35 Burst results for "C. M. O."

Twitter CMO Leslie Berland Asks Board About Mass Exodus Following Sale

Mark Levin

01:40 min | 5 months ago

Twitter CMO Leslie Berland Asks Board About Mass Exodus Following Sale

"Leslie Berlin Twitter CMO A Twitter CMO a something of communications from a meeting Monday in a leaked audio We want to thank project veritas which is constantly under attack by the FBI and the DoJ and The New York Times This is a fantastic room With a fantastic young leader in James O'Keefe Cat 9 go Out of the board and mister monster plan on dealing with a mass exodus considering the acquisition is by a person with questionable ethics with the authority I can answer this for mister Musk if I may The exits over there drag your ass out of there and go join Disney Get the hell out of here Or maybe you can work for Nike in China Maybe you'll enjoy that or maybe or maybe you'll enjoy working for Apple in China Go ahead But drag your ass out of here And the fast of the better Questionable ethics they said mister Musk you know what That's based on ladies and gentlemen These constant attacks and filings against him in the Securities and Exchange Commission Where the bureaucracy is highly politicized and anti business Oh so he must be unethical He must be unethical So these are the dead Enders These are the hardcore lefties that are used to controlling your speech And they don't like the fact that now this is going to be a private company So they need to go Mass exodus are you kidding me A lot of people would love to work there Love it Love

Leslie Berlin Twitter James O'keefe Veritas DOJ FBI The New York Times China Disney Nike Securities And Exchange Commis Apple
How to Achieve Extraordinary Results When Building Your Brand

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

02:13 min | 1 year ago

How to Achieve Extraordinary Results When Building Your Brand

"Welcome to digital conversations. I am your host billy bateman and today i'm joined by a man that needs no introduction. Cmo gong. Would you let booting you doing today. I'm great to be here. Yeah yeah man really excited to have you and In have this conversation so before we get into it you know for those. That don't know you mind. Just introducing yourself and tell them a little bit about gong. They don't know what gong is sure. So i'm rudy as said on the chief officer chief marketing officer at this is my fifth time leading marketing team for a tech company figures companies of our public and Contact this is my third time working with my currency yo ben-dov so we work together across three. Different companies was all by south. Salesforce was Influences and gone is probably not going to be bought by anyone. Because we're waiting for that Gone is revenue intelligence platform that unlocks reality to help people in companies achieve their full Whether it sales teams marketing teams product teams has were success teams week. We help. everyone has anything to do with revenue. Yeah you guys do a great job. The first time i heard about gone my brother's a sales rep at sas company. And he is asking me what what tools are you using. He's like well they just got this. This gong thing like a month ago and i. I was a little skeptical. But he's a really good. It's helped my calls quite a bit. So at a typical response we get some companies reps initially a little Don't know my boss uses against new york. Listen everywhere. I say but it's really meant for them. It's what have to enter notes that their calls so they listen other reps calls and learn from them so they can go back and see what the customer or shared their calls with the customer asks for feedback and get help companies who are really allow helping the rep succeed and turn some of the struggling ones into fantastic once gonna get a ton of value out of

Billy Bateman Cmo Gong Sas Company Rudy Salesforce New York
"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

CMO Moves by Adweek

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

"Awesome progress it innovative marketing but we also need to establish the purpose and the tone in the position of these brands inside of an for e as a whole i think we probably all are reading every day more and more about how consumers are expecting things from brands are expecting brands. Abbot point of view. They're expecting our employees are expecting us to to take positions and we know that we know that trust does drive growth we know that increasingly high percentage of consumers are saying. They're going to spend their time. They're going to spend their money with brands that they can trust with brands. They feel like are transparent with brands. Who are will To kinda put their neck out there to take positions. And i think for us. We really wanna focus. It is is in the products themselves. You know i. i'm. I'm really proud to say that. We are increasingly driving diversity nor gains to have the women's national teams in fica to to have than women inside of our games in on the battlefield at in the in the world of sam's and heroes and heroines that are that are represented so representation in the products themselves. I think is probably the most powerful thing we can do. And then when we think about how we get there will. It is to have diverse teens. It is to invest in dynamic talent. Who will help us see the world in the right way. Who will help us learn as we get. But we're all learning. I think any of us would be naive to say were perfect. And then we've got it all figured out to. How are you guys thinking about it. Is this resonated with your approach. Oh absolutely to your point. Certainly a journey. It's one that we're all going on together. And we're all learning in the moment and it goes back to what we were talking about before this notion that in order to authentically represent your consumer. You've got to understand the voices and probably represent those voices. And in our case particularly within the realm of sport we have a responsibility to athletes that they can see themselves in our brand and be proud of our actions that we take and that is an amazing partnership when you think about some of the individuals on rawson diversity that is represented air. We know we can do more. We know we recently launched a women's advisory council. It's it's helping us out from gender perspective. Got a fair amount of of racial diversity but we also know we need a tons of other lenses in which we're going to better engage with this next generation ford so certainly the goal is to ensure that has become a bit more inclusive across.

sam rawson ford
"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

CMO Moves by Adweek

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

"Hi welcome to sima moods. my name is tencent. I'm here in the san francisco bay area today and i'm the cmo for electronic arts. And i'm joined by kaelin thornton david nice to meet. You really excited to be here today. As you mentioned kaelin thornton. And i happen to be a fortune enough to lead the marketing team. See him all over the gatorade company. So join you all today from portland oregon but in about a week or so actually make the move at chicago and join the gatorade family river excited to be here. Can't wait to get into the conversation. All right let's get after it Indicated we've had a chance just to get to know each other a little bit year over the last few weeks at lund to hear more broadly about this new gig of yours. How you got there. I know you've been in it for a few months splits. I'd love to hear a little bit more about your backroom. Absolutely it's been an incredible journey and now back up a little bit and give a bit more of a foundation and then how ended up here but a little bit about myself. I grew up in texas and was just with a background. Life experiences sports passions for power sport has been something that's been instrumental in my life from as long as i can remember. I've got family members that play. My dad actually played freshman football. And i grew up doing everything. Sign my force. I actually was gymnastics. and then. I was fortunate enough to play professional football much much later. In life for the cowboys. And and the reason i mentioned that is because it really has played a pivotal role and all of my experiences both personally and professionally join an inverse of texas and undergrad and then having a chance to play for the cowboys and then to the left turn work in finance for awhile and found myself just really wanting to get back into sports or culture so went to grad school at stafford and had incredible experience there and then ended up ninety where i was at the company for the better part of ten years and transformed of in terms of how i thought about serban athletes and as an athlete and myself and i really learned that there was just a multitude of ways in which you can engage in really fuel that athlete journey so after spending ten years at nine hundred i had the chance to work in a number of different roles. The jordan family. Mikey basketball and i ended up with a decision just like on. Hey am i at the point. Now were in really ready to learn something different and new way in which to serve the athlete. Because i'd spent the bulk of may in footwear and apparel and an all things certain athlete perspective. And what. I want to try something new and big about how i can continue to serve them from a hydration perspective from a fuelling perspective. And all things that go with that so as i was growing up there were two iconic gray brands that really were instrumental in my growth in one was nike. And the other one's gatorade and so the opportunity came about to make believe over here at the beginning of the year and.

kaelin thornton david kaelin thornton tencent san francisco bay cowboys lund football texas serban portland oregon chicago gymnastics stafford jordan basketball nike
The Purpose of Getting Weird in Your Marketing  With Penji's CMO Johnathan Grzybowski

MarTech Podcast

01:49 min | 1 year ago

The Purpose of Getting Weird in Your Marketing With Penji's CMO Johnathan Grzybowski

"So let's talk about the purpose of getting weird. Because i think there's actually a marketing tactic. Here we see lots of companies that try to do zany funny out of the box stuff to get noticed and it's not even just companies influencers. All sorts of people are just trying to stay in the top of the media cycle. Stay present stay top of mind. And sometimes they're doing things that maybe are considered off brand or a relevant to their brand but it just gets everyone talking and remembering them which has to have some sort of business impact. How do you figure out what the purpose is of your media strategy. How much attention you need and want attention is good attention. The reason why the episode is discussed as like the weirdest things is actually a contrarian. You where it's my job as the speaker and the person that you're listening to to convince you to not actually do weird things and the one thing that we found out very early on is that we will never trade respect for attention and we don't want to be little ourselves and we don't want to make ourselves look different than what we actually are as workers in cofounders of the business. We tried that. We did the weird thing. We did the cool things. It worked to a degree as mentioned before we created a robot in getting in multiple newspapers in the local region of where we're located in philadelphia. But it never brought in customer. Not once did it. Ever bring in the actual customer and the reason why i say that is because if you have the fundamentals in the foundation of a strong business. You won't need the disrespectful things. The marketing ploys in order to actually grow the

Philadelphia
The 3 Eras of Marketing: Revenue Era With Drift CMO Tricia Gellman

MarTech Podcast

01:30 min | 1 year ago

The 3 Eras of Marketing: Revenue Era With Drift CMO Tricia Gellman

"Tricia. Welcome back to the mark. Podcast even having made this has been a fun conversation series. I'm excited to continue our conversation and talk about what we're doing today. This is what you've called the revenue era. So why are we out of the internet age and into the revenue era. Actually you know one of the things that i think about the internet age is really the rise of demand generation as a function. Like in the past you had marketers. You had sales people. But the idea of tying what marketing was doing directly pa- sales was very difficult pre internet. So you had all of these tools that rose up. They kind of created silos in a way like you. Had you know your marketing automation tool. You hide your email till you had all of these different things that you were doing and looking across them to figure out what's happening and what's not became challenging with the proliferation of all of these tools and marketers were really measured on the leads because it was the first thing that marketers could measure was like am. I bringing in enough of the food. Let's call it. But what i think we've started to see. Is that if marketers are measured by leads and sales as measured by revenue and supposedly the demand. Hurry you're connecting them. You have to actually connect them and sales doesn't care about leads. What they care about is the leads convert as it creates someone who's interested in buying and then do they buy into the revenue era is all about marketers. Getting closer with sales and closer to the understanding of is what i'm doing. Actually impacting the business and stepping up and saying that they wanna take responsibility.

Tricia PA
"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

CMO Moves by Adweek

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

"I know that sounds unnatural. <Speech_Female> But it's really. <Speech_Female> It's <Speech_Female> all the things you <Speech_Female> and i were just talking <Speech_Female> about. It's <Speech_Female> i look at it for three reasons. <Speech_Female> One when you think <Speech_Female> of kids or children <Speech_Female> and i have one <Speech_Female> when they're standing. <Speech_Female> I even have pictures. <Speech_Female> I think of myself as <Speech_Female> person <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> standing <Speech_Female> in summer with <Speech_Female> an ice cream coming in <Speech_Female> your hand. And it's <Speech_Female> all over your face <Speech_Female> and its own <Speech_Female> your hair in it's <Speech_Female> stripping down <SpeakerChange> your body <Speech_Female> and you're just so <Speech_Female> thrilled <Speech_Female> and proud to have <Speech_Female> that i love <Speech_Female> that idea of <Speech_Female> bringing that <SpeakerChange> every <Speech_Female> day and <Speech_Female> the community <Speech_Female> aspect of it <Speech_Female> and you see <Speech_Female> couples or individuals <Speech_Female> or <Speech_Female> families <SpeakerChange> going <Silence> to the ice cream shop. <Speech_Music_Female> No <Silence> one's unhappy. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Everyone's <Speech_Female> happy going to the ice <Speech_Female> cream shop. Everyone's happy <Speech_Female> leaving the ice cream shop <Speech_Female> and it's a part of your community. <Speech_Female> It's epicenter <Speech_Female> and then just use. I <Speech_Female> said there's so much diversity. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> What flavor <Speech_Female> what's inspiring people. <Speech_Female> I just think <Speech_Female> the whole idea <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> just something. I <Speech_Female> would just love to do <Speech_Female> and i love to make <Speech_Female> it to. I'd love <Speech_Female> to actually make the ice <Speech_Female> cream. I love to <SpeakerChange> cook. And so <Speech_Female> i'd love to do <Speech_Female> the night my <Speech_Female> husband proposed. <Speech_Female> This was <Speech_Female> seventy eight years ago. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> stood there <Speech_Female> pros <Speech_Female> such a lovely <Speech_Female> moment and <Speech_Female> we were all right now <Speech_Female> when you wanna do <Speech_Female> you really wanna go <Speech_Female> get ice cream. <Speech_Female> Got <Speech_Female> ice cream. After <Speech_Female> we got engaged <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> at jenny's <Speech_Female> in atlanta <Speech_Female> it was <Speech_Female> jenny's ice cream. That's really <Speech_Female> good ice cream. <Speech_Female> No yeah yeah. <Speech_Female> That's awesome <Speech_Female> the whole world of ice cream <Speech_Female> is actually really fascinating. <Speech_Female> There's also like <Speech_Female> this whole. I love <Speech_Female> all these new <Speech_Female> Ice cream companies <Speech_Female> coming out so <Speech_Music_Female> actually follow. <SpeakerChange> It <Speech_Female> was an industry. I'm <Speech_Female> really fun. <Speech_Female> It seems the <Speech_Female> ice cream. It does <Speech_Female> seem with ice cream industry. <Speech_Female> It really boo. There's <Speech_Female> all these new <Speech_Female> brands popping <Speech_Female> the actual ice cream. <Speech_Female> I'll has gotten <Speech_Female> bigger longer <Speech_Female> at the grocery <Speech_Female> stores. Well <Speech_Female> upper sure it's <Speech_Female> really. It's an <Speech_Female> evolving industry <Speech_Female> from staying <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in. <SpeakerChange> What's your <Silence> <Advertisement> favorite asking flavor. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Oh my god. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I knew you were gonna ask <Speech_Female> me. That <Silence> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> depends <Speech_Female> on the mood and <Speech_Female> it depends on the the <Speech_Female> place i have. <Speech_Female> This gelato <Speech_Female> place near my house <Speech_Female> in. It's summertime <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> they have <Speech_Female> their july. They <Speech_Female> have this <SpeakerChange> blueberry cheesecake <Speech_Female> which is one of the <Speech_Female> best things i've ever had <Speech_Female> but they <Speech_Female> also have a <Speech_Female> just a sorbet <Speech_Female> like a non dairy. <Speech_Female> Which <SpeakerChange> is the apparatus <Speech_Female> spritz. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> It <Speech_Female> is so phenomenal. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> buried <Speech_Female> cheesecake and apple <Speech_Female> spreads <Speech_Female> that's awesome. Hopefully <Speech_Female> everyone is inspired. <Speech_Female> Not only <Speech_Female> by everything you <Speech_Female> talked about today. <Speech_Female> Hopefully everyone <SpeakerChange> goes <Speech_Female> out and gets my <Speech_Female> absolutely <Speech_Female> thank you so <Speech_Female> much for having <Speech_Female> me. This has been such a <Speech_Female> this has been such a great <Speech_Female> our thank <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you lisa. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks <SpeakerChange> so much <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> bye bye. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> Thank <Speech_Female> you so much for tuning <Speech_Music_Female> in today and we <Speech_Music_Female> hope you enjoyed the show. <Speech_Music_Female> If you did. <Speech_Music_Female> We'd love your help in sharing. <Speech_Music_Female> Cmo moves <Speech_Music_Female> with one of your friends <Speech_Music_Female> or colleagues and <Speech_Music_Female> please also be <Speech_Music_Female> sure to subscribe <Speech_Music_Female> on spotify <Speech_Music_Female> apple podcasts. <Speech_Music_Female> Or wherever you listen <Speech_Female> better <Speech_Music_Female> yet leave us <Speech_Music_Female> a review while you're at it. <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks again <Speech_Music_Female> and we'll see <SpeakerChange> you next <Music> time.

