35 Burst results for "C H P M Cal"

Prime Suspect Paul Flores Charged With 1996 Murder of Kristin Smart

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

Prime Suspect Paul Flores Charged With 1996 Murder of Kristin Smart

"Pedro, arrested this week in connection with the murder of a Cal state San Luis Obispo student 25 years ago, is also now being investigated for sexual assault in Los Angeles. Paul Flores has long been the prime suspect in the disappearance of 19 year old Kristin Smart 1996, the college freshman was allegedly killed during a sexual assault in Florida. His dorm room slow county District attorney Dan Tao says floors is also suspected of committing sexual acts around sent Piedra where he lives and where he was known to frequent the bars. We do have evidence in this case that leads us to conclude that there very well may be additional victims in the Southern California area, so we would ask that anybody that may have had experience with him that they have questions about for them to reach out and contact law enforcement. The LAPD says detectives have gathered evidence against floors about assault that allegedly occurred over several years. The only county Da's office has not decided whether to final charges based on that evidence. Well.

Kristin Smart Dan Tao San Luis Obispo Pedro Piedra Los Angeles Florida Southern California Lapd DA
Paul Flores Accused of Killing Kristin Smart During Rape Attempt

The John Phillips Show

00:22 sec | 3 d ago

Paul Flores Accused of Killing Kristin Smart During Rape Attempt

"In the Christian Smart case. San Luis Obispo County prosecutors believe they know where her body was buried. Paul Flores is now charged with murder and attempted rape. His father is charged as an accessory for allegedly helping to dispose of the body. The 19 year old vanished on her way back to our Cal Poly San Luis Obispo dorm 25 years ago floors was the last person seen with her.

Obispo County Paul Flores San Luis Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
'Prime suspect' arrested in student's 1996 disappearance

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 3 d ago

'Prime suspect' arrested in student's 1996 disappearance

"A man who attended Cal Poly university in the nineteen nineties has been arrested in connection with the murder of a female student who vanished nearly twenty five years ago the sheriff in San Luis Obispo county California says they've considered forty four year old Paul flora's likely to be the suspect for years he was the last person seen with Kristen smart when she disappeared in nineteen ninety six returning to her dorm from a party announcing on K. E. Y. T. T. V. the rest of Paul Flores for the murder of Kristen smart and the rest of his father Ruben Flores as an accessory to the murder sheriff Ian Parkinson says they've executed dozens of search warrants in recent years and now have evidence linking the suspect to Kristin smart he vows they will continue to search for her remains we are not going to stop until Kristen has been recovered police say new witnesses came forward in the case after hearing about the podcast your own backyard I'm Jackie Quinn

Kristen Smart Cal Poly University Obispo County Kristin Smart Paul Flora K. E. Y. T. T. V. Ruben Flores San Luis Ian Parkinson California Kristen Jackie Quinn
2 Suspects Arrested in 1996 Disappearance of Kristin Smart

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:45 sec | 4 d ago

2 Suspects Arrested in 1996 Disappearance of Kristin Smart

"Arrests have been made in connection with the 1996 disappearance of Cal Poly student Kristin Smart Cave be Kay's Jensen. Reiter has the latest nearly 25 years later in murder charges are finally being brought against the main suspect in the Kristin Smart case. I'm here this afternoon to announce the rest of Paul Floors. The murder of Kristen Smart and the rest of his father, Ruben Flora's as an accessory to the murder. San Luis Obispo County Sheriff in Parkinson made the announcement from the Cal Poly campus, not providing any details as to what evidence finally led to those arrests. And this is probably a question I will answer at this point. That we have not recovered Kristen. We will continue to focus on finding her remains regardless of any court

Cal Poly Student Kristin Smart Kay's Jensen Kristin Smart Paul Floors Kristen Smart Ruben Flora Reiter Obispo County Cal Poly Campus San Luis Parkinson Kristen
Paul Flores Arrested in 1996 Disappearance of Kristin Smart

The John Phillips Show

00:26 sec | 4 d ago

Paul Flores Arrested in 1996 Disappearance of Kristin Smart

"Time person of interest in the 1996 disappearance of his former Cal Poly San Luis Obispo classmate, Kristin Smart. His father was also arrested. Paul Flora's long described as a prime suspect by authorities was taken into custody and San Pedro by San Luis Obispo County Sheriff's officials. His attorney confirmed he was informed of his client's arrest, but said he had no further comment. California is now pausing the Johnson and Johnson

Kristin Smart Paul Flora Cal Poly San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo County Sheriff San Pedro California Johnson
"c h p m cal" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:09 min | Last week

"c h p m cal" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Show is hosted by michaela rear. Let's talk about email. Maybe you can't remember life before it. Perhaps you're part of the policy that remembers the thrill of the. You've got nailed. Take whatever your first memory is most would say. It's a vital tool for day to day communication. But can you imagine your life without it. Our guest today definitely cat. I'm talking with cal newport. He's a computer science professor a new york times bestselling author and a podcast hosts. The title of his newest bestseller is synonymous with his mission. The world without now. If you've ever taken a vacation and you felt the dread of returning to a full in box you might be on board with ditching. Our current law. But cal says it's not really the tool that is to blame but rather the way we approach it and a mindset. He calls be hyperactive hive. Mind here's couch to explain. Email is a tool as great. If you need to a synchronous lee send information over a digital medium. The thing that really caused all of the trouble is that once email spread as a tool throughout the the sort of standard knowledge work workplace. It brought with this new way of working. You just mentioned it was called the hyperactive high. Find s my name for it. Then i think that's the real villain in my story. The hyperactive hive mind is an approach to work. Where you say look. We all have an inbox. We all have a email address tied to our name. Let's just figure things out on the fly ad hawk back and forth messaging. If we need to do something let's just go back and forth. If you need something for me just let me know if i need something from you. I'll grab you. We'll just take this natural way that small groups of people have always coordinated and we'll make it digital and scale it up for everyone in our organization in all of our clients and all of our vendors etc and is this hyperactive hive. Mind way of working. That i think has been a real disaster and one of the visual pitchers that you illustrated that it's sticking with even now is getting these little things and these messages in these emails and it feels as though you have a tribe that you have to respond to right away. Why is it that we've been taught we have to respond and it has to happen now and has hyper-active hive mind contributed to this. There's two related effect happening. So there's the human psychology at play here and then there's the workplace culture play here in both of them are causing negativity right now. Let's start with the ancient stuff. So when i used to wear tripe here i actually mean it in the literal sense. I'm looking back one hundred thousand years. We're talking about nomadic. Hunter gatherer tribes the the history in which we actually evolved most of the social networks within our brain and so we have been evolved in that history to take one on one communication with our tribe members very seriously and for good reason. This type of social cooperation was at the key to our survival. If i am not good in maintaining social connection with you then when there's a famine you know five years from now you might not share food. I might die. My jeans might not get pass on. Okay we take this seriously. The inbox by happenstance really conflicts a terrible way with this instinct. Because even though our prefrontal cortex says look the six hundred emails that are in our in box. These are not tribe members who need us. There's complete expectations in our company. That we're not going have fast response times a lot of these. Emails are not even that urgent. Our frontal cortex might be telling us that but there's deeper parts of our brain says these seem to me like tribe members tapping me on the shoulder and i'm ignoring them and that means to famine is going to be a problem and so an inbox is like a a social torture machine. That's meant to keep a low level but consistent home of anxiety because of the way it conflicts with our brain then we look at the culture of companies and the actual culture that you need to check these boxes all the time and here i think is really important that people think that this is just a malformed culture that we could fix by changing expectations but once we recognize that the hive mind is how most organizations operate. When you have that workflow in place you do have to check it all the time. Because that is the only way you have for people in your organization to make progress to collaborate the coordinate to move information to make things going at hawk back and forth unstructured messages. If that is the only thing you have then when people step away from it it actually causes problems. Which is why my big point is if you're going to solve the miseries of the hyperactive hide. You're not going to solve it in the inbox. You're not going to solve it with your habits. You're not going to solve it with your hacks you're not going to solve it with new norms. You have to actually go underneath the inbox rip out the hyperactive hive. Mind and replace it with other ways of having people work together and collaborate. That's going to be the only way to actually solve this problem. I think that's what we've been missing over the last twenty years when we've really been trying to grapple with this issue of email overload and this is such a novel idea that i want to just sit in it for a minute because i believe you would've been writing this book before the pandemic hit now in the pandemic whereas zoom meetings are norm. Emails are flying by. We don't have those one on one conversations that maybe would help us kind of deviate from the hive. Mind so i'm wondering how the pandemic has had you thinking about your own work. The pandemic has been a really interesting twist to the story soon into the pandemic. i took a commission from the new yorker to write a big piece on remote work and the pandemic's on what we should expect from the future of remote work so it gave me an excuse to actually continue to scrutinize these issues for months into the pandemic and see what's going on. The conclusion i came away with is the pandemic as making the hyperactive pipeline. More hyper so if you're in an organization that already relied more or less on the hyperactive height mind. Things have become notably worse. Now that you're fully remote to the point where i think a lot of people are are feeling the strain in a way that they could kind of get along with it when they are still in the office and it can still grab people and you could still see people and you could still have a quick conversation to sort things out and you had commutes on either end of your workday. Kind of split off work from non work people. Who could you could kinda keep a handle on it. It's spiraling more out of control during during the pandemic. Here's my optimistic. Take if that pain gets so acute. This pandemic might actually be the forcing function that gets a lot of companies to say all right. All right. we're gonna do the hard work of replacing a high with better ways of doing it because this is not sustainable. And so that's my optimism. Is that this bad event. Shakes things up enough makes the problem worse but also puts people into a mindset of like. We're ready to experiment. Shut down our offices like we're in the mode of trying different things. I'm hoping this will shake people out of this. Hyperactive hive mind. Wrought that we fallen into and we'll start to see some innovation in alternative ways to collaborate or coordinate. Do you think we're going to have to get Corporate america and americans in general have to get to the point where we're so burned out before all of this will happen or should we just start fixing it now before we get.

six hundred emails cal newport michaela cal new york both today new yorker one hundred thousand years first memory one america five years two related effect last twenty years americans
Andersson scores in return, Kings top Vegas 4-2

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Andersson scores in return, Kings top Vegas 4-2

"The kings in the three game losing skid with a four two win over the golden knights in Las Vegas as they moved within four points of a playoff spot in the west division Ellie getting goals from Andreas out there to see you Jared Anderson Dolan Alex I Apollo and Leah Sanderson every games it's huge and we we treat every game that's a playoff game here now and you know we want to win every game we got the smarts to enable play the right way don't get too stressed about that but the standings and I think is that okay thank you to every day and try to focus on one game at a time William Karlsson she Theodore score for Vegas as they fall in the second place in the west one point behind the avalanche cal Petersen is the winner in that Marc Andre Fleury takes the loss hi Mike Reeves

Jared Anderson Dolan Alex Leah Sanderson Golden Knights Ellie Kings Andreas Las Vegas Apollo William Karlsson Theodore Cal Petersen Vegas Avalanche Marc Andre Fleury Mike Reeves
SpaceX explains crash of  Starship prototype during landing attempt

Glenn Beck

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

SpaceX explains crash of Starship prototype during landing attempt

"I'm Dave Williams. Cal. I have new space exes Prototype stainless steel rocket. The starship came apart or exploded yesterday while attempting to land following a test flight over Boca Chica in South Texas. This is how space X described it during the live webcast. Looks like we've had another exciting test of Starship number 11 Reminder again. This is a test series together data on Entry of the Starship Vehicle. Space X has sent four starships up on test flights. Each one has exploded or come apart while landing. The official Space X statement referred to the latest failure as a quote rapid,

Dave Williams Boca Chica CAL South Texas
'Zombie' Urchins Are Wiping Out Kelp Forests

Environment: NPR

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

'Zombie' Urchins Are Wiping Out Kelp Forests

"California francisco. has a sea urchin problem. They've exploded in numbers off the northern california coast and these purple spiky urchins are wiping out crucial kelp forests so scientists are searching for ways to slow him down. Here's npr's laura summer diving. A kelp forest is a lot like walking through a real forest. The seaweed is thirty to sixty feet tall. It's very surreal. You're kind of coming around. And then you have this large canopy over you. That's kind of filtering light. At least that's how it used to be says. Meredith mcpherson a graduate student at uc santa cruz. She and her colleagues found that ninety. Five percent of kelp forests have disappeared in counties north of san francisco. Cal provides a key habitat for all kinds of marine life. We were expecting something like that. But it doesn't really make it any easier to digest in terms of the actual loss of the coastal ecosystem because of an ecological double whammy. I came marine heat. Wave known as the blob. Water temperatures rose far above normal then came a more direct attack. Purple sea urchins. Their veracious grazers. They devour kelp. Sometimes we see dozens of them. Crawling up the stem of the kelp and kind of taking it down from there. Normally urchins are kept in check by their main predator off northern california a giant starfish sea star scientists call them known as the sunflower see star. But they've been wiped out by sea star wasting disease. Scientists think that both the disease the blob of warm water were made worse by climate change even now with most of the kelp off northern california gone the urgency

Laura Summer Meredith Mcpherson Uc Santa Cruz Northern California NPR Francisco California CAL San Francisco
"c h p m cal" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

