these vaccines the word. Unprecedented is overused. But this certainly wasn't precedent that no other vaccine that i'm aware of Ever has come to market has come to universal's us faster than than these vaccines and i think much of the credit goes trump and i think it would be very gracious and helpful to the president the current president to at least acknowledge that as you know that is something he is incapable of. Doing that is unfortunate because dr fauci is is seeming to claim credit for that. And i have one minute left. That was my final question for you. If you're sitting in the audience where she's given a press conference what you ask him. Well first of all i would say. Why can't we get a second opinion. I mean i in medicine you always get more than one opinion. The the media you know if it civil rights in the past. They only turn to jesse jackson. And now it's al sharpton as if they speak for all african americans and now in medicine. They turned to dr fauci. Well there are other doctors out there with various opinions on this pandemic and whether it was a good idea to shut down the country and whether we can safely open now especially with people who have actually they have been vaccinated can show their cards like i can And yet The and the best way to improve the economy of course is to open it again. So i would You know i would put. Why can't we get in a second opinion. Why are you the only one. And there are people within the nih. By the way who do not fully agree. With all of your pronouncements. Why can't we hear from them. And i think the media ought to go out and interview of these people but of course they don't 'cause it's easier just pick one guy and make him the face of the entire Battle against the pandemic thomas. You are wonderful breath. Afraid air bags. Thank you for being our guest by pleasure. Dr fauci says your children shouldn't be out playing with other kids without a mask coming up. The like very show continues..

jesse jackson america washington Fulton sheen Jesus christ one minute hundred million ten books Zenica johnson johnson joe biden eighties more than one opinion second opinion republican hundred today Cal thomas nineteen twenties Warp speed trump
A highlight from My College Experience in a Nutshell (Part 1)

Graduation, Here I Come

01:15 min | 2 months ago

A highlight from My College Experience in a Nutshell (Part 1)

"Spring semester. Two thousand eighteen for one is the first semester. I got to go outside of campus to report. For example i cover a civil court case regarding property dispute. I attended a neighborhood council meeting a few blocks away from my house. The semester is also the continuation of my second year in a university pep band when the semester starting in january. I didn't anticipate ticky of what might become the most fun semester. I've had the band. Ceaseless women's basketball team was on fire. The band include myself as a every home game. Cheer them since. I commuted campus every day. I would always stay on campus on game days and usually at the library either doing homework or studying between my last class and before the game starts fast four to march college basketball playoff time. The men's basketball team missed the playoffs that year but the women's basketball team was in for a journey. It all began on march six when the band cheerleaders and dance team border buses to cal state. Fullerton where the first round of conference playoffs was being played like the year before we had snacks on board. We played mario kart embalmer man. We told stories and dare homework using our phones as hot spots that night season defeated hawaii the first round playoffs

Basketball Fullerton Mario Kart Hawaii
"cal" Discussed on Meditative Story

Meditative Story

04:45 min | 8 months ago

"cal" Discussed on Meditative Story

"Thank you cal. In just a moment, a guide you through closing meditation. Fest though I want to acknowledge salesforce sponsorship of Meditative Story. While you may know them for their role in being companies and customers together. SALESFORCE also works to improve the state of the world. Sharing the stories of leaders who are making positive changes. With grateful to them for making meditative story possible. Knowing the cow, we'll be sharing his story. I watched the footage from that game where he broke the record for consecutive appearances it's quite a thing. Twenty two minutes of the crowd celebrating his achievement. One Minute for every hundred games to break the record. COW SHAKING HANDS WITH FANS. Hugging friends. Smiling. Smiling. A celebration of showing up. A celebration of always being there present. No matter what. It's made me wonder if you'd like to try something with me for our practice together. It's a bit different to other meditations. We've done so far this season. But let's give it a go. Let's play. Twenty two seconds. One second for every hundred kms cal ripken junior played back to back to break the record. Twenty two seconds. Let your attention be relaxed. Alert and bright by CAL third base. And showing up. Showing up for whatever is in the mind and in the body. Showing up for Tabah comes into our awareness? Okay, how was that? Twenty seconds can feel like a long time or it can feel like no time tool. Either way we set. Breathe. Feel your body. Feel the temperature of around you and your skin. And like CAL will go again. Twenty two seconds seeing what happens. Knowing what is happening while it's happening? That's my favorite definition of mindfulness. Twenty two seconds of showing up. Of being here. Welcome back. Okay for this last lab instead of going into the twenty two seconds with intentional bright awareness. That switch. It up. To. Celebration. Bring to mind a time when you did something. Amazing. Something worth celebrating. Or bring to mind the positive quality people tend to associate with you. The most for me, it's being easy going. What is it for you? Letting. Go of any self judgment that might be here right now. And choosing something within you to celebrate. And enjoying the.

CAL Meditative Story Tabah
"cal" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

04:39 min | 9 months ago

"cal" Discussed on What It Takes

"To understand CAL ripken junior you need to know the story his dad told him early in his career the story of wally pimp while he was a power hitting first baseman that supposedly took a day off and supposedly had a headache or something took a day off and then gave an opportunity to a guy named Lou Garrick and Lou Gehrig came in never came out. So essentially while he lost his job because he took a day off and my dad. Through the minor leagues say Okay Look. if you WANNA take a day off and you think you're tired and you sit down and a guy that replaces you get gets three hits in the game at night. What do you think the manager is going to do tomorrow? He's GonNA WANNA play. The guy that got three hits don't let that guy three his. Here's another story for you. It's called two, thousand, one, hundred and thirty one. That's the number of major. League Baseball Games in a row that CAL ripken junior played before he beat Lou Gehrig's long standing record and after ripken reached two, thousand, one, hundred, thirty one he went right on playing another straight five, hundred, two games for a total of two, thousand, six, hundred and thirty two consecutive games all for the Baltimore Orioles and Ripken didn't just show up and play of course, he killed it A. Two time MVP for the American. League, but the streak as it's known is what cal ripken junior is best known for, and there's not much chance that is record will ever be broken. I, know people say things like that only to be proven. Wrong. But here's why just to give you a little context, the guy who holds the third place record after cal ripken and Lou gehrig a shortstop name Evert Scott. Who Played One thousand, three, hundred, thousand, seven consecutive games in one thousand, nine hundred sixteen. This has what it takes a podcast about passion vision and can you say perseverance from the Academy of Achievement? I'm Alice Winkler. This child is gifted. And I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have. Opportunity not a perfect opportunity and you don't take it. You may never have another child it always. So clear it was just like the picture started to form itself. There was new wing which alive could prevail over the truth darkness over light their life every day I, wake up and decide. Today I'm going to love my life. Decide. If they're going to break you league or it's when you go on and play stay out of there. And then along companies differential experiences that you don't look for you don't plan for. The boy you better not Miss Missing. When Mary Jordan met up with cower in junior a few weeks ago at the Academy of achievements offices in Washington DC they challenged each other to some baseball trivia. Of course Mary did wisely have her notes in front of her alright. What is the distance from the back tip of Home Plate to second base? Hundred Twenty seven feet three and three, eight, three, eight inches or something. That's exactly. How is play some seventeen inches and how wide basis? I'm not sure about that but I think a foot twelve, fifteen i. Something about you know what? A forty five foot line is now. It's the one I base the last forty, five feet you have to be on the line or in foul territory. In the feet or you can be ruled out for interfering but I forty five feet you can be anywhere you want. How much baseball way. Well, if Gaylord Perry has it or or somebody who saved the piece of it Only weighs five and a quarter round says, how bad could it hurt? Cal ripken said he was good at getting out of the way the ball whenever he was at bad. But he did get hit in the head seven times during his twenty one seasons in Major League Baseball each of those times he was anticipating a breaking ball a ball that curves dips when in truth a fastball was headed straight toward him. Thank goodness for helmets but each time he got beaned ripken said he just wait for the ringing in his brain to stop and would get back up and keep.

cal ripken Lou Gehrig Baseball Lou Garrick Academy of Achievement wally pimp Gaylord Perry headache Major League Baltimore Orioles Alice Winkler Mary Jordan MVP Washington Academy of achievements Evert Scott
"cal" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on KCRW

