30 Burst results for "Bution"

Can We Learn to Talk to Sperm Whales?

TED Talks Daily

01:59 min | 3 months ago

Can We Learn to Talk to Sperm Whales?

"You're about to hear the sounds of the largest tooth predator on the planet and animal bigger than a school bus with perhaps the most sophisticated form of communication. It has ever existed. These are the sounds of the mighty sperm whale. A fellow memo that can die of almost a mile hold its breath for more than an hour and lives in these amazingly complex major societies these clicks. You heard homepod us are just the facet of what we know of their communication. We know these animals are communicating. We just don't yet know what they're saying. Project said he aims to find out over the next five years our team of specialists for bodices linguists and marine biologists aim to use the most cutting edge technologies to make contact with another species and hopefully communicate back. We believe that by listening deeply to nature. We can change our perspective of ourselves and reshape our relationship with on life on this planet. This of course seems like an impossible goal. People been trying to make contact with other animals for hundreds of years. How could we do what others could not especially given that. I'm sitting here on my couch. In new york city in the middle of the pandemic and protests. I spent the last twenty years as marine biologist and oceanographer setting bution from all different perspectives from microbes to sharks. I've assembled interdisciplinary teams. That have built the first shark. I camera to see the world from a sharks perspective and of collaborated with engineers to design robots so gentle. They don't even stress a

New York City
Prof. Cecilia Lunardini, Professor of Physics at Arizona State University. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:38 min | 4 months ago

