22 Burst results for "Buster Keaton"

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Can give you a very nice edge. These boys it's still. I'm hung up about sixty feet of bridge missing kim. They haven't got your back in water and juice schmuck right at least a hundred guys find hundred man just like that out for better. Show up kelly. The my hair is still could get. Nobody said anything about flipping inflated caliber machine all of our country. I'm making fifty dollars. If you carry the machine three sherman's happy with these guys. Who's at quarterback itchy. See we're just private enterprise. Operation weeks circus could be. That's.

fifty dollars hundred kelly about sixty feet least a hundred guys kim three sherman
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

07:42 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"There were the films that would just turn up and there would be an in house pianist or sometimes a small band and they would then play often side on sane but that would have a bag of tricks that they could have the choice music and that have the love music and often. It'd be the same music for each film. It was actually the genesis of a lot of this film scoring. was i reckon. A lot of these little theaters where musicians got to pretty much. Have a regular gig and that would be improvising. You'd call it multimedia improvisisation these days. They were the first film scores but there were other films that would turn up with a score. Maybe fully scored. Sometimes that would have. This is the love theme. This is the choice music. This is the late motif for the bad guy. And so they'll give a few clues and then it'll be up to the musician musicians to insert it at the right places and so it was lovely and loose but there are other people like charlie chaplin was renowned for riding his own scores for his films and in a way. I mean he was a for a filmmaker. He was a pretty good composer but he was my genius. Composer and the chaplain. St- i believe very precious about other people writing scores to his films. They want the film to be saying the white chaplain them to be seen with the music that he wrote. And that's fair enough. But some of those films could really do. With a bit of a sprinkling united could be amazing. Say some new scores to them so in a way they can date more quickly. If you use the original scores in my opinion anyway so i think that was a lovely thing about keeton was. He was a blank canvas for us. It was literally a film with nice score this beautiful film with nice score and as we set their writing to it. It felt like when you're watching it and you came up with the pace of music and you placed it to the film if it was the right bit of music and almost like the film turn to you know it was just suddenly the emotion was right and or the you know. The energy was right and suddenly that scene suddenly make sense or the structure of the film. The music we'd ride the structure of the film and suddenly you're writing this amazing of music because the film has got such a great structure to also just thinking about the nineties jerrell. Maybe even back to the eighties music. Thomas of weddings parties. Anything written a school for the sentimental blog and johnson String quartet for ten doors. Box the louise bookstore. Those at the time where inspiration. I've heard of the mic. Thomas one but i never saw it and when we were i think i even went to see it. My memory of it is. We had a lot of help from a fellow called john rouse who ran the nova cinema. Who used to run the valhalla cinema in melbourne and he was a tremendous help to us with things copyright and he was the one who produced the jan andersson film and so he was kind of excited. When i told him that we were going to take on this project. And so i think for their final show. He got me tickets to own. Say the jan andersson production side. That was the first time. I've actually seen a silent film with live music and i went straight from that show to our first rehearsal like literally came out of the cinema and got on my bike and rode to a rehearsal lenders and we were sitting there that well. I'm just saying what it could be like. That was a coincidence interesting. Because her the way she scored it she did a very traditional kind of she scored it all out on pipe like she wrote the score app for cortex and they had a click track cape in time and it was a very beautiful film but my god. It's really long. It's like two hours long plus inc and it's a big ask to write two hours of music with a string quartet. I think there are some beautiful moments but it did feel like it was a big stretch for them to personally. I felt there were times when i was kind of feeling needed. A big orchestra here or something like that. The advantage of our band was that i were multi instrumentalists so there were five of in the band but there was upwards of fourteen instruments that we can draw on so add. Accordion player is also mandolin player. And very good cellist. And he can play a main harmonica and a very bad saxophone. And i was classically trained as a florida spot. Apply the banjo. You know terrible clarinet player and guitarist played drums and did all the folly and percussion things like that so we could go from a string quartet into a crazy ragtime jazz feel into a jonzon. Kind of groove. We all had a very catholic taste in music so we loved the kind of the slapstick style of music but we also loved the discordant the contemporary sort of styles of music as well and we loved films like tiny and things like that so we could drawer and a lot of different styles and sort of hopefully mesh them together. So that that's why. The scores succeeded is because a lot of different elements in there and we managed to join the modules together in a way that might same. Three reasonably seamless. I think in prepar conversation. I had a chance to watch a couple of times. you'll vision. Help can call it that the shylock junior As the film with your school it fascinated may want know that you will the group as composes said that you drew inspiration from all sorts of places in Mr connie for example. What does it compose. who's working full. Silent film have to take into a camp that may be competitive for a toll. Key film may not because Aside from having to fill up the space full time movie which someone who's doing for talking would never have to do but a year having to musically explain things more to an audience. There's already a language established now for movies. I like about but went silent. Movies were made scores. Were in the light movies. Though in their infancy and so we can look back at these movies with this language that has been evolved and developed and apply that to these old movies when you see them often. They've got a creaky organ or piano in the background business resemblance to what's going on the screen. I think that's the nice thing about it. It's a blank canvas like you said and we can explore what happens if we i could sherlock junior comic moment right at the end of the film where he's scratching his head looking at at this couple of just had babies wondering how to have babies and for us that was like let's put in horror theme rock and Having babies is those scary for us at that time and so we get that choice. So i think if you're going to do a talkie film or talkie.