"It turns out that cal's maybe helpful to us in the pandemic there's a biotech company in South Dakota using cows to make antibodies for treating human disease and lately they've been making antibodies for covert nineteen years NPR's Joe Palca this story is about cowboys but it starts with the department of defense DOT is always looking for ways to protect its warfighters from infectious diseases Tracy pals as with the defense threat reduction agency as an example she says her agency was behind the production of in a bowl of vaccine started out in development in our office but we did the early development so it's not surprising that the DOD is also funding S. A. B. bio therapeutics of Sioux falls South Dakota C. E. O. Eddie Sullivan said the Pentagon was looking for a company that could deal with any new viral threat and be able to very rapidly produce eighty specifically target hi neutralizing antibody that can be used in patients as quickly as possible targeted neutralizing antibodies can help slow an infection and someone who is sick or prevent an infection and someone who is exposed to a virus to make these antibodies quickly Solomon's company uses cows but these aren't just any cows these are cows that have been given the genes to make a human like immune system and Sullivan says there's a good reason to use cows in order to be able to produce large amounts of human antibodies that are specific to specific diseases because when cows make antibodies they make buckets of them and they produce a variety of antibodies making it more likely one or more will be effective so if you inject the special cows with what essentially amounts to a corona virus vaccine that prompts the cows to make human corona virus antibodies Solomon says they've already shown this concept can work for murders and illness caused by a virus similar to the one that causes cove in nineteen so we already have considerable background in producing these antibodies to a corona virus but whether they work against the covert nineteen corona virus still has to be shown to do that S. A. B. has partnered with William claims track at the university of Pittsburgh clin stress says the first step is to show the covert nineteen antibodies aren't causing more health problems than they solve we're doing a national antibody tests for that and then subsequently it will be doing advocacy tests efficacy tests will show whether the antibodies actually prevent disease in animals exposed to the corona virus we will look at virus production will look at weight loss signs of infection to evaluate how sick they get assuming Klim stress tests show the antibodies can prevent disease SAB says they hope to start testing them in humans later this summer there was one thing that I was puzzled by about SAB biotherapeutics biotech companies tend to crop up near elite universities frequently on the east or west coast so I asked SAP's any Solomon why his company chose to locate in Sioux falls he said the answer is simple cows love it there if you're gonna be a cow you would want to live in one of our facilities here in South Dakota I'll keep that in mind Joe Palca NPR news this is NPR news and this is member supported Casey R. W. this.

cal
"cal" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It turns out that cal's maybe helpful to us in the pandemic there's a biotech company in South Dakota using cows to make antibodies for treating human disease and lately they've been making antibodies for covert nineteen years NPR's Joe Palca this story is about cowboys but it starts with the department of defense DOT is always looking for ways to protect its warfighters from infectious diseases Tracy pals as with the defense threat reduction agency as an example she says her agency was behind the production of in a bowl of vaccine started out in development in our office but we did the early development so it's not surprising that the DOD is also funding S. A. B. bio therapeutics of Sioux falls South Dakota C. E. O. Eddie Sullivan said the Pentagon was looking for a company that could deal with any new viral threat and be able to very rapidly produce a specifically target hi neutralizing antibodies that can be used in patients as quickly as possible marketed neutralizing antibodies can help slow an infection and someone who is sick or prevent an infection and someone who is exposed to a virus to make these antibodies quickly Solomon's company uses cows but these aren't just any cows these are cows that have been given the genes to make a human like immune system and Sullivan says there's a good reason to use cows in order to be able to produce large amounts of human antibodies that are specific to specific diseases because when cows make antibodies they make buckets of them and they produce a variety of antibodies making it more likely one or more will be effective so if you inject the special cows with what essentially amounts to a coronavirus vaccine that prompts the cows to make human corona virus antibodies Solomon says they've already shown this concept can work for murders and illness caused by a virus similar to the one that causes cove in nineteen so we already have considerable background in producing these antibodies to a corona virus but whether they work against the covert nineteen corona virus still has to be shown to do that S. A. B. has partnered with William Klim stress at the university of Pittsburgh clin stress says the first step is to show the covert nineteen antibodies aren't causing more health problems than they solve we're doing initial antibody tests for that and then subsequently it will be doing advocacy tests efficacy tests will show whether the antibodies actually prevent disease in animals exposed to the corona virus we will look at virus production will look at weight loss signs of infection to evaluate how sick they get assuming Klim stress tests show the antibodies can prevent disease SAB says they hope to start testing them in humans later this summer there was one thing that I was puzzled by about SAB biotherapeutics biotech companies tend to crop up near elite universities frequently on the east or west coast so I asked SAP's any Solomon why his company chose to locate in Sioux falls he said the answer is simple cows love it there if you're going to be a cow you would want to live in one of our facilities here in South Dakota I'll keep that in mind Joe Palca NPR news this is NPR news and this is KQED public radio welcome to Tuesday but housing is saying good morning to Joe McConnell and showing no there's high wind advisories and I gotta tell you I was potting a plant yesterday and all the durch is blue right into.