Prof. Cecilia Lunardini, Professor of Physics at Arizona State University. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis the most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations. Bit researchers leaders. Who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info. Yesterday's dini whose professional physics at amazon is taking versity. One of the primary of usage focus is new leaders. Welcome to see you thank you. Yeah thanks for doing this. So i know that you have done a lot of work on neutrinos. You have a few papers. That came out recently. And i want to talk to a twenty eighteen paper dalogue and my own neutrino signatures of primordial black holes. invite you say. These studied primordial black holes ph is as sources of massive neutrinos by hawking radiation under the hypothesis that black holes emit nuclear no bass item states be described quantitatively called the pbs evolution and lifetime is affected by the mass and flew munich dialect my own nature of neutrinos before we get the details celia I wanted to get some definitions of folks would know what black court saw a few episodes of black holes Here we're talking about. The pride won't imprac codes owes The these black holes are fall close to the big bang And then as caulking radiation Sort of The black hole evaporating So to speak and that That lady Imitating these particles called neutrinos. Right is that. Do i understand that correctly. Yes so so pry bhutia blackhaws before we get the neutrinos what is sort of the mechanism of formation their ho- exactly what they have formed sure We believe that Primordial hose could form in the early universe from density fluctuations so We know that any object could can possibly become a black hole if you compress it into a very very small volume so this same process could happen in the universe with Density fluctuations that could be a regional space where there is an over density compared to the surrounding and each of over the east coast past Then then it could get to the point of becoming a black hole This this The details of this process are beyond my expertise But this is fairly reasonable thing to expect and The diesel really small rate in the scheme of things. Yes so when i started to Learn about time or their black holes. I was amazed by how different in mass can be. They can be may be the massive wouldn't but they can also be The mass of Being or they can be Even even smaller so they can really be very very tiny. Yes oh so. That's really really small so this is sort of quantum fluctuations only universe Kind of getting Getting concentrated in vide- small areas But we believe those. Those primordial black holes emit nucleus. we Have to go back to stephen hawking for that stephen hawking wrote this seminal paper Which is about what we nowadays. Nowadays call hawking radiation so he demonstrated that any black hole regardless of what it is could be primordial black hole or a stellar. Nicole doesn't matter any black hole isn't really black because it meets radiations so radiation particles And the the process that we call evaporation so Because a black holes fundamentally gravity objects they would meet any particle that couples to raggedy including trees so It's the moment you have a black hole you do. Have hawking radiation and neutrinos are just that are expected. Part of hawking radiation. You're so caulking radiation so that that happens to every black hole even the even the supermassive ones right so i it said gentle phenomenon And so going to neutrinos now Don't typically thing neutrino site Caltrans and electrons are really well known. neutrinos are particles. Dad don't interact with The matter Espionage don't interact much with matters. We don't really see them. They don't really see them. And and so it's difficult to measure that's right and so so this could you give a. What does the history of neutrino vendor we. I understand such things existed. Let's see We go back to the twentieth century and the story goes That the father of neutrino sees Warfare he. He made the hypotheses of a new particle existing as a way to explain Some strange behavior of neutrinos produced by by nuclear decay so It's it's a long story but Let me just say that For a long time. Neutrinos who just the hypotheses and then around the mead of this twentieth century They would actually officer so we started to Know that this particles existed and But that was pretty much heat. So we didn't know much about the properties And one of these properties the mass which we still don't know i'm easy after all these decades but we still don't know if neutrinos have something like a magnetic went for example And something that we didn't learn until much later on is the fact. That neutrinos oscillate. That's that that sounds. That's something that we that were somehow established Turn of the sanctuary around the around the year. Two thousand really after after decades of of testing with the solar neutrino selling trainers. So there are still there are still a number of no on your trainers. One of them is the mass one and the other one is the The nature of the neutrinos being the iraq particles or miranda particles we She's kind of a fundamental cost. So there are that. That's that's that's related to the fundamental nature of the neutrino as particle break. So so they do. They have a mass but masses small. Do they have a chunk. Neutrinos don't have charge so they are electrically neutral and that's Comedy the biggest reason for for them to be a so allusive as you were mentioning earlier on especially in the in early. Nineteen hundreds all the particle detectors so basically a electro-magnetic detectors they were looking for charge or Magnetic behavioral some sort. So neutrinos don't have that and so they They only have the weak interaction At that that we know wolf and gravity of course and so that's why they They escape detection so so easily because their interaction is very weak. Yeah so so. That's sort of the beauty of neutrinos right so because they don't interact V can go back digits of years. Simple hats Perhaps become pickup one on earth and it would have travelled that distance through all sorts of things but would not have affected wider rate right. Yes and so so the other phenomenon of neutrino is that you mentioned that they also late so are they're failures of tinos they go back and forth. Yes it's It's actually a fairly Easy to this cried kwan to sonam on We know that In quantum mechanics there is this Particles described by these function which is called the wave function. And so the neutrinos could be on. Neutrino could be born as a say an extra and then it's quanta way function would evolve over time in a way that after sometime. The wave function is no longer a purely electron neutrino way function. But the has a little bit or even law actually of a different flavor. It could be a new one or tau. So what we observe in the actors. Is this change of flavor and perhaps the most striking demonstration of this phenomenon is solemn. Neutrinos because we know that the sun produces an extra treatments and It doesn't produce a new on and talion trainers so But here on earth we do Have evidence that the solar neutrino flags that we receive has some You wanna talion. Trina in it and that can only be explained by sedation and Actually after this other neutrino data showed this phenomenon. This was also confirmed by a saint men made experiments so it's a fairly established phenomenon it and so that the flavors are Electron new on tall. Yes that's right and so. Did you understand the vendor made in the sun for example there they are made as electron Neutrinos and by the time they reached the earth day the Immunes dot. Yes yes Impart young. that's that's what happens so ease. It always the case that they get a manufactured so to speak as as electoral neutrinos always. It depends on where they are born. There are places where neutrino sutter born in or flavors. A so it's it's it really varies with With the type of environment We are talking about okay. Okay and so in the people you say ph is this primordial black holes. We talked about radiates right. Handed and left handed dutra knows in equal amounts so anybody right-handed unless the cleaners. Okay let me see so Yes you say. Indicates of dirac neutrinos. pba Left neutrinos in equal amounts possibly increasing deceptive number noon pheno species nest. Yes is that explainable. Yes so right handed than left handed. Neutrinos that may take why to explain what that exactly means me. Just say that It's related to the neutrino mass. So if you're truly knows didn't have a mass which we know they do but if they didn't have a mouse They would only exist as left handed particles which means that basically their spin is Is anti aligned with the momentum and but if they have mass and the iraq particles There could be another type of neutrino which is right handed. Which where the This being ease aligned with a mentor other than anti line and so If you are iraq these these two different species could exist and so instead of having one species of neutrino emitted left-handed one Indicators of a massless trina if we have not suv nutrients than you would have to species and so. The black hole radiate war energy compared to The case when neutrinos don't amass so when we started working on this paper i was interested in this phenomenon that A lot of the literature having to do with a developer. Evaporation of primordial black couls. Consider the neutrinos as massless about. Now we know that they are massive. And so i thought well Sixty speaking at primordial black hole could radiate more energy than previously thought. So i found that aspect interesting and then sees you mention the possibility to increase the effective number of species. That's related to what it was talking about. So then you the black hole would ra- gate more neutrino States or more neutrino Species to spe pseudo speak and then Would increase the number of neutrinos per cubic centimeter Data we observe today so I'm kind of glossing over a lot of these days. But basically cosmology gives us a measurement of this and effective which is called the effective number two species. And if you have this right. Handed neutrinos coming from the primordial black holes. This number could be higher than than expected. And so that would be may be a i way to tell that maybe there are more black holes in the universe yet. So so the hawking radiation essentially creation coming out of black holes Expected defined Expected that over a long period of time. Black holes radiate away lap. Later ray out the mass or information that didn't do it And so this. Radiation is hockey. Radio station is it is a new park. Or is it. Fundamentally composed of neutrinos hawking radiation is made of every particle that no of so A black hole. A camera gate Pretty much everything. Photons neutrinos throngs You loans It said cetera but There is the catch here. The fact that a black hole has a temperature which is another Big achievement of stephen hawking to end and others To that the black hole is thermo dynamical object and so Basically the bigger the black hole the lower the temperature so if the temperature is really low The black hole wouldn't be able to immed- Very massive particles because they are thermal energy would be sufficient for that so because masses energy Mc squared right so because massey's energy If a black hole has too low of a temperature It wouldn't have its quantum energy It's it's Wouldn't be enough to produce the mass off a particular particle for example a proton may be too heavy to be produced by a really low tanto black home so so the beaker. The black called the lower the temperature. Yes ed so. So then can expect the bigger black holes to have more of a neutrino content in radiation. Yes because The bigger black holes would as i said be able to radiate the heavy particles and so they would only be able to radiate away the low mass particles and so there could be black holes that only emit photons gravitons and Neutrinos do a of sort of the distribution of this primordial black holes Isn't you know sort of everywhere. What is what do we know about you. Know some of the distribution of bbc's you mean spatial distribution like where they are now. I'm wondering just like the easy would do sort of look at the early universe will find them everywhere Probably at the beginning they would be a more or less uniformly distributed Bug in the universe. Today they would probably be Behaving like the dark matter. Does they would Be part of galactic halos In other words they would be they would class gravitationally on large structures like a like a galaxy placido galaxy so these call still around They would they would behave like like the dark matter down. So they would be in in halo. Galaxies would have by. Now have april would would they not have disappear because it far it depends on the mass That they have when they are born so their if their mass is less than a certain value that trying to remember Basically yes they would have to By now they would have completely evaporate did their masters larger than they will take longer to evaporate and they could still be around So they roughly speaking the dividing line between a black hole. Steve being around today or not. I think it's something like ten to fifteen grams fiery recall correctly into fifteen clams though So this paper. Eusebio obtained the diffuse flux of right hill. Neutrinos from his idea and so so. So so the nikkei actually act to build these neutrinos. They'd be flying here do pbs specifically In principle that's a possibility we Considered that for certain Masses of these black holes and certain density of this black holes the flux of neutrinos that they generate over time could be fairly large and so we could Detect these neutrinos If we had a very Power who attacked so Now life is never ideally in the sense that a real Ut detector have substantive issues like ground And so on. So at the end of the people we conclude that impact is giving given the limitations that current nutrient doctors have It may not really be possible to detect neutrinos trump mortgage black holes but people. That's a possibility and that alone is interesting. Yeah because they suggestion that this primordial black holes could be as as you mentioned could be part of the dark matter that yes to seeking. Is that still About us that has been. There has been a debate on these Kind of going back and forth in the scientific community The latest i heard is that Black whose could be part of the dark matter. Maybe even a large part but probably not they entire dark matter so a one hundred percent primordial Battery is a bit difficult to justify the day. experimental bowels that we already have constrained so various types but there could be scenarios where maybe a fraction of the dark matter. He's made of primordial black holes. I wanted to go into a ended up paper in twenty twenty supernova neutrinos directional sensitivity and prospects for dissertation here the export potential of current and future liquid cinta league neutrino detectors. I decade old town. Mass a localize a super a supernova neutrino signal into sky in douglas was feeding the core collapse nearby star tens to hundreds of english Coated and don't be constructed policy in the detector can be used to estimate a direction to the star so so this is now neutrinos from supernova and You so so we. We have Idea here that before this opened on what happens. If please open over a time period it is creating neutrinos that could pick up and and potentially get ready to see the super bowl. Yes that's what excites me The fact that Think about bitter jews. Beetlejuice is the most famous nearby star. That could go supernova anytime and we don't know when that's going to happen and If it wasn't for these neutrinos that our paper is about we will know until the style literally Collapses and and then soon after becomes superman but in this paper we we Show that before the star collapses which is the beginning of the supernova process We can detect these. These neutrinos That are used at that at that stage and so increase the pool we could know that You know tomorrow. These days beetlejuice exploding and that that would be quite exciting. Yeah it's beetlejuice is is red joy and reasonably close to was really big star. I can remember Cecilia there was some suggestion that It could go supernova within something one hundred fifty thousand years which is obliquely in cosmic time so it is getting ready to go to Supernova right yes. I am not you formed about exactly the number of years give or take but it's it's ready it's ready. It could be any time and any time any time for an astronomer muse anytime the next thousand soviet so we should. We should hold their breath. But it's ready could be tomorrow. It could be in a hundred years could supernova. I know that this is not part of the paper but could the beetlejuice supernova avenue adverse effect on north really know a supernova is very very spectacular event. it's it's a star that collapses so it implodes i and that explodes and then when he explodes It's very bright. In the case of bitter jews we could. We could see by naked-eye shore but in terms of A fact of each radiation and neutrinos in light on on us and on our daily activities. It wouldn't it. Wouldn't affect them in any way so it's a save Show to just enjoy without any worry. Great answer so you talking about supernova neutrinos so so can be actually detect neutrinos from supernova. What different from what we talked about in the previous people Different from pbs I'm not sure. Can you repeat yes. So the new teen emanating from a supernova different from the Neutrinos of expectancy from a primordial black hole. Yes the the different In many ways disney trails have higher energies. So it's much much easier to attack them and indicates will beat the jews. We would detect thousands or even more of dan millions. Probably of them Indiana so different in the way they are born because in our primordial black hole ordinary black hole The processes volcanoes the asian. Which which is a gravity phenomenon in a supernova. You're born out of the very hot and dense environment That the that that the star as after it has collapsed so star collapsing on its own way to become very dense and so In this very dense in hot environment nuclear processes take place that produce these nutrients. So i guess the main difference is that indicates supernova it's most nuclear phenomenon and in the call is really fundamentally a gravitational sonam. Okay you discover technique in this paper and you saved sin principle possible unique the identify the progenitor star so So the existing technology and ideas discussed in the paper viki see teacup a neutrino decode. Identify valid came from or what direction thing from embed you can go back and look at the in that direction if he find to supernova then you could say that the supernova that created in-principle Yes let me. Just say that There are situations and this is not one of them but there are situations where if you have one neutrino you can point to the pointing the sky. What came from in these case. It's a little more complicated. Because what really gives us. The information is the statistical distribution of these nutrients so we are talking about may be the tax in hundred a hundred Gable take from say be for example and What did detector really observe is not the neutrino is kind of a vector which is related to the products of these neutrinos so this neutrino sues interacts with the interact with the detector. And then out of this interaction you have a positive on the new thrown and those can be observed and you can you can create a factory using these two and then and then these rector will have a certain orientation but each each neutrino coming will give you a differently oriented vector but statistically if you look at the distribution of these factors you you can tell you can you can do for with a certain of course The direction of the neutrinos because these vectors are not uniformly distributed they are they have a non uniform distribution of the direction. And so using this information we can we can define a regional the sky where The new three could come from so we can. We cannot now down to a point but we can now down to maybe a cone of a few tens of degrees Width and then we look in that cone and see what stars that com and maybe be juicy one of them. Yeah so As you say you if you see a few Neutrinos Statistics bution of those will give us some some probability That it is in in some region of the sky. And then you say the paper You can then that if it is happening please open nola. You learnt other observational. Modalities multi messagero rations Invisible in radio and other other types of observations Do actually pick up more data so this is almost like a early alert system If it is in place right yes i would call it a very early I learned to because it's we're talking about maybe our worse or insert very fortunate cases. We are even talking about maybe day Before the assad goes supernova and. so that's enough time to plan for for it so a something that fascinated me When i heard about this from a from a an experimentalist is that there is a human factor which was not aware of but The factories so if you have come up with thirty minutes to plan for watching supernova this may not be enough because it just takes stein to make phone calls and get a hold of people and and decide what to do. Come to a consensus in that. I saw in addition to technical things. Like okay have to maybe turn your telescope Direction which takes time. But i i was really fascinated by the human factor. Those things that if you had style we'd be you can kind of gathered. Relevant people decide something but if you have thirty minutes or or or minutes maybe not so. Yeah yeah i wondered. If such a earlier system is in place Perhaps could be something programmatic. Crises is picking up And you have some you know. Maybe some ai techniques or something like that that identifies the region and it goes. Programmatic returned the telescopes look. Yes yes exactly so. There could be a protocol in place For that so e if a telescope was suitable for observing a nearby supernova which which is not always the case than than now that we showed that it's possible to know beforehand if a star is going to go supernova then there could be some sort of protocol in place already so that when the alert comes which is we can just activated the protocol and oriented telescope. maybe automatically will in some sort of Organized way yeah as you say if you remove humans from the process it becomes not better there is actually already working this direction It's called this new two point. Oh a network which has to do with Exactly these using neutrinos as alert for the astronomy community and That has to do with exactly a creating alerts and also creating protocols for how to react to an alert rate. I want to end the people that just came out. it concordant scenario for the observation of neutrino from the tidal disruption. Even eight hundred twenty nine hundred ninety s t You say be induced at phenomenology concordance canadia with the logistic jet of for the title disruption event Between ninety s jesmyn proposes a source of the astrophysical neutrino event. Ice cube So the title disruption even this is star getting cooler into a black hole getting Getting sucked in rate is that the is that even up to the match yes This is something that we We had about be in in popular science stalks What what happens if you get too close to black hole and It's kind of scary. So the answer is you would be ripped apart because your feet will be pulled in with a strong force than your head and these. This is what happens to two statehouse. Use the star gas to close than by guests Ripped the park. Which is what the tied is option means and so instead of a star Rotating around a black hole we just have a stellar stellar That dr intially. I created by the black hole and so This is something that The happy neighbor cops serve did so so we have. This does happen this particularly Eighty twenty nine hundred ninety s and Bequeath actually see a new cleaners from that particular even so tightness. Deduction events are fairly well established phenomenon in astronomy. We have many of them served They they are Fairly a common plays events But what's special about this particular one. Eighty two thousand nineteen years. G is that We could let's say It could have Produced on neutrino that was detected a ice cube so eighty twenty nine hundred ninety s. She is the first either direction event. For which is coincident. Neutrinos detected a dice. Cube in queens. This coincidence is likely to be accidental. So on approachability estimate tells us that these coins. This is pretty causal not accident so eighty twenty nine hundred ninety. The g could be the parent of this neutrino. And that's that's that's a i. That's very interesting. Yes i skew. is a is a big ice cube in the in. The south is I'm not sure it's exactly cuba. But it's it's the biggest block of is which has been Eastern With values Small detectors So it's it's an array of swarner detectors but yeah it's basically a big block of ice which has been transformed into a detective and so so the idea that this high energy neutrinos from what they were System montemar even that happened Out there this high energy neutrinos passing through that ice q. believe some telltale signs All of that happening and yuxi picked up Then began back Just like you were talking about the previous creeper begin. Please back to a region so this is one of those cases where you can tell from a single neutrino of course the with with a narrower where you can tell the point in the sky where three neutrino kate from. It's doable with one single neutrino because this high energy neutrinos when they enter the is They produce ca a shower so they kind of illuminate. They you me nate. The is but the do it in a way which is very much Beat so and then and then the direction of the the direction of bigotry knows. We have a pretty good accuracy often. How often could be a pickup something like that. Do we have an estimate of how often that would happen. Meaning ice cube detects something like this. Every year ice cube the tax Of the order of ten high-energy neutrinos froth outside our galaxy. Tadesse the number for the entire crop of neutrinos that ice cube has It went we talk about tidal disruption events in the specific these are fairly rare phenomena and so they estimated that maybe a few times so percent of the entire neutrino flux the thais cubeys of serving could be from tidal disruption events. Not much more than that. So we are talking about less than half of the total flats being to tell this option events okay and so the tug disruption burned as as you mentioned It starts getting clipped applaud and pulled back into a into a a black hole but this ten percent. Do they have to be these braces as they call it. The things that have a jet that is sort of lying towards us. Is that it necessarily condition for these types of high energy neutrinos. It's it's a plausible scenario Let me just say that. There is an important difference between blazers in tidal disruption events. In the fact that the ablaze is something that has a jet. She's always on so the jets kinda kerman feature of of these particular galaxy but the title is adoption. Event is transient events. Saw dotcoms creates the accretion. This accretion of the star of the black hole produces flair is flair can last year or two but then it would just fade away so There could be jet and in fact in our paper we present where there is a jet so they partisans the user chat But if there is a jet in tiger disruption event. That's a transient suggested. That's born when This starts to create the stellar debris. And then it's on for months or years and then and then shuts off and it has two point in our direction as you as you mentioned because otherwise we would. We would see the trains your so this high energy neutrinos sillier how. How many orders of magnitude are we talking about coming to the one set you pick up. Let's say from the sun I'm not sure about the question. Can you maybe rephrase yet. So when you say this high energy neutrinos that is coming from let's say a tidal disruption events or something like that How much comedy orders of magnitude more energy Outdoors come to you. Know the ones that might be created the sun a lot menu of this magnitude so It is a big difference. So the sun produces new three meals. over a wide range of energies Higher energy neutrinos from the sun reach energies of the order of ten am pt and mega awards and for the ice cream. Neutrinos we are talking about one hundred of the older one hundred t. v. or even thousand teams. Which would be p so. Let's say maybe eighty tortoise magnitude finding the mass rife or okay and so this e. v. measure it is actually measuring the mass of the neutrino of newfield. Now these these neutrinos are have such a Such high energy that basically It's impossible to know their mass Because because as i said massey's energy so they talk energy of neutrino Detected is to be so high that that percentage view to its mass east so tiny that this practice mutual so i was wondering if we know the energy couldn't be sort of back computer to save the mass is or it doesn't follow The reasoning is a bit different and The way to sink about this is perhaps they let me see the formula for energy particle Which used the rest energy Applause the kinetic energy and So connecticut is so high that he thought the overwhelms direct energy. So it's it's and of course every time you measure the energy when three no. There is a narrow associated with the measurement so You we can't really we can't really tell what What led the boss of the detroit news but both roughtly this. This appears to be sort of an early warning system for many many things right topped the supernova the in the title disruption events producing heightened plano's So this could be sort of inundated with a monkey message. Observations protocols as you mentioned that gives us a higher success. Wait suspect. I would think certainly nominated be one right That's the power of multi messenger astronomy the integration of different signals coming from Photos tree knows navigation waves Causing me craze and Danger plays very powerful emmanuel cases and maybe supernova case is the most striking Xenos come first. But that's not always the case So in the indicates of tidal disruption events Did you know that was observed. Came about five months later than the initial dhammika looser version of the tidal disruption events so It's if it can go both ways. neutrinos can be early alert or they only alert could be for example a radio salvation or or an x-ray use ovation and then and then the neutrino attacked or could Focus a surge in that direction as see what they find which which has actually been done ice cube sometimes. Does these these archival. Search this on the basis of others from From for example x ray or gamma ray surveys interested. Exciting eighty that said a lot to be owned It seems It seems like these till don't know all the production mechanisms for neutrinos but if we have robust with to pick them up on than we can place them back and and talk asking questions What might be there definitely So yes so. People celia the next five years Wanted the aid is that you believe Be will make a significant crocus in this Innovative neutrinos then two different areas. That a very promising One is Broadly speaking Manmade nutrients so there is. There is a big push especially hitting the united states to build Create very powerful beams of trainings and then these beams are manmade. So we know that very well. We know that energy we know the composition and we can use them to learn about The properties of treatments and then That other men bead neutrino experiments where Scientists look for the between months so that's also very promising In something i really. I really excited about that. That may be a furious novel with noble the neutrino mass us from these very high position laboratory experience. Then there is the whole Topic of neutrinos as part of the mouth of mike messenger astronomy and in that area. I think what was was to look forward. To among other scenes is the interplay gravitational waves shock waves. You still Somehow a science of its own into a large extent but there are so many possible connections. We've neutrinos tidal disruption adoption events should produce reputation ways so baranov shoot us gradation ways So so there is. There is a a lot of potential there which is still unexplored in and that's where i see myself Working on in the next few years you adjust very quickly The do gravitational waves travel bid closest and new ashtrays and so if If they both are produced in In uneven they're expected to arrive on earth close to simultaneously. It depends on the timing of the production if the answer is yes the waves ending a knows are born at the same time which may not be exactly true because the physics that governs tation waves is different from the one that that governs neutrinos. So but the difference in timing would be the difference Accumulated that birth But but the two were were generated genetically the same time. They should arrive the same time. Just thinking this a systematic difference in the production time than guan lorries given early warning for the other. But that doesn't seem to do a case right. There could be cases where significant lag in the production of rotation way with respect to the production of the tree nose and one example is. We haven't touched on this before but let me just nation mergers so if we have if we have a merger for example we have maybe a merger of a neutron stars or black hole neutral star before the merger happens so when the two objects that kind of still approaching each other we should start observe serving ways and this is what this is what has been seen so Delight experiment observes these these nominal But if we have a merger After the merger has occurred and the two objects have become one than a. Dan could be the formation of of over an accretion disk and he secretion Trainers which we can which we can back so the neutrino We come After they initially asian waves and so relation as would be the alert for the neutrino. That does excellent. your this has been great as celia. thanks so much complaining pleasure. Okay thank you bye. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on variety of topics. If you like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com.

