21 Burst results for "Buster Keaton"

Kid-Friendly TV Show Recommendations

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

09:29 min | 5 months ago

Kid-Friendly TV Show Recommendations

"I think it's important to clarify. We're doing these recommendations are for very little kids and everything that we are talking about all of the recommendations on this episode our TV and I think there are parents of very young children and people who give advice to parents have very young children who tend to obsess over screen time and how much screen time a toddler should have look. These are unusual times and the first thing that I want to say before I even start doling out recommendations is just to remember that you're doing the best you can. You're doing fine if you need to put your toddler in front of a TV or a tablet and that is what needs to happen for you to stay sane for you to get your work done then so be it. Your kid is going to be fine. Your kid has you. That's what's important wanted to get that out there. I will also go so far. As to say as a person who obsessed about this didn't obsess about it goes back and forth the important part of the best you can is the you can part so if you are stuck on the fact well. The best is only two hours. It's the best that you can do. Given your circumstances your doing great exactly so. My first recommendation is something that my parents put in front of me. When I was very small child back in the seventies which has been fairly recently rebooted for new generations the electric company. The Electric Company is a educational children's program in the seventies it featured such wonderful luminaries as Rita Moreno. It has an extraordinarily charming kids show. That is really focused on education. But does it in such a warm and inviting and pleasant way so the original seventies electric company you can stream it via Amazon? It does cost money. You can find pretty lengthy excerpts of it on Youtube floating around and you know a lot of us who grew up in the seventies. We'll have you know like individual favorite moments from the electric company. I just remember that that was something that my parents really love to have on and around because though it was geared very very much too little kids and they say online. They say that it's geared toward five to nine but I think you can really go younger than that. My parents didn't go nuts watching it now. They recently rebooted the electric company from two thousand nine to twenty eleven. Those three seasons you can stream for free at PBS DOT ORG and As an incentive for parents who listen to this show and have not checked out the rebooted electric company one of the CAST members is William Jackson Harper. Who Played Chidi on the good place incentive to watch the new electric company Occasional guest spots and occasional music composition from one Lin. Manuel Miranda. I'LL AL. Obviously we could go back and forth. Comparing the quality of the two there is no way to compare something. You were nostalgic for as a child with something that is trying to duplicate that magic but that is a marvelous piece of educational programming. That is still entertaining. And that is right up there with stuff like Mister Rogers neighborhood and sesame street and all sorts of wonderful stuff that you can find on PBS kids. Electric Company is just a gorgeous piece of that puzzle. And I don't think it gets as much recognition as it should get especially compared to some of those other classic pieces of programming love it. Excellent Pack Loved Electric Company Berry. What is your first recommendation? We in our family when my oldest was younger and I was pregnant with my second son. It was really imperative for me to be sitting down lying down pretending that I didn't have a child for like two or three hours a day but I also had already watched so much Daniel Tiger which is wonderful and other. Pbs Kids thing. That probably taught me a lot about parenting but I wanted something that I also really liked from the creators of Wallace and GROMIT. Shaun the sheep which I have so many I mean I literally have photographs of both my husband and my then three year old watching. Shaun the sheep and both laughing at exactly the same amount because it is genuinely funny. It is the first thing that I think our family all liked the same amount where we really all were engaged in it in the same way. I you know you're not pretending to love you know Mom Tiger or whatever you're not pretending to be like Mom Tiger. I'm really actually mom. Tigers really haunted me over the years but I will say that Shaun. The sheep is both adorable in terms of its slapsticky laps. But it also looks gorgeous. So if you're not familiar with Wallace and gromit they created these these beautiful claymation sort of handmade aesthetic from our animations and Wallace and gromit. I also highly recommend but it's more of a sophisticated storyline. What's Great About Shaun? The sheep is that they are sort of snack. -able basically it is a brilliant sheep named Sean and the adventures of him and his farmer and his friends and it is genuinely funny. They're all of these little references. That are incredibly sophisticated without going over the head of your little ones. There's a kind of buster Keaton ask quality to it and I can watch them all the time. I really truly do not get sick of Shaun the sheep and my kids who are now as we said six nine still really love them. It's about that and maybe the British bake off are the only things that the entire family can agree on. If you've missed out on it please go back and watch it and you may find yourself watching it even without your children and where we find it. You can find it in a myriad of places. It is on Amazon prime. It is on Netflix. The Shaun the sheep extended universe of both movies and also the Wallace and gromit from the same animation studio are in many streaming places so if you just search Shaun the sheep you will find a gorgeous claymation that will make you. Giggle is a great pick and man. My kids now are nine thousand nine hundred sixteen and at no point in their lives. Has there been more than like a small handful of things that everyone in the family can enjoy at the same level at the exact same time so when you find one of those the love that you experience as a parent for that piece of entertainment is intense. I feel you on this one in a big way. Very very nice excellent. Pick Berry Hartman Steven. You'RE GONNA give us your second pick and This is not surprise. Me Buddy well. This one is specific to one of my kids particularly my older kid my son. Jona when he was little he obsessed over a cartoon that I watched as a kid called the wacky races and the wacky races were a very short lived. Hanna barbera cartoon aired in late. Nineteen sixty eight and a little bit in early sixty nine and then has kind of lived on in reruns. There's a DVD set that has like the complete collection of the wacky races. Hanna barbera cartoons are pretty primitive. You're talking about children's TV in the late sixties. You have some kind of squeaky gender stuff. There's like one female racer penelope pitstop. Who's like more concerned with her makeup than with racing? It has that name is amazing. Insert pitstop into my middle name. Very pitstop hardiman stuff hardiman The thing is though there's something about the way. This particular cartoon was structured where each episode of the show all of these goofy characters. They were the same characters. The plot couldn't be simpler. They're racing and at the end of each episode. One of the racers wins. There's a bad guy racer named Dick Dastardly. And his side kick Mutley. Who has that famous? Little wheezy laugh and my son who was obsessed with numbers kind of obsessed a certain amount of scorekeeping managed to latch into it. Not only as a piece of like fun cartoony entertainment but kind of latched onto it as like a statistician almost and really got obsessed with it. Even though there were only seventeen episodes he just watched them over and over and over again. Now the wacky races have existed in a couple of different forms. There's a wacky racist game for the we. The kids also played. This is also like electric company is one that got rebooted and it got rebooted a few years ago and once again if you're obsessed with the nineteen sixty eight version you're gonNA watch the version from twenty seventeen or two thousand eighteen and roll your eyes because it's not the exact entertainment that you grew up with but you look at the voice cast on this rebooted wacky races. It's Tom Kenny WHO's TV. Spongebob Jill Talley who's also voiced from. Spongebob she's also from Mister. Show like Tom. Kenny and Billy West. Who was stimpy. He was fry in Futurama. You have some really lovable voice. Cast working with this show. So lucky races isn't necessarily the top of very many people's list as far as like high quality children's programming but it was really important in my house and really had this nice kind of cross generational appeal where I got to feel nostalgia watching it and my kids hooked into it in ways that even I never did