cal
"cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

12:11 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Tools for hacking the brain and and you know the emotion to the user into all of their APPs right and so every APP now had game game of vacation and notifications and those things that draw you back time and time again so I think you're right when I first started using iphone. There weren't those things or at least they weren't as prevalent. They weren't always on right and so you weren't always drawn back to pick up the phone so it's the game of vacation of the device which has led to such A. It seems to me anyway. I don't WanNa make these statements especially to someone who's studied the thing and Nauseam so I should have said as a question do you think it's the game -cation that has been the primary culprit. Yes I mean it depends how broadly defined game vacation but basically yes. It's a a collection of strategies that helped make these APPs and and so one of the big changes that led this way was for example when the social media companies change the experience so it was no longer about. I post you post because I know you I check what you post. That was the original social media experience original web. Two Point Oh vision. They replaced that with. I hit this APP and there is an incoming stream of social approval indicators about me there's wykes which weren't there it's obviously there's likes for my post there's re tweets there's favorites. There's people moan auto tagging me in their photo so that that was one of the big changes because it meant When you hit that button sometimes you're gonNA see a lot of social approval indicators about you and sometimes you're going to see no social approval indicators about you and sometime you might see that people are upset you the way? Our brain is wired. We can not resist polling that virtual slot machine lever if those are the rewards come out and on the other end and that wasn't a purposeful and then they re engineered the interfaces for for all of these tools to have that game vacation. Feel so now you can have swiped down to reload. That's very slot machine asked right or maybe inlet they go to endless scrolling on certain types of interfaces so that that you you have no easy friction point. That's going to get you to stop facebook. Change their engineers made the original notification badge gray because that was to facebook Palette and the attention engineers came along and said no no. No it needs to be alarm red. Because that's what is more likely to create a sense of sort the distress or urgency in the human brain. You'll be more likely to hit the APP. And so it's a whole reinvention. The be an intermittent stream of social indicators which has nothing to do with the original idea of social media wasn't there it's completely contrived Eddie of a like button photo tax that's all about driving eyeballs coupled with this sort of in a interface reinvention and I got to say and not not the sound conspiratorial. But there's there's a few pockets in academia That specialize on what they call persuasive technology. How do we redesign? Redesigned technologies to actually induce desired action in the user A lot of people who ended up innovating these ideas at the big tech companies came out of these research groups. And so this. This is all intentional. It's why when Sean Parker the original facebook president more recently a couple of years ago came out and said we're hacking your brain you know we're hackers and we figured out how to Hack your brain and I gotta say this was terrible news for the social media companies. The idea that we're exploiting you. This addictive is making you unhappy and I think this is a real reason why they're PR. People told the social media companies. You have to tack car to another topic. And that's why you see the conversation. Almost entirely about things l. like privacy and data portability and content moderation as they had changed the subject they cannot be talking about. Are these services addictive and making people unhappy unhappy. Because that's a problem. They can't solve if they make the service less addictive their revenue plummets. And so there's been this shift in the way they talk about things and say well. Let's deal with with with issues that maybe we can do something about maybe. We can add into inscription to try to reduce privacy violations. Maybe we can keep tweaking. Content moderation standards. There's a reason why they're talking about that and not talking about their former president saying that we're having your brains is because that's playground. They wanted to be playing right well. It's interesting you know I. It takes us a while to to study and acknowledge at a social level to study. Acknowledge the damage that can be done at a broad level from from something like smoking or alcohol all addiction and then to take action against it. Do you think that's going to happen with the brain hacking through these electronic devices or is it just something that the the government's going to be like. Yeah whatever. It's just free market. Well you know you have to keep in mind. We have to get the historical example in mind. I think this is actually an interesting point. So there there's been recently in the news like let's say Chris Hughes one of the Co founders of facebook and some of the presidential candidates coming out and saying Social media the big companies like facebook or like big oil and they need to be broken up the trust that needs to be broken up but maybe the better analogy is actually big tobacco because think about the The government response to BIG TOBACCO WAS NOT WE'RE GONNA somehow regulate tobacco companies to make cigarettes less harmful. There's aunts a big tobacco was we're going to essentially Angelique exit but also educate the public that you probably shouldn't be smoking and I you know I'm wondering if that's not. The more apt analogy here is sitting social social media company. This is a this is a free service based on extracting attention fundamentally it's going to be It's GONNA be addictive. It's going to be exploited if they have a fiduciary responsibility to the shareholders to be addictive and to get as much use as possible. And so I don't know if the idea of what we need to do as maybe just get more competition in this space is somehow the key to to me. I see this a little bit more through the Linzo how he used to see big tobacco. That's what I'm trying to do with. My books is shift the culture to some degree where people no longer feel comfortable with the idea that this is something that they're just going to slavishly check on their phone. I mean I think when something is unhealthy as opposed to uncompetitive. That's a different set of solutions. To begin to look at right or another. You know option is that we're heading into narrow people because of the exorcist information and the diffusion of information that a lot the people are demanding more social responsibility of the companies that do business with as well as investing. And so you know. I think you're GONNA find companies that exploit things that damage the social fabric having a harder and harder time staying business. That's maybe a dream of mine fine but it's not happening right now. It doesn't seem but you never know right. You never know and the funny thing about a company like facebook is. It's it's historically unique. We've never before in history had a company that was so valuable I mean facebook is valued around five hundred billion dollars. That's almost twice ExxonMobil's valuation and yet at the same time is so dispensable. If you think about facebook I if I came to you and said look. I'm sorry a court order. You're not allowed to look at facebook facebook in ten years. Exactly the people have the same reaction. Oh it's okay I mean if there I'm GonNa look at it and yet it's worth five hundred billion dollars typically when you have a company that valuable it's because let's say they supply oral and our entire economy requires oil the run And it's a necessity and it's a social good but this weird place to social media companies are on on is that their hooks into their audiences is very tenuous and people can very easily leave platform and go to another. I've been documenting pretty thoroughly a lot of people my age just leaving social media altogether like well I tried it was okay. I mean they don't really play. They're an interesting source of distraction. But for most people are not at all dispensable. So they're in this rear precarious situation situation. Where you know? Kim Kardashian says the right thing about instagram tomorrow and they could see their user base plummet by thirty percent. That's a scary position to be in. If you're one of these companies except that they own instagram you know who they are valuable to the business world is doing business on the Internet and spending companies spending millions of dollars a month. Yeah on facebook. which crazy just to attract eyeballs and hopefully convert some users? Yeah well I mean. There's a reason that worth five. Hundred Billion Dollars is because the advertising works but for the advertising the work they have to get the average millennial user now uses social media. Something like one hundred forty one minutes a day. That's what makes them so. Valuable is the fact that they've convinced a sizable fraction of the population to essentially dedicate the bulk of their leisure time to entering data belt themselves in the databases right. Let's talk specifically about your book. Now I saw in some of the notes that Ellison put together for me that you were hoping to get a small Qadri of peeps to do a little experiment and to go off all social media and screens hundred percent for thirty days and you ended up with a boatload of volunteers. How did that come about? And what were some of the surprising things about that. Study so the original L.. Ask and this was an email I sent to my mailing list and so it was a little bit under the radar and I said look. I want to find volunteers to do this thing. I'm calling a digital declutter. Were as you said you take a thirty day break from all these optional technology your personal life and then when you're done the idea was you don't just go back to everything you rebuild from. Scratch so the thirty days the idea the thirty days as opposed to just doing this over weekend. The idea of the thirty days was that you could actually have some time for reflection experimentation. figure out what do I really care about what I want to really spend my time on. Get some clarity on that. So that when it comes time to add back tech you can be much more intentional. I thought I would get I. Don't know a dozen volunteers. I mean that's kind of a big ask ask right. I honestly thought about dozen volunteers and I can talk to him all. I thought this will permit. There'll be twelve people who do this and I'll keep him on the phone and then I can. I can kind of write about the experience in the book what it was like for these people and instead sixteen hundred people signed up. Wow so it became an actual like research search study it became it became like an actual research study was as and then you had the code the surveys and come out. Data was except for to be clear. I purposely did not officially code the surveys or gather data in a quantitative kids because then I would need approval from my academic institution so But it but it became like an unintentional sort of social movement ended up being covered the New York Times. A one of their reporters roommates was doing it and and And that that's what really helped me understand that there is such A. There's such a pent up hunger for change here. But I'll have to say when the big things I discovered from. This experiment is a a people were surprised to discover the extent to which their phone had pushed everything out of their life that they used to care about and they they've been telling themselves this story of well. Look look at my phone occasionally when I have nothing else to do its idle time. I mean the elevator. Not a big deal and that first day when they didn't didn't have the phone to look at they realize I don't know what to do with myself. I have gotten rid of. I have stopped putting in the hard work required to actually build up a meaningful will a meaningful leisure life outside of disk professional activities. So that was the first thing I learned The second thing I learned is that the people who treated this like a detox and I really hate hate to use of the word. Detox in context technology Because I think I think people are completely abusing the concept when they talked about digital detox which was for most people they mean a break which is which is actually a pretty big insult to the substance abuse community where the where the whole notion of detox is is to make actionable change as the foundation for better life. Eddie that you just take a break from the thing that's bothering you is but that's a bit of an aside But the people who treated the thirty days like one these digital detox isn't just tried to white knuckle it. I'm just going to not use my phone. I use it too much. They almost all failed. lasted a week or two and we're back to the people who succeeded needed and making lasting change out of these thirty days for the people who took the thirty days and said I'm GonNa get after it and figure out..

