17 Burst results for "C."

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:34 min | 9 months ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Of debate, and then a vote on whether to uphold or reject the objection to the electoral College votes presented. You could watch this procedure on C SPAN television. Right now. On C Span one TV, she pulled the vice president who is performing these duties in his role as president of the Senate. My pitch in Nancy Pelosi rooming together senators to make their way into and take their seats inside the House of Representatives. Way are hearing is the chatter in the House floor as members of the U. S. Senate make their way back into the House chamber for Enjoyed session objection to the Arizona electoral College vote not upheld by the House or the Senate, and we'll resume consideration of the electoral college vote. From the other states and Vice President Mike Pence presiding over this process. A joint session of Congress to count the electoral vote will resume the tellers having taken their seats. Two houses retired to consider separately and.

vice president Senate Arizona electoral College House of Representatives C SPAN Mike Pence Nancy Pelosi Congress
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

05:55 min | 9 months ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"At noon. Join us as they swear in more than 60 new members. The House Alexis speaker and as both bodies begin their work live coverage Sunday at noon Eastern time. Watch the House on C Span and the Senate on C Span to watch online at C span dot orc or listen on the C SPAN, radio app. This is a re airs. He's been radio programming from Friday. W. C. S. B A from Washington join us on this episode of the weekly for Insight and Information. About six women who are part of the 117th Congress's freshman class. Here is representative Cori Bush, Democrat of Missouri. I realized well, someone acting to run and after this was have been murdered, asked me to run for office. I said no efforts. But then I realized that this is the only way that we get the change that we're seeing. The people that are out here on the ground, the people that are risking themselves that keep coming back after being brutalized after being arrested after all of these things, How do we get that heart into into federal offices? We have to run. And so I thought about my son. I thought about my daughter doing what my son to be The next hashtag. He was 14 at the time. I don't want my daughter to be the next and I couldn't bear that. So I decided to run. Cori Bush, Democrat of Missouri, just one of the members you will hear when you listen to the weekly find it wherever You listen to podcasts next, an event from December 8th as politico hosted a women's leadership. Virtual discussion participants included a Michigan Democratic governor, Gretchen Whitmer. Good morning. My name is Carrie Buddha Brown. And I am the editor of Politico. And it is my pleasure to join the women real community virtually for our capstone event powering forward the year ahead, and there's no better way to kick things off than a conversation with Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer. A Democrat who is in her first term and governor. Thank you so much for being here with us. I'm sure. Yeah, it's great to have you before we get started. I encourage all of you tuning in to follow us. Follow the conversation on Twitter, using the hashtag rule with us and share your questions and thoughts by tweeting at Politico Live. Let's get going. Governor. I want to start with the role of state governors in 2020. You were only a year into your first term serving as governor when Cove it hit. And on top of this, 2020 has thrust governors into the national spotlight in significant ways from fighting the pandemic to climbing out of a recession. Racial injustice, protests, of course, and a volatile presidential election as you reflect back on 2020 what has been the toughest decision you've had to make and why. Well, there's no question that there's no playbook for the nation's governors to be in the midst of a global pandemic, something that hasn't happened in 100 years on dealing with the recession. That's a company that but on top of it to have a federal government that was in such disarray around, harnessing the power intelligence and Will of the American people to fight our common enemy. And so these challenging times have. I don't know that I've even processed 2020 and I probably will in 2021 at some point, But I will say that you know, as one of the governors that has been trying to leave my state through this. I am grateful that I've got other governors with whom I can share information and thought processes, then share. You know the difficulty with which We are trying to make tough decisions. Think the decision early on to take kids out of school one that weighed heavily on me as a mom with kids in public school, ongoing that when you take 1.5 million kids out of Michigan schools, half of them will not get the meals that come to rely on for Monday through Friday. And so each decision whether it is not having in person dining or it is kids out of schools has all sorts of repercussions that we have to plan for and seek to mitigate. And so I would say each of these decisions is is tough. But that was maybe one of the first heard us once we had to make good. We're gonna We're gonna come back to that in a little bit Cove it and how you personally have handled Of being a mother who has kids at home. Learning virtually LFT. Here's some tips on how you how you manage that I would like to switch is quickly to the election Day Fallout. Michigan You know, Election Day we're month passed it. But the fallout continues one of my reporters here, Tim, Alberta, who is a Michigan native lives there now in records from Michigan. He had this pretty big piece in our publication two weeks ago, that really focused in on how Michigan became the center of these unsubstantiated voter for God claims. Uh, the speaker of the House of the Michigan House of Representatives. The Chatfield told him told my colleague Tim, Alberta, that the party his party made a mistake by not allowing for the pre processing of absentee votes which resulted in the backlog and a lot of the controversy that surrounded this election. So company after 2022 10, do you see a need to push for Changes to election law so you can head off any of the sort of similar problems going into the next election cycle or 2024. What are your plans around that? Well, I do. And I was pushing for that, and the Legislature only agreed to one day early processing. We were seeking to have a lot more time. Florida I think has 40 days or something like that, You know, certainly in the midst of a.