jenny atlanta apple lisa
"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

CMO Moves by Adweek

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

"Oh absolutely and people don't want to be sold to. They just want their attended. yes absolutely. so what's your favorite part about being a amount. Would you love. The most is the content creation the team building. Is you know. Probably a mix of everything. Certainly the see i think for any leader whether a cmo or or is always the biggest part of that is going to stand for leadership at. I think that is why this roller any c. Suite role is really critical. We get to not just partner with each other in our other members of the cc. But we get to help teams really fulfil their potential and feel fulfilled in their role and especially in marketing marketing..

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

CMO Moves by Adweek

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

"Always been my experience again being able to harvest experience in com experience in direct to consumer as well as coastal. And so really. What you're really looking at is creating that unified experience that is that's been a change. I think a lot of companies have gone through. And i love the fact. The caspers do either stores are. Our stores are very. They're emblematic of the brand. And you feel like you're walking into exactly what you would expect and everyone so knowledgeable and it really becomes both inspiration and education moment and so that's part of the reason i think casper does it. So well they took this beloved brand from the start and they've brought it to light very well across multiple channels. You're totally right End that's a big think. Trend that's happening now. Is these originally direct to consumer brands are now popping up in target in popping up in these different spaces from a wholesale standpoint and i think that they recognize the scale and the power of being in big box stores like that but the ones that really punch through the ones that had that same unified experience and though surprises the same product. It's the same kind of experience you have. But maybe it's more convenient or maybe it's an add on purchase that sort of thing it's also strong regional brand. I think everyone knows the big box. But there's tons of strong regional brand and go to most places in the country these of those areas in those communities and so it's really important to flex bows. I think there's always shifts in retailer ships in our industry. And i think the other one is really around content and the importance of content. And the way that consumers want longer relationships in more immersive content at. I think that is really going to be the next evolution. That really content. Is the commerce going. Well beyond luring the digital the physical the multichannel into just becoming more of an immersive content experience. Oh absolutely and people don't want to be sold to. They just want their attended. yes absolutely. so what's your favorite.

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

CMO Moves by Adweek

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

"I'm obsessed with this podcast so to be here today with. Lisa is an honor. And if you've followed. Lisa's career like many of us. Have you'll know that she is a powerhouse in the retail space. She's worked at big brands. That we all know in love like levi's lacoste hsen. And most. recently. She is the cmo of casper. Sleep and i'm thrilled to have you welcome to the show. Thank you so much. I'm thrilled to be here. I'm such a fan of this podcast too. So i'm thrilled to be on and excited for today awesome. Let's jump in. Tell us about your current role. I mean very simply. I'm in charge of the stories that the brand tells and the growth of the demand for the products. And i really look at this as a singular opportunity you know. The demand generation is as well as the storytelling. This is kind of different role in the sense that a lot of the you mentioned some of the companies i worked for in the past and what made those companies really are the market as a marketing. Challenge is really interesting. Is that as you said. Everybody knows them. Most people love them. They were really Part of the cultural fabric and so awareness and building. That was never really part of the immediate challenge for me as a marketer. But the relevance piece was and so it's been very interesting to be at a brand like casper were the relevance piece. Was almost right there out of gate but with so many copycats very unique challenge of not just building the awareness for this brand but making sure that brand mattered more and more to people again in every day. And that's really what. I'm focused on right now. It's such an interesting challenge to face as marketer. I faced similarly in going from airbnb to delta airlines. And you can imagine at airbnb. It was very much about brand building. Very much about shaping the brand from a couch surfing brand to an experiential brand and you counter that experience a delta and claims are full at delta everyone knows the delta name but it was about shifting.

Lisa casper levi airbnb delta airlines delta
"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"Would share in also ask is how they are able to authentically listened to their customers right and How they can get create feedback loops and experiences. That enable them. Of course never. When you're creating a product you're not going to go and iterating over and over and over again you need that product experience to be excellent when it goes to market. But how they're actually able to create feedback loops that can inform a flywheel that really drives brand and product that gets reinforced by consumer. And so that would be. That's something that we've built for. Glossy a in the way that we operate and i bet there are many ways even though the business models incredibly different for those companies the larger companies to be able to do that and so i'd authentically like i always come from a place of asking questions so i'd start by asking those questions and i think that's a way to understand how they can build it in a way that would work for them and inform inform their future approach to customers interesting. That's a good one. And i think they do all do that in a different way and that would be a great one to riff on and maybe if we have time later this podcast we can. We can do a bit of that. Because i do have some experience but you know to me. One principal was you have to live it. You know the great ideas. That i've been a part of is when you immerse yourself in your in people's lives and you went in with your eyes wide open and of course you were doing it with some sort of category lands but just go in there and see how they live their life and what things are concerned about. What their passions. What are their problems. What what are their dreams for their life and their families and then things get interesting but go in wide. I going curious and go in and be part of their experience absolutely. We often say a lot. People product sat down. Which i think is a great guiding light. And exactly what you just said which is listened to the people's stories and with that you can create incredible product experiences that that plug into their stories versus challenged. Create a different story than they're expecting. Let's talk about the cmo role. And you've you've been a glossy over six years. That's you know nearly the life of the brand so you you've been there to see this amazing story be part of this amazing story but you were just promoted to cmo in june twenty twenty one. So it's still pretty fresh. So congratulations i and i want you to tell me how and when you heard about you being appointed the cmo and how that felt i would say it was a very natural evolution in conversation As many of these things are i have been leading marketing at glossy hang in different capacities since i've been there. And so think in the trajectory of what we were building as a brand and both what we've achieved so far and most importantly what we're looking forward to achieving it felt like a natural conversation and so it was very humboldt excited honored and also fell a renewed sense of pressure in a really great way to continue to build this brand challenged the status quo and think about what it meant to be in a quote unquote. Cmo's seat versus s vp of marketing director of marketing seat as i was previously. And then my my team will know. But i often go back and say that i couldn't have done it with all without all of the people around me right. The most important thing is that it does truly take village. I know it is cliche to say that but An incredible company cross functional team inspiration from the customer. So the first two things that came to my mind was i was humbled excited honored and then also so thankful to the team that's enabled us to get to this place and to build What i hope will be defining of what a future marketing organization can be for consumer brand. We're gonna talk about that. But the first thing i want to ask you is what is your i mean. You have to have one of the great. Cmo jobs in the world right. And you think how your brand was found it. And i want you to talk about. What's your favorite part of this job. And on the counter side of that least favorite part. My favorite part of the job is the creation of experiences. So i often talk about home marketing for me about media. Mix or the next commercial that you're going to create or the next social posts that you're going to put out but it's ultimately about is this an impactful costumer experience and that ranges from anything including the stickers that we include with every order right quick surprise and delight. That's an amazing touch point once you've had a fully digital experience with us in you're getting that delivery on your doorstep all the way to the flagship stores that we open or building new experience on our website And then also of course building our beauty products so for me. My favorite part is being able to build impactful experiences and having the privilege to work with teams that are so designed focused so customer centric so curious about how we can continue to do that in a really special impactful curated way and because of our business model. That's truly only the result of the pressure that we put ourselves to achieve the next goal and not the pressure that distributors put on us. The broader industry puts on us to fill in certain gaps so that is absolutely by far away had experienced creation is the my favorite part of the job And then say my least favorite part of the job is when we disappointed customers when we. It's the exact opposite side of the coin of what i just described so hearing hard feedback that something expected to land in a particular way or to change. Someone's routine did not fulfil their expectations. And i view those as very important learning experiences. But i don't think i would be human if i didn't admit that those are some of the hardest moments of the job when you have really high expectations for what you can deliver an achieve for the customer alley. I wanna follow up on that question about disappointing customer. As the least favorite part of the job. I hate that feeling too and it's hard not to get emotional about that. What do you do when that happens. I listen. I think that's the most important thing and i often say to the team. We're not going to be able. We will always be able to listen to every single customer anecdote every single piece of feedback. Then what's really important is making sure that we are pragmatic reasonable and as focused as possible on which pieces of feedback we act on. So i think what's really important is to listen authentically absorb and then decide how to act how that will change the way. Operate how that might change the way you position product or greet the product or changing experience. And i think that's really important. I think people would people who know me. Well tell you that. I love to sleep on things as in i. I don't want always want to make fast decisions. Sometimes as a leader you were required to make decisions with incomplete information. One of the most important things i think is to mealy listen digest and then decide what you want to do about it. So my first reaction is you to listen and digest and then decide how to act instead of acting on emotion because as you said you find those women's hard Anyone's who's dedicated much of their career much of their life to ensuring that consumers feel excited about your experiences. It's hard you don't want to act on that sentiment. You want to act on truly hearing what they're saying and understanding what that means you will do next. It's a beautiful thought sleeping. When things underrated. I mean almost every decision. I've made it hasn't gone as well as it should have. Did not sleep on it so i think that's really really good advice. I also think it's a real. I try not always successfully to make bad customer experiences or a bad launch or a bad initiative. Whatever it might be into something that is inspiring for us to learn and improve an elevator commitment. And so that's hard to do sometimes as a leader. But that's always my goal and that's exactly what you talk about when you listen you absorb you talk with your team sleep on any.