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"cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Don't use Tucker an end. It is only useful when it comes to human flourishing when you're deploying tack for very specific intentional purposes that you care about as soon as the tech becomes an end in itself that we start to see problems. Hey folks welcome back to the unbeatable mine. PODCAST is Mark Devine your host. Thanks so much for joining me today. We're GONNA have an incredible show with my friend cal. Newport author of digital minimalism and one of my favorite books deep work Kelso's spoke to have you. I'll introduce more but Jeez it's really good to have you back on the show and Michigan. Yeah it's my pleasure. It's been too long. It has. I've been tracking your work and I know that your your university professor your computer computer scientist actually but I loved when I read and deep work just how you organize your life and so it really was not surprised that you're next work was digital minimalism. Because because you already are kind of a minimalist and I'm really stoked that you went deep into that subject to help other people appreciate the benefits of that. But so let's you know before we get into all that cool stuff. Let's remind our listeners. Or those who aren't familiar with your work or who you are as a person you know just a a little bit about your background and how you came to teach computer science and and what it is it really fires you up and makes you unbeatable. Well I really do too. Thanks thanks so I am a computer scientist. And that's what I've been training for my whole life I went right out of college to Mit. Got My doctorate and now at Georgetown. My focus on the theory of distributed systems. That means I do the sort of non useful type of computer science where we saw the equations at the whiteboard instead of actually building useful things with computers but I have also been a writer in parallel with that whole progression. I wrote my first book when I was still an undergraduate digital minimalism is my six and so I've been writing at the same time That I've been a computer scientist. It used to be the case that the books I wrote were just topics were relevant into my own life at the time so for example back in two thousand twelve I wrote a book about career satisfaction I wrote it then because I was entering the job market and I want the know about satisfaction in two thousand sixteen. I wrote deep work because I really cared about. How do I get tenure or more? Generally how knowledge workers succeed and I really went. Deep defunding the value of focus. I will say however mark that in recent years with this new book and the book. I'm working on now. Really Seen My mission starting to sharpen where I no longer see my life as a writer as something different than my life as a technologist I now see myself primarily right now as a technologist who also writes about the impact. Are these technologies on our culture. And so that's what's really been getting me fired up. Starting with deep work with my new book digital minimalism and the book. I'm writing now about email. That's it's called a world without email is all trying to grapple with the intersection of tech at our culture. Is I think these are the more important issues facing us right now so in a way. It's your it's your apology to culture for screwing US up with all your computers stuff. Yeah this is my apology for what I've wrought with my academic work. uh-huh what you've wrought on. Well you're not alone. There's a whole like a whole bunch of other people working in that area to distract us and to take us away from important things like spending time alone and being quiet and that type of stuff. So let's let's talk about deep worked before we get into your current work or or your more. Recent work with digital minimalism. One of the things I loved about deep work was this notion Russian that if you want just mentioned if you WanNa really contribute and not just skim. The surface of of social media news is in common just like languaging in a social context. If you really WanNa go deep and understand something deeply you have to kind of escape and different people. We'll have different ways to do it. How do you like how do you I mean not escape from reality but escape from unreality and go back to where the true information lies right which is going to be found inside through inside intuition as well as being able to really penetrate a subject by studying with deep concentration so tell us what year discovery was that what worked for you and what works for some other high level thinkers and authors and creators? Well for me like with a lot of people there. Two components to trying to really prioritize depth do type of thing that moves the needle and knowledge work so one component is actually just minimizing the amount of non depth stuff on your plate and so this is an ongoing aggressive effort to try to make sure that you're not adding too much shallow allegations on your plate. So there's this this overall effort to minimize something that I work very aggressively at. I'm sort of try to be very careful about what what I allow on my plate. What I agree to what initiatives I take on? I'm sort of DETTORI. Hard to track down. I say no to most invitations to do most things because because I don't want my time being taken up then when you focus on what is on your plate. I do something that a lot of other people do which is I- also late between periods of deeper work and periods of shallow work. And I do that on many different scales and so that might mean on the scale of an individual day. I like to start start with deep work and then once that energy is spent maybe move over some of the logistical stuff. On the scale of a week I tend to have a balance of some days. Maybe are a teaching as as long as I have to be on campus teaching. I'm going to put other meetings on that day. I'm going to dedicate that day more towards non deep efforts but then other days in that same week might be almost entirely dedicated into deep thinking and then on the scale of seasons as a professor. I do the same thing. I'm entering summer right now. That means going into hibernation mode. I'm about to become very hard to track down because I'M GONNA be reading and writing for months at a time and so having a clear separation between depth shallows at multiple different scales coupled with an overall commitment commitment to be incredibly careful about what I agree. A lot on. My plate has helped me get in enough of the deep cycles to keep doing interesting things. you know that that's awesome and it sounds simple but there's a tremendous amount of self awareness that goes into what you just said in those two big categories. You know saying no in service to that bigger. Yes right there right the self-awareness required to know what to say. Yes to is really the most important born thing right so that that means really getting clear about what is your unique gift to the world. You know at a broad level and then how you're going to express that and really dive into that at this point in time right and that's going to change as you have offer you. It's changed as your interests have evolved right and then the other thing go ahead. Yeah I was just GONNA say briefly. There's an irony to that as well. It's absolutely vital and the irony is as what you're as what you're doing the thing you're working deeply on gets gets more developed and gets more impactful the demands to take you away from it grow as well. It's this this weird binary coin and sort of the the more you become useful useful. The more you're deep thinking becomes useful to the world the more the world is going to try to take you away from your deep thinking which and it's difficult. I mean this is social reciprocity. Just just yesterday. I was showing my wife. I said look. Clean my inbox on Tuesday Earlier in the day and and here it was Wednesday afternoon and I was saying there are now nine request Austin here for my time from people I know and every one of the whos is going to require like a relatively delicate social dance to basically say no to so it gets pretty hard. I mean I think it's worth emphasizing your precise. It's hard work but it's where it's worked. It's absolutely vital to do if you want to keep doing things if impact right and the irony. There is the distractions. Come as you said. Because of the deep work and because of aligning with that purpose of that gift but also The requests are are in alignment with a meaning the more of an expert you become. Let's say digital minimalism. The more avenues. You're going to open up in the more experts and opportunities for things like this podcast. That opened up in his all in alignment with this new vein of gold. That your plumbing but you still then you have to do that like the next layer of selectivity right and so it's not the old stuff that's distracting anymore. It's new stuff. New People new interest new avenues. And like you said that's just a never ending thing. You can't get rid of the distraction. You just keep on sharpening the saw your awareness on what to say yes do and what to avoid so you can keep going deeper in the right lane or follow the vein appropriate to use that metaphor. You know all the way down to the depth fastening because you know we could literally spend the entire time talking about and how to do that right out how to develop that type of awareness. The other thing you said this idea of having a battle rhythm is really interesting knowing how to spend your days where or your energy is going to be best spent on deep work you know the deep work and then also You when you're doing something like you were. Where are you might be doing reading? And writing and then teaching you know some people will say the teaching is the deep work right is is every bit as important because you have to be the engaged. That's where you're offering your gift of the world just in a verbal sense as opposed to a written sense. I'm curious as to why you would categorize teaching you. You know as as shallow work and reading and writing and thinking as deep work well. That's that's a good question because what I should clarify I guess is the reason. Ny Teaching tends to anchor. Shallow Day is not the actual time in the classroom. Because I agree when you're actually communicating. That's very deep. What we're doing now? For example. I consider that are deep work or when I'm in front of Front of my students and teaches a class on computational theory that's deep work it's more than teaching brings me to campus and drew once. I'm on campus. Now it's can do office hours. I can do the meetings with students I can do. So it's once I'm on campus and in a I'm here and available my thought is let's batch. Let's make this a day if I'm going to be here and doing other things. Let's make this a day where I do everything I can. which is like? I'm on campus right now recording this I have a full afternoon of meeting scheduling said. Well let me take advantage of that whereas yesterday I was at home all day and work it on one thing deeply the entire day so these blocks the deep and shallow are pretty large blocks and you fit different things into that block that go go into those categories. Yeah that's right they can be. They can be on all sorts. It's a different scales with their offense. They are often quite large. Yeah that makes a lot of sense and that rings true for me. Whenever I've tried to do you know I'm going to do in our ninety minute? Block of deep work. And and then I'm GonNa go do something else it's just really. I don't know what the right word is just difficult to really go deep and stay there because you're constantly getting pulled out out so for me it's gotta be like a day or like you said a week next week. I'm going out to be alone finish manuscript and that would be my deep work week so it sounds like you have the same thing but I love the idea of seasons and that's kind of unique to your profession. It's difficult for other professionals. To have a seasonality. I think to to their battle rhythm but I think that would be interesting to think about right. If you're an executive you know. Can you arrange a sabbatical or something like that. During the summer months Komo go deep on something. Yeah I think I mean I think that would be a good idea. we see seasonality on a on a more of like the weekly scale. We're seeing this. Starting to emerge in software development where for example the sprint methodology has become big where they're recognizing sometimes the right way develop a software product. It is to actually take two or three days and make it clear that this is all. You're doing you're just working on this. You're just doing one thing just going deep And then when this is over it's a completely the different phase. Okay I'm not in a sprint. And maybe we're being logistical planning. And in general though at what I find surprising is that we have a whole economy based off knowledge. Well IT products. We have a whole mass support of our economy. This based on US using our brain to create value and yet we understand so little about the actual. Let's say cognitive or physical best practices.

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"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