Electric Company Shaun Wallace Amazon Loved Electric Company Berry Tom Kenny Hanna Barbera Mister Rogers Cast Youtube Rita Moreno Buster Keaton Daniel Tiger Netflix Jill Talley Manuel Miranda LIN Berry Hartman Hardiman William Jackson Harper
Electronic Television: The Great Depression And The World's Fair

American Innovations

05:26 min | 8 months ago

Electronic Television: The Great Depression And The World's Fair

"It's nineteen thirty. The world is stuck in the early stages the great depression many Americans lift their spirits at the new moving picture shows in theaters and nickelodeon 's Buster Keaton Charlie Chaplin comedies. These films are often introduced with Mickey mouse cartoons or newsreels one newsreel in particular dazzles the audience with the promise of soon bringing these new moving picture shows into their very own homes presents. A backstage preview television the newest miracle of modern Electrical Engineering Mr penalty shown shown at the right is working on the image dissect to photoelectric camera. Tube of his own invention that distinguishes his system of television from others. It is said to be responsible for the most clearly defined television pictures placed in the second of this receiving system is a funnel shaped cattle due the round flat surface of its bulb becomes the picture screen in Studio Monitor. It does it as well. As in home receiving sense the image detector Tube and the Cathode Ray tube are the heart and brain system. Television Vilo Farnsworth's image to sector tube and camera system had finally brought the long anticipated picture radio into being station equipment. The electrons become radio impulses to broadcast and picked up by receiving sense where the routine is with us. The radio impulsive becoming points of light that appear on the screen as picture thirty pictures. I completed every second. These earliest television programming was live performance music and sound accompanied. The OBAMAS was action both visible and audible elements going on the air in perfect synchronization battling with the speed of light to amaze of tubes and equipment. The show leaves the station send the towers viewed by the television public and audience as yet small and comparatively ignorant of the research and experiment. That makes it possible rush to see and hear people many miles away watching this newsreel in the movie theater. The audience is intrigued but sceptical. The most fanciful dream of mankind is day startling reality destined to become the world's most popular science in one thousand nine thirty in San Francisco. Two years have passed since Filo funds worth with help from his wife. Pam Gardner and her brother cliff triumphantly showed off off a working prototype of electronic television. Violence picture was on the front page of the San Francisco Chronicle under a headline that called him a genius is name was being being mentioned in newsreels magazines journals and the Associated Press but he hadn't yet found a manufacturer to partner with so financially files fortunes agents hadn't changed Penn gave birth to their first son. Filo T farnsworth third the previous year and a second son. Kenny would follow in nineteen thirty one but now a curious envelope in the days male brings a new possibility. You got a letter here. Filo says it's from New York I can't believe. RCA is offering one hundred thousand dollars for the image sector would. That's wonderful that exactly pam they want to own it outright i. It's not ideal but one hundred thousand dollars is a lot of money. Not compared to what television will eventually be worth. It's a mistake to cash in too soon like this. We have to keep the faith. I understand. Filo it's your invention that's Pammy. It's not it it never was. It's it's all of the great minds that have come before to make this possible. And it's you it's cliff. All of us were a team but they wanna buy our work and call it. There's it's just not fair. They can license it if they like. I've spent my entire life working towards this Pam. It's like it's like trying to sell one of our children. The Lord will provide Filo a a few weeks later. The farnsworth's receive another big opportunity with visit to the lab from United Artists. The Film Production Company was Silent Age Film Stars like Charlie the chaplain. Douglas Fairbanks D W Griffith and Mary. PICKFORD PICKFORD is especially enthusiastic. We just had to see this amazing new television system. We've heard so much about it. But when the time comes the image to sector won't cooperate Filo is rattled. I I'm sorry folks. This is humiliating million chaplain smiles. Don't sweat it. I've seen worse like Douglas's latest picture a few hours later. After the stars leave cliff finds the problem on a wire wasn't plugged in it. Was that simple Dan. How did I not see that Pam tries to reassure him? Mary Pickford was here. We were all a bit distracted. It did keep the faith Filo when a third opportunity knocks a few weeks later Filo is determined to answer the call this time. FILC who radio in Philadelphia. They they they want to license the Patents Fund our research. But it'll still be ours with some help Vilo at Phil Co so in Philadelphia moving from the bay area to the city of brotherly love. What do you think it sounds great? And so the Farnsworth family packed packed their bags with their belongings precious equipment and board a train to head across the country to Philadelphia Pennsylvania. His family counting on him. Kylo could only pray he was making the right decision.

Filo Vilo Farnsworth Cliff Filo T Pam Gardner Mary Pickford Philadelphia Charlie Chaplin Pickford Pickford Buster Keaton San Francisco Chronicle San Francisco Nickelodeon Obamas New York Pennsylvania
List of copyrighted works entering the public domain in 2020