Michigan politico Gretchen Whitmer Cori Bush Michigan House of Representati Missouri Tim Senate Alberta Twitter Washington Carrie Buddha Brown Congress Cove representative W. C. S. B
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:01 min | 11 months ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I had a question if that's okay, Yeah. S so I'm pretty familiar with this 3/5 compromise and I understand what it is, but I was just curious like how did it come to 3/5? Because that's like, super specific thing. You know, I know, like why it is Don't really know why specifically Dreyfuss. I am not sure anyone knows why specifically 3/5 like so many things that the convention we have very limited sort of. No Taking on the nature of the debates on did varied from moment to moment because There are a handful of people who were delegates who kept a journal or a diary during it, and most of those are very spotty or like you might have days go on, and their diary just says attended convention today. The entire what happened? James Madison tried to take as took about as complete notes as we could, but it just seemed like scribbling 18 hours a day. All things were going on, so we never. He didn't always capture it. Everyone said in every moment, so you have like him talking about like them debating things like a 3/5 compromise. Not really going into like, what were the difference specific? Fractions throughout. 3/5 must have sounded good enough to everyone is probably because that's often what things how things worked at the convention. Is that, um They would decide that that number sounded satisfactory to everyone. So something like also, like y two year terms for the house, you know it was like, Well, someone proposed four and people are like, Oh, that's too much. Too long and so has proposed one and it's like, Oh, that's not long enough. Someone said to me like Yeah, that's good. And so like it is probably just sort of a matter of the South. The Southern states being like okay, getting three fit. We'd rather they. The South came with a proposal that slaves counted as full individuals for apportionment. Really increase their power in the Congress. And then there are other There's some members. You wanted them that sleeps that the count is all it cut it all. So 3/5 like this was good enough for everyone to say fine or enough people to stay fine. But why 3 to 3/5 probably remains a mystery unless somebody's done some really good sort of historical work that I don't know about. Other questions. All right. So let's run through how the electoral college works sort of step by step and from 30,000 ft. And what the outcomes of that have been like. So how does it work today? Let's talk about how working 17 89, But how does it work right now? Right now. You have 538 electoral votes as part of the college and given election year before me before. It is very simple. Each state gets, too, which is the number of senators they have, plus the number of house seats they have so Utah's four members of the House of Representatives Plus the two senators that every state has so it has six electoral votes in the Electoral College, another state that has 10 House members would have 12 electoral votes in the Electoral College. In this way. It's sort of Almost roughly proportional to the size of the state by population, but with smaller states waited a bit heavier because they get that to seat boost a matter or to vote Bustamante how small they are, and then consequently, larger states sort of, like, ratchet it down a bit, because it's not clearly proportional. The District of Columbia. It's three votes, no matter what, under the constant under constitutional amendment prior to the You're somewhere between? I don't remember. Now, I think maybe 19 seventies, The District of Columbia didn't get to vote in presidential elections in have any votes in the electoral college. And so that was an amendment tacked on that D C would get three which at some point, maybe come awkward because at some point D C may be large enough to have Um To through it. The regular apportionment scheme have four votes, but I'll still be locked into three. Such is the life of Washington D. C of always being either under or non representative in the government, along with Puerto Rico and various other parts of the United States to win. You gotta get a majority of the votes, which is 270. You notice that 538 is the total number of votes so you can't have a tie. It is possible to have the electoral college come out 2 to 69 2 to 69. That's a nightmare for everybody. But you need to 70 at minimum to become president. If you don't come to 70 doesn't matter if you have more than your opponent. So if you had three candidates getting electoral votes, you could have a way you could have sort of its flight in such a way that no one gets a majority and therefore nobody wins at the Electoral College stage. Exactly how many votes each state gets gets reallocate ID every 10 years after the census, just the way just like we reallocate House seats based on the census every 10 years because the formula is simply Two plus the number of house seats. So if you tower to pick up a seat and then coming census, which is unlikely to do But if it were, it could go from having six electoral votes to seven and other states may gain or lose electoral votes, Justus they'll gain or lose seats in the House of Representatives. A lecture in American history. What Utah political science professor James Curry on one side all is said and done votes for the president or cast by the 538 electors in order for there to be Winner decided this is essentially what the outcome of the process can look like. This is what we call a car to graph of the 2016 electoral vote. From the electoral college and the number of things that notice here one. I'd like to show this because it shows the size of these states based on the number of votes they have, rather than based on the either their land area or populations. So this is an accurate representation of the size of each state within the electoral college and also lets you louse you more clearly.

House of Representatives Utah president Dreyfuss District of Columbia Congress James Madison United States Justus Columbia Bustamante James Curry professor Washington D. C Puerto Rico representative
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:47 min | 11 months ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Nation's credit even system was well capitalized at the start of the pandemic remains so today with high levels of network and ample liquidity. This strength has allowed credit. He has to adapt to the operational challenges resulting from the pandemic, total assets and federally insured, crediting his rose 18% over the year aiding in the second quarter 2020 to $1.75 trillion Credit even shares. The deposits rose by nearly 17% to $1.49 trillion since mid March, is furious works diligently to provide credit things with regulatory relief and much flexibility so they can continue to safely serve their member owners. We've also adjusted our examination program to particular staff, and we all continue to work remotely and effectively. We continue to examine for compliance with the bank Secrecy Act and potential cyber security risk helping to ensure our credit union sister remains secure and resilient. We've issued 11 interagency statements and 20 guidance letters to the industry to date. Hoping credit means to address emerging risk and implement the regulatory and statutory changes that have been made in response to the pandemic. The N C U. S provided over $3.7 million in technical assistance to small low income and minority credit issues in the former guard, 2020 Community Development Revolving loan fund allocation. Which went directly to covert 19 assistance. The credit even systems network increased 6.8% over the years to $182.9 billion. The aggregate net Worth Raceway for the system stood at 10 point or 6%. Well above the 7% statutory requirement. The sheer insurance fund is also strong and the equity racial remains well within the statutory.

N C U. S
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:38 min | 11 months ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And from earlier tonight Want to show you again Victory remarks by the president elect Joe Biden, vice president elect Comma Harris, There is the lineup for C SPAN television. You can Tune into C Span one and continue to Ah watched his re air of the remarks made earlier this evening by Joe Biden in Common, Harris. Scanlin with more on tonight's speech will grow with the The Biden Victory speech tonight from Kamala Harris as well still waiting concession remarks from President Trump and those likely won't happen anytime in the next days soon as legal challenges will continue from President Trump and his team, But the Incoming Biden administration, wasting no time with what may be ahead the Hill reporting here that President elect Biden reportedly plans to issue executive orders, reversing a number of President Trump's policies, including rejoining the Paris climate accords, repealing the ban on immigration targeted many Muslim majority countries and Maura and some Publications that had been friendly to the president. Certainly early in his administration. This is the Drudge Report, Matt Drudge tweeting this this evening or the this morning? You're fired from the Drudge Report. This will be the look of the New York Post Phil Corso with the post weeding their front page after 144 million votes, five days of counting and the squeaker winds in the rust Belt states, America finally gives her verdict. It's Joe Time and this report from NBC local in Washington D. C. A mark secrets. The reporter, the owner of a D C liquor store, told news for that he sold more bottles of champagne today in the past New Year's combined That's from NBC for him, and we want to get your thoughts on tonight's speech this election five days of counting as bill, noted Caleb in Alaska, he voted for Buying Harris ticket. What did you think of of of the president of the President elect's speech? I found his speech. Amazing. I feel like we have a president in office who is finally going to be a president for the people and not just for his supporters. What line What line stood out to you. The one where he one thing, he said. He said I'm not just the president for Red States or for Blue states. I am the president. I am an American president. Um, this being my very first election. I'm so proud to see Joe. Taking this election and winning the vote of the American people, and I'm excited to see what the next four year has in store for us. What do you think she topped his agenda. Um I think what your top his agenda is definitely covert 19. We need to get this under control. I have friends in other countries around the world who look at America as the laughing stock of the way that we're handling. This virus is awful, and it's not able. We're not controlling it The way we should be doing If we're the greatest country in the world, we should have this under control some of your thoughts earlier today and again, you can watch the three air of the remarks and women's in Delaware from Senator Kamala Harris, now Vice President elect Kamala Harris and President elect Joe Biden. We are airing those on C SPAN television as we have C.

