35 Burst results for "C. Cuisine"

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

03:58 min | 2 months ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Gastropod

"In 1838 and 39, the Cherokee were forced to migrate from their homelands in the southeast, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, to what's now Oklahoma. During the forest march, hunger disease and exhaustion killed more than a quarter of all the people on that walk, 4000 people died. The only reason we have some of these seeds is that families made that decision sometimes in the manner of moments under severe pressure to protect their seeds because they knew they knew that they were going to need seeds wherever it was they were going to end up. So on the Cherokee trail of tears removal, for example, those seeds somehow survived that removal, and that means that even when families were starving, that these seeds were protected so that there would always be food, and same with the Dakota removal. There were families that protected enough seeds no matter what, that we now have food today. And the seeds that Native Americans saved on forced relocations like these, even while they were starving, those seeds have been handed down by families and communities over the generations. And one of the women who helped preserve these seeds was Cora baker. So Cora was a gardener, a traditional gardener who lived by she lived in the Wisconsin dells, and she farmed in garden all her life, and she used to grow the Indian corn she called it, and she would hang it up she'd braid it and hang it up outside her barn to dry, and people would come by and they'd stop to visit and they'd see her corn, and they would give her seeds. So she ended up with this beautiful collection of seeds from all over this region, but some from, as far away as the Southwest, we had hopi black turtle beans in her collection.

hunger disease Tennessee North Carolina Oklahoma Georgia Cora baker Dakota Cora Wisconsin Southwest
"c. cuisine" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

05:42 min | 2 months ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Gastropod

"Be in dream of wild health are both about a 30 minute drive away from Minneapolis on opposite sides of town. Rebecca grew up on an organic farm, but she's not Native American herself. The local Shaka psu community actually headhunted her because they wanted to start a farm. We broke ground here in 2010. It was born out of a health impulse over a dream of wild health, Diane is a master gardener who's a member of the rosebud Sioux reservation in South Dakota. She started off as a volunteer at the farm, and then took over as director a few years ago. And the farm started as a program of petoa Conti, and that was the St. Paul based nonprofit that provided transitional housing for native people in recovery. And out of that work, the clients were asking for a way to reconnect with the land, and with traditional foods because at such an important part of native culture. So it started as a tiny little garden in 1998. Then we received a gift of very old, precious seeds from Cora baker, a Padua de elder, in 2000, and then, in 2005, we purchased this ten acre farm, and then we've been here ever since building programs for youth and helping to restore the land. We're going to come back to those precious seeds, but first things first, I was curious, what exactly do you grow on a Native American farm? Rebecca and Diane walked us around, they're growing a lot of the foods you'd find at any farmer's market. Bell peppers and carrots and onions and the like. These are the typical vegetables that any healthy community might want to eat. But and this is what makes them really unique. They're also growing indigenous crops. Some of them are foods that are very familiar. Corn, squash, and beans, but Rebecca and Diana growing varieties that you probably haven't seen or heard of before. We are growing a miss squawky Flint corn that we received from miss walking. Seed keeper, a few years ago, we grow a whole chunk red flour corn. We grow this Dakota yellow corn. We grow an oneida white hominy corn pottawatomie Lima beans, Cherokee trail of tears, pole beans, a Rick or a yellow beans, hidatsa shield, figure beans, get a Cosimo, Lakota squash, and it's not just the varieties, the way they're growing the corn squash and beans that's a little different too. Before coming here, I had never grown a three sisters garden, and so that's been an adventure. Three sisters? Yep. So in a perfect three sisters garden, you grow corn squash and beans together and the pole beans provide an anchor for the corn in the corn provides stability and a trellis for the beans. You grow squash around the corn and beans and that provides shade and weed suppression. It helps create a more temperate environment for the soil. So it doesn't get too hot. It doesn't get too cold, it retains

rosebud Sioux reservation petoa Conti Rebecca Cora baker Diane Minneapolis South Dakota Padua St. Paul squash Diana Dakota
"c. cuisine" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

05:22 min | 2 months ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Gastropod

"Hello gastro bud listeners, we have a great episode for you today. It's one of our favorites. I know we say that all the time, but we really do love this one. And it's especially timely for our American listeners who may well be sitting down to a Thanksgiving meal that includes lots of delicious and indigenous American foods. Corn, cranberries, turkey. There's a story behind Thanksgiving, of course, but there's an even deeper story that we tell this episode. The story of Native American cuisine, what it was, what happened to it, and why that matters. In this episode, we highlight the work of a lot of super interesting people in the native community, and if you stick around to the credits, we'll have the update on what some of those people have been up to since our episode first aired. Enjoy.

turkey
"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:30 min | 9 months ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Them accessible and ensuring the essence of the dish is present. Today, Roy yamaguchi Sam Troy, Alan Wong, and most of the others are still crafting amazing food. There are also other well-known Hawaiian chefs who are continuing the legacy of HRC and more. And these include Leanne Wong, Michelle Carr, Mark Noguchi, Andrew Lee and Sheldon Simeon. Simeon is perhaps the best known because of his amazing ability to take familiar classics and up level them with a refined touch. Additionally, his two turns on top chef ended in trips to the finals and getting voted as the fan favorite both times. He and his wife Janice own and run tin roof, a popular restaurant on Maui, and he wrote cook real Hawaii, a beautiful cookbook with 100 recipes that demonstrate his skills and culinary heritage. HRC has also influenced school lunches in a way thanks to the hyena pono, farm to school program, where a greater emphasis is back on locally grown food and fresh cooking to school meals. Since the 1970s, lunches had mostly been unpacking or unwrapping processed foods and heating them up for students. So much like the questions and goals of HRC, school lunches are back to honoring the plethora of fresh ingredients across the islands. In the end, HRC is as American as California regional cuisine or Southwest regional cuisine. In many ways, it's the most open minded fusion cuisine out there because Hawaii is truly a melting pot where white people are the minority. As always, we like to follow up our main story with short recurring segments. This is a segment called what are we reading where we highlight books and comic books that have caught our attention? So what have you been reading? I've been reading a really cool comic book actually called the mask of halia by comics, and I'm going to talk about the comic book in just a moment, but first I do want to mention the group itself. Comics. It's a fascinating group. The creators are all women of Asian descent. And their mission is so inspiring and I can paraphrase and such, but I think it's best if I just take it directly from the website. They say, our mission is to create stories that introduce Filipino and other Asian mythology through a riveting contemporary fantasy comic series, our stories aimed to inspire young women everywhere as they follow our female heroines who learned to spark the warrior goddess within. Our hope is that our readers will be inspired to face the future with hope, compassion and grace born from an understanding of the past and the struggles of our ancestors. Oh. Yeah, I mean, really fascinating. It catches your imagination. It's really inspiring. So the mask of halia is just the first issue that I've read so far. It's written by Caitlin fajon and Jennifer zheng, with art by rhino Renaud villa, coloring by Charlene Dewey, cover art by Catherine Leno and production help by Cecilia Lim and waverly limb. The story centers on Marcel Reyes, who, along with her mother, moved back to Cebu city, Philippines after her great grandmother passes away. She discovers a wooden mask that throws her into a Filipino mythical world where there's an ancient battle that includes a giant sea serpent named bakunawa. I really like it. I mean, you know, I felt it left me wanting more. And as good comic books do, you get to the end and there's like a cliffhanger and the writing is great..

Roy yamaguchi Sam Troy Leanne Wong Michelle Carr Mark Noguchi Sheldon Simeon HRC Alan Wong Andrew Lee Hawaii Simeon Janice Caitlin fajon Jennifer zheng California rhino Renaud villa Charlene Dewey Catherine Leno Cecilia Lim waverly limb
"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:16 min | 9 months ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"To buy more local ingredients and build up the industry if need be. To create a symbiotic relationship with the local farmers. They met again 6 weeks later on the big island and began visiting farms, but had some challenges with farmers who weren't always willing to grow the produce that was being requested by the chefs or were interested but didn't have high enough quality items. Little by little, though, each of the chefs would find a farmer willing to work with them. For Roy yamaguchi, it was a local farmer on why mauna loa named dean okimoto. It became a mutually beneficial partnership where dean would travel with Roy for demos and explain the various screens, growing the business for okimoto. It required a little bit of risk on the part of both chef and farmer because sometimes new growing techniques had to be experimented with that would eventually be adopted by more farmers. It was a time consuming process that eventually resulted in moving away from a relying on the larger wholesale food companies that had traditionally supplied local restaurants. These challenges focus on ingredients, which was a huge hurdle, but the actual food development and identity was just as important. On the mainland there was a movement towards local or regional cuisines, probably most famously through southwestern cuisine and California regional cuisine. The turning point for HRC was when Beverly gannon suggested hiring shop Gordon to help them organize and get the word out. Although his work was predominantly in music and film, he understood marketing and star power. He realized that of the group of 12, there would be a few celebrity chefs but the rest would be required to support the goals of the group with less of the limelight. By the way, extra fun fact, Shep Gordon was like the manager or something for Alice Cooper. Oh. So it's kind of weird that he took on the food thing. Although I think that I'm pretty sure he lived in Hawaii. That was one of the reasons that he got roped in. With Gordon's direction and the help of marketing agencies, Hawaii regional cuisine, chefs began to gain attention. In the first decade of HRC, Bon Appetit magazine featured Roy yamaguchi, Alan Wong, and Mark elman. Yamaguchi was also inducted into the fine dining Hall of Fame in 1992. In fact, in 1994, writer Janice wald Henderson, who wrote the first article on yamaguchi, curated and produced the new cuisine of Hawaii, recipes from the 12 celebrated chefs of Hawaii regional cuisine. This was a sample of the talent of all 12 chefs, but also helped be a springboard for a variety of other books, including Roy's feasts from Hawaii by yamaguchi, Choi of cooking by Sam Choi, Alan Wong's new wave luau by Wong, and a taste of Hawaii new cooking from the crossroads of the.

Roy yamaguchi dean okimoto okimoto Beverly gannon HRC Shep Gordon Roy Hawaii dean Gordon Appetit magazine Mark elman Alice Cooper fine dining Hall of Fame Alan Wong Janice wald Henderson California Yamaguchi yamaguchi Sam Choi
"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:29 min | 9 months ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Or Portuguese sausage, or a hamburger steak, smothered in gravy, and sometimes topped with a fried egg. Yes, we're talking about the beloved loco moco. The popularity of this plate lunch was also pushed along from local chain, zippy's, as well as the California chain, L and L Hawaiian barbecue. In many ways, the luaus and plate lunches created a belief that Hawaiian food was similar to Chinese food and that it was inexpensive and more akin to street foods. The food wasn't taken seriously as an actual cuisine in the eyes of real chefs. The idea of refined cuisine was reserved for swanky, French restaurants across the islands, and that leads us to the development of Hawaii regional cuisine. Perhaps the triumph of fusion foods. Before we go any further, we want to mention the book eating Asian America again. There's a great essay written by Sam yamashta, a food historian who researched Hawaiian regional cuisine. So technically, fine dining did go beyond French, but chefs who cooked in fine dining restaurants emphasized continental cuisines and were often French German or Swiss chefs. Dishes included rich sauces, lots of butter and plenty of tradition. European tradition to be exact, which probably isn't a surprise because of the colonial period where white people were often the wealthy landowners. The plantation owners were the upper class and anyone considered a local born and raised in Hawaii, was considered lower class. Education, social life, and food choices were all racialized. In the late 19th century, early 20th century when Hawaii was annexed, divisions were growing even more with locals going to public schools and eating certain foods while Caucasian elite and the ruling class of Hawaii, or Ali, were often attending private schools like iolani, punahou, kamehameha, and mid pack institute. Fun fact, kamehameha was actually only open to Hawaiians. The divide of local food versus fine food was illustrated by the restaurants that opened. From the earliest days in the 1830s to the 1930s, there was a rise of more casual cafes, lunchrooms, and canteens. Sometimes attached to a general store, then you have the more refined fine dining establishments like the Alexander young hotel that would often use high quality locally sourced foods for vegetables, fruits, and some meats. Interestingly, there was still locally caught fish that.

Hawaii Sam yamashta zippy California iolani mid pack institute America punahou kamehameha Ali Alexander young hotel
"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:30 min | 9 months ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Hot dogs, spaghetti, chili, beef stew, grilled cheese sandwiches, and more. Basically, open the menu from any diner from the U.S. mainland in the 40s or 50s, and you can see those types of items in Hawaii, and that includes on the zippy's menu. But there was also a more insidious impact of World War II. After the Japanese empire's Attack on Pearl Harbor, the intense mistrust of Japanese Americans resulted in martial law on the islands. We talk about this in season one, episode 11, if you want a more in depth history of Japanese internment and the impact on Hawaii. Part of martial law was the decision to ban all Japanese fishermen from doing their job because there was a fear they could be conspiring against the U.S.. However, there were a lot of Japanese fishermen, so it essentially crippled one of the few ways to get fresh meat for the inhabitants in Hawaii, which led to an increase in the use of canned meats and other convenience foods. And it's easy for us to look at that now and wonder how they could choose spam, but the fact is during World War II residents had a choice of getting their protein from dried salted meat or from spam and other canned meats which were juicy and seemed more fresh. We know fresh canned meat sounds like an oxymoron. Spam continues to be popular in Hawaii, where an estimated 7 million cans are consumed per year. Fun fact, there are only about 1.5 million Hawaiians, so everyone is eating an average of more than four cans per year. Spam musubi is a type of onigiri where spam is often marinated in teriyaki sauce, fried, and then put on or in a block of sushi rice and wrapped in seaweed. It's one of the most ubiquitous uses of spam in Hawaii and has disputed origins. One story is that misses mitsuko kaneshiro made it for her children in the 1980s before selling them out of a local drugstore, city pharmacy, and Honolulu. It became so popular she opened her own place michonne's musubi where she sold 500 per day. The other possible origin is with Barbara funamura of kwai, where she sold it out of the Joni Hana restaurant at about the same time. World War II and martial law also resulted in some interesting mindsets in Hawaii to be as American as possible. There's a whole history on Hawaiian school lunches that will save for another time. But let's just focus on the idea of American foods and the idea of culinary assimilation to create the guise of fitting in. In a lot of ways, this was led by the cafeteria ladies from the 1940s to 1970s, who were often of Japanese okinawan, Chinese Korean and Filipino descent. They created wholesome meals from scratch, often with odd surplus foods from the U.S. government..