13:28 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"He's one of the people who Did a blurb for your book and I remember talking to him about multitasking. And the idea of going back and forth between things you feel like you're nailing it but in fact you're making your brain work very hard and you're wasting whatever however many minutes it takes when you get back into the project you're working on you you are wasting all the time reengaging turning your brain back to the folder that it was looking at and it's something as simple switching back to you check your email so I know when I'm writing a long form piece for ESPN. I close all my tabs the only tabs that can be opened our research related. Because I don't want to see a notification in my email I don't Wanna be tempted to look up something else And you talk about that too in terms of our ability to not just focus on work but life and the people around us were just taxing our brains by the constant back and forth we are not good at network switching and and it takes time and we yeah. This is the result that goes back to experiments as early as the nineteen twenties and psychology. Now today we have people like attend. Who can actually get into the neuroscience? Explain what actually actually is happening in the brain. We've known this for a century. It takes time to switch our attention from one thing to another and so if for example you're in a work context. The very worst thing you could do. If your work requires you to produce something complicated is to say okay. work on this. Whatever this script this memo this computer program but we want you like the average worker to switch and check an inbox once every six minutes which is about what the average knowledge worker does not as a recipe for incredibly diminished cognitive kind of output? Because every time you do that quick check your switching your circuit before it completely switches. You try to switch back the whole. Thing gets jumbled it takes a long time for your mind to clear it out and before cleared out. Hf again and create a new jumble. The same thing happens in our personal lives When you're trying to say extract value from spending time in nature with the friend every time you a quick check of a phone glance at an inbox or text message you get this? Jumble of network switching and suddenly the richness of the experience is far diminished. And so we do this enough at all all times at work in their personal life that in general our experience of the world is persistent we diminished. We don't even realize it Intel we try experiments like saying go without your phone for months and then suddenly people it says. If you're taking off there is life different or if you're in work you say spend half your first half of every day no email or something like just do an experiment like that. It's as if you're taking some sort of neurotrophic drug like you're under limitless Tillerson uh-huh well and what we're getting back to is actually normal. We don't realize the degree to which were persistently diminishing experience to this sub normal thing that we we we come to think of is just I guess this is what life is. And it's like when you know wizard of Oz. Goes into color at that fifteen minute mark into the movie. That's what happens when you take just constant context which out of your life well and you acknowledge that. We're still relatively new in the age of the Internet and so we're still not even sure about how using using the Internet in our phones and everything else is actually changing our brains and how they work. There are some studies involving young people who have trouble looking into each other's eyes or who you cut out of a conversation right around the same minute as everybody else their age when they aren't in inspired or used by it and immediately check their phone There's all these studies ladies that are going on now to try to help us understand the ways that were either damaging our brains are not utilizing them. Well but a lot of it hasn't come out right so we're the guinea pigs for all this stuff that we will later find out was deeply damaging to how we function with each other and and all that other stuff so let's quickly go over the steps for this digital declutter it. It starts with thirty days and it's not throw your phone out for thirty days. It's identified the things that you really need and keep those and get rid of everything else. Yeah you're basically taking a break from what I call a optional personal technology so these are the technologies and your personal life that you can step away from for thirty days without it being a big deal so for most people this is like social media streaming videos video games online news things you can step away from Fairmont. That's not gonNA cause a big deal. It's not worth things so it's not an excuse to not answer to your boss email unfortunately and where you have overlapped so like if you're work requires you to do a little bit on facebook. For what say recruiting or something like this. That's fine just put some rules around it not on my phone. I do it on my work computer. I have scheduled for the for the purpose of the Thirty Day. Experiment so you're you're essentially cleaning out your proverbial personal digital closet. Ause it so that you can have that the empty to the best of your ability for about a month and then you define the rules very carefully because if someone needs needs to be on a facebook group because it involves their kids after school project or something or needs to be on a facebook group that that helps promote their brand or works on their brand than they would bookmark the page for that group never entering their personal time line so they can't get looped into the suck of WHO. What's this person writing in whose this person doing doing? Never getting on the feed. Only going to that bookmarked page. Yeah and it would be on your computer. You would take the apps off your phone almost certainly unless you really have to do it on your phone. The tricky thing is text messaging because they plays a incredibly important logistical goal for a lot of people. Hate my daughter. You skip picked up from school. That's how I find out text message but it also can be this constant Distraction so what. A lot of people do in thirty days with text message is if they are expecting a key logistical tax. They'll keep it around. Otherwise they tend to put it on. Do not disturb and maybe check every two hours or something like that so the the worst what happened is that their friends or family trying to reach them might have a bit of latency before they respond so so the things. You can't get rid of all the experiment just put some rules around it and the rules of a different for everybody. So it's about holding yourself accountable right. Don't make it too easy on yourself. Nope I think well I technically need this. I don't even know where I would begin to be honest with you because I feel like my job requires crossing over into all these places. And there's obviously benefits like everyone. Who's listening to this? Is Listening on a podcast right. So maybe you decide that podcasts are not a time suck and door. Don't require bouncing around in wasting time. It's intentional you choose news one you listen to it. Maybe you're accomplishing things. While listening. That might be something that you would allow. Well you could. Maybe you would have during your thirty day. Some sort of a schedule for okay. Listen to podcast during this particular activity but not every activity another hacker. Journalists did which I thought was really interesting. Who's going through something like this is that they actually hired someone to check for relevant breaking news on twitter and the person could they check like once every two hours it it gave you know? Here's the particular I won't say what particular field the journalist was in the particular topics I care about and They could call them if the collar Bro. which by the way is something? I'm surprised that more newsrooms don't do. This really should be like one of the first thing they do is the first year Internet media can raise the monitor twitter behalf of of the journalists. Who have been there longer? So you can get creative. You know Whatever gets you as much sort of space from the conflict companion model as possible is what you're trying to do without it? Being a problem I would have some assistant where I'm like. You didn't tell. Tell me about this. MEME that everyone's saying now I didn't use it on this. TV show and it wasn't funny. It would be very difficult. We need someone who who understands the district very well But I guess that would be that would be the search for the perfect. The Perfect Assistant All right so they've got the tricks that they could do to keep the couple of things they need and other than that they try to do this this full sort of reset and then when they reintroduced things. How does that work right so so crucially before that during the thirty day period? It's not just about some sort of detox effect and if anything I'm really wary about the the sort of appropriation of the word detox in this context During the thirty days before you do do you WanNa be doing is very actively do experimentation reflection getting back in touch with what you really matters what you really like. You know what's really valuable to you. So it's a very active active time when you're rediscovering beyond the world of your phone. What do I actually like to do with my time outside work with actually meaningful? Then when you get to the reintroduction you work backwards of course from what you discovered and so for each of these activities you identified during the thirty days as being really important to you you ask. What's the best way to use? Technology to support court. Amplified as you bring back in that technology you put some rules around it to maximize that benefit and avoid other costs and those answers. That's that's what the fines technology and your personal life going forward so everything that comes back into your wife comes back in for a particular reason. It's essentially the digital equivalent of Mary. CONDO Rondo. I didn't know about Mary condo until after I wrote this book now I know a lot about her essentially the digital equivalent of what she says. which don't just sort of mess around with your closet or take out a few things? uh-huh organizers India down to ourselves then just put back into things that you really care about. That's what you're doing. You're starting from scratch with checking your personal life. This time you rebuild it. You're doing it much more intentionally than the first time around. You bring things back into particular very important purposes and because you know why or just an attack you can put really really good optimization rules around it yeah. MERIE CONDO has down. That system works in that whole sparking thing is very easy but vague way to kind of encompass encompass everything does it spark joy..

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"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"You can start to optimize now. You can put rules in place. It will make sure that you get that value. But you don't fall down these traps that have nothing to do with that value. And as soon as people start putting these rules in place optimizing tech for specific specific purposes their entire relationship changes and they go back to two thousand nine iphone type users. They use their tech for these specific high leverage purposes. It gives them huge benefits for the most part. It's not this constant source of distraction. So I mean it seems simple. minimalism is simple. But it's impacts. I've really found to be pretty profound. You work backwards. This is what I WanNa do and then you just look the packers toolbox that you pull things out of very carefully to support these small number of things he really cared about the shift in perspective makes all the difference. Yeah the idea of it being a tool and not a companion and right now for so many of us it's it's essentially a companion. It's who do I talk to one on board who I listen to what I've got nothing else to listen to. Where we we start to create this relationship with our phone that goes beyond using it's specifically for things and instead searching it to find out what might fill our time or what what might be interesting? I want to get to some of the digital minimalism steps. Can you advise for people. But I quickly wanted to have you some some of the things that we're losing out on because of our inability to detach from our phones there's a couple couple things And and starting solitude and why sort of the idea that we're never bored anymore can be bad well so solitude if we used to the definition ah I think is relevant is when you are spending time free from input from other minds so the definition of solitude I care about here is you're not processing another minds outputs you're not talking somebody not listening to something. You're not really something. That type of solitude is absolutely crucial because it used to be essentially the default state default state. Your mind was in your thoughts and observing the world around you then occasion elite you would interact with another human. At which point your mind would go into all hands on deck mode because we're wired to be very social expend a huge amount of resources to manage interactions with other minds as we go into this all hands on deck modell. Let's say have an interaction with a family member or retried number one of the things we have now with the this sort of odd constant companion bottle of smartphones. Is that for the first time in human history. We can banish every last moment of this type of solitude from our life that any possible moment where it might just be us our thoughts and looking at the world around us to look at the screen and there'll be a nice statistical algorithm showing it's something that's been mathematically selected to make us interested the result of this is our brains never get into that default state which they're not at all wired to be. You can't keep your brain revved up in process from other not mine modes all the time. What happens when you try to do that? Things break down with one of the biggest side effects being the sense of anxiety that has become a sort of pervasive background In our in our in our society kind of accepted yeah. We're all this kind of anxious all the time. A lot of that is that we're simply over clocking our brain. They're not meant to always be processing this information. That's sort of misuse of our neuronal hardware. And that's sort of the idea behind meditation right that we need to occasionally a quiet our minds. Whether that's you know in in walking and moving around and trying to focus on one problem or literally meditating and trying to think of nothing. Is this idea that our brains ah break occasionally but you don't even you don't even have to go so far as meditation. It's sufficient just to do stuff throughout the day that you don't have their phone when even if you're just looking around thinking even if your mind it's not clear it's just the fact that it's you and your own thoughts. That's the state that we have to be on a regular basis. Well we used to do that a lot. I remember when I would be on track trips in college. I would sit on a bus and I would stare out the window and think and occasionally I would have journal and the things I thought I would write down. And there's a lot of creativity and space to to solve things this and think about yourself and other people and everything else. When you're not being fed new information constantly which I think is hard because I also am someone who very much likes to use my time to like peak? I talked about my being like Jenga game like I need everything to slide into a little slot because otherwise I won't get it done so if I'm getting my nails done I'm listening to a podcast if I'm working out I'm listening to a radio show to prep from my other show later There's nothing wrong with that right as long as you occasionally get breaks. Yeah as long as I have a similar type of lifestyle but as long as you're regularly scheduling in time where it's just you and your mind and even if it's ten minutes here twenty minutes here or after you shut down at seven or something like just. That's fine while you're trying to avoid is the complete lack of solitude which is incredibly artificial condition. That really wasn't possible until without seven or eight years ago so the opposite of that is also true. We don't need too much solitude. We also need human interaction and the guest. I just I had Jim Hill. Zaki was talking about how the lack of day to day face to face communication because of urban living solo living you know having our pods and everything else else can affect our empathy and kindness toward each other Kate Fagan a colleague of mine. Wrote a book What we made mattie running some of the research and there is about how our actual brains react to talking on the phone versus reading a text versus talking in person and on the phone and in person you at least get some brain activity when you talk to someone you love someone when you love sends you a text about a hard moment? You're going through the brain activity isn't there. You can feel like you've had the same exchange of consolation and kindness but your brain doesn't see it and hear it that way because it actually needs to be triggered by the sound of a voice or you know the the psychosomatic reaction to somebody's face and what they're doing while they're talking to you. That's a huge part of this. Our phones and why there's so much loneliness and mental health issues is we're stepping away from the actual face to face. Communication seems seems to be absolutely true. It helps explain this otherwise paradoxical result that we find again and again that increase social media usage tends to increase loneliness which doesn't make sense on the surface. I mean social media use is a social activity but what seems to be happening is exactly what you're talking about. It's not that being on social media. Yeah that makes you feel only. It's when you replace other types of richer. Social interactions with the social media. You end up with a net loss. I mean all the research is clear. We're incredibly sophisticated. Social animals are our experience of sociology is multi modal to be sure we take an all sorts of different channels of information and the whole thing gets fixed together in different parts of our brain simulate and understand the people were talking to right now for example. I'm really listening to the the timber and pacing of your voice. The careful careful listeners would probably notice that there's some Linden continents going on here. We're actually matching the way that we're pacing the way we talk. This helps create a sense of empathy. So we have the complicated tasted multi modal social computers because this was absolutely crucial to our species. Survival and this complex social computer this evolved over millions of years does not understand glowing ASCII characters on a piece of glass. It probably doesn't know what that is. Just we have no experience with that on any sort of deep evolutionary loosener timescale and so if we take this rich dance that we train our whole lives to do which is to be communicating richly with other humans. And we replace it with ASCII characters and bit met emojis on the small little piece of glass. We think in the frontal CORTEX. I'm out of being so social. I've been on my phone all day long but the rest of this huge complex computer which which is just lying there idle doing nothing. I was like man. We're we're lonely time we've actually communicated with someone I think it's a real issue back with more. That's what she said. Was Sarah Spain in just.