vice president president Joe Biden Senator Kamala Harris Matt Drudge Trump Drudge NBC Joe Time Buying Harris America C SPAN Joe Ah Maura Paris rust Belt executive Delaware Phil Corso
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Santa Judiciary Committee chair Lindsey Graham. Now putting on a mask, so doesn't look like things are completely solved yet microphone problems in the Hart Senate office building during Day three of the Judiciary Committee hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney Barrett. If you missed any of today's hearing, or the previous two days, the opening statements on Monday in the first round of questioning on Tuesday we haven't all archived on demand at C span dot or some of the other headlines today, Judge Barrett saying. No one is above the law, but not saying one way or another. If a president has a right to pardon him or herself. Also, judge Barrett asked about how she feels about allowing cameras into the Supreme Court. Republican Senator Chuck Grassley asked to that earlier. Another interests of mine that our priority at 87 years of age won't live long enough to see done. But I've discussed cameras in the courtroom and introduced legislation on that over the last 15 years. It's not a very popular subject. Judge Souter joke that he'd have to roll over in his dead body before they put cameras on the Supreme Court. While I can respect that point of view, I totally disagree. Many of us believe that allowing cameras In the courtroom would open the courts the public and bring about a better understanding of the judiciary's for many years. That bill that of introduce has been called the Sunshine in the courtroom and a bill to give judges that discretion to allow media coverage of federal court proceedings. I'm also close sponsor Senator Durbin's built to allow cameras in the spring card. I understand that the seventh Circuit Court of Appeals where you currently serve adopted procedures to allow request for video Recording of oral arguments as well as public release of the recordings. That script has your court had any problems with these procedures? What are your views on allowing cameras in the courtroom? If confirm, Would you keep an open mind about allowing cameras in the Supreme Court? I would certainly keep an open mind about allowing cameras in the Supreme Court. Senator Chuck Grassley, questioning Supreme Court nominee Joe Jamie Cockney Barrett earlier today and C Span has supported this movement to get cameras into the Supreme Court. Should that ever happened. You can you'll be able to watch the case is alive on C SPAN television gavel to gavel. Still waiting for the hearing to resume. They've been having microphone problems now working on the voice of a half an hour delay as they are in the middle of a questioning round 2 20 minute each for each senator, Senator Blumenthal was in the middle of his questioning when the microphones went out. This's a re air. She's been radio programming from Wednesday. W. C S P A from Washington, The Hill newspaper reporting top senators on the committee on Wednesday, quizzing the nominee on a looming case that could determine the fate of the Affordable Care act. The Judiciary Committee chair Lindsey Graham, and I and Feinstein, top Democrat on the panel. Kicked off the third day of Barrett's hearing, pressing her on the health care case. And if the individual mandate mixed by Congress in 2017 can be struck down without taking without tanking, tanking the entire law. We'll play some of that exchange and break away as soon as the life hearing resumes here is Senator Lindsey Graham. Questioning Judge Barrett. This hearing has been more about obamacare than has you. Obamacare is on the ballot. If you want socialized, single payer health care that's on the ballot. Why many of us subject Obama care? It was written and passed on a partisan line. Think on Christmas Eve. Most big changes in society have more buying than that. You're talking about 1/5 of the American Economy. And as I said yesterday from a South Carolina point of view, this is not worked out. Well, we started with five exchanges were down to one. You have one choice for rural hospitals have closed. Premiums have gone up, not down by an average of 30%. And when you look at the formula used by Obamacare, I can understand why Senator Harris likes it the way it is. I can understand why Chuck Schumer likes it the way it is. Uh, three states get 35% of all obamacare dollars. New York, California, Massachusetts. There 22% of the population in South Carolina. If you had a patient formula, no matter where you live, you got the same contribution from the federal government. South Carolina would receive almost an additional billion dollars. I don't blame California, New York and Massachusetts for warning Mohr. People in South Carolina should blame me and center's got for except Sing that construct so when it comes to healthcare will have our different positions. But today is about you. And today is about whether or not you're qualified to serve on the highest court in the land. Severability. Can you tell me again? I know you've been asked 100 times the Doctor of severability. What? What does it mean? Push. Push the red button. Thanks. So, no, I can't hear you. No, it's not. There we go. There we go. Okay, go. So the doctrine of severability is a doctrine essentially of statutory interpretation, and what it means is if you have a statue on the affordable care Fact is obviously a very long statute. If there's one provision within the statute that's unconstitutional, the question is whether that one section can simply be rendered null and excised from the statute severed so that the rest of the law stands or whether that vision is so central to the statute that it's unconstitutionality like once it's pulled out, the whole house of cards collapses and the presumption is always In favor of severability. It's a question of your intent. But the main thing is the doctrine of severability as a presumption to save the statute of possibles that correct that is correct. So I want every conservative in the nation to listen to what she just said. The doctrine of severability presumes, and his goal is to preserve the statute if that is possible. S O. From a conservative point of view. The generally speaking we won't legislative bodies to make laws, not judges. Is that correct? That is correct. And would it be further true that if you can preserver statute he tried to to the extent possible. That is true. That's the law folks. Senator Lindsey Graham questioning Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney Barrett. Earlier today, as the committee met for Day three at 9 A.m. Eastern Back live to the committee room, which has been in a recess for about a half hour because of audio issues. The microphones went out just as Senator Richard Blumenthal was getting underway with his questioning, replaying for you some of the key moments from earlier today and find it all at our video library. C span dot organs Soon is the hearing resumes. Life will take you back live on C Span..

Supreme Court Senator Lindsey Graham Senator Chuck Grassley Amy Cockney Barrett Joe Jamie Cockney Barrett Senator Richard Blumenthal Judiciary Committee South Carolina Santa Judiciary Committee Senator Durbin Circuit Court of Appeals senator Senator Harris C SPAN obamacare Judge Souter Chuck Schumer president Hart Senate
"c." Discussed on AstroC?bala C?smica

AstroC?bala C?smica

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"c." Discussed on AstroC?bala C?smica

"Up so low. got. Them more? You. Did! The Bachelor. You know. Our love new. His. Single young worship. Even though crappy. League other. An okay. So, you See on losing Romania Super Bowl. Is the sound. Your Low Was Yours the sound movie. From. He's. The. Most these days and blended all. neagle gays in La Familia, you. enjoyed. A. Rebel. Out Nico, so. Mindy, this'll! Know the aim. Be! With you for? This. For loans. From the job. Is Well. I seen even. Get Alone Eagle. Movie unless. You Down this. Season our get quite a few. Only. GonNa get him we are. Our is more honest either the neal's formerly Dowell loggains. Via, she said this were. Pushing Weekends. Slowly. Many other. Shoe. Though he says we. Do. We got. Your body dog. Wow this. By. This. Is. Over? We're getting over the other see. All. Yeah. He. More, how? Do we. Source of your. Take. On. Game Goro for not. Doing These was. Seem reasonable washes other game. From. Donald do even. Though? Is. Forgotten. Borough. Who? Our MINI ESPN occasional gives one of. The Menu I. Need. Somebody you need. To slow. Held us. Held a diva. I! Doubt. They'll who committed days you can. Do they omitted the. People with knowing this stuff either is on. Department? Missile. Legal what so I think? W. believed. They believe she or He. What I why you out by blood. Or your. Luggage. It shows you that he has. The. Is. Even think. Louis C.. His. New Goal..