The Takeaway

04:16 min | 9 months ago

List of copyrighted works entering the public domain in 2020

"As the clock strikes midnight on new year's eve get this thousands of copyrighted works will finally entered the public domain and that includes books movies music all sorts of creative works that were first published in the U. S. in nineteen twenty four and if you're a little hazy on came out that year here's one the first movie adaptation of Peter Pan okay yeah we would have had a clip for that but that one was a silent film but also one of the things coming out this year blues legend of ma Rainey song CC right I'm enters the public domain it means it's no longer protected by copyright and the public can use and consume it without permission and at no cost and without the public domain we wouldn't have so much art that rests on the work of authors like Charles Dickens and William Shakespeare and these mass expirations used to happen every year in nineteen ninety eight though Congress passed the copyright term extension act it extended copyright protections for existing works for twenty years January first twenty nineteen so the first public domain dump since nineteen ninety eight for more on this host and you have a your recently spoke to Jennifer Jenkins a clinical professor of law and director of the center for the study of public domain at Duke University Jennifer thanks for joining me thanks so much for having me on the show tunes in so give us a couple of examples of maybe more of the popular works in the public domain and that some of our listeners might be familiar with well works from before copyright existed such as the works of Shakespeare the works of Mozart the works of Beethoven the works of Charles Dickens all of these are in the public domain and your listeners might be familiar with them because if you think think about the contributions of Shakespeare to our culture because Romeo and Juliet was in the public domain letter bursting was free to write West Side Story the movie's Gnomeo and Juliet and for me unless di did not have to get in touch with his errors and they were not subject to a veto and Shakespeare himself through in the public domain before him Romeo and Juliet you on Arthur Brooks the tragical history of Romeo and Juliet which in turn on all of its Pyramus and Thisbe and so your audience may be able to think of you know scores of works that drew on public domain material when something is not in the public domain what happens then because I understand that the song Happy Birthday was not in the public domain isn't that interesting it is now when something's not in the public domain that means that if you want to use the work you have to locate the copyright holder and you have to get permission from the copyright holder is welcome to say no are they can charge you a fair fee or they can charge you an exorbitant fee now this is a good thing copy rights are very important the public coming in as the yen to the gang of copyright protection so the design of the copyright system is there will be a term of copyright protection when you meet any of us you know enjoy exclusive rights over creative works then after a certain period of time that copyright expires in those works go into the public domain where anyone else is free to use and build upon them so there's some work entering the public domain and twenty twenty what might people be excited about what's coming into our public domain wonderful music so my favorite musical piece going to public domain is George Gershwin's Rhapsody in blue some literary works Thomas Mann's the magic mountain EM Forster's passage to India wonderful children's book a a Milne when we were very young there are also some wonderful silent films works featuring Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd silent film called Dante's inferno which itself to a public domain works Dante's divine comedy of course but also intermixing that with elements from Charles Dickens and the Christmas Carol so they're really great works going to the public domain next year and I know a lot of us are very excited about that so if

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"I'm a huge buster keaton fan and my son it you know are kids grow up watching buster keaton films so i said well you know you should tell you're you're teacher that i'm writing a book about which or i'm so far unsuccessfully writing a book about it and i'll be happy to come down in and give a talk about that that subject and to my surprise she agreed invited me down and i did this talk to my son's class and as part of the class we did some improv exercises that that actors do and during that afternoon that what's happening i thought oh this is the way i hear i am standing in front of a group of aspiring actors who specialize in dialogue and you know creating scenes and i thought well this is the way i need to write the book the the chapter on witty he banter and verbal wit which are struggling with at the time i need to write it like a play and show you know there's a classic journalistic a victim show don't tell i couldn't show how it works how verbal fireworks fireworks work rather than trying to explain it to people and that's how i kind of a light it on the idea to write each chapter in a different style so the chapter on verbal which while actually there's a couple one is written in the form of a play another is written in the form of a rap song lyrics to a rap hip hop song is a chapter on on the neuro science of wit how it works in the brain and that's written like a scientific paper there's a chapter written in i am contaminate the heroic couplets of alexander pope in english poets firm eighteenth century who's great great wit's end wrote a lot about wit there's a home about spirituality spiritual side of which which is written like a sermon like you would hear in church on sunday.

keaton alexander pope
"buster keaton" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Are basically marvel movies, and they're big and Cillian fund. And then the. The craft to the John wick movies is like insane. Like there's did you see the third one not yet. There is a there's a knife fight that is very early on. That is like Buster Keaton is just fate. Keep heightening it without ever tipping over. Right. Or just sort of like I don't understand how you craft implant, something, especially if the speed it's going stunt guys, right? It's like, yeah, it's like coordinator, all stunt its due to that. I mean, I'm sure they boarded out which is why the, the stories make. No. Yeah. Like, you know, John wick. Yeah. Trickiest thing like okay. And then he does it. Yeah. And then like the end. Right cliffhanger, and it works great because do I want a bunch of some fun world building amazing fighting, and stunts and stuff? But I don't need to be like, yeah, like yeah. Okay, his dog died, and he is sad. Uh-huh. I did think all the world building that was something that surprise me that I did not know was a part of that. And it's just like that, that's one of the coolest parts of it to be. Yeah. Heard it just gets even sort of deeper and for some reason, sometimes that would annoy me where I'm like, yeah, you're on ask. But and this I'm like, yeah, I think I think we're all having fun. I think everybody knows exactly what's going on. And no one's being like us. What is saying about the world? What's the most fun? It's, it's. It's almost one of those movies where afterward like you and your friends each other like that. That was great. Right. Like his first one this admit that we fucking love that. The movie just goes like all the world building it presents like you already know it. Right. I love that. Okay. And if you make a swear you have to cut your thumb on this thing, inhale dependent and they do it, like people know you know, this, we don't always time experience. So anyway, here he did the thing like wait. What is never mentioned that before? What is this assure guess? Okay. Right. So like, did I fall asleep prison? Hey movie Crushers I wanna talk to you about credit card bills and light stream or your credit card bills keeping you up at night,.