Cmo
"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"When deloitte ask c. suite members. What's the most critical functional area over the next year. Digital technology was cited as number one in with the promise that digital will give us a three sixty degree always on view of our customers prediction capabilities and a chance to connect with consumers in unique personal ways. It's clear why it's number one. But the move to digital. Hasn't come easy. Consumers have pushed back against invasive digital marketing practices leading to greater scrutiny and new regulations and the sunsetting of third party cookies has made measurability and even faster moving target. I know it can be frustrating. It can create a disconnect between promise and delivery to help. cmo's deloitte has identified six disruptive trends that cmo's can use in their digital marketing strategies like customer data ownership in housing data capabilities and data privacy for the full list and to learn more. And how you deliver on the promise of performance. Marketing go to cmo dot deloitte dot com and download their latest research. I wanna talk about where you go for inspiration and i know you go to your customers. That's how the brand's start at right and And that's one one way. You are unique as a brand. But i want you to talk about other ways. You are inspired alley by other people other companies. So i'm just looking for you do so many things so well you know with a with a consumer. Who who do you look for. And where do you look for inspiration. Look a lot of places. I think it's really important to look outside right if i only looked at glace customers or glossy Customers that wouldn't help us build a perspective on how to continue What i what is do which is to continue to rewrite the playbook for defining brand consumer relationships especially in a world now where the brand consumer relationships are direct and we operate jackson. I think it's really important to look outside. One place that. I love looking in my daily life. In one of my curse. My personal passions in purposes is really finding things that are simple solutions. That changed my every day or make my everyday better. And so i love looking towards Companies or brands or people that are creating product or services that ultimately change consumer behavior right. it's the classic People would have asked for a faster horse. They never would have asked for a car example. Right and so one thing that comes to mind is music right. My personal consumption of music Tens of millions of people's personal consumption of music has changed significantly since a product like spotify came and it kind of came from an unexpected place. You may expect a record label or someone with a lot of historical. Music acknowledged to create a product that changed that consumption. And so that's a perfect example of a simple solution that has changed my every day Other people's every day. And so. That's where i look for inspiration and that's what i aspire when we look back inward to do with our products are experiences that we're building with customers which is really to enhance their every day and change the routine for the better in a way that makes them feel really good about where they are in that moment. So the i look for inspiration and continuing to find small companies been companies. That are doing not think. That's a really good example. I also love the i mean. I'm inspired by what i would call more traditional marketing campaigns. That truly Strike emotional chord. So that can be. I'm trying to think of really good example but those happen often right like you see them from anything from technology company to a car company to beauty company in one that comes to mind lately that was recently shared with me. And i'm actually not sure how old the spot is was a google Campaign where a parent had created an email account for their child and written emails over time. It was sort of the modern version of the baby. Book can really struck a chord with me. Because i had actually done something similar when i had my daughter. I made her an email account. I see seed her on her birth announcement and every month since then. She received an email about her russians milestones things that i love about her For the past month. And so i feel like i look for moments like that too. That truly are about purpose about a person's journey. And how that in journey intersects with whatever brand or product may be offering. But i think those types of moments truly inspire me as well and then the last thing is i walls looking for brands and companies that are challenging industries. it's something that glossy did right. When we started at least from my perspective we set out to change the way the industry operated. Which was these large conglomerates top down telling you that you had a problem or that. You weren't good enough that you needed this product to solve your beauty routine or make you feel better. And we ultimately took a bottoms up approach looking at customers and what they desired from. Pd industry how they want it to feel. So i'll give you an example there. That's been close close to my heart within glossy variance firing We have our black owned businesses grant program. We are recently reviewing the twenty twenty one applications and in doing that. It's just amazing to see how the industry has opened up since gossett started to include so many independent brands because the barriers to entry of being able to launch a brand promote your products or social media. Whatever it might be a really disrupted the industry. And so i'm really inspired to both inside and outside beauty by finding brands that are being bold and trying to define a new approach to to branding end to customer experiences. You just went through pretty three pretty good criteria for brands that grow in those. The challenge industry striking emotional chord offers simple solutions. So that was nice. Little text book. About what a brand should be these days and what you know one i think positive thing from the last year and a half amidst all the sadness has been so many brands. I mean you were already there but so many brands stepped up thinking about. How can i be of service to people. And what new products and services might i offer. And i think once you do that you don't go back so i'm kind of excited to see what happens in our industry over the next few years with that. I think that renewed commitment within companies to be of service and to help people find solutions to stuff. That's not going well with them. You know or things that you know. One of the one of the great experience i had a. Png was whole swiffer experience where you know. We came up with a totally different way to clean. That was kind of fun and joyful and reframe the category and it became a really vibrant brand still is to this day. Yes the simple solutions for every day. That make you make you feel better in. Your daily routine are pretty important. I also think you hit on a point that i think about a lot. Which is the expectations. Consumers have brands have evolved significantly today right role. They expected them to play both in their personal lives. And in the greater world is They very high expectations as they should be. But it also changes the way we as marketers and how companies have to operate in order to fulfill those expectations. Okay have a really good question for you here. Before we leave consumer centric city. I grew up in the proctor and gamble culture and that company purports to be one of the world's most consumer centric companies and in many ways they are but their model is so different from yours. So if i were to drop you into a big meeting at png or laurie al or estee lauder.

cmo deloitte jackson gossett google laurie al estee lauder
"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

CMO Moves by Adweek

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Moves by Adweek

"Moves with the incredible melissa. Hardly who is the global cmo for the dating app. Okay cupid melissa. Welcome thank you so much for joining us on sia moves. Tell me thanks for having me all right. Let's start with a question about your own dating experience. Give us your best worst funniest experience. I love talking about dating toby. I was single in new york city for a long time. I went to college in new york city. I got married in my early thirties. So say good. Twelve years of single them in this city. I have my fair share stories. But i i will tell this story before i worked at a dating app. I was known to be a good wing man. Matchmaker girl who will talk to the girl or the guy or the person that you don't really have the balls Cocktails talk to you. I was definitely that person. And so my favorite story is i was at. I had to be dragged out this number takeover. Those rainy nights in new york city for your listeners. Raining in new york is a big deal. Because you're walking everywhere you're like tests having the toxic rain it's thing and my my girlfriend said you're coming out. Get dressed get on some heels. We're going and we were at employees. Only just still a grey bars always been a great bar but it used to be like even better and what am i girl friends who is just always single. Like such an awesome person saw someone she was to. I waited for her to go to the bathroom. I went up to this guy. I said like i'm with a really awesome person. She's so cool. You should absolutely get her drink. And and then i started talking to has friends because i thought your boy up. I would like martini. Thank you very much. I think he was so taken aback but five years later he asked me to marry him. So playing wang man work hang wingmen works. i love it. i love it. School the assists assists as well as a house. It impressive workout. But we did go. It's interesting in new york city. I think i was single for a period of time in new york city. I think i still have a little. Ptsd from that experience. This is a little bit before the time of the dating apps which may or may not have been helpful to the situation but it's certainly a unique environment in which to be single for sure. It is a unique environment. But i feel like when i tell people because i'm married with kids but i'm on thirty two dating apps around the world moment because i need to know how they're working. What what they're like. What the experience is like. And i feel like when i tell people i work at a dating app and i'm trying to convince them to get on the dating app. I have when i'm like was. I was single new york city for twelve years. Oh carry on wise mentor. Show me. I don't have all the answers for sure but but i've been there. It sounds like you. You have to amazing thirty two different dating apps. Your husband must live in a constant state of power. Neue he yes. But i'm also. He's on thirty two. Because i like to wipe it the guy so it's recipro- call and some of the apps are maybe focused on clear. Dating some are so he..

new york city cupid melissa toby melissa new york wang
"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"Did you personally take away from from. It is an hundred good to see you again. Thanks to you well i. I really enjoyed three days. I didn't know what to expect. Really going into it to be honest so it was the first time but I think sometimes. Just get so or at least i get so into the details of the business. I think i get caught up in specific projects in specific campaigns. It was just really nice to be around so many other people and first of all who are inspiring marketers are line winners and to hear about their business. Challenges mendes be inspired by people who have one and people that i really league admire. People that are really look up to. I was able to go back like the next day i shared. I shared some of these things with my team shared. Some of the case studies actually shared the burger king sample that you just shared with them and To inspire some current projects that we have going on a lot of brand purpose work purpose into short-term and long-term gains for the brand and i was just. I can't speak enough about about the three as limit a time. It was awesome. It's great so anyone else personal takeaways hand. I see you nodding. do you have something. I got absolutely. It was such a wonderful program. Thank you again. His theme susan everyone. My biggest takeaway was very deliberate. Approach that lot of see most. We heard from took to fuelling creativity in their teens. Again of the early underscored enough and you know for the past two years. Second part of google switches goes moonshot factory. That's all bad. Fuelling innovation. And i actually see so many policy in fuelling innovation end fuelling. Creativity at creativity is often less obvious to the business into the rest of the organization This program has been amazing. You helped me see these files and to bring this to the team in the organization to really have even much more deliberative approach to fuelling creativity. Creating culture offer spec culture of all ideas being her goats. You're failing failing fast at cleaning cheat but not being afraid to fail so it really really is an amazing definitely. Recommend the program to anyone in thank you which is the end. This is shannon. Can you hear me yes. That's okay great it's six. Am in the morning here in china so good morning everyone. I just want to ask you all a quick question on a scale of five to one. Show me on your hand. Should you be focused on the future as a cmo or that being five or one. Should you be more grounded in today. Where would you put yourself. And where would you say as cmo should be on a scale of five to one okay. there's some fours. there's some threes. okay. I think one of the concepts that i took away from the session. That we had together is really. What's the unique value of. Cmo and keith weed. Reminded us that our role is to bring the outside in and to bring the future forward and that is one concept. I have not forgotten in one that i brought to my work every day. Now since we had the session together even said finances looking where the money is going. We should be looking at where the money is coming from so beyond creativity. I think our role as driving growth and looking at those future opportunities was reminded to us all on how critical that was and there were two ways that i took tips on how we could do that. One is inhaling culture. The adobe seem reminded us of that in fact when we asked her what What was one of the keys of being a great. Cmo she said watch a lot of tv and online video. So i think that's one thing that i i walked away with and then the second was We need to give our team some slack. We need to give them the space to be able to focus on the future and to think about those future opportunities. Deliver those for the business. Lastly i'll ask you. Are you curious. Raise your hand. If you're curious why. I asked a question at the beginning. Well the reason why. I asked that question is because we also had a session on how to interact with your team as zoom worlds and how to engage them and bring them in to the conversation and so one of the tips that we were given is ask those kinds of questions so you can keep your audience engaged so i think really from the big picture of the future. A lot of discussion around that two very practical tips for today. Those are some of the key takeaways. That i got from the accelerator. Great thanks thanks mediation on a good use of our learning mandy at any any big take personal takeaway for you. That you've found like really meaningful since you got back. Yes so mine. Were actually the same shannon's whereas an interesting point right. We're not marketing lead company. Many of your companies. I know are bracketing led And i think there was a lot of great insight piece from keith. In in terms of figuring out. Where the money's coming from in the future was a big one us But then also a doubling down and i think it was an who talks about this as your brand strategy as the north star and how everything really cascades there across the customer experience but then even closer within marketing team has used that a lot to really check ourselves on our performance driven work That needs to move fast. That needs to oftentimes be more in services very taxable. Kpi's but how can make sure the whole organization sees how their work fits in and uses our purpose in uses our brand strategy to help relieve guide. What we're doing and we talked a lot at Leadership team was in the session as well which was great because then we could go back and sort of debrief on it together. We've really about almost like our marketing plan for the company in terms of how we're now gonna go from. We've been in a phase of transformation. To where i think the company would say we now have a great marketing department and they do marketing things to really going to that next level of driving the strategy in the voice of the customer across a much bigger view of the company and play a more strategic role. So that was a lot of takeaways. I had were kind of an in those spaces in more. Maybe organizational related than some of the specific Other things dimensioned fantastic. Thanks hey thanks you for good to see you again in great insights and pedro. Thanks for your your insights as well. Thanks to suzanne steve and all the marketers who participated with those rich insights. That was a recap of this year's cannes lions festival of creativity and the cmo accelerator program. Here are my big three takeaways from this year. cmo program. I try to build a community around your brand and involve that community in your marketing as an luna's of adobe says let them help you second if your work is not emotionally moving your organization and your customers. It's just not good enough people during the program. This year kept talking about goosebumps being a new. Kpi third takeaway solve problems that matter to people. The pandemic has taught many brand people that helping people with things they really care about is great marketing. Let's not lose. That thought as we hopefully commander this pandemic and return to some sense of normal if you're interested in signing up for next year's ken lion. Cmo accelerator program.

keith weed mendes shannon susan google adobe china keith suzanne steve pedro luna ken lion
"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"Show love right so here is some of the gang. That was with us Pedro i'm going to bring you into this in a moment to comment steve. If you go to the next slide. I just want to talk about the five big takeaways from all the discussion. This year. we have fifty people in the room and all the speakers that command all the interactions. We did i one which. I haven't heard this strongly since i began doing this. Invest in your own development live in the base. Get better your craft investment in each of us individuals to become better leaders more in touch with their customers more in touch with new technologies. That's why we're talking on tv tonight. So there was an awful lot of this. I haven't seen in previous years. Second one and pedro was very strong. You know there was a strong feeling that our brands are here to solve problems. That mattered matter to people will to do more important work. And so you know we've all been always been about benefits and making life better. It was more intense this year. More serious is whole. Move to kind of be more important for people i love. This one may goosebumps a kpi for your creative work and for your team culture. The a in the big trade association. The us always does every year. What the biggest word is in marketing. And it's been sustainability in the past. It's been purpose. I say it's going to be goosebumps. I've heard this word used about six times this month as a kpi. If work is giving goosebumps it's going to move the business and it's gonna make the world better. Sandra team culture fourth one build a community and involve them in your brand. Most of the hot brands. Today are really good at building a community and involving them in their brand tick talk. Peleton adobe go down the list and the one. We don't do enough of this. There are a lot of revelations in our three days. The focus on a few ideas that can galvanize and change the company and change life or customers. Be clear about your talk tires. Priorities and focus focus. Focus so pedro arab losing my voice. Come on in here. I want you to comment your speaker in this great program with these great people. Just react to these takeaways to exempting. So thanks for having me. A- yeah you said. We talked a little bit about dino show v problems than narrow. I think the you know the year that actually almost two years now. That was a big lesson for all of us. You know because when you have disruption to the level of the condemning. That just had dan. You said different things happening the world. And you can you can learn from them and enforce there was a big lesson because some of all gold bunnies they have the assets and the capabilities to solve problems. That sometimes we'd be on the product that we sell in and and you know during this endemic. I think we gotta use those capabilities in that infrastructure that we have Anyways it was also another another lesson that because we face dad all over the world that safe time. The we saw the true power of mobile collaboration. When everybody's facing the same problem and they really wanna solve it at the same time. So we leverage that a lot of knowing the you know in the global teams and and was amazing to see the level of ideas that we had war with truly truly amazing in the third aspect on no one is the agility. That have to do things. I mean in during during ovid If you really wanted to matter you needed to matt fast because it was an urgent emergency shoo-in and and the agility that who had i will never come back and also so. I think those are the old that a lot of the work that came out You know that we submit action to come came. Kim alderney during in from a greatest standpoint and we had the we had this year the most number of prizes. In what seventy percent of whole poodle workers related to and also the time to develop networks which schwerin than actual job. Sometimes sometimes things from straight skin can breathe creativity as well right so. Those are some of the topics that we talked about awesome. Pedro thanks for that. Hey i wanna bring in my colleague. Suzanne to- cellini who i hope is on the there she is hey. San suzanne is x. Png she's worked with me since i left png. She's been part of the team at cans since the beginning. So she's a fantastic partner of steve 'self She's the one who runs young markers academy and has and she helped the program for cmo's this year. Suzanne is going to talk to a few of the people in the program few of the cmo's slash senior marketers. Talk for just four or five minutes. About how what they did when they went home what learning they applied. And how they react to some these tapes. I'll turn it over to you. Yeah thanks jim. Hello everyone and thanks. Gary for having us on here and so. I think you've heard quite a bit. From steve at an jim about what we shared at the hands program but we thought it would be interesting to hear from participants and get a feel for what they take away from madden and and what have they done with any of that and how that lines up with some of these takeaways so a few of our participants are on here and So we have garett mcguire. Cmo of merrill we have mandy rasc- who worked at kroger Who works kroger. Sorry runs marketing at kroger. We have hannah mctaggart. Who's the head of marketing at at loon. Loon a google and shannon taylor who runs pampers and an old babycare in net for png in china. So i'm going to open it up to all four of those four four of you a navy Let's see how it works. If i let you let you add jump in as you can Because i can't see everybody's space right now but would what. What did you personally take away from the from the accelerator. We have these five takeaways but is there anything you personally took away so maybe let's start with garrick 'cause you're closest to me and my screen and what what did what.