07:58 min | 2 weeks ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Cal thomas. Is our guest written ten books including blinded by might talking about the role of the moral majority in american politics in the eighties. You were vice. President of moral majority from eighty to eighty five. Where is the moral majority today. Well it's It is no more as an organization but these kinds of Improvement movements crop up In every generation we've had the moral improvement moral rearmament There have been There was an anti cigarette movement That that tracked with prohibition in the nineteen twenties so they're always been these Efforts through the political system to improve the moral and cultural condition of the country but all of them fail because they They failed to address the central problem which in this Easter week holy week People focus more on perhaps than they do at any other time which is a inner condition Called sin and nobody can reach that. Except for god and and So while all of these movements were well intentioned as was the moral majority trickle-down morality from washington. No matter who is in there Because that's not where the problem is and it's not where the solution is either. Even though some politicians continue to promote that notion but is there in need for a way to give voice to evangelical christians in america in in a more powerful consolidated manner to sort of combat some of the policies of the left that are seemingly and attacking the church. Well there's no Well several things that question first of all there's no greater power than the gospel itself. It's the only power to salvation and it is the only power that can actually change your life. I have had very very few. Probably count them on one hand without exaggerating Write me and say you know. I used to be a liberal democrat. But i've been so persuaded by the power of your arguments in your column that. I'm now a conservative republican. That just doesn't happen But i have had many people who i've had the privilege As we say of leading to. Jesus christ Be transformed by the renewing of their minds and have a different worldview because they see the world differently a- as far as The persecution of the church. I mean even jesus of nazareth said they persecuted me. They're gonna persecute us so that that comes to the package. It's it's how we respond to persecution. I think that is the most important thing. And if you're persecuted for doing the right thing then you should rejoice because you stand it along lineup of prophets who have gone before if you're persecuted for being a jerk then you deserve it but the moral majority did good work and i think the influence and the ability elect candidates and pushing agenda was very useful in that time. Don't you well sure. But it didn't last. I mean we have there's still abortions going on there. Things of advanced in the in the marriage category. We have transgenders. Now we have the polygamists who After the supreme court ruling that same sex marriage was predicted by the constitution. The polygamists now say they want to be next You've got Taxpayer funding of abortions Under under biden You have now All of this Diversity business even in the military I just reading a story. From today's washington times american seals green berets and delta force. Are now going to get their first ever. Inclusions are well. I always thought that the military was about fighting and winning wars and breaking stuff. But now we're gonna get inclusion czars. And they're making uniforms now for that will fit pregnant women in the military. I mean we. We've gone crazy. Because as i say my book america's expiration day we've lost. We've lost our center. We can no longer defined right from wrong because everybody has their own personal truth and as long as your truth makes you happy. Even if it's the opposite of somebody else's truth it's okay. Because happiness and fulfillment are now our highest calling. I remember something. The late roman catholic bishop Fulton sheen said many years ago. And before things really got that he said america doesn't suffer from intolerances. Some charge america suffers some tolerance of virtually everything. And that is a problem. If you stand for everything you stand for nothing when you look back over your career and there have been public health. Crises there've been issues of public health. That took over from age to all any number of things. What is your reaction to what happened. Not just the pandemic or how. It started chinese role in it. But how we responded as a government and as a people well i think that you know here's joe biden now trying to take credit for these hundred some tens of millions of people who have been vaccinated and he wants to hundred million by the end of may or whatever it is but he gives absolutely no credit to president trump who who authored Warp speed as he called it and prodded these drug companies pfizer burner. Zenica johnson johnson to Speed up the creation and delivery of these vaccines the word. Unprecedented is overused. But this certainly wasn't precedent that no other vaccine that i'm aware of Ever has come to market has come to universal's us faster than than these vaccines and i think much of the credit goes trump and i think it would be very gracious and helpful to the president the current president to at least acknowledge that as you know that is something he is incapable of. Doing that is unfortunate because dr fauci is is seeming to claim credit for that. And i have one minute left. That was my final question for you. If you're sitting in the audience where she's given a press conference what you ask him. Well first of all i would say. Why can't we get a second opinion. I mean i in medicine you always get more than one opinion. The the media you know if it civil rights in the past. They only turn to jesse jackson. And now it's al sharpton as if they speak for all african americans and now in medicine. They turned to dr fauci. Well there are other doctors out there with various opinions on this pandemic and whether it was a good idea to shut down the country and whether we can safely open now especially with people who have actually they have been vaccinated can show their cards like i can And yet The and the best way to improve the economy of course is to open it again. So i would You know i would put. Why can't we get in a second opinion. Why are you the only one. And there are people within the nih. By the way who do not fully agree. With all of your pronouncements. Why can't we hear from them. And i think the media ought to go out and interview of these people but of course they don't 'cause it's easier just pick one guy and make him the face of the entire Battle against the pandemic thomas. You are wonderful breath. Afraid air bags. Thank you for being our guest by pleasure. Dr fauci says your children shouldn't be out playing with other kids without a mask coming up. The like very show continues..

jesse jackson america washington Fulton sheen Jesus christ one minute hundred million ten books Zenica johnson johnson joe biden eighties more than one opinion second opinion republican hundred today Cal thomas nineteen twenties Warp speed trump
"c h p m cal" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

08:33 min | 2 weeks ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Reading about ramona quimby a ralph s mouse or henry huggins. You'll remember the name beverley. Clearly she passed at the age of one hundred and four. She said she wrote about the kids in our own neighborhood. Nineteen ninety nine. She answered a question. I think children want to read about everyday kids. That's what i wanted to read about. When i was growing up. I wanted to read about the sorts of boys and girls that i knew in my neighborhood and in my school in my childhood many years ago children's books seem to be about english children or pioneer children. And that wasn't what i wanted to read. I think children liked to find themselves in books. Larry was still a young girl when she decided to become a children's book author by the nineteen forties. She had become a children's librarian in portland oregon and she remembered boys in particular would ask her where the books about kids like us. There weren't any so. She sat down and wrote. Henry huggins her first book about a regular little boy on click. Attach street in portland. Henry huggins was a hit upon the first printing but her readers wanted to hear more about the little girl who lived just up. The street then came the best known of all her characters. Ramona quimby for nearly thirty years. She insisted on answering all of her own fan mail because she said she learned a lot from their letters. Cal thomas do you answer all your own fan though. That's a great question. I answer some of it but I can't do it all and one of my earlier books. I decided to have some fun. It was called commonsense solutions for a stronger america and i had a whole chapter on some of them. I hate mail. I couldn't i couldn't print Some of the profanities but You know one of my favorites was When i was doing commentary for npr somebody wrote and said is there. Some kind of inbreeding program at npr. That produces a guy like thomas. I like that. That was creative from miami. Wrote me said i'll never read you again so i wrote her back and i said yes you well. You won't be able to help yourself three months later. She wrote me again. I said you see you see some fun some fun with it. We were talking off air. You were here at. Kp your tv channel two in the late sixties and again seventy three to seventy seven in some of the names you remembered has the local newsroom changed since you started fifty years ago. Well i think Well first of all I came under the very heavy influence of ray miller. Who was the news director at the time of the host of is texas which was the most popular syndicated program in the country even beating wheel of fortune. Some people don't believe that but Steve smith and got together along with k bailey. Hutchison and Took those shows and had them sent and preserved at rice university where anybody can go see them. Although i guess you can call up some on youtube these But ray really told me how taught me how to write and was a tremendous influence in my life I think local news is is pretty much the same. Frankly you're in florida you know. It's car chases and murders and burglaries and and charges of racism. And all this stuff So it really doesn't change that much. Unfortunately i think that Sometimes local news promotes stereotypes It doesn't focus on successful and honorable minority people only on people who commit crimes or victims of them. And i think that has a corrosive of leading to cynicism Frankly by a lot of us And obviously the technology has changed. I mean i go back to the film processing days boy. Do i sound h. And then you had to edit the film and then you put it on the air and now you've got you know satellites instant communication live stuff and And so the technology has changed. But i think the world view and some of the content is not. He was probably a very young man in a recent Veteran of the vietnam war where he was the sniper. But i guess you knew bill by esa. The recently retired in a matter of fact Couple of years ago down to houston and went went to see him a channel. Two and Always a nice guy. I like that a wonderful job. an anchor and a reporter before that and He was he was one of the last ones that Working when i was there in houston runs. Oh yes ron. Ron came later. He was a channel eleven. I go back way. Back to the days of larry rasco and bill wa l. Doing sports talk johnson during the weather. And oh yeah we had a great time. It was kind of a simple operation. We didn't make much money. They gave us a one month. Bonus every christmas which was to make up for the low. Pay the rest of the. But but i learned a lot. I mean it was like being on a team in baseball i i. I was able to My craft and it helped me a lot At later when When i became a columnist in nineteen eighty-four. I remember something. Lee tucker said it was a who say a reporter there when i was there He was asked. What's about the said. Yeah count ever had an unexpressed thought. I thought that was pretty funny. You ron chummy a relic of different age growing up in orange i watched sasebo buran and larry bowl you and then when i came to houston i remember the guys like ron stone in there were just so trusted. You know dave those guys when they delivered the news you never. You never had a hint that they had an agenda or prejudice or bias or a partisan angle. It was the news as it was. I miss those days. Yeah i do too and But you mentioned ron dave. I didn't know very well. Ron elving and he was Both of these guys Deliver the news not in a sensationalist way but in a in a low key way and run at a had a streak of kindness and in that i think came through on the air And a sense of humor and a sense of irony and he was very very good. And i you know it's funny because he came over from channel eleven. Keijo you and steve smith wound up doing from channel to the cage. You so. I often thought that that was some kind of prisoner. Exchange steve smith voice. What a person was great. I had no idea. Because i guess they had his chair down low but i served on a board at the university of houston with him years after he had retired. And i go in to meet him. And i don't i walking walk in the room and there's this guy that i mean. He must be six six six seven. I had no idea. Steve smith was so darned tall. What a guy yeah. Well we're the same. We're the same height. I got that two people would say you. Don't look that toll on tv. I say how big's your tv before high. Def yeah well you gotta. You're always seated so unless you're out in the field and even then You know unless you're standing right near somebody It's it's difficult to tell. I got a minute and a half left in this segment and hopefully you can hold with me for one more after that covering president trump watching president trump. So unlike all the president's you'd watched over the years. What were your thoughts. Well i thought his policies were we're fabulous and obviously they worked. The problem for him was and he never really came to grips with. This is that he allowed his personality to overcome the policies. He would have for example. There would be great employment numbers they would come out on a particular day wonderful numbers for women and men and minorities and everything and then he would make some kind of off the cuff remark or criticism of someone that had nothing to do with employment figures and that would be the headline. And i think that's what did he man. I think the result of this last election was more a judgment on his personality and conduct that it was on his policies which is too bad. Because all of those policies that worked are being replaced by policies. That while. I agree with you and that would have. I was not a trump supporter in sixteen. I look at the questions of joe biden as to how much he misses ice cream during lent and flavor. He'll have when he come back comes back and i go you know. It's almost as if they were searching for something else to attack trump for if you can hold with us cal. Thomas.

Steve smith Ron elving steve smith Lee tucker florida Ron two people joe biden Henry huggins youtube fifty years ago one month ron dave Keijo houston first book Larry three months later ron late sixties
"c h p m cal" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

07:43 min | 2 weeks ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"I just learned to cal. Thomas losing key largo. It felt right cal. Thomas welcome to the show sir. Well thanks very much actually. I don't live in key lago anymore. My wife and i moved to miami but her fabulously successful restaurant called decision. And still there. So i continue to get my allowance. So what happens if i walk in the fish house and i say hey cal. Thomas said Tell you. I'm a good friend of his. I get like an extra turner saucer. What yeah you get an extra tartar sauce. Charge a double. What's the best thing on the menu. Everything but You know it depends. What your taste is wonderful hog fish lobster tails i sound like. I'm with a chamber of commerce down there. Listen we might. We might sell some fish. I'm all for that cal thomas. One of the most popular syndicated columnists ever hundreds of newspapers veteran tv radio for nineteen years with fox news channel before that with nbc kp pr. See tv began. His journalism career. I want to get to this later at the age of sixteen and in two thousand nineteen. He marked the thirty fifth anniversary of his. Well read column cal. I wanted to start by asking. You wrote a piece in news in advance and you also posted at cal. Thomas dot com about the president's press conference last week and you didn't seem to be impressed. Shall we say having these things as long as you have having commented having asked the questions having offered commentary afterwards. What was your thought as to the president's performance well as has been said in many places He waited longer than any other president in one hundred years to hold a news conference. I think his handlers are rightly concerned that he will go off on some tangent and say things they later have to correct which has already happened. i have never seen a president with a full briefing book at a news conference. I mean the presidential press secretary genvea sake and Kayleigh mcenany her had briefing book so they could give the correct answer on various issues. And that's fine Ronald reagan only had little cue cards little Three by five cards but this guy had an entire briefing book and plus. He's got the teleprompter in the back of the room many times from which he can read things i think awful lot of people try to be fair and kind here But but view. This president is having some serious cognitive issues. That's not a political judgment it's it's an obvious judgment. He has trouble string together. Complete thoughts he will start off by saying well number one and he never gets to number two and during his news conference last week he started to give an answer and said well. Gee i'm going on and on. Maybe you don't want to all of these details. I should take another question. It's torturous to watch. And i don't think anybody should Wish ill to any president whether they voted for him or not But this. This is a serious situation and awful lot of people in washington and elsewhere who believe that biden as a trojan horse for the second progressive far left agenda and disturbing particularly coming on the heels of not one not two but three falls simply trying to ascend the stairs headed into air force one. How much should this concern us. Well it's part of a pattern and and it's not an isolated. I mean who hasn't tripped or lost their footing Whether it'd be on ice are going up steps or or a curb that one didn't see that one tripped over the. That's not the problem. And your gerald ford famously slipped and fell on the steps of air force. One and he was mocked for weeks on saturday. Night live by chevy chase who who was playing him at the time on that program. So it's not these things. These are human things but they have to be taken together as a pattern and if you look at the debates if you look at You know going back several years. This is a pattern. That joe biden has he said he was. He was asked during the debates. The presidential debates last year whether he took cognitive tessie said. Oh yeah man. I'm tested regularly for this stuff. So i was hoping that the press conference that peter doocy who has never called on unfortunately or somebody else would ask a question that said mr president you said during the campaign that you are frequently tested for cognitive issues. Have you been tested since you became president. If not why not and if you have will you release the results. And if you haven't would you have it done and then when you release the results i think that's a natural question The polls show nearly half. The country believes he has some kind of mental impairment. it is disturbing. You have watched him from a unique perspective. Close up for many years. The man's been in the since nineteen seventy two. He's not a young man but he appears to have seen an absolute erosion in his cognitive faculties years. But could you talk about his early years. Because as much as i disagreed with his politics the man had some snap for a long time. And you can. I can see that having drained away. But i suspect you can much better well. It's very gracious man. He's got a very handsome smile addresses. Well he's a politician. I mean this is what politicians do and Obviously very popular in delaware his home state or they wouldn't have elected him and reelected him over and over then. He has this personal narrative that he has politically used to his advantage about. His wife and daughter being killed in a car wreck that came. That's come up several times and recently and this whole idea of a well. I can empathize with the hurting and poor of america because Because because of course we've got this hundred biden situation with all the scandal personal and and political surrounding him. That never comes up. Any of these press availabilities or at the news conference now. You know it came up Frequently in aditorial set another In other venues During the trump administration with people questioning the business activities of the trump children and the in laws so this is part of the double standard in washington is a friend of mine says talk radio host If liberals didn't have double standards they'd have no standards at all a fair assessment. You can find out more at cal. Thomas dot com. If you can hold with us a bit more of their lots of questions. I have for you. Sure right cal. Thomas is our guest. You can find out more at cal. Thomas dot com and the book. I was reading that. You have a book. I'm not sure if it's out yet or going to america's expiration date the fall of empires and superpowers and the future of the united states. Is that out. Oh yes came out last year and It is it is. It looks a history book that looks at the contributing factors to the decline of great nations and empires of the past. And i've found a pattern to all of them and one of the contributing factors is uncontrolled immigration without assimilation massive national debt. A loss of shared moral sense. Now all of those three things and more are happening now in america but we don't learn from history. We think we were the first people ever to you.

peter doocy nineteen years delaware Kayleigh mcenany washington miami last week saturday one hundred years last year cal five cards Ronald reagan chevy chase thirty fifth anniversary One first people two thousand nineteen second gerald ford
New York City Area University Requiring Fall 2021 Students Be Vaccinated

WBZ Midday News

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

New York City Area University Requiring Fall 2021 Students Be Vaccinated

"Students planning on attending in person classes this fall must get the covert vaccine. Vice President Tony Cal Sado is confident in that timeline, approximately 4 to 5 months it will be able to work with our students to make sure that they are vaccinated. They will not be able to attend the university if they don't fall under one of those Exemptions or if they are not vaccinated for the fall semester. Students have to provide proof of vaccination but are allowed to seek an exemption for medical or religious purposes. It is 10 08. That means time for a

Vice President Tony Cal Sado
A highlight from My College Experience in a Nutshell (Part 1)

Graduation, Here I Come

01:15 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from My College Experience in a Nutshell (Part 1)

"Spring semester. Two thousand eighteen for one is the first semester. I got to go outside of campus to report. For example i cover a civil court case regarding property dispute. I attended a neighborhood council meeting a few blocks away from my house. The semester is also the continuation of my second year in a university pep band when the semester starting in january. I didn't anticipate ticky of what might become the most fun semester. I've had the band. Ceaseless women's basketball team was on fire. The band include myself as a every home game. Cheer them since. I commuted campus every day. I would always stay on campus on game days and usually at the library either doing homework or studying between my last class and before the game starts fast four to march college basketball playoff time. The men's basketball team missed the playoffs that year but the women's basketball team was in for a journey. It all began on march six when the band cheerleaders and dance team border buses to cal state. Fullerton where the first round of conference playoffs was being played like the year before we had snacks on board. We played mario kart embalmer man. We told stories and dare homework using our phones as hot spots that night season defeated hawaii the first round playoffs