John wick Buster Keaton Cillian coordinator
"buster keaton" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Know, I'm I, I wasn't I was I was married. I'm not married now. And then that, you know, I'd like to get married again. And then have that life you know, I'm not that old and no not. I'm still, you know, forty eight and I have, you know, I just I don't know. I just it was dark time. It was a lot of dark stuff going on. I mean, that's what was dark. That's what the talks up was physical. You know, I don't know how other people I mean when I watch people that really like have to deal, I mean, my pain was, was pretty bad, but there's some people that lose a leg and, you know, like in the plane, Pasco ball, you know, and wheelchair and like that the human spirit. In those situations is amazing. But I would never I, I don't know what I would do if I were. I, I would have to find the human spirit, if I were in a wheelchair and I you know, a physical comedian now in a wheelchair would be I don't know. I would have to. Honestly, you know, figure it out. I would figure it time. I gave up. I just gave up always just like I mean, imagine Jim, Gary, like I guess he would figure it out, too. Yeah, but, you know it doesn't feel like seen it before. I haven't seen a physical me. And I mean, even Buster Keaton was like I got a broken act. I'm going to keep going, you know. Right. You know, but that's this is how I saw other people you just keep going. Or you don't or the, you know, they don't say anything and then you find out later like oh, really that's what was going on. Well, when you're the show must go on, like wolverine so you can throw yourself on the floor. I mean tapper Chevy Chase. You can throw yourself a million times, because it gets laughs. Sure. And so you're going to, you know, through this sort of Darwinian, natural selection process of comedy bits. Oh, this works, I should do more of these. Yeah. And then at a certain point you know, as you know, as you start to get older, just, you know, looking to the left, too fast, you could like you know. So throwing yourself on or has an effect wrestlers like the old like the. Basler's sacrifice their. Yeah. They do bodies for entertainment, and Joe, what do you, what do you do at that point? But I do think that you would I do think that you would figure it out, because you're I would you're gonna get because you're still funny. It's like you know how to be funny. Yeah, exactly. It's just how, how can you be like finding out ways to be funny without throwing yourself back in a chair, right? But did you. Get I'm only asking these questions has I if it's a largely, so that if people are going through stuff, whatever their darkest time is. Yeah. Well, that's what I like for people to get out of the book. You know, really that kind of inspiration that, you know, survival of the process. Yeah. Yeah. 'cause there was did. Did you have a DUI thing? I, I did. Yeah. Yes. And was that it was that because of the pills and because of the I was actually on Ambien that night I wasn't on pills. I couldn't walk the straight line because of my I had surgery. Right. So that's what messed me up. You know, they gave me a Breathalyzer what type pass and I and I but I didn't I didn't walk the straight line. You know, but what's so funny, about the nights that I got I hit the parked car because I felt sleep it wasn't parked car. It was one of those whatever OECD cards on the air, who's on the exit ramp exit ramp was blocked off. And I was. Heading in that direction. I hit the pylons now you're on Ambien, did you know, you were about to drive or did you, did you say, okay? It was it was a bootie call. Okay. And, and the woman someone said, come over already on. Heavier what we up as like. Hey, do you wanna come over, and she said, I'm really tired? She's like, well,.

Joe Buster Keaton Gary Basler Jim
"buster keaton" Discussed on Couples Therapy

Couples Therapy

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Couples Therapy

"It's like Marx brothers. Well, those aren't we love even here Paul. We love Chaplin and Buster Keaton, and those you know, he hates chaplain, but I like chaplain I get into. Keating more. Keep more doesn't mean. I hate to. I love Chaplin. No. But it's true. It's it's true. We do we do like penalty origins of modern comedy at technicians and a lot of ways love the the the actual structures skills. We have we have definitely a love of physical comedy. You don't not a lot of people think that way. Yeah anymore. I don't think. Yeah. As much as they used to, you know. Yeah. The struck the really good physical gag is beautifully structured perfect craving. Yes. Because it translates everywhere in and people don't know that it's not just falling down. It is about is about building attention to the fall. And. Yeah. And what comes after the fall? It's like, it's a very it's a very beautifully structured thing. A good fall. Yes. And if you knew how hard those guys used to work on that perfect timing of that thing. And it's like, it's a lost thing doesn't really I don't think people really do it very much anymore. Don't think about it. You know, except for those. Is there any physical comedy Johnny Knoxville? That's the west. But that was like, yeah. That's almost as the world game to physical comedy. Make you laugh and jackass. Yeah. I'm too squeamish to watch it. I never watched it. I don't like people getting hurt too pathetic. Because then I feel it in my body again hugging himself with his hoodie actually worked on jackass the movie That the. the the routes things for the second season than they ended up in the movie, and yeah, so thinking of hey, let's see what happens when this guy hits himself in the nuts with a sledgehammer. Oh, the wait is that real to that actually happening much worse than no? Okay. Who still has not we got more. Exactly him sweating. Johnny Knoxville's all over the bogdonovich. Buster Keaton documentary would he really is? Is he He is is he he. in fan? I think I think it was also wait for bugged on its to try and bring the young folk kin folk. In their forties. If. Knoxville? That's the young young people weren't dead yet, folks. And that's young folks to me. Wow. That's amazing. The other guy Harold Lloyd says name was the third of the great, gene third. Loyd was an absolute genius. He was he was missing some digits. You had people don't off in a in a gag any wore fake, we're fake hand. So he's the original jackass yet pretty much index finger off well doing a like a gag in one of his movies. So a lot of people might know the image of a guy hanging off the clock over a city street. That's him. But he was doing that with a fake hand. Oh, so he was an amazing guy. Netted dedicated to the cause because a comedy. It's a cause it is would you? We're wrapping up, but would you give anywhere? Would you give a finger for comedy? Now. It's funny because I actually did a show recently with a comic who was missing a finger and she talked about, but she like didn't tell it didn't talk about the end, and then was kind of vague. And I was like give me the full finger story. I went into the mole story of how you lost this Bangor. And I thought about it, and like your stories one, my favorite porn film. What What I I said. said. And I was like, yeah. It's kind of tasted. Yeah. And yet, you know, you gotta jump in. I mean, she and I thought it was like I got finger story. My first night in prison meant to prison law. I'm sorry. It happened a lot that you kept going to prison. I'd only paying taxes. Who does tax season is now let's right in it. You gotta stay in the US. You gotta stay in the US. Thank you so much for being thanks. Oh. How do you feel? She said retire..

Johnny Knoxville Buster Keaton Loyd Chaplin US Knoxville Keating Marx Paul Harold Lloyd Bangor
"buster keaton" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Drivers have to do with already know traffic is bad enough? Good deal will have rights in the lane. No times the bike and whole as always not just relegated to just a side of the lane more. So. Student of real bad. I do I mean what happens to bolster Keaton movies? The Buster Keaton movie. And then you know, how soon pitchers in your traffic were just ride in and out of traffic, and you just. Me what happens to our? Insurance for vehicles. Will go up. Just because of the bike boxer because. Yes, because the bike riders multiplying on the roads. That's an interesting question. I don't know that. But to Jim thanks for the call to your point. You have on the side of the road. Normally, you got these bike lanes or whatever people ignore them, they'll park on them. And you know, who else parks on them? Sometimes they'll put the construction cones or the construction lights our police officers. So I happened to the person riding the bike on the side of the road. They go into the lane and have to go around these people. It's it's always obstructed. It seems like there's always problems with that sort of thing. And then you have the bicyclist going into the road. Anyway, because they can't keep things clear. Donald your next up. Hey, donald. Yeah. My time out about the urban driver or bicycle riders versus rural bicycle riders bicycle riders out where I around the county or just basically exercising and the roads are not going to work for school. And we don't let all exercise activity in the roadway. They are join a club or find a bike trail, but they ought to be a speed limit where bicycles aren't allowed because they do backup. Traffic calls quite a hazardous problem out in the rural areas, I do think that's a great phrase that I've never thought of it that way it just rolled out my window and say stop exercising in the road..