john rouse charlie chaplin melbourne two hours jan andersson fourteen instruments keeton jerrell each film Thomas florida five sherlock junior eighties first rehearsal connie first time Three ten doors nineties
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

07:00 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"New civic clubs more appropriate for the ship and he got into a into a milliner. He's getting through lots of different hats nod. Not that the father keeps ripping him off and then the heavy puts on is best Traditional poke pipette and then bustling Not aware that is just a love. That little self referential megabytes in the phone. When you mentioned earlier about the romeo and juliet thing that was the concept that came up and other buster films. I think most obviously probably our hospitality. Which was the only film he ever did with his then wife natalie talmadge who was part of the talmadge dynasty. They're not really talked about that much nowadays. But back in the twenties and Early teens the challenges were very very famous actor sisters constance natalie reportedly wanted to be a writer. She did not even want to be an actress bat. They had a stage. Mother who very much encouraged probably going to encourage probably needs The probably imagine some mental abuse probably went into it of kind of forcing her daughters into into show business. That's the only thing they ever did together. And in fact that was natalie's last film was our hospitality. And i definitely recommend it. It's got a cute dog. It's also got some good old southern southern attitudes that. I don't recommend people continuing in modern times. Is that also the one where they're in that funny little train. Speaking of trains yes. The rocket was Based off a real creation there's also a hole in from sort of climactic secrets with him. Like a brevine that goes into a waterfall and that is some of the most harrowing buster keaton stunts. I have ever seen. That is one holy. How are you alive while he's not having more. But how did you stay alive for. Yeah there was one biography. I read about buster where the author was just talking about the talmadge family almost too much whereas just like come on. I just want to know about buster. Like of course the talmadge is were a major influence and they didn't really like him. It doesn't sound like and it sounds like natalie spent money like water. They had a couple of kids together but they slept in separate beds for a long time. I think after the second kid who's just like that's it. We're not sleeping together anymore. So there was a lot of extramarital affairs that were going on. That were pretty much known about. It was just not a good scene for him. At all being married to natalie and got him involved in a lot of real estate stuff and i don't think that he had a lot of money after they were coming out of the nineteen twenties which was another bad thing and then eventually they would divorce and i. I luckily his last virginia was supposed to be just like salt of the earth and just took care of him so well but yet doesn't sound like him in the talmadge is Had a lot of love lost and of course. Obviously mileage is going very but one source. I read when the subject was broached. Him about you know. Youtube will be sleeping in separate bedrooms like the women like plural. It wasn't just natalie. It was like her mother lay. How awkward has i mean. It's gonna be having your spouse be like you know where i i'm not touching your anymore. You need to go to another room but to have your mother to have your mother-in-law say that that's that's just poor buster again. The fact that he only ended up having a bit of a drinking problems a miracle. Yeah the man with through some things that would drive a lesser soul too. Much stronger of vices am i. Opinion why did i say his last wife was named virginia. That's weird it's an. It's an old-fashioned name now Virginia illinois are the eunice. It's all it's all the same the thing i didn't realize when i was watching steamboat. Bill junior is. I thought it was named after the mickey mouse cartoon rather than Something else but apparently it was already a an act. I guess or it was a song. That's what it is was a song about race between two steamboats. I guess it was but it's kind of ironic that disney would name their for short steamboat. Willie because really and we've talked about. Why buster kind of lost his steam. And i think one of the reasons wasn't sound like we said he had a good voice. He was able to do witty repartee. He was not some sort of mush mouth. Person that had trouble wants to sound era came in. I think part of it was him losing his independence. And also i think part of it might have been cartoons because there wasn't necessarily the need for the stuff that he was doing a live action was then being done in cartoons though. I think some of his live action stuff was more exciting than a lot of cartoon stuff or you can do anything. Buster seem to be able to do anything might knowledge of wayne cartoons sorta became like regularly ongoing