Hawaii U.S. Pearl Harbor mitsuko kaneshiro michonne Barbara funamura Joni Hana restaurant Hawaiian school kwai Honolulu U.S. government
"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:03 min | 9 months ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"So it should be no surprise that there's a more refined and redefine form of Hawaiian cuisine known as Hawaii regional cuisine or HRC. However, to fully understand HRC, you have to also understand traditional Hawaiian cuisine as well as the different foods and cooking techniques from other cultures that have influenced food trends in Hawaii. Let's start with actual traditional Hawaiian food. Why is an island so it probably comes as no surprise that traditional Hawaiian foods rely upon fresh produce, seafood and shellfish. And local meat sources. You've probably heard about some of these foods, dishes like poke, clua pork, poi, laulau, haupia, and breadfruit. Poke, of course, is probably the best known traditional dish that is eaten across the U.S. now. Classic Hawaiian style poke is a base of bite size cubed raw fish, seasoned with several ingredients that include onions, green or Maui, sesame oil, soy sauce, chili pepper, and garlic. And you can't forget the seaweed. There's a special seaweed called limu kohu that provides a wonderful flavor. Then there's Kahlua pork. What we all think of when we think about a luau. It's a slow cooked pig that's cooked in an emu, or traditional underground pit filled with kindling, wood, porous stones, and rocks, and covered with tea leaves, banana leaves, or other green aromatic leaves that help slowly steam the pig for about two to three hours. The use of leaves to wrap things is repeated in various dishes like Lao Lao, which is another traditional dish where fish and pork are wrapped in Taro leaves before steaming, and speaking of Taro, it's the main ingredient of poi, which is essentially Taro root that's been pounded, thinned out a little and allowed to ferment. It's a staple starch in Hawaii that's often eaten with other things and adds slightly sour goodness to any meal. The theme you'll see over and over with traditional Hawaiian foods is that they're all fairly simple dishes that honor the ingredients, utilize all parts of those ingredients and focus on seasoning with other easily found local items. One of the unique things about Hawaii is the acceptance and integration of the different foods from the various immigrants to the islands. Many of these foods and ingredients were brought in by the laborers originating from east and Southeast Asia. With the high percentage of Japanese Chinese Filipinos, Koreans and Portuguese on the islands who came as laborers, it's understandable that the changing demographics of the islands would also create change to the foods. One of the biggest fast food chains on the islands is zippy's and zippy's menu is like a microcosm of what decades of food integration looks like. It's easy to draw a culinary line from China to the zippy's turkey jock, one ton mean, gene doy, a Chinese style deep fried mochi stuffed with red bean paste..

HRC Hawaii Taro U.S. Southeast Asia east China
"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

03:33 min | 9 months ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"You're listening to Asian American history one O one, a podcast about Asian American history from generally known historical happenings to the deeper cuts that we don't hear about in school, where your host Jen and tad, the daughter and father team. Welcome to season two episode 23. We're going to start with the bad news first. On May 11th at two 20 p.m. three women of Korean descent were shot at the world salon in Dallas, Texas. Although multiple rounds were shot, the women had non life threatening injuries, which is great. The male shooter left in a maroon minivan after the attack. The police originally believed the crime wasn't hate motivated, but Dallas police found a link between the latest shooting and two drive by shootings in Dallas on April 2nd and may 10th. Witnesses of both drive by shootings described a red or burgundy van or car and all three shootings appeared to target Asian run businesses. Thankfully, there were no injuries in either of the drive by shootings. Dallas police are still searching for the suspect as of this recording. On to some good news, James Hong, at the age of 93, has made history as the oldest person to ever receive a star on the Walk of Fame. You may not know this, but it actually costs money to put a star on the Walk of Fame to not only put it there, but also maintain it. So Daniel Dae Kim put a crowdfund out and he got $55,000 over four days. Hong has had a 7 decade and counting career..

Dallas world salon Jen Texas James Hong Daniel Dae Kim Hong
Why Are America's Shelves Empty?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

Why Are America's Shelves Empty?

"With regard to these shortages, which we want to talk about today, I mean, let's start by saying it's affecting us. So we have our media room when people go, oh, you have a meeting room. Well, one of the media business. So we do have a media room. We sometimes will have investors come and watch a movie and so on. So we're replacing our chairs and this was supposed to happen what in August August of last year and it's now scheduled and after several delays was supposed to get these chairs. Well, first, the first thing it was, it was a delay in the foam. They didn't have the foam. So there was a shortage of foam. They got the foam, and then the latest delay was the mechanics. So in other words, you know, can't lean or whatever. You can't fix the chair up and down. And then the latest the lay after that was that they thought that the chairs were on a truck and the evidently weren't. So it's a transportation of the completed product. Anyway, if this seems a little esoteric to people, and we're supposed to get these chairs, we'll see if it happens, I guess what? February 7, something like that. And then I'm reading articles and you were sort of outraged about the fact that people can not buy pet food. Right, so a couple of weeks ago a friend of mine posted this photo of some empty shelves, and she has cats, and she was so upset because she can not find cat food, or the cat food that she normally buys. So she was very upset about that, so she posted a photo of that and I was like, oh, that's too bad, you know, cat cat food. You're not a fan of cats. I like cats, but I know you don't. But anyway, but that's beside the point. Well, I'm sure I'm pretty sure the cats are very temperamental and very particular about their cuisine. It's a little bit like the favorite restaurant is now closed and they're like, oh yeah, where's my food? So that was bad, but then I started seeing more Friends talk about how they couldn't find dog food and other types of pet food. And I was like, what, you know, this would be a really interesting segment to do. So on my Facebook, and it's my personal Facebook page. It's not a public. And I said, hey guys, if you have pet food shortages in your local grocery store, can you take a photo of your shelves? And so many people sent in photos, I could not possibly put all of them on, and I'm going to show you some of these photos in the podcast. If you watch it on rumble or YouTube, a lot of them, and then more people started weighing in on, oh, it's not just pet food is not just cat food, dog food. I can't find cold medicine. I can't find toilet paper. I can't find this. I can't find that. And so they were sending photos of that as well. And so it is just it's

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Breakdown or Breakthrough? UN Chief Lays out Stark Choices for Humanity

UN News

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Breakdown or Breakthrough? UN Chief Lays out Stark Choices for Humanity

"Ahead of the high level week of the seventy six. Un general assembly session which begins on twenty first of september. You g antonio guitarist launched a common agenda his vision for the future of your organization. The report lays out two distinct divergent visions for the world. One of breakdown in perpetual crisis or a breakthrough to greener safer world at the heart of the vision is enhanced multi-lateralism with a summit of the future creating a new global consensus on what the future of the world should look like. And how to secure it sometime. Thomas away from your news sat down with mr guitar. Wish to discuss the report as well. As the un chiefs take on some pressing global issues including the humanitarian situation in afghanistan and the covered nineteen pandemic. She started by asking him to explain why he remains convinced. That multi-lateralism is the key to a better world. Look what has happened to. Our worlds vitals is defeated. The world's more than linear in the health after everything started we still have the vitals spreading everywhere and we see that impact on the lives of people that are mexican cuisine inequalities economies in extremely difficult situations and of course the most vulnerable suffering enormously and the world's was not able to come together and to define a global vaccination plan and bringing the countries that produce vaccines or can produce vaccines together with the organization with the in international financial institutions to then the with the pharmaceutical industry and doubled the production. And make sure that there is an equitable solution at the production. This cannot be done by country alone. Sweden by all the problem. Is that the multilateral issue we have now which is essentially late. Show them late. Show is not even the power to obtain information about the situation.

Antonio Guitarist Mr Guitar Un General Assembly UN Thomas Afghanistan Sweden
A Closer Look at the Algarve Coast

Travel with Rick Steves

02:18 min | 1 year ago

A Closer Look at the Algarve Coast

"Let's start out today on the beaches of southern portugal. The all guard prejean offers one hundred miles of warm sun and a collection of charming resort towns. From land's end to the spanish border are guides are christina. Dorte and robert reich. They specialize in showcasing the highlights of portugal. And the all garb to american visitors christina robert boondi. Thank you together. So when we think of the algarve christina what does it mean to the to a portuguese holidays. Israeli go to holidays with our families knows and normally because the kids are in school until the end of june so everybody goes at the same time so july and august can be pretty crowded but if we have a chance and going out of july august it is a marvelous place to go wonderful beaches. Wonderful food very good offer of of places where to stay hotels and also houses that we can rent houses or apartments and june absolutely beautiful until the first week of july. It's quiet so that is interesting that there's a huge bell shaped curve of demand and in the summer summertime vacation. It's everybody's down there. Yes now robert When you think of the popularity among locals and you were local are the locals looking for a big resort or are they looking for the cute little little cove for the little town. That locals are looking for Just basically good nice relaxing beaches wherever they may be right because What christina was saying is it's kind of like when you go off season little bit off season You have to think that you can't go. You can't go to the beaches that are up north because the weather still not quite a good because there are good beach resorts north of lists. That if you're a little bit shoulder season he wanted to go south. Because you're guaranteed good weather down there by morocco. Now when you go to the south I'm sure that every region of portugal has some different cuisine. What do think about to enjoy the food scene when you're on the elgar food scene is fantastic. Because you're right there on the water. You'd every kind of fresh seafood you can imagine and i guess the the best expression of that in portugal is the is the dish that everybody goes there. Force the cut the planner. The planner is like just a big big mix of all this great seafood. Some potatoes juicy broth. it's just really like the essence of the

Dorte Portugal Christina Robert Boondi Algarve Christina Christina Robert Reich Prejean Robert Morocco
"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"My food stories. More plenty more okay. Thanks for listening to the maria. Liberati show this is maria liberati and special. Thanks to my producer. Britain roselle my production intern. Alexander troy and this week special. Guess jeremy nunez stand up comedian and host of the amazon prime comedy special. Who's with me. And thanks to this month sponsors for the giveaways edwards and sons dot com and baker. Louis and again. If you like and share this month's episodes and join my newsletter at maria liberati dot com. You'll be entered in a giveaway to win the prizes from edward and sons and baker lee. We'll be selecting winners at the end of the month. And also were giving away a copy of my book the basic art of pasta. So we already had for. June are winners. Were su winters of pennsylvania and she won the limited edition grilling kit from vital choice. Fatal choice was our sponsor for last month and Lor mapfre dona. She won a pizza from lou male. Nadi chicago pizza and cheryl comiskey in ireland. Who won a copy of my book. The basic art of italian cooking davinci style. Congratulations to all of you. And thanks to our sponsors for last month's gifts and hey this episode. We talked about local recipes in. Jeremy gave us his take on his towns local recipe. If you have any local recipe you'd like to share with us on an episode. Please reach out to us. You can write to me at info at maria. Liberati dot com. You can reach me or my production intern. Let us know. Let us know the recipe too late to share or posted on social media. Hashtag the maria liberati show and if you make a pens annella salad the very recipe that i gave in. Tonight's segment take a picture. Hashtag at the maria liberati show share on social media. And you'll also be entered in a giveaway for the drawing and we're going to be sharing food on the new website for the podcast shortly so. Please keep sharing until next time. Peace love and pasta..