Nico Dowell loggains neal W. Mindy Romania Goro A. Rebel Louis C ESPN Donald
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Question yeah we'll come back we're going back and forth so go ahead thanks I've been following the Russian situation early on because a friend of mine I had a significant other for twenty years since the money laundering researcher I don't want to mention names but he works for someone who's on the network on a regular basis so I was aware of it now based on all the information that all of us now and one of his genius son said we get all the money meaning from Russia yes do you think he owes Russia multi millions of dollars and that's why he's such a panel just based on your information it I mean my information is the same as everybody in this room I don't have any secret sources I follow the news maybe more closely than most people I'm obsessive about M. S. N. B. C. is never off always on and it's amazing how selective hearing is that I can tell when it's something I need to really listen to and I suddenly you know golf and I rewind to the start of it and it does seem that there is Deutsche Bank let's not forget them the Deutsche Bank in Russia have significant financial interest in him based on what he and they say if we get financial records ever will be able to know for sure whether that's true why Russia originally picked him as the person they wanted and it's clear everyone in this room it was Russia who interfered in the election it is not you crane it's not a bad person sitting on the bed it is Russia that's clear and the mall report lays that out very clearly as well as does the Senate intelligence committee report so Wyeth's continuing I don't know why I mean obviously he's let it go don't forget all the meetings like the one a trump tower and the fact that he still says he would take foreign intelligence which is you know the federal election laws that you cannot take anything from a foreign power from from a foreign entity doesn't have to be the government you can't even take it from a citizen of Russia or France or England our allies as well and so yeah I mean there's something going on for sure thank you Joe yes thank you so I I I just curiosity I was wondering if with the technology we have today if any fragments of.

researcher Russia M. S. N. B. C. Deutsche Bank Wyeth Joe Senate intelligence committee France England
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Consumer decide so this is an exciting time in transportation with electric vehicles autonomous vehicles but what about the guy who drives in nineteen sixty nine M. G. C. so do that or nineteen seventy five Datsun two eight easy these are the kind of cars I like to drive I think we're gonna have to accommodate a transition period they'll be people who want to hold on to their cars yeah so that is why the you know this whole technology about vehicle to vehicle communications vehicle to building communications vehicle to infrastructure the internet of all things is going to be very important right and so that brings us to another topic which I don't know whether we want to get into back to this whole wifi spectrum mission will be very important critical it's critical in Seoul all by the way I do we have brought four hundred copies of eighty four point oh a Thomas vehicles four point oh the previous administration in twenty sixteen issued a guidance document for a Thomas vehicles innovation it was basically a road map for trial attorneys we don't believe that we believe in the triumph of the human spirit and so we came out with eighty two point all pathway to safety eighty three point all and because technology is changing so quickly we now have new guidance that basically harmonizes the thirty eight different federal agencies that regulate autonomous vehicles drones and these other new technologies this call eighty four point oh and maintaining American leadership in autonomous vehicles so it should be out here someplace if you see a place to pick it up hope you enjoy it he got asked secretary went well these innovations are help driving the economy secretary school Leah how's the economy doing great I mean it's it it really is historic right as I said we've got a three point six percent unemployment that's a number most of us thought we never hear inside right about a.

M. G. C. Seoul Leah Thomas vehicles secretary
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Time when funding for historically black colleges and universities was in jeopardy the White House and Congress came together reach a historic agreement it's president trump who for the first time ever signed legislation to permanently fun H. B. C. use we all understand the importance of a healthy business climate its president trump who's been pushing the public private partnerships he recognizes that there's more money in the private sector than there is in the government we don't want to just keep driving government that so fostering those kinds of relationships to make all the difference this president trump who is overseeing this historically strong national economy and help foster the economic renaissance that kids are work vital lies communities that we need so badly and I gotta tell you it doesn't take a brain surgeon to figure out how incredibly none of these changes have been for our country but for good measure as a brain surgeon I can testify that president trump leadership has been transformative and above all these accomplishments I've come to know the president on a personal level as a friend he's a man who is deeply driven by a sense of kindness and compassion talking to the people who drive the cars are parked cars at Mar a Lago they love him the people who wash the dishes because he's crimes and compassion when he bought Mar a Lago he was the one who for for Jews and blacks to be included in the clubs that were trying to exclude them you know people say he's a race is not a race certainly an act of compassion to help our fellow Americans who are struggling in neighborhoods and true crime this in.