thing with disney studios. Like he was still doing. This phone was nineteen twenty. I wasn't with isolate starting ellie said. He's older he was still making films with mgm and other studios after that. So maybe that was an issue then but would he have lost his confidence at the time of this phone. Do you think because of animation. I'm not sure if he would have lost his confidence at this point. But i think you know steamboat. Willie was the scene. Year was also nineteen twenty eight. That was the first time that we now have because we had cartoons before that but this was one of the first sound plus image cartoons that was out there like you said this is the same year as the jazz singer is coming out a believer that might have been taught twenty seven as opposed to twenty eight. But it's right around that same time so it's not like sound. Put him out of business. I think it was more the lack of freedom to do the crazy shit that he did. But then i also i just want to say that i think cartoons might have also played into it a little bit that and also had thirties and sound by the mid thirties. You started having things like cereals. To and cereals most the cereals tended to be more just sort of like fantas- fantastic adventure Kind of comic book style plots return of shandu and Of course. I have damage the one with bill would go see. That's totally on brand for me. Y'all later i like flash gordon batman. It's simply yeah. You didn't see as many comedic shorts wsl.

natalie talmadge Youtube natalie gordon batman disney studios two steamboats thirties ellie juliet nineteen twenty first time one source second kid nineteen twenty eight Bill junior twenty seven Willie one biography romeo constance
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

03:45 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Gone on journey but they did not who they were at the start of the film laced perceptions of each other a different side by the start of the film. The busting character. Ed while staying Bill junior is decide. This incompetent Sort of a guy cat do anything widely. Nothing that his father that considers that's important but by the end he's saved the day using maybe some belief in himself and some skills that he's let along the way being on the ship you know the first time he's on the ship everything he touches making the move when it shouldn't it's bad. He falls out of the iphone on his ask This is fantastic acrobatic sacred. It's not a big one. But between what he's being pushed around rabbi's father on the boat onto the dock that some really strong acrobatic skills which took back to vote. Vote is just like that. The overall academics film compared to other films The phone that we spoke about this time. I was with you. Mike was a sons struck. The family friendly vision of mike in fright is like groundhog Thiru even once over the cookies. Nasty into the with chief brompton. I love a story way. The character is one type at the of the beginning and then he finds nobody ever finds is carried. Joel he changes in some way by the end of the film. i put. This is the first but it certainly italy example off the top of out. I'm a sucker for that. So the story. He kind of comes into his own in to me one of the funniest sequences which is when his father ends up in jail. And buster has baked bread and put all of these files and saws and all this kind of stuff into the bread and his father just doesn't like him at this point now is he's such a disappointment and as father is now in jail and he really shouldn't be and so when buster comes in he's just like i don't want to see the sky get him outta here and buster's like i brought him this bread. I want to give them this and his father's just like no no no get out of here. And there's all of this stuff that goes on. And then eventually mustered takes bernie ripston end off and they just like look inside and the father finally fucking figures out what's going on all my got and then at one point all the tools just fall out and this is where you get. I talked about how. There's not a lot of title cards but you get a great title card that just says something like all. The dole must have fallen into the toolbox. That is a fantastic. That is the sequence way. The father turns around he. He sees all my go here to get me. All you've got a plan okay. And he starts to show a little bit of begrudging respect for his son. But even if you saw that look at that overall theme throughout the film if he would just shy some of that five minutes sequence. It's hysterically financial. I care how many films you've saying about the file being in the this. The original in the best. That was just that was hysterical. I just wanna come back originally to like the pad the film with the father perception of his character. He doesn't appreciate him sid. While you're not a real man. He doesn't like the beret that he's wearing. He doesn't like the fact that he has a ukulele. He doesn't even know what it is. An as christ's sake The the father is talking with his first night. These to dig tough silent guys.