packers Sarah Spain mattie Zaki Jim Hill Kate Fagan
"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"Comes up so hope you enjoy. That's what she said super excited to have cal. Newport on the PODCAST I'm sure. Regulators will see a theme bouncing around from people who engage with each other comment on each other recommend each other for the podcast and and cal came recommended because a lot of what he's written about in his books has come up in conversation on this podcast I WANNA start with way back when in growing up and how you how you found yourself to become an expert on how to work well and now on digital minimalism. So let's talk about being a kid. What kind of kid were you had a nerdy tech science guy from the start? Yeah always a computer nerd. My mom was a computer programmer when I was growing up so I was exposed to programming at a young age. So I I always had a computer hacking on the computer from a young age Also though was involved in other things awesome well quite a social guy was a mid distance varsity track athletes. So I had the life that pulled in a lot of different strands. So I could you you know come from the track back to my high school tech company onto a computer back out to the the exercise room so it definitely an unusual but interesting mixture texture of traits when I was growing up. And where did you grow up mainly in New Jersey near Princeton New Jersey. Okay so you're you're you're balancing the track stuff. I was collegiate heptathlete. So your Your mid distance stuff was always the the bane of my existence but a part of my training training so you. You're bouncing all this stuff. At what point are you a teenager who decides you WanNa Start Your own business. Well the thing to keep in mind about that the timeline which is this is the late nineteen nineties. We're talking about. which was the first tech BOOB? This was the tech boom with pets dot com and Web van. That first time with the Nasdaq was going crazy. And one of the weird side effects of that first tech boom is that otherwise reasonable adults. Figured figured that it made a lot of sense to hire teenagers to watch that contract. There's just a sense of I duNNo. Don't young people know a lot about technology. let's give a lot of money Johny to the sixteen year old who design our website pillar web strategy. I think it was one of the rare windows in the history of business where people would actually think it was a good idea. Yeah Sign Contracts with people who are so young that their dad had the drive them through the meeting so I took advantage of it. I don't do that now with social media. Because they know that they I don't get it so they have to hire young people to explain to them how to be on Tick Tock and how to best sell their social media APPs to other young people. It's funny you mention Napa is Saturday night live always runs an old episode before the new one now shortened version and they ran an old jerry. Seinfeld David Bowie episode from Nineteen. Ninety nine this this past Saturday and there was a sketch for some sort of I think it was. Maybe a law firm but they were late getting to the web and they weren't in a rush and so their website was something awful. Awful like tiny baby penises dot com or something and it was just sort of how absurd the Internet and I can tell you exactly what it was clown. Tina Start Art cloudiness dot fart. I don't know where he came. Up with baby penises. I knew the penis was in there. Yeah and it's funny. I was just I was just thinking eating how incredibly distant that feels. Now the idea of like oh well. We missed the the website with our names. So this is what we're stuck with and it reminded me when I was reading your book you talked about and I'm only going to skip ahead for a second. You talked about the introduction of the iphone and it was essentially an ipod that you could call people on and I completely forgot the introduction of the iphone as being that simplistic and not being about all the things we use it for. You know things move so fast. I mean I went went back when working on that section of the book and talk to the original head engineer. Who worked under jobs on it? And that's what he confirmed. It was an ipod that made calls. The big problem. Solving is that people used to have their ipod and their Nokia Razor. That's two separate devices you'd have in your pocket. There's too much stuff in your pocket and the iphone was what's going to combine them into one and that was the original marketing. Push forget about it. I think it's a great example of how quick how quick things have been moving in this particular regular world of consumer facing tech. Yeah Okay so back to your. I believe seventeen years old and you decide to start a tech company. What was the goal? What did you think you are solving? elving what problem. Nothing that exciting on the surface right on the circus. We were doing essentially website development for companies. Now the big insight right that that I had with my my business partner was my girlfriend Michael Simons big insight. was we figured out early. About outsourcing and so what we were doing as we were going to these meetings and our ills that suits and had the laminated spiral bound pitch books and then we had teams in Pakistan and India. That would do most most of the actual graphic design and development. So we were sort of early to this idea that there was this arbitrage at the time the sort of huge inefficiency and that you had a- ah excess number of heavily train graphic designers and programmers overseas without a rough work and so we were playing that arbitrage game and making the big high profit margins. Doing it what did your parents. I mean your mom's obviously a computer programmer. So is she like. Oh good following the family footsteps or were they concerned about you already diving moving into the business world. Well I think they were fine with the computer programming stuff so you know. I was a programming nerd and I was taking CS courses at Princeton in high school. That type of thing the business. I'm sure made them a little nervous. Especially when there was contracts involved in a lot of money changing hands and interesting remember. Remember the the thing to remember valley nine hundred ninety eight or nineteen ninety nine is not only were there no smartphones. But we didn't have cell phones right so I was running this business in an age where I was either in school or at practice for most of the working days. That's what made it particularly interesting. Is that we had to run a business talk about lack of accessibility. I literally couldn't couldn't be reached for maybe ninety percent of the hours in in the workday so it required a lot of creativity I missed a lot of school and got in some trouble for that because it has been a business meetings and etc but they luckily let me graduate nonetheless. So it's clear from a young age you figured out some some work hacks and some ways to be successful successful. Which is why you started writing books about how to win at college to become a straight a student how to be a high school superstar all that stuff and you wrote those sort of after your own educational educational career Undergrad at Dartmouth your PhD from Mit? And while you're in in your own academia what did you think that you wanted to do with the computer science and with your studying of of sort of how that how that relates to everyday life. Well at first the idea was I wanted it. Just be an academic computer scientists. So when you're studying any field at a high level the ultimate goal this is the message you get from professors. You're studying under is to be the an academic to do original research to push the field forward and so once. I realized maybe halfway in my undergraduate career that maybe had a shot at an academic career in computer science that that became my goal that life style the autonomy of being a professor is what I was what I was looking for. I was writing in books at the same time. But it wasn't until later until later in my Grad student career that the two worlds came together at first it was. I was training to be a computer scientist. Oh and I I also wrote books. Those worlds were completely separate. My doctoral advisor discovered. I wrote books because she came across one at a table at the bookstore. She had no shot just doing the side as well and so they were really separate worlds and then they all kind of came together once. I got the Georgetown and professorship when I realized wait a second I work on technology. I'm also really interested on the impact of technology on society. I could probably be writing about this stuff that I'm also workout and writing about the broader impacts and so those worlds came together gather and and now there's a great conciliates between what I'm doing academic as a writer but until recently quite separate. Yeah Yeah I mean it's it's there's that academia academia and the computer science stuff that would connect you to all the people that also work in that field. And maybe not a lot of other people whereas when you're incorporating the study of communications occasions and how it affects our everyday life in our work. Suddenly you've opened yourself up to the everyday person who who is learning from your expertise without necessarily needing to understand all the stuff that goes into and all the research that Gotcha there so you. You're writing books and you end up back in two thousand sixteen writing deep work rules for focused. Success asked an distracted world. This feels to me like a pivot point for you in understanding The very current conflicts for people in staying focused doing the job job workplace productivity and all these new technologies So tell me how deep work sort of a very short description because I want. I want to get from that to the newer book right. So the idea behind deep work is that In the knowledge sector in particular which is about fifty percent of the US economy right now. The ability to focus without distraction is being widely undervalue. That we're we're very distracted with email and slack and personal digital tech Heckler. Social Media in our attention bounces back and forth all the time and we are forgetting value in sustained attention and so the argument of that book is that this is market mismatch. That's right. This is something that we're getting worse at the same time. It is becoming more valuable so that if you specifically train yourself to be an extra concentrator or if your team organization are your ties is unbroken concentration. It's sort of unfair competitive advantage right now. Yeah so I mean this was a huge thing for so many people and I think a a lot of people were even very slowly able to step outside their bodies and recognize their their their difficulty in focus. There's been some really interesting stories about people people struggling to read books because they have trouble focusing on that for a long time when they're so used to these snippets on the Internet. So you're you right deep at work and the response of so many people to you about social media and technology and how they struggle to balance that with the messages of your book are what led to the digital minimalism right. Yeah because people work was really focused on the workplace it was unintentional consequences of new technologies in the workplace. And this was the big feedback feedback. I began to get from readers after the book came out which was okay. Maybe we by this. But what about the impact of tech and are personalized which was really really focused. Much more on things like phones and social media and the attention economy which is actually quite different than what's going on. Let's say in an office place with your email or slack and so I was getting a lot of pressure from the readers. Okay but what do we do about tech in our personal. It was really something that was becoming clearly a problem in our culture especially starting around two thousand seventeen where it really began to uptick. And so that's what they're digital minimalism was okay. Let's turn from work to people's personal life and find out what they're taking what they should do about it. Well you are. You're thirty eight thirty thirty seven. Thirty eight Sir okay. So you're thirty seven you've never had social media accounts I. I'm not sure how that's possible were you were you so aware before we even learned of all the dangers that you never put your toe in the water. Or how is it possible that you never joined facebook facebook twitter and everything else well..