big trade association pedro Pedro steve Kim alderney schwerin Sandra San suzanne adobe Suzanne dan cellini kroger matt us cmo garett mcguire Cmo of merrill mandy rasc
"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"Each of the last eight years my colleague suzanne tosolini and i have designed a special program for cmo's and next in line cmo's at the cannes festival the program's objective. Easier is to synthesize the lessons from ken. Lions to give participants actionable learnings to build more value for their brands organizations. When they get back home in short to be better leaders each year we host about fifty senior marketing leaders representing a wide range of industries in countries for a two day peer to peer learning experience with some of today's best marketing minds in this discussion. Susanna and i talked with some of the senior marketers who were part of this year's cmo accelerator program and we get their hot takes and big learnings from the session. I think jamie says see my time. I think it's used right run through the accelerator. Yeah hey gang this next little phase. We're gonna talk about. I wanna give you i left. Png in two thousand late two thousand eight and in two thousand and three i brought png can to Kind of shake us up. I get out of our world and one marketer of the year. Five years later and i left the company after that and ken lions reached out to me after i left the g. Steve was part of this team. And said you know we do a lot of a lot of things that can recreate a people. But we don't do a lot for clients and clients are now about a third of our audience. I don't know they may be even a half of the audience now. So could you help us figure out what to do for clients to enhance the experience because it's overwhelming those who have been there and sometimes it's hard to make sense of everything and bring it back and apply if your business so so we began a young marketers academy and it was a huge hit and it was people under thirty nominated by their companies to conquer through the week together with myself and so my team so that was wildly popular so after a few years into that we said let's do something for cmo's so for the eighth year with pulling cmo's together to kind of make sense of and it's a leadership kind of intervention. We bring a lot of ken into a small room and kind of unpack it ourselves and and so this year we did virtually and i just want to share a little bit of what we learned this year. There are some people in the group here who were in that event. We're going to comment on it. So steve if you can go to the next slide. These are always our hopes in objectives. I am I am turned on by people becoming better leaders. And that's what this is all about and we we we organize the accelerator to be better leaders of the creative process to be better creative people ourselves and to ensure that we're facing the future. Cds are always our objectives every year. And the next slide. I think shows some of the brands that were represented this year. Some of them are in the house. Tonight and proud of that slide. People they go back to be better leaders and do better work for their customers and their employees. The world's better place and now we wanna share a really quick video of what happened this year. We went nine hours over three days. Totally virtual pedro was a speaker. He's in the house tonight as well at abyan bev. This little video gives you a sense of the spirit in the room and what happened and kind of the magic. So i think it's better than my words suggest. Share this ninety seconds or so. What happened in the cave wade jim. I love the jacket jockey. Welcome to the cmo. Celebrator wanna welcome. Ricardo welcome sean and kathleen to the cmo accelerator credible marketing. Incredible human stories incredible creativity. We need to get the magic of what we do back into the imagination of a new generation. Now you can learn keeps so skilled up. You have a lotta fun of accessible invade in place. Hello georgia how. High jim pedro. I'm having nice water out of my personalized still are. I have a brand new year. Wants to say hello before we sign off your dog lovers. Well this is teddy. We're going to have an live. I wanna start with katharina bien y mellon who has a really great question and chat. I wanna bring her in and ask her that. One live high on my call. Tom thank you so much the pace of change now..

suzanne tosolini ken lions ken Susanna Lions jamie Steve wade jim steve pedro jim pedro Ricardo kathleen sean katharina bien y mellon georgia Tom
"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"Confused. Let me take you back steps. You haven't heard of stephen football club right. Well neither had we but we realized that even though there at the bottom of england's fourth division they were going to appear in the same video game all the expensive players are going to be and that's when almost two years ago we decided to sponsor stevenage because if we put our logo on their real shirt we would definitely have our logo in the game. Introducing the stevenage challenge gamers across the world immediately started choosing stevenage signing the best players to our team and playing with them for every goal they shared on twitter. You'll be gave them rewards the news. The gaming community by storm the best game stevenage. They had burger king as their sponsor all lawrence on my god football food. What could possibly be better. It's just like that are small team. In real life turned into the biggest team online so gamers chose the best players in the world to play for stevenage sports. It's in the flame that when that was one of our biggest winners in cam and took three going great and as a site together with a window is was the biggest biggest win is estelle jim. I think we're gonna guess. Yeah i want to ask gary v who hasn't chat but it hasn't come on the screen yet gary v y. What do you think. Why did this win. A grand prix. Why the jury love it. Why do you love it if you love it. Hi everybody thank you so much. There's so many of you here. Chad is a lot of fun. I love it. And i am big. Shout out to some of the people in the chat referencing it. I mean my favorite thing is underpriced attention. It's how i think of everything. It's why i struggle with so many of the rules bar industry. Because i don't think we think in those terms i think we think an overpriced attention to be honest And so this was just incredibly thoughtful arbitrage of actual consumer behavior not industry talk. I'm obsessed with obsessed with creativity. But i'm sure even from stephen jim down a lot of it can be fluff for actual human stuff. This is one of the big games in the world the logo was going to be seen in perpetuity and then they also supported it. They knew that the deal was good. Because of the arb- which is just brilliant but then the fact that they also created more layers to not just on that which would have been enough to be probably success for what they invested but they created the social component textbook. Ironically one of the reasons. I'm very bullish on that. Fte's is from farm bill to feta to to say i've watched gaming dynamics play out with skins and other things of that nature. So it's a it's a fun tie into a lot of things we're going to be talking about today but for me personally because it's actually consumer centric not subject to opinions around the video. Also gary v. Hey jackie woodward in the house with bojangles. Jackie are you around right here. Yeah you're in. You're in the category. So what do you think about this work. What do you think about gary said. What are the what are the principles you think that are driving had was resonant among consumers. Well i also reinforce the world cup for mcdonald's in the ninety s and early two thousands. So i can only imagine what they must've thought I agree with gary on all points. I mean i think it's so consumer centric so ideas driven snow clever and really drove to the product as well which is also i think important. You know that every time you put. It posted a goal on twitter. You gotta free hamburger so it wasn't just about being in the game. It was also about connecting back to the restaurants. Which is you know. Part of all of our jobs is driving not just awareness that growth. So i really thought it was a brilliant activation and and and i'm envious alright steve. Hey back to you for the last word. I joined lions back in two thousand five. When you see some of these win my always my. I always always a simple idea. I coulda done that. You know what i mean. And and he just seems such an easy. An easy thing to do doesn't it. But that's the genius of the agency that we back on this david. You know they make it. Look super impo. But that's you know darin lies. The beauty of what creative agency can can bring value to a brand that steve letham from ken. Lions giving us the big picture of the festival this year after the break. I'm going to share the panel discussion with several marketing leaders. On what they learned at the twenty twenty one festival deloitte is the exclusive sponsor of the cmo. Podcast a of what you read and hear about in marketing focuses on the dynamics of business to consumer relationships and experiences but business to business relationships tend to be more complex with longer purchase cycles or stakeholders and more at stake in every transaction deloitte recently published closed the expectation gap with your beat abi buyers a paper that analyzes results and implications from recent original research on be to be buying and selling the research gives you some important insights into how leading b to be marketers for strengthening those relationships and driving growth through emotional connections and it shows how digital technology is being used to build those connections by including the perspectives of both buyers and sellers the research demonstrates the gaps that often exist between what beata companies think their customers want and what customers actually expect to download your free copy of closed the expectation gap with your beat. Abi buyers visits cmo dot deloite dot com.

gary v stephen football club estelle jim stephen jim jackie woodward twitter lawrence gary Chad england bojangles football steve letham Lions Jackie mcdonald darin steve ken david
"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"I worked with the loyd as the exclusive sponsor of this show. Because they're always working to elevate the cmo as part of their twenty twenty one global marketing trends report. They surveyed executives during the height of the pandemic and notice. Something i thought was fascinating. Confidence across the c. suite dropped significantly for. Cmo's were the least confident of them. All only three percent of cmo's surveyed considered themselves high-performers. But here's the good news. It doesn't have to be this way this crisis of confidence. It's our perception. Not how reality marketings profile was elevated across the c. suite during the pandemic and the study showed that c suite executives see marketing and sales as critical functions in navigating the current environment. The eyes of the organization are on marketing and as leaders. There's never been a better time to confidently take our place at the strategic table to drive real growth to learn more about how you can elevate your role. Read the full twenty twenty one global marketing trends report at cmo dot deloitte dot com. Im stangl and i helped. Major brands find their purpose and activated and the prophets follow. Seven years i was the global marketing officer for procter and gamble where oversaw the marketing of hundreds of brands. You may not know it. But the cmo's chief marketing officers of all of your favorite brands are trying to connect you with your favorite products and services through purpose and on this show i delve into how they do it. When this episode of the cmo podcast we are releasing recap of the twenty twenty. One can lions festival of creativity. Which for the first time in its sixty seven year history was completely virtual this recap which includes a panel. Discussion was recorded in july for the panel discussion. We have some of the most innovative marketers in the world including pedro air from ab inbev garrett. Maguire from merrill the footwear company. Hanna mctaggart from alphabet the parent company of google shannon taylor from procter and gamble and previous cmo podcast guests mandy rousey from kroger. First up let's listen to an overview of this year's weeklong festival from the head of talent and training and lions steve. Latham raise your hand if you have been to cannes lion so a decent amount well this year as you know it was virtual but it was still awesome. Went for five days. And i'm about to introduce my partner at cannes. Lions steve latham. He's the head of talent and training. He staying up very late for us in the uk. I think he's having a gin and tonic and some peanuts is what it is. It's late for cheese. He told me But i have known steve for many many years. I've been going to kansas. Two thousand three. When i first took proctor and gamble on a mission to try to elevate dr creativity. Steve is just going to give you a few words about what happened this year at at lyons it was the first time they went five days. Virtual we're going to look at a little bit of work. We're going to get a response to that work. Run look at work that won a grand prix. Never we're gonna come back to me. And i'm going to tell you what happened when we gathered some cmo's together this year To talk about what's going on in creativity and tell you what the takeaways were from that. We're going to talk to a few people who were in that session. That's the plan. It's going to be fast paced fun. I hope energetic. Suzanne started us off on the right tone. So i'm going to turn over to my good friend steve to introduce what happened can this year. Steve take it away. Jim is the best to a broadcast. I've ever experienced. I've never had wisconsin cheese but if you wanna uk sales rep. I am your man. Just me so. Jim thank you so much. Thank you gary andrea and the whole team for welcoming me hit today's Privileged to stay up and be part of this and as i just want to introduce the headlines. Ready from this is ken. Lines international best would of creativity which wasn't quite a festival yet again We could be there in person but fingers crossed ten in two thousand. Twenty two can is lie was a five day. Veterans event held in june attended by thousand registered. Elegants come under twenty one hundred twenty countries with access to sixty hours of live content across two hundred and five on demand sessions and this year. We also welcome by the juries who actually discussed resume and he total. They awarded nine hundred eighty two trophies across twenty eight lions from fifty three countries and the breakdown of that is four hundred seventy nine bronze lion two hundred ninety seven. Silver hundred fifty. Six gold awarded on forty grand prix. And of course it wouldn't be a bad can lions without seeing at least one piece of work. One of the most popular sessions the accelerated. This year was behind the witness. We would join by. The president of the social and influence jury debbie and even global with the imo and former jerry president tussle who explained why they thought the juries awarded three grown prix to beg kings stevenage challenge. This moved to access fee for fans and have a prime spot in the game itself. begging choice the sponsor. The rail stevenage soccer team knowing insurance to ship will be digitally rendered in the fee for game for to see this wasn't example of modern day. Thank you buy a brand to leverage leverage technology gaming and social tegray effect by understanding in the gaming world. You can build experiences the add to it. No interrupted game is won't brands intriguing into their world. They want epic entertainment. And if you're gonna put a foot into their world at least add value to it and in this instance. Post your goal onto twitter. I'm receive a free burger..

cmo Im stangl procter and gamble inbev garrett Hanna mctaggart shannon taylor mandy rousey loyd steve latham steve gary andrea procter Maguire kroger Latham merrill Steve proctor uk
How CMOs Can Drive Success in Turbulent Times

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

02:07 min | 1 year ago

How CMOs Can Drive Success in Turbulent Times

"All right. Everyone welcome to the show today today. I am joined by monica sullivan. Cmo demand science. Monica thanks for joining me today to be heavily. Yeah yeah we're excited. We're gonna talk about marketing marketings role in helping companies during times of transformation. You've got a lot of experience in that but before we hop into that. I just would like you to share with everyone. Your career journey What sparked your interest in marketing. What led you to be in the cmo demand. Science sounds great. Happy to do it. I think you know it's easy to say always wanted to be a marketer. But i'll be honest and say that you know in in undergrad. I didn't really know what that meant. I thought it was advertising in super bowl ads and things that were just cool and sexy big budgets and of course that's not all the reality although that's the fun part for sure but i. I certainly am thrilled. Still be on the path in marketing. And i started really my journey for ernest at digital I was there for eleven. Years was an amazing opportunity and foundational time for me and talking to my peers. We're all in agreement that that was really when we grew as marketers. We actually have a reunion coming up in the fall. Hopefully in person in the boston area so excited about that. And you know there's for sure six degrees of Six degrees of separation with my peers at dinner. Toss around this area and beyond which makes it also fun to continue to be connection. Engage with people that you've known for a long time who are growing in their careers. Many people in as cmo's at this point but you know it's it's there's been a lot the journey as well and and took me a lot of places to get to orient today. So wanna talk to you a little bit about that. Because i really learned a lot in in what it takes to be transformational and succeed in. It's not really about being able to send a memo about a new marketing campaign. It takes a lot of engagement of communication as you know.