Basketball Fullerton Mario Kart Hawaii
Misinformation About COVID-19 Planted a Seed for Online Anti-Asian Hate Speech

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:28 min | 3 weeks ago

Misinformation About COVID-19 Planted a Seed for Online Anti-Asian Hate Speech

"Today marks one week since the mass shootings in atlanta that killed eight people including six asian women police have not yet labelled the attacks hate crime but we know that hate crimes against asian americans have been on the rise this year. Researchers at cal. State san bernardino at police data from sixteen american cities and found that anti-asian hate crimes more than doubled in two thousand twenty at the same time online. Hate speech against asians has also spiked as we think about these attacks. We have to ask. What do we know about online hate speech and how it translates to real world. Violence davey alba is a tech reporter at the new york times who covers misinformation. She's been following anti asian sentiment online during the pandemic it really started with a lot of the conspiracy is and misinformation around when the corona virus emerged and that seeded the idea that the public should be suspicious of asia and with the latest surge. In this last few months it turned into something more nefarious and it. Some of the hate speech and posts. That i've seen is really some terrible and vile stoff racists speech and a lot of it also included calls to violence against asians and have researchers been able to directly link. Those two things hate speech and the calls violence that we see online and the actual violence that we're seeing rise in the real world so what we do know. Is that the increase in volume of hate speech. Online as statistical predictor of real life violence. We've also seen that. Misinformation is linked to hate speech for instance. There's a study that came out month and it found that users who adopted the hashtag chinese fires were far more likely to pair it with overly racist hashtags. So you know you can kind of see that arc now of misinformation going to hate speech and going into real world violence. Let's talk about where this hate. Speech is popping up. Do we see different kinds of things depending on the platform. Yes we do these. These posts are in different places online. as i mentioned there in the most extremist corners of the internet so there are some telegram channels that i've seen that are dedicated to just making fun of asians and i'm kind of using a euphemism there. It's much more vile than just making fun. They use slurs. They use memes. Glorifying violence against asians and they sort of make it into a joke. Worth all. Turn it into a cartoon. But i've seen you know cartoons of asians being accused by hanging I've seen posts of pictures from the malay massacre where american soldiers are stomping on vietnamese people. And all of that stuff is glorified and pointed at as justified. Because you know people say this is rightful responses to the world having to deal with the pandemic that originated in china. I wonder what role the platform should be playing here. I know for instance. Facebook has a policy to take down posts that pose imminent harm but it seems like that could be hard to prove exactly and a lot of people who all misinformation nowhere the lines are so they get right up close to it and use certain tricks to sort of wink at these racist ideas or to spread misinformation but don't quite crossed the line. Sometimes it's not a straight line to harm but dotted one and there's stuff that skates really close to these notions that remain up and still contribute to this toxic conversation online. Davey alba is tech reporter at the new york times covering misinformation

Davey Alba San Bernardino CAL Atlanta The New York Times Asia China Facebook
Report: California wildfire sparked when tree hit power line

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Report: California wildfire sparked when tree hit power line

"Officials say a pine tree contacting electrical distribution lines led to a deadly fire last autumn that killed four people including an eight year old girl investigators with the California department of forestry and fire protection seized equipment belonging to PG&E in the weeks after the sock fire tore through rural communities in the Shasta area last September and October officials now say the northern California wildfires that killed four people and destroyed more than two hundred buildings was sparked when tree branches came into contact with Pacific gas and electric power lines cal fire says their investigative report has been forwarded to the Shasta county district attorney's office PG&E is the nation's largest utility it's been a merging from bankruptcy after lawsuits from several devastating wildfires that killed more than a hundred people in twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen I'm Jennifer king

California Department Of Fores Shasta PG Shasta County District Attorne Northern California Jennifer King
Philadelphia Sixers Blow 19-Point Lead In 109-105 Overtime Loss To Milwaukee Bucks

Around the Horn

02:31 min | Last month

Philadelphia Sixers Blow 19-Point Lead In 109-105 Overtime Loss To Milwaukee Bucks

"Nine sixers one five in overtime how this game overtime layup. Instead of dribbling out it could've taken that one yard bought david chen losing it on defense but in overtime it was y- honest and it was johnny sitting on the sixers courts. Ramona you have a problem with sitting down on the sixers four. Oh i've never seen before and this is a nice. Is it nice. Move like the bucks are kind of disregarding team in the eastern conference even though they ran away with it but like the last seven points or you want to run to close the game so i think for is go ahead and sit on the court take arrest degree breather and i did kind of his tweet at the end of the gate where he said like. Sit back and enjoy the show. If anybody's fans should appreciate that. It is joel. Embiid philadelphia seventy sixers fan. Cal shaw the only thing i have a problem with is celebrating beating philadelphia without their. Mvp candidate with him sitting over on the bench in street clothes. It's just you know. Would philadelphia be celebrating if they beat the bugs without you us. I don't know. I don't think that would be a big deal either. They had to come from behind. They made a nice comeback. I like milwaukee like holiday being added to the team. But but. I don't think this was a big win for them. And we kaplan i just think it's a little rich to hear philadelphia complain about janas doing this when he literally stole a book out of joel. Embiid's playbook giuliani. Does this stuff all the time. But this is one of those rare games. It was a win for both of them. I mean the sixers came in second half of back to back without embiid. They held the Bucks to their worst first half the entire season and then you have the books. They have their worse first half of the entire season and they've resilient and they wants us out of it and that's a win for them to i don't think this is t o celebrating on dallas star. But it is something you know. Yana said he's having fun. And i'm all for having fun but sit down. Phillies court and then taking a photographer's cameras snapping pictures blowout win vs india last month. He's having a lotta fun at the expense of is eastern conference rivals in it and as an unofficial historian of nba pettiness. I'm all for it but pump the brakes you be without without embiid. They blew a nineteen point lead. You almost blew the game at the end of it yourself. So this game looked and felt like a playoff game because you know what you gotta be careful doing stuff like this because you might see him again. You don't want to spend into the win too many times ramona and but the best part about this was the white house and he wanted to goes down. Yeah

Sixers David Chen Philadelphia Cal Shaw Janas Joel Ramona Embiid Johnny Bucks Phillies Court Kaplan Milwaukee Giuliani Yana Dallas NBA India
Human Factors on the other side of the world

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

04:55 min | Last month

Human Factors on the other side of the world

"And welcome to this episode of twelve to human factors podcast. I'm nothing slightly. Because i've been playing around with the new gadget and actually be playing the intro before the start of a recording session where normally i'm cutting afterwards This focused is a bit special for me. Because actually it's going to be the third we've ever had a guest and it's a gentleman who used to work with in early career. It's actually real delight to be able to catch up with somebody. So i want you all to cowbridge. Welcome cal thank you now to say yes. It's it's been. It has been way too long. Tallies the director of age of x which is a human factors consultancy based out in new zealand. And that's where he's talking to his Today he's a A member of the human factors ergonomics society of new zealand ways. Also been past president and he's also a fellow of the charge into economic and human factors here in the uk. So thank you very much for making time to chat today. It's absolutely fantastic. It's it's early in the morning for you at the moment. is that right. Nine o'clock nine. That's still in the morning. Yes relaxing get at least it took about organizations. Look at niebuhr tried to work out exactly where we were in the county. I actually had to do maths. Partido my strongest point and the year as well yes. He does not harmful. It's absolute fantastic to catch up so the audience. Could you just give a quick rundown on. What is he doing now. So what you enroll in What do you get up to okay So as far as already said i run a company called hatchbacks limited and saturday with huma practice consultancy. that's based oakland and the Consultants dotted elaborate country. Also complete news in australia and the a lot of the work. A lot of the work that we are doing at the moment is is. i suppose. It's focused if you can imagine a general project lock saad Very much focused on suppose the more often than not test inside of things so So usually we get cold into either test new technology. That's already been deployed which is not ideal obviously o'reilly We may well begin. Possibility and more requirements are suppose requirements looking at gaps analysis. You Kicking off a project. That's g that's generally the the bulk of the The area where we are that being said in congress too much detail by working such project to the where we have been involved victims from taiwan and To some rapid prototype in some testing on in the process now of of just kicking off the final aspect may trial at the new technology. Selectiveness generally what it can be quite varied quite a rarity. Isn't it to pick up the product right from the beginning of which we preach and evangelize about human factors should be throughout. It is still much more rare than than i would like. Yeah yeah so. Before we get into the project you get into all that type of thing we are talking through still through the pandemic. It's still kicking around but also new zealand is being you've done within a very different way too. Many of the other countries you personally you clearly have done. All the countries are you've dealt with it very differently. How you found working through. Code fatty extremely hard. And i don't thing that many of us human factors people using that have an easy ride from its own. I can't speak for everybody personally. And what i found was a lot of projects guts canceled Projects got delayed And that was not necessarily affecting too badly because they had naturally stocked. it's out in some cases. Been an opportunity that was in the pipeline over native really. Was the name on the dotted line in that nine. Never came Really for me. I don't tend to think that we've got work until that names on the doc- lab because of the years that you can think that you've got something and then right at the eleventh hour. Somebody changes the martin. Some corporate decisions might control

Human Factors Ergonomics Socie Huma Practice Consultancy Niebuhr New Zealand Oakland Reilly UK Australia Taiwan Congress Martin
Biden condemns hate crimes against Asian Americans

WBZ Morning News

00:53 sec | Last month

Biden condemns hate crimes against Asian Americans

"On Thursday, President Biden commented about the rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans. President calling it wrong and UN American in Los Angeles yesterday, activists echoed the president's message calling for action at the local level to protect their communities, according to the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernadino from 2019 2020 hate crimes against Asian Americans in Los Angeles more than doubled from seven and 2019, 15 and 2020 the number of hate incidents in this country. Continues to grow both in numbers as well In severity, advocacy groups gathered near downtown L a calling for action to prevent crimes. People here say they want the next state attorney general to be a member of the Asian American Pacific Islander Community TV sees, said Garcia reporting from downtown Los Angeles. Congressman

President Biden Center For The Study Of Hate A Cal State San Bernadino Los Angeles UN Asian American Pacific Islande Garcia
Islanders cruise past Sabres 5-2 for 5th straight win

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | Last month

Islanders cruise past Sabres 5-2 for 5th straight win

"Brock Nelson scored twice in the islanders won their fifth in a row by earning their third straight five two victory over the Sabres the game was scoreless until Anders Lee and Nelson scored sixty two seconds apart early in the second period the islanders also received goals from fourth liners Casey Cizikas and cal Clutterbuck supporting Ilya Sorokin twenty four states Jeff Skinner finally scored his first goal of the year but the Sabres dropped their seventh in a row and felt once six versus the Isles this season I'm Dave Ferrie

Brock Nelson Islanders Anders Lee Sabres Casey Cizikas Cal Clutterbuck Ilya Sorokin Nelson Jeff Skinner Dave Ferrie
Barzal shines as Islanders beat Sabres for 4th straight win

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Barzal shines as Islanders beat Sabres for 4th straight win

"The islanders scored four goals in the second period to a race of one nothing deficit and defeat the Sabres five to two it was a highlight reel worthy goal for Matthew bars all that open the floodgates as cal Clutterbuck Brock Nelson and Scott may feel each found the back of the net unders Lee added the final goal in the third period Lee credited Basel's goal with energizing the bench in the second sets the Wade party scored that goal I think and I mean we've seen him do stuff like that all the time especially this year he's got a few pretty highlight reel goals but I mean that's just it's high level hockey right there the win helped extend the under control of the east division lead and move their home record to nine into the loss of buffalo six in a row Christian Arnold Uniondale New York

Cal Clutterbuck Brock Nelson Wade Party Islanders Sabres LEE Matthew Basel Scott Hockey Buffalo New York
The Early Days of Esports: Competing in the Championship Gaming Series with Scott "Boomser" Bednarski

Esports Network Podcast

03:57 min | Last month

The Early Days of Esports: Competing in the Championship Gaming Series with Scott "Boomser" Bednarski

"I'm excited to talk with you after I talked with Aaron last week or two weeks ago. He was like you need to talk to Scott because Scott has some awesome stories from back in the day. So first first thing to start take us back to the days of the championship gaming series and set the stage for people who weren't watch sports at the time. What did that event look like? So back then with the championship series was first and ousted the Oceania region, there wasn't much news or information about the the series there was no like real announcements a TV show all these large Acquisitions that they are doing in North America and in Europe of these top teams back then so the the whole Prestige of it or the whole the whole production value just wasn't saved from the community in Australia and the Mets game in Australia still was Cal strike 1.6 and the game was to be played in Counter-Strike source. So when that news came out along the top teams of the top players back then didn't really have much of an interest in converting just to be into this red tournament that that was to be played in Asia in in in the Malaysian reads. So what actually occurred was minimum exposure to it earlier about six or seven teams from the Oceania region was to play this qualifier with not much, New Jersey. At all, I was actually part of the winning team. I was actually playing Counter-Strike 1.6 and I actually retired around that stage and when they realized that they had to go to Malaysia office. There was an age limit the chip should gave me serious said that you must be eighteen plus I'm assuming this got to do with the contracts that people have to sign but there's no mentions of salary said full-time work and and all that type of stuff that we professional player. So I was actually called out of retirement from my brother who was a part of the proud that when he came home and said you want to come over to Malaysia and I was like, oh free trip overseas that was like the bee's knees and Esports in Osceola and there wasn't many opportunities to travel overseas. I've done it a couple of times at least age boasts really rare. So I decided to come out of retirement and go over to Malaysia and we just knew nothing about anything. Even our manager knew pretty much nothing and we had one team Utility from Australia. Both Counter-Strike Source teams were flown over to Malaysia. We had the ballot bailed out between us on stage to determine which team would represent. Oh Chicago but where we got there. We're in this bus and we're just had no idea where we go. We were taking all these back roads in Malaysia. We just like, oh this is going to be one of those events that you read up about where everything's not organized and you know, the conditions are you know, fantastic but we got there. They took us to the most to this day. It's pretty one of the best hotels Resorts I've ever stayed in my life. It was a fantastic facility and they had all the teams from Asia there as well. So we had china we had to buy we had Malaysia we had Korea we had see a poor off all those countries were they're from Asia representing their their regions, and we're the only region that yet to determine who was going to represent the cows truck side of things. But yeah, we first got there was just fantastic and long story short we end up competing against the New Zealand team. It was meant to be telecasted but circumstances happened where we couldn't get home video tabs that we had to fight a red of net cafe in Malaysia that would accept us to play against each other with the CGS or officials and then we ended up defeating the New Zealand team quite convincingly off next minute reader that we get told that we played all the televised live production that's going to be sent all over the world to play against all the Asian teams. And yeah, it was a roller coaster from that. That's what everything pretty much

Malaysia Oceania Scott Australia Asia Aaron Mets North America Osceola Europe New Jersey Chicago Korea New Zealand China
"c h p m cal" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

08:20 min | 7 months ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on What It Takes