maria liberati Liberati Alexander troy jeremy nunez baker lee su winters Lor mapfre Nadi chicago pizza cheryl comiskey maria Britain edwards baker amazon Louis edward pennsylvania ireland Jeremy
"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"Dawson is a dawson illinois jarrett. Yes maria it is yep dawson illinois and he has a special. Where was that special comedy. Special released on amazon prime it was actually released during the pandemic so it came out. I want to say May twenty twenty one. Yes it was actually supposed to come out Right around march twenty twenty one in the pandemic started as i say you know the folks amazon. Just montage shop doing their best. So they got delayed a little bit and may twenty twenty one. It came out there. You go and that's definitely. It's definitely a way to have some fun. Especially you know. We all need a bit of levity during all this stuff going on in a way to have fun so we were gonna start off with jeremy's gonna tell us about this now dawson illinois by the way has only five hundred people me so one of my guests. Today's david page. Who was he has. A book out called feud americana. And you know we're talking about. We always talk with david about how you know small towns and the history of foods and things like that and i think really this small little towns in america. There are so many things so many things invented so many dishes and things like that. That people aren't aware of so we're going to start off by us telling about this dish. Called what is it a horseshoe still horseshoe okay that you think relates to or or comes back to dawson. Illinois was invented. They are right so this this is sort of the big trendy dish you know all the tourists when they come to springfield they see abe lincoln sites and everyone has to come to see to have a horseshoe and every restaurant claims they have the best horseshoe fast so now what is and again. There's there's a debate s to wear this started but everyone swears by in my town is created at the corner bar So what is on on your plate. You're gonna put piece of toast on top of that. French fries right. Well i've already messed up on. Top of the toast is. Is your meat protein. So most of the time. You're going with a hamburger patty here. Some folks will do like Ham okay something like that but generally hamburger patty then the french fries on top of that then cheese sauce on top of that all right so basically it's a heart attack yes heart attack in a meal and and The the big debate. Of course you know. They say started our corner bar. If so i there's probably five drunk guys had some leftover food in a kitchen and throw it on a plate. Just eight see what generally what. What makes her breaks. You is your cheese sauce. You know maria you may know you can just buy some people just by cheese sauce in a can and dump it. You know something like that or you can actually do some hard work and make a legitimate cheese sauce and there's very in springfield and the surrounding areas of illinois we've got various flavors of the geez sauce as well Very your worship by the different flavored of cheese sauce. And i think those types of dishes are so much more fun than you know the higher end restaurants and all that other stuff. I think it's so much fun to learn about these little towns during these little kind of dishes that they have so But i say we could make that kinda healthier you know veggie patty. Maybe doing some french fries. That are not fried baked. Maybe like a hallway bread but of course it would not be the same thing. Yeah and then to keep it so you may be thinking too. So one So it's called the horseshoe uh-huh but some people say. Oh it's too filling. You've got this giant plate so now they have sort of a half portion. A lot of places serve aptly called the pony shoe. So just made me think. I had this idea for a restaurant. People want to eat healthier. And if you wanna steal this feel free okay. But so it's healthy restaurant. Every all the fried items are going to be cooked in air. Fryer all right. Here's the thing. Nobody knows they're still actually deep fried. And everybody say oh. How good is this a tastes just like it's dried actually for me. They don't realize it's not and unfortunately i think they're really probably are places out actually doing that. So there you go well. That's a great idea for a restaurant. So jeremy tell us about your book. It's called you can't write city hall right when you were. And how long were you. The mayor of dawson illinois. So i was the mayor for for many years. Maria many years and So yeah. I wrote the book. You can't write city hall. It's this basically a comedic retelling of all the things that happened when i was mayor. This little town. You know a little bit of everything lynn. So a little side note. I have when you put a book together. Sometimes you have a what they call a copy editor who make sure you leave out an important detail. Something like that and When i was mayor actually defeated. The guy had been the mayor for twenty or twenty four years. Something like that. Gosh and she's going through and she's reading and psych I'm describing the night. I'm sworn and she says well you say your mom. Is there in your sister in your wife. You don't mention your dad. We need to clarify. Why is your dad not there. Did he move away as he passed on. What's going on as like. Oh my dad wasn't there because he voted for the incumbent mayor. Oh gosh that's funny really funny so can you tell tell us about his story when you were mayor anything anything you can tell us so i guess i like to tell and if people have have seen me before they know this story one of my favorites though is I actually wanted to war. For being one of illinois's most ethical maier's death and that was yeah and it was largely because i issued a fine to my parents so i remember my dad calling me when he found out and he's like jeremy. Why did i get this fine in the mail and it was like well. Your grass is too high. You have to mow your grass. Jeremy you mow our grass. I was like well. You should have called me sooner. Who's now you owe the town three hundred dollars and me fifty for mowing your grass. Oh well so. I guess then he was glad he had voted. Not for you but for the other mayor. That's great jeremy. jeremy. I'm sure i'm going to have you on again but Can you tell everybody. I want them to know where to find your special. And what's the title of your special on amazon prime so the amazon prime special is called. Who's with me So you can find on there. And the dry bar comedy specials called neighbourhood sasquatch and as far there's a new platform drive our comedy plus and you get a month free. Use my promo code jeremy newness. Wow that's great and tell everybody where they can find your book. You can't write city hall. Yeah so the book is available online at a book. Retailers got the amazon barnes and noble books a million walmart available all there or you can buy directly from me or learn more at. You can't write city hall dot com. There you go. Jeremy thanks again and thanks again and i'm sure we'll have you back again much success. We'll thanks. maria stole.

illinois amazon hamburger patty jeremy heart attack yes heart attack maria david page springfield dawson jarrett Dawson city hall lincoln Illinois david patty Fryer america
"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"His town. My guest today was mayor of a town of five hundred. Battalions dawson illinois and This jeremy nunez stand up comedian and he's going to tell us about a simple dish well-known in his little town as well as sharing some funny stories about being mayor of this. Little teeny town dawson illinois. It's always fun being able to share the dishes. We love with others. Jeremy nunez is also host of the amazon prime comedy special. Who's with me. He's also considered one of america's funniest mayor. And so we're going to discover. What some of america's funnies mayors favorite local foods are so stay tuned. And i will be sharing a recipe. That is a local recipe to tuscany. But it's a recipe that you can make local to where wherever you are it's a pans annella salad really simple to me but you can make it as mentioned local to wherever you're at it's just made up of day old crusty bread. It's kind of a way to recycle and not waste day old bread fresh tomatoes fresh red onion fresh cucumbers and you can also put a generous amount of fresh herbs basil rosemary oregano and even mint and then of course extroversion olive oil and white wine vinegar or balsamic vinegar but he know if your town has a farmer's market and you can get some great fresh tomatoes fresh cucumbers fresh herbs or even better yet. If you grow those things in your own garden you can make it a local pans annella salad with the most intense days of summer just about here and coming. The desire to cook in front of a hot stove is dwindling kind of down. And it's usually at its lowest point during this time of the year but with all the fresh fruits and veggies available one need only know how to combine them with minimal cooking and as mentioned the pans analysis. Alad is the perfect way to do it. So here's my recipe for a analysis. Salad you can have this as a late dinner or lunch or it makes perfect. Auntie pasta to begin a meal or serve it at the end of a meal as the italians do makes a great salad of a refreshing ending to a meal as well. This calls for one and a half pounds of red ripe tomatoes and as mentioned if you can use local tomatoes. That's the best tomatoes to us for this recipe. One fresh red onion one fresh cucumber ten slices of crusty day old italian style bread white wine vinegar just about a quarter of a cup. Extra-virgin cold pressed olive oil about four tablespoons. But i always say to taste so if you want a little more a little less olive oil at that. In the most important thing is that it's extra-virgin and cold press and the small handful of freshly choppy seas all but if you also have because at this time of the year herbs are growing all over the place so you know if you have fresh oregano fresh rosemary. Mix it up and chop a small handful of each of those herbs and add those in also and then saw and freshly ground black pepper taste if the cucumbers are not organic and you're going to peel them and wash them slice them sprinkle with salt and place in colander for about ten minutes. Wash and cut the tomatoes into slices or cubes. Place the crusty bread under a broiler till golden not burn but also to make the bread crispy just for should be about anywhere from a minute to three minutes when the bread is cool. Place it in a bowl and add in this splash of white wine or balsamic vinegar whatever you have on hand or whatever you prefer just enough in a gird to saturate the bread lately so about a quarter of a cup of the vinegar. Let that marinate set that aside slice the red onion thinly place that in the bowl with a bread slices. Stir that gently. Let that marinate. Then you're going to add in chop basil and any of the other chopped herbs if you have them on hand if you don't shop basil alone is fine. Said all of that aside and then you're going to brinson dry the cucumber slices. Add them into the bread mixture. Then add in the tomatoes against stir gently salt and pepper to taste drizzle with olive oil to taste. Toss this gently and let this mixture sit for just about thirty minutes before serving. And if you'd like more recipes follow my blog at oriole liberati dot com and you can also find more recipes in my gorman world award winning book series the basic art of italian cooking which you can get at maria liberati dot com art of living premium media dot com and really anywhere books are sold. The basic art of italian cooking is the first in the book series. The basic art of italian cooking holidays special occasions. Second addition is the next in the book series and the basic art of italian cooking. Davinci style all the books are really culinary memoirs of my life in italy where i really studied cooking and Spent money years. They are teaching cooking in studying cooking. And the basic art of book series is also available on maria liberati dot com art of living premium media dot com. You know with summertime here and so many fresh fruits and vegetables and ingredients at hand or always looking for recipes to cook. Check out my book series and you might find something along with a story to experience the recipe to enjoy and just a reminder to like and share this month. The month of july's episodes and also sign up for my newsletter at maria. Liberati dot com. And you'll be entered in our giveaway drawing four. let's see our sponsors. This month are edward and sons dot com through giving away a really nice gift package of foods and you can go to Edwards and sons dot com and check out their products and baker lay in honor of this month being the month of best deal day. Baker louis has some french themed bread products and they're also giving away products this month. Both sponsors of we had a lot of winners win prizes already. Let's see we had Sue winters who won the limited edition grilling kit from vital choice was our june winner and also laura man for dunia who won a pizza from lou male naughty chicago pizza and you may be our july winner so we're also giving away this month a copy of my book the basic art of pasta so please just like and share the episodes for the month of july and join my newsletter..

jeremy nunez Jeremy nunez dawson illinois maria liberati america amazon Baker louis italy Sue winters maria edward Edwards baker dunia laura chicago
The Hero from Season One

Scuba Shack Radio

08:03 min | 1 year ago

The Hero from Season One

"It's time for another installment of si-hun it's still alive and this time we're going back to season one episode twenty-six the hero and it premiered on july fifth nineteen fifty eight sixty three years ago on my third birthday. The hero opens up with mike underwater. Telling us these working with. Dr george snider on a project to turn ocean plants into food. Apparently they need funding for their research. And that's where a millionaire elliot conway and his wife. Gloria come in you see. Elliot is a big game hunter and he wants to take his hunting underwater and he wants to hunt for sharks and giant squid only problem. He doesn't know how to dive. He needs mike to teach him and gloria so he can bag. What's down there. Mike price five thousand dollars now since it's going to research glorious says it's a worthy cause and a tax write off elliot agrees to pay like twenty five hundred dollars upfront and the remaining twenty five hundred when he gets his first shark. So now they're off to a place known for sharks portable ongko and they go in elliott's private plane and that plane. Looks like a dc. Three named misguided gal now. Puerto blanco is on the west coast of south america. A small fishing village with a new hotel. Not much more. Just as they're getting off the plane guy comes running up and he introduces himself as dr gomez. Any needs to use of elliott's plane to get a sick child to a hospital over three hours away. Elliot agrees so now. They're all set to start their scuba training. And mike tells. Gloria things will be okay if elliott follows all precautions glorious says he never does mikes response he better now before they start training mike scouts out the deep area offshore for sharks. We see a variety of sharks white tips black tips and even some clown fish interesting. Now we start to see what scuba training was like in nineteen fifty eight. Mike takes the couple through snorkeling skills and then talks about how the equipment is delicate and technical. He tells them there is only one way and that is safely theory in practice. That's what it takes. But elliott is getting impatient in the next scene we see mike demonstrating what happens when a balloon is inflated at depth and brought up boom. Goes the balloon back on the boat. Mike tells them it's called an air. Embolism and you must always excel. Exhale as you extend. Gloria asks mike. How fast and he tells her no faster than your bubbles. Elliott wants to know. When do we stop learning and go hunting. He wants his shark. Glorious says she's tired and wants to sit out the next dive. Elliot tries to coax her into diving. But mike says it's dangerous to dive if you're tired so now we switch back to the hotel and we can clearly see the tension between elliott gloria. Gloria tells mike that that elliott is a mixed up millionaire. He's an architect. Who inherited the conway oil company when his father was killed in an auto accident. Elliott doesn't want to really be an architect anymore. Just a big game hunter. Now elliott comes into the scene and he's carrying a spear gun that he's all proud of its cocked and loaded. Mike is furious and he and elliot start to argue. And in the argument elliot drops the spear gun. It goes off narrowly missing gloria and lodging in palm tree. Now we switch back underwater. Mike says elliott has be elliott has become pretty good. Shot with the spear gun. And they're shooting at this target. That set up kind of lake for archery. But mike says he just needs to stop pointing a gun at mike. Now we switch back to land where mike. Gloria elliott are working on camera to document the shark on elliott. Says he wants to order. Chicken cacciatore for dinner might tell them. Oh no that's too spicy before diving. Says okay good now. Probably order to and elliot goes off. It's just mike gloria now. Gloria tells mike she's unhappy made a big mistake in marrying elliot. Mike tries to console her and she tells mike he's sweet and she puts her head on his chest. Elliot sees this and is upset. What's going to happen when they go on the shark hunt the next morning. They are at the dive site. Mike cuisine i finds a shark and is ready to take them down for the hunt. Just as soon as you can get the bait ready now. The three of them are down below at seventy five feet. Gloria has the camera as mike elliott head off to the hunt just end we switched to the surface in a boat is approaching. Its dr gomez. He needs elliott's playing again. As you get close to the dive boat. He throws his anchor over the side and it crashes down into gloria breaking her rag might just happens to look back and sees the glory is in trouble and they both rush back elliott steps in and starts buddy breathing with gloria the sharks. Fresh off debate sense trouble. As the big one continues to circle. Mike is impressed. With elliott's calmness and sends them to the surface while mike fights a rearguard action again and he spears the big shark. We then see all the divers back on board and dr gomez says we must go sure back at the hotel. Elliott s mike. Why don't they haven't hospital here. In puerto blanco might tells him. It's always money. Justin dr gomez emerges and skulls mike for letting gloria dive in her condition. She's expecting a child in six months. And dr gomez congratulates elliott by saying congratulations senor. Now you need to take her back to the states to the hospital. That does elliott is going to build a hospital in portable. Ongko and keith tells mike it'll be done in six months. Mike says that can't be done elliott. Replies you don't know me when i go to work elliott conway the hero. You'd recognize him. That's larry hagman. J are jr ewing from dallas or tony nelson from my dream of jeannie Mike nelson tony nelson coincidence. Who knows