Monica Sullivan Monica Boston
"cmo " Discussed on CMO Conversations With Tricia Gellman

CMO Conversations With Tricia Gellman

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Conversations With Tricia Gellman

"That had kind of always been more like in my opinion kind of like a sales kickoff to our customers to talk out. We get our customers. Tell our stories for us because it's combined environment so they actually can do that as it's not strong any air. In how do we give them the benefit of conversations between themselves so can learn in a retailer or a you know a financial vertical and those really wants those kind of started taking hold and people felt proud to share what they sharing in the brand had cohesion. It was easier to get the content produced and get people on board and push it out. I also had to make sure that the metrics were impactful at the board level. So how do we have. We ensure we have the right metrics for nps force for customer success so that we have indicators of anything that might be at risk. How do we ensure that in a different ideas such as how we tell our stories in. Qbr's in what we made he should your talk about its upcoming what is the product roadmap and time line. How do we ensure that that's timely. So there was a lot of visas to that but honestly the person that did the true turnaround with scott his vision. I mean it really has a vision when it comes to things. It was all of us that executed a complete alliance of customer success sales marketing operations. It hr mean. It was without the team in the leadership team that we had one. We have never been able to sell the company as fast as we did in for the valuation. We did at the close in january only to have it close cove To the first call for cove on. I took a call for three days before the company actually salt from china and then we entered. You know this whole transition. So i think we as a leadership team had come together strategically so well that we are able to pivot very quickly and and we have a new board that had different metrics and with their guidance. We've really been able to align and brace for impact cut called streamline and really pivot into a great success story right now but it was. It was all pieces working together. There really is no. There's no i in this whole component. Because it was it was a lot of stuff we just find the stories. Yeah i love that. There's now i and the story of a building success in building the company which is great but one of the things. I think that is really important. Is that you really have ab- to this line which i think during Pressure across different industries etc of being a sales driven marketer. Into why do you think that right. Now that's really critical. I've always been like. I was part of the marketing tech stack. Like i said early on until have always been metric driven. And i don't believe in vanity metrics. I just really have is focused on the bottom line. I think right now. Because of like i said. Cmo's have a tenure of about fourteen months if you don't make an impact quickly and not just an impact on the brand positioning revenue sales but the bottom line. You're going to be replaced or you're going to be out and so i really think you have to do it very very fast right now. I think the marketing.

nps scott china Cmo
"cmo " Discussed on CMO Conversations With Tricia Gellman

CMO Conversations With Tricia Gellman

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Conversations With Tricia Gellman

"Here with you and another episode of cmo conversations. This week were releasing one of my favorite episodes. It's with cat mobley. The cmo of first advantage. Kevin i only met in the past year but fun fact each other by name and we were talking each other in the past. That's because we used to compete in the same market and one of my previous roles. I've always respected her tenacity so when we had the opportunity to get her onto the show. I couldn't wait to sit down and talk shop. Cat is a definition of powerhouse marketer. She played a key role in transforming first advantage the brand and their go to market strategy. Which hoped triple the company's valuation prior to its sale january twenty twenty. Not only that. But i'm releasing the episode today in part as a big congratulations to her and her team. There also adrift customer. Because in june they went public and they had a very successful initial offering cashiers. So many incredible lessons with me in this episode about building or rebuilding marketing team from the ground up forming a tight relationship with our sierra and what it takes to really think about the business value that marketing is driving for the company the results. she's proven by partnering around revenue are outstanding. And i think we all learned something from this episode. Thanks for tuning in wrong. Before.

mobley Kevin
Sports Marketing Podcasts Opportunities With Learfield IMG College CMO Jennifer Davis

MarTech Podcast

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Sports Marketing Podcasts Opportunities With Learfield IMG College CMO Jennifer Davis

"Do you find that in sports media. I know in radio. There's individual shows that are around one sports or at least a local market. You get a local sports channel. They're gonna talk about the bears and the giants and the cardinals. and the forty niners. And maybe the raiders. Even though they're in vegas they kind of bounce around from individual topic but with podcasting feeds you can be more verticalised. You can just have one specific show. I've seen this on the professional level where there is a warrior show sponsored by the athletic core nbc. But i haven't seen it in the collegiate level where there is the cal bears basketball show by anybody other than the cal athletic program. Maybe it's just because cal. Flex aren't as popular as texas in alabama and florida and some of the other major programs. But are you seeing sort of vertical is shows that are individual sports or school specific. I think there's a huge opportunity there and actually more nuance than what you think. Because college sports people tend to be fans of whatever that our team is playing. Even if they don't know the rules of the game like would we started doing e. sports at the college level. I saw some great tweets from college. Sports fans die hard like tennessee football fans. They're like my team is doing well and east sports. I don't know what that is. But i'm a tennessee band so go volunteers and i think there is as you said kind of across sport affinity but then there are some programs and often it could be the revenue generating sports football basketball but it also could be some of the olympic sports where the fans a lot has been written recently about the fans being very fluid in that. They don't get a lot of game day or meet day content because of the nature of the sport there van said they are used to looking for nontraditional content to keep up with what's happening in gymnastics or field hockey or swimming or rowing. So i think there's opportunity to do exactly what you are talking about in especially because of that community element. I think we talked about that. A couple of episodes ago is that. There's nothing like that college community. College community can be rallied around a specific type. And i think you're onto

Niners Cardinals Raiders Basketball Giants Bears NBC Tennessee CAL Vegas Alabama Football Texas Florida Olympic Gymnastics VAN Rowing Hockey
"cmo " Discussed on CMO Conversations With Tricia Gellman

CMO Conversations With Tricia Gellman

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"cmo " Discussed on CMO Conversations With Tricia Gellman

"Welcome everybody thank you for coming back to another episode of cmo conversations. Today i have with me dylan. Steel who i met at salesforce years ago. But is now the cmo at coalition dylan. Maybe you can introduce yourself and give a little background on how we met each other and how we've stayed in touch over the years. Yeah absolutely thank you so much for having me on. The podcast really excited to join you. I think i've just begun. I moved in my first month of cmo coalition. So this'll be an intro. For folks on how to deal with their first month. But you and i met at our time at salesforce together where i worked in product marketing for six seven years in a variety of roles focused on the salesforce platform tools for it and developers security. And the like you're demand general but together. We got to do a lot of great work. Some fun traveling good socializing and you really been a nice part of kind of i mentor and board of directors. I think about my marketing career or have a crazy burning question that i don't know how to answer or sometimes just need a sounding board someone to bug so really appreciated that we've been able to keep up the relationship over the years. Yeah i think it's great and One day maybe we'll work together again. That's always One of the reasons. I poke you but i haven't won you over into my new team so i don't know one day but hopefully it'll be a very successful samho career as well and this is just the beginning. So i'm excited to see how that continues to grow for you as well in the podcast. We spend a lot of time talking about the future of marketing. The relationship of marketing and sales. You mentioned your personal board of directors and that we had an episode where we spoke about that with them a different simao so several topics that we've talked on here there in other ways but today i think what we want to talk about is like a little bit of your journey right like we've talked and i've had multiple product marketers i think product marketers are emerging as one of the really good hotbeds for cmo's because they touch across so much of the business. But i think it's newer because twenty years ago. People didn't even know why they needed a part of marketer. So maybe you can talk about like okay. You're product marketer. But then actually you left salesforce. He went to spunk in. You didn't do project marketing. Yeah that's exactly right. So i i loved my time as a product marketer and being at salesforce it certainly was an opportunity to sit at the intersection of so many different parts of the business..

salesforce dylan
Grow Your Brand with Nicole Rodrigues

Accelerate Your Business Growth

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Grow Your Brand with Nicole Rodrigues

"Guest. today is nicole. Rodriguez nicole is a powerhouse. Founder of two companies and our peer group and the young dream foundation as well as the author of beverly hills. Boss she has more than nineteen years of experience in pr. Social media and digital marketing. She's the creator and personality behind practical. Guide the publicity and practical the pr. Both of those letters are capitalized. An award-winning video series. Aimed at helping ceo's cmo's and others understand the true benefits of utilizing pr and digital marketing. Thanks so much for joining me today to call. Thanks so much for having me. I'm happy to be here. I'm thrilled to have you here. We're gonna be talking about brand opportu taking advantage of opportunities and so. I'm curious about what you think. Are i'll say productive ways for a business to draw attention to itself if it's new that's such a great question. So so here's here's my take on it right And it simply just based on on tons of experience and what i've seen but when a company is brand spanking new what used to happen back in the days. If yet a new business you had you opened up your store. There was no computer. There was no you know maybe put some flyers up and but you opened up your store and people would know. This person is open for business It was that physical location and as things trend more more more more digital even more so now at the pandemic the news digital storefront is usually a website or somewhere digitally that people can go and learn about your business or just your products or whatever

Rodriguez Nicole Young Dream Foundation Beverly Hills Nicole
Interview with Dara Treseder, Peleton's Head of Global Marketing and Communications

Skimm'd from The Couch

03:29 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Dara Treseder, Peleton's Head of Global Marketing and Communications

"To our women's history month series on skimmed from the couch. Where we're telling you about the women who made history this past year this week. Our guest is dr troy cedar. She's svp had a global marketing and communications for peleton the world's largest interactive fitness platform. That's led the charge. Apple fitness during the pandemic and dr herself is one of the most esteemed marketing professionals in the country. Before arriving at peleton last year dr was the cmo of carbon a three d. printing company and before that was the cmo of ge ventures darn. Thank you for joining us. Welcome to skin from the thank you so much for happy. Abby excited to dig in you have a great and lengthy resume. And so i am curious of all the jobs that you've had or activities you've been a part of which one stands out that means the most to you while obviously my palatine experience. You know it's interesting. You learn so much in your career right. You grow so much. I remember sitting in. The audience wants listening to meg whitman. And she talked about what it was like to be a veteran ceo. I remember kind of being like That's an interesting an interesting phrase. I had never heard someone use that before. And because i've had the opportunity to be a cmo twice in my career before this role. I felt really prepared. I kind of really understood what peleton needed. And i feel really equipped to be able to bring that to my team and to really create the environment that allows the amazing humans. I get to work with to thrive and succeed because you get better with time. It's almost like practice. makes permanent. Practice makes perfect practice. Makes better. And i feel like i've had experience practicing and so it feels really wonderful to be able to bring all the amazing things i learned at the amazing places. I worked to peleton at this moment. In time you are born and raised in nigeria and went to school both in the uk and later in the us. I'm really curious about your background and having the exposure in perspective from multiple places how that led you to marketing are inherently makes you a good marketer you know. I think that it's really important to live in different places and get exposure to different cultures. 'cause it's very interesting. How things change at how things can be very different as you move between different societies different cultures different nations and. I think that i am able to bring a certain richness and fullness to my marketing experience. Because i've had many experiences where i has been you know other and i have had to see how do people relate to me. How do people talk to me in a way that really resonates that feels authentic that draws me in and so having that in my own personal life i've been creates a wonderful texture right wonderful context for how i'm able to kind of step into the shoes of others step into the shoes of other segments of our customer step into the shoes of customers with behaviors. That are different than mine. Because i've had the experience of having basically navigating different worlds in my own personal experience. So i think it's i think it's a richness and i think it definitely has prepared me. I think to be a better marketer.