Joel bernie ripston Ed five minutes iphone first first night Mike first time Bill italy mike one point one type christ one of the funniest sequences brompton title
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

09:56 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"To be completely different phone but all the drama could have been saved if the recruitment office had gone and told masticate cacti. Listen you're really important to us as an engineer. But it goes away and he. His his kismet has been deflated. He thinks i'm good. I think i'm too short. I'm not strong enough on this on the net enough and if they'd only gone and told him then the problems to be solved it of course it would be nice film. I loved that. When there's the little guy who gets the draft slip the sign up slip and buster's like wait a second it's like starts feeling the guy's legs off of that like you know. Hey i'm i'm as just as tall as you are. I'm just as built as you are. That was so good. I love that part. I've mentioned chases chases a really so much a part of these films and this film. It's really smart it. I mean this is mad. Max fury road a century beforehand. This is buster chasing after his engine which has been stolen which is going to the north by stolen by all of these yankee soldiers. And he's chasing them and you get to the end of it. He saves the girl gets back in a train. And then he's chased back and it's basically that's your halves of the movie. Like one half is him going. The other half is him coming back but with him. Coming back there's also the war sequence but the chase of him going forward going north of chasing the general all of the ways that the yankees are trying to thwart hem. This chases created some of the most memorable images for me. The whole thing. He at one point hooks a canon up to the back of his train. Car that he's taking and he's shooting at these guys. The first time that the canon shoots it shoots from the back of the train to the front of the train and get this again. This long shot of the entire train in frame. And you get to see the cannonball fire from the back all the way to the front of the train. The thing about this movie is that buster. Keaton is a fucking mad man. The way he moves around on the train he can never just walk. He's always jumping hopping crawling just the way. He moves back and forth between the back of the train in the front of the train. Where he's chopping up the wood and more. He's throwing it in the engine where he's standing on top of the very front of the train where he's down on the cow catcher. I mean that's another one of these amazing images. Which is the yankee soldiers have thrown all these logs or wooden stakes or whatever onto the track and he gets down on the cow catcher and picks up one of these and the way he tosses it at another one and basically plays tiddlywinks with these huge logs and bounces the other one off of the track so that the can carry on with completely unencumbered. Guy could have died from doing that but instead he's just like okay and toss and boom and done. It was just remarkable a cool as a cucumber. The whole time. I it's it. it's absolutely my boggling. There's one scene where eventually gets to rescue this simply girl. I'm sorry i'm not phanor. I'm not man is helping her get in there and he like jumps up and crawls through the window of the like a monkey are slate. My god if i tried during that i would be. You would have to call me concussion. Jones i it would be. It would not be pretty. It would not be a good thing and yeah as his his fluidity of movement is it. It's always on inspiring. It doesn't matter if you watch this ten times you're still just going to be like holy cats when they're on the way down south and it's the engine the fuel car and then a car behind them and he jumps from the car behind them midway onto the fuel car onto where the the would would be firm to chop up and it just incredible. He's gotta jump at least twenty feet on a moving train from the back of one thing onto a lower car. And you're just like you could have crawled. You could have gotten down and moved across but no. He knows that to do that jump. It's gonna make it more exciting so let me ask you this. Do you think the film is actually a comedy or is an adventure with just a few comedic. Bits in it. Because i'm i'm sort of thinking that some of the comedy bits where he falls flat on his ass as he's trying to shoot or something like that we may be superfluous. And if he just had the Just make this action at an actual adventure. Kate comedic bits that work with the