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The History of Lorenzo de' Medici

This Day in History Class

04:07 min | 7 months ago

The History of Lorenzo de' Medici

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy v wilson and it's january first happy new year. Lorenzo de medici was born on the stay in fourteen forty nine. The medici family of florence was rich and powerful. They had come to florence sometime in the twelfth century although they had started out as just simple tuscan peasants but over a couple of hundred years they became incredibly wealthy and powerful by the middle of the fourteenth century. There were one of florence's leading families and they also had a reputation for being extremely adept at negotiating in the worlds of politics and money and this was through. Legitimate means as well as through things like bribery. Lorenzo domenici was described as the most medici of the medici. He was nicknamed lorenzo. The magnificent he's been described as the most powerful the most famous the most brilliant the most influential in the world of art thanks to his patronage and the most ruthless came to power in florence along with his brother in fourteen sixty nine after the death of their father and the two of them were ruling together and nine years later. There was a conspiracy to assassinate both of them and to take control of the republic of florence away from the medici. This was called the pazzi. Conspiracy the potsy and the medici were basically rival families within florence. One of the things that had led to this whole rivalry in the conspiracy was that the potsy family had taken over the financial affairs of the papacy and that was taking business away from the medici which the medici did not appreciate the ringleader in. This conspiracy was francesco. Potsy and he wasn't the patriarch of the pazzi family. But he was the one that was driving all of this. The fascination was finally set to take place during easter mass. in fourteen. seventy eight and lorenzo's brother giuliano was killed but lorenzo escaped afterward though. Lorenzo sought retro bution against olive his conspirators. There was a lot of hanging people throwing them out windows. A lot of dismemberments overall it was very gruesome and there were more than seventy executions of purported co-conspirators this whole incident though really shaped lorenzo's that his brother was dead so he was on his own in terms of his leadership at the republic and it had also gotten rid of a lot of actors and demonstrated the links that he would go to so after this whole conspiracy and the war that followed food. He had the support of a lot of the people of florence. He ruled almost as a monarch. Although lorenzo really liked to describe himself as just a highly respectable citizen anything special he and others in the family also acted as patrons to writers and artists and architects including people like botticelli and leonardo davinci among many others there was also of course michelangelo. Who was brought up partially in the medici household lorenzo domenici was also a collector of antiquities and of artwork. Basically what they were doing. They couldn't really afford to pay for the most extravagant biggest name artwork so they would find lesser known undiscovered talent of sort of cultivate them by their work for cheap. It's not however totally accurate to say that the medici family single paid for the renaissance. Sometimes they are described that way. Lorenzo was also a poet himself in addition to his patronage of other artists by the fourteen ninety s though lorenzo's health was declining the city of florence. Also becoming less and less enamored with the lifestyle that he had enabled and encouraged. This is a lifestyle that was just full of lavish festivals. in extravagance. He died at the age of only forty three. His son giovanni later became pope. Leo the tenth.

Lorenzo Tracy V Wilson Lorenzo De Medici Lorenzo Domenici Potsy Medici Giuliano Francesco Leonardo Davinci Florence Botticelli Michelangelo Giovanni
Food Justice

Call Your Girlfriend

05:02 min | 8 months ago

Food Justice

"I i would love to hear you talk about you know. Five years ago or for this work was really such a central part of your life. One days weeks look like and was it sort of a slow transition to being so daily weekly constantly active in food justice or or was there a moment where things really changed overnight. I five years ago. I really started to shift working in compliance and like research basically wanting to be more involved in community health in public health stuff. And i started to get more involved than nonprofits. Who do a lot of culturally relevant to the food workshops around la understand food in different ways and the just kind of got super curious going to like health conferences and the progression was slow. But i knew. I was hunting for it. I'm like there's gotta be some way for me to plug in with a skill. Set that i have to make an impact when i met outreach groups doing this That completely shifted. That's that's when i was like okay. This is where i wanna be. I scaled down my interest and kind of try and understand academics of health in really really doing more groundwork and two thousand seventeen start to literally make burqas britos and my kitchen and going out on saturday morning with with with the crew and like handing them out. And that's when really like. I started to turn because i start to see in person what was happening scarborough nachos in food but like public health wise just so many things just kind of colliding and it it matter that i saw it in person in matter that i had a team of people to bounce ideas off of so that we could figure out different ways to build support making homemade meals for folks Grow that was beautiful. I was doing that for like months. But i felt i started to feel like there was something else that was walking. I love what we were doing. But i felt like this isn't enough like i'm happy to be going out there and and giving hot meal i love to make for folks making them feel like loving care for but there's gotta be another piece that we can do because i was like this isn't enough. Something's data change without this people out there trying to figure out the policy and everything else attached so why the city has failed our house neighbors for people who are listening to this far from la or who are kind of far from this work. Maybe you can talk a little bit about services not sweeps and explain what is services not sweeps at this point where coalition of about forty plus different organizations became together about two years ago basically creating demand for the city to provide different services for an house neighbors and basically just not use criminalization and sweeps to take care of our homeless problem in los angeles so sweeps meaning like literally clearing away places where people have been living correct. Yes yes in the beginning. It really was us just as a coalition of different organizations in los angeles coming together. It's like based on the expertise of of different folks within the coalition that we came up with a list of demands because homelessness not going to go away anytime soon and we just wanna make it easier also better for our neighbors to be able to survive we figure out the housing solution for it and all that owes a model created to ed really led by an housed leaders within our coalition has a lot of our work is also informed by them very much that includes my work fisher and food. And we're still continuing right now. Where a lot of work is sometimes. We'll be attached to efforts in from from vietnam or from from different folks it's evolved so much especially under The i personally feel. The city has become more harsh neighbors in. That's been like a nightmare to try to. Fight has also been very vocal of politicians. Not putting their names were few district bution because almost like virtuous person but like no you like are pushing for sweeps almost like violent acts against humidity. But then you're gonna tell me that you're you know you're trying to see them on one hand and then you're you know you're not caring In the other. And so it's almost like feels like such a patchwork way for politicians to make themselves look better and i mean none of that right. Who can say not like. You're not doing good thing for giving someone like a hot meal. You know about groceries but i feel like historically politicians especially in local government used that too so that they don't do their job.

LA Los Angeles Fisher ED Vietnam
Lou Holtz talks Notre Dame and more

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

13:10 min | 8 months ago

Lou Holtz talks Notre Dame and more

"Lua alluded to you as being a builder and again i go back to the interview which you had here in the studio with us and the obvious question from a person when you They asked you about the rumors you going to. Usc and you said usc is one of the three best jobs. And i said wait a minute. I know notre dame is one of the best. What's the third best job. And you said the one that i get and it turned out to be usc but the university of south carolina. And and i'm just wondering when you reflect back about taking over that program. Why did you take over such a struggling program. And what is it is allowed. Lou holtz everywhere. He has gone to be able to build success. What i foresee a we will not arrive. I think we had three offensive linemen on scholarship is all we had. It did have a quarterback and didn't have a running back to his per se. But you know you grin there you you just you try to fundamental you. Try to do the things that we talked about. Just you know. Build build the football team. And i have gone to six different situations in college and never inherited a winner and went to bow game no later in the second year with matter of fact after going on eleven we finished seventeenth a country next year and beat ohio state in a bowl game following here i think we finished loveth in the country. Beat state again on january one. But it's not because guy it's Coach it's all about the people. If team i mean it's about coaches and players. All all really tried to play their road and believe that you can do something. We read great fan support in south carolina. We were below eligible this year. We'd basically accepted a bowl bid and then of course after a little probably had with trump said in my last football game we decided not to go to a bowl game. I would've liked to vendor micro in a bowl game and yet at the same time within hayes and i'll have the same legacy Last was in clemson was involved. Refer also that's not a great legacy to have necessarily but it's a good football team. Many people coming back in. Like steve spurrier command. And you know he. He's a guy that likes to win. And i think he can win earlier. I believe that in the bud by heart. I think he's an excellent coach. I think the players will respond well to them. And i think we took a the longest losing program the country and took it to a bowl game and he'll take it from there to the championship level when you talk about coaching today And i think about francs being fired after he won nine games and i think about the expectations that go along ty willingham of course sopa but notre dame in his first year wins his first eight and then what has happened to him recently as well. What are the expectations of football coach at a major program today. Well i've been figured that basically very very impatient but you know they. They want instant success. One instant gratification and want to go the top. That the trina goes to the university of louisville inherits a very very good football team. From coach smith went onto michigan state. Now goes between things that a tremendous job but You know feel air. And he has those great athletes. They have great success. Urban meyer. who. I hired at university of notre dame you know he goes to Utah has instant success and everybody sitting there saying well. Hey he can do it let. Let's go get that guy that can do it here that we can win immediately will You know having code having smith there your quarterback as a pretty good asset to have it set about where somebody also had success. And i am sure they they look at it and say well gee they came in and they were down and all of a sudden they one. That's what we want to do and everybody all the fans wanted to two things who's going to be the new coach and he will be the next quarterback i. It's unbelievable i. i don't care you. You want to become unpopular to hurry. Go for being the second team quarterback to the i team the anything too is if you think about it and i was thinking about notre dame just the other day what should be their expectation level and i know the obvious as well to win championships but if you look at the landscape of football today lou there's a lot of teams that are able to get outstanding athletes that don't have the same requirements to get maybe to get into school There's a lot of schools have reputations of putting players into the pros and what have you so having said all of that. What should be the expectation at notre dame today as far as their season and their teams year in year out when further. Joyce hired may at the university of notre dame. He said. I wanna talk to you about a couple of things. Basically not negotiable. These are not negotiable university. Notre dame we are need understand. This now isn't even before i was ever offered the job at you. Know we we. We will not redshirt. We will not take transfer from junior. College will not take a transfer from another school against need search chain core curriculum classes for years of english. Three years of math through calculus at center players are going to miss practice because of late classes or or or labs or tutors or things along that line. The players are going to live on campus. We are going to have great facilities. You have nothing to do with the discipline but athlete on campus We don't pay a whole lot You're not allowed to president of the university. Notre dame was the rule when say they gave the president rates once that they could give me a raise anyone on all that and he said with the we're expecting to compete for a national championship at least once every three or four years and I didn't find anything wrong with ed. And we did the head it. I think that should be their expectations. Not necessarily this year even next year. But i do think They expect Charlie wise to compete for the national championship. And i think he will. The same things are saying about notre dame they said about whenever procedure went there years ago. They said it. When i was there i remember my first year recruiting at notre dame. My aunt had us fifty eight to sixty year before. I got there in their last football game on national television and You go into a home to recruit a young man that have all these That have all these articles in there. About how Notre dame can't win anymore and the schedules to tough. There's all this. And there's all that. And i just don't believe that i i think you know. The sec schedule's pretty tough When i was at university dame might think at fifty four percent of games ever coach there were against a top twenty five football teams. But that's part of notre dame you play the best you know. We played washington when they're really good. We played tennessee. We played texas We we we played Miami florida played. Florida state You just that's just the way you did it at notre dame and I don't think it's any different now. I might be a little bit down right now but yeah. I think it's going to be fine but lou. Isn't it a little bit different. In the sense. That i used to think of notre dame and you probably going into a home where you know it was. I want this kid. The kid's gonna sign right there. It was like with john wooden at ucla. I mean john recruiting because everybody wanted to come and play for john wooden at ucla during those particular years but now the competition it. It's almost like well. We've got a pro passing program so if you're an outstanding quarterback you're going to go to this score that school i mean isn't the the mystique oh most of notre dame and not to their own detriment or fall but isn't it a little bit perceived differently today might be but i don't think necessarily it should be. I mean on tv every saturday. One time when i said notre dame we had fifty seven players active in the nfl. The next was penn state with thirty nine and third with southern cal with thirty eight But we we had to work hard. Recruit again we. We found uphill struggle. But here's the different. We could go to california and would we went after navigate. It was us usc or ucla. When would end attack between us. Texas tech today and you went into florida as a youth. Florida state miami and florida. You went into nebraska to be between you and the university of nebraska. You could go anywhere in the country and you would have legitimate chance to recruit the best athlete in that state but you would have to use the beat. The home state and you didn't always do that but when they start talking about well. Nfl i want this type of program. Notre dame's not a four year decision. Support here decision. What do you do in your football's over guarantee you're gonna play in the nfl with china education. You'll get what are you gonna learn. And are you going to be better prepared to go in there. You know i was watching Tonight on tv On some sports show where they had the ten major mistake officials made and one of them was grown bettas called tails and the guy said hatch. And i had to laugh because a whole time as notre dame the first thing i said the locker room before the game was we will call tales. We always called. This was a game. But i just think that You're still a forty year decision. Not a four year decision. You talk about the only thing that's going to change it from where you are today to where you'll be five years from now the books you read the people you meet in a dream a dream and the baby. You're gonna meet university in our day and they're going to be the ones that are going to be illness companies and being. Ceo's and they're going to be the leaders that those are the people you're gonna come in contact with and then you get him on campus. Let them talk to your athletes now. The guy that doesn't feel comfortable in that environment isn't gonna get isn't gonna fit well notre dame anyway and now there were always people that didn't want the discipline did want the the challenge. Academically didn't want to have to work that hard on their academics guy that they won't be interested in the university of notre dame necessarily but one thing i used to laugh about was you would read. You would read these top twenty two football players in america. What schools air considered and other day. It'd be listed on about eighteen oven. Maybe seven of them. We were recruiting because we couldn't get in school academically. But they would always put notre dame was one of their schools Florida not because it made them look good so to speak and I think notre dame will get back. I really do because it's a national school a special school. One of the thing that i think is the lou holtz legacy when it comes to football in. It's almost like parenting. In a sense. You mentioned about urban meyer. I think a barry alvarez a host of other coaches you must feel awfully proud of the the legacy of lou holtz from the coaches that went on from underneath year wing onto other programs either as assistance or successful head coaches as well. I've always felt that. I learned this from woody. Hayes have an obligation to prepare your coaches to become head coaches. I'd always explain why we did things and how we did it. the philosophy at center. I think we've made it look simple that everybody would come in and they go. I can do that. I wanna be head coach. But i went down. Visit very alvorada in preparation for the bogue. Gabi speed come down and one time we had about. I don't know maybe a sixty some former graduate assistants were either in major college or professional that had been graduate assistant said many people gone on u. p. care coach for me at the university of arkansas. We we started him out You know monte kiffin coach for him in the defense coordinator tampa bay et cetera. Just you know it's just so many coaches you enjoy it and that's one of the reasons why you wanna talk to me. Now's not because. I prepare them but because of the contribution they made our success but not mind. There's there's their contribution to my success is far greater mike. Entre bution to there's