"And they're not hitting, they're in a slump, you want to let A. Sleeping dog lie. Hand maybe sometimes you can motivate earl weaver was very good at motivating his own player or sometimes waking up to to prove to him. That is so so managers had different techniques, but I never had a problem. I learned myself I. Think the most important thing about. Playing and playing high pressure situation or playing at the highest level is to understand yourself and understand yourself in all situations, and if you start to don't try to be like for me like Eddie Murray or someone else you some of the advice that they might give you. But Learn Yourself Murray was a mentor of yours great player. What advice did he give you? You know what Eddie was probably the best leader by example, and not so much. My words you know sometimes, if he said something, you know been yet to stand up listen to it. But for the most part, he taught me the importance of being there every single day because I got credit for the streak that I play all these games in a row seventeen years. But any averaged twenty understated way Eddie averaged Eddie averaged. He was an everyday player in the definition of an everyday player at that time was every single day, and if you're a player like Eddie Murray who had. Fourth in your lineup switch hitter Clutch Guy Power Guy the lineup right. When he's in the lineup, it didn't feel right if he wasn't in the lineup. So he understood his presence on the team he understood is value and even though he was a little banged up, little hurt may get hit with a pitch or slid into a base wrong He always saw the importance of his presence being in the lineup and he would make that known to me and you know you you need to play they're all counting on you. We're all counting on you and so following his example. Really started that thing called the street. He was the physical person that's out there on the field. That I could follow during the many years. The cowboys can played game after game after game. He of course had down days, injuries and slumps when he could have been pulled from the line-up he never was during this time there were news reports or headlines Hey can maybe you should get off the field maybe we you know he's doing this for him and not the team were you ever worried that you know yes, I'm playing through the pain or Playing through the slump but maybe it's not the best thing for the team. Well. I think that everybody should come to the Ballpark I. Didn't make the line about I didn't manager's job and the streak wasn't created by me saying you manager Earl Weaver you put me in the lineup every day. The job of a player in my opinion is to come to the ballpark because you're part of a team and then the manager chooses who you play. so by the managers choices and there was several different managers, their choices put me in the lineup and I performed, and so then you earn your right to deserve deserve a chance to play, and then there's a reason why the managers writing in the lineup. So the streak was created by these decisions daily decisions by managers. Now, at some point, some managers say, well, the streets too big and you know I, just had to keep writing his name lineup. I would think that. That is sort of shirking your responsibilities a manager you have a job do a job to do all I did was come to the ballpark all the time, but in moments of slump. and you're in the game. Has. A series of slumps had plenty of slumps. do you believe that you can find the answers by sitting on the bench and then maybe practicing or you need a mental break and all that there's all kinds of players I never thought the answers were in. The batting cage or on the bench watching somebody else play. And the manager. Would put me in a lineup for a lot of reasons. So Frank Robinson probably paid me the biggest compliment and I didn't know this until after the fact, he said there was plenty of times when I was a manager where I thought I needed to take a day off. I need to take you out a lineup you're struggling his hitter. You were agonizing over that. And I thought it would be good for you individually if I took you out. And then let us Regroup. And and maybe you'll come back and hit hit better. He said but selfishly I sat down I thought about all the other things you did in the course of a game you know all the other values that you bring to the table each and every day is that I didn't want to take you out so I put one of the easiest jobs in my job as a manager was I had to wait for someone to come to the ballpark see if they could play. Check with them to see if they play. He said with you I knew you could plan I just put in the lineup so I think. You know there was these intangible value set nowadays you're you're you're analyzing everything. So statistically oriented and I'm I'm a stat guy I'm a data guy. Love that I love using that to your advantage but there are intangible values the night they cal ripken broke Lou gehrig's record a lot of intangible values were on display heart perseverance loyalty to name a few and Baltimore Pride though it was an event that was watched and celebrated around the nation it's considered today twenty five years later one of the greatest moments in. Baseball. This. Kid We really think. Did CAL ripken would limp record breaking night. Homerun Monday. Homerun Tuesday. Homerun Wednesday. You got to. Be Kidding. Let's talk about that night. twenty two minutes ending vacation. We're all watching it people remember it like it was yesterday. But when when that happened with what was going on in your head your heart. Lava controlling kind of personality, and so early on I wanted to kind of control things. So I could deal with them right anywhere from the media was getting Out of control in a sense, I had to bring some control of that and so during the early part of that year. When I went into a series we developed A. Routine where we talked to the media for the first day and it would buy me an opening. For this next two days, I could keep things sort of normal but as the season went on, there was A. Finish line that started to develop. Now, I never played to a finish line. I always played today to play the game and played as hard as I could and didn't worry about being injured and all that, and then got up the next day did the same thing. But then all of a sudden during that timeframe, there was a finish line of celebration that was being planned and I didn't like that you know I didn't want to think about that I wanted to stay in in the mindset that. We have a challenge today we have a teen challenge and I'm going to try to meet that challenge of the day and be there for my teammates. That's the simple approach that I used but there's pressure that started to develop expectation to get to finish line to break Lou GEHRIG's record. And I tried to absorb that there was some people that said, well, you should just play to the game and then take the next day off and then tribute to Lou Gary and I thought that would be the most alien thing to do because I didn't do it because I try to break Lou Gehrig's record I play because I think that's the job you should come to the ballpark ready to play and I think that was an honorable position have your you're everyday player and you're trying to help your team win So the emotion started to build and I didn't know how I didn't know what to deal how to deal with all these things except try to ignore it try to keep. Even when it happened, people were saying Oh my God. It's so learning yourself trying to stay. It was really important during those moment celebrations for me. I tell you to play well, and it was really important for us as a team to play well, because it's not celebrating in attendance record celebrating you know you're Y you're playing. But but when you did when they stopped the game and they said, this is.

Eddie Murray Lou gehrig earl weaver CAL ripken Lou Gary Baseball cowboys Baltimore Frank Robinson
"c h p m cal" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

04:39 min | 7 months ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on What It Takes

"To understand CAL ripken junior you need to know the story his dad told him early in his career the story of wally pimp while he was a power hitting first baseman that supposedly took a day off and supposedly had a headache or something took a day off and then gave an opportunity to a guy named Lou Garrick and Lou Gehrig came in never came out. So essentially while he lost his job because he took a day off and my dad. Through the minor leagues say Okay Look. if you WANNA take a day off and you think you're tired and you sit down and a guy that replaces you get gets three hits in the game at night. What do you think the manager is going to do tomorrow? He's GonNA WANNA play. The guy that got three hits don't let that guy three his. Here's another story for you. It's called two, thousand, one, hundred and thirty one. That's the number of major. League Baseball Games in a row that CAL ripken junior played before he beat Lou Gehrig's long standing record and after ripken reached two, thousand, one, hundred, thirty one he went right on playing another straight five, hundred, two games for a total of two, thousand, six, hundred and thirty two consecutive games all for the Baltimore Orioles and Ripken didn't just show up and play of course, he killed it A. Two time MVP for the American. League, but the streak as it's known is what cal ripken junior is best known for, and there's not much chance that is record will ever be broken. I, know people say things like that only to be proven. Wrong. But here's why just to give you a little context, the guy who holds the third place record after cal ripken and Lou gehrig a shortstop name Evert Scott. Who Played One thousand, three, hundred, thousand, seven consecutive games in one thousand, nine hundred sixteen. This has what it takes a podcast about passion vision and can you say perseverance from the Academy of Achievement? I'm Alice Winkler. This child is gifted. And I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have. Opportunity not a perfect opportunity and you don't take it. You may never have another child it always. So clear it was just like the picture started to form itself. There was new wing which alive could prevail over the truth darkness over light their life every day I, wake up and decide. Today I'm going to love my life. Decide. If they're going to break you league or it's when you go on and play stay out of there. And then along companies differential experiences that you don't look for you don't plan for. The boy you better not Miss Missing. When Mary Jordan met up with cower in junior a few weeks ago at the Academy of achievements offices in Washington DC they challenged each other to some baseball trivia. Of course Mary did wisely have her notes in front of her alright. What is the distance from the back tip of Home Plate to second base? Hundred Twenty seven feet three and three, eight, three, eight inches or something. That's exactly. How is play some seventeen inches and how wide basis? I'm not sure about that but I think a foot twelve, fifteen i. Something about you know what? A forty five foot line is now. It's the one I base the last forty, five feet you have to be on the line or in foul territory. In the feet or you can be ruled out for interfering but I forty five feet you can be anywhere you want. How much baseball way. Well, if Gaylord Perry has it or or somebody who saved the piece of it Only weighs five and a quarter round says, how bad could it hurt? Cal ripken said he was good at getting out of the way the ball whenever he was at bad. But he did get hit in the head seven times during his twenty one seasons in Major League Baseball each of those times he was anticipating a breaking ball a ball that curves dips when in truth a fastball was headed straight toward him. Thank goodness for helmets but each time he got beaned ripken said he just wait for the ringing in his brain to stop and would get back up and keep.

cal ripken Lou Gehrig Baseball Lou Garrick Academy of Achievement wally pimp Gaylord Perry headache Major League Baltimore Orioles Alice Winkler Mary Jordan MVP Washington Academy of achievements Evert Scott
"c h p m cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

12:11 min | 1 year ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Tools for hacking the brain and and you know the emotion to the user into all of their APPs right and so every APP now had game game of vacation and notifications and those things that draw you back time and time again so I think you're right when I first started using iphone. There weren't those things or at least they weren't as prevalent. They weren't always on right and so you weren't always drawn back to pick up the phone so it's the game of vacation of the device which has led to such A. It seems to me anyway. I don't WanNa make these statements especially to someone who's studied the thing and Nauseam so I should have said as a question do you think it's the game -cation that has been the primary culprit. Yes I mean it depends how broadly defined game vacation but basically yes. It's a a collection of strategies that helped make these APPs and and so one of the big changes that led this way was for example when the social media companies change the experience so it was no longer about. I post you post because I know you I check what you post. That was the original social media experience original web. Two Point Oh vision. They replaced that with. I hit this APP and there is an incoming stream of social approval indicators about me there's wykes which weren't there it's obviously there's likes for my post there's re tweets there's favorites. There's people moan auto tagging me in their photo so that that was one of the big changes because it meant When you hit that button sometimes you're gonNA see a lot of social approval indicators about you and sometimes you're going to see no social approval indicators about you and sometime you might see that people are upset you the way? Our brain is wired. We can not resist polling that virtual slot machine lever if those are the rewards come out and on the other end and that wasn't a purposeful and then they re engineered the interfaces for for all of these tools to have that game vacation. Feel so now you can have swiped down to reload. That's very slot machine asked right or maybe inlet they go to endless scrolling on certain types of interfaces so that that you you have no easy friction point. That's going to get you to stop facebook. Change their engineers made the original notification badge gray because that was to facebook Palette and the attention engineers came along and said no no. No it needs to be alarm red. Because that's what is more likely to create a sense of sort the distress or urgency in the human brain. You'll be more likely to hit the APP. And so it's a whole reinvention. The be an intermittent stream of social indicators which has nothing to do with the original idea of social media wasn't there it's completely contrived Eddie of a like button photo tax that's all about driving eyeballs coupled with this sort of in a interface reinvention and I got to say and not not the sound conspiratorial. But there's there's a few pockets in academia That specialize on what they call persuasive technology. How do we redesign? Redesigned technologies to actually induce desired action in the user A lot of people who ended up innovating these ideas at the big tech companies came out of these research groups. And so this. This is all intentional. It's why when Sean Parker the original facebook president more recently a couple of years ago came out and said we're hacking your brain you know we're hackers and we figured out how to Hack your brain and I gotta say this was terrible news for the social media companies. The idea that we're exploiting you. This addictive is making you unhappy and I think this is a real reason why they're PR. People told the social media companies. You have to tack car to another topic. And that's why you see the conversation. Almost entirely about things l. like privacy and data portability and content moderation as they had changed the subject they cannot be talking about. Are these services addictive and making people unhappy unhappy. Because that's a problem. They can't solve if they make the service less addictive their revenue plummets. And so there's been this shift in the way they talk about things and say well. Let's deal with with with issues that maybe we can do something about maybe. We can add into inscription to try to reduce privacy violations. Maybe we can keep tweaking. Content moderation standards. There's a reason why they're talking about that and not talking about their former president saying that we're having your brains is because that's playground. They wanted to be playing right well. It's interesting you know I. It takes us a while to to study and acknowledge at a social level to study. Acknowledge the damage that can be done at a broad level from from something like smoking or alcohol all addiction and then to take action against it. Do you think that's going to happen with the brain hacking through these electronic devices or is it just something that the the government's going to be like. Yeah whatever. It's just free market. Well you know you have to keep in mind. We have to get the historical example in mind. I think this is actually an interesting point. So there there's been recently in the news like let's say Chris Hughes one of the Co founders of facebook and some of the presidential candidates coming out and saying Social media the big companies like facebook or like big oil and they need to be broken up the trust that needs to be broken up but maybe the better analogy is actually big tobacco because think about the The government response to BIG TOBACCO WAS NOT WE'RE GONNA somehow regulate tobacco companies to make cigarettes less harmful. There's aunts a big tobacco was we're going to essentially Angelique exit but also educate the public that you probably shouldn't be smoking and I you know I'm wondering if that's not. The more apt analogy here is sitting social social media company. This is a this is a free service based on extracting attention fundamentally it's going to be It's GONNA be addictive. It's going to be exploited if they have a fiduciary responsibility to the shareholders to be addictive and to get as much use as possible. And so I don't know if the idea of what we need to do as maybe just get more competition in this space is somehow the key to to me. I see this a little bit more through the Linzo how he used to see big tobacco. That's what I'm trying to do with. My books is shift the culture to some degree where people no longer feel comfortable with the idea that this is something that they're just going to slavishly check on their phone. I mean I think when something is unhealthy as opposed to uncompetitive. That's a different set of solutions. To begin to look at right or another. You know option is that we're heading into narrow people because of the exorcist information and the diffusion of information that a lot the people are demanding more social responsibility of the companies that do business with as well as investing. And so you know. I think you're GONNA find companies that exploit things that damage the social fabric having a harder and harder time staying business. That's maybe a dream of mine fine but it's not happening right now. It doesn't seem but you never know right. You never know and the funny thing about a company like facebook is. It's it's historically unique. We've never before in history had a company that was so valuable I mean facebook is valued around five hundred billion dollars. That's almost twice ExxonMobil's valuation and yet at the same time is so dispensable. If you think about facebook I if I came to you and said look. I'm sorry a court order. You're not allowed to look at facebook facebook in ten years. Exactly the people have the same reaction. Oh it's okay I mean if there I'm GonNa look at it and yet it's worth five hundred billion dollars typically when you have a company that valuable it's because let's say they supply oral and our entire economy requires oil the run And it's a necessity and it's a social good but this weird place to social media companies are on on is that their hooks into their audiences is very tenuous and people can very easily leave platform and go to another. I've been documenting pretty thoroughly a lot of people my age just leaving social media altogether like well I tried it was okay. I mean they don't really play. They're an interesting source of distraction. But for most people are not at all dispensable. So they're in this rear precarious situation situation. Where you know? Kim Kardashian says the right thing about instagram tomorrow and they could see their user base plummet by thirty percent. That's a scary position to be in. If you're one of these companies except that they own instagram you know who they are valuable to the business world is doing business on the Internet and spending companies spending millions of dollars a month. Yeah on facebook. which crazy just to attract eyeballs and hopefully convert some users? Yeah well I mean. There's a reason that worth five. Hundred Billion Dollars is because the advertising works but for the advertising the work they have to get the average millennial user now uses social media. Something like one hundred forty one minutes a day. That's what makes them so. Valuable is the fact that they've convinced a sizable fraction of the population to essentially dedicate the bulk of their leisure time to entering data belt themselves in the databases right. Let's talk specifically about your book. Now I saw in some of the notes that Ellison put together for me that you were hoping to get a small Qadri of peeps to do a little experiment and to go off all social media and screens hundred percent for thirty days and you ended up with a boatload of volunteers. How did that come about? And what were some of the surprising things about that. Study so the original L.. Ask and this was an email I sent to my mailing list and so it was a little bit under the radar and I said look. I want to find volunteers to do this thing. I'm calling a digital declutter. Were as you said you take a thirty day break from all these optional technology your personal life and then when you're done the idea was you don't just go back to everything you rebuild from. Scratch so the thirty days the idea the thirty days as opposed to just doing this over weekend. The idea of the thirty days was that you could actually have some time for reflection experimentation. figure out what do I really care about what I want to really spend my time on. Get some clarity on that. So that when it comes time to add back tech you can be much more intentional. I thought I would get I. Don't know a dozen volunteers. I mean that's kind of a big ask ask right. I honestly thought about dozen volunteers and I can talk to him all. I thought this will permit. There'll be twelve people who do this and I'll keep him on the phone and then I can. I can kind of write about the experience in the book what it was like for these people and instead sixteen hundred people signed up. Wow so it became an actual like research search study it became it became like an actual research study was as and then you had the code the surveys and come out. Data was except for to be clear. I purposely did not officially code the surveys or gather data in a quantitative kids because then I would need approval from my academic institution so But it but it became like an unintentional sort of social movement ended up being covered the New York Times. A one of their reporters roommates was doing it and and And that that's what really helped me understand that there is such A. There's such a pent up hunger for change here. But I'll have to say when the big things I discovered from. This experiment is a a people were surprised to discover the extent to which their phone had pushed everything out of their life that they used to care about and they they've been telling themselves this story of well. Look look at my phone occasionally when I have nothing else to do its idle time. I mean the elevator. Not a big deal and that first day when they didn't didn't have the phone to look at they realize I don't know what to do with myself. I have gotten rid of. I have stopped putting in the hard work required to actually build up a meaningful will a meaningful leisure life outside of disk professional activities. So that was the first thing I learned The second thing I learned is that the people who treated this like a detox and I really hate hate to use of the word. Detox in context technology Because I think I think people are completely abusing the concept when they talked about digital detox which was for most people they mean a break which is which is actually a pretty big insult to the substance abuse community where the where the whole notion of detox is is to make actionable change as the foundation for better life. Eddie that you just take a break from the thing that's bothering you is but that's a bit of an aside But the people who treated the thirty days like one these digital detox isn't just tried to white knuckle it. I'm just going to not use my phone. I use it too much. They almost all failed. lasted a week or two and we're back to the people who succeeded needed and making lasting change out of these thirty days for the people who took the thirty days and said I'm GonNa get after it and figure out..