action but any of the bits wages sold falls flat on his ass with maybe extraneous. Would you decide. This works is a astrid at adventure thriller. I could see that. Like i said i. I was thinking a mad. Max fury road one. I was watching this towards the end when it becomes the battle. I guess some of the jokes didn't necessarily need to be there. And i think that's what really cause some problems when it came to. The movies appeal to at the box office. One of the quotes was that. There's nothing funny about deaf. Because at i gotta say it's fucking hilarious sequence to me when he is he's there and he's got this sword and the sword blade keeps flying off the handle right this. This would be a major foul on fortune fire. Just this would not pass. He has the sort and he's pointing at the soldier and he's just like hey you need to fire over here and you hear this noise and the soldiers just collapses and then he starts talking to another one and again. The soldiers collapses keeps getting shot. The soldiers keep getting shot by a yankee sniper and he goes to the third guy and the third guy falls over and this is cracking me up but apparently some audiences or critics of the day did not find this funny and this is like you talked about how bogdonovich must have seen this. I know for sure what he allen must have seen this film because this is right out there so much of this right that he takes that sword and point some place else in the handle. The blade flies off again. And that's what ends up killing the sniper but apparently this whole idea of people being shot randomly like this and kind of showing the absurdities of war through this movie or just too much for people to handle at the time as the train sequence bids. I kept on thinking year. Robert zemeckis is a fan of this back to the future straight. Now it's when the bridge collapses was. I thought of the bridge of the we require. I was thinking that i was thinking the good the bad. Oh a little bit. As well. As i mentioned part of the reason why people when this came out had a hard time kind of finding the darker kind of alignments funny and this is that the civil war was a few decades away but it wasn't even one hundred years old but on top of that you had world war one very recent specter and created. That war was a lot more bloody and traumatic for europe than it was for america but there were still american soldiers coming back with stream. Ptsd disfigured like it was it. All wars is nasty. That's obviously an understatement. But while we're one definitely seemed to have a very very debilitating effect on people on the psyche of people had serve it so time and distance can help us find certain things. Funnier a distance from it. If you're somebody who's still going through eh. Yeah it's not gonna be as funny to you. That's that's understandable. I thought it was funny to you. Might and there's also that question of how much this cost in. That could have been poisonous. Well i mean. I'm sure we all remember like i went to waterworld is one of them. But i'm sure we all remember movies that were just costing a lot of money when they are being made or you're hearing about troubled productions. This was semi troubled. Though a lot of our co-directed i read several times where he would basically force the co director out and then re-shoot everything that the co director had done that happened with an r buckle co direction that he worked on it happened with another one. I can't remember if it was. This wonder steamboat. Bill junior but he would just redo things so the redoing of stuff the way that he would improvise come up with new ideas. The forty eight thousand dollars that they spent for the train to collapse on this bridge there were fires that were going on with this because of the the train was and they would accidentally catch stuff on fire on either side of the tracks. Just a bunch of things. Were going on with this movie. I think one of the people onset had their foot crushed by train. Sorry to laugh but just all of these awful things they had to settle lawsuits and all this so the the movie ended up costing seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars and in comparison you look at some of his best earning films and they would make five hundred six hundred thousand dollars and this one costing seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars. You're already taking a big chance at. It's not going to make back. Its money and then when it gets panned by critics and audiences for shirts bake make back. Its money so yeah. This was a major black mark on his career.