Football USC Ohio State University Of Notre Dame Ty Willingham Lou Holtz Notre Dame LUA University Of South Carolina Steve Spurrier Charlie Wise Urban Meyer Ucla John Wooden Smith University Of Louisville
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 1 year ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Decentralization Philosophy Part 1  From Buddha to the Conquistadors

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09:34 min | 1 year ago

Decentralization Philosophy Part 1 From Buddha to the Conquistadors

"I've been trying to figure out how to talk about this topic for a while because cryptocurrency is this really kind of strange flat structure. That has all of these little hierarchical structures built on top of it and you can take that analogy and you can really really zoom in on it or you can really really zoom out on it as kind of still true really regardless of how you're looking at it and I think a lot of this has to do with just the nature and sort of the oddness oddness of crypto currency and a Bitcoin as a community right as a movement and as technology that also is attached to people getting rich. Sometimes today I WanNa talk about a topic that I've been calling catalysts and CEOS and take a look at what the crypto currency space looks like. Today what it looked like in the past. Ask Talk about some of the different attributes that got us to where we are today. So Toshi said an interesting precedent. They led with their ideas and to a lesser extent their code and the early sparked a was association that contribution catalyzed first Bitcoin and then the crypto currency movement at large those who believed in that vision given an opportunity to get rich in some cases crazy rich rich and that combination of factors lead. I all coins coins than ICO's SAFT'S STO's and I don't think even talked about on the show before and who knows what will come next because clearly the path of innovation that's occurring here is not over at all but it also created what feels like a strange legacy that we're going to explore today as simply put are charismatic leaders who emerge from that flat structure that is the bitcoin protocol more or less dangerous more or less problematic more or less notable than the mark Zuckerberg's the Elon Musk's Jeff bezos. Goes and Steve. Jobs who really lead their movements. There's not that much of a difference between Associate Akimoto and a Jeff bezos except for the way that they fundamentally went about not inciting the change that now has kind of swept the world in one case kind of the e commerce site of and the other case this digital currency cryptocurrency or blockchain bitcoin movement. Or whatever you WANNA call it. Today's conversation is about decentralized catalysts and centralize CEO's the first thing I thought of when you said SA- Toshi contrasted to Jeff bezos. US was the difference. Between a certain personality type blended with introversion versus extroversion an extroverted rated person who is very smart and capable and intelligent and can see the future almost but wants credit and wants to be the face of an organization and is is comfortable in that role. You end up with someone. Like Jeff bezos. WHO's out there? And he's totally comfortable with that even though he retracts heat sometimes but but she didn't want the credit souto she wants to be behind the scenes and gets everything they needed from just being the mastermind. Mind who's kind of silent and letting other people be the face and I think that's really interesting. If you study personality types. Maybe even like the Myers Briggs. Souto Souto she is like your classic. I N T J personality type. They're like the mastermind architect but they don't need the credit and they don't need to be the face. Jeff Bezos as US would be like an E. N. T. J. who's like the CEO and the leader and wants to be the public face. I think that's a really interesting point. But I think that there's another factor here. Maybe okay which is that. Was it a choice. For Satoshi to take the type of catalyst like behind the scenes never revealed role or was that a factor of the not just the disruptive potential but what was being disruptive of course it was a choice. I mean Saito. She clearly thought through the implications of what they were doing carefully but if they really wanted credit they would have justified some way to take the credit and to be public about it. I think you always have a choice. I think another pretty good way to differentiate so Toshi from Jeff bezos is one of them make several hundred million a year contracting with the CIA Eh and the other one was never heard from one someone spoke to the CIA. I don't know who's point that supports but I think the big different factors that there was a legal path for Jeff Bezos to do what he did and even if he was an introvert. It still a good choice for him to do it. If it winds up that he has all the resources and success. I don't think we see that in practice very often where you have a founder. Who Comes in catalyze is a thing and then leaves before it actually becomes successful and their contribution bution isn't largely replaced by what comes after? I don't think it's so cut and dried that. What Jeff Bezos was doing or wanted to do with there was a legal path for him him? I mean he was doing something that nobody had ever done before. What was that avoiding state sales tax? This is another good point. Jeff bezos has been really interested in Star Trek. He wants to create a star trek future and some of the things he's been doing are totally unprecedented. And so it's not as though you can really say. Oh they're definitely legal because there's never been a legal precedent to establish that they are legal. You could say oh well Ijaz doing things that are a gray area or questionable. But he's he's not asking for permission and that's an admirable quality so you're talking about different levels of challenge and so with Jeff Bezos thing and with examples like like Uber. And other things like that. You are talking about companies that are doing very disruptive things but the question is who are they disrupting and in both of those situations the person or the entity. That's it's being disrupted their state governments and so if you're like a national company and you have presence in many many states that actually gives you the ability to play a bit of a game there. The thing that Uber did is kind of the reverse of what happened with napster. Napster was a decentralized network for file sharing then hit a bunch of national and even global organizations that suited everywhere but it was ultimately fighting these national or global organizations whereas Uber. They weren't fighting any global or national organizations they were fighting lots and lots and lots of little regional monopolies and it's to a lesser extent. Sure about Amazon to every state where they weren't collecting sales tax. Well that was an individual a fight so it's not like they had a problem with the United States. They had a problem with each individual state. Look at what's happened with projects in the lead up to the invention of Bitcoin and all of those centralized charlize alternatives. They were competing with the federal government for fundamentally monopolized right in the right to issue currency and control sort of the dynamics of the money that we all use news. And that's a place where it seems like you couldn't have done this as a CEO because people tried that and they basically all wound up getting arrested or getting all their assets season in many cases giving customers assets assets seized two so as we can see. There are definitely reasons why people do decentralized and centralized organizations whether it's from personal reasons just because they don't want the credit in some cases or in some cases because having the credit is dangerous and on the other hand the advantages of taking on that leadership role. Well the thing about a flat structure is that it's a flat unstructured. So even if you're on top of it still major basically at the same level as everybody else but organizations you know. Companies these are hierarchies for the most part and so if you have that role at the top of that structure well. It's a lot higher than you'd be if you were at the top of a flat structure. All of this comes back to one of my favorite books. It's really short and highly recommended. Did starfish and the spider by Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman. I read it actually before I became interested in Bitcoin and it was really kind of formation book for me. We've talked about on the show before but it's been like five five years so I figured it wasn't a bad topic to bring up again. The subtitle of the book is the unstoppable power of leaderless organizations. And if you're a fan of decentralized technologies but I've never read it I cannot recommended amended highly enough quoting from the book. A spider is a creature with eight legs coming out of its central body. It has this tiny head and usually eight is. If you chop off the spider's headed headed dies and that's exactly what happens with centralized organization a centralized organization has a clear leader. WHO's in charge? And there's a specific place where decisions are made if you get rid of the leader. You paralyzed realized the organization now. This contrasts with a decentralized organization. which is a fundamentally different animal? It's actually a starfish. At first glance at starfish looked similar to a spider appearance but the starfish is decentralized. starfish doesn't have ahead. The major organs are actually replicated through each and every arm and in reality. starfish is a neural network work. Basically a network of cells instead of having a head like a spider the starfish functions as decentralized network and you can even in nature see situations where a starfish fish has been wounded and for example in arm or even several arms have come off what tends to happen is that actually both pieces will then grow into a complete starfish and it's another another method that they can reproduce. You might say that that's inefficient from a biological perspective to duplicate or pent-up locate editor. How you even and say that word but to make five copies of all of your major orders and neural tissue? GAFFER's them this great advantage of being able to regenerate just from from a small piece it means that while starfish might not have perhaps some of the advantages that a spider does it also isn't vulnerable in the same way. That spider is to damage to you. Know very small parts of it because again it's just not centralized we're GonNa talk about this concept in a different way a little bit later. But what other comparisons do you like besides this kind of starfish in spider for decentralized and centralized organizations and kind of broader question that I wanna come to his how many companies do we actually think or how many any projects do we actually think like rough. ballpark percentage in crypto actually are starfish versus. How many might be using a network that is a starfish but in reality the are themselves

Jeff Bezos Sa- Toshi CEO United States Souto Souto Cryptocurrency Mark Zuckerberg Napster Steve ICO CIA Myers Briggs Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman Amazon Satoshi Saito Ijaz Founder
Chinese cryptomining giant Bitmain’s civil war breaks into open

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

10:02 min | 1 year ago

Chinese cryptomining giant Bitmain’s civil war breaks into open

"Last week and actually for this whole past week. There's been a fair bit of drama. At bitcoin. Mining giant. Bit mean what happened well. So long story sure it was a it was a coup so From October twenty seven to thirty years there was a video surveillance camera. Expo in engine and my colleague John He was the he's the CO founder will be man and he was was ad expo. It was their launch some kind of a chip from Yemen for video surveillance cameras and then one day after that Jihan on the after that there was a change of the business registration data of Of Beijing Technology. Okay so in that restriction change microbes no longer the executive director will be man. He's he was also so taken over by Jehan as a legal representative an hour that Japan will who is also the other co whole funder of demand so a couple of hours after that change Japan will send an email to all staff to be man. I'm employee's employees saying Michael giants basically dismissed off. All his roles have been men and any employees. You should not engage with anymore and it should not take any directions for him so basically shut him down and that was basically it an hour after the email. Hey Japan will submit Someone all this stuff to your own hands meeting meeting to tell everybody what happened. So that was what happened on last Tuesday and on today one week off to Dad Meiklejohn finally spoke on his. What we share way ball and said is going to take some legal action to return to the office Irene? So let's go a little bit into that stuff meeting. What was the backstory that Jihad gave to explain or justify his actions while so that was kind of like a shock to many employees? Because I guess not. Many people have seen a word like expecting that so he took that opportunity to explain to everybody what happened in why he had to come back. And why he they had to take such actions and he basically use the one hour meeting to explain what happened from December twenty eight eighteen when when when the kind of conflict has started between him and my crew John Yet that was that was pretty much all of the one hour meeting. And what was that conflict. So the backstory of the December twenty eight eighteen was that at that point. The Big Quin price was like a was a big big price crash and was thinking about layoff so Jihai in a couple of family. Members of the company was were like pushing for the plan to lay off employee's because at that time I think they may have about juicers people initially based on what John said in the meeting was micro. John was AH was against the plan so they had a big struggle on December. Seventeen Jihan says on that day Meikeljohn returned to the office called for a second meeting and on that meeting. He wanted to be the socio. So as of as of December last year Japan and micro were co CEOS in CO chairman of women so he said on that that day micro Office wanted to become the only CEO. He said that is the way to save the company so that that was what happened at that time. So there was a conflict of Should have a layoff but then they come to agreement that there should be lay off and they also come to agreement that they both will step down from cozy ethos and they will ask the second other person to on the new. CEO role and they will step down from the day to day management. So that was the conflict back then the as time moves on like bay. Men official announces announced that news in March of their stepping down to the public to Hong Kong. IPO failed But what John said was MICR didn't really stepped out from the management role. He's still kind of micromanaging the details and wanted to spend more efforts on AI. Stuff instead of the crypto mining equipment. So that kind of that kind of diversed I Big Business a little bit. So that kind of started the the conflict started to escalate one. Other thing is I think Jihan also said to the employees bit mean almost didn't survive that period and actually what he said is the only only reason it was able to pull through was at the price of Bitcoin had increased later. I'm assuming he's talking about kind of you know through the Spring and And even a bit. The summer we saw the price of acquaint increase but how has bitten means struggled this year in twenty nineteen still. I sing in twenty nineteen. I mean he said himself in the meeting. Based on the transcript. I got that The market share big demands mining equipment has declined. I mean I think they're still the number. One has the most dominant market share in terms of making mining mining machines but their market dominance has declined and the same time there Wi- will competitors like non. And what's minors Microbe eighteen silicon. They have been able to seize on the opportunity of the price of press jump since earlier this year. So I mean there. I think they are doing during fine. But in terms of market share the mining equipment business has decline and also the mining pool business is also Declining if you look at the hash rate. real-time Hasher Distribution Bution Pity comment pull used to dominate the top two ranks but this year it was taken by pulling and after Paul. Yeah and one other thing that is just so curious is that at least last year Macri was chairman and and he owned thirty six percent of bit main holdings while Jihad actually owned only twenty percent. So how jeon able to oust macree. If Macri was the larger chair holder and I mean it was pretty dramatic. The way he did it I think you know not allowing him back in the building after this trip and having his email access over to cut off it was like this was a huge surprise to macri. I guess we could say yeah. That's also one question I I haven't been able to figure out to be honest if you look at the IPO prospect the file till the Hong Kong Stock Exchange last year as September last year. They they were coached. CEO's co-chairman Mike crease. You're right micro has about six thirty. Six percent of Commit Holdings John has about twenty percent and go Shin on the two two your three other family members they have four to six percent respectively and another eighteen percent was hold was. Hello Oh by a trust for the employment stock option incentive that was the all the ordinary shares that counts for bowel like nearly ninety percent. I think and all the others like nearly ten percent were held by external uh shareholders. Now there were basically preferred. AM prefer b-shares Through the equity raising commended in two thousand seventeen twenty eighteen so technically I don't know how he managed to do it but that's just give you the breakdown of their equity structure based on the IPO. Filing they last year I don't know if they have changed it in any way but uh what John said in the in the in the in the meeting was he stepped Opposed as Costa Ios. He also stepped on he. He also let Microsoft take the chairman row so supposedly he was not a chairman and now he is a chairman. So I don't I don't technically the holiday did it was somehow did yeah. I saw dovey one tweeting that she she doesn't think a- and Samson Maui. I think tweeted the same thing that it doesn't appear that the shareholders were consulted the other shareholders. So yes so. Maybe we'll find this out leader