facebook. Eddie president Sean Parker ExxonMobil Kim Kardashian New York Times government fiduciary Chris Hughes Ellison
"c h p m cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"Don't use Tucker an end. It is only useful when it comes to human flourishing when you're deploying tack for very specific intentional purposes that you care about as soon as the tech becomes an end in itself that we start to see problems. Hey folks welcome back to the unbeatable mine. PODCAST is Mark Devine your host. Thanks so much for joining me today. We're GONNA have an incredible show with my friend cal. Newport author of digital minimalism and one of my favorite books deep work Kelso's spoke to have you. I'll introduce more but Jeez it's really good to have you back on the show and Michigan. Yeah it's my pleasure. It's been too long. It has. I've been tracking your work and I know that your your university professor your computer computer scientist actually but I loved when I read and deep work just how you organize your life and so it really was not surprised that you're next work was digital minimalism. Because because you already are kind of a minimalist and I'm really stoked that you went deep into that subject to help other people appreciate the benefits of that. But so let's you know before we get into all that cool stuff. Let's remind our listeners. Or those who aren't familiar with your work or who you are as a person you know just a a little bit about your background and how you came to teach computer science and and what it is it really fires you up and makes you unbeatable. Well I really do too. Thanks thanks so I am a computer scientist. And that's what I've been training for my whole life I went right out of college to Mit. Got My doctorate and now at Georgetown. My focus on the theory of distributed systems. That means I do the sort of non useful type of computer science where we saw the equations at the whiteboard instead of actually building useful things with computers but I have also been a writer in parallel with that whole progression. I wrote my first book when I was still an undergraduate digital minimalism is my six and so I've been writing at the same time That I've been a computer scientist. It used to be the case that the books I wrote were just topics were relevant into my own life at the time so for example back in two thousand twelve I wrote a book about career satisfaction I wrote it then because I was entering the job market and I want the know about satisfaction in two thousand sixteen. I wrote deep work because I really cared about. How do I get tenure or more? Generally how knowledge workers succeed and I really went. Deep defunding the value of focus. I will say however mark that in recent years with this new book and the book. I'm working on now. Really Seen My mission starting to sharpen where I no longer see my life as a writer as something different than my life as a technologist I now see myself primarily right now as a technologist who also writes about the impact. Are these technologies on our culture. And so that's what's really been getting me fired up. Starting with deep work with my new book digital minimalism and the book. I'm writing now about email. That's it's called a world without email is all trying to grapple with the intersection of tech at our culture. Is I think these are the more important issues facing us right now so in a way. It's your it's your apology to culture for screwing US up with all your computers stuff. Yeah this is my apology for what I've wrought with my academic work. uh-huh what you've wrought on. Well you're not alone. There's a whole like a whole bunch of other people working in that area to distract us and to take us away from important things like spending time alone and being quiet and that type of stuff. So let's let's talk about deep worked before we get into your current work or or your more. Recent work with digital minimalism. One of the things I loved about deep work was this notion Russian that if you want just mentioned if you WanNa really contribute and not just skim. The surface of of social media news is in common just like languaging in a social context. If you really WanNa go deep and understand something deeply you have to kind of escape and different people. We'll have different ways to do it. How do you like how do you I mean not escape from reality but escape from unreality and go back to where the true information lies right which is going to be found inside through inside intuition as well as being able to really penetrate a subject by studying with deep concentration so tell us what year discovery was that what worked for you and what works for some other high level thinkers and authors and creators? Well for me like with a lot of people there. Two components to trying to really prioritize depth do type of thing that moves the needle and knowledge work so one component is actually just minimizing the amount of non depth stuff on your plate and so this is an ongoing aggressive effort to try to make sure that you're not adding too much shallow allegations on your plate. So there's this this overall effort to minimize something that I work very aggressively at. I'm sort of try to be very careful about what what I allow on my plate. What I agree to what initiatives I take on? I'm sort of DETTORI. Hard to track down. I say no to most invitations to do most things because because I don't want my time being taken up then when you focus on what is on your plate. I do something that a lot of other people do which is I- also late between periods of deeper work and periods of shallow work. And I do that on many different scales and so that might mean on the scale of an individual day. I like to start start with deep work and then once that energy is spent maybe move over some of the logistical stuff. On the scale of a week I tend to have a balance of some days. Maybe are a teaching as as long as I have to be on campus teaching. I'm going to put other meetings on that day. I'm going to dedicate that day more towards non deep efforts but then other days in that same week might be almost entirely dedicated into deep thinking and then on the scale of seasons as a professor. I do the same thing. I'm entering summer right now. That means going into hibernation mode. I'm about to become very hard to track down because I'M GONNA be reading and writing for months at a time and so having a clear separation between depth shallows at multiple different scales coupled with an overall commitment commitment to be incredibly careful about what I agree. A lot on. My plate has helped me get in enough of the deep cycles to keep doing interesting things. you know that that's awesome and it sounds simple but there's a tremendous amount of self awareness that goes into what you just said in those two big categories. You know saying no in service to that bigger. Yes right there right the self-awareness required to know what to say. Yes to is really the most important born thing right so that that means really getting clear about what is your unique gift to the world. You know at a broad level and then how you're going to express that and really dive into that at this point in time right and that's going to change as you have offer you. It's changed as your interests have evolved right and then the other thing go ahead. Yeah I was just GONNA say briefly. There's an irony to that as well. It's absolutely vital and the irony is as what you're as what you're doing the thing you're working deeply on gets gets more developed and gets more impactful the demands to take you away from it grow as well. It's this this weird binary coin and sort of the the more you become useful useful. The more you're deep thinking becomes useful to the world the more the world is going to try to take you away from your deep thinking which and it's difficult. I mean this is social reciprocity. Just just yesterday. I was showing my wife. I said look. Clean my inbox on Tuesday Earlier in the day and and here it was Wednesday afternoon and I was saying there are now nine request Austin here for my time from people I know and every one of the whos is going to require like a relatively delicate social dance to basically say no to so it gets pretty hard. I mean I think it's worth emphasizing your precise. It's hard work but it's where it's worked. It's absolutely vital to do if you want to keep doing things if impact right and the irony. There is the distractions. Come as you said. Because of the deep work and because of aligning with that purpose of that gift but also The requests are are in alignment with a meaning the more of an expert you become. Let's say digital minimalism. The more avenues. You're going to open up in the more experts and opportunities for things like this podcast. That opened up in his all in alignment with this new vein of gold. That your plumbing but you still then you have to do that like the next layer of selectivity right and so it's not the old stuff that's distracting anymore. It's new stuff. New People new interest new avenues. And like you said that's just a never ending thing. You can't get rid of the distraction. You just keep on sharpening the saw your awareness on what to say yes do and what to avoid so you can keep going deeper in the right lane or follow the vein appropriate to use that metaphor. You know all the way down to the depth fastening because you know we could literally spend the entire time talking about and how to do that right out how to develop that type of awareness. The other thing you said this idea of having a battle rhythm is really interesting knowing how to spend your days where or your energy is going to be best spent on deep work you know the deep work and then also You when you're doing something like you were. Where are you might be doing reading? And writing and then teaching you know some people will say the teaching is the deep work right is is every bit as important because you have to be the engaged. That's where you're offering your gift of the world just in a verbal sense as opposed to a written sense. I'm curious as to why you would categorize teaching you. You know as as shallow work and reading and writing and thinking as deep work well. That's that's a good question because what I should clarify I guess is the reason. Ny Teaching tends to anchor. Shallow Day is not the actual time in the classroom. Because I agree when you're actually communicating. That's very deep. What we're doing now? For example. I consider that are deep work or when I'm in front of Front of my students and teaches a class on computational theory that's deep work it's more than teaching brings me to campus and drew once. I'm on campus. Now it's can do office hours. I can do the meetings with students I can do. So it's once I'm on campus and in a I'm here and available my thought is let's batch. Let's make this a day if I'm going to be here and doing other things. Let's make this a day where I do everything I can. which is like? I'm on campus right now recording this I have a full afternoon of meeting scheduling said. Well let me take advantage of that whereas yesterday I was at home all day and work it on one thing deeply the entire day so these blocks the deep and shallow are pretty large blocks and you fit different things into that block that go go into those categories. Yeah that's right they can be. They can be on all sorts. It's a different scales with their offense. They are often quite large. Yeah that makes a lot of sense and that rings true for me. Whenever I've tried to do you know I'm going to do in our ninety minute? Block of deep work. And and then I'm GonNa go do something else it's just really. I don't know what the right word is just difficult to really go deep and stay there because you're constantly getting pulled out out so for me it's gotta be like a day or like you said a week next week. I'm going out to be alone finish manuscript and that would be my deep work week so it sounds like you have the same thing but I love the idea of seasons and that's kind of unique to your profession. It's difficult for other professionals. To have a seasonality. I think to to their battle rhythm but I think that would be interesting to think about right. If you're an executive you know. Can you arrange a sabbatical or something like that. During the summer months Komo go deep on something. Yeah I think I mean I think that would be a good idea. we see seasonality on a on a more of like the weekly scale. We're seeing this. Starting to emerge in software development where for example the sprint methodology has become big where they're recognizing sometimes the right way develop a software product. It is to actually take two or three days and make it clear that this is all. You're doing you're just working on this. You're just doing one thing just going deep And then when this is over it's a completely the different phase. Okay I'm not in a sprint. And maybe we're being logistical planning. And in general though at what I find surprising is that we have a whole economy based off knowledge. Well IT products. We have a whole mass support of our economy. This based on US using our brain to create value and yet we understand so little about the actual. Let's say cognitive or physical best practices.

scientist US professor writer Mark Devine Michigan Tucker Georgetown Newport Kelso Mit Komo executive Austin whos
"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