Buster Keaton Donald Jim
"buster keaton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So here we see Mr., Hilo and he's overlooking an area of office cubicles and try to, identify someone that he's supposed to meet. And it is in this extremely alienating sixties space and he's now going down kind, of Carter between cubicles He's seen this. Man that he wants to interact with and he's looking. For. Him and and we're seeing him just totally confused he's he's a very funny sort of his choreography yes is really really wonderful he's running around like a rat intimate like around amazing, he's a little bit like Buster Keaton if you will Kind of like a curious soul that doesn't. Really talk very much but he's he's just a bystander And the whole scene, is about him interacting with this, alienating interior architecture exactly he's now. Looking outside of the glass wall, he's looking in the wrong direction Lettuce entirely lost and what's what's so wonderful. Is that we have this privilege view from above so we can see the full scene inside and outside and. We. See where they're mis aligning in space so. It's sort of conceptual in space Spatial very abstract condition It's an amazing thing to watch. In, so many ways great. Great, piece, of cinematic comedy also nineteen sixty seven officers. Didn't look like that then that office looks. Like. Most offices, today really, you know I mean that's the extraordinary thing to see this fifty. One year old movie that was so kind of prescient about how officers would come to look. As, as cubicle, farms well in fact also this, set was entirely made and these buildings were constructed for for this movie and? He designed, it, right. He did yeah yeah and he and I think he. Saw to every detail it actually took a long time and. A lot of money I think it it. Put them financially under but part of what I love about that movie is the use of glass and something that we've been thinking about for a very long time is how glass has been thought of in the twentieth century from the moment in the early, part of twentieth century where? Was this miracle medium Is, that where you can. See, through, walls and you can structure buildings outside of. The wall structures and all of a sudden. You. Had this, inside outside, spatial continuity whereas postwar these glass building start to emerge everywhere and. They become the most economic way to build and they become generic and then all of a. Sudden, everyone that, just loved being able to see, through glass what was all of a sudden self conscious about being seen because? It was, a, two. Way system so this movie also is about voyeurism and. There are other properties have like reflection and so forth there. Near us throughout the entire film so he. Clearly had thought about all of these cerebral whippy artistic issues that you're talking about as he was putting together this I totally I mean maybe without those words but there are big chunks of of this foam that are about looking in always the cameras outside, of buildings very rarely inside Spaces so you're looking into domestic, spaces you're looking into office basis your people are trying to communicate through glass and they're not able. To communicate and I built to hear each other there are all sorts of interesting reflections of places that are are there are. Not there, and I, think it's a testament, to glass it's a beautiful movie about glass here is another film where the, architecture is integral the shining record, by Stanley Kubrick It takes place in this remote empty mountain, lodge in the off season in the in. The American west so basically haunted. House and it also has very little dialogue so,.

Buster Keaton Carter Hilo House One year
Jesse Widener of Klamath Film

Herald

05:40 min | 2 years ago

Jesse Widener of Klamath Film

"Heralded news news learn is now. Empowering the community base, slow the news, your news with falls, Oregon. Empowering the community and serving mclamb basin. This is the the news facing us pop. Greetings and welcome to base views heralded news podcast featuring interviews with local experts discussing issues important to the climate basin. I'm kirtland key with the herald news this week. We're joined by Jesse Widener Klamath film here to discuss one of my favorite topics, movies, upcoming events, such as the annual climate independent film festival and a special screening with a very special guest coming soon. Jesse, thank you so much for taking the time out of your schedule to join us here. Well, we will get into everything that Clem film entails and just a little bit. But I always like to start these things off a little bit of background on our guests themselves. Can you educate us a little bit more about who Jesse Widener? Sure. So I've actually got a fairly wide arts back there used to work as a draftsman architect California for about seven years before I moved up here, I've studied music composition, do some drawing some writing. I practiced photography for several years before I started getting into the film thing. So the film thing actually really comes from being the sort of great medium. It's an amalgamation of all these other disciplines that you. You can do kind of throw all these different dispirit interests into one thing. So what was the first video project that you worked on? The first project was probably the first project I did with Klamath film, and it was on one of those old. I don't say hold the nineties hand held nineties early two, thousands of Devi Cam with the digital video tape. And one of the first things I learned was that the screen on it is not as it shows brighter than what the actual film was. So I was exposing to the screen and when I actually took the footage home to work on, it was so dark. I had to crank everything is still looked nasty and black, and it was horrible. I'm from Hollywood is well, I grew up in Eugene, but I spent a long time in Hollywood and those Devi cameras there fuzzy because when I was working on a lot of projects, some of those cameras were fifty thousand eight hundred thousand dollars now that everything's gone digital. They're selling those things on EBay for one hundred bucks. People can't get rid of them. Yeah, yeah, ours, ours is more of a consumer grade one though that we were. We're using it was, you know, like something you'd pick up Fred Meyer or whatnot, and it just wasn't that hot and me not knowing what I was doing with it was even worse. So well, one thing that I have found fascinating being involved in film is the number of people like yourselves that got involved in simply by doing, didn't have formal Bagger. There are film schools that people can go to, but lots of times people just get involved when it for the sake of having an idea grabbing a camera and giving a try and kind of learning as you go. Right. That's a funny thing because I think you know, obviously the film industry is still young, maybe one hundred years, old hundred twenty years old. Just you know, it's not like painting or something like that, and it's been a master apprentice industry for a long, long time. You know, you start working on a film as gopher basically, and work your way up. And then at some point you did start getting into the film school stuff with that sort of seemed to be the advice path go to films go, go to USC, go to southern California, whatever the case maybe and then it not in the last probably twenty years with the advance. In technology with the internet, having all of these YouTube videos, and there's several channels that teach you how to do all these filmmaking techniques or whatnot. I think it's really democratized and commodities that industry where you can just from your house, you'll get a five hundred dollar camera. It's amazing compared to anything from, you know, ten twenty years ago and then sit on YouTube for your to do stuff. You know, the technology's advanced, but what's really fascinating to me as just a fan of film in general. I love going back to the old silent film era, the little black Charlie Chaplin Buster Keaton and stuff like that. And you look at the things that they were doing. They were inventing how films are made then. And while the technology may have changed the method for creating film really hasn't and over the course of a century, right? Yeah. The structure is generally isn't actually, I have a slight complaint about structure of fill. You know, when when film for start out, you're talking late, eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds and nobody really knew what to do with it. You know there was this massive creativity of, you know. What? What wild things can I do? You know what weird effects can I do? How can I freak people out that never seen something on screen like this and somewhere in the teens, the nineteen teens. It's sort of took on this the purpose of films to tell a story. And I think it's really been pigeonholed in that one hundred years. You know, it's it's like saying the purpose of painting before there was photography. The purpose of painting was to be as realistic as possible and the medium geared towards that realism until in the eighteen hundreds of the camera came out and they realize somebody could just snap a picture. So you know what was the point of painting now that's when you saw painting expand into, you know, pression ISM and surrealism and Dada. ISM cubism and Jackson Pollock jap- technique and all this kind of wild stuff. And