John He Chairman Jihan Japan CEO IPO Bitcoin Macri Yemen Hong Kong Stock Exchange Dad Meiklejohn Co Founder Jihad Of Beijing Technology Hong Kong Michael Giants Executive Director Irene Micro Office
Chinese extradition bill spurs mass protests in Hong Kong

Today in Focus

04:55 min | 2 years ago

Chinese extradition bill spurs mass protests in Hong Kong

"Now. Hong Kong leader, Carrie, Lam has said she will not scrap a controversial new plan to allow extradition of suspects to mainland China for the first time, despite mass protests, supporters of the law say will prevent the semi autonomous city of Hong Kong from becoming a criminal refuge. But critics fear Beijing will use it to extradite political opponents to China, where their legal protections cannot be guaranteed the guardians Helen Davidson, is in Hong Kong, where organizers claim that a million people have taken to the streets. Last Tuesday, around one hundred eighty thousand people gathered in Victoria Park in Hong Kong, and that was for the vigil commemorating the Chatham and square, mascot. It was the thirtieth anniversary this year. So that was always going to be a really big event, but the opposition to this tradition Bill, which has been really increasing over the last few months in particular. It was also a really heavy presence at the vigil as well. You know, it was a reminder of the democracy that they hold onto here in Hong Kong, and what oppression in China. And by China, Ken, Maine. The extradition Bill would laugh a case by case extraditions to number of agents. Hong Kong doesn't currently have arranged with this includes mainland China. And the obvious concern that people have is that China's legal system and Justice system is not considered to be very free that it's not considered to be very fair. Whereas Hong Kong is very proud of its Justice system. And it's, it's sane is one of his assets as a diplomatic and financial hub in the west of the activists who pushing against this Bill. The low will legitimize Chinese Chinese abduction. They're looking at the multiple cases of disappearances renditions by the Chinese government of people in other countries to get them back to mainland China into face charges of, you know, various different things, which are ultimately saying, as being rich bution for their political opposition in their political activism against China no-one really trust that Hong Kong's real. Assurance that they will never hand over someone for political reasons. No one really trust that. So, you know, it's a, it's a real fear, among people in Hong Kong. And that was something that came across a lot. When I was speaking to people at the protest yesterday. I went down there about half now before it was starting. And I really struggled to get there. You know, I was on the Woking couple of blocks, but it would have taken, maybe an hour the straits fool, and it was, it was a save white t shirts everywhere, you look, social media was full of videos of jammed up metro stations of ferries that were being that were feeling up being able to get on. And everyone around me was walking very purposely towards Victoria Park. People are frustrated, but it was incredibly painful sorry, determined that this really painful events. There was at one point someone tried to agitate the crowd saying, let's jump over onto the straight, and people called him back saying no going to do this. Right. It got very light. And there are thousands and thousands of people still trying to get into the area around the legislative council midnight their permit for a protest expired and police told them that they had to move on. There was some, some k groups it said, no, we're gonna stay just sit in. We're gonna be here until Wednesday. You can't move us. This refusal escalated into clashes between police and protesters. It was quite violent that there are barricades and bottles thrown. There were several people injured, including police offices and the riot. Police really messing and I were rushing at these protests is quite systematically, to push them, further and further up the right one hundred meters and then ten minutes later another hundred maters. It was quite intimating. I think I mean no one was really putting up much resistance at that point because the offices were at numbering. Protest is at least five to one. Kong legislative council is going to debate the Bill again on Wednesday and it's looking like it will pass. In the last couple of years. Pro-democracy legislators have been expelled from parliament, they are significant minority but era minority, and they just don't have the numbers to push against this Bill, and because of that, I think people get up and we are looking now at more protests on Wednesday and further into the future as well. Helen Davidson, my thanks to her and to Francis Ryan.

Hong Kong China Bill Kong Legislative Council Helen Davidson Victoria Park Beijing Chatham Carrie Chinese Government Maine LAM Francis Ryan One Hundred Meters Ten Minutes
"bution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:28 min | 2 years ago

"bution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Had the inquest all of the horrible terrible detail of what happened on that night in November seventy four is in the public domain. You say the police have to do more to be more investigation. The truth. Has to be got to. Oh, please our employees and paid to do a job. And that's what we expect them to do. We have Nive the inquest is now left the cordless quite literally at the chief constable of west millions places door because they have always said, when new evidence comes to the fall, we will look at this, and investigate accordingly. Well, new evidence came is out of the blue three Whitney so in some others, and we now expect West Midlands police to go an interview with the assistance of the garter in Ireland's. And with the assistance of the police service of Northern Ireland to interview to the suspects that are still alive have been named in court an out of court and to find is what they know. And if they have any links to bring up is a prosecution we. Want family? I can't speak to the other families. Our family wants a prosecution, you cannot, what sort of the country are we going to leave for future generations? If we allied mass murderers continue to have their liberty without any fear. Refractory bution where they come to last cities, kill with impunity and know that no one is gonna come looking for them is the kind of society that we want to leave a few generations, I chose to have children, because the loss of Maxine had such a massive impact on my that the thought of losing the child, I know arm not strong enough to cope. I would never have coat losing the left one a child of my island. Hi, Martha coped, and how the other families and thousands of others. I will never understand the loss of my sister left. It's Mark and it's embedded in Vienna. You put incredibly powerfully. But the truth is some of the names that came out during the inquest, and I've been around for a long time, and there are certain individuals, including the investigative journalist, and former MP Chris Mullin and for example, the former intelligence chief of the IRA here in Conway, who I quite open that they have more information. They know certain things that, you don't know about the background of the bombers, but the various reasons they cannot and will not go public with that information. Are you saying that somehow they must be forced to give that information? You know what's interesting is high outsiders. Like yourself view, our perspective. Our five imagine anyone who's listening. Imagine your son your daughter. Your mother, your father, your brother. Royal sister is blown up beyond recognition, some of them could not be recognized because our injury. Was so dire that they had no face then you discover that not only are they an ex journalist there an MP a member of power you talking about. Chris me, who has to be said, did more than anybody else to uncover the inet police investigation, the injustice of looking up, six men who innocent of the crime without him? None of the clarity that has come to this case ever been achieved. You have no argument from me there. However, that's where ends where Chris Mullin is concerned, because he has refused time and again, to assist us in bringing those who are still alive to just if he could have done this because. Pledge to those people agreed to talk to him that as long as they were alive and bake gave him crucial information as long as they were alive. He would not disclose their identities. I'm sorry, that anyone who has the source of information where they are keeping it how he's able to sleep at nice is incomprehensible to all of us incomprehensible even to all of our supporters. He claims to have journalistic ethics his moral compass Isiro because he has knowledge of murderous. He would say indeed has without those ethics without that pledge safeguard on animated. He would never have got the story in the first place and you would be none the wiser about all of the failing. Prison along with the other five you have no argument from what he did for them. But why did they stop there? Why can he not think continue to come forward and assist us with coming forward to tell us a principal, the principal? Not one. There's more revolved. Absolutely, not, not when there is murder involved to me is just it is inexcusable. And there is no excuse. Absolutely no excuse. That's like saying, I shook his hand gentleman's word when he knows that they're a murderer. You have been a driving force behind the Justice for the twenty one movement. And clearly you are still determined to get to the truth of who did the Birmingham bombings, but in your heart, do you believe after more than forty four years that you can get that true? Absolutely. Absolutely. If we don't do it the authorities aren't going to do because when the when the Birmingham, six were released nine hundred ninety one nobody came forward, nobody and say, okay, if they didn't do it. We need to find who. Did do Devin Cole workplace recording to come into three? Investigations on west mittens places investigation, but just to do with their investigation, not reinvestigating. It's called us them one into three and I can't discuss that because we've had to sign paperwork. Just to do with the Westminster. You want to. Open public inquiry now. Yes. Yes, also public prosecution. But you see what you've got to remember, is this? We have been blocked at every single juncture, because we are fighting the juggernaut of the British establishments, what people need to understand the Llano this goes around the world. And so what people need on Sundays is when the legal aid was first implemented. It was the foundation of our welfare stays, and the welfare state was paused the mechanism for Farrah's people like us to bring the states to account, but the legal aid is nice cease to exist in its original format. It does not to say on the team. This is a matter of Royal all wrong, and the right or wrong here is that our loved ones these the rights, the truth, Justice McCann's ability, where legal aid is concerned, where we have not been given. Equality of l'egalite, because the inequality later light is so much to the fall, where if it's all been arranged by on elected civil servants. Hide in the shadows with at the behest of Whitehall officials, whose only course of action is to cost happy, you possibly put a cost on our loved ones. Lies and Justice. The campaign is taken up most of your adult life may take up my life. You're prepared to live with that. Absolutely will avoid it a, my brother and all of our supporters the other families, we know one thing for sure the governments and the Brigitta authorities aren't going to do it, and there's west men's place bus. I beg swat. The gauntlet is, is they Thompsons door chief conspire weapons place. We hope that, hey, now has the opportunity to prove us all wrong and do Justice and do right by the twenty one. Julian Hamilton we have to thank you very much for being on hold..

Chris Mullin Birmingham principal Ireland Nive West Midlands Whitney Julian Hamilton Chris me Devin Cole Northern Ireland Maxine Justice McCann Llano intelligence chief Martha Brigitta Whitehall murder Mark
European election is breaking taboos in Cyprus

Inside Europe

03:30 min | 2 years ago

European election is breaking taboos in Cyprus

"Yes, he Hillary crosses the buffer zone that divides the northern part of Cyprus from the south every day on the campaign trail. He's sixty years old, fluent Turkish and creek and famous throughout the island for his country bution to create peace. I as a professor author and filmmaker now as a politician to cause, in Iraq is the only candidate in these elections, who's visiting the whole country will try to get something better for generation small island. Why not? If we don't arrive at peace. Nothing is secure, what you're living right now to divide islands is a conflict herds, which you don't know what's going to happen tomorrow. At the end of may fifty polling stations will be installed along the buffer zone or the green line, so that northern supreme can vote in the European elections. The Turkish Republic of northern Cyprus is only recognized by the Anchorage government, the international community officially regards this territory as part of the Greek-Cypriot Republic, and therefore, part of the European Union, though ULA suspended. They're almost one hundred thousand acre separates, hold a European passport and zilla excess attitudes to, what's the e you are changing. Rectory EU, like Norring or being the some to now this if my candidacy SIMS to be changing it. Discover gain where European identity, and they want to mobilize this time. Shea. Cairo today is campaigning from Augusta a coastal town about one hour east of Nicosia in the Turkish part of the island he's a candidate for a Cal. The main Greek-Cypriot position party, 'cause erects goals, bringing both communities together and fighting against nationalism. Not only in Cyprus, but all over the EU. In a small side wrote close to the main musk forty students sitting on wooden benches drinking gin and tonics and focusing on one topic. The EU considerate is not only campaigning for his own party. He wants to remind young Turkish-Cypriots that they are part of the EU to five years ago during the two thousand fourteen elections to the European parliament only two thousand five hundred people from the north cast, a vote, that's less than three percent of those eligible to do, so I have never wooded on the European parliament elections before because I didn't quite know that we could even wrote to be honest, and, like, we didn't know anybody, because it was always from the other side. Now there's someone who's actually understanding on this, sending the yield on this, then what difficulties we are actually dealing with? And how we want actually be in part of the EU and Europe in the row, they don't really know us and. He can present us and show them who we are ever since Turkey invaded the north of the island more than forty years ago. Turkish separates have been isolated from the rest of the EU the border with the south only opened in two thousand and three the island's division is part of the everyday life.