10:54 min | 1 year ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"Inquisition expects the Spanish inquisition. That's right the ten questions. Everybody gets a nobody expects number one. What your desert island album? You can only have one island. I album probably led Zeppelin too. Nice what happened. Or what habit or quality do you think has contributed attributed to your success Diligence by by what I mean. Gene is the Steve Martin definition of diligence. which is is not just about sticking with one thing it's about consistently saying no to everything else? I think that's my a couple of things in my teeth. I'm willing to run with it for a decade or more networks out pretty well so the opposite of me and yet I found success somehow by by virtue of being jack-of-all-trades Trades and master of none. That's fascinating maybe I should try to focus a little more number three. What would you consider your biggest failure but my my the biggest here well I didn't quite do as well. As my. My Contemporary Mark Zuckerberg valuing in doing monetarily right. I would argue that maybe especially currently with some things that are going on politically and otherwise that maybe you're maybe you're thriving. That's probably true. Yeah my my day. Experience is probably less stressful. You right right six. Oh Okay Minneapolis. About about that as far as I know you haven't affected any elections elections lately so for Nowak of trying it turns out the number four. Have you ever been in a fistfight fight As a kid for sure. Yeah but not not as an adult. Not as a grownup I have not been punched as the FE interface. Since it's probably I don't know I was like twelve years old. You definitely have kids. Don't you have three. Yeah Yeah only parents say as a grownup anybody anybody. I don't think I've ever used that unless I was talking to a kid Number five if you could switch live with anyone for a day who would it be. Oh I I just heard an interview with the novelist. Dave Eggers road schedule to schedule He right now he he wakes He reads for two hours and then he sits around with a notebook. They're kinda capture random passages that come to mind and then at some point he might try to write And he has no he does not have a smart. There's no Wifi in his house. So that entire loud completely cut off from the Internet and so after I heard that interview that my first responsive man I wanna be Dave eggers Microsoft. Yeah when you're a grown up yeah he he's from Lake Forest. Which is where I grew up and a heartbreaking work of staggering genius is one of my favorite books He's he's great Number six what's the most embarrassed you've ever been. Oh well I mean I don't know what the most a an issue I have to deal with. A lot is I I have a High Basil Basil but tablets which means I run very hot and I'm not used to wearing suits and so it's a a not uncommon occurrence that I can be like on a stage on a the panel in front of like lots of people and I will just open up like a like a a valve and sweat like I'm I'm meant to be sort of like living in the cool Scottish. Moore's in a kilt or something that I've run too hot to be under lights and suits and that's happened to me Yeah that's that's happened to me more than once I. I'm kind of used to it now. But it's still a little embarrassing when those if you've ever wanted to get a fix for that when you're desperately we need the Guy who host College Game Day for. ESPN wear suits with air conditioning. It's actually blows air through and under under there's suits using some mechanism that I do not understand something you could look into if you're ever in desperate need of of being able to appear without that problem actually exists. I've always wondered that and also. How do the Onfield baseball reporters do it? I've never understood it. They have shoots and it's ninety five degrees at okay great. I'm look I'm here you do. You might have to use a computer to Google but it'll be allowed. It'll be for a purpose. It'll be intentional activity. Yep that's right Number for seven. What's the thing about yourself? You'd most like to improve I. I've been working recently. I'm relatively healthy are but not like I used to be when I was doing college high school athletics. And I'm working on that now I would I wanna be in terms of Like my cardio fitness and Diet I would love to go from five to nine. I've images myself still sort of collegiate rower like once was laws and I'm far from that so I would like to be much more fit once again. There's a lot of APPs for that. If I just get the right right out right out number eight if you could be commissioner of life for a day what one rule would you enforce that everyone would have to adhere to I would say you're have to remove from your phone any application where someone makes money off of your time and attention every time you tap on it and then if we made that one change universal the cognitive productive surplus recreate in this country would be would be phenomenal. You Know Eh. Civic Participation Rise. You'll get healthy again. It would be a I think a phenomenal change for an otherwise relatively small idea. We'd we'd have to call our friends and relatives and see how they're doing wouldn't be role and pretend like we. We know Number nine. What's the most scared you've ever been? Oh probably when I was When I was nineteen years old and I was I was rowing crew and I was I was having this issue with my heart would go really fast? And so they sent me with a sensor could bring with me to hold it to my heart like a portal. Et Gene Rickey recorded. Next time. It happens and you could phone it in because just before the Internet was wireless phone into information and I did that. Then they called and said well You should come to the hospital right now. Come later and you should come right now and I don't walk up stairs. Oh my gosh as possible on the way AH Because you know it turned out it was okay but it was one of few things in one of those. Two things was was going to be the same thing that happens to college. Athletes with a ventricle goes out of control and they drop dead. It might have been that So until they can figure it wasn't. It's not the call you like. Wow that's terrifying. That's that's terrifying number ten. What three words would you most? Hope people would use to describe you I would say Focused good character. I'm GONNA combine those with a hyphen and and and Compassionate or empathetic. Whatever word you would use to describe I you know someone who cares about the other people around him? Yeah that's that's that's good. I like those finally the bonus question. Who would you recommend I have on this podcast? Oh interesting question Well I would say Well well first of all you know the Golfer Rory mcilroy recently mentioned digital minimalism as a something. He's reading helped him with the federal. You're so so you should have an interview with him. That's all you allow him to talk about But no I would. I would say my my friend Ryan holiday if you haven't already create eight new book out. Stillness is the key You know his book obstacle is the way is really have used In the NFL right now among other places but he was really interesting. Philosophical thinker on some how some ancient wisdom applies the modern life. And that's who I would say Ryan Holiday. You gotTa have him on. I'll have among together. They'll be good to talk about. My book actually intersect with both of their lives. And bring them together. Gone on your podcast. Yeah there you go. It'll be like James Corden couch right. I'll just bring disparate people together. And how do they connect to cal. Newport thanks so much for coming on this was really fascinating. Appreciate it my pleasure. That's what she said. It's time once again for South Bitch sessions where I rant about something that bothers me and I fix it this week. People post photos of their wack ass Thanksgiving dinner on social media. Now listen if your family s crappy meals I'm not gonNA hold that against you unless you're actually cooking it. I'm not gonNA fall to that. There isn't a single item on your plate. That isn't Beige. But it is your fault if you decide to post to instagram and expect people to like it and not say terrible things about it. One day if snap. It's probably going to be about this. High going to have a Thanksgiving plate with nothing. Green or orange were literally any color that doesn't match the Turkey meat again. I'm not judging if it's fancy or expensive I'm I'm just saying how the Hell is all your food the same damn color and if it is why are you sharing it. Don't bring shame on your family by broadcasting the beige each right if good about what we accomplished today. If your Thanksgiving plate sucks keep it to yourself. If you're feeling left out I guess go online and steal a pick of something that looks appetizing off Google images and then pretend it's yours but I'm pretty sure cal Newport would tell you that it's not a good use of your time. Hashtag don't broadcast asked the basin fixed if you're looking for another great. ESPN podcast. Checkout laughter. Permitted with Julie Foudy Julius Smart Conversations conversations with interesting people inch loves donuts. Two they come up a lot. Be sure to download and subscribe to laughter permitted. Wherever you get your podcasts if you you gotTA dilemma for the Commissioner Fix tweeted to me at Sarahspain or go to the I tunes or PODCAST APP subscribe to? That's what she said was Sarahspain Rate Review it and leave the dilemma in your review. I might get to it on the PODCAST. Thanks as always for lasting about an hour with me. Well that's what she said..

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"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

13:28 min | 1 year ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"He's one of the people who Did a blurb for your book and I remember talking to him about multitasking. And the idea of going back and forth between things you feel like you're nailing it but in fact you're making your brain work very hard and you're wasting whatever however many minutes it takes when you get back into the project you're working on you you are wasting all the time reengaging turning your brain back to the folder that it was looking at and it's something as simple switching back to you check your email so I know when I'm writing a long form piece for ESPN. I close all my tabs the only tabs that can be opened our research related. Because I don't want to see a notification in my email I don't Wanna be tempted to look up something else And you talk about that too in terms of our ability to not just focus on work but life and the people around us were just taxing our brains by the constant back and forth we are not good at network switching and and it takes time and we yeah. This is the result that goes back to experiments as early as the nineteen twenties and psychology. Now today we have people like attend. Who can actually get into the neuroscience? Explain what actually actually is happening in the brain. We've known this for a century. It takes time to switch our attention from one thing to another and so if for example you're in a work context. The very worst thing you could do. If your work requires you to produce something complicated is to say okay. work on this. Whatever this script this memo this computer program but we want you like the average worker to switch and check an inbox once every six minutes which is about what the average knowledge worker does not as a recipe for incredibly diminished cognitive kind of output? Because every time you do that quick check your switching your circuit before it completely switches. You try to switch back the whole. Thing gets jumbled it takes a long time for your mind to clear it out and before cleared out. Hf again and create a new jumble. The same thing happens in our personal lives When you're trying to say extract value from spending time in nature with the friend every time you a quick check of a phone glance at an inbox or text message you get this? Jumble of network switching and suddenly the richness of the experience is far diminished. And so we do this enough at all all times at work in their personal life that in general our experience of the world is persistent we diminished. We don't even realize it Intel we try experiments like saying go without your phone for months and then suddenly people it says. If you're taking off there is life different or if you're in work you say spend half your first half of every day no email or something like just do an experiment like that. It's as if you're taking some sort of neurotrophic drug like you're under limitless Tillerson uh-huh well and what we're getting back to is actually normal. We don't realize the degree to which were persistently diminishing experience to this sub normal thing that we we we come to think of is just I guess this is what life is. And it's like when you know wizard of Oz. Goes into color at that fifteen minute mark into the movie. That's what happens when you take just constant context which out of your life well and you acknowledge that. We're still relatively new in the age of the Internet and so we're still not even sure about how using using the Internet in our phones and everything else is actually changing our brains and how they work. There are some studies involving young people who have trouble looking into each other's eyes or who you cut out of a conversation right around the same minute as everybody else their age when they aren't in inspired or used by it and immediately check their phone There's all these studies ladies that are going on now to try to help us understand the ways that were either damaging our brains are not utilizing them. Well but a lot of it hasn't come out right so we're the guinea pigs for all this stuff that we will later find out was deeply damaging to how we function with each other and and all that other stuff so let's quickly go over the steps for this digital declutter it. It starts with thirty days and it's not throw your phone out for thirty days. It's identified the things that you really need and keep those and get rid of everything else. Yeah you're basically taking a break from what I call a optional personal technology so these are the technologies and your personal life that you can step away from for thirty days without it being a big deal so for most people this is like social media streaming videos video games online news things you can step away from Fairmont. That's not gonNA cause a big deal. It's not worth things so it's not an excuse to not answer to your boss email unfortunately and where you have overlapped so like if you're work requires you to do a little bit on facebook. For what say recruiting or something like this. That's fine just put some rules around it not on my phone. I do it on my work computer. I have scheduled for the for the purpose of the Thirty Day. Experiment so you're you're essentially cleaning out your proverbial personal digital closet. Ause it so that you can have that the empty to the best of your ability for about a month and then you define the rules very carefully because if someone needs needs to be on a facebook group because it involves their kids after school project or something or needs to be on a facebook group that that helps promote their brand or works on their brand than they would bookmark the page for that group never entering their personal time line so they can't get looped into the suck of WHO. What's this person writing in whose this person doing doing? Never getting on the feed. Only going to that bookmarked page. Yeah and it would be on your computer. You would take the apps off your phone almost certainly unless you really have to do it on your phone. The tricky thing is text messaging because they plays a incredibly important logistical goal for a lot of people. Hate my daughter. You skip picked up from school. That's how I find out text message but it also can be this constant Distraction so what. A lot of people do in thirty days with text message is if they are expecting a key logistical tax. They'll keep it around. Otherwise they tend to put it on. Do not disturb and maybe check every two hours or something like that so the the worst what happened is that their friends or family trying to reach them might have a bit of latency before they respond so so the things. You can't get rid of all the experiment just put some rules around it and the rules of a different for everybody. So it's about holding yourself accountable right. Don't make it too easy on yourself. Nope I think well I technically need this. I don't even know where I would begin to be honest with you because I feel like my job requires crossing over into all these places. And there's obviously benefits like everyone. Who's listening to this? Is Listening on a podcast right. So maybe you decide that podcasts are not a time suck and door. Don't require bouncing around in wasting time. It's intentional you choose news one you listen to it. Maybe you're accomplishing things. While listening. That might be something that you would allow. Well you could. Maybe you would have during your thirty day. Some sort of a schedule for okay. Listen to podcast during this particular activity but not every activity another hacker. Journalists did which I thought was really interesting. Who's going through something like this is that they actually hired someone to check for relevant breaking news on twitter and the person could they check like once every two hours it it gave you know? Here's the particular I won't say what particular field the journalist was in the particular topics I care about and They could call them if the collar Bro. which by the way is something? I'm surprised that more newsrooms don't do. This really should be like one of the first thing they do is the first year Internet media can raise the monitor twitter behalf of of the journalists. Who have been there longer? So you can get creative. You know Whatever gets you as much sort of space from the conflict companion model as possible is what you're trying to do without it? Being a problem I would have some assistant where I'm like. You didn't tell. Tell me about this. MEME that everyone's saying now I didn't use it on this. TV show and it wasn't funny. It would be very difficult. We need someone who who understands the district very well But I guess that would be that would be the search for the perfect. The Perfect Assistant All right so they've got the tricks that they could do to keep the couple of things they need and other than that they try to do this this full sort of reset and then when they reintroduced things. How does that work right so so crucially before that during the thirty day period? It's not just about some sort of detox effect and if anything I'm really wary about the the sort of appropriation of the word detox in this context During the thirty days before you do do you WanNa be doing is very actively do experimentation reflection getting back in touch with what you really matters what you really like. You know what's really valuable to you. So it's a very active active time when you're rediscovering beyond the world of your phone. What do I actually like to do with my time outside work with actually meaningful? Then when you get to the reintroduction you work backwards of course from what you discovered and so for each of these activities you identified during the thirty days as being really important to you you ask. What's the best way to use? Technology to support court. Amplified as you bring back in that technology you put some rules around it to maximize that benefit and avoid other costs and those answers. That's that's what the fines technology and your personal life going forward so everything that comes back into your wife comes back in for a particular reason. It's essentially the digital equivalent of Mary. CONDO Rondo. I didn't know about Mary condo until after I wrote this book now I know a lot about her essentially the digital equivalent of what she says. which don't just sort of mess around with your closet or take out a few things? uh-huh organizers India down to ourselves then just put back into things that you really care about. That's what you're doing. You're starting from scratch with checking your personal life. This time you rebuild it. You're doing it much more intentionally than the first time around. You bring things back into particular very important purposes and because you know why or just an attack you can put really really good optimization rules around it yeah. MERIE CONDO has down. That system works in that whole sparking thing is very easy but vague way to kind of encompass encompass everything does it spark joy..

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"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