Sea Hunt Vintage Scuba Vintage Tv Elliott Mike Gloria Dr Gomez Elliot Mike Underwater Dr George Snider Elliot Conway Puerto Blanco Mike Price Elliott Gloria Gloria Elliott Mike Gloria South America
"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

"When you think more of the traditional filipino diet what are what would you consider to be as a as a nutritionist. A dietitian what are some of the healthiest aspects of that traditional filipino. Diet or are really low that we have a lot of vegetables going dishes in like you said earlier. It's usually a mix of different vegetables so we have string beans. We have better mellanby have bottle board. We have carrots choi. The water spinach the washes in a variety of vegetables. And this is very common in philippines to eat a lot of these vegetables because they're cheaper and it is associated with simpler life and with a lot of filipinos be poor in some really can afford a whole lot of vegetables. Really go a long way and also because we are surrounded by so much water. I mean if you've seen a map of the philippines because of that seafood is very common only growing up again but but like looking back. I'm actually really glad that my mom helped me acquire that taser seafood. I still eat seafood. Maybe more often than regular american. Okay so i have to ask. What would you consider to be. Some of the maybe the less healthy aspects of traditional filipino diets who filipinos. We love fried things fried pork belly. stir fry and as he's Using a little bit too much oil sometimes and you can tell the truth Port we leave the fat in there sometimes so much so that when they put him in the fridge and you take him on. It's so greasy and and so meaner growing up. I didn't think much of that. But now you know having gone through nutrition Saturated fatty gotta gotta get rid of that but also like the salty. We lacked dipping sauces and the dipping sauce is usually sauce fish sauce because it adds another layer of flavor. So what happens. Is people just keep dipping their meat into the dipping sauce. And you know the ads marceau and honestly the philippines. I haven't seen a whole lot of low Products even interstates. When i go to asian store and look for our products i. I'm not sure that..

asian philippines marceau american filipino filipinos
"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

"And i'd love to learn more about filipino cuisine. I lived in the philippines for about a year. And i fell in love with the food. And i'm curious as to which parts of a traditional filipino. Dieter healthy and which might be modified to make them more. Nutritious will thanks for that suggestion katie and joining me today to talk about filipino. Culture and cuisine is levin dodoma's levin was born in the philippines and now lives in the united states and although he originally planned to study nursing. You told me. He was so fascinated by the coursework on biochemistry that he eventually switched pads to study nutrition instead and levin is now completed his master's degree in nutrition and he's currently completing his dietetic internship which will eventually result in his becoming a registered dietitian nutritionist. Welcome to the podcast levin. Thank you so much for joining me. Thank you for having me. And letting me after the world of filipino food. Yes i've been looking forward to our conversation because you know i think that for a lot of people. Filipina food is much less familiar than perhaps other sorts of regional cuisines. So maybe we could start just with filipino food. One oh one just give us a little bit of an idea about traditional meals and cooking style of the philippines. Yes so every filipino. Meal would have this two main parts. You will have the rice because it is a staple as with really most of asia and then we have what we call the. So alum is the general term for whatever is eaten with rice. This is usually a mix of protein with pork chicken fish and usually a variety of vegetables. It's not always just one vegetable. It's a variety there's always a mix and lee filipinos for some reason. We tend towards the the salty this hour in the pungent. Which kind of sounds odd. But it's actually really good once you've acquired a taste for it. Tell us a little bit about how neighboring cultures in southeast asia have inste- filipino cuisine. So in the philippines one of the major issues influences that we have is not actually from southeast asia. It's more chinese because we back in the day an an talking you know century earlier we traded with the chinese that chinese influence that you see in filipino food. Be seen noodle dishes stir fries they use of soy sauce fish sauce and we also have some dumplings really similar foods with really similar names between a filipino cuisine. And chinese visine. I think for example. The sweet work done in chinese joshu bow and in the philippines. We call that trump out the chinese shuai in the philippines. We have shown mice. So there's really a lot of carryover from chinese cuisine..

southeast asia today asia levin philippines katie united states trump one vegetable two main parts Filipina about a year One levin dodoma chinese filipino century earlier one filipinos
"c. cuisine" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"A dish called dry pot where you get to pick your ingredients and among the ones i picked for it were artery and duck blood and liver and tripe and things like that and it was fantastic absolutely fantastic. One of the big differences between chinese cuisine and western cuisine is a chinese appreciation for the differences in textures as well as differences in flavors. Something that that americans for the most part get squeamish about but i gotta tell you i could eat there all day in the stories that go together to make up american cuisine. I talk about one that that you find particularly fascinating because i was originally from new york and because i'm jewish i was fascinated by the bagels launch and cream cheese story in that this was not a dish any jew in europe eight. What happened was the transcontinental railroad was completed which made it possible to ship salmon from seattle to new york. This was pre refrigeration so the only way to keep the salmon from rotting was to pack it in copious amounts of salt which brian did and turned it. No surprise incredibly salty but it then became a dish that fit comfortably into what were called. Appetizing stores stores where new york jews went to get such items as a smoke fish. Herring that sort of thing. The standby dish of the early. Jewish immigrant was herring. It was the cheapest thing you could get. Locks slid ian there It was more expensive. Mel brooks actually told me that growing up in brooklyn they can only have locks once a week because of the price but it then became natural somehow to put locks on bagels and the addition of cream cheese actually made scientific sense because it was the cream cheese that would blunt the sharpness of the salt. Now there is no record anywhere of who first suggested cream. Cheese with lock's although the break stone company owned by a couple of jewish brothers was advertising in yiddish newspaper the forward Specific uses for cream cheese with jewish foods. And i guess it just makes sense that Eventually ended up on god's gift to perfect food. Which is the bagel lox and cream cheese sandwich over the last couple of decades. It seems chicken has gotten to be huge. I mean it just. It's everywhere even burger places that used to sell just burgers now probably have a chicken sandwich. somewhere on the menu chicken became a big part of american cuisine lately. How to some extent it was probably push starting in the seventies by increasing concerns about health. We are at the point now where there is more chicken sold in the us than beef and the experts. Tell me that's never gonna change. But the oddly american element to it is yeah we. We all jumped on the chicken bandwagon. But we all eat fried. So i'm not sure how healthy that is. Was colonel sanders. Really the launch point for the big fried chicken boom yeah. It was He was. It opened the door to to the concept of the fried chicken chain in america. i am pretty clear of that. It helped expand america's interest in fried chicken beyond the south Or areas Suggests chicago which had a large southern african american population that that had come to chicago as part of the great migration but yeah it it was harland sanders who kicked it all off and then there's pizza and everybody knows that there is some italian heritage to pizza but it somehow seems to be very american and and pizza is everywhere. Well it's a wonderful food is. There's just something terrifically warm and tactile about picking up a piece of pizza. Which by the way is not done in italy. They are eaten with a fork and knife but pizza. I guess was the right place right time. It came to new york with immigrants from new the hometown pizza. It immediately changed because the ingredients that we had here and the method of cooking were different. We've in america had a higher protein content than the weeden. Southern italy bakers in america were baking with coal not would as was used in italy. So right off. The bat of new york pie was a crispier than anything you'd get in naples but also it's a relatively simple item to make and was carried throughout the country for the most part by italian americans of moving west. The interesting thing is that you can make pizza. You can top pizza with pretty much anything. So it became highly regionalised based off and on what the local ingredients were in saint. Louis a favored cheese for example. Is something hold prevail. Which is a process cheese. Heavy if i recall on swiss. So that's what pizza gets talked win. And now you've got saint louis style pizza i. It was a relatively easy business to afford to get into and it was not restricted by lack of ingredients. Let's say it does seem that a california pizza kitchen that chain really had something to do with the creation of more. I guess you would call a gourmet pizza well. California pizza kitchen started. It's unusual menu because they recruited a guy named ebola do To super allies. Their pizza program edlund do was much of the creative genius behind The pizzas served at at spago. Ebola went to work for wolfgang puck and basically was the brains behind his Alleged creation of gourmet pizza when the do went to a california pizza kitchen his big contribution and he was responsible for the whole menu but his longest lasting contribution turns out to a been a barbecue chicken pizza which is now pretty much in american standard. One thing that does seem very american is ice cream Except it was in the form we know it invented in italy and then pass through other european countries and likely came to america via the british in colonial. Times it's a fascinating topic because it can be anything to anyone. There's a real renaissance.

new york america europe naples italy brooklyn chicago California Jewish seattle Mel brooks jewish once a week last couple of decades One seventies first american Louis eight
"c. cuisine" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"You probably own a lot of stuff. You often hear people complain that they have too much stuff. They need to get rid of stuff. Maybe you've thought that so. Perhaps you've had a yard sale and people coming by your old stuff so you have room to go out and buy new stuff. What is it about owning stuff. That is so important. What does it mean to own something here with some really interesting insight and research on the topic of ownership is bruce hood. Bruce is a professor of psychology at the university of bristol and author of the book. Posessed why we want more than we need. I bruce welcome mike. Thanks robin young. Sure well this. Whole concept of of accumulating stuff and trying to accumulate better stuff and better stuff than your neighbor has and always wanting stuff it must scratch some sort of psychological itch in people. Yes yeah now. This is a point. Made by adam smith who many regard as one of the funding fathers of modern economics. He pointed out that there is a motion relationship. They of feeling of a status and satisfaction when you accumulate wealth and a poor person feels lici. I think he's the phrases ashamed of their their poverty. So there is that sense of achievement on the fear of of not having things but iran about i think investment is probably the sociologist who coined the term conspicuous consumption. Which was this really interesting phenomenon. That he noted the people would assuming they had the money would prefer to pay or by a for example a silver as opposed to a speed data base metal. Like future because they use this as a way of showing off to others how much wealth they had. So this is a way of signaling. Your success weather's something. I've noticed that. I'd like to get you to comment on. Is that for many of the things that we want to acquire. it's the wanting. It's the the thrill of the hunt of getting it More than it is having it like. You really want that new car but once you have the new car very quickly it just becomes your car and it's you're not doing an eyeing over it every day. It's just your car but it was the getting it. That was so exciting. Same thing with a lot of the things we buy. it's the thrill of the hunt. Yeah and i know this from personal experience. The i i I went through a phase of collecting antique movie posters. That's my. I have a passion for the nineteen fifties b. movies. You know this dreadful films right. The science fiction films well. They're posters generally very beautiful because they put all their money and resources into the post not in the actual film but in any event. These are not works of art. So i went through a phase of of collecting these. And i discovered you could buy them on ebay on online auctions and i soon discovered myself bidding things. I didn't really want. But it was the whole thrill of the chase of the potential of of acquiring the The item it really was driving. My behavior and this actually borne out was really interesting research looking at the activation in the brain. These are using studies. called functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. They show you which areas lighting up during various activities. And what brian nelson. He's the research behind it. What he discovered was that the area of the reward center the area which gives you that sense of pleasure. Drive when you're on. Tissa painting the The arrival of the the goal then. That's what's really motivating behavior when you actually get. It doesn't seem to be so satisfying. So that's the the pursuit of things and i think there are a lot of. I think a lot of your listeners will probably recognize that the the prospect of going shopping or the thrill the chases it were. That's often really what we find outside. And then you take it home on deena sit very very quickly because the other side of the human behavior is that we adopt things very quickly. We think that this'll be a satisfying purchase. We're gonna ever make we gotta home at. Yeah it's good for bit. We want the next thing. So we're on this relentless treadmill trying to find that to recover that that joy the chase that one category of stuff that i think many of us struggle with is the stuff we get from our parents that we get handed down you. You're just so reluctant to get rid of it. I have. I have in a drawer in my office here. A bagful of probably relatively worthless jewelry that came from my mother and and it came to her from her mother. I couldn't more give it away or throw it out. It serves absolutely no purpose except it takes up space in a drawer. Yeah you're lucky. I have a whole attic full of furniture for my in laws. Fortunately passed away up meals. We are not working away. Getting getting rid of this. I think that's a very important point you've made there is our connection material. Things isn't just a financial transaction when it comes to things which to people especially relatives than a choir sentimental value people feel very strongly about. Sentimentality is really important motivation. I think in our emotional connection to physical objects. And i've been doing research in this area for a number of You might be interested about this. I got really fascinated by this by looking at my daughter. At the time. Martha who developed this really peculiar behavior attachment to a blanket. Now i didn't know about this attachment Behavior again. I'm sure many of us. The young children will recognize. Exactly what i'm talking about is usually a blanket or teddy bear and she became inconsolable. If this object went missing and so we had to take it everywhere and it was just this ridiculous behavior was a blanket cheetah we had to cut it into so that we always had a spare backup. Because you know the the worst thing possible was if we'd lose it a moreover when we bought a second one and she knew there were two the second one even though it was identical. She didn't like it. The had to be original. Now this connection this emotional connection with objects in particular authentic original objects and sentimental objects evokes in most of us are this this concept called essentially and we think that there's a dimension if you like when he's one of a better word a property of physical things which make them unique in replaceable. So i often use this as an example for people who don't immediately get what. I'm talking about a wedding ring. Imagine that your wedding ring needed to saco back to the jewelers to be Repair maybe had In its little dead on the jeweler decide just to remove. The damage fit and replace it with a bit of gold from his work show. Would you think it's the same ring and people say yes. It's still the same. It's just being fixed. It's being is being modified and say well imagine that you go back you know. Every day for the next couple of years. In each time he replaces a little bit of. Gold is still the same ring. I'm people generally think it's still the same ring. If this transition is gradual by then. I said imagine that. Jewel that accumulates goal is taken away. Increase the second ring which is original ring and that really flow people. Because they can't really figure out. Is it the same ringer. Because if he went if he took the ring in the day on the first day that you were getting repaired and he gives you a different ring. You say that's not the same ring is there's a property within things that we feel connected to that is it's it's organic is essence of the original ring and this factors into a lot of our rational thinking about the value of things and this is why an original work of art is worth so much more than identical duplicate. Even though you couldn't tell the two apart now some people say oh well. That's what to do with supply and demand and so on. It's not it's to do with a psychological connection of authenticity with who created the original piece of work who wore before and this is why people volume clothing must be worn by celebrities on. It's one of the reasons that we value the personal possessions of those that we care about emotionally and by the way there's a flip side to this sort of positive contagion. It also explains like people would be very reluctant to put on the clothing. A killer which is one of the stunts date several years ago. Demonstrate the power of it. I told people i showed them this cardigan How many of you be willing to wear this cardigan for twenty bucks and people with their hands up said. Would you still be willing to wear it if you knew. It was worn by jeffrey dahmer. The mass murder of course seven puts a hands down so there is this belief that stuff things have a kind of almost spiritual connection with the previous owners. There's an example of just what you're talking about that. I remember from a few years back. That i want to ask you about. I'm speaking with bruce hood. He is a professor of psychology at the university of bristol and his book is called possessed. Why we want more than we need. Are you one of those people like me..