European Union Northern Cyprus Turkish Republic European Parliament Shea Iraq Hillary Professor Europe Nicosia Anchorage Government Norring Cairo Augusta ULA One Hundred Thousand Acre Three Percent Forty Years Sixty Years Five Years
Understanding Australia's Political Narcissism

Between The Lines

10:12 min | 2 years ago

Understanding Australia's Political Narcissism

"Have you often thought that are major political parties don't offer a choice? They just offer an Tweedle dum Tweedle day. Well, that's more or less been the case since the mid nineties when both labor and the coalition champion what's called the economic reform agenda, or as some of the critics deride the neoliberal consensus deregulation privatize -ation tariff cuts tax cuts leban- microphone all that. Well, my guess says those days are over the may eighteen election. He says could represent an audio logical shift in Australian politics, and that's a good thing. To teams palmesano is professor of practice at the university of Sydney, he's a former rice discrimination Commissioner he's worked as a library vase, and is the author of book called on height. Published by 'em UP, get item welcome to between the lines on now. In your recent Sydney Morning Herald column. Mm USA just quote out political Nassim of monitor Frances that could be coming to an end house. Oh, we're saying perhaps the most ideologically significant election for quite some time here. And it's because we have the lay the pioneer Bill shorten offering a forthright progressive social democratic platform. It hasn't gone about presenting itself as a small target in this election. It's put a quality registered bution back on the Genda. You say this in the fact that it's pushed for capital gains tax reform, negative, gearing reform pushed for higher wages, the childcare policy announcement during this election is another example. So what you're seeing here in some is a muscular rejection of market liberalism assigned that the state is back at least on the lie beside and that you'll you'll saying challenge to the idea that a marketing. Clemmie must also mean a market society. So long gone are the days when you had a lie bellator running for office. Kevin rod describing the stalling himself as an economic conservative precisely and that has been the template in many respects full libero position. Now who's reflect the thinking of a lot of people in the community just how has the power of market liberalism. How is that filed? Let's just look survey at from the global perspective with still saying the effects of the global financial crisis with seeing here. What is a transitional transformation from stable managed capitalism to speculative financial capitalism. And the legacy of this committee described as follows when not saying global growth in in any significant way, you might even say the global economy is in naming with saying ultra-low interest rates with seeing quantitative easing by many central banks, huge jumps in public indebtedness. Also significant increases in inequality and on top of that when not necessarily saying the market operate in the perfectly competitive foam that you would expect of market liberalism, think of the concentration of market power in the new digital Konami the enormous size and influence of organization such as. Google or Facebook, or Amazon, I think these are all signs that market liberalism is not working the way that and that exit Bill shorten is championing this notion of famous, but is income inequality really Rausing in this country. I'll turn to a productivity commission report last g got the quotes. He it found that sustained growth has delivered significantly improved living standards full the average Australian in every income group that the economic mobility is high and quote movements in inequality indexes a slot rather than series in other words, Australia. According to productivity commission is not locked US where we have seen real income inequality Nora, we lock Europe where growth has stagnated for decades. How would you respond to the productivity commission all the productivity commission report still acknowledges that income? Inequality has risen of the past three decades. It's suggest. And here is that they may be a question about the degree to which income inequality has risen. But also, the productivity commission is also clear that when you look at the ends of the distribution on income, it's become in their woods stickier. So you seeing less mobility in some pockets of distribution, and as they put it stickiness is indicative, some entrenched inequality. So thought wholesale repudiation of the rising inequality in some of this is also that up in methodology. So the methodology that the productivity commission us was to look at surveys conducted as part of the Hilda exercise, the household income and labour dynamics in Austria study that is very well regarded, but if you look at other methods of measuring inequality, for example, looking at national accounts, dotterel taxation statistics drawing on the methodology that people Thomas Pickety have developed measuring income inequality. Then does appear that income inequalities at historically high levels going back to nineteen forties or the mid twentieth century. We've not had income inequality at such levels in it straight. And that's based on research done by Andrew Lee. Mentioned Thomas Pickety who Thomas Pickety fringe economists? I think climbed to find on this issue of inequality, but opportune to people have been on this show over the last few Yee's team. Keisha Mahbubani from Singapore. Johan Norberg from Sweden Steven pinker from Harvard met really from London victim Putin in Melvin and nisi that market liberalism, including free. Tried has delivered the single greatest reduction in extreme poverty in human history effect, isn't it? Yes, it is. And imagine if the distribution will equal even see more people having been liberated from poverty or enjoying a rise out of hardship. There's no question about the absolute gains that come from market, liberalism and not rejecting the idea of market economy. We know that the market distributes resources in a much more efficient way than a centrally planned economy does. This is the lesson of the twentieth century in the listen of the failure of of communism. The point here is about whether we want to be a market society is will that we have the logic of the market being applied to conduct government and to add relations between between people see Mahbubani, nog- and Pinkett, they'd respond inside that government policies lie policies, if you like to force inequality down that would incur a cost in lower economic growth, and that would argue low living standards, not just in Australia, but across the world. Well, that would argue that and it's an it's an idea that I believe should be contested. I'm not arguing for a perfect equal distribution of resources. But if we believe, for example, when the idea of Aaquil opportunity, I believe you need to have some redistribution of resources for that to become realizable. No question that socialism is having some sort of resurgence. And you mentioned that in your recent Sydney Morning Herald article, certainly if you look in the United States, you see Bernie Sanders doing very well, politically, Jeremy Corbyn later of the party, and there have been plenty of polls. And we've had guests on this program talking about how socialism is becoming very popular, especially among millennials. Now, you say, quote, what those on the right to cry as the evils of socialism, a good number of us regard as decent common sense. But what about the terrible atrocities committed in the name of socialism in the twentieth century team. What about the? Abject failure of socialism everywhere has been implemented. Let's not get too blunt Tomei to when when when our third to run I refer to those on the right decrying was socially. I was referring specifically to the education minister Dantin criticising. The labour party's announcement recently on childcare policy as an example of socialism, if not communist or words that affects and I think that's a bit of blown somewhat exaggerated when I'm talking about social democracy. I'm talking about an ideology that still exists within the limits of multi-party, democracy, individually Berty and the rule of law that what social democracy means is that the state has a role in regulating markets and in redistributing resources, it's about elevating the value of community and the value of quality beside the value of freedom. Young people who are attracted to socialism. They also distrust government regulations, and they mar on Pinerolo and small businesses. They're disconnected between the two. No, this is this is precisely and it will strike of the point. I'm making about a mock economy. This is a market society. Millennia was understand perfectly. Well, the power of entrepreneurialism and the benefits of of the market what they don't accept is that the market must govern everything in society. What I don't accept his that the distribution thrown up by the market is is something that is necessarily desirable in all cases. So if you look at how millennials are experiencing, the housing market and housing affordability. If you're looking at how they experiencing work and the diminishing job security that they experience all the precarious nature gig economy that many of them are engaged in their frankly, not saying the benefits of of market liberalism market. But you tackling dance. You can't tax a loss. You can only tax prophet and

Sydney Morning Herald Thomas Pickety Labour Party Australia United States Tweedle Dum Tweedle University Of Sydney Konami Professor Of Practice Commissioner Andrew Lee Genda Johan Norberg Clemmie Kevin Rod Europe
Cyber Law: Everything You Need to Know

Reimagine America

08:45 min | 2 years ago

Cyber Law: Everything You Need to Know

"You know, we hear every day attacks and hacking, and all of this kind of stuff at Facebook, or you know, even this week at Amazon my goodness. But it's so much bigger than that you, and I both know that. So it really is a question as you said in your outlined before you can understand tax adversaries and mitigation options. The to understand the environment that we operate in. So what is eyebrows space? Well, thank you for having me this morning. I may you know, it's it's a large and almost unwieldy unwieldly complex topic. And I'm looking forward to getting some specific areas over our conversations about cyber risk. But to really understand what that risk looks like and to look at how governments businesses and even we as individuals can begin to mitigate reduce that risk. You do that whole what we government we refer to operating environment. So what really want everyone to walk away? Today are coming up city of two different things. What cyberspace really is what in compass and also what we call a cyber attack surface and other term talk about a little bit. These are foundational pillars to understanding cyber risk. And why cyber threats are so important and important to all of us and a lot of different ways some obvious when our banking accounts hat, some not so obvious in the sense that everything's interconnected, and that's going to impact nearly every aspect of our lives. So so this is going to be pretty elementary because I want to start what kind of broad overview and evolve discussions. From that funny show understanding inches some specific risk areas that we're gonna talk about in time. And why am one of the things we're going to address over time is what congress did something. What if congress actually will be nice this what we one of things? I hope you is listeners walk away with from today's discussion in the subsequent discussions. We're gonna have is just how big just how important and just help potentially dangerous. This space is while congress thinks infrastructure is potholes. Indeed, the first please think in world and everything you can see everything, you know, about it. Continents countries. Borders, fiscal borders, political borders, if oceans waterways, trysofi provider's office buildings laws regulations. All of these things are designed around the concept of national sovereignity and are defined by those borders of markets and governments and industry operating each. It's a world we've known since the dawn of human progress that shapes our every engagement in our interactions. It's a well we can travel cross too. But it takes hours sometimes days pay on. How far you're going now to understand the cyber operating environment. What it looks like I want you to begin imagine a scale magnitude, which cyber risk redefines everything so think of cyberspace as nother world overlaid on top of that physical world and. Cyberspace world. There are no geopolitical borders. There's no natural border snow real borders of any kind, and it is one that can be traveled across at least the information from a computer can. But takes literally fractions of a second run two hours days. We take physically move across that now because this cyberspace were encompasses and impacts everything in our physical world. It does not, but does not have the same geopolitical legal distinctions. We have always governor selves by. So it raises serious questions about how do you enforce what should be reasonable behavior? Let's look at it. Another way laws long ago, an internationally accepted established what is quote unquote, normal behavior for a country to country interactions. If you fire a missile over the border adversarial country, it's an act of war clear-cut, perhaps even likely so even if you don't actually kill anyone. But if you fire cyberattack across the same borders, and you use it to say stealing lectu, probably is not an active war. What if? A cyber attack took out electric grid, which in turn got the power to community hospital, resulting the deaths of patients who couldn't be treated should not be considered any different missile lands in somebody's house reasonable people. Argue it certainly should. But the point is the laws not that clear cut as not black white inter still a lot of gray area when it comes cyber operations have yet to coalesce into any kind of standards of normative behavior between countries and that offers. Countries with ill intent great great opportunity. It also in an we don't mean just from a Connecticut warfare fence. But clearly as we are seeing now in the trade negotiations with China. Differing laws differing philosophies about what it means to electrically steal from someone else or electronically to snoop or eavesdrop on somebody else. Let's important point. I touch them. I want to go on the staff of intellectual property is a longstanding problem was greatly exacerbated by cybersecurity is when we think about cyber it's important to remember impacts bill's economic security and national security the defense side of the national scale that relatively obvious think of as missiles again, the cyber attacks against say military governates he's, but there's a number countries in the world who argued economic security is national security vice versa, don't really draw any distinction between them. So they allowed our military cyber operators to do fairly broad another piece to this equation, those attribution instantly, we're gonna talk a lot about and coming weeks. How how you know who did an attack? And as well beyond today's conversation. But as important to understand for now that actually bution in general, it's pretty hard to do. And it can be fairly slow to actually be very slow depending on on the specifics of cyberattack see how this kind of political wild west nature of cyberspace very few loss to guide or set, what should be normal and acceptable behavior. And you have the challenge of attribution making it relatively easy for cybercriminals to do this kind of work anonymously in that encourages cybercrime and a lot of it in a foreign hackers. Try to explain people businesses governments in order to get something funny. It's a lot of it. For example, sometimes simple hacking, banks. Sometimes it's a ransomware attack shutting off access to your to your all of your data, forcing all employees in a company to pay up bitcoin or some other non Mus cryptocurrency or lose their data. Sometimes it's something more sophisticated. I'm reminded a two thousand twelve s give or take a couple years case, which Subir criminals hack their way into the port of Antwerp Belgium, nor to modify shipping container manifest before ships had actually. Arrived. They do this in funnel hundreds of millions of dollars worth of drugs guns money from three years tonight efforts. There are a lot of ways crime impacts not only rampant, but it is growing significantly. So no sign of abating as the next week. We'll start looking at this specific risk areas about why it why not continuing. As we all know. Well, most of us have been hack at some point or another even if we don't necessarily realize that people can also get exploited directly, your computer could be hacked can be stolen using it for mation gleaned from hacks places like equifax, so your Bank, and guess believe or not there really are people respond to the Email for deaf ear businesses that gave associated prison Nigeria offering you cut of a twenty five million dollars state if you'd only wired money ahead of time. There's a lot of reasons why this kind of stuff continues. Yeah. Actually, I know somebody who was approached and did put out some money owed here. Yeah. Yeah. People people can be gullible in some of these EV these attempts have become quite sophisticated unless the key because what's changing cyberspace sophistication level. We won't even talk for now about artificial intelligence. But there's a lot of things are making making these kinds of attacks much easier to reeducated and a lot. It's it makes people a lot more receptive to the risk itself. Yeah. Well. The the very basic, very basic nature of this is everything from that little phone in your hand everything in this world is now

Congress Facebook Amazon Connecticut Mation China Antwerp Belgium Equifax Nigeria Twenty Five Million Dollars Three Years Two Hours
"bution" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"bution" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"And oh my goodness. You know, like, I love the criterion collection. The criterion collection has announced that their starting their own streaming channel with a monthly fee. So one of the big things that the thing that made, you know net flicks. So successful so fast in so many ways was a deal for the online. Bution writes from stars and having all of these movies that were on the stars catalogue. And then when that deal ended, you know, it was everybody bought on the hammer to beat on that flicks. I understand why they did that because Netflix got those those those online reproduction rights from their star steel for basically nothing compared to what other people were paying more power to him for finding dealmaking happen. But now, we're looking at this total DS Bora where every or or maybe, you know, return immigration were all of this the students like Disney like, yeah. We we can do this. We bought the technology. We have amazing streaming technology. We can bring all of our titles into our house. And then gentle parent, you can pay fifteen to four thousand dollars to us above for the right to stream your children's favorite movie over and over again, and they can come one step closer to the every movie theaters, and every record companies dream, which is making you pay every time you watch a movie or see or listen to a song. And yeah. Yeah, exactly rating. But literally I've been in rooms with people there where they literally been like, you know, would really prefer not to ever distribute on physical media or lose the rights against dream, right? Like, the the visit people were so they're they're so angry. The fact that people got to buy something once and then. Watch and use it for indefinitely and sell it. And but even even the without the cell part. When do we get to a point where you know, you're paying we are getting there for subscriptions reveal games, right? As opposed to buying the one game once for sixty bucks and then an implying the entire game. You have all forms of micro transactions descriptions deal sees season passes because it's all about that long tails. It's it's it's the revenue per user. It's the our PU. Yeah, I mean, the the the, you know, the versale doctrine, I mean that was fought to the supreme court back in twenty thirteen or that that the finally decided in the supreme court because basically somebody's like we sold it to you can't resell it to someone else. Somebody's to buy fresh again from us, and I get you know, that's that would have been if one that court case life would have gotten a lot more expensive for everybody. But it's it's it's always interesting to see the attempts to figure out new and exciting ways to get people to buy something again. Video game. Revenues have trumped movie revenues since long before Michael transactions were you know, the way that they were making their money. Oh now that they're doing that way. I think it's just skyrocketing. It must be I'm curious. If Bander snatch was a response to their concern about the games and fortnight being you where the kids are spending their time. I wouldn't be surprised. I mean, it is a way interactivity and it's also stopped higher seat. Because you can't it's combat piracy a little bit. You can't pirate type of interactive media. The same way. That's interesting. That's really interesting point download banner Sach, and then recompiling or leave it up to leave it up the pirates time. Yeah. Right. They'll open source their own choosing adventure software that you just dropped the clips in and get the same thing. I want be surprised if that happened that'd be pretty amazing..