11:05 min | 1 year ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"More information. That's what she said so one of the things that you talk about in figuring out declutter digitally is that that. It's not just get rid of your phone or delete this APP. It's about what do you want your life to be. It is a big question. It is a deep question. It is a real understanding of yourself. It's not as simple as facebook is bad. Social media is bad. It's who are you and what do you want. And how is what you do on your phone actually filling your day and your time and therefore filling your life. Well this this is the big surprise. Finding of what's going on with with all the success the phone you said really what it's replacing and what people discover when they step away from the constant companion model is that they are surprised. The extent to which this distraction has kept them away from the important things in life including dealing with heart things going on their life hard things that they have to deal with themselves and their job and in their friend circles looking. You know facing head on difficulties having aspirations for what they want to be doing pursuing harder activities that give us much more richer meaning it pushes that all out in creates essentially an existential voi- but it's distracting enough that we don't notice this big void. That's Yanni right behind. It does and that's kind of the state that so many of us are in. There's big existential void. That's deeper and deeper and deeper behind us but the phone which is causing it has just off to the side so we don't quite notice recip- when people step away even temporarily they realize you know my God I haven't been living life. You know it's like the island of the Lotus eaters and so people are surprised price the extent to which this is keeping them away from the hard but important things that makes it good life good and so yeah reclaiming your wife from the devices. It's all about starting with what you WANNA do in one do it. And then putting those devices to work to help with tackle and it could be behaviors like I want to exercise more. It could be skills. I want to play an instrument. It could be time spent with friends and family. It could be volunteering. It could be writing your book instead of procrastinating. Any number of things but reduced true the the the time that we spend doing mindless unintentional things on our phone would be replaced by something else. I think that's very hard for people to understand is unless you it's sort of the sliding doors. I don't know why that stupid Gwyneth paltrow movie always comes to mind but I think it was like the visual that always pops into your head of this this idea. You can't figure out what your Tuesday would have. Looked like if you had replaced everything that you've done on your phone with something else until you actually try it. But that's very hard to get people to do. Yeah but it it. It's a point that we've known the sages have been pointing out as far back as an equity not about phones but in general about this types of easy distractions. I mean this was this throws big point in Walden which is which is really a book about economic mineral was not really about nature if you read it closely but he nick says point he talks about you know farmers who get blindsided by you know how what value they're going to get out of this thing they just bought but not think about how many hours of extra labor required to actually buy it and whether or not that trade off was actually worth I know is having the wagon allows you to get the town each week. Twenty minutes faster worth it if it takes three extra hours of labor per week to actually pay off the loan. When he talked to get it right I was thinking the same thing applies today? You have a double opportunity costs of I. This takes you away from things that could be more valuable to when you are doing the things that are more valuable. The Casa companion model of phone use diminishes the value. Get Out of it. There's a difference than being there with your friend completely and being there with your friend plus looking at all the time. So it's hitting us on both sides and I think the net loss of rich value in people's lives is much larger than we think because what we focus on is hey in the moment this tick tock. Video is Kinda funny. What's so wrong with looking at something? Funny I'm just a little bit tired right. Yeah and we don't add it all up to the amount of time that we spend doing that instead of being intentional One thing I think is clear to me and and is partly why I've used this. PODCAST that was extensively is supposed to be somewhat connected to sports. In some way maybe and instead I just started moving towards like really interesting interesting psychology neuroscience. And everything else. Is that when you get older and everything else becomes a little bit more settled. You know who you are. You have a job. Maybe you're more financially settled. You've got a place to live. You're not hungry for all the other things then you start to not only look inward but also around you at other people you get really for me at least very invested in understanding myself and other people and behaviors how to make your life as great as it can be a really accentuate. The time that you're you're we're here on this earth when you're younger so much time often to think about that stuff right you're constantly just trying to figure out. How am I paying my bills? Is this job that I like all all that stuff but younger people are the ones who are learning these habits and behaviors and don't have anything to compare it to so they're even tougher situation because I can at least say I remember for a time where I didn't spend time on my phone all the time. What did that feel like what did I do? How did I spend my time for younger? People that didn't exist. They've always had the internet. They've always had had smartphones pretty much. How much more difficult is it when you don't have anything to compare it to when you can't go back and remember a time when our phones were not like this? It's definitely an issue see. I noticed this because as as part of the work for my book I I suggest that book this thirty day process where you're centrally. Sort of step EPA away from everything from thirty days to your act back together and then you kinda rebuild your digital life and so I had something like fifteen hundred people go through this experimentally when I was preparing to right about it in the book and what I found was there was a should staff at exactly that generation divide so people who remembered. Let's say young adult hold would without constant companion smartphones and social media described this experience of walking away from thirty days as a return to things that they used to enjoy doing rediscovery. I forgot how much I like reading books or Deep Socialization actually sacrificing time and attention a on behalf of another person or thinking creative thoughts. What's or walking? Or what have you for young people. It was terrifying and has a very low success rate literally. The what they the I. What do I do this first day when I don't have my phone with me was an existential crisis and so I had to actually revise my now? I talked to someone who is thirty five or younger or maybe thirty or younger. You have to kind of get the divide right. I say before actually experiment with walking away. I'm doing my sort of thirty day process. I actually spend a lot of time. First before you change anything about your digital habits trying to put in place to discover more of the alternative so that when you actually get to that time I just try to step back and see what life is like you know what to do or you have something to draw on. You basically have to do a crash course in non digital meaningful activities Right if you're young enough you basically have to cram for that exam so I think it's a huge problem. Others who problem young people have is. We underestimated the degree to which adolescence lessons in particular. Adolescence and young adulthood is a training ground to learn how to interact with other human beings. I mean we all remember those who are old enough being at the High School Party when you're sixteen years old and how complicated that social navigation was like. Am I supposed to be here my cool enough who to talk to. How do I look how we interact with this person? And all that awkward interacting in person interacting threat or teenage years beyond this how we actually mastered the very complicated art of interacting in person with other team and beans. We have this whole generation. Now Miss that you don't go to the High School Party. They send whatever it is snapchat over the new technologies of the day it. It changed a lot but they sit in their through there on their phone at the party next to each other then. Maybe we'll do this. I mean this sounds like get off my lawn but maybe a young enough of my lawn is small enough to get away with it. Sounds like it off the lawn. Type curmudgeon behavior. But there's a lot of research that back this up is that this generation's now get into the workplace and they they have to talk to clients. They have to talk to their bosses after talking to their colleagues they have to do the business of working with other people to produce valuable output. And they're completely lost. They don't know how to do it. And so that's another side effect underestimate. What happens when we It's an interesting experiment. But we underestimate the negative impacts are going to be only take a whole generation. And let's say your whole life through pictures and ASCII characters on a small glowing piece of glass. Yeah it's fascinating. You say that because one of my friends runs a retail tails store and I was talking to him about his trouble in hiring people who who can work forum and are invested and I started off with the get off. My Lawn millennials. Man They just there's there's no work ethic they all want to change the world. They don't want to do the jobs you've got to do first and then I thought about it and I said man if I was working one of the first jobs I ever had that had nothing to do with my career aspirations nations. That was not anything I was passionate about. It was just I need to go to work and make some money and I had in my hand. something that had movies videos social. Oh media interesting articles about things actually did care about. It would be very hard to just stand there and stare and wait for someone to walk in the store or even to maybe engage with a coworker. I didn't like take like we used to have to talk to people that we did not enjoy back in the day and now we don't have to do that. We can just choose to not do that into our phone. And it doesn't make it okay. But it made me much much. More empathetic for millennials who haven't known otherwise in trying to focus when they've got this thing in their hand and the job is something that they're holy uninterested in. Yeah and then there's there's the The wider economic impact. And maybe. This goes a little bit back more to deep work territory. But I think we're actually going to see in the ECONOMY-WIDE I met Trix. A continued stalling in productivity because our economy is increasingly focused on complex knowledge complex. Knowledge work rewards intense. It's concentration the easier stuff is increasingly being automated or outsource we have a whole generation that is essentially terrible at concentration. It gave him these devices. It's the same as if we're in ancient agents sparta or our entire civilization depended on warfare. And if we're giving junk food and cigarettes to all of our our kids it's going to be probable when they get the warfighting age. This is our businesses missile being drawn. Well the business of America Company right now is out there and being smart and that requires concentration and so I think there's also going to be An issue that's going to hit us at the level of talking about economic wide. Metrics that when you build out a whole workforce of people who are uncomfortable concentrating and you say our main Output as a country is knowledge conflicts knowledge. If it comes from thinking hard about things that's going to be problematic. Yeah well so I had I had Daniel Levitin on my podcast. The neuroscientist and I know you..

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"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"You can start to optimize now. You can put rules in place. It will make sure that you get that value. But you don't fall down these traps that have nothing to do with that value. And as soon as people start putting these rules in place optimizing tech for specific specific purposes their entire relationship changes and they go back to two thousand nine iphone type users. They use their tech for these specific high leverage purposes. It gives them huge benefits for the most part. It's not this constant source of distraction. So I mean it seems simple. minimalism is simple. But it's impacts. I've really found to be pretty profound. You work backwards. This is what I WanNa do and then you just look the packers toolbox that you pull things out of very carefully to support these small number of things he really cared about the shift in perspective makes all the difference. Yeah the idea of it being a tool and not a companion and right now for so many of us it's it's essentially a companion. It's who do I talk to one on board who I listen to what I've got nothing else to listen to. Where we we start to create this relationship with our phone that goes beyond using it's specifically for things and instead searching it to find out what might fill our time or what what might be interesting? I want to get to some of the digital minimalism steps. Can you advise for people. But I quickly wanted to have you some some of the things that we're losing out on because of our inability to detach from our phones there's a couple couple things And and starting solitude and why sort of the idea that we're never bored anymore can be bad well so solitude if we used to the definition ah I think is relevant is when you are spending time free from input from other minds so the definition of solitude I care about here is you're not processing another minds outputs you're not talking somebody not listening to something. You're not really something. That type of solitude is absolutely crucial because it used to be essentially the default state default state. Your mind was in your thoughts and observing the world around you then occasion elite you would interact with another human. At which point your mind would go into all hands on deck mode because we're wired to be very social expend a huge amount of resources to manage interactions with other minds as we go into this all hands on deck modell. Let's say have an interaction with a family member or retried number one of the things we have now with the this sort of odd constant companion bottle of smartphones. Is that for the first time in human history. We can banish every last moment of this type of solitude from our life that any possible moment where it might just be us our thoughts and looking at the world around us to look at the screen and there'll be a nice statistical algorithm showing it's something that's been mathematically selected to make us interested the result of this is our brains never get into that default state which they're not at all wired to be. You can't keep your brain revved up in process from other not mine modes all the time. What happens when you try to do that? Things break down with one of the biggest side effects being the sense of anxiety that has become a sort of pervasive background In our in our in our society kind of accepted yeah. We're all this kind of anxious all the time. A lot of that is that we're simply over clocking our brain. They're not meant to always be processing this information. That's sort of misuse of our neuronal hardware. And that's sort of the idea behind meditation right that we need to occasionally a quiet our minds. Whether that's you know in in walking and moving around and trying to focus on one problem or literally meditating and trying to think of nothing. Is this idea that our brains ah break occasionally but you don't even you don't even have to go so far as meditation. It's sufficient just to do stuff throughout the day that you don't have their phone when even if you're just looking around thinking even if your mind it's not clear it's just the fact that it's you and your own thoughts. That's the state that we have to be on a regular basis. Well we used to do that a lot. I remember when I would be on track trips in college. I would sit on a bus and I would stare out the window and think and occasionally I would have journal and the things I thought I would write down. And there's a lot of creativity and space to to solve things this and think about yourself and other people and everything else. When you're not being fed new information constantly which I think is hard because I also am someone who very much likes to use my time to like peak? I talked about my being like Jenga game like I need everything to slide into a little slot because otherwise I won't get it done so if I'm getting my nails done I'm listening to a podcast if I'm working out I'm listening to a radio show to prep from my other show later There's nothing wrong with that right as long as you occasionally get breaks. Yeah as long as I have a similar type of lifestyle but as long as you're regularly scheduling in time where it's just you and your mind and even if it's ten minutes here twenty minutes here or after you shut down at seven or something like just. That's fine while you're trying to avoid is the complete lack of solitude which is incredibly artificial condition. That really wasn't possible until without seven or eight years ago so the opposite of that is also true. We don't need too much solitude. We also need human interaction and the guest. I just I had Jim Hill. Zaki was talking about how the lack of day to day face to face communication because of urban living solo living you know having our pods and everything else else can affect our empathy and kindness toward each other Kate Fagan a colleague of mine. Wrote a book What we made mattie running some of the research and there is about how our actual brains react to talking on the phone versus reading a text versus talking in person and on the phone and in person you at least get some brain activity when you talk to someone you love someone when you love sends you a text about a hard moment? You're going through the brain activity isn't there. You can feel like you've had the same exchange of consolation and kindness but your brain doesn't see it and hear it that way because it actually needs to be triggered by the sound of a voice or you know the the psychosomatic reaction to somebody's face and what they're doing while they're talking to you. That's a huge part of this. Our phones and why there's so much loneliness and mental health issues is we're stepping away from the actual face to face. Communication seems seems to be absolutely true. It helps explain this otherwise paradoxical result that we find again and again that increase social media usage tends to increase loneliness which doesn't make sense on the surface. I mean social media use is a social activity but what seems to be happening is exactly what you're talking about. It's not that being on social media. Yeah that makes you feel only. It's when you replace other types of richer. Social interactions with the social media. You end up with a net loss. I mean all the research is clear. We're incredibly sophisticated. Social animals are our experience of sociology is multi modal to be sure we take an all sorts of different channels of information and the whole thing gets fixed together in different parts of our brain simulate and understand the people were talking to right now for example. I'm really listening to the the timber and pacing of your voice. The careful careful listeners would probably notice that there's some Linden continents going on here. We're actually matching the way that we're pacing the way we talk. This helps create a sense of empathy. So we have the complicated tasted multi modal social computers because this was absolutely crucial to our species. Survival and this complex social computer this evolved over millions of years does not understand glowing ASCII characters on a piece of glass. It probably doesn't know what that is. Just we have no experience with that on any sort of deep evolutionary loosener timescale and so if we take this rich dance that we train our whole lives to do which is to be communicating richly with other humans. And we replace it with ASCII characters and bit met emojis on the small little piece of glass. We think in the frontal CORTEX. I'm out of being so social. I've been on my phone all day long but the rest of this huge complex computer which which is just lying there idle doing nothing. I was like man. We're we're lonely time we've actually communicated with someone I think it's a real issue back with more. That's what she said. Was Sarah Spain in just.

packers Sarah Spain mattie Zaki Jim Hill Kate Fagan
"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