Robert zemeckis five hundred Keaton forty eight thousand dollars bogdonovich seven hundred and fifty thousa world war ten times third guy Jones one half first time six hundred thousand dollars one scene civil war one thing one point one hundred years old one europe
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

04:00 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Of all of these brides. That are just so on hammond and need his money so they are just a rabbit documentary. That recommended that we watched that had been the righted by mcdonagh's watching all these films and particularly the dream sequence of sherlock and that china sacred spain seven chances it made me think up began which makes complete sense that he'd big directing this. I mean. obviously. He's a walking encyclopedia cinema. Anyway but the whole scruple set up at the end of. What's up doc. That chase sequence. This know why he wasn't thinking of buster keaton up. Think he'd be watching it. Be thinking of that rather than a foam. What bullish or something like that is it was. It was comedic possibilities of the choice rather than the action possibilities of the chase. So let's talk about the general. Isn't that a lot of films that are close to perfect but this one is very very close to perfect. It's a little questionable these days. That buster is fighting for the south but if we can look past that i think we find a pretty good film here. This whole thing. He wants to join. The army wants to be part of the confederate army and his girl here her father and her brother they immediately run out to join up with the army and once they declare war on the north and i love that he doesn't immediately go running out but then he wants to be front of the line and just all of the ways that he goes about becoming front of the line and that it gets refused and all the ways that he tries to get back into the line and try to pass himself off as something that he's not so that he can get to be part of the army again. This is one of those kind of mistaken identity kind of things where he is being refused entrance into the army. Because he's an engineer and he's more valuable as an engineer than as part of the army and i love this whole thing of how how much he loves his girl yes but he loves his train. I think even more because of that amazing picture that he gives to her of him in front of his end. I love it just like in one way. Committee said that the house was a character of his. This gripe set up shop months again. What i'm talking about framing this beautiful moment where she confronts him Why didn't you enlist in the army. We get shame on the left or on the right the train behind him says his to gripe lobs the trains not gonna let him down but the human love of his life is about to let him dance a anyway namie until you've got that uniform on and i just sort of interesting because as someone who wasn't born didn't drop in america i. I hadn't watched the kim been series. I didn't know a hell of a lot. The civil war is always occur. What's a confederacy of that. I had my guesses. And i read something that said that this is actually based on a true story that was trying to staffed and think the the northern soldiers food kept to the triumph taking beckon executed in the south but the person who wrote the his history book back at the time about this incident had written about it from the northern his perspective and busta. Keaton had said that he found this. And this is something shrew me. He said he'd watch d w griffith's both of a nation and he was quoted as saying something like the new is candy Villains but the southern is never kane and he was inspired by birth of a nation. Now i haven't seen it but read about it. I've heard about it and it just sort of seems bizarre man. Apparently like you know he..

Keaton mcdonagh america china seven chances sherlock griffith both candy Villains civil war one way keaton one kim beckon spain
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:16 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"The street. And then this is big chasing with all these cops and there's even like a cutler longshots way he's walking down. The street is hundreds of cops behind him and he's completely unaware of them in the same thing happens with all the brides who following him down the street. And he's walking up front the so that triangle at the pinnacle and them in the background that gun to the background that sharp and a exactly cooling at a recycled of Happening cops but i do like to think that he will do this better. I can do this on a grand scale Than i did in that film in love that he took what he done in previous films and say right. Let's see how. I can improve on that bike. That funnier meg. More grand in scope. I definitely think that he recycled jokes especially when they worked. We'll talk about this when we get to steamboat. Bill junior but the whole idea the facade falling around him which then We've seen a lot of other films like that. I saw a little bit of in one week that i saw a little bit of in other films where it's just like okay. He's kind of doing this thing. It's not a spectacular as the one in steamboat. Bill junior but yeah the definitely will recycle gags how many trained jokes can get but he definitely shoves them in there kind of thing but the thing is i don't mind and like you said he's kind of recasting it because yeah i saw cops and that was just amazing to see all those cops running after him and i love him running from the brides and especially when his partner is coming up to him and has to run next to him and and like trying to get a message to his partner to to make sure that that he'll be at the house by seven o'clock so that they can get married and yet these bribes just everywhere and every time he turns a corner you think that he's gonna get away but note. There's a whole other group of brides. That are there that are going to attack him. And it just. It's fantastic to see this just endless chase and all of the creative ways that it can get around things. But he's still again is like at the whim of all of these brides. That are just so on hammond and need his money so they are just a rabbit documentary..