Dr Troy Cedar Ge Ventures Meg Whitman Abby Apple Nigeria UK United States
Team Selling with Lisa Palmer

Sales Success Stories

05:03 min | 1 year ago

Team Selling with Lisa Palmer

"I'm lisa palmer and i'm super excited to be here at the sales success summit twenty twenty today. We're going to talk about team selling visual dr boarding and how you can combine these two to win in the enterprise sales so for those of you who may not know me from before. I have an interesting background in that. I've said on both sides of the chair from buying and selling perspective. I spent the first part of my career as an it practitioner up to and including a chief innovation officer role which included both a cio and cmo function. So i spent a lot of time in the buyers chair. I've also had the privilege of sitting on the enterprise selling side of that table for many years now and i want to share with you today. Some of the things that i feel like are critical to helping win in a complex b. two b. enterprise selling situation so today we're gonna talk about five key points. We're going to start with what the success look like defining. This upfront is absolutely critical next. We're gonna talk about. How do you backstop your deals to make sure that the timing doesn't slip then we're going to talk about the key to avoiding competition in your with your customers with your accounts that we're going to move into a process. We can actually operationalize what we're doing by co creating the solution approach with our clients and then finally. I'm going to give you some visual dart boarding examples. These are really important to get your to get your juices flowing around what the possibilities are for you to be able to apply the technique with your customers. The number one thing. I always tell people. Is that selling about helping our customers to be successful in if you care about helping your customers to be successful than you will really dig in witham and co create solutions. So let's talk a little bit more about how we get to. That co created solution. So let's start with defining success so anyone who's ever heard me speak before knows that i am a huge proponent of doing your homework so before you ever engage with clients. You need to have done a robust background. You need to have researched your client as an individual person as a buyer. You need to have researched the their particular enterprise the industry that they're working in and you need to understand macro economic climate challenges that they are facing so make sure as that very first. Step that you define what success looks like from your customers lands always always from the customers. Lund's next we want to talk about. How do we backstop are deals. And what do i mean by that. The number one competitor for each of us from selling perspective is do nothing as we all know. Many of our clients will ultimately decide. The risk is too high. The timing's not right. Whatever the case may be they actually choose to do nothing so we want to make sure that we are clearly identifying in partnership with our clients. What a back. stop. Timeline is what i mean by. That is focus on the business outcome that they are trying to drive so when we talked earlier about defining success from the customers lens than we want to dig into that further and we want to understand not only what success looks like but what is their time. Line the timeline. For the business outcome that they're trying to create and once you understand what that business outcome need is what are they trying to do with their business. And what is the time line that is associated with that that by identifying these things then you have a very clear time line so that when your customer is tended to not move forward to not push down the process you can remind them of how your joint solution is going to help them to meet their desired business outcome timeline so without backstopping against that time line you're going to put your deal at risk and more importantly you're going to endanger the customer's ability to make the impact that they need to make for their business so again. If you approach everything from the lands of helping the client to be successful this backstop piece is very obvious and helps everyone to understand why it's critical that you keep moving forward

Lisa Palmer Lund
Billy Gene on Increasing Your Traffic

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Billy Gene on Increasing Your Traffic

"Jean maman. My i've got some stories i could tell about. You might come organically during our talk today. We'll see they're all good stories. Obviously they're all fun stories. But i wanna start because i love your story. I never get tired of hearing about it. But how you you. At one point. Fifty km debt. We're supposed to be honest. It's not super abnormal. I mean we have this. Massive college data. We get into credit card debt. We do stupid things all over the place but you went for fifty k. In debt running this wildly successful agency in downtown san diego. I've been to your office multiple times. I mean baller talked to us about how you made that transition on his the virus. Summarize it for everybody is number one just on the the mindset of asking for help period like no no one figured that out by themselves and so many times people think that's the case but tactically speaking because i'm tactics guy audience listening. They want the juice. It's got really good at its spending a dollar and tony into three period. I mean at the end of the day. Mike quote unquote secret weapon. It's just advertising. And you know who i got up from the most profitable companies in the world when you look at the balance sheet of All the fortune one thousand companies. The apple is the facebook the insurance companies the walmarts etc. What people don't realize that you see is not just the billions of dollars in sales. They spend billions of dollars in advertising. But when you go to small businesses the first thing you say is how customers. What did he say referrals. Every time. and it's just like the the most successful companies in the world legally have to tell you exactly how they're doing but we don't do it for a long time. it was. Low stuff was expensive right. Tv radio billboards. It just didn't make sense for a small business. But i mean honestly facebook youtube. It cost one to ten cents. You know to show somebody in advertisement one to ten cents e- you can show for five to fifteen bucks a thousand people your message. That was my big secret. So if i had something to so i would just literally make video ad with myself on an ask people to buy it and that's it i would just make more than spend so if i if i sold something. That was a thousand bucks. I'd probably spend two hundred bucks in advertising. And i just repeat the process over and over again so wildly. Simple like what we do. It's crazy but the difference is is. I was able to overcome the fear of losing money on ads. That's what stops people. they go. Well what if. I spend one hundred bucks on fire and it doesn't get a return then you try again. It doesn't make it not the path anymore. It just means you miss you get back up and you try it again until you find something that works and you keep repeating it now. You've had a lot of things that have worked over the years. You've had some things that happens but when you talk about that arbitrage of turning one dollar to three dollars you've obviously had a lot of those and there's a lot of examples you could give but you know. I just want one of your favorites like you know. This is almost too easy now. Of course all good things come to an end all arbitrage get tighter and close up over time of course but what was just one year like. This is almost too good to be true. I'm going to max out as long as i can. I mean there's been a fun one for everybody listened to because they probably won't think it's possible as take billboards for example. So i purchased billboards and a lot of people go why billboard like people don't spend money off of that and this is where people really have to get obsessed with it's about being created so quick story in san diego california. I bought four billboards. That cost me thirty. Six thousand bucks. And i ran a ma and that was for three and a half weeks. Just let that sink in thirty six grand for three weeks from frigging billboards that people drive by and so then people go like. How do you make money from him. Well what i did is. I made a call to action on it to go to a website and it was an automatic webinar. The same way that i would do facebook or instagram or youtube anyway and i was just like i wonder if anybody will obtain i wonder if anybody watch and they did and it made like ten thousand dollars back because what i was selling a thousand bucks so immediately people say okay. You lost money billy. Lost twenty. six thousand bucks maintains man. That's stupid. well. What i did is people for some reason. Give a lot of authority in position to billboards because they know they're expensive. And the companies that are doing. Billboards are the biggest companies in the world. Automatically think your official. I mean i still think of pete knows that guy will always be the real estate guy in san diego one hundred and so take that right. So what i did is i said okay. Well we're going to take. We rented a helicopter and we flew around. We went to helicopters and we flew around me and my cmo at the time and a helicopter. And my buddy paul filming from the other helicopter and we flew over all the billboards and we flew over all the billboards and we turn that into a facebook ad and then from that advertisement we brought in probably like a million bucks like throughout throughout using it over arbitrage being the. Yeah so it's just like how can you use. It wasn't just three weeks like you're able to use that footage forever the pictures of you in front of the billboard forever even today literally putting it up ironically today using that same clip of the helicopter and so people you got to start looking at your content as an asset the same way you do real estate people go. It's a real estate investment. And i can make money off of that again and again again. Same with your video. What's the difference. I'll tell you what the difference is videos. Cheaper video was easier to make. And you don't need to go through escrow so everybody if you're not using videos as is cash asset you're

Jean Maman Facebook San Diego Baller Youtube Tony Mike Apple Instagram California Billy Pete Paul
Why CMOs Get Fired: Results Do Not Equal No Results Plus An Excuse

Lochhead on Marketing

08:31 min | 1 year ago

Why CMOs Get Fired: Results Do Not Equal No Results Plus An Excuse

"Do not equal no results plus an excuse one of things. I love about sales by way of example is sales is pretty binary. Yeah they're make your number you miss your number or exceed your number and in sales if you miss your number couple of quarters in a row two quarters out of four you just gotta start being worried about your job and if you're a ceo. Certainly ceos of public companies. Don't get to miss very many quarters. And even if you're a private company you don't wanna be missing your numbers and so at the end of the quarter. The ceo has to stand up and tell the world and investors. How the company did that quarter and the interesting thing. If you're a public company is wall street doesn't give a shit why you missed the numbers. So if you're not he hitting or beating your numbers every quarter. They don't care. It's like the like a kid that sticks us their fingers in the net. We're not listening. They're just gonna tank your stock and if you're going you're going into the penalty box for a two minute minor and if it was a really big miss it'll be a five minute major. Those are hockey terms. If you're not familiar with hockey and so as a ceo you live and die by the numbers every quarter and as a head of sales chief revenue officer vp assails Whatever whatever whatever title is head of sales That's true too and the reality is that should be true in marketing as well so results do not equal no results plus excuse and i knew that i was getting somewhere in my life in terms of training myself to produce results when i didn't even give a shit about my own excuses so when you can't stand your own excuses for For not producing results. You're probably getting somewhere okay. So now this sort of leads us to the question. Okay so what. What are the marketing results that matter because there's lots of things that marketing do you could say. Oh we build a new website that that that's a result it might matter. It might not matter but it's definitely a result so let's talk about the results that matter i think at the highest level. There's only three things that marketing organizations should be focused on number one design and dominate category. That matters number to drive revenue near term mid and longterm and number three create enduring value as measured by market cap or company valuation. We wanna be creating the most valuable company in a category. That matters okay. So let's just hit those three things again number. One design dominated a category. That matters number to drive. Revenue and number three create enduring value as measured by company value market cap valuation and ultimately our objective is to become the most valuable company in the category. That's how you know you're the category queen now. If you focused on just those three results it can be very clarifying on a number of dimensions. And i'll get to that in a sec. Let's talk about why those three things matter so much number one design dominate category. That matters i think that is the seminal be hag the seminal focus of the entire executive team and frankly company itself and if your company's not focused on that i don't know what you're doing number to drive revenue you know there's a lot of cmo's who get all wrapped around the axle about leads or sales off the website or this or that or the other look creating leads driving revenue in the business. These are not hard things you got to go. Do them the work that the doing of the work is real work. But it's not rocket surgery So if you need to drive revenue you probably need traffic to your website. So go to the traffic store and buy some and get really good at converting traffic into customers. And there's a million marketing podcasts and books and and all sorts of tools and tricks and tips we can do to drive revenue but the bottom line is as marketers. We have to be illu air. Wars and ground wars the high level strategic steph and the ground level revenue tactical stuff in the truth. Is you gotta do both. It's not an either or it's a both and legendary. Cmo's particularly when you start your new job. go to the driving revenue. I if you want to score points internally drive some revenue sit down with your head of sales. You're ceo and say what do we need to do to create massive revenue upside problems in this company and get busy on that if you get overly focused on the strategic particularly early on in your tenures cmo. You're probably in for deep shit so design and dominate a category that matters that's the medical driving revenue if there's no revenue the medical won't matter. We need to put food on the family. As george w bush said so put food on the family legendary. Cmo's drive revenue and then enduring value. This is also the objective of the entire executive team but marketing needs to be focused on it. We want to be the most valuable company over a long period of time in a category that matters and We're the category queen of that Category all right so these things are very clarifying because you can look at any execution any activity any investment Any new hire that you're doing in marketing and ask yourself the question. Does this one design and dominated new category that matters to drive revenue and three create enduring value. And if it doesn't don't do it stop doing it. Just don't fuck do it. now. I've sat in the cmo chair. I know there's a lot of things that are distracting. I think the cmo gets pushed and pulled in ways that some other c. level executives do not and so there's a couple things i'll you to number one. Marketing is not an internal service bureau. This idea that marketing has internal customers. I'll marketings here. Just depart the business You know sales our customer. That's insanity marketing is the business. It doesn't support the business now. Yes marketing does need to work with sales. Es marketing does need to work with engineering and product development and product management and so forth of course and in that context every department needs to work with every other department but if we are at the beck and call of these other departments and they ring the bell and we salivate then. We're going to be in a constant state of stimulus response so be very very careful about allowing yourself to get turned into an internal service bureau. That's one Another one is a lot of marketers. Cmo's even ceo's get very focused on the competition. Let's say the competition announces some cool new thing they do so they re a bunch of money or they launch a new product or whatever it is people get very focused on the competition. They start talking about the competition. You don't want that shit in your head the more you talk about the competition internally or god forbid sternly the worse off. You're going to be now. I'm not saying you should be ignorant about what they're doing. I'm not saying that at all but you don't want them living in your head rent free. You want to live in their head rent free. So don't be overly focused. Be smart. Be savvy be knowledgeable but not overly focused on competition another area. We get distracted. A lot in marketing is typically The cmo and the leaders of the marketing organization get a lot of help. Because everybody's marketing expert. Everybody saw an ad The super bowl. They thought was awesome. And they wanna tell us about it or they see something that someone else is doing in the text or email that thing and they say oh. We should do that. We should do this and we should do that. And so marketing. I think gets a lot more help the. Cfo doesn't get that much saying help. In air quotes right the. Cfo does not get that much help about like how to close the quarter. All right she's in charge. She does it and You know the head of engineering isn't emailing the cfo. Saying this is how she she should closed. Quarters books whereas as the head of marketing we get those emails a lot and so don't forget everybody thinks they're an expert and they're