White House Congress president Lago H. B. C.
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:13 min | 1 year ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And the I. T. C. acknowledged in the report that the more strict you make the route country specific rules of origin the more you diminish growth so again directionally we don't have a quantification of this but directionally we know it's going to diminish growth in jobs help bottom line I I think it's very unlikely that this produces any net new jobs and I think most likely it's probably it's it's very small but probably a net negative economic growth relative to where we are today last point on substance here we have a CBO score came out this week you may have seen it it's relatively new and CBO come to the conclusion that the labor rules them I should say that the minimum wage rules on auto production Mexico are it they cannot be complied with and so they won't be complied with and so the alternative under US MCA is that autos and auto parts that don't comply will be hit with the tower the CBO analysis is that that car will in fact going to a fact and course that's a tax on American consumers and it's about three billion dollars on top of everything else US MCA is a three billion dollar tax increase three billion dollars is not an enormous number but it is what it is so let me just wrap up how I think about this site the way I look at this as we took a free trade agreement and added some constructive features taken largely from TV pay but then we slept on an expiration date we impose costly new restrictions on the trading partner we eliminated the dispute settlement mechanism for U. S. investors we drop the intellectual property protection for the most innovative new medicines we gave a big gift organized labor in the form of a process designed to allow protection is to impose further restrictions down the road we'll get little or no extraction on the growth out of it maybe a modest so it shouldn't be terribly surprising this speaker Pelosi a lifetime protectionist and other protections in Congress for spike in the football the AFL-CIO has endorsed this deal it's been two decades since they have endorsed a trade deal and here's my final thought this is almost certainly going to pass probably by a big margin in both houses I just want to stress that this should not be a template for further future agreements this should not be the way we approach trade in the future we should not be looking to restrict trade we should be looking to expand trade thank you very much senator Pat Toomey Republican from Pennsylvania at the American enterprise institute December nineteenth the moderator for Q. NA is Derek scissors with ATI this would be a great time for the twenty some people who are standing up to sit down if they want to the wise you're gonna get a little tired and I would love for you to have questions I also notice that I'm to the left of senator to me as I'm sitting here for just definitely not true but I you know we could thank you for your your remarks and and I could agree with them we could spend the next twenty minutes agreeing with them I agree with you on most trade the general post a trait I agree with you on the intent of keep people in the administration of the guard US MCA I agree with you on intervening in Mexican or other foreign labor market down there's a but right yeah **** dolls let's not talk about what we agree with on let's talk about what we might disagree on or at least you know disagree partly on at and I'll I'll start with a key a key element of this and for you and I'm not sure it is for me as you probably know the administration the president originally wanted a much shorter review period in fact you wonder re appeared in his second term so he can have the option of bailing out of U. S. M. C. A. while he was still president if you won reelection I don't find sixteen years to be a problem trade agreements change in sixteen years where should be evaluating almost every trade agreement after a while the C. as you mention correctly with digital trade you know the situation has changed your new technologies or new trade patterns their new issues that come up and actually I find a review period at sixteen years to be an excellent kind of enforcement you know don't start cheating because we will be looking at the sixteen years later and later in this case sixteen years later a lot better kind of enforcement and some of the other things you mentioned which I would also Jack to so let me come back at you about the review mechanism and say sixteen years as in six years which is where we started it's a reasonable amount of time yeah I create some uncertainty at the end of the cycle but there's going to be uncertainty anyway because the world changes politics change in the in the in the participating countries and I'd prefer to have a review mechanism that's general rather than some of the enforcement mechanisms and I know that you and I both have problems within the agreement yeah so I would disagree with that and and and but but look the point about the fact that the world changes and you need to be able to reflect those changes in a trade agreement I think it's a valid point the way I think about it is you can always revisit a trade agreement anytime you get the three parties together at any day of the week any any year you can revisit it for really any reason if you have any collective will to do so the question for me is what's the presumption you know what what is the default setting is the default setting that it all goes away unless and until you get all three to agree or as the default setting that will continue this what I would hope would be a liberalized free training environment and will make changes when we all agree on what those changes should be so I think it's a question of what's the better default setting the house do you and this is a little bit of a nerdy question but do you read this this particular so I agree with that I think that's the right way to have review mechanism but do you think that this particular one with regard to U. S. M. C. A. is the default setting is to rip it up in the text or do we feel like the default setting is to rip it up because there are some protections both in the administration the Congress to support it so they're still around sixteen years they're difficult to strip it up in other words is of the agreement that's that's that's that's doing this wrong or is it the political supporters of the agreement were really thinking about the review mechanism and that harmful fashion I think it's both okay I I I I think it's both yeah I I think the administration would have taken this in an even more door protectionist direction if they thought they could and still hold Republicans so I think that's part of their motivations to create a an opportunity to do that but yeah but I think it's both I think it's just it's it's fundamental mistake to have an inner second question I am a hundred percent with you on US intervention in the foreign labor markets you know my instinct about investor state dispute settlement is that's US intervention in the foreign judiciary's you know when I think of free trade I don't think of giving extra protection to multinationals you make the terms of the agreement you have an enforcement of the agreement you don't have a special clause for companies just like you don't have a special clause as was added in force and US MCA for all this intervention and into labor so could you make I understand that we win the case is you're a completely around you and I can see it being in the in the to the benefit of American companies to have this provision I don't really see it as a free trade provision I see it as a as a it's to our advantage provision can do you think you can make a a pro trade provision for that for this extra set of authority that has to do with protecting companies a legal rights in foreign countries so I I get that argument but but you know we have a we've got a global infrastructure that says where we have a state department that sets up shop in every single country around the world we patrol the the oceans and and keep the sea lanes open with a very expensive maybe we do things outside of our borders to that that part of which is designed to help facilitate commerce so creating a mechanism to adjudicated dispute in a place that can't be relied on necessarily to to do it fairly strikes me as a a modest step it's it's eminently fair I mean the way I don't think it's a system that's designed to stack the deck in our favor but rather to get a fair outcome and by the way most foreigners investing United States tend to feel like they'll get a fair shake in the U. S. federal court and so they don't opt for the honesty as mechanism as often as as we might I I I think it's a very reasonable provision and I think of it differently from this tax payer mechanism to enforce Mexican labor law that that's I think that's that's a a creation to serve in the U. S. organized labor let me ask you a specific question biologics are important issue because we don't know how you know there there is a growing industry in a very very important the American economy but putting that aside and I realize it's a big thing to put aside what do you think of the I. P. protection in the agreement I. P. is an area of American comparative advantage it's very important both in this agreement any future agreements to have good I. P. protection I know I'm not trying to minimize biologics I just know that's a very controversial issue that you brought up other than biologics do you think the eye peas provisions are pretty good yeah so I I haven't studied that as as in as much depth as I've looked at some of the other things in part because my sense is that that's all movement in the right direction I I do think there should be strong intellectual property protections and I think that the administration the this agreement does improve let me ask you about and I don't you know I'm happy to talk more about the agreement itself and I've maybe we'll have more specific questions about the agreement but a key point that you made at the end and the beginning was you don't want this to be a template and I have two questions about that one of them is look we have a template with Canada Mexico already that was working well I agree with you a hundred percent so you know going backwards towards protectionism in that template seems like a bad idea but what if we extended USMC aid to countries we don't have a free trade agreement with what if we send it to the United Kingdom what if we extended it to Taiwan we already agreed that we could do better right but I'm asking if we took the U. S. M. C. a template which is partly a step backwards in the garden after but used for countries where we don't have free trade agreements would you still see that as a yes backward or forward in global out so the question I think the the question you're asking is is this what we have to settle for right right I mean at I think we have a huge moment a huge opportunity with the U. K. right now they need a free trade agreement with the United States they need one with the European Union as well they're gonna need one with the United States and so I kinda like the prospects for getting a really good one I wouldn't want to start with the assumption that this is the best we can do you know when how many industries we got a pic over there and and impose some kind of restrictions whether it's a minimum wage proxy or or other forms and are we going to have the expiration date which you may not object to but but you know but I would and the underlying principle of it you know we've had administration officials come in a Republican senators luncheon make the argument that we're better off if we diminish the competitiveness of our neighbors and other countries were better off if we can find a way to raise their cost of production because then they can't compete with us as well that's just completely wrong that is a complete misunderstanding of the the merits and benefits of trade so let's not accept that premise and use it to launch negotiations with countries like Japan and the UK were we have big opportunities to have really good trade agreements senator Pat Toomey with Derek sisters of American enterprise institute on December nineteenth and is the question I would try to dock so you because I get to ask the questions in this particular case let's say you SMCA is the template going forward but you can change one provision only one it's the template you're stuck with that we're gonna be negotiating with Britain we're gonna be negotiating with Taiwan whoever we're gonna be negotiating with and you can pull you can say I want this this part one provision changed or free trade provision what's the provision well so I will interpret that question to mean what do I find most objectionable and I would say that the treatment of the auto sector is the most disturbing part of the the the the willful systematic mechanism to take away the only competitive advantage one of our neighboring countries on our counterpart has to diminish their productivity to raise the cost of their products to American consumers that just so goes to the heart of this that to me goes to the heart of trade more than the expiration date does more than the investor state dispute settlement mechanism so if I had to pick one thing that would be the last thing I would want to see replicated be that okay well I certainly whenever governments pick out sectors and decided is favoritism or punishment or whatever that cuts against people support open market so I'm with you I I I do have I want to open it up to the audience not that I don't have more questions but I want to follow up a little bit on that one of the key elements of treatment at auto sector has to do with rules of origin right which you're very familiar with I think most people here familiar with because you're familiar with trade but I'll just explain it it it basically is a rule on how much has to come from inside the trade agreement versus how much can come from outside the trade agreement and there are advantages to loose.