The criterion collection Bution Netflix Disney Bander Michael four thousand dollars
Talking live webcasting, screencasting and desktop video encoding

Digital Production Buzz

08:11 min | 2 years ago

Talking live webcasting, screencasting and desktop video encoding

"Fox, Sports and major broadcasters have used and continue to use the wire cast product to stream and produce their content. There's also a second piece that we have on the enterprise side. So Fox Sports, for example, they leveraged our light speed live enterprise class streaming in coder and capture product to augment their replay production capability at the World Cup. This last year we have actually a couple of areas that were very strong and light production. Let's focus on the wire cast side rather than the enterprise. I'd and before we talk about wire cast, it seems that live production falls into two sections. There's the production self with cameras and lights talent and audio. And then there's the distribution whether it's the broadcast or satellite or streaming one. Do you think that's a good economy and to where of the greatest change has been over the last few years? You're absolutely correct in the segment Haitian, I use an example. I went to a little school called Cal poly in central California on the coast. And I love Cal poly. And as I moved up here into the mountains of northern California. I couldn't get Cal poly football. Then I wanted to stay connected to my university because I just have an affinity for it. Why could I get Cal poly football as I got it at the video business. It became really clear there were two areas, and you've identified them exactly one is the cost of production to is the cost of distribution. So the equipment historically has been very expense. So there's a huge capital investment. And then there's an operating expense associated with it. So it takes people to run most of that equipment. So that's the production side on the distribution side. The historical distribution capabilities of cable and satellite have been prohibitive for business like hell poly to actually distribute their their content. What's gone on in the last few years is we now have tools that allow you to produce the content at substantially lower price points. In many cases, unattended live production is actually out there at this point. If that's if that's what you wanna do. Then there's also the distribution with over the top distribution is ubiquitous everybody's got a Netflix account or Hulu account or YouTube live or alive. Facebook live whatever there are now over one hundred streaming services out there. And now I. Can get my Cal poly football. In addition to Cal poly, wrestling, and swimming and baseball anything else that allows me to stay connected to my university. Just because of the technology capability that has driven down the cost of equipment cost production cost of distribution, many of us that are have been in production for awhile, very familiar with satellite distribution or broadcasters to bution, but what is an efficient workflow. What's like a checklist, we need to keep in mind. If we wanted to do live streaming the output of your production needs to get sent to the cloud. How do you do that? So usually there's an in code or that takes a it's either embedded into the software or hardware, or you take an STI input, and you're going to which is the base band out. But that would be normal distribution anyone code that into an RTP stream or in our team stream. That's the general accepted practice that. Stream needs to be sent up to a cloud provider to either a CD in that you have contacted with or another platform such as Facebook live or Vinnie alive that allows you to do the distribution that you could lie your customers to dial into so the hook between the production and the distribution really amounts technologically to quite simply a good in coded RTP stream that will do it for you. You mentioned the content deliver network. The CD had the great pleasure of working with wire cost a couple years ago when I was working out of my video studio, and the very first livestream that we did I didn't know that CDN's existed. And so I had people attaching directly to my wire cast output, and that didn't work very well. How do we pick a content delivery network? What what questions should we ask? Where do you customers? Want to go over the content. It really varies. So for example, there's a company there's a. Broadcast company called Meredith which is holds a bunch of local broadcast stations. Meredith broadcasting stations in they've purchased wire cast gear, which is a wire Kassof. We're on a reconfigured computer that we sell that. They've decided that their audience watches late breaking news through Facebook and Facebook live so what they wanted to be able to do was to send their late breaking news to Facebook. So that's where they pointed wire cast too. But if you pull down the list of wire cast destinations there is boy, there's are a lot of destinations take Sunday, for example. So let's say a lot of your customers may wanna be Sunday churchgoers, and they wanna watch the local worship service, and they're not not not able to attend. There are other CDN such as shrimp. Dot TV and streaming church dot TV that provide the

Facebook Fox Sports California FOX Cloud Baseball Netflix Youtube Vinnie Hulu
"bution" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"bution" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Justice in air quotes here retribution. I think it's probably a better term being enforced. The reason for the legal system is to make sure it gets enforced on the right people. You know, because there's a reason for though, how old this maxim is laurel you might be able to tell me the the idea that it's better that ten guilty men go free than one innocent man is a hundred guilty men. But yes, the point still ten, but anyway, regardless I don't know how old is this maxim is. But basically our legal system is based on. The fact that you would rather see ten men. Guilty men, go free than one innocent man, be incarcerated right, obviously that's been turned on his head with modern plea bargaining systems and that kind of thing, but regardless that's what it was based on. And the reason that it was it was instituted was because guilty people were being having Richard bution brought against them all the time because somebody like. People. Because that's a witch or whatever or somebody believes that somebody hurt somebody else, but they didn't. And they went ahead and hurt them. Anyway. Or killed them is certainly not a perfect system. The law of the jungle none of these systems are, but it is a system you're saying, it's a deterrent. You're saying the fact that those things could happen is the negative. Yeah. It is. And it's about the most natural system. You can come out there. Now, the legal system is man's attempt to replace the law of the jungle, but we've seen what a screw up that has become. I mean the innocence project exists because of all the people they're throwing in jail that shouldn't be in jail. Even though there's supposedly all these legal protections against being thrown in jail for something. Right. Because when the prosecutor himself is a corrupt individual, and is just interested in padding his conviction record, then he doesn't have any disincentive from convicting the wrong people. He just wants to put a warm body in a cell. So he can claim he's done something for crime. That's correct. And the system rewards that kind of behavior. Right. So you're going to see that kind of behavior. Yeah. You'll see when prosecutors do things like offer low plea bargains. Right. Like, if something bad happens, you you pick what it is the actual crime some crime occurs. The prosecutor offers the person one year, but you're yeah. One year suspended, but you're likely to get ten years if you take it to trial. Well, a guilty person should take the plea, but an innocent person should say, I'm not going to do one year in jail. Even though I'm facing ten because I wouldn't do I wouldn't tell people will lie in order to get whatever. Well, the prosecutor will continue continue on through take it to court. The person gets convicted and gets ten years. Obviously the prosecutor didn't have any real belief if he was willing to give a guilty person one year..

prosecutor Richard bution one year ten years One year
"bution" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Bution against the person who did it, but you don't get to pay it forward. Right? Like you don't get to be like, well, I was stolen from and the and the guy's gone now, and I'm never going to be able to find him which is kind of analogous to the situation here because the the person who got your money forty years ago, you're not gonna be able to get back from that person. Okay. So that that's an justify you today being like, well, now I'm gonna club. This young kid over the head who's working now and take his money. I remember like earlier in the program probably about this time last year we had a guy call in and say that he wanted social security because he paid for the guarantee right that he would get social security. But that was half the sentence. The the other half was the guarantee that somebody else would be robbed from it's look. It's like it's an illegitimate transaction. It's like saying, it's like paying a hitman to kill somebody, and then they like, where's my. My death like what why didn't. You murder that person I paid you good money you owe it to me no you that type of transaction is illegitimate the entire basis upon which social security is structured is morally deficient it's actually evil it's immoral. It's rights violating and it needs. To stop and those who have been victimized by it up tight it's Glenn Beck and. You're listening to Minnesota's home for. Fox News on, the radio twin cities news talk AM eleven, thirty because you deserve, the truth Huge.

Glenn Beck Fox News Minnesota murder forty years
"bution" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"They don't use no predictor letting you know i bet they do i bet there that's i bet they're smart they must have thought of that gotta be so i'll let you know when that does happen or if it doesn't so let's continue here of course you can bring up whatever you want a little bit more here from the story the cbc about ka beck province not being too friendly to cannabis legalization basically they're doing it because they have to they're coming up with rules for cannabis distribution that will allow only the province official monopoly retail stores to do this they're not planning on having very many of those stores and further finance minister carlos tau told cbc's daybreak earlier this year that he doesn't expect cannabis to quote ever be a huge source of revenue unquote for quebec the objective he says is to quote control and hopefully diminish consumption of this product well it doesn't that actually happened whenever you legalize or decriminalize it actually usage actually goes down no necessarily there have been some numbers that show that teenagers are less likely to start using cannabis if there's a very short window where bumps up a little of ood i can go buy this thing i can get my hands on this easier i want to try this thing and then once it's readily available it's like yeah i don't really like this yeah i mean you certainly if you look at colorado and washington state they've had tremendous revenues and obviously there's the tourist guys because everyone's coming out you know from the four corners of the earth that come visit colorado for whatever reason to get their green get their bud according to the story regardless of how much the government earns on the sale of pot it's promising a twenty twenty promising twenty five million a year it'll be set aside for health initiatives and research even the government's expectations for its own legislation are conservative after adopting the bill charlotte blah pointed out it wasn't perfect and that perhaps in the future quebec would make it legal to grow one or two plants at home but she said major concerns remain around health and she stressed the pot that pot is not a trivial substance in other words quebec's legislation is unlikely to be relaxed anytime soon and then there's other stories like over at seeking alpha dot com and they have a chart comparing all the different provinces in canada and how they're planning on distributing this so there's only one province in canada that's the schedule in province with population of one point two million people where they're actually going to allow private growing excuse me private bution and private retail so in others other areas is sort of a mix so in ontario and quebec it's government retail in british columbia it'll be a mix of private and government in alberta manitoba and saskatchewan it'll be private retail on scotia.

"bution" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

Digital Production Buzz

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

"Bution as well as ot services and then underpinning that is technologies group that's building platforms that enables all of that to happen in a far more expediently then where do you fit into this vast assemblage of tools as the chief product officer of the company i'm responsible for actually designing out that platform that enables not just all of our internal services to run on it but also enables our customers and even our competitors to leverage some of the processes and technologies that we come up with why are you calling it a platform not a collection of tools the world of collection of tools is kind of everything that the industry has lived with for a long time now the platform is really something that allows people to see the totality of everything they do and everything that we have works together so that depending on whether or not you're just a small independent filmmaker doing one particular thing or you're someone at a studio who's looking at the full range of applications that you have to work with we don't feel that anybody should be looking at them as individuals silo pieces but rather a singular platform that enabled all of that to work in conjunction with each other in april deluxe announced one one is the name of the platform that we were just referring to so the way i describe it is you need to look at it on a couple of mentions so first and foremost it is that unifying application tier that makes everything worked together right so again whether or not you're creating content or distributing content or even responsible for streaming content to the end consumer one can tie into all of the pieces that you wanna use across that entire life cycle secondly where people have kind of worked with post production facilities in the past has been very much a walled garden it's send me your content and i'll do a function and then send it back to you or somebody license the piece of software and let you do it on your own with one we basically enable all of the various.

Bution chief product officer
"bution" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Mr bution and getting those products to the consumer this is about the habit of the consumer in what we're willing to pay for think about convenience stores i mean how did they get their name because they're convening we don't have to go in and and i walk through a huge they're not cheaper they're not shaper they're not cheaper there convenience stores i can make a quick stop and i can get in fact i think there's some name quick stop i can make a quick stop and go in and and leave you know very quickly and we pay for our time we pay to keep more of our time and that's what we pay any online retailer that can get to a timely fashion we're willing to pay for that but at the end of the day we vote with our dollar if you don't like the business model don't shop with them for whatever reason i don't i don't care why you don't like him that isn't any of my business but it is my business when the government starts saying that they're going to pick the winners and losers by taxing me that's where i have to draw that line and i want to make this very clear many sane people have insane economic ideas sure i wanna make that clear yes the the economic idea is insane not the person right eight six six ninety redeye standard shift transmissions and rear axles work hard to keep up with torque of modern diesel engines this is what makes gearbox oil changes so important gearbox lubricants must be at the correct level appropriate grade or viscosity and in good condition if the oil level is low it's possible that there is a leak in one of your seals and you should have it thoroughly inspected as soon as possible gearboxes also have vance designed to allow air to escape and keep contaminants out of the oil having them inspected will ensure it's hoses and caps are intact and doing their job manufacturers recommend replacing gearbox oil when contamination is detected or at their specified mileage or time but gearbox well oil change intervals largely depend on the duty cycle of your truck this maintenance tip is a service of aibling hd when.