Klamath Klamath Falls Oregon Portland Ralph Dr Ralph L Las Vegas Writer Eccles New York Siskiyou County Tula Lake James Ivory San Francisco Steve Buscemi Jesse Widener Reisen
"buster keaton" Discussed on Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

"One was southern momma. Some YouTube guy who stuff I haven't seen an. I like live on the internet. He also describes himself as the fastest growing comedian on ever. So he was like one of the variety comics to watch one of ten, how the only like straight white man of the ten. I know he didn't get along very well with the other comedians and then started a fight on one of the panels that he was on. Yeah. And then was outspoken about the fact that Heeb like thought comedy was not a space to talk about race and gender, but also like just didn't really tell jokes of it. It was just like told one joke that has been attributed to Buster Keaton. The his opening joke with like a toast to our our wives and girlfriends may they never meet? Yes. And like from nineteen twenty three, he just I mean, I feel two ways about him. Number one, I just feel like I guess there's a space for everyone to do whatever they want. I'm not going to be like a. First amendment or whatever. I think that he at a certain point, what I think people aren't talking about is the fact that he started all this shit with these queer people of color. Other other comedians on the panel and started shit trying to tell them what is and is not appropriate, and he doesn't even do stand up and then then he was allowed to. Then later that day perform on a showcase with them, no one ever thought everyone's like, oh, what an asshole. But no one ever thought like, hey, is this putting other performers endanger? But this guy is so combative in so hostile because that's a fear. I mean as a woman, if I'm in a room with a bunch of guys straight guys, I really like, where's the exit. Even if not thinking, I'm like, subconsciously going, how do I get out of this if I need to? Yeah, so I feel like there was that thing that I, I didn't really see people talking about it and also there is a discussion of whether or not people should talk about this online and give him more of a platform. Right, right. I don't think there's a bright answer for it. No, no. But an extension of that has been like we're only talking about him and not the nine other people who are amazing and yeah, and I love all other nine people. Most of them have been guests on this show and like, yeah, we should keep talking about all of them. I, it's, it's, it's it's, but you can also justify like, look, this is still going on. Yeah, and this shouldn't be happening. And where were the where were the checks and balances to keep this guy from? You know, verbally attacking these other these strangers? Yeah, we should be, you know, I don't know. Asking for tips on how to be better comedian. You tell a joke and what's to setup. Another thing I was reading touched on this which is like in improv, which you're like an improv person. You're like, UCB. Yeah. I mean, I used to dab. I couldn't take eleven pm Tuesday night with Marxist anymore. Yeah, but there was an article I was reading that was like part of the scary thing about being like marginalized within the comedy community. If you're like part of an improv class and you're on a show with a straight white man, you have to kind of go along with his his choices on stage which might be racist or bigoted or something like, have you experienced that? Okay, actually have a great story. So Susan messing was my first improv teacher in Chicago. She's she's kind of a legend there. She is a legend there and she had this really. I don't even know if. Applies now, but I really, I always think about it. She was like, when a guy calls you a slut onstage when a straight white guy calls you a slow on state or does something agro like that you go?.

Buster Keaton Susan messing YouTube Heeb Chicago
"buster keaton" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"He's the only one watch us stars that none. Of the other It. Was the best and wasn't that fun. To watch him swim boy he was a heck of a summer The thing that amazed me watching. Him swimming and watch other people's flame He made a week Yeah He was swimming probably against the, current which is why it looked like he was moving faster and he, was but he kinda made. Awake I remember. My mom you know Saturday morning is, watching Tarzan Yup or or Saturday afternoon you know the Saturday afternoon matinee, or whatever it was TV Back in. The fifties and Remember mom telling me he was he, was an Olympic champion swimmer and I went wow No, kidding He was traveling the first actor that, was ripped No every actor nowadays every, male actor is ripped but without steroids without steroids Probably, the first ripped actor ever Let's boy? Buster Keaton was ripped wasn't he He was a lot lots molar it. Would've taken two of him to, make Johnny Yeah Using the term ripped in a different? Sense Oh okay You wanna. Play, or Okay right Claymation. Or, animation Animation Square dancing or line, dancing definitely skirt outside, Oregon, music ballpark or church church Romance, novel, or detective novel detective Public library, or bookstore.