Bruce adam smith Martha twenty bucks jeffrey dahmer brian nelson second ring robin young Tissa ebay university of bristol two mike first day several years ago one category each time one seven second one
"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"c. cuisine" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Just help carbon. Pass them how to do that. So what are you. What are you I think like the the purpose is so admirable. And you're right. There's there's pressure on it to happen. Now what are you. You got to catch people with delicious. Like what are you excited to serve at the restaurant. Well you know we as a whole bunch of different kinds of proteins. So there's all there's rabbit there's benistan elk. There's also the lake fish around the up to fifteen thousand lakes. Turn them soda. And we prioritize purchasing from indigenous producers. I have to indigenous fisheries close by a close by to us. So we can get walleyes northern whitefish and all sorts of lake superior trout in herrings and things like that just like you know so much stuff even insect usage so we have some local Cricket farmers and you know we're just really open for all those pieces but like there's just so many fun flavors there's all these barriers choke cherries berries and all the berries all the plums. All the crab apples and then you get into like well tubers and wild greens while ginger lockdown while onions like there's just so much around us for us it's just fun like looking at. What is our ambitions pantry that really represents this region and what kind of creative foods can we create with that. So that's gonna designing your menu as being really creative with these offerings and You know just just kind of seeing where we go with it and we can explore other regions in our main offerings are going to be rescinded seating but mostly we just wanna open the doors so we can you know bring in guest chefs from the southwest or bringing some guest chefs from northeastern explorers flavors from british columbia from alaska. Whoever there's so much to explore out there culinary in connor sean. You're telling me that native american people don't eat the same thing and it's just the same like we don't all live in. Tv's and it's a big piece. Why we against bribe because like. There's no reason that one piece did identify all of us as our food because it had nothing to do with us to begin left and where to diverse. We have so much amazing diversity. There's so many languages out there. So many cultures somebody religions and you know if we see our future through or you can stop at indigenous restaurants driving across this nation in any direction and being able to experience that you know 'cause you'd come in come across the native restaurant somewhere in ohio or or washington state or wherever it might be and you get to explore what are the true flavors of that particular land space in the histories there. I don't want this to be a downer. I want people to be engaged and to understand what you know. You're talking about but because it's such a painful subject. I feel like a lot of people. Don't want to know and it's the same reason why people don't want to know there was a ahead on you know that stake that you're eating right. It's just like anything that has to deal with pain and suffering and tragedy. I feel a lot of people. Just don't wanna know anything about and we'll use your described to me was. Oh yeah almost. Every state in in this lower forty eight had all kinds of indigenous people in different tribes and different languages and different everything. Where do they go. I know it's a stupid question to ask. But i feel like it's important one for a lot of people to understand again. What happened absolutely. And that's why we think that history is such an important part in this goud opens up the doors to talk about history. People you know people should be reading. Indigenous sister The the indigenous peoples since three the united states by roxanne dunbar. Or it's because it really lays out what happens to all of america's especially in the eighteen hundreds and that's like the most damaging generation you know people don't know that ninety percent of the indigenous population californians out like three decades right. There's just like so much pieces out. There and people just comfortably live without having to think about the land of their on the generational wealth that they've been born into is a direct result of colonialism genocide. And you know all of those things that happened in american history. But you know we're trying to find a positive path through this because you know there's so much delicious screwed around us. There's so much amazing stuff that we can come up with and creates and you know again like we're setting up systems that's hopefully going to go beyond our lifetime that we're going to set up so the next couple of generations down all grow up having access to their own indigenous foods and their cultures know how to take it not to do something way better than i can never do. How much of this is about with this restaurant. And what you've done with your not prophet. is about preserving recipes. Because i can tell you another story. Maybe i'll tell it you know. On his pocket. I found it to be very difficult to find certain tribes diet or written history. How hard is it for you to locate this. Because i found it to be difficult. And that's just me just one project. I was working on. You're doing all of it. Well we know we're not trying to cook like it's exactly fourteen ninety one. We're just trying to understand as much of our ancestors indigenous diets as possible. What we're putting in their pantries and all kinds of dr herbs or insects or our agricultural pieces like what are they have to pull from to utilize. Also it's those flavors so we're looking at a more modernized version. So we're using you know it's kind of one foot in past one foot in the future a little bit because we're trying to understand like all the pieces of in we live in a different world so you have to look at the world through this indigenous lands because sandilands aren't necessarily from here right but we want to look like from an indigenous perspective. Can you eat at the medicine. Can you do something with it. And there's all sorts of questions that you ask that indigenous lens so all we're to do is look at. What is a modern viewpoint of indigenous culinary and how that gonna benefit us however indigenous food systems going to benefit us in the future. And there's just so much because you know indigenous peoples around the world we're able to have agricultural systems that were completely organic right And extremely diverse with all sorts of plant diversity in there that they have been able to maintain for generations of generations then all indigenous peoples across the globe had that huge dollars of wild plants around him what to do. What's food what's medicine. How do you craft with things like the world gave us everything we needed. Not generate. that knowledge is so important because we live so far removed from our own environment across the board and especially with histories the colonial history. They just pretend like nothing happens And we can look a little bit deeper because you look at mexican food way more indigenous senators. You know spanish or french right. Because you have the nixon last corn policy of beans your chili's you have all these things that are really representative of pre colonial mexico. And you know so. It's easy to decolonize because we can go into manhattan you do decolonize. Dinner of what should have been there. If there was anything natural left there right because we have the knowledge of the tribes. The language is What kind of plants. They were growing. What kind of animals and protein seafood there are utilizing and be able to build the pantries to to build those menus off of that. This episode is brought to you by. I'm healthy way dog food. It can be hard to resist sneaking your dog their favorite treats but when it's time to take control of their diet you need a meal that will keep them healthy happy and at the right weight certainly something that i've had problems with my dog savvy as gets older and not exercising as much and was switched out his diet so he's a little bit healthier so try. Iams healthy weight dog food. A kayla recipe with less fat versus imes chunks made with a medley delicious ingredients. 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ohio ninety percent alaska washington america american express roxanne dunbar one foot one project one piece manhattan up to fifteen thousand lakes californians fourteen ninety one connor sean united states nixon spanish mexico mexican
Beyond Meat Launches Beyond Burger 3.0

Smart Kitchen Show

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Beyond Meat Launches Beyond Burger 3.0

"Of the things. I think it was interesting about beyond three point. the. They adjusted the formula a little bit. I think they actually got rid of mung protein. Which i thought was interesting because they added in two point. Oh what any kind of other things that are that you would note about this royce. No the press release. They came out with their. Here's what i do know the press release says it's meteor and juicier for whatever that means the rep told me that they did get rid of the mung protein. They're still pea protein. Based and then it'll be available in stores. Nationwide starting next week on may third. We kinda thought. Something was up. Because i tried to buy directly from their side. A few weeks ago noticed you couldn't and so. Those notions were kind of confirmed this week. So i'm definitely like i enjoy beyond my son really likes it so i'm curious to see how it reformulated. I'm excited to try it. Yeah pepsi versus coke analogy to certain degree in the post to you wondered if that was like this could potentially be a new coq. Ron do you think this kind of a related sites kind of site. Thought as i think that some people have thought that this may be too much power. Aggregating at the top of these new meat brands. What are you. What are your thoughts about beyond. Do you think that's happening. I actually don't think it's happening. Because i was actually i was actually listened. Kinder tech. some people were talking that they try and keep track they. There's eleven hundred plant based food companies. That's not including the cellular of companies. Were around now. They just they hunt them down. And so what's happening is the whole plan is like going into all these little companies. That are starting up. Each one of them has a different angle for a different regional part of the cuisine or different product that similar. And so we're gonna get a lot of

Pepsi Coke RON
Brian Oliveira  Happy Hour at Home, During the Pandemic

Self Made Strategies

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Brian Oliveira Happy Hour at Home, During the Pandemic

"Here are the self made strategies of ryan ali beta excited to do this with you in to To talk about happy our hospitality and then cuisine. Yeah yeah awesome so walk us through how you started happy hour hospitality. To begin with yeah. We started in october twenty. And i say we My partner also named brian. And i and it was born out a change that i needed from the derived of the restaurant industry. And that like seven day week nonstop To something that gave us the ability quality of life and us abbas sustainable business and really It kind of just snowballed from sue small events that we were doing for friends and family that kind of word of mouth. Got us to where we are now. Yeah that's really cool and so you do a lot of catering if people want catered meals you'll also cater parties. of course you'll cater events. How does that all work if somebody wants to. You know book. Happy our hospitality to come in and cook a meal for them or cook a meal for them and a few friends were still in the pandemic. so you can't have a huge indoors. At least we definitely specialize in. I would say smaller than so We love doing the private jenner's that's in private dining You get accustomed tasting menu suited to your likes and favorite dishes and then on the other side. We you know parties weddings showers texas tradition more traditional events on kind of a mix of workshops for

Ryan Ali Brian Jenner Texas
Reem Kassis: The Arabesque Table

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Reem Kassis: The Arabesque Table

"Palestinian rights ream cusses released her debut cookbook palestinian table in two thousand seventeen four much critical acclaim now cast is is back with her second book. The arabesque table contemporary recipes from the arab world the released takes a broader look at contemporary cooking across the arab world emphasizing. How much different countries. Sharon have influence on each other. I spoke to causes a bit earlier on. She started by explaining. Why choosing the name for the book too long then writing it. I submitted my second manuscript drafts without a title for the book but in hindsight is actually a blessing more than anything because the name derived as a result of the experience of writing. And what i learned along the way and the reason we chose. The arabesque table is arabesque. As you might already know is an intertwined hatter or design that is recognized and islamic arabic art and what i wanted to convey with. The book was at cuisine. Similar to this artistic pattern that inspired the title is inherently also infinitely intertwined and more beautiful as a result in addition to that though i mean we were trying to get a name that conveyed what the food was and to call it. The arab table would not necessarily have been accurate because there were a lot of dishes inside. That were inspired by other cuisines intersection of those cuisines. So arabesque conveyed both of those things. You know the intersection at the same time. The idea that it is not purely one regional kind of cooking in the book but tell me more about the approach you took when you were working on this book you say that you wanted to celebrate the evolution of middle eastern cuisine. One thing i specified in the book is the whole idea of the term. Middle east doesn't convey accurately the cuisine of our region because middle east is simply a term for a region that was between the british empire's easternmost colony of india and europe and what really ties. The cuisine of region together is it's being arab and it's acculturation under arab and islamic

Ream Sharon Middle East India Europe
How Automation Can Create a Better Future of Work

HumAIn Podcast

02:28 min | 1 year ago

How Automation Can Create a Better Future of Work

"Thanks so much for joining us on the show. Thanks for having me. David them happy to be here. Well i'd love to tee up for audience where you are today with your startup. You've been scaling up. Very involved with enterprises very involve product releases and this movement is exciting. I'm really interested to hear that as someone who's an educator and developer to see that there's exciting tools out there to build and make products so can you share with our audience. About what tonkin does today. oh yeah absolutely. I think you touched any important point. There duncan We raised a round right before the garona pandemic it's so Of twenty twenty in being going rapidly since. It's very exciting time for us. Duncan is almost five years now. And so i like to say that i've been singing the same song for five years in you know it wasn't the same market as it was five years ago which is a great thing for us in. I think you touched on the important point. What does it mean to enable more people to use software. And what impact would that have own enterprises in business in everyone's life. I think that's what we're all about. It's been amazing to see in the last decade how this movement that started perhaps with companies like your has now grown into these verticals of mar tech and sales tack and building for anyone. What inspired your growth and tonkin to scale. I think the biggest moment for me. It was actually my previous jobs before. Starting talking i was engieering in a public company public softer company in had the opportunity to grow my team quite rapidly join cuisine and gritting their from on handful of people to over one hundred fifty people until so really doing very couple years. Maybe when you think about the challenges that comes with growing operations there's internal challenges and then there's the external oranges of working with parliament and in really walking across different processes. Now i'm a software guy. I've been writing coaches. I was standing result kind of thing in so for me. It software should always be the solution right. Always the first bush to go to an even though we had all those great tools in place and you know the top. Crm's in the top medium project management tools in like most companies.