Mr bution vance aibling
"bution" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Bution in getting those products to the consumer this is about the habit of the consumer in what we're willing to pay for think about convenience stores i mean how did they get their name because they're convening we don't have to go in and walk through a huge they're not cheaper they're not cheaper they're not cheaper there convenience stores i can make a quick stop and i can get back up there i think there's some named quick stop i can make a quick stop and go in and and leave you know very quickly and we pay for our time we pay to keep more of our time and that's what we pay any online retailer that can get to us and untimely fashion we're willing to pay for that but at the end of the day we vote with our dollar if you don't like the business model don't shop with them for whatever reason i don't i don't care why you don't like him that isn't any of my business but it is my business when the government starts saying that they're going to pick the winners and losers by taxing me that's where i have to draw that line and i want to make this very clear many sane people have insane economic ideas sure i wanna make that clear yes the the economic idea is insane not the person right eight six six ninety redeye standard shift transmissions and rear axles work hard to keep up with the torque of modern diesel engines this is what makes gearbox oil changes so important gearbox lubricants must be at the correct level appropriate grade or viscosity and in good condition if the oil level is low it's possible that there is a leak in one of your seals and you should have it thoroughly inspected as soon as possible gearboxes also have vance designed to allow air to escape and keep contaminants out of the oil having them inspected will ensure it's hoses and caps are intact and doing their job manufacturers recommend replacing gearbox oil when contamination is detected or at their specified mileage or time the gearbox well oil change intervals largely depend on the duty cycle of your truck this maintenance tip is a service of valvoline hd when.

vance valvoline
"bution" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"I just wanted to say if the people coming onto bution tognella yes people come in here i try to shut us down and and all of a sudden the audio just shuts down that you'll know it's the slorc sloan sports analytics people coming over to shut us down but it sounds it sounds like a typical bombs beatriz drones on forever and ever and he doesn't really it takes a while to get a point he looks like he talked about basketball ally the president talked a lot about how he was a mediocre high school basketball player mediocre i think that's a little stretching it your remarks that playing basketball with other people revealed much about their character in opined that the nba would be well sir by junior league so that the ncaa is not serving as a farm system for the nba with a bunch of kids who are unpaid it's i don't know what he's talking about several going to happen this is good say that's what the ncaa is now it's creates the nba players but did he talks about diversity any any claims joe by the way that his white house with scandalfree he said quote we didn't have a scandal that embarrassed us the former president admitted his team made mistakes but no massive screw up he then said quote i know that seems like a low bar haha a generally speaking you didn't hear a lot about a lot of drama inside white house is that really true boasting back on those lose a attendance do you think that cycle little mama admitted that he screwed up that he made screw up stirring the administration i think he'd be admitted it and of course that we had embarrassing stories i i mean what about the whole area was it a little screw up was it a out are all forms the scandal by considering scandal that he went out and said that you won't lose your health care and you won't lose your doctor once we pass this bill this health care reform bill which was a it's a complete lie bill that was embarrassment i would say oh that was the most egregious mistake it wasn't even a mistake it was an intentional why that he.

bution tognella president basketball nba ncaa joe white house beatriz
"bution" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"The office of emergency management and disaster district planning so that all of our local law enforcement partners and so far department and he amassed health department they have a copy of our plan so they know how we're at how we're acting how were responding we attend quarterly regional emergency manager meetings there so that we all have familiar faces uh we have a face two through the name that we see on the emails and and whenever anything happens and in our school district after the parkland shooting we had a lot of threats were made on social media and because of our public safety partners we bet those as much as possible through our local resources that our school district then we get into the the the local municipal resourceuse like the bution center that was helped establish through federal grants and then we get on into the fbi and that's the point i was making earlier the fbi is always ready and willing to help us and we have great partnership with the fbi and and the agents in charge in in our sector of of of our town and there are always ready and willing to help they like to know what have we done what do we have and work and they take it from there and i i i don't want to uh put my finger on that as to what happened in parkland but i i know that our local the way we work with our local public safety partners is that they like to know what has been done and work and they take the football from here and go on so i think these partnerships and the exercise exercising know uh frequently and having these quarterly meeting so that we have these uh basis through the names i think helps in uh in uh crime prevention in our area the bank they said i do agree i think what are the comments he was bacon him i think we need to do in my school district you saying that we.

bution center fbi football
"bution" Discussed on Radical Personal Finance

Radical Personal Finance

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on Radical Personal Finance

"I take a million dollar portfolio at the i just need to take out one sixtieth of that account as at the age of thirty and then the rest of the money continues to accrue with no taxation it continues to maintain the character of the ira account which means that the taxation is deferred and so that it continues to build into building to build and then if it's a traditional ira i just go ahead and take the money and i pay income taxes on whatever my distribution is in that year now this is more powerful with a roth ira and this is one of the reasons why roth ira raise can be such a valuable estate planning tool for people who have them because roth ira raise don't have required minimum distributions four a retirees so if somebody is wealthy and they don't need the money the money can continue to grow tax deferred from say eight seventy two h ninety it a natural death and then the child can continue to maintain it uh and and and they receive the money over that same district should scheduled but they still receive the money income tax free and so it's more powerful in a roth ira because roth ira as can be left alone for longer because they don't have requirement of mr bution but it's still powerful for anybody who inherits an ira from their parents or grandparents and they don't need the money they can stretch those distributions out and wind up getting much more money out of it because the the account stays invested and invested tax efficient way.

income tax roth ira mr bution ira million dollar
"bution" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"2017 am i able to use the rules that were in effect at the time for the tax year i made the conversion henry characterize that converse and all the way up till twenty october 15th the 2018 like we've been able to do since conversions basically became or of an issue a thing available to us now there has been guidance the other is basically you could recategorised a traditional ira contribution to a roth country bution or you could wreak care could rise a roth convert their contribution to a traditional ira contribution you could wreak characterize a roth conversion back to the original type of account that it was before or you could we characterise a company retirement plan of 401 k or something that went to an ira you can turn that back into a traditional ira terrorists has issued guidance instead those last two are no longer going to be allowed to be undone we will still be able to re characterize the contribution from one type of priority to another type of ira but it's the converted principle of existing ira existing retirement plan monies to a roth that will not be able to be on there's also been some guidance although i haven't seen it in writing from the irs oli i've only heard of it a secondhand and verbally that the irs has said that the 2017 conversions are going to be allowed to be undone if you want to tame rules for 2017 is we had going into 2017 definitely 2018 conversions are done cannot undo those but we've we've heard of iris representatives discussing the 2017 conversions and saying those will still be allowed so so fi converted an ira a traditional ira sometime back in 2017 in i decide after everything else has you know for whatever reason i shouldn't have done that roth conversion i'd like to just undo it that's what arri characterization is it is saying now want to pay the i don't wanna pay taxes was taken all out take the earnings do all this stuff let's move it all back and act like i didn't do it that's what rick characters issue was if i if i did it back in 2017.

irs henry ira rick 401 k
"bution" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Family know what happened to their loved ones do the animals ever miss lead you on purpose as that ever happened only cat cats do this why why would they would they lie you well because i get asked all the time which animals are the smartest animals and you know everybody says oh you know whales and dolphins and and while that may be true whales and dolphins are very intelligent chimpanzees and you know um caps they make a fool out of me every time um it let's just say for instance take a litter box issue if you have a multi taught household and my job is to go in and figure out you know maybe who's not using the litter box they'll blame each other so literally say you know oh he did it over there he did it richard bution or something smart some of them aren't she's smart for their own good no they're not afraid i wouldn't say that they're afraid um i think they just are very good at manipulating their environment and us i have cats to get what they want so that's just another opportunity for them to manipulate and sometimes they do just they're just messing with me sometimes they're jokesters and sometimes they do messed with me but yeah no which to choose and what is no cost i rely on their human there i work very closely with my clients so the human who belongs to that animal i work very closely with um so i i'm reeling this information back and forth to the human and their human is validating confirming that information for me what are they generally ask oh gosh i get us every everything from um health issues if there's something going on with their pets and they have this feeling that there's something wrong but the vets are telling them know they're fine and test results are fine i can ask the animals were there feeling pain or discomfort um i can sometimes see on a entered level or a cellular level where changes are taking place for instance if there's let's say a kidney issue or a liver function um even something within the glands like the siro aid or the pancreas i picked up on little snippets of in for me we could at least tell a vet what's wrong with themselves we could get them cured a little quicker let's talk about your latest work.

richard bution
"bution" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"bution" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Mr bution to dividend meaning more money in the hands of shareholders and likely a boost to stock prices overall so wall street becomes a major mechanism for distributing the corporate tax windfall which would help a lot of americans right not really says economist kimberly causing at reed college more like a very fair pocket shareholder who are going to have even more while closing says the top five percent of taxpayers get sixty percent of dividend income and eighty seven percent of longterm capital gains only about fourteen percent of americans own stock directly says nyu economist edward wolff about forty percent have an investment in the market through a 401 k type retirement account but says wolf people of a retirement account can't really cut the gain until they retired though doesn't really affect fairer current consumption or even their current wellbeing and roughly half of american households hold no stock at all i mitchell hartmann for marketplace that half of the country mature was talking about the doesn't own any stocks they were the winners today all three major indices lost just attach also and just because congress is voting on the tax bill today and there's been all the talk about how much it's adding to the national debt here as of the close of business yesterday is the total outstanding public debt to big here you go twenty trillion four hundred ninety two billion six hundred and 65 million six hundred seventy three thousand three hundred and ninety nine dollars.

Mr bution stock prices reed college capital gains edward wolff congress corporate tax kimberly nyu eighty seven percent ninety nine dollars fourteen percent forty percent sixty percent five percent 401 k
"bution" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"bution" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Do you know uh trump is what billing guy r s out now and pay in a wrecker bution is back to these organisers no we or or back airs right or retribution you know we should be able to sue luca you know or or money that's being ccri yeah i i don't i again i don't know when you talk about if they're protected in in any way from my lawsuit personally on this i i would have to look into that legally i don't know whether you could go after a lois lerner or uh you know the head of the arrests were you know you bob you can't wept the president i know that you wouldn't be able to get the ex president for that even if he knew about it well what happens is what it what happens is most likely the government get sued and this is exactly what happens the taxpayer ends up pain for the wrongs of the government because there is no government the government is simply an entity that is supported by the taxpayer i saw the other day somebody was saying you know the the treasury department needs to pay back the i'll use on social security there is no that means thursday and back the earlier as though treasury department is don't treasury department that has this loaded cash it comes from the taxpayer we get this all the time by the way we could be precise like joinder stand that there is no government entity that itself creates wealth it is the tax payer that greeted now for it i guess you could predict the.

luca lois lerner president treasury department social security
"bution" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"bution" Discussed on Mixergy

"Sort of like the asked method from why ryan will back in surveys of different things like that so that's where all of our facebook traffic goes uh simply because of the water sale cycle uh most were google being traffic is it actually converts much better a desire are why but there's less of it to be had at this point sell a facebook still drive the predominant amount of our traffic uh we'll get from pinterest uh twitter instagram instagram onscene that big yeah it's not huge amount of traffic um but we what we find is that people will have multiple touches with us one of the things that we had a really do is dive into will they chen watch bution because what we're looking at a cost requisitioned uncertain platforms if we didn't dive deep to see how many times they're coming back would actually agree with money but we broke out what i challenge bution found out that most people come back five or six times before they buy from different channels uh we're able to tribute more revenue choose sites like instagram pinterest and everything that we would have basically walked away from other west all right let me take another break and then i'm going to come back and i want to ask you about the idea that if my answer good i can get somebody come sign up for mixer do premium because if you're an entrepreneur you just need you're heads could be the best in the world but if i don't have a kitchen to remodel right now i'm not going to be persuaded by an ad to do it in some wondering how do you know when is the right time to come to people how do you create a funnel as you said considering that it's not necessarily the right funnel the right time when you're funnel is is suggesting that it is first i have to tell people about a company called hostgator have you ever hosted on hostgator gary.

ryan facebook pinterest bution google
"bution" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"bution" Discussed on Malicious Life

"Whether these rumors of threats are true or not it is clear that the big money that spam brought with it was the great catalyst for the organisation and establishment of cybercrime what started out as virus writing for the sake of intellectual challenge or is a type of vandalism turned in the early 20 frist century twist sophisticated business which had an organized distribution of work between those who rode the male where those who ran the botnets to distribute spam and those who ran the sales and marketing the story of blue security is a kind of a cautionary tale for those who might tend to discount virtual crime although this kind of crime is less for the janik thin armed robbery it is still a very dangerous threat and cybercrime organizations have a significant amount of power today more than ever this power is spread throughout the globe it's interesting to point out that the has been certain decline in spanish to bution in recent years from an alltime high of 85 from all emails in 2009 to between 5060 nowadays this decrease can be attributed to pressure applied by international policing bodies on botnets managers or maybe the success of online marketing bodies such as googlefacebookandtwitter which provide small businesses of tentative and legitimate modes of advancement but despite the decrease in spam cybercrime not only didn't disappear but it expanded do other more lucrative areas the following episodes will dive deeper into this brave new world of crime the people behind it.

vandalism armed robbery bution