T. C. CBO
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Questions yeah she's been radio W. C. S. P. from Washington we'll hear from historian Kevin love in he addresses the long held belief that some African Americans fought for the confederacy the civil war so thank you for joining us this evening I am getting please be as a director programs exhibitions and community partnerships for the Massachusetts Historical Society we are apparently exactly on time as always it's nice to see some new faces in the audience if this is your first time visiting the mass historical site and like to extend a special welcome to you we are the oldest Historical Society in America we hold a collection of over fourteen thousand manuscripts and objects it is truly breathtaking collection we make all this material available to the public for free we also host academic seminars educational workshops rotating exhibitions and of course many many public programs based on the subject of tonight's talk I thought is worth highlighting some of our upcoming public programs that explore African American history most notably we are hosting a four program series on the legacies of sixteen nineteen this series stars from the fact that this year is the four hundredth anniversary of the arrival of the first and slaves Africans in the British colonies in North America this series will discuss the history of Africans and African Americans in the American past with each program featuring scholars will elaborate on a theme from the perspectives of seventeenth eighteenth nineteenth and twentieth centuries are the first of these programs actually passed it was a couple weeks ago we still have three more to go so if you have a chance to join us I hope you will the next program will be on October nineteenth and early looking at after native connections tonight we'll hear from Kevin Levin who will talk about the myth of African Americans who fought for the confederacy he argues that these claims would have shocked anyone who served in the army during the civil war and this is a more recent construct he suggested the story is due to poorly understood primary sources and a twentieth century backlash against African American games and civil rights on as we often do we pulled some material from our collection for a small display that was in the reception and if any of you know Peter drum you'll know that means a person who does not like to be stumped so when reviewing the book this evening he went out and found images in our collection of African Americans fighting for the confederacy these if you look are of course not actually images that contradicts the subject of tonight's talk they are images that have lots of Asterix is around them but are interesting in the context of this of their images from the Harpers weeklies from the eighteen sixties and after the program if you're interested I'm sure Peter would be happy to explain more and to talk about them so Mister Levin received his masters in history from Richmond university he has published extensively including two earlier books including I remember in the battle of the crater and interpreting the civil war museums and historic sites he has also published numerous articles including things in the New York times that land take the Smithsonian magazine and The Washington Post he is very active in social media and has a strong Twitter presence as well as maintaining a civil war memory block so please join me in welcoming us because this evening.

W. C. S. P
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And I can check their social media half of them do it ten times so twenty five percent of the teenagers in the United Kingdom are waking up ten times a night check your social media you know that's happening here is it is it a surprise we have some tremendous anxiety and depression in spikes in suicide rate what's this all happened because we didn't do anything no regulations of the social media company so you're right to talk about this issue this is a re air C. span radio programming from pride W. C. S. P. a promotion so I'd love to hear what you're I I really want your because my view on this is I don't have all the answers for for I will hide my love to follow up with you after this Mister Khan between one in mind right in mind right I agree thank you Sir thank you I want to doctor Connor Mister Khan thank you thank you Sir all right in the hope here is that right thank you for having me and I would love.