Hockey CMO SEC George W Bush Super Bowl
2021 Super Bowl Ad Review

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

07:48 min | 1 year ago

2021 Super Bowl Ad Review

"Like there's two ads. I've really want to get everyone starts on I think they're the most polarizing we'll certainly talk about our picks for the best. Although i will say this year it was not exactly like a plus plus it was like you know pretty good lead like the the best ones were all pretty good And none of them were were tremendous home runs But that's the two that were kind of late editions. we already talked about only in passing But then also the two minute. Gps dot with bruce springsteen. Let's start with that nicole. I think we all know what what they were. Attempting you know like cheap wanted this rousing halftime in america type ram farmer. Type spot fill. It really fell flat. I actually kinda surprised that they released that one early because it was a two minute long spot. I thought at least it would be a two minute surprise So that was a little shocking to me. But yeah then when i saw it i was like oh man two minutes okay. Let's get cozy. Let's see what this is going to be like. Am i going to be laughing like last year. Because last year was such a pleasant like fun. Add to watch and this one. I just kinda felt like. Oh they're going like the safe route they're going like the middle of the road route. They're going to do the call for unity and also like to me. I as a consumer from the consumer perspective. I didn't love that. Because i feel like if i want to see a brand lean into its purpose i wanna see them. Take a side not do the middle of the road thing. I know that that's where a lot of Like i guess politics wise lot of people doing calls for unity but it still felt like a little too early for the brands to start doing the calls for unity. Like i'm still waiting for purpose from brands rather than middle of the road right now. I guess my question would be in. Jameson a. You and i talked about this many times. But i can't think of a brand that has ever succeeded by being like can't we all. Can we just come together. They learn anything from gap putting up that tweet that it was like a hoodie that had like read into on it and it's like a collie unity shoot rented after election day. Jeep is like we're going to spend twenty million dollars gap bruce springsteen in here and do the same exact thing in front of a hundred million and hope it works. I mean it was a touching message that i felt ill timed and i saw one tweet from at its kenya summit. A perfectly like what they displayed in that ad fundamentally goes against lead. Diversity inclusion is in america right now. And i think right just did didn't didn't showcase what america is today showcase a unity of one america used today. And you know what. I would have actually appreciated if they just re-run last year's groundhog day ad and donated that money to a cause that actually supports you know unifying missions I think that would have been funny and understandable and Yeah that that really fell flat a lot of the ads this year. Celebrities team to kind of try to force things like the cuts. The storylines is just we. I felt like the in this kind of i guess my last real thought on jeep is just the it's the kind of add that cmo's and and if i'm just being honest here because it's late i'm tired League basically wealthy white folks and and and just affluent people in general kind of ivory tower folks are gonna be like what a brave message like wouldn't important message. I'm so glad they used their storytelling to do this. You know what i mean. And and that's but to everyone else on the ground like who who has survived this past four years and knows how much farther we still have to go. It's just like oh there's a small church in kansas. That's that leaves their doors open. Okay cool then. Never mind like we're all good and you know it's just anyway. That's that's my. But i i also wanna make sure we say plenty of time talking about oatley because who wants to start us off one. No we haven't gotten to talk realism curious. I loved story. edited the story By katie lindstrom and No they wanted to go with something else in there. Trying to come up with With all these eight years and ended up like the ceo was kind of forced into the spot because he was like well. I guess i have a better idea. And he brought back an idea that he had and it was just him trying to come up with a jingle and From i saw you know it. It definitely caused a stir In terms of using a simple melody and a simple backdrop and like a shaky table with you know that lovely oatmeal gone. They're really worried about that class. Like nobody take this down from production. Okay we're going to go with it. But i thought it was so so on brand you know it. It was not expected and A little endearing. And you know i am. I am a consumer of that brand. And you know they. They also laid that message with you. Know the mission of. Let's also be sustainable and talk about. Let's let's take a quick pause to listen to the song for anyone who might have missed it in all of its glory It reminds me of like kind of like nineties weirdo alternative Kind of punk music. I don't know there's this weird vein of like intentionally bad dead dead milkman. style was. let's give it a listen made for you. Who moves like male but made for you. Well no no no no bill nicole. What did you think of the okay. So here's the thing. I actually when i was first watching it. I thought to myself like oh. That's actually kind of cute. I don't hate this. And then everyone i was in the room with just got quiet and they all just started like laughing at the same time. They're like oh. This is terrible terrible. We hate this. We all hate this. So i actually think that i'm one of the few. Maybe i'm i'm the right consumer here or something. I like the brand also personally but yeah. I didn't hate it right away. I get the cornyn est. And i get that like i don't know maybe maybe now that i've listened to not while i'm also editing and distracted by other things i get it but i listen. I was kind of like oh cute. Okay i have to say. Maybe one of my favorite advertising tweets of all time. And i won't name him because he's a great dude and Good on him for his transparency but so someone tweeted that oatley dropped the ball and then a few minutes later shared his own. Tweeden's i've been informed that my agency created the and and so it's actually fantastic

Bruce Springsteen America Oatley Nicole Katie Lindstrom Jameson Kenya Bill Nicole Kansas Tweeden
One of the Dumbest Social Media Marketing Lies Ever

Lochhead on Marketing

10:02 min | 1 year ago

One of the Dumbest Social Media Marketing Lies Ever

"Talk about one of the dumbest social media. Marketing lies out there that you have to be everywhere on every platform and you need to put out one hundred pieces of content today This is bad advice. It will exhaust you and your marketing team. It will more than likely make you feel terrible. It'll absolutely piss off your prospects and customers and it will in no way help you become a category queen or king but other than that. It's great social media marketing advice. Let's pop the hood on this whole thing. My friends at oracle net sweet. I the leaders in cloud. Erp they are the platform for your business in the cloud. Checkout net sweet dot com slash different. Today that's net sweet dot com slash different and you can get free product tour of the platform that you are going to want and need for running your business into the future. My friends at spunk are the leaders in data to everything. They helped bring data to every question every decision and every action checkout. Sp l. u. n. k. dot com slash di the number two and the letter e spunk dot com slash d to e and category pirates. The newsletter has set sail. Go lockhead dot com. You can't miss it there and You can set up your subscription to category pirates. Now heyhoe let's go. This is long head on marketing. The podcast that helps you develop a lens for what makes legendary marketing legendary hosted by christopher lockhead three times. Cmo godfather category design and a high school dropout. The marketing journal calls one of the best minds in marketing and the economist calls off putting to some all right. So this thing that you hear all the time be everywhere on every platform there's new platforms coming up all the time we gotta get our strategy for this or strategy for that we got us putting out content content content content. You gotta be everywhere on every platform and you gotta do it a hundred to two hundred times a day all right. So there's a ninety nine percent chance that you're doing too much most of us do we get we're marketing people. We chase shiny objects. We come up with cool ideas. We wanna try shit experiment etc etc on episode ninety. We talked about the power of shaving. The dog shave that doggy down. Remember the sage. Words of bruce lee who said i fear not the man who was practiced ten thousand kicks once but i fear the man who has practiced one kick ten thousand times in one of the reasons that many of us feel like. We're constantly behind on our social media. Marketing is dumb. Fuck advice we've heard about being on every platform and puking out all this content so let me share with you counter perspective. There's a legendary copywriter named ben. Settle s. e. T. t. l. e. There'll be a link to his website and the show notes or you can just google him if you like. He sells writing services. He's copywriter. he's got some books in some courses and some newsletters and things along those lines and he's got a very well known as well known cult. Figure a niche in the Copywriting world and if you check out his site you'll see why an ben settled does not have any social media. He's got a post out about why he cut it all out and essentially he thought it was a waste of time and so he cut it all out and i don't know ben personally but it doesn't seem to have affected his business and his profile is probably bigger now than it was a couple years ago when he cut all of his social media ties and he essentially said he thought it was a waste of time so he didn't wanna do it anymore. I don't know about you but to me. There's something very appealing about this approach. Part of me wants to go full bend. Settle in. But i have it so if this is too extreme for you or your company or your brand i get it. It's too extreme for me to probably But ben is onto something. It took me a while to realize that i should not be on all social media platforms and over time i've discovered which platforms Work and which ones don't for me so for example platforms that are tuned to sound bites and silliness. Not so much for me. I suck on twitter totally suck same thing on instagram. Yeah i like to post photos of the the hands or our cat being some pretty shit at the beach or whatever but like when i tried to do marketing podcasts and books and stuff on social media on instagram. I failed completely. I'm still not sure. I understand what a real is. And what a what a fucking this is into that is so the bottom line is on twitter and instagram. I cut it out. I still have accounts on both platforms. But i stopped trying to get anything done in terms of promoting podcasts or books or any of the stuff that i do. I have the accounts. I put photos of being upper. Whatever i do tweet. Some business stuff on twitter but my expectation is zero on both instagram and twitter there just for fun and Have never been on tiktok. I find it stupid fucking stupid. So i'm not interested. Hey if you like it by all means have at it. But you're not gonna see me on tiktok anytime soon. I gave pinterest discovered. Not for me If you a regular listener talked about clubhouse recently as i said a couple of episodes ago clubhouse it's interesting. It's great but the reality is hosting a webinar hosting platform with no video. So i've tried it a little bit. I wasn't that motivated or excited by it. Maybe try a little bit more. We'll see who don't know on that one Cora and facebook are like bees for me. there okay Better than facebook or corre as you probably know is a question and answer site and so i like both reading them and responding to them. I think that's very very cool. And when you respond to somebody's question It's a more powerful thing to just sort of posting something generically out there and hoping it catches. Somebody's i Facebook is all right for us. We've a small. Facebook group not really focused on it Check it out on a fairly regular basis and engage with people But a mistake that a lot of marketers make is they promote their facebook group We don't do that member. They're facebook's customers not yours when people go to your facebook page or your facebook group. Facebook controls what they see what they don't seem so the only thing we asked people to join is Is to go to a lock dot com and join our newsletter now our newsletter category pirates because with a newsletter. We have somebody's email. There's no tech giant in between the two parties. So when i joined a newsletter it's me and the newsletter provider when you join our newsletter same thing and when we send you something you'll get it and if you don't like it you can opt out but i don't like promoting a platform facebook because they control whether or not people see our post how they participate in our group and i think that's bullshit that's just me so with a newsletter there's no tech giant inbetween creator and consumer Now from social platform perspective. What has worked for me by a mile. The best is lincoln. And it's tune to my skills and what i'm looking for in social media first of all i like to write. So linked in is more of a longer form writing platform. Brevity is not my thing so tweets have never been what i'm good at and so Linked in is more optimized for long form written content. I also like real thoughtful dialog believe it or not that happens for me on a very regular basis on linked in a way that it's impossible on something like twitter and as a side note. I will not deal with anybody online. Who's got a fake name or you know his anonymous or any of that. I like dealing with real people. And on linked in most of the profiles there are real people. Most of them are professionals. Not morons and so you can have a thoughtful conversation with people on on lincoln and i deeply enjoy that now. We also have a youtube channel. By way of example it's mostly useless for us. Became clear to me early on that to be successful on youtube. You couldn't just drop of video of two people talking for an hour on the video on youtube and hoped to be successful that you need to create purpose built content for youtube. So we don't really do much. They're either however we did tripled down on audio podcasting and we tripled down on the newsletter for the reasons. I already talked about so what what tends to work for me is longer form content Podcasting and writing. So what is what's my point. What what does all this have to do with you I think when you think about your social media marketing whether you're doing it for yourself as an individual or for your category company and brand on a as an individual pick one platform that really works for you and tripled down on that platform. I'll tell you when. I when i just stop fucking around on all the other platforms and religious focused on linked in my life. Just got a lot simpler and much more effective. Frankly now if you're thinking about social media marketing for your category your brand and your company maybe instead of picking one pick three but just three be legendary. Those three maybe have a presence on others. I get that but only pick three for your company. Brandon category be legendary at those three create purpose built content for those platforms. Really figure it out and make it

Facebook BEN Christopher Lockhead The Marketing Journal Twitter Instagram Corre Bruce Lee Oracle Pinterest Cora Google Youtube Lincoln Brandon
Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale

"Let's talk about the professional path and You are now the vp gm of the hispanic business unit for pepsico. What was your path to get there. Yeah i am studied engineering for college. So i was math and science person in high school and my physics teacher mr adrian nouvelle who actually was so important to my life that he came to my wedding by way and kind of steered me into the space helped me with College application letters recommendation. And so i studied engineering before. You're so i've been in a manufacturing environment for awhile. Bump steel toed shoes uniform union arment. And that's really where i started my career At the same time my company was so gracious that They paid for my mba. So i went to Uconn in stamford connecticut to take classes at night and really got more exposed to concepts of business management marketing research and just really loved it and so then when i asked for a new gig they said finance or sales and unlike okay sales and sales and all i need to go into marketing because marketing guides what we're doing in sales and i think they could do a better job and so i was lucky that my General manager at the time created a job and that was that was the beginning of my marketing career. So very classically trained at unilever and then pepsi around marketing from like you know the analysts all the way through up till now you know a vp gm. Which i'm really proud and excited about and And yeah i feel like i'm in a really great role. Right can make a big impact on the careers of our of our folks drive to mercy inclusion and drive the business results faster than general market because the population is growing so quick so and There's just so many things that are benefiting from being in this role that That i'm really grateful about. But that's kind of the the journey really. It was not linear at all Did not start off wanting to and marketing that side of my brain and that analytical process orientation i think does just a market yeah i think increasing edge to a home maybe ten years ago when you made the original switch i think today it's much more analytically rigorous than it has been in the past But yeah no. That's that's phenomenal. And i've had a few folks on the show. That have transitioned from engineer to sales marketing. And it's it's funny the way you went through that transition in how you described it because a few of them have described it similarly meaning they. They went from engineering the sales and then they realized my words not yours. How bad marketing screws it up. And they need to go help marketing. Try to figure that out because it it comes down to the sales folks at some level whether their marketing is getting it right or not so. It's an interesting learning curve and A pathway that. I've heard before. So what would what drove what drove the creation of the hispanic business unit. And how are you guys thinking about like measuring success. That's a that's a big scene seemingly to me as an outsider like it seems like a big big thing like a big shift in how you're organized. Yeah this was created. I believe in twenty eighteen by out. Carrie who at the time was still pepsi. Co when of are really incredible leaders kirk. Tanner who's our ceo and My current boss. Greg lyons our cmo and they just really realize that you know the hispanic Business is untapped potential and if we have a fixed mindset about it and we're not going to capture that growth and So what's the do different because in the past. Yeah we had a multicultural team. That definitely had A role but didn't necessarily have ownership and so the do different had to be to create an organization that was dedicated to this and have the right resources. And that's what they did and And it's been pretty successful. Ever since the the key measures to the other question you had really is around. Hey can we help grow faster with hispanic consumer than the general market. Can we help build equity with this fan of consumer and And those are some key metrics we look at and so far. We've we've been We've been pretty pretty successful doing that.