New Jersey cal Princeton New Jersey Newport David Bowie facebook Johny Nokia Napa Tina
"cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Or someone makes money off your attention. When you tap on it you don't have to quit anything yet but just get rid of the easy access and then to maybe start doing some work to introduce high-quality leisure into your life so that when it comes time to do the extreme thirty day complete reset? You're not looking at the first day of the first morning of the first day and say I have no idea what to do with myself so you already have put back into place activities that you know for sure are going to give you meaning <hes>. I love that cal. Thanks so much <hes> the book is digital minimalism before. Can you give us a snapshot of what Your Next Project as you mentioned. You're already digging in your is it top secret. No it's not I mean so I'm in the early stages of writing a book tentatively titled a World Without Email and it's once again about tech and the workplace and it's about some of the unintentional consequences that happened when we introduced low friction digital communication to the workplace unintentional negative consequences and these shifts I think are coming sort of radical shifts to how we work that are going to then correct for are those unintentional consequences. Oh cool can't wait to see that one cal. Thanks again for your time. Keep up the great work and I know you're about ready to go deep on something so stay focused. It's my pleasure. Mark do work all right. We'll talk again soon. Appreciate you all right folks digital minimalism. Check it out and also a highly highly recommend deep work. If you haven't read it I mean that is a classic and really important in fact I would say those to kind of go hand Endon Glove and support kill any way you can. He's doing great work. It's really important so I appreciate him and I appreciate you for listening and for paying attention the N._B._A.. Online podcast this is a lot of fun but I think it's also so important conversations so that we collectively can evolve ourselves and evolve culture to be healthier and more balanced and more unbeatable so appreciate you and until next time stay focus go deep and let's practice a little digital minimalism so they say they're right minimalism. That's a big word for me who see next time Divino..

Mark Endon Glove thirty day one cal
"cal" Discussed on Starting9

Starting9

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"cal" Discussed on Starting9

"Like you were like that was important to you where a fan buys a ticket to the baseball game. And maybe you go over three with a, you know, ground into a double play struck out twice. I'm still going to give a fan who paid to see me, specifically an experience, that they can take with them for the rest of their lives. So that stuff wasn't point to, and that's that's I don't think that that's lost now. But I think that in a day where. You know, social media, and there's blogs podcasts or so many different media outlets that for baseball specifically stuff like that doesn't get talked about enough. You know, I wonder you just brought up an interesting point. Social media wasn't so big in my day. It started to become bigger and people jumped on board. And it was a way to communicate with fans more intimately, which I think is good. But I remember in the year of nineteen ninety five when the streak was broken I had a, a much bigger. Influx of media, requests. And so I had to manage the media requests. And so we figured out a really good way to do that. First day in you make yourself available to everybody could buy two other days. But and then once you start doing that so much is that some of the things that were forgotten was your interaction with the fans. So I started signing autographs after the game so that I could because I was missing that part of my day. Now, I wonder are you saturated so much with social media, and all that kind of stuff that you'd lose the energy to have the one on one relationship back 'cause I always thought it was an icebreaker from me. I'm introverted, I'm a little shy by nature, but actually signing autographs then opened up the conversation. Right. So then you gotta feel and you could hear back from the fans and what I really enjoyed about the autograph was it brought the, the fans almost out onto the field and brought them in, in an area that you're used to being a gave them some insight on what's going on, right? And I'm sure that this has happened. I'm just curious how many times is this happen? How many times have you been approached by someone and they said, I, I need my son Cal my dog's name is Cal because of you how many times does that happen. This book tour just started, and we start signing some books, and so you normally in the book signing atmosphere or environment invariably, I'll meet a kid this name cow, come up, and tell me and the, the last book signing that we had. There was a lot of cows. Before that it was kind of funny in the first part of your career. Everybody would say they named their dog after me. Yeah. It was Ripken or something else. But then all of a sudden you start seeing some cows coming up. And, and I guess that's the ultimate compliment is, or they just like the name the name is kind of unique. Yeah. Do you know what Calvin means? I share. Don't bald? It's really a policy, but, but the name has become a little bit more popular. And I guess that's the ultimate compliment same way. When I grew up, Brooks Robinson was my hero. And there's a ton of is that were around the Baltimore area or. That people emulated Brooks..