Buster Keaton Tarzan Yup Public library Oregon Johnny
"buster keaton" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Of a lineup and the sarah why do you think this is i think you should have taught that i thing when you had moved children you donate that that way but no everybody has got those futterman matt conditions i suppose to meet people nowadays we live much more inboxes wish it in front of screens we get out of the door we get in a car we leave we all work at different times and not working nine to five zero with king some of us working through the night some whatever so i think the opportunity to meet people um just round the corner uh it it is very very difficult now and i think that's why i'm the organization infants and they just fan um in cardiff on recognize that and he's trying to do something about it by giving people a a chance to meet people and through a little i'm great and it is different to different places and we often talk about i will have so much more friendly up north but i i put a theory about this well i'm husband's from stay contract and i can i know to shout i knew that not the north at swiss mittens identities up north to me from london but but the thing is if you grow up in one area new notes that of course you'll know neighbors unit you frenzy of family members yeah you know your grandparents might have known somebody lives in the streets as well if he will be in around there and you and then you of course you'll we will ferry because you know each other with people with two big cities whether it's london all new glasgow will venture people who moved to a big city they're less light today the people who live there because their new to the city sukhumi show nor could it be oh hi how are you to somebody's a complete stranger in the street no i think carded everybody that oh cut a touch of funky place where you talk to people in buster keaton but he can if you talk to people in bed keys you don't necessarily become friends with them you know you glad to have somebody to to.

sarah cardiff glasgow buster keaton london
"buster keaton" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

Freedom 95 Radio

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

"Perry i'm sorry by people touching my blue blanket it's not important it's a minor compulsion i can deal with it if i want to it's just that i've had it ever since i was a baby young i find it very comforting the physical performance by gene wilder is as good as the verbal and buster keaton would be while looking down from heaven and just think and while the 1971 wilder addition to play willy wonka and mel stewart's film adaptation charlie in the chocolate factory there was initially hesitant when he learned about the role would finally accepted it under one condition here's gene wilder with that story read the book and mel stewart's the director came to my home in new york and you see you wanna do it i said well i'll tell you i'd like to do it if i can come out and all the crowd quiets down and i'm i'm using a cane oh my god what he walker's cripple and i walked slowly you can hear a pin drop in my can get stuck in a brick and i do i fall over on my face and do a forward somersault in jump up and they all start to applaud you should what mel stewart's what do you wanna do that for i said because no one will know from that point on whether online are telling the truth he should are you saying he won't do the film if you can't do that i said that's what i'm saying teok i met uh uh uh he did mean it and that's why gene wilder is gene wilder that's not in the book it is not in the book when woody allen offered him a role in one segment of everything you always wanted to know about sex but we're afraid to ask gene wilder accepted everything the movie was a hit grossed eighteen million the united states against a two million dollar budget here's the scene from that film or wilder plays a doctor whose patient informed him about his love for a particular barnyard animal coming misdemeanor us sit down right over here i just want to get so history and the first so here name is stop bruce meters and your address on me a media i am from romania i.

Perry gene wilder buster keaton mel stewart director new york walker woody allen united states romania willy wonka bruce two million dollar
"buster keaton" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"I'm sorry i don't like people touching my blue blanket it's not an coordinates a minor compulsion i can deal that it if i want to it's just that i've had it ever since i was a baby young i find it very comforting on the physical performance by gene wilder is as good as the verbal and buster keaton would be while looking down from heaven and just thinking while 1971 wilder addition to play willy wonka and mel stewart's film adaptation charlie in the truck factory while was initially hesitant when he learned about the role but finally accepted it under one condition here's gene wilder with that store i've read read the book and now stewart the director came to my home and they are and you wanna do it i said well i'll tell you i'd like to do it if i can come out in all the crowd quiets down and i'm i'm using a cane oh my god will he won't chris crippled and i walked slowly and you can hear a pin drop in my came get stuck in a brick and i do i fall over on my face and do a forward somersault in jump up and they all start to applaud he should what mel stewart's what do you want to do therefore i should because no one will know from that point on whether i'm lying are telling the truth he should are you saying you won't do the film if we if you can't do that i said that's what i'm saying okay i met you did mean it and that's why gene wilder is gene wild that's not in the book it is not in the book when woody allen offering him a role in one segment of everything you always wanted to know about sex but were afraid to ask gene wilder accepted everything the movie was a hit grossed eighteen million the united states against a twomillion dollar budget here's the scene from that film or wilder plays a doctor whose patient informed him about his love for a particular barnyard animal coming missed made us sit down right over here i just want to get some history in verse the tough so here namias stop bruce meals and your dress our me i mean i come from romania i.

gene wilder buster keaton director united states bruce romania willy wonka mel stewart chris woody allen twomillion dollar
"buster keaton" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on WWL

"You what i would do if i were you i would text news news or weather w we atag yard age seventy eight seventy unita confirmation message back and then you text why i think it is the letter not the word casino why that's why you're texting and and and get the weather and news alerts we don't charge but you're a text and data rates and all that stuff do apply and i tell you that because with the rain in the parades and last minute decisions you're gonna wanna know as soon as you can johnny and brokerage higher end up w well good morning all right you go on beautiful beautiful hey listen um i think strata wichita me uh president trump gave us is still pitch about the wall and he said that mexico is gonna pay for it now that's why allow american voter put his guy to keep security your name without the fan ask of americans that that he said mitch input mexico in mexico presidency he paper nothing here's and i think i think if you saw mexico's gonna pay for this wall from the beginning your dilution you were delusional that now what they're trying to say is nano which drew a wrong or false or but that through tariffs i think our other charges given to mexico that they will pay for the wall but in a different way now whether that's true or not i don't know when i guess you'd still have to say will if he can charge those kinds of tariffs and they're willing to pay it well i would have been even more money right exactly exactly the last caller the at commentator ruwais of guy he made them key point lift quickie god imprison when they come over here give buster keaton but the thing about it who all all three branches right now the republicans you hit the bill that the past with the thought that my problem right there.

wichita trump mexico buster keaton president
"buster keaton" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"I got hooked in so within a year i was done with the full 100 and i wanted more or less so i found out there was a guy i believe it was chris merrill out here who does a great job with a lot of your if i productions related stuff and the montage each year for the f i words but somebody very nicely sent me the booklet of the four hundred the ballot had gone out of the four hundred that you pick the one hundred from i started going through those i got so hooked that really it became an obsession than each year you would give me a a new head of the drug when cbs would air another afi one hundred list it wasn't a first there was the just the one hundred greatest than there were one hundred comedies one hundred thrillers on and on and on and so i have to ask you because i understand you were really the driving force behind that series had it it's star why did it start and you know thank you again for doing it well that's why we do it your story is exactly the embodiment of purpose i have to say success has many fathers and so the the person that i remembered saying you know what we should really countdown the 100 greatest movies of all time was a gentleman named li tomlinson who stood in the hallway and said what do you think of this idea and the board debated it at a high level for many years and there were pros and cons because the a i can't say that one movie is better than another movie it's completely subjective and of course that's true it but that wasn't the point the point was to catalyze a global conversation about what makes a good movie and why so that it's not just about the weekend box office it's about what's your favorite and so on the first list there were glaring omissions for example there were people picketing me if i because buster keaton general if not all number liz and by the way they were right right but here's the thing buster keaton was then part of the conversation and.