10:46 min | 1 year ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"I can't reconstruct exactly how that came about. But the the the two things I remember as one is Mark Zuckerberg was a contemporary contemporary of mine. So we were. We were both at Ivy League schools doing tech companies at around the same time so there was probably some notion of jealousy. They're like why is this guy's right. The FACEBOOK DOT COM company. And the other thing I remember is I for whatever reason I really hate listing favorites and people forget that two thousand and four facebook. The whole thing was about my favorite movies. My favorite quote my favorite Brian. I have a block. I can't do that when people ask me for my husband. Mike would you rather. What's your favorite if you could only? He's like no. I'm not playing the game. And that's what facebook was so I didn't sign up but then it put me in this weird position. I was like a an anthropologist who had just arrived at. You know. There's just an island and it was so interesting to be able to watch this to be one of the only people my generation and was able to watch this with some distance that you know after a while it became clear that I'm not going to sign up for any of these things much more interesting to study them than it is to get the get lost in the world. I think I'm the only one could be raising my age. Who's never had a social media account but it turns out it's allowed you know? Yeah well the and you know there are some who would who would argue. You know. You can't tell everybody. Oh don't drink alcohol if you never try it or whatever. Those rules are for trying to comment on other people's habits without understanding. Maybe why they're drawn to those things but you're right. It does also allow you to view it from afar and one of the things that I think watching or observing serving people get sucked into their phones. Even as someone who does that a lot is is the absurdity of it. The idea that if you ask someone do you want to spend. I Dunno seven hours of your day staring at a screen and not talking to people and not engaging they would say no but if you actually show them that's what they're doing doing and so from afar you're watching your like not engaging in benefits or the positives that people get from social media and you're then able to just limit it to the things that stand out as negatives let's talk about Tristen Harris And and that part of the book it reminded me of it would be AH episode straight out of Silicon Valley right where you know. A guy creates better internet where he doesn't want to sell people's Sell People's personal information and realizes that that's not possible within in the scope of the industry. That's kind of what I felt like when you introduce this guy. Tristen Harris who turned who tried to stop Internet companies from making money off of essentially our time and focus waitress on Harris. His startup was acquired by Google. So he he was thrown into the Google world and he witnessed witnessed firsthand the degree to which these giant attention Konami monopolies are specifically engineering their products that capture attention just like an Exxon Mobil. Mobile engineer is explicitly engineering. They're drilling equipment to get more oil out of the ground. And so he does the Tom Cruise in Jerry Maguire tight move. He writes a manifesto titled Something Like Respecting Our users. Attention really is Raymond Crowe really and he described it. Distributes it and you know it gets on the desk of of Larry the insurgency. And you're like yeah this is this is great. You know. It's like that scene in Jerry. Maguire everyone is clapping when he comes down into the lobby of the of the conference. And they said we're going to give you this new role you're going to be head the thinking of user ethics this down they put him in this role and it is as if you were just put in a office in Siberia. Nothing happens. No changes were made. He had no role or influence in the the company. It's like eating the guy at Exxon Mobil that says. Hey maybe we should tell US oil. You'RE NOT GONNA be you're not gonNA have a a big impact and so he laughed and basically became one of the early whistle blowers other many others actually followed after him but he was one of the first whistle blowers to say guys. You're not just using stuff so much because you like it and it's just a natural engagement with it. The entire business model. We're hacking your brain. We're using advanced science just to get you to look at this way more than is useful healthy for you and so he was the start of this sort of sequence of whistleblowers and this was a huge problem. Tom For social media right. It was a huge problem and ironically what kind of saved him was the political issues of the two thousand sixteen election because it allowed the conversation conversation to pivot away from rear. Hacky your attention and making these things addictive to things like data privacy and content moderation which is much more complicated and much more off you skated and these are issues that they may be do. Something about. The debates are really complicated and distracted people from what was becoming a major prophet them a two thousand seventeen eighteen which is wait a second. You made these addictive. We're using it way much way. More than we should trust. On Harris was sort of the first person to point that out and so much of that matters on how much people actually care about whether their brain is being hacked into right so I remember I saw a guy on the daily show talking about how he used to work for a big food brand company. Big You know something that made all the different processed foods and sitting in a lab with other scientists trying to figure out the exact amount of sugar sugar sweet who mommy that would make you want to eat more and more and more but never get full but WANNA keep having it and out of principle. I was like I'm so mad. Let Their tricking my brain rain in my body into wanting this stuff. I don't WanNa have that anymore and I eat far less processed food because it annoys me the idea that it's not even really food. It's chemicals that were made to approximate something that I would wanna keep having and I kind of feel that way about the Internet when I find out that it's intentionally using psychology and science to to trick me into wanting to click the next thing or I had Jia Tolentino uninsured this great story about Tick Tock and how it basically like read your mind signed and then send you to the next thing so that you never wanna get off this ride that makes me want to pull back on my behavior but not everybody. There are some people who really don't care what they figured figured out as long as it gives them this fix for border more this rush of excitement when they get a new like how. How does that sort of part of why it died down because people just didn't care well no I think I think it was these other issues right i? I the fact that we are engineering. These things to be addictive. It was a bit of a bombshell of a revelation. I mean this is the big story. I tell key chapter in my book. Is that what we forget. Is that in the early days of smartphones and social social media. We didn't look at our phones all the time. That'd be completely weird behavior. No one did that. No one bought an iphone in two thousand nine and looked at it all day. Long the key step that triggered that behavior savior is when the social media companies led by facebook in particular facebook trying to prepare their revenue numbers for their issue. They engineered the experience to be about these things like likes and re tweets and hearts and photo auto tax and all these incoming social approval indicators which the founding President Sean Parker described as US trying to hack your brain which is exactly what they were doing so they completely change seems everyone's relationship with their phone without their permission and without anyone really wanting to look at their phone more. I think this is a bit of a a bombshell the storyline. What I've found is when I when I'm on the road? Let's say promoting the book. It's what people care about what they care about is. I'm looking at this too much. I'm looking at this too much. And it's taken away from other things. I find valuable but there seems to be and this is just speculating. But there seems to be a big disconnect. Let's say between the media that covers technology. What they care about what the average person cares about because if you're a technology journalist things like twitter are so much at the core of your life you have a hard time even thinking about it as being anything but essential so the storyline Ryan capture? Your attention is how are people miss using these essential public goods. Who is using? You know what information is false. What is what's happening here? What's happening? People's data Howard is essential public goods being misused. The when I'm on the road talking about whatever these topics no one ever raises their hand and says the thing I'm really worried about is what happened to my data or the thing I'm really worried about is what exactly the content moderation is. That's what I hear what I hear is I'm not paying attention to my kid or a use of spend a lotta time outside doing these things that matter to now just on my ipad. So I think it'd be disconnect up between what we're seeing reported and what the vast majority of people who are uneasy with this technology. You're actually feeling right now. Well and digital minimalism isn't a painting painting tech as bad or your phone inherently as bad particularly coming from someone who works in the field right. That'd be very strange if you wanted us to all get rid of electricity but it is talking about how it needs to be intentional. I think what you just pointed to is really interesting with if you introduce something to someone a random product and you said this is going to make you smarter at times. You're going to be entertained by it but it's also GonNa make you lonely. You'RE GONNA struggle with mental health. You're going to have a loss of focus. You're you're going to waste a lot of time you're going to lose friendships. Potentially you're going to argue a strangers. Right they're going to be like. I don't know if the benefits outweigh it right. But we don't really take. Our interactions are our relationships with our phones. We don't get that big of a view of it usually. We're looking at very specific things. I like facebook because I get to see pictures of my friends kids or I need twitter because I need to be updated on the sports news of the day when it happened I think that's one of the biggest issues with it. Right is that there are benefits it it can make you smarter. There are things to be gained from it. It's just that most people don't give themselves any rules and then it becomes a wash because they misuse it and they waste time on it. Yeah that's exactly what happens. I mean the social media companies call this the ecosystem strategy which is you have a broad ecosystem of possible services and benefits and your goal. Is that for each potential potential users. There's something in there that is unambiguously useful to them like the finding pictures of their nephews nieces or you know for me. There's certain trade rumors about the Washington. Oh she didn't national so they really do need to know. Congratulations if you're an I take full credit yes no it is And it didn't once you're in then they want you in the ecosystem then once they're in the ecosystem the track you analogous been to three hours a day almost none of it which really connected at original benefit. The core idea of digital minimalism. Who these guys are women digital minimalists? That seem to have this figured out. What they do is pretty simple? They start by figuring out. What do I really WanNa? What do I care about how to relate to spend my time and then they work backwards and say okay? What tack might amplify these things care about? And that's the tech they allow into their lives is but the reason why this is so effective is once you know why you're using a specific piece of technology. I am using facebook for exactly this purpose..

facebook Tristen Harris Exxon Mobil Jerry Maguire US Tom Cruise Ivy League twitter Mark Zuckerberg Google Brian Mike Raymond Crowe Washington Konami tricking Siberia Larry
"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"Comes up so hope you enjoy. That's what she said super excited to have cal. Newport on the PODCAST I'm sure. Regulators will see a theme bouncing around from people who engage with each other comment on each other recommend each other for the podcast and and cal came recommended because a lot of what he's written about in his books has come up in conversation on this podcast I WANNA start with way back when in growing up and how you how you found yourself to become an expert on how to work well and now on digital minimalism. So let's talk about being a kid. What kind of kid were you had a nerdy tech science guy from the start? Yeah always a computer nerd. My mom was a computer programmer when I was growing up so I was exposed to programming at a young age. So I I always had a computer hacking on the computer from a young age Also though was involved in other things awesome well quite a social guy was a mid distance varsity track athletes. So I had the life that pulled in a lot of different strands. So I could you you know come from the track back to my high school tech company onto a computer back out to the the exercise room so it definitely an unusual but interesting mixture texture of traits when I was growing up. And where did you grow up mainly in New Jersey near Princeton New Jersey. Okay so you're you're you're balancing the track stuff. I was collegiate heptathlete. So your Your mid distance stuff was always the the bane of my existence but a part of my training training so you. You're bouncing all this stuff. At what point are you a teenager who decides you WanNa Start Your own business. Well the thing to keep in mind about that the timeline which is this is the late nineteen nineties. We're talking about. which was the first tech BOOB? This was the tech boom with pets dot com and Web van. That first time with the Nasdaq was going crazy. And one of the weird side effects of that first tech boom is that otherwise reasonable adults. Figured figured that it made a lot of sense to hire teenagers to watch that contract. There's just a sense of I duNNo. Don't young people know a lot about technology. let's give a lot of money Johny to the sixteen year old who design our website pillar web strategy. I think it was one of the rare windows in the history of business where people would actually think it was a good idea. Yeah Sign Contracts with people who are so young that their dad had the drive them through the meeting so I took advantage of it. I don't do that now with social media. Because they know that they I don't get it so they have to hire young people to explain to them how to be on Tick Tock and how to best sell their social media APPs to other young people. It's funny you mention Napa is Saturday night live always runs an old episode before the new one now shortened version and they ran an old jerry. Seinfeld David Bowie episode from Nineteen. Ninety nine this this past Saturday and there was a sketch for some sort of I think it was. Maybe a law firm but they were late getting to the web and they weren't in a rush and so their website was something awful. Awful like tiny baby penises dot com or something and it was just sort of how absurd the Internet and I can tell you exactly what it was clown. Tina Start Art cloudiness dot fart. I don't know where he came. Up with baby penises. I knew the penis was in there. Yeah and it's funny. I was just I was just thinking eating how incredibly distant that feels. Now the idea of like oh well. We missed the the website with our names. So this is what we're stuck with and it reminded me when I was reading your book you talked about and I'm only going to skip ahead for a second. You talked about the introduction of the iphone and it was essentially an ipod that you could call people on and I completely forgot the introduction of the iphone as being that simplistic and not being about all the things we use it for. You know things move so fast. I mean I went went back when working on that section of the book and talk to the original head engineer. Who worked under jobs on it? And that's what he confirmed. It was an ipod that made calls. The big problem. Solving is that people used to have their ipod and their Nokia Razor. That's two separate devices you'd have in your pocket. There's too much stuff in your pocket and the iphone was what's going to combine them into one and that was the original marketing. Push forget about it. I think it's a great example of how quick how quick things have been moving in this particular regular world of consumer facing tech. Yeah Okay so back to your. I believe seventeen years old and you decide to start a tech company. What was the goal? What did you think you are solving? elving what problem. Nothing that exciting on the surface right on the circus. We were doing essentially website development for companies. Now the big insight right that that I had with my my business partner was my girlfriend Michael Simons big insight. was we figured out early. About outsourcing and so what we were doing as we were going to these meetings and our ills that suits and had the laminated spiral bound pitch books and then we had teams in Pakistan and India. That would do most most of the actual graphic design and development. So we were sort of early to this idea that there was this arbitrage at the time the sort of huge inefficiency and that you had a- ah excess number of heavily train graphic designers and programmers overseas without a rough work and so we were playing that arbitrage game and making the big high profit margins. Doing it what did your parents. I mean your mom's obviously a computer programmer. So is she like. Oh good following the family footsteps or were they concerned about you already diving moving into the business world. Well I think they were fine with the computer programming stuff so you know. I was a programming nerd and I was taking CS courses at Princeton in high school. That type of thing the business. I'm sure made them a little nervous. Especially when there was contracts involved in a lot of money changing hands and interesting remember. Remember the the thing to remember valley nine hundred ninety eight or nineteen ninety nine is not only were there no smartphones. But we didn't have cell phones right so I was running this business in an age where I was either in school or at practice for most of the working days. That's what made it particularly interesting. Is that we had to run a business talk about lack of accessibility. I literally couldn't couldn't be reached for maybe ninety percent of the hours in in the workday so it required a lot of creativity I missed a lot of school and got in some trouble for that because it has been a business meetings and etc but they luckily let me graduate nonetheless. So it's clear from a young age you figured out some some work hacks and some ways to be successful successful. Which is why you started writing books about how to win at college to become a straight a student how to be a high school superstar all that stuff and you wrote those sort of after your own educational educational career Undergrad at Dartmouth your PhD from Mit? And while you're in in your own academia what did you think that you wanted to do with the computer science and with your studying of of sort of how that how that relates to everyday life. Well at first the idea was I wanted it. Just be an academic computer scientists. So when you're studying any field at a high level the ultimate goal this is the message you get from professors. You're studying under is to be the an academic to do original research to push the field forward and so once. I realized maybe halfway in my undergraduate career that maybe had a shot at an academic career in computer science that that became my goal that life style the autonomy of being a professor is what I was what I was looking for. I was writing in books at the same time. But it wasn't until later until later in my Grad student career that the two worlds came together at first it was. I was training to be a computer scientist. Oh and I I also wrote books. Those worlds were completely separate. My doctoral advisor discovered. I wrote books because she came across one at a table at the bookstore. She had no shot just doing the side as well and so they were really separate worlds and then they all kind of came together once. I got the Georgetown and professorship when I realized wait a second I work on technology. I'm also really interested on the impact of technology on society. I could probably be writing about this stuff that I'm also workout and writing about the broader impacts and so those worlds came together gather and and now there's a great conciliates between what I'm doing academic as a writer but until recently quite separate. Yeah Yeah I mean it's it's there's that academia academia and the computer science stuff that would connect you to all the people that also work in that field. And maybe not a lot of other people whereas when you're incorporating the study of communications occasions and how it affects our everyday life in our work. Suddenly you've opened yourself up to the everyday person who who is learning from your expertise without necessarily needing to understand all the stuff that goes into and all the research that Gotcha there so you. You're writing books and you end up back in two thousand sixteen writing deep work rules for focused. Success asked an distracted world. This feels to me like a pivot point for you in understanding The very current conflicts for people in staying focused doing the job job workplace productivity and all these new technologies So tell me how deep work sort of a very short description because I want. I want to get from that to the newer book right. So the idea behind deep work is that In the knowledge sector in particular which is about fifty percent of the US economy right now. The ability to focus without distraction is being widely undervalue. That we're we're very distracted with email and slack and personal digital tech Heckler. Social Media in our attention bounces back and forth all the time and we are forgetting value in sustained attention and so the argument of that book is that this is market mismatch. That's right. This is something that we're getting worse at the same time. It is becoming more valuable so that if you specifically train yourself to be an extra concentrator or if your team organization are your ties is unbroken concentration. It's sort of unfair competitive advantage right now. Yeah so I mean this was a huge thing for so many people and I think a a lot of people were even very slowly able to step outside their bodies and recognize their their their difficulty in focus. There's been some really interesting stories about people people struggling to read books because they have trouble focusing on that for a long time when they're so used to these snippets on the Internet. So you're you right deep at work and the response of so many people to you about social media and technology and how they struggle to balance that with the messages of your book are what led to the digital minimalism right. Yeah because people work was really focused on the workplace it was unintentional consequences of new technologies in the workplace. And this was the big feedback feedback. I began to get from readers after the book came out which was okay. Maybe we by this. But what about the impact of tech and are personalized which was really really focused. Much more on things like phones and social media and the attention economy which is actually quite different than what's going on. Let's say in an office place with your email or slack and so I was getting a lot of pressure from the readers. Okay but what do we do about tech in our personal. It was really something that was becoming clearly a problem in our culture especially starting around two thousand seventeen where it really began to uptick. And so that's what they're digital minimalism was okay. Let's turn from work to people's personal life and find out what they're taking what they should do about it. Well you are. You're thirty eight thirty thirty seven. Thirty eight Sir okay. So you're thirty seven you've never had social media accounts I. I'm not sure how that's possible were you were you so aware before we even learned of all the dangers that you never put your toe in the water. Or how is it possible that you never joined facebook facebook twitter and everything else well..

New Jersey cal Princeton New Jersey Newport David Bowie facebook Johny Nokia Napa Tina
"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"That's what she said that's what she said that's what she said what she said. Well that's what she said breath. Welcome to that's what she said. Conversations with interesting people from the world of sports music comedy and more talking about their lives careers successes and failures. Newport dilemma is that I have way more than I'll ever have time to read okay so I personally judged when Marie Condo told everyone they shouldn't have more than thirty books in the House and then I felt personally seen what a mean popped up. That responded you mean like on nightside table now condo did clarify graphite that if books sparked joy you can keep as many as you like which I most certainly have but.

Marie Condo Newport
"c h p m cal" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"Cal. Nelson. Take. Eight. Bill. Yes. Yes. All. Now. Now. How?.

nelson
"c h p m cal" Discussed on Get Up!

Get Up!

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"c h p m cal" Discussed on Get Up!

"Because you say if you missed shy we make baxter old out of the puck is let osi what are the calf stevenson centers shot scores pelly capitals forcing game seven with a three nothing shutout making the play riley watson waiver torres hits bob what's the difference between poverty and golf i'm about to get up at the table on a morning field with those kinds of moments welcome back to get up alive above the heineken river decade pier seventeen that'd beetle that's jalen is nice down there by the way beautiful day really busy day we've had here we've had a lot of guests and we're going to have cal ripken junior here at our studio and i can tell you in advance hembo was going to lose it i'm a little bit you've worn me about this starting to get comfortable for ripken this is one i'm not afraid that i'm overselling hembo is reaction to cal ripken i'm also not afraid i'm overselling the greatness of lebron james bring you highlights of last night's game four at the q lebron and company needing a win to even up the eastern conference finals with the celtics and early on they were jumping out too quickly to this first quarter i look at this past by kevin love we're going to call that ninety four feet and it basically was wonderful it's over thirty yards in the air so baker mayfield tv can complete some of those this season in cleveland was awfully good and then this came a festival of celtic mrs at the basket not once.

baxter torres ripken lebron celtics kevin love cleveland riley watson heineken river jalen baker mayfield tv celtic ninety four feet thirty yards