Cal baseball Brooks Robinson Baltimore Ripken
"cal" Discussed on Hurry Slowly

Hurry Slowly

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"cal" Discussed on Hurry Slowly

"Wary about plugging into the power grid because they wary about being too it might hurt the community to be to a mesh to the outside world, or they really don't like cars, for example, because people can drive far away and don't have to spend so much time the community. So they're very intentional. There's obviously a lot of issues with this community as well. And I wanted I wanted wish this particular model, especially the fact that these intentional decisions are made by a small group of people all of whom tend to be men and everyone has to abide by. The decisions that's not good. But what you notice as an interesting principle is that a lot of Amish people are feel incredibly satisfied incredibly happy because the intention -ality of I'm living in a certain way that I really value way outweighs the the convenience isn't benefits. Lost of the things. They turned down not being electrical grid not having not having cell phones. So there's there's a principal to generalize here, which is being very intentional about how you live your life trying to support things you really value in knock it too cluttered up with the other things that intention can give you way, more satisfaction than what you lose by various minor conveniences of technologies that you sidestep. This is this underlies not just digital minimalism. But almost any minimalism movement is under girded by this idea that being intentional about your life is more important than maximizing. Conveniences. I think Cal is really onto something with this idea of intention -ality versus convenience about a year ago, I removed the Twitter app from my phone. I still have a Twitter account, but I can only access it from my desktop, and even now twelve months later, I still have moments where I have a reflex to post something I'm thinking about while I'm out walking around in the world. And the interesting thing is I wouldn't even classify myself as someone who was particularly addicted to Twitter in the first place. But that's how deep these things run and it occurs to me that reflects that impulse to share is rather like volunteering to be the sports caster for your own life. It's like you're locking yourself in a little booth high above the crowd and high above the action. So that you can comment on it. But my choosing to constantly comment on the action. You affectively remove yourself from the Plainfield remove yourself from the game of life. You no longer feel the flow of really sinking into a good conversation without the distractions or the soothing solitude of sitting with your own thoughts and letting them marinade into something richer. You cannot both comment on the action and be a part of the action at the same time. It's impossible. But even though I'm aware of all of this. I have no doubt that that reflexive twitch will come again. Because convenience is easy and being intentional is not. But it's a heck of a lot more rewarding in the long run. And speaking of sports now, it's time for your final moment of zen. What do you do when you need to slow down? If it's a busy day busy week baseball on the radio that is no no better invention for sort of shifting your mind into another mode than to sit outside on your porch on one of these sort of humid, mid Atlantic summer nights. And I have an old battery powered radio with an analog dial, which I love, and you know, Charlie slows Dave Jaguar do the call the nationals game, and you sit there, and you just gotta listen to it in your mind wanders because a lot of downtime. Mass like medicine. You know, I mean, it's it's a game that's paste. Well for slowing down a mine in our current age. Thanks to Matsue sich for producing this episode. And to Devon Craig Johnson for composing are lovely music. If you feel like this episode gave you some new ideas. I would love it. If you left us review on I tunes. Every review helps us spread the word about the show, which helps us keep making the show. I didn't put a handy link in the show notes as always thank you for listening. And remember to take your time.

Twitter principal Cal Devon Craig Johnson Matsue baseball Atlantic Charlie Dave Jaguar twelve months
"cal" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"cal" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Baloney. And then if there is start surroundings object zone. Oh, so for example. Do you get how this works? For me, please dot com review sushi. Okay. So sushi is when it's enclosed like like think of like a sushi roll, right? But the ends are not enclosed. So it goes all the way around. So for example. Is a sushi. Pigs in a blanket sushi philophical rap. Oh, I see those those ends. Gotcha. Burrito. Number seven. Oh, that's a on. If it's tucked if the answer, tucked sushi sushi and actually that salad and a bread bowl thing. It's actually called a quiche. Why did I okay? So that was wrong identified that one wrong that type where it looks like a bucket that's called quiche. Okay. Deep dish pizzas. A quiche a salad with the bread bowl is a quiche key lime pie. Quiche? Cales zone. That's when it's all wrapped. So a burrito is a CAL's zone. This is how obsessed with food. We are in this country that we're we have so much of what's put it in categories. Pop tart, where's the start? Pop. A pop tart delivers Cal zone crustal uncrossable. I'll council and corn dog. Kelso. It's all all Kelso. Sub sandwich. That's a sandwich note taco. Yeah. Oh..

CAL
"cal" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

06:18 min | 3 years ago

"cal" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"His new podcast for which i was interviewed big questions with cal fuss men just google big questions with cal fuss nephew an where he views all sorts of folks like kobe bryant and damon john and seth godin and on and on and on and then there's me odd man out so without further ado in preamble i'm kind of stalling with this intro i apologize guys here is my interview aka being interviewed by cal fuss men just went off to springboard rather just went off the springboard so i've been thinking about this conversation for a long time and i basically had two ways to prepare i thought i won i know you we been in the sauna together we have met your mom that's right met your dad we've gone out to eat you won't let me pick up the check listen to your podcasts read your books so i do in some ways no you and i thought i could do even more research or i could try to just white my memory clean and approach this in a way that i really don't know tim and i'm going to try and forget a little about what i know and just act like i bumped him to tim ferriss on the train holy shit tim ferriss doing pretty good trains for my memory they got trains so and it's funny when i went out to see you i went on a train and so i thought that would be interesting way to go and the more i think about it the thing that really hits me about you goes to a story about brian grazer ron howard okay so once a producer and the others filmmaker partners and i'm interviewing them in the claridge hotel in london and we're talking we're having a great conversation and in the middle of this interview a fire alarm goes off and water sprouts from the ceiling in an instant ron howard russia's to it was sort of a kitchen in this room and he grabs a bucket and he puts it under the water at the same time ron howard ran to the bathroom and got towels and had them down and i was just amazed at how they both in a second went in their own directions to solve the problem and together they came up with the solution while i just sat there watching this and the more i thought about it i thought the genius of tim ferriss is he does both at the same time you're like two people who would you wouldn't ordinarily need a partner to do the things that you do and yet you have these skills on different sides of the spectrum that reside inside you and i'm thinking how did that happen so let's start at the beginning i was talking yesterday to this guy wim hof oh yeah no yes okay now he goes underwater and distaste under the cold for minutes at a time and when i was asked him how this came about he explained when he was born he was born a twin the second twin any came out a basically deprived of oxygen and he didn't know it until years later but his whole life became a movement toward the moment he was born with and i'm wondering at your birth did something happen that helped make you who you are it's quite possible i don't remember all too much but as i've been told i was born premature and ended up in critical care i still have scars you can actually see one right on my wrist there looks like a cigarette burn oh yeah have another one underneath my left nipple basically it's in the rib area and that is from a respirator i had i as i understand it five fullbody blood transfusions to oxygen the blood properly and i was in really bad shape very very very tiny and under incubator lights and so on so i had a lot of of spos trauma but difficulty coming into the world and seemed to have recovered but i was very kind of brother but i was very very very small up until about the end of fifth grade very small kid very much run so has your life has been a good part of it spent in search of getting the most out of your body and definitely a pretty good relation will there is in in some direct ways in the sense that the experimentation and the recording of experiments started with primarily wrestling which was the only sport i really gravitated to towards or actually did well in i.

google cal
"cal" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"cal" Discussed on Short Story Long

"What's the what what's the through line of all these people but focusing too much on that right so if the through lines this that means i have to somehow not only make kyri irving story good but i have to make cal story and kyrie irving story somehow have a similar r o anyone do that heck no one else saying is when you're thinking and sitting down and looking at the i tunes top charts and you're like well how do i make a top podcast those are the type of things you start thinking right i have to create this awesome format i have to create everything has an i can explain it saying is it's from doing it and from relaxing from the through lines find themselves the things that are similar and different find themselves the great stories find themselves if you let it breathe and let it be a story in a conversation if you come into it with a with too hard of an agenda you're just gonna strangle it to death yeah and i think a lot of times sadly shows are sold that way well this worked so will do that twenty five times yeah and sometimes it can be very cool like if you look at rocky now karate kid is not much different than rocky but they completely changed up the place they change the age and so you wouldn't know you're watching rocky all over again and they made it work but most that that's the one out of one thousand nine hundred ninety nine other ones people can tell this this has been ripped off and it's really sad.

cal kyrie irving
"cal" Discussed on Get Up!

Get Up!

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"cal" Discussed on Get Up!

"Because you say if you missed shy we make baxter old out of the puck is let osi what are the calf stevenson centers shot scores pelly capitals forcing game seven with a three nothing shutout making the play riley watson waiver torres hits bob what's the difference between poverty and golf i'm about to get up at the table on a morning field with those kinds of moments welcome back to get up alive above the heineken river decade pier seventeen that'd beetle that's jalen is nice down there by the way beautiful day really busy day we've had here we've had a lot of guests and we're going to have cal ripken junior here at our studio and i can tell you in advance hembo was going to lose it i'm a little bit you've worn me about this starting to get comfortable for ripken this is one i'm not afraid that i'm overselling hembo is reaction to cal ripken i'm also not afraid i'm overselling the greatness of lebron james bring you highlights of last night's game four at the q lebron and company needing a win to even up the eastern conference finals with the celtics and early on they were jumping out too quickly to this first quarter i look at this past by kevin love we're going to call that ninety four feet and it basically was wonderful it's over thirty yards in the air so baker mayfield tv can complete some of those this season in cleveland was awfully good and then this came a festival of celtic mrs at the basket not once.

baxter torres ripken lebron celtics kevin love cleveland riley watson heineken river jalen baker mayfield tv celtic ninety four feet thirty yards