chris merrill li tomlinson buster keaton liz
"buster keaton" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on KGO 810

"To accommodate specific version i'll go fast blazing saddles great let the lady eve i thought that was a feminine product for on your having your lady tangible blazing seattle's number twenty yeah okay my wife now refers to her lady time even on when i said it she thought it was awful and she told me never say it again she now refers to it as our lady di maybe nice checkin crawled maybe the i'll catch on and women will start talking about their lady to account that is a victory thus sherlock junior buster keaton nineteen 24 could all great haven't seen it should we only after like maintain eighty and a lot of what i'll go faster we don't get our number one on laws bringing up baby the great dictator charlie chaplin again monty python and the holy grail arg argue with his girl friday to be or not to be all admit i've not even heard of a number of these movies little on them uh modern times charlie chaplin into a big basket number eleven ice how about leballa ski right next to a charlie chaplin movie i ate sits a classic that fits you just wonder in ah in dam near a hundred years will people be talking about the big levesque i don't know i'm curious as to what kept it out of the top ten yeah so here we go bigger basket eleven here's your top10 the general what muster kate from 1926 was at the second buster keaton movie yeah probably funny for healthcare buster keaton he's one year old time ease funny i like buster keaton stuff just if they're silent films she got to get into that hole he looks though rise the many walks into something in that is this a book uh i had of that buster keaton movie at number nine it's certainly on my list this is spinal tap a hope for sure among the greatest things at harvard number eight the here here's a great movie critic sort of thing number eight play time by jacques tautai from 1960 seven new i'm sure it's very grohl lewis soon see how they're taking.

seattle buster keaton charlie chaplin kate holy grail harvard jacques tautai hundred years one year
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"The you know the history of movies in terms of showcasing performers going back to say buster keaton uh and then to fred astaire and seeing him dance head to toe uh in in his movies in and jackie chan and all these people and seeing all this stuff happened onset are you know on the day and you know when you're watching these movies performers are doing it so full that into all of the other stuff i'm i'm talking about in terms of the performers are making it happened and there's the drama and there's the crazy gore and there's the sole stuff and there's the independent draw at once he starts stacking enough of this stuff i guess this is you pass the threshold of its seeming insane to to normal human weeks to me at all makes complete at i watch them like of course that's where this needed to go i understand your stacking enough completely different viewpoints in interests that in in the end land in this what the hell that i just watch experience fence outlet how the we won't get into details at this points about lee insane shit bradley doesn't this movie but how is it described in the script when you're reading it it's the best thing i read i mean i i remember i love on tomahawk i thought it was incredible and that was a kind of thing you like where's this movie going what happened like it's kind of funny and other talking like these characters this was really good performances iin this is what they gotta go where in it complicated.

fred astaire jackie chan bradley buster keaton lee
"buster keaton" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The top the top five and i'm looking at this top five and i have seen four of the top five i have not i don't believe seen the number one cavity accord did the bbc despite the fact that i know i know what it is so at number for dui who five or ten my club people usually do the top ten dough thank yeah which had attacked he added i'll do the top nine 'cause i have no idea what the ten idota a general the general is a buster keaton phil they said that is the tenth greatest comedy of all time i know bureau buster keaton though that was great stuff back there charlie chaplin it was gene chaplain i got buster keaton those never a huge surplus muster keep what was i i don't know what the the thought was behind him i i don't know let of his work to be honest but i know the name i know he did the general can overturn on his liz i really funny move you oh is hilarious he also easily in let's see buster keaton is it the number ten movie he is also in the number eighteen movie so when the top twenty he's in two of them and charlie chaplin is only in one of two of the top twenty so number ten is the general number nine this is spinal tap very for our counties movies a you can watch overnight like dramas i can watch again and again comedies while i enjoy them i don't really in like watching them time and time of day lose some don't hold up some because i know the jokes i don't i don't watch them there's only one i watch if i ever so if i see the other guys with mark waugh berry will farrell view ever seen that one i watch that that hilarious that when i watch i can watch it anytime becomes a but other companies even ones i love like stripes animal house those kind of the dead i grew up loving maybe i watch a little other burma oh my god strobe zone i got to watch over just doesn't hold up for be any more said comedies a tough that doesn't happen the only movie that i was forced was well i was forced to watch over and over again was when a tape of saving silverman was.

bbc buster keaton charlie chaplin mark waugh berry silverman
"buster keaton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"You know i don't really feel like driving crossed wrong she this obscure movie you know on i'll i'll i'll succumb to laziness or or fatigue or whatever it may be now the other half the it's ready now the other aspect of criticism we wanna discussed is the unfortunate schaab lem of swimming against the tide yes case in point right now i did not care for dunkirk now that puts me in a minority it has gotten rave reviews i've read several columns that insist it's going to be a leading oscar contender this year because it's about the importance subject the oscar folks like that it it with the production values an execution of the film are impeccable uh but i had misgivings about it and i found some things to quibble with and i said so honestly in my review on my website leonard maltin dot com and you got a plug it when you can uh and i know as a result a lot of people are unhappy with me well so what happened was a few weeks ago we both did not like wonderwoman and this did not go well for us i liked it open thing is like the beginning oh know they're pieces in it but collectively when the film ended we're sitting next to each other and the film ends and i didn't know what he thought usually i can guess because we've seen a lot of movies together unusually i can guess of my body language add something just your face he doesn't have a poker face so if he's enjoying it'll be sitting really pleasantly and if he's not it's just this like buster keaton and and i i went back and i said what did you think he said that's the dullest superhero movie i have ever seen and i said i'm so board and that's the thing is that it's a movie so everyone's here's what hacked the same way now i can't hard i can't go on a corner i have air my opinion publicly that's my job.

dunkirk buster keaton oscar