Tonkin Duncan David Bush CRM
Sable Hotel Navy Pier opening today with Lake Michigan, Chicago skyline views

Bob Sirott

05:58 min | 2 years ago

Sable Hotel Navy Pier opening today with Lake Michigan, Chicago skyline views

"It's a big opening day today at Navy Pier even though the pier is still closed, Big New Hotel is opening and the CEO at Maverick Hotels and restaurants is with us now, Bob Bobby, How you doing, Bob? Good morning bombs. I admire you because let's see Navy Pier temporarily closed probably till spring, and the hotel business is tough right now, But you're going ahead with the big opening today. How do you feel about it All? Honestly, we feel good. I think our timing is right. You know, we finished the construction of the hotel in November and decided it wasn't the right time to open and narrowed forward until today, and It just feels right today. We're telling people that it's probably the only time in history they'll have Navy appeared of themselves and then the period when the period opens, that we think that the You know, there'll be a reverse of activity down counts. Now talk about why you're calling this stable. That's name of the hotel s A B l E. What's that all about? You know, that's a great story for those of your listeners. That historians shit downtown Chicago Lord, you know that During the Second World War, Navy pier was actually Enable training facility and they ward an aircraft carrier off the end of the pier to train pilots and take off and touchdown landings. And that crack carrier was the USS able And we thought that was just a great connection for the pier and a terrific story and we decided to name the hotel after that aircraft carrier disable. Yeah, This is this is quite some property and tell us a little bit about the hotel. You have Ah, lot of meeting space and event space. And what is it more than 200 guest rooms in the hotel? 223 guest rooms at the same time that we're opening the hotel will be opening a new restaurant on the pier Lyrica. Which is I was inspired by Latin cuisine, small plates and and share a bles and so on. The hotel also has about 5000 Square feet of meeting space. And, of course, is Probably five FT from Festival Hall, which is the second largest Free span space in the city of Chicago. So we're blessed with a lot of amenities. Bob, I know you've been in the hospitality of business for 40 years. I'm sure you've never seen anything like we've gone through in the past year with the pandemic. The hotel occupancy rates right now. About half what they were two years ago today, But I love that you're optimistic. Talk about why you you feel so positively about all this. I think we're going to see people come out of their caves in big numbers through the summer months, and I think we're already starting to see it. We've as an industry seen an uptick in reservations, future reservations. Um that where there's very courage Ng on the more that we see on the news people getting their vaccines and that the positivity rate has stayed in the relatively modest number more hope that we have by summer will be living our lives a little more normally, after the summer, we get back into the A part of the year that we live off so conventions and business travelers in Chicago and it might be a little bit more difficult, but I personally think the business traveler might come back faster than most people expect. You know, people do business in the city haven't seen their customers in the year and I'm sure they're ready to get back and text their their customers again. Well with your hotel opening today and also offshore, the world's largest rooftop bar. It's It's a great way to in enjoy the pier before all all the crowds come back and and speaking of those crowds. Ah, and I don't know how much you know about this Bob. But apparently Navy Pier is going to use some new optical sensors to monitor where crowds are and where they aren't so that at least as we get through the final what we hope will be the final months of the pandemic. People can Stay safe on the pier. And and that's the most important thing right now, isn't it? It is. Yeah, that's amazing technology. Yup, That's something that they're going to be using when they reopened this spring, and as far as the hotel goes and and the rooms You're sort of modeling everything so that it it pays homage to the pier and Chicago history. Correct Way had an entirely Chicago based team, including designer Jackie Coup architect designer Jack Cope and make you Construction who built the hotel and Jackie took great care to Not not make the hotel look like a cruise ship, but really not too bad, whole nautical theme and you see it whispered throughout the hotel and really were thrilled with the way that the hotel turned out. We're excited to get people over there. One of the interesting things about you know what we learned it offshore to our surprise was Offshore was not a tourist hang out. It was a local hangout. Upwards of 80% of our business were locals and we think we'll see the same with lyric and we think the hotel will will also be a great amenity for for us to live here in the city. It's uh, the curio collection by Hilton. That's the hotel the stable at Navy Pier and Bob Habib is the CEO at maverick hotels and restaurants. He's the

Navy Pier Big New Hotel Maverick Hotels Bob Bobby Chicago BOB Festival Hall Jackie Coup Jack Cope Jackie Bob Habib Hilton
pisode #35  Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

Conversations pour Elle, partages de sagesse féminine

05:02 min | 2 years ago

pisode #35 Le voyage initiatique de la maternit et parentalit avec Bianca Thuot - burst 3

"With us on the lobster savvas zone. The was pm almost young. Duncairn unix daniels on punk combined and his sons pissy ticket shows kush toll bagel Fox replays on. He added shushma There mickey soc nine now was super allows. this was so in motion. And i'm on the the kiss jan mumbo from the in toss financial concerns me yet put down stairs committee. All the polar dogs s become should body police secret dossiers even modern jeep indefensibly young put on the hostile metro area. Don't kill lou wop are highly. Listen you can lose moisture inch normal analysis To new to new number. don't care. Skiing mongrel geneticists tizzy komo privacy solutions. More lab senior key can you. He ended up. Don't do these emotion. Keith's manifests komo. Hover says it said burial laps yemen ad. Foam kiss turned ma on the. Da shows moldova's young till noon. We'll see a pattern allergy. Lucy bacall tunnels on a cd-rom metal set. Espy la pursue clash. Pf of wa. Who passer washington komo On a duty newly well spa style Example second level year until voc grew in neon new palette bent medlock A sorta p pallet fantasy. Not man and knock them up. You can see on this deserve. Speak here look trap. Kalani fungus kong secure. This is super sandy Tom put the point. Back by the copa habita- homes bhaskar bessemer dot. There are five are were doto the question and data sonate signed on as all put dorothy house. Ski faker bail you. Devolve year this town under file a cuisine and mia to new white house signed on it cuts the and bounce kotova. You're just took on paschi spouse wall septum farm. So michael community agreement signed docile cume of peer pundit poor pe- can you dr pair basketball dominate bonanno cast cylinder labus much. Craig glossy found league dick's p male fiscal sur. Five are tom of walk. It's just a kick acre cuisine. Could to serve democra- chris european malcolm dot com massacre And super attack my bhakta. The league belle pound. I love the minds found evil just wonderful spots if oh nouveau producer. Spirit said whenever say formats if calmly copeland apple dies on me the a mark. I'm so the fam- keep rooster while dope pass on liz off downscale. Vp conquer a nozzle bikes hotter yet. Dope person give the shows but panay ms similar p dishes the savasta savage Plant the kootenai against the for his social museum nesper. Pacifica defy fan cone factory the global and our cats in addition the performance. And the rest. Of the sixes. Not after the war. Just explain me them jobs. We have come up with a quantum abi of board. don't just get dot com. Donald took sa- salad come Less bengals facilitator. Some mr scuola. Paul son vie to see up. You don't don't the caribbean on the wii sipple. Total if die but access simba's school for dawn that built

Shushma Mickey Soc Jan Mumbo Lou Wop Lucy Bacall Espy La Sandy Tom Dorothy House Komo Daniels Labus Craig Glossy Moldova FOX Chris European Malcolm Skiing Keith Allergy WA Bonanno
Interview With Robert Livingston

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Robert Livingston

"How you doing. I'm doing good doctor livingston. Are you bummed. That if you google your name you're going to get one of the fathers of the constitution right or one of these early founding fathers taking all the real estate yes yeah this ranch of being named dax. There's just not a bunch out there right now your christian name it is. It is yeah. My mom and dad had read a book in the lead character's name was dax. And let's go for it where you from originally. So i was born in lexington kentucky and that's where i spent most of my time but i've lived in six states in four foreign countries. So do you have a favorite my favorite place to visit his turkey. Eastern bowl is my favorite city in the world really has the oslo balance of chaos and order if you will oh okay good. I need you to drill down on the order. Because when i look at it looks very bright. Very frenetic very exciting. And i'm a little bit like that's seems maybe too chaotic. There's a method to the madness because there are places. I've been that are chaotic. They're just chaos deal with it but turkey just seems chaotic like this. Is it comparable to any other form or european country or is it its own thing and that's why you love it. It's its own thing. But i would say it's most comparable to spain. I don't know if you've been disowned ensuring people go out to eat restaurants. Don't open before nine o'clock in the party starts at one. Am and it goes to eight in the morning and spain has a different rhythm. And i think that's the most similar country to turkey and its mediterranean so similarities in the cuisine fish a lot of oil you know and then a crazy history. One of the most historical places you could visit. And that's what i like about it too. So you just hit the number one criteria for whether i like cities or don't and that is rhythm so i'll be places and i'm like yeah it's beautiful. That's a big tall building. That's got all the accoutrements of a great city. But there's just no rhythm happening here and then conversely you go down to austin texas. They don't have a ton to look at. And i'm like oh i can feel the rhythm all around me exactly now. How did you end up at harvard. Like most things in life. It had something to do with my network. So i was in england at the time because i had accepted a position because again our wanderers case. You can't tell i. Don't mind packing up and going to some exotic place. And i got an offer to take over as head of organizational behavior department at the university of sussex and i had my own center and when i was there at the center i discovered my real passion. I like to say. I transitioned from being a gardener to being a florist. When i was just a straight researcher i had my hands in the dirt. Cultivating blooms if you will. And then. when. I was head of the centre. I interacted with metropolitan police. The nhl the national healthcare service all these organizations to sort of give away my flowers if you will and so. I got into the florist business. Like how do you arrange these flowers into the perfect bouquet to give it to people at weddings. Because what's the point staying in a greenhouse if no one ever sees the beauty of your flowers and so you know when i was in england i discovered the passion of sort of giving away the science and then harvard. You know i was giving a talk. And they said well. You know we're holding company of entrepreneurs will let you come here and do whatever you wanna do if you don't want publish anymore will let you be a practitioner. But an academic at the same time and i was like really because most places aren't set up you know. Harvard makes its own rules. So i sort of took on this position to be an academic practitioner which led to this book that we're going to talk about which is sort of trying to distill. The science synthesize it assembly like a bouquet into something that people can digest and use to make profound sustainable change around racism. So that's like my purpose in life. Now where did you get your doctor. Degree because lexington kentucky and then ending up england emceeing already. You're privy to to dramatically different racial structures. And i wonder where you went to college if you maybe even a third and that somehow helps you on your journey just to have witnessed all this stuff firsthand. I went from coast to coast to coast and into the mid west. So basically i started my undergrad tulane university in. I did a study abroad in spain. Which is how. I came to know. Spain fell in love with spain. And i majored in spanish. That was one of my things. And then i went to. Ucla started at the gulf of mexico. Coast number one went to california. Ucla that was number two. And i was getting a phd in romance language and linguistics. So something completely unrelated. But i was looking at themes of oppression in latin american literature and colonialism. So i always been interested in that. In undergrad i did the thesis on a comparative study of racism in brazil and the united states but long story short i was hiking in joshua tree. And there was a psychology student. Who said you know you're doing really cool research. Did you know you could do this in the real world. And i was like no. There's a field where you can actually study racism and discrimination. She's like yeah you know. Why don't you come in audit a class. And that was the beginning of the end. So i left that program. I got a master's. I was a heroin from impeach d. But decided to start all over again in social psychology. So i started at yale. Struggled from coast to coast to coast and my professor at ucla said. Don't go to yale because i got into princeton yale. He said go to ohio state. That's like the best program in the country in what you're doing and as a phd student or go to programs not schools. And i didn't think. I could live in columbus ohio so i went to yale and then i was like you know what i can't live in new haven connecticut so the professor at ohio state would you guys take me and fortunately i had my own funding because i wanted. Nsf fellowship. so. I was able to export that i went to ohio state and worked with one of the top people in the field maryland brewer. Who's like the godmother of social identity.