United Kingdom Connor Mister Khan W. C. S. twenty five percent
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And why C. P. isn't perfect and I'm going to say one more thing about that in a minute but as voters in Brooklyn it's a politically risky move that the DA's office is making to have this program if someone goes through it and hurt someone else it could discredit the whole office the whole endeavor and that's happened in other cases in New York and you know we all know about Willie Horton as a kind of example of what happens when one high profile case was wrong and then they're all kinds of political ramifications so just something to think about as voters as you're evaluating your criminal justice system how the media covers it what you wanted to be on and then one criticism I have of why C. P. which goes takes us back to the end of try story about the police is that even though people's charges are dismissed and they're supposed to be sealed the police I think are still targeting and tracking people who've gone through the program I'm one trireme was pushed into this polar he was telling that story he did something that was taking power into his own hands found the lawyer who sued the New York police department he won a settlement proved its case but it also meant that the police in his neighborhood maybe like had a special eye out for him and so just in the time that we've been taping together over these months there's been a couple of times really need a plants tape in the studio and I'm sorry this call or text and said Hey like I just got picked up someone commit a crime maybe even though the cops are looking for someone they said that I fit the description and so I tell her the story just because it's really hard to go on with your life and do the things you want to do when you're constantly I think feeling like people are assuming the worst of you it's a really a very real phenomenon that has everything to do with race and class and you know it's happening Emily Bazelon at the green light bookstore in New York joined by some of the people she wrote about in her book charged around us yes I I think that's important because that is what the form of a lot of diversion programs this happens to be one of the better ones that we see a nation wide and I think even in Memphis they have some now which are diversion programs that are actually just another way of surveilling people and kind of keeping track of them and making sure that they they never can really get out of this at the space thirty want to talk about what recently happened with the video yeah so basically one morning and then the office was channel neighborhood in police I DO is patrolling is patrolling in hello with one of my friend he's he's space on the ground is the weather actually when he's in the grass on they caught on to his heart that is Congress of Lee and so my friend to put is here at home I was on the first Indian he told to put his hands behind his back obviously I started recording is the lake because like this is Rathmann and stuff like what made job one of the judges yeah I must've been really burly this late it was built on the floor of the day's stuff you probably had a bad cold a lot of mucus is is Abbas like the bad that nobody does barbecue is that like I said it's because with the DM police when they get so much higher rates and stuff so own I'm cord accident police for his badge number many uses not comply with me as though so I did see a some soldiers been as is recorded so because the light is just to go to show like we live we could be harassed for no reason and stuff lady in green we really done nothing as of late just to resolve and in like when when the police come as I do have to do so into us and stuff I don't know if they wanna get pay high salary soon so sign the artist to robbery yes I think so yes so I just want to give you know live at the point at this perspective on in this city is you know been reports of quota based quota based policing on which is when the commissioner sets arm preset numerical goals for a restaurant was full offices and so that's what is a but if you know the saying only a part of a heightened urgency so the Phillies quotas because again we we live in a society that as a private prison complex with you know these these these you know institutions are contracted to have a certain amount of bodies Colleen give of the center for community alternatives and you know the only way to do that is to arrest people so you know and the easiest way to do that is to arrest people who are marginalized in a radio press already live in on the on the edges of of our society you know who already have so many other external stresses in fact is on that you know it is does not even you know the supports in place to to have you know to write advocacy plan old and in need of things I'll spend a lot of time all over this country and I've been blessed to be and you know some really nice places all over this country I've also been and some not so nice places and in this country and one thing that I can I can say is that this doesn't happen every with ideas places and in New York City where people don't experience this and you know when I sit have conversation with them like there is no different than me right to have the same interests the same desires same passions the same in the same trauma over those things but for some reason and black and brown communities the responses to those things our criminal laws so I just want to is one of the I think that's that's really important because one of the things I really like about her stories and he keeps the cookies which they're not expecting and and other communities they might be more careful about what they did because they don't think they're gonna be consequences not even the fact that YCP has been a good experience was a good experience for you the fact that you're even NYC P. that wouldn't happen in a lot of places you wouldn't even have to go through the diversion program and and and cemented remember the three and a half years right if you're not in the diversion program you're going to prison for three and a half years for having a gun and not not nothing else right so I wanted there are questions that we forgot I forgot to give that to the audience but if anybody has questions Austin when you to make this first receivers Matias owner here.

C. P. Brooklyn
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"On the next edition of the weekly C Span's podcast, the green new deal. What exactly is it in Canada two parties agree on any of its principles? Also, what is the true price tag for this ambitious legislative agenda questions that are answered in our conversation with Lisa Friedman who was on a climate beat for the New York Times. So there is the cost of not addressing climate change. Which could also be in the trillions was report put out by thirteen federal agencies late last year that said the United States could could lose a large chunk of GDP to dealing with. Wildfires and sea level rise and other issues related to the impacts of climate change the other side of the cost of this Bill and of dealing with climate change is the benefit science. It has been listed. What is the jobs benefits of developing more solar capacity in the United States? What is the capacity of developing more more wind power these states? Those things are going to be offset against the cost. And I think it's really a hard thing to know. You know, what the final price tag on something like this, especially a resolution as vast as this could be climate reporter for the New York Times. Lisa Friedman are Gascons he spans the weekly be sure to download the free. He's been radio app or check us out on the web at C span dot org. We hope you tune in. This.