Mr Adrian Nouvelle Arment GM Pepsico Uconn Pepsi Stamford Unilever Connecticut Greg Lyons Carrie Tanner Kirk
How To Manage Digital Reputations With Josh Greene

Lochhead on Marketing

05:00 min | 1 year ago

How To Manage Digital Reputations With Josh Greene

"Josh. It's great to see you. It's great to be on. Thanks for having me. I'm really excited. I your fascinating guy so Here's sort of an idea. I think we live at a time. Where when most of us get introduced to somebody new one of the very first things we do after somebody says. Hey i want to introduce you to josh green. I'm gonna go you. And i think that's pretty pretty normal and in a world where i saw post from a dear friend of mine duska zapata. Who's rough and tough six months into a new job and she. Her post was all about the fact that she's never met the people that she works with in person. And so we're living in this digital first world right and so. I think it's a natural thing when we meet somebody. I think a lot of google them so this leads me to a question which is but yet. Most of us don't know how to take responsibility for what happens. Somebody types josh green into that little box. And so maybe let's use that as a jumping off point in terms of. How do i manage. What happens after somebody starts searching for me absolutely and really the first thing that you want to do is take a look at the overall results when someone Searches on your name and take stock of how many of those results are items that you control or about you and then start thinking about whether you would like to have more mentions of yourself on that page or the ones that are already there. Are they conveying what you would like them to convey To the world when the world looks at you so If they if they google you are you the world's best stockbroker or you a stockbroker who's been barred three times from the industry very different results. Very different impact could be the same person But but what shows up in google especially on that first page is really going to influence a large chunk of the world of their first impression of you. Yeah it's interesting. My buddy isaac morehouse. Who's the founder of crash. One of the things he says is i love be your own credential and of course part of that is what do people see about you. Digitally when they start digging around and so You know when you and i met. I didn't know much about how i myself or for that matter. If i'm a. Ceo or cmo or an entrepreneur. What have you My company you can actually take control over a fair amount of what happens after somebody types in your name can't you you can you can And i think you're a great example of of someone who's done a nice job of that whether intentionally or not it wasn't so tell tell me because when you and i first met. You told me that you said that. Hey the shit that comes up is good and anyway tell me about what you saw and what was good and what was not good. And how that applies more broadly to other people in other companies. Well when i took a look at your name there was a nothing negative really on the front page at all. You had your twitter feed was showing up in the top three or four results which is usually a subconscious. Cue that someone's something of an authority in their area or google algorithm thinks that over on the top right side of those search results is what's called the knowledge panel and most people it's powered by their wikipedia page In your case it was powered by amazon bio. Which is i suspect. Both something you or publicists have written and also very flattering And also much more positive than a typical wikipedia result would be there which is a much more neutral encyclopedia extending entry and the nice thing for you is. People are so used to sing with a pd content. There that when they see that you're a number one podcast an author and cult classic writer. They assume those things are all automatically true because they're used to wikipedia source of truth being there and in your case you're probably the you're the first person i ever saw. Who had something other than wikipedia. Showing up there in a meaningful way I've seen a couple of others since since that started looking for it but really if someone looks at this page are gonna say. Wow this is someone. Who's you know a thought leader in his space. Whose accomplished a bunch of things which is a really great start. Anyone trying to learn more about you

Josh Green Duska Zapata Google Isaac Morehouse Josh Twitter Amazon
2021 Global Marketing Trends with Deloitte's Ashley Reichheld

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:03 min | 1 year ago

2021 Global Marketing Trends with Deloitte's Ashley Reichheld

"Let's let's talk business. We want to talk a little bit about this report. That deloitte has released the twenty twenty one global marketing trends report. What drove the report in went into it. Well this is our second annual report. But this one was really characterized by the challenges of twenty twenty and that level of uncertainty that we're seeing has really impacted all of us in some way myself my mom of three old trends and well. I thought i was a master at balancing working kids. I've learned a whole new set of work from home. Sales gotta really speedy mute. Button trigger finger pilot fisher price toys under my desk that bear testimony and this year. We really use the study to kind of help explorer and break down some of that uncertainty. We use subject matter expertise. We voices smithfield and two overarching surveys. From consumers up twenty five hundred and executives up just about four hundred of them to help break down that uncertainty in the report a believe it's unified seven trends overall and you go In detail on each of them. But can you tell me kinda just at a high level. Were the the major trends seven themselves are purpose agility human experience trust participation fusion and talent and i think in general agility trust talent participation are fairly straightforward largely those companies without. Do you trust them to do with the say they're gonna do. They have the talent to do it. Do they nibble participation with their stakeholders in the customers. The ones i usually get questions about not understanding are the other three so purpose and that's a company that knows what they exist and therefore can make choices a little bit more rapidly. That sense of purpose helps them particularly in times of uncertainty. Actually because they can they can make tough decisions right away. The second human experience and i often get asked. Hey so white you just call that. What is call it. A spur ends called employee experience. I'm sure we'll talk about this. But the reason we call it human experiences because you don't wake up as customer employees. You wake up as a human being. And if we want to elevate experience we have to understand you as a human and then fusion of course which is that art of bringing together new business partnerships early in the report. You identify this drop in confidence across the c. suite. And just curious. What do you feel drove that drop and this is the second time i've seen this question i guess from deloitte is working with the loye. The cmo team within delay and the cmo club on some prior research. We looked at confidence. Drop or confidence levels. I should say of cmo's in general and while this most recent snapshot shows the drop in confidence. I'm kind of pleased that cmo's aren't last on the list now. A small bright spot in the foreseeable ceelo's but tell us a little bit about this dropping confidence. Well at the start of our chat. I talked about this notion of uncertainty that feeling and basically the research suggests that c. suites are humans to and no exception to that rule so on a percentage basis. Cmos aren't last but they are second to last Within a percentage point of and you actually see the biggest declines with. Cio's an nco's. And i think really what you're seeing is that lots of executives have gone into survival mode and you see them by the way prioritizing things like improved efficiency and productivity over more human centric initiatives in that that instinct is is very common but unfortunately it does run counter to some consumer expectations. When we did this research. We learned that as times. Get tougher consumers. Expect more connection. Not less said consumers are really looking for companies to step up and you have c. suite executives who are uncertain and lacking confidence today. And not really sure the world is heading and it's making it very difficult environment. Operate them in these uncertain times to us over over used phrase currently but one of the other two data points stuck out. I think is a sign of the times potentially i'm gonna stay kotei stats and then we can discuss what we think they mean but fifty eight percent of respondents could recall at least one brand that quickly pivoted to better respond to their needs and eighty two percent said this led to them doing more business with that brand. Seems that these factors kind of together talk about one the agility that you've you mentioned before is one of the trends to this human experience component like are we actually delivering what people really want and value and purpose. I think alignment potentially of those two things like what's going on in the world and what do people really need am i. Do you think. I'm interpreting that right just based on the data and what the trends that you're seeing i do although. I think i'd argue that. The each of the trends has an impact there. If you think about an organization's ability to co create with people so fusion for example if your co creating with people rapidly you're able to respond to create address needs more rapidly if you're encouraging participation from your customers than your doing a good job or hopefully a better job at least of hearing what it is. They need to be able to adopt if customers trust. You more likely to tell you what they need a believe you when it comes out and then of course talent is critical. All these things without talent. You can't do any of them

Deloitte Cmo Club Fisher Price CIO
How to Build a Dynamic B2B Marketing Team With Mitch Fanning

Marketing Spark

06:07 min | 1 year ago

How to Build a Dynamic B2B Marketing Team With Mitch Fanning

"With provides marketing software and services for the multifamily industry. Welcome to marketing spark mitch. Thanks for having me on mark. Maybe we can start by telling me a little bit about how long you've been at rent sink and what rents inc does so been at renting inc for about a year and a half and As you've you've already kind of mentioned Rinsing inc provides marketing solutions for the multifamily. So one way you can think about it. One way the listeners can think about it is at its multi it's hub spot for multifamily but just with services. My role is not only to help shape product strategy but to formalize and execute on the go to market and scale operations so what does multifamily just to give us a little bit of color on what that involves okay. So this is interesting because my background is not a multifamily. Multifamily is really the the owner operators the investors the property management firms. That essentially you know by manage and essentially invest in apartment buildings. And what's really interesting to me at least in this space. Is that this industry when it comes to marketing is kind of where the bb space was like ten years ago. Smeeting and what i mean by that is what it comes to technology when it comes to their technology. Stacks and the things that they're doing. They are just kind of catching up to the to the bbc's base so it's almost like history is repeating itself so as a marketer if you're dealing with customers who may not be terribly tech savvy. Does that mean that a lot of your marketing is around education. Because you've got people who may not be using a lot of technology at all. Do you have to win them. Over to the fact that technology is is a valuable and useful tool and then convince them that your software is something that they they should consider. I think just like i would say any Any industry or any situation When things are Kind of Ahead of its time. I would have said that was the case. Maybe three three four years ago Couple of things have Have changed that number one year. Getting into a situation where you're finding a lot of young people are running these marketing company marketing teams in In multifamily and to covid people have had the change. The way they've done business. And i i know that's probably a reoccurring theme on this podcast but Multifamily different so over the years. You've held a number of leadership marketing roles at a variety of companies. And i. i think it's given you some really interesting perspective on the marketing landscape. How it's evolved over the years. Can you talk a little bit about the role of the cmo an early stage company. Because it's really important job but when it comes after the products been developed it comes after a sales team has been created and sometimes the marketing person is to the game for release for burglary speaking. So what is their role and and how do they establish themselves so that they can have a seat at the table. This is a great question and we probably could probably talk a lot longer than fifteen minutes on this one particular subject. I would say first of all having if i'm being honest you as a marketer you really need to be honest with yourself and what i mean by that is you really have to ask yourself. Am i a builder or my farmer. And what i think that means at least to me is not everyone is designed to be in an early stage tech tech environment In not also includes anyone else outside of marketing and conclude product excetera. But if you are that person The one thing i would say is your you need to be really good at standing things up an. That's everything from the technology. That's that's that's everything to do with the programs etc. But i think you also need to be really good at understanding the business and i think one of the things and i would say that no matter what stage of the business. You're in but i think a lot of times early stage marketers come in as individual contributors and they get stuck there and the problem with that is they get siloed and they're not able to connect what they do to business results so i would say that's number one but also say you have to really understand other other functions outside of your own and i don't think a lot of marketers spend a lotta time understanding business in general whether it sas understanding what sas means the business model behind that the metrics that you know investors and ceo's actually track and two. They don't spend enough time outside of their own this one. So what do you mean by that. I think what i mean by that. Is they so here. Here's the thing when you go from a individual contributor to leading marketing the toughest thing beyond the things i just mentioned is managing up and educating internally and i'd say think it's it's something that just marketers Have this infliction over. But i think it's just a hard thing to to train yourself to do in other words continually trying to communicate what the vision of the company is what marketing is doing externally but also internally

Rents Inc Rinsing Inc Mitch BBC CMO SAS
Interview with Alexandra von Plato

The CMO Podcast

04:05 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Alexandra von Plato

"What i'm looking forward to is being home and being present and you know oddly to my kids i have twenty six year old. Who actually lives on his own now and two teenage daughters and They're they're sort of captive now. You know so. I'm going to be spending time with them. You know i'll be present and they won't really have that many places to go. Which is unusual. 'cause they're always trying to escape so i'm really looking forward to being cozy honestly and spending some time together and being grateful just being grateful for for having each other and recognizing that so many people have been in so much pain and are actually living this holiday season with great grief and loss and will be thinking about them and will be grateful for what we have. That's a big word grateful. These days i agree with you. I was a cmo roundtable. Call last night and everyone talked about. It was very poignant. Very talked about gratefulness and And this thanksgiving. I think is especially significant for so many people and so so. That's that's one of the positives coming out of this. What teenage daughters what are they. What are they doing at home. Are they staying schools. Virtual right yes it was. They were doing a hybrid up until week and now they're back fulltime at the at home so you know for a little moment there. I mean teenagers never released super look forward to going to school but they were happy to get back and get socialized in. Get out of the house. So now we're back all sorts of sheltering in place here and i have one daughter his in the midst of applying for college. You know it's very surreal time to do that. I mean she's looking forward to her independence in the next chapter of her life and so much of that means moving out moving away and having that big experience so you know. I think i see her trying to tamp down her her own. You know anticipation 'cause she. She's she's kind of. She's kind of steeled to be disappointed by not being able to go wherever she ends up you choosing or being able to Get accepted so so that's going on. So that's you know very very bittersweet but i would say you know bitter because that time of life you know you need to get this. Is the separation moment that so much about how your early adulthood forms and you know. I'm sad for for these kids who aren't going to get that full swing and my daughter. Who's a junior you know. She's a look. These kids were able to seamlessly. I mean they didn't have to cut over to a virtual platform friendship like they have full fledge relationships through these platforms that they're very comfortable having so it's not like they're missing out on connecting with people. But you know there's certainly a lot less parties. Maybe that's a good thing. So what about twenty twenty one. What are you looking forward to next year. I mean we you know from from my family's standpoint you know we're just keeping everybody safe and keeping my parents you know safe in and you know hoping that Sometime next year. And i hope. I i don't anticipate it being much before the end of next year but that we can look forward to truly being able to returning to some kind of normal you know pace of life and connection with the people we love and the colleagues we love the. We do