Spain Harvard Lexington Kentucky Livingston England Oslo University Of Sussex Mediterranean Metropolitan Police Google Ucla Turkey Austin NHL Texas Tulane University Assembly Gulf Of Mexico Princeton Yale
Colleen Aubrey On Amazons Huge 2020 And What It Has Planned For 2021

AdExchanger Talks

08:39 min | 2 years ago

Colleen Aubrey On Amazons Huge 2020 And What It Has Planned For 2021

"My guest today is calling. Aubrey the vp of performance advertising at amazon. Who has been a mainstay at industry preview. Now while colleen's title focuses on performance. Her purview goes well beyond that. I think a lot of our previous conversations focused on the branding side of things and it's always a big year for amazon and advertise advertising. Twenty twenty was big in particular. It was on advertising reported. I believe a fifty one percent year over year surge in its last earnings called and booted in great part of by e commerce. So of two thousand twenty was huge for amazon. What does twenty twenty one bring will calling is here to tell us all about that calling great to have you on again. Thank you mine. It's great to be here so you know. Obviously we've all been endorsed for the last thousand million years in that. Interim heavier picked up any any new hobbies new ways of passing the time yes to be honest. Twenty twenty is not going to go down as my favorite year while in the first few months it was a little bit novel working from home experimented with a bunch of new things to take advantage of the opportunity so we don't example as we did a bunch of virtual dinner parties and so we had different cuisine types and then was like shopping. I'll challenge but really the end of the day. i do. Miss the variety of life. Before the coronavirus and i really miss the less structured creative process of sort of working with people in the office having said that I reflected actually on twenty twenty one. I returned to work on the full. January and amazon's cultures really grounded invention and focused on our customers. And i was. I realized how incredible it has been the ways that we found new in creative ways to work together. And i think i'm very proud of the work that my team did we scrambled we adapted and we kept building and we also Cya different that. I think we spent more time looking out for each other up. More time recognizing the difficulties. And i think we became more flexible and then for me personally had develop new ways of engaging with people and be willing to share a little bit more of a puzzle experience and encourage people to take care of themselves. So you're from visual happy. Hours to all hands to community in employee. Donations match programs We worked really hard to be safe and civil customers each other and the communities. We work in the in the past when you and i talk in person. Remember those days You know you always have a lot to say you always have a lot to say about you know new products. That amazon is building the way you guys are kind of increasing the capabilities within amazon advertising. obviously twenty twenty was was a year of tremendous change. There was a huge surge ecommerce companies. That might not have been familiar with ecommerce. Suddenly in it So how did that impact you know your roadmap in two thousand twenty and how does all that activity from twenty twenty impact impact. Would you guys planned to do. Twenty twenty one. Yeah there's questions. I think the first thing was that we realized very early in twenty twenty that it was even more important for us to keep inventing and keep delivering new features and capabilities advertises. You know we. We know that brands are facing a myriad of new challenges and uncertainty. And said you know the the impetus asta keep delivering became even greater because we need to give brands the products and features to be able to adapt and create maximum value from their advertising investments. And that also includes empowering the partners which agencies in tool providers they work with to help them to adapt to this set of very rapidly changing landscape and increase their efficiency by eliminating eliminating some of the more transactional pots of of managing ad campaigns. So i know you can't probably detail your entire twenty twenty one roadmap few free to if you if you want to but can you give us a hint of how you know how specifically things might have might be changing for amazon advertising this year. Well this year. I guess is really a- a case of sort of building on what i think of being pretty significant of focus in twenty twenty And so for advertising specifically we continue to improve the programs and services we have available full partners and these partners airport supporting now sellers who continue to be a big focus for us a vendors and our office and i think twenty twenty was a breakout year in terms of the pace of wanting features to our api and as such getting hat into the hands upon us and into the hands allow advertisers to adaptor that shifting environment in customer needs so as an example we launched four times as many features to our advertising. Api in twenty twenty twenty nineteen and we made progress moving beyond campaign creation management to address content marketing so we won't post than amazon attribution emission product to the api we also launch Api's for product eligibility keyword translation content moderation invoicing and manager account operations. So you know despite working virtually i think we we found ways to accelerate out delivery of features we found ways to work more closely partners and across the full funnel said advertising products. And i think that will drive out. Twenty twenty a roadmap his ford. We've also seen like a new categories of companies jumping into all nine retail due to the due to the pandemic has that has has has amazon advertising had to change or rethink those features in order to accommodate some of those e commerce newbies. Well i can't really speak to the broader category chen's but i can say that your small and medium-sized businesses. Continue to make over. Fifty percent of all units sold in amazon stores and in fact during the past holiday season small medium sized businesses in the us so nearly a billion bucks in our stores and we continue to invest heavily in supporting these businesses so amazon teams launch more than two hundred eighty tools and services to help as i last year. And i think this continues to be a priority as the before do those. Those small medium sized businesses interact differently with amazon versus like the the big corporations you think about what's essential to To a business. There's there's a lot that is that is common And so you know that sort of foams the basis of where we start like. What is the common advertiser will business need. And then of course you have variants in the way that this needs sort of as you get into more of the specific challenges that each segment of customers that we have will be will be working to address. But i think there's some common pieces that are really important regardless you want You wanna be too operate efficiently. And this is i think we're focused on. The api partners in and that group of of businesses will serve on the very wide range of sellers vendors and authors from the quite small to very large on markets. And so you that way. By focusing on that it's a way for us to actually enable everyone to have full access to a feature said to to operate Efficiently and to operate in a way that suits their business whether they using the advertising council or whether they're working with experts on that help them drive growth of the

Amazon Aubrey Colleen Chen Ford United States
Pablo Escobar's Hippos Are Out of Control

Kottke Ride Home

05:33 min | 2 years ago

Pablo Escobar's Hippos Are Out of Control

"A couple of years ago. I read a novella called river of teeth by sarah gaily. The concept of the story is based on a real world event. That almost happened smack. In the early twentieth century a bill was proposed in the us house of representatives and informally supported by theodore roosevelt. The us should import hippopotamuses from africa to the swamp lands of the gulf coast and breed them as an alternative meat source for americans basically starting a new industry in the us of hill. Ranching as you know this proposal never came to be but gala novella now collected into a volume with a sequel and some other stories under the title american hippo imagines magic in alternative history where this did happen only set fifty years earlier. You get kind of gulf coast cowboys on hippos tape story. It's great loved it. I highly recommend it. Or if you just wanna dig more into the facts. I put link in the show notes to a long read on the history of the hippo proposal by john. Mouallem will the reason i bring. This up is because americans in the early twentieth century. Were not the only ones with dreams of becoming hbo ranchers decades later pablo escobar would also get into the hippo game importing four of them to live on his estate in columbia and now forty some years later they have bread and multiplied and are spreading all over the wetlands of north bogo. Talk causing mayhem. Consternation and some real concerns for the region. Scientists say this now invasive species is competing with native wildlife polluting local waterways attacking humans and they project will grow in number two fifteen hundred hippos by twenty forty at that point the scientists say they will be nearly impossible to control their environmental impacts will be irreversible but never mind controlling fifteen hundred hippos. How do you control a dozen or even just one. That's not like you can just google it you know. In colombian officials are not hippopotamus experts and there are unique challenges levied upon this specific situation. I quoting the washington post in their natural habitat. Hippos spend the long dry season crowded into waterways shrunk to puddles. They're vulnerable to disease and predation not to mention one. Another as bad tempers but tropical columbia is hippo paradise. Environmental agency researcher david vary lopez said rain is abundant food is plentiful and they're no carnivores large enough to pose a threat. The animals spend five hours a day grazing on grasses and the rest of their time basking in the cool waters of the magdalena and surrounding lakes and quotes report from columbia not being the hippos natural habitat having in effect on the hippos behavior it also affects the surrounding communities impression of the hippos. The officials tasked with dismantling escobar's estate back in the ninety s. Weren't sure what to do with the one male and three female hippos so they just let them roam instead of sending them to a zoo with his other animals and mostly they did that because the hippos were massive and aggressive no one really wanted to approach them so we'll get the harm be and letting them go well. Kenyans and other african communities with native hippo populations could tell you a whole heck of a lot. You've got hippos from each sex so they can breathe for one and they're also hugely destructive to the environment into other animals. Hippos killed more humans each year than other large mammal. But when you don't grow up around hippos you don't necessarily know that so the hippos have become something of a mascot and columbia. According again gift shops in nearby puerto trail info sell hippo keychains and t shirts at the amusement park that was built on the site of escobar's former pleasure palace. Visitors can tour the lake where several dozen hippos now live occasionally one will plot into a nearby community looking as blase as a shopper on his way to the grocery store the hippopotamuses. The town pets resident claudia. Patricia camacho told the local news in two thousand eighteen. You could say that he now takes to the streets as if it were his own and quote but the hippos aren't as friendly as they may look on t shirts. They terrorize farms and hurt residents at times. The government has ordered the hippos to be shot on sight but there's been pushback from animal rights organizations and local residents so then they tried putting the hippos in a pin but and this is one of the mini quotes from this article. That honestly sounds straight hundred jurassic park. Etcheverry said i didn't know they could jump hikes so then they tried big pens with high enough walls that the hippos can't jump onto them. They've also been focused on trying to prevent them from breeding by cuisine. And then castrating the males. They've been through a steep hippo anatomy learning curve on that front though. Not even being sure where to look. For the animals external reproductive organs turns out. It's a bit complicated. They finally got a system of castration down. But it's costly and complicated so they can only do about one year but the estimates are that the population grows ten percent a year and apart from the bodily harm humans and the destruction of farms the hippos as they multiply host of other problems quoting again. A twenty twenty study of hippo inhabited lakes found that nutrients from the animal's feces were fuelling huge. Plumes of area an algae. These intern reduced the oxygen content of the water. Making it toxic to fish.

Sarah Gaily Gala Novella Gulf Coast Mouallem Columbia North Bogo David Vary Lopez Us House Of Representatives Pablo Escobar Theodore Roosevelt Escobar HBO United States Africa The Washington Post Patricia Camacho John Google Etcheverry Amusement Park
Hello Fresh Had a Great Year, But Microwavable Meals Did Even Better

Business Wars Daily

02:37 min | 2 years ago

Hello Fresh Had a Great Year, But Microwavable Meals Did Even Better

"With on again off again covid restrictions keeping hungry mouths out of restaurants. It's no surprise that twenty twenty was a banner year for cooking at home. That's been great for meal. Kit companies like hellofresh and blue apron. Homebound customers tired of familiar recipes flocked offerings like smashed black bean to start as in meatloaf la mom already and under forty-five minutes hellofresh orders grew one hundred fourteen percent over a year ago according to a statement from the company as much as meal kits have shown during the pandemic though. There were no match for their biggest rival. The microwave twenty twenty was a record year for the frozen food. Aisle sales of microwavable ready meals in the us grew to more than twenty five billion dollars last year. Outpacing the growth of all other grocery items according to market research published by global industry analytics. This increased demand sent items. Like tinos pizza rolls. Marie calendar's is and trader. Joe's tikka masala flying off their ice shelves twenty twenty also saw gin hot pockets that came as a blow to military bases where the microwavable meat and cheese filled bread bars or a snacking staple so report stars and stripes magazine nestle owned stouffer is meanwhile celebrated its record year by debut in a shop where it showcased food themed clothing with slogans like cheese. Self care yeah. That one's a little debatable. Live laugh lasagna. T shirts aside. However microwaveable meals showed they could adapt to the times amy's kitchen which built a brand off organic and vegetarian. Ready meals enjoyed sales bumps up to seventy percent for some of its products as reported by food navigator usa dot com nestle. Meanwhile grew it's plant based offerings by forty percent in two thousand twenty on top of organic and meatless options. Healthy choices have been winners to namely the company's diet brand lean cuisine that is until december when pieces of plastic from a broken conveyor belt ended up in a batch of frozen mashed potatoes. I guess that means this time. At least the lou calorie frozen meals might actually tastes like plastic nestle recalled ninety two thousand pounds of their lean cuisine baked chicken and potato variety as we emerge from the pandemic. It remains to be seen whether pre-prepared microwaveable meals will continue their meteoric rise. Customers might be looking for a break from all that processed food. just ask allison robot celli. Who eight and reviewed thirty five hot pockets in four days for the takeout when recalling the experience she says nobody should attempt this without a note from their doctor

Marie Calendar Nestle Tikka Masala Stouffer LA USA JOE Allison Robot Celli
Best of 2020