Lisa Friedman United States New York Times C Span Canada reporter
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:40 min | 2 years ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"That's all I marked. Have to. I haven't read the book yet. But based on what you're describing is sort of the structure and how you put it together. It's a collection of many stories, but you also, I guess encouraged by your brother shows to do research and get some facts. So I'm curious how because I think in many ways you try to be a storyteller. But then using you want the numbers to also convey something. So I was just wondering if you could talk a little bit about how you combine those two because they are hard. I did that for my dissertation. Yeah. For my PHD, and it was difficult. So I'm just curious based on this random sample that isn't Nestle representatives. Right. Then I hate to go to the science of it. But that's sort of where I'm thinking. How would you then take this to the next step like how how do you use this as powerful? Data to create change whether the conversation level at at action. Actually, it wasn't a publisher who publishes really left me alone. They just said do what you want and we'll deal with it later. So, you know, which was really nice because I really felt free then wrote, but I hated the idea of going and reading books. All the stuff that I immediately gave a set permission to. But then as I wrote never stuff, I want you to know like, for instance, remember I read a bit about victimhood and how you don't feel like a victim compared to other people. So then I went and read about it because I was interested, and I found that there's a whole theory of collective victimhood where people are together it's very easy to take on that mantle. So it kind of it was just me. I'm not quite as quite a shallow is I like to pretend. So I wanted to I did want back up. And so I looked back up. And then the other thing is I had a secret weapon researched to my husband because he he just is a news junkie and read everything. And so every day, I took my computer, and he just be sending me links. So this great so anything that was stop. He would send me, and then I kind of go look for that or find an expert. So it really happen organically. I didn't think about how to use it as data for study. But I do I feel like I'm not trying to present a study where say sixty percents forty percents, but I do feel like when especially when I was seeing something kind of outlandish that hasn't been said before I try to get a little backup for it. Because it seemed to make sense. And then there, and then also rape is not the only thing I'm interested in. And sometimes so many other things connected. Really? Well, like there was this movie much. I I'm blanking on the movie. But it was made by this guy. John C Ford who is a trans man who when he was still a woman. He's black his brother was mode, and he made a film, it's strong island. That was one a lot of awards and in this film. There's just this one tiny little part, the he's talking about feeling guilty and responsible, and I saw the spot and was like this huge lightbulb on my head because I had the all trained thing that if you guilty fear responsible, it's bad because. Anti-feminist because it's not you who's responsible. And that's true. The woman is never responsible for the rape. But it gave me a way to think about why we see like that it's not necessarily self loathing because the way he put it is that he said, my brother was murdered and I felt so guilty that I hadn't gone that day or whatever it was that he thought he did that caused the chain of events and he said, but for me, it was better to feel like that interfere. Absolutely, no, control. So that to me was real revelation. So just the fact that while I was writing the book, I was doing lots of other things I could make these connections, and then I could quote actual people, and it wasn't just me blathering on. So I don't know how it can be useful. But as you know, I tried to back things up. Author and sexual assault survivor. So highly Abdul Holly her book what we talk about. When we talk about rape. Thank you so much. I had a question on insights that you've gained in the process of your research and exploring stories about the shifts that happened in social interactions and relationships whether it be your story or the stories of the other women that you've spoken to and the kinds of skill building that you think is needed. And whether the cultural variations in that. So it's more of sort of what requires focus both from the community or from within the family or outside, and what other kinds of shifts in experiences that you've seen. So if you could speak a little bit about social interactions and relationships that would be great. Thank you. Well, I one. Porcelain interactions. I haven't seen that many shifts in because you know, I sort of dealt with it all in in my life before. But I I'm not an expert, but I have many opinions. And I really think that the thing that needs to happen. The most is that we bring it down to the that we understand that rape is a choice. It's a choice. It's not the weather is not deeply marauding men who can't control themselves. I have this story in my book. Where I I asked a question to men are reading the book saying that we've all been up this idea that. You don't want to lead men on because after point they can't stop does. This whole thing of men can't stop. And I've never understood that. And I my question is if you in a room having really hot sex with somebody who really attracted to you're right in the middle of it and your grandmother walks in and she's looking at you, could you stop probably you code. So it's really not about the point of no return. So I think this is good and bad because it makes you realize that it's not something they can't help. So I think if you keep that base that basic thing in mind, and the other basic thing is that sex is meant for everyone. Sex is not something from Maine to enjoy and women to deal with it's meant for. Everyone's pleasure. And if we in our own little ways. Get that message to our kids that you know, you you have ruled you have affirmative consent. All that stuff is great. But if you. A boy Otago if you're a guy if you actually I interested in better the goes into it. That's a huge. I'm not reach like mine where it was going to happen. No matter what because of the strangers. It was a whole different thing. I'm talking about the kind of green Deidre thing, which is more common. If you care if it matters to you the other person's into it. That's that's that's that's sex sex is not taking where you want and for women if the league acknowledged that you know, we have a right to pleasure that we are sex. Not just something falls to bear. Even the whole thing. The whole mythology about virginity like for minutes greeting for women. And why why does it have to be right that? So I think that that at a personal level. That's something that I would prescribe. If anybody asks me, but you did. And then the other thing is at the global level. I think we need to explore really what Justice means I think in this country and in India, the Justice system is really broken only dynamics of race and class, and caste and bowel. So if he generally try to pay attention to that it will become better for everyone, including victims. But the other thing is that I don't have the onset of this. But I feel like some money to write a book on how do you how do you figure out? How do you pass out the whole business of evidence and proof in cases of rape because it's really tough. It's really tough. And so he says she says thing I completely believe in due process. But how how do you do that? It is a little different. And I am not sure what it is. I think that's the question we need to wrap. With that. I I don't know how. Hi, thank you again. Sharing. I'm really excited to meet your. I'm curious about. If they're like when you're thinking about the impact of this book and just even us here, how we can just be riffles and the story telling and sharing, and is there any group of people or type of person in the world that you're like if this person gets a hold of my book, I really hope that they take time to digest thing. Is there an ideal because if people that you have exposure, yeah, I'd like Donald Trump and all this cabinet. That'd be great. But but yeah. But the thing is that I, you know, it's a funny thing because I know this sounds very naive. But I don't the book mostly sitting at my desk in my pajamas. And I didn't. We believe that it would ever become a book. So I kind of wrote whatever I didn't send some I says, and I didn't have you're supposed to have a ideal audience in mind, I didn't have that. So why writing I didn't have an audience? But now, I I really hope it's for everyone. I want women to read it and take heart to know that rate doesn't have to end things. One men to read it because I do believe that many men are very good hearted and want to be part of the solution. And I hope I've given some pointers. So I I hope it's why everyone, but I wasn't really thinking about nominee next book be much more. God. Along those lines. Did you find writing to be therapeutic at all or or especially since you've gone through sort of several iterations of telling your story, you're telling your message? So from your op-ed to this book. Have you found it to be a way to sort of understand your experience and your so refreshingly? Sort of okay with everything, and you know, life goes on right? But how has how if writing has been therapeutic? How has it been through? I was wondering about that before I sat out writing. And because I wonder if I wasn't so white about myself kind of going into adopt base about my own experience because it really has been a really long time, and I have been through all that off stuff. And I didn't think they'll come. But I did think that it would be a real Downer talking to so many victims because I remember the recruits this, I got hundreds and hundreds and hard to hear these stories. But the funny thing is it was the opposite. Because I kind of forgot that the rape crisis center. People call when they went crisis. Here are the people I talk to for the bulk people who have adjusted or have somehow integrated it into their lives not so differently for me is actually most people. So I found a totally inspiring. They will I found it inspiring to find the of people had. So it wasn't so much therapy. But I did in fact in. In many ways, it was like a very nice way to. Personally to see how five come and the weird things like like Chris said about my father sneaking into the book if it was actually taken that ram. 'cause I my father died some years ago, and I've been very grief stricken, and this was it felt almost in way of doing something for him. So it wasn't cheap related family related. So I think it's been actually for my family because my mother who's always been very supportive, but a bit nervous about the whole thing is just out there handing out copies to everyone. And it's great. So it's been but in terms of dealing with. I think that most of that was done before. But I wasn't too concerned. One more question. If there's sunny out there. So Abdul Holly her book what we talk about when we talk about.

rape Abdul Holly publisher Donald Trump John C Ford India assault Chris Deidre Otago Maine Justice Downer
"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"c." Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Live from the White House driveway with the Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and the house speaker Nancy Pelosi standing beside them with a number twos. In the house and Senate the two whips Senator dick Durbin and congressman Steny Hoyer. We'll see whether any Republican leaders come out and speak or perhaps the president himself will be speaking later after today's meeting. On this edition of C Span's the weekly a new year, a new congress what to look for in the one hundred sixteenth congress as lawmakers return to Washington. Our guest is the editor in chief of the hill newspaper with Democrats in control of the house. What does it mean for the congressional calendar? Husak explains their scheduled to have a longer summer break. And that Steny Hoyer has said is just spend time have members spend time with their families. However, it's going to be pretty intense until the summer usually before the state of the union if let's say Republicans control the house. Well, they don't they really wouldn't have a busy time before the state of the union, but when the opposing party wins, that's a different story. So they're going to be hitting hitting the ground running House Democrats it's going to be pretty intense throughout the year. And unlike an election year, they're going to be here in the fall, they're going to be here many days, and I think a lot more days than they certainly were in in two thousand eighteen but to be fair that's an election year where come onto over one their home camping. Tune into the weekly C Span's podcast available on the free radio app. Online at C span dot org or wherever you download your favorite podcast. On this second.

Steny Hoyer Senator dick Durbin C Span White House Senate Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi editor in chief congress Washington president Husak