Monocle 24: The Menu

07:22 min | 2 years ago

Best of 2020

"Up next we meet one of ireland's finance jeff's kp mcmahon based in galway the michelin starred chefs. Culinary accomplishments include any restaurant and anne robotic cookery school as well as his. Release the irish cookbook. One of the most beautiful cookbook releases off. Twenty twenty till's the story of irish feud and how it has evolved over thousands of years showcasing the richness and variety of food from this green islands with its five hundred authentic recipes. The author jp mcmahon jones me in the studio back in march to discuss the book on how irish food is about so much more than just lamb stew and potatoes as was initially. It was a bit apprehensive because there are many many irish food cookbooks in the twentieth century. But i suppose. I found that a lot of them had been written for an irish audience or perhaps people travelling to ireland. It was important for me to try and give an international dimension and was one of the reasons why publishing with fight on made a difference because they have a global reach and it was in order to try and change the perception of irish food. I think also because we have a restaurant called a near which is will mission star restaurant. We've had it for ten years and we've been investigating irish food for ten years and i felt a lot of the things that we've been doing over. Those ten years weren't in cookbooks. And some of them are very old things like using seaweed using wild food in different ways. And i wanted i suppose that a record of that and that was the start i think the initial for doing it was a had traveled a lot to different places and taking part in chef events and i realized that are affected that we had really good produce in ireland. I'm we just weren't singing about it now. I took part in events in mexico in america and canada in europe and we were always celebrating the cuisine of a particular area. And as why are we doing this. And why aren't we kind of like saying well. We have really good food where shellfish or or whatever so. They were kind of the driving forces behind the book. Now what do you think. Ireland has been so modest about its food on its culinary legacy heritage. I think there's a certain humbleness modesty to irish people and they're probably not the best people at selling themselves like i think we're frustrated capitalists and we want to do things but at the same time we don't want to come across as being bombastic. I think that's worn element. I think the second element is the famine and the subsequent diaz before that happens. I think that impacted irish food particularly of the twentieth century and on the one hand you had people that did not have that much access to food in art and even though there was a lot of food and then the second part you had people who did have access that is food. Who were i think. Predominantly from the anglo-irish irish element and some has be would call the west brits so the people who would be associated with england and these people who had food. I think we're not considered to be irish often. This kind of tension between the tradition that it goes all the way back at least a thousand years between people on the island and people who have food and people don't have food on who we consider irish what we consider irishness tried to take a very broad perspective on it. And so when you go into the archives of the recipe books that you find are from landed gentry anglo-irish aristocracy mostly on. I think when became independent in nineteen twenty two. We kind push that assignment. But that's not really irish. You talk about going to the archives of research did you actually conducts to gather all these five hundred recipes. You having this book. Some of it was looking at best. Baseball's cookbooks from the nineteenth to twentieth century and looking through tried to pick recipes that i thought represented ireland in that respect i found stuff like say pollen is a river fish that is almost forgotten and offend a wonderful pollen recipe. I think in the nineteen seven book and interest. Enough are fishmonger had just been talking about pollen and nobody easing it and it all goes to europe and his fish from nee in northern ireland. That was one thing. I think looking ass older manuscripts was wonderful thing. Because i love history as well and looking at how people wrote recipes and how they i suppose. There was a certain assumption in recipes that the person who was reading new it already so the method was very very scant and often the recipe books were household management books. That would be passed down from mother to a daughter to a granddaughter so people could be able to cook the recipes. Were very interesting. A lot of pickles. Stuff a lot of preserve stuff because there was no frigid. So a lot of salting like i suppose. There's almost like how to live because if you couldn't do these things then you in trouble. Did you come across many recipes that had been practically forgotten already. Yeah like one or two some that we probably would not eat now. One was pickled herring. Which i thought was really interesting because i did a story and friend of mine because i thought didn't they meant herring and she was like no. That's terron lake orion and i was like wow because there's one heron galway and flies up and down and if anyone was to pick them i be in trouble but the interesting thing was that it reminded me of like an s quebec spanish dish where they cook fish or chicken and they covered in vinegar and wine solution and essentially that was the recipe and the recipe started off was like chopped the heads off one hundred hereon got and viscera them. That was the start of the recipe. And i was like wow. That's already a big mess. Some of the other things that are still useful. I think i put it in was quincy and quincy eric. Something that are not native to ireland but there was a lot in the seventeenth and eighteenth century that would preserve a lot of quences and so preserved. Quincy was what i would call mark cross again and again and again and also recipes would almonds. The irish were obsessed with amines. Which again is one of those interesting things to think about because again. Do not come from ireland.

Ireland Jeff's Kp Mcmahon Jp Mcmahon Jones Galway Europe Diaz Mexico Canada America England Northern Ireland Baseball Quincy Eric Quebec Mark Cross Quincy
Like Water in the Desert

Gastropod

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Like Water in the Desert

"Philip start by introducing you all ramona. Button of ramona's american indian foods. I am Pima living on the pima reservation here on a hill river. I am also have donal them from south of here. They used to be known as the papagos. But now they're called the on them and the p. r. on them that's my other half mesa river people. And i'm gary ramona's husband terry button ramona. Interior farmers their farms about an hour. Southeast of phoenix on the way to tucson and the whole region is a desert. The sonoran desert includes phoenix and tucson and parts of california and it stretches all the way over. The border into mexico. Ramona's ancestors have been farming in the region for thousands of years and her dad kept the traditional live on the reservation where she grew up. My father did the wheat. He did the tempered. Beanstalk brown swam bob and the white tip rabin which is the start about and he did. Squash the gabon. Ceos watermelon and sugarcane and the black eyed peas just us above and chilies mostly. I don't for his chili. And those tilles are part of what brought ramona and terry together. Ramona had left the reservation to work as a nurse. In south dakota terry was there studying lakota songs and culture friends introduce them and they told ramona. That terry had picked up a few words of pima as well. That's the language of ramona's people in the south west. So terry tried out his rudimentary pima on her. And i said well you're saying it correctly but you're Die like accent is different and so it was a little bit hard to decipher. But i could understand him. So i said well Maybe we're a good match and so it happens. And then when i came when i met ramona the first experience i had with southwest cuisine was her dad's long green chilis and they were so hot they blistered my lips. They turned white. She would send him to me in the mail when i went back to school. Share with some of my buddies. Nobody could eat them and her dad. Pretty famous actually in the local community as well known for he's used to sell small brown paper lunch sacks with chilis and he'd have mild and medium hot he regulate a chilly temperature by the way he irrigated his chile's he wouldn't let anybody else water his plots not just because he was manipulating the firing of his tilles. It was because the water itself was so rare and so precious. There was never enough. A shirt is a place full of things other than water. They get a bad rap because they have low rainfall and It's as if they're empty spaces. Gay napkin is a desert agricultural ecologist. And he's written more than a dozen books about agriculture and the desert and its foods. He lives an hour south of tucson also in the sonoran desert within a mile and a half of where i am sitting right. Now we have evidence of forty five hundred years of agriculture in the form of corn remains from an archaeological site. So i am in the valley in the united states with the oldest history of agriculture. Yeah well as far back and farther back than written history can go. The people were farming. Here when padre eusebio kino who was the first non indian person to come into this country came here and visited the payments in sixteen seventy five. They were irrigating their fields with diversions from the hilo river at that time

Ramona Terry Hill River Mesa River Gary Ramona Terry Button Ramona Pima Tucson Beanstalk Brown Tilles Phoenix Sonoran Desert Donal Rabin Philip Gabon South Dakota Mexico
A Bulgarian Feast

Travel with Rick Steves

06:13 min | 2 years ago

A Bulgarian Feast

"Let's start today's culinary edition of travel. With rick steves for the sampling of bulgaria's lively food traditions. That's one country where you definitely want to be invited over when he was going to be a feast as a crossroads of dynasties for centuries gary is one of the oldest tenure in it is a proud cuisine based on all of these cultures that have come and gone it. Mir's it's complex demographic makeup end it's fascinating history. You can learn about people through their museums and art and you can also learn about a culture through its kitchen and right. now we're going to is. We're joined by stefan motza jeff and we're gonna talk about book garin cuisine seven. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me here. Ick stephan how does bulgaria's history and it's complex ethnic makeup show itself in your cuisine. It's interesting question because we have always been. At across of civilizations turks greeks mediterranean culture slavic culture and all of these different cultures they reflect in our cuisine. And this is the reason why. Our cuisines has many specifics. Okay so you're gonna take me out to dinner and we're going to demonstrate that. What are some dishes that would illustrate the many different invasions that bulgaria has endured the first and most traditional dishes actually liquid. It's our alcoholic beverage. Here rakiya we start every meal with rakiya typically made of grapes or other fruits while we're waiting for ourselves to come. We hear foley. Our first sakir finished your drink the rookie through the meal. Exactly okay. So the first course would be solid kind of salad may have the most traditional one East coat subsc. Sarut literally means a solid from subscribe region this region our capital cities software. So around sophea. But i find that every meal all across bulgaria the beloved chops ca salad. Yes it's like our traditional south in every single restaurant from the obscure the most upscale restaurants to those in the remote villages. This is a must on the menu. If you are familiar with the greek salads. It'll be something close tomatoes cucumbers onions peppers. The best peppers are not the robust but roasted peppers roasted peppers s and on the top. You put some cheese. Typically countries couches. Yes and increase it a slab cheese. Yes is a slab of jason here. We grated cheese. Stefan when you eat the very best shops ca salad. You've been eating at all your life in connecticut. This is really good. Why is it really good. really good. What distinguishes a chops salad. I this is the cheese. The cheese chase is important and the other thing the peppers. they must be roasted in some restaurants. They don't want to work quite much in the kitchen. So they're all but roasted peppers and cheese. I've catcher this is travel with rick steves. You're talking stephan. Both jeb about garin cuisine. Okay you've had your salad. What comes next after salad. It came to the main course. Our main course. Of course a lot of grilled and barbecued meats kickboxing or give up is means meet crooked and meet bo grilled meat balls so these are minced meat or meat balls stuck on long stick. No no no long six. No no. they're just like pure meet. Maha put on the grill and then put on your plate. What kind of spices. Oh all kinds of spices. Actually the spices that we use of course a lot of parsley a lot of do savory. These are very traditional spices and on top of that. We have one very traditional shot in a soul this mixture of different herbs. This is a sauce. It's not a sauce. It is sort salt. Yeah it's okay. Bold colorful sought and different herbs. So red paprika sage savory everything put together and we dip our breath insight and we just enjoy. That sounds very good. Do you have an influence of greece. Greece's a big culture and and a lot of ways. You have the similar environment in your cuisine. What sort of greek flavor would you find for sure. One of the most traditional meals that bulgarians belief. It is bulgarian. It is the moussaka sexually coming from our southern neighbours from from the greeks but here in our version we add just minced meat and potatoes. We don't at zucchini or eggplant inside. No potatoes mainly towards the potatoes and and the minced meat in greece. Of course they have a lot of these appetizers. You have this way of serving people family style plates yes. It is also very popular in bulgaria. The missouri style intellectually is the same word that we use for that. We have different. Appetizers some Cheese some dry sausages and also different dips. Now i'm remembering some beautiful cold soup kind of a vegetable called supporters that this is called the the atar. It is very traditional bulgarian soup during the summer. It consists of yogurt chopped cucumbers garlic. Do walnuts and a few drops of olive oil on the top sound just beautiful. Yes and it saves us during the hot summer days because it can be quite hot in the summer. Yes that's very possible. You talked about the Grilled peppers in the shop salad. But also i remember when i go to a restaurant. There's a lot of stuffed peppers as part of the main course. Yes stuffed peppers. This could be on the menu of every bulgarian family very traditional one. The most traditional one is to have stuffed pepper with rice and minced meat but also on the other hand we have a stuffed peppers with what which is of course and these are very delicious. Choose sca buick

Bulgaria Rick Steves Stefan Motza Sophea Stephan Gary Foley Mediterranean Greece Jeff Stefan JEB Connecticut Jason Missouri
Will distributing a COVID-19 vaccine be a "logistical nightmare"?

John and Ken on Demand

03:07 min | 2 years ago

Will distributing a COVID-19 vaccine be a "logistical nightmare"?

"About the subject of vaccines. How hopeful here as you said. We could be a couple of weeks months away from starting to see some distribution. Can we get people to take it though. That's the million dollar question. It's gonna be a logistical nightmare. I mean first vaccine. The pfizer vaccine is gosh to have to store that Minus i think ninety four degrees fahrenheit refrigerators can get it down to about ten degrees fahrenheit but Mine is ninety four fahrenheit. This is very very unusual type of product to during product that they've talked about today doesn't have such stringent requirements. But look it's it. It's going to be a nightmare to try to get this vaccine distributed to three hundred and thirty million people across the country. And by the way you know you're going to need two shots three to four weeks apart so trying to keep the the the pfizer product you know at this very very cold temperature in distributing it in a very timely fashion. I don't think people are going to probably be able to get vaccinated in terms of the masses probably into spring into summer. That's the reality. So that's why. I'd be a very very strong advocate of again. You know personal wearing a mask hand washing all the routine things that we've been told now many many times but the vaccine i think it's it's it's gonna be Our way to escape this plague because Your alternative is herd. Immunity who eighty eighty five percent of the population ultimately becomes infected Than than than transmission naturally slows down. But i think it's interesting these two products. But i the the the to mr and a vaccines have been available. You know what it's no cuisine and it's that these are in a Vaccines have come around. I as opposed to the more traditional what we call whole virus vaccines so these products. It's it's great Genetic engineering where you have the body's response to generates a protein that your body reacts to and then theoretically protects you once we had the genetic sequence of the Covid nineteen virus was relatively easy. I mean i'm not a vaccine. Knowledge is but i can tell you. It was relatively easy to make an m. r. a vaccine. What we have to do is prove that it's safe and once we can get that data out. I think that'll be really much more reassuring to the general public. You never really know clinical trials or one thing. There have been lots of medications that did great and a clinical trial. Guess what when they opened it up to the general physician prescribing population and we started giving it to all our patients. They had to pull it back within a year. Because there were all these unexpected unanticipated Medical problems associated with it. And i can tell you that. From personal experience with antibiotics that looked great on paper and once they were delivered into the general population. Unexpected side effects were seeing and the fda withdrew the approval.

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