seven o'clock one week hundreds of cops steamboat Bill junior
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

07:10 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Yeah you can tell some of this might have been sped up a little but still it's just as all of these near misses with cars and all this and it's just like how is he doing this. You know just careening through traffic like this. There's one point when the he's on a bridge and he's going across a bridge on the handlebars of this bike. And there are two trucks and there's part of the bridge is missing and these two trucks pass each other beneath the bridge. Just at the right time for the biked drive across the two of them. It is just amazing. There's another part where he is on a platform and he's going across in the platform starts to collapse and the collapses just so that it touches the next part of the road that he can continue on with no interruptions. And he's just like how in the hell are you doing this. This is fucking incredible that gag that you mentioned that stuff that you mentioned with the two tracks being set up. It was all very natural at all took place in very quick time. I mean i can imagine it a lot of films way. That sort of action is the thing you get the music build up. You get the shots. Build up Wigan show you something really amazing here. It's just another stunt. Just another part of the story. It's ol- setting the store. There's no big deal made of it. We can still be here talking about it but what really impresses me is. That is just another stunt in a million stunts and it's all very natural part of the story this one part when he gets back to the house at the still sherlock junior at this point and he gets back to the house of the girl in the body and all this and he flies through a wall in kicks the butler and talk about jackie chan. I mean it is just amazing that he flies through this house to kick this guy. It was just like oh my god. This is martial arts way before martial arts worth thing in the us it was just wonderful to see and you're right about those stunts. I mean we would get shots of the trucks. We will get shots of the guys who are driving the trucks all this stuff instead to the point from earlier as far as the he frames these things. We are in an extreme long shot. Seeing the stuff happen seeing these trucks net really realizing why they're there just realizing oh my god. Look at that bridge burgess and then next thing you know you start to see a truck movie. Start to see another truck move. And yeah it's just so nonchalant about we're just going to do this and we're not gonna. It's not that weird Moment in the moment to golden gun. Where roger moore corkscrew the car and you have to like slow it down and then actually play like a corkscrew noise with it which is just one of the most embarrassing moments from those james bond films. I think the issue though with the truck setup coming back to show is. He's playing everything for laughs. It's as much as the exhilaration from saying these things. It's always about the humor. And if he wins. Set it up as you described with a james bond film or any other action film day doing it because this is the thing he had. The joke is the thing so from what. I read in one of the biographies. He was doing two major films a year with two features which at this point what like sixty minutes but still pretty impressive that we're doing all this stuff especially when it is so involved in order to have these things. These incredible set pieces. Incredible stunts this stuff and that he's to turn out one. In the springtime in one in the fall he gets a couple of weeks either side of that for vacation and he's right back to work and he was a little bit of a workaholic. Apparently he wasn't happy with seven chances which was a stage. Play that somebody close to him bought and brought to him and i think tank was. Just like yeah. That's going to be the next film. Keaton manage to do wonders with it. And this is another one where stunts galore but really it takes a while before we get to the stunts. There are a couple of little things at talked earlier about him. Jumping over wall. There's a great great moment where he plays some sort of businessmen in here and his businesses going down the tank and the central thing of it is that he's been named in his uncle's will of getting Seven million dollars if he marries someone by seven pm on the day of his twenty seventh birthday so of course he finds out about this at noon on his twenty seventh birthday. There's a moment where he leaves the business and he's going over to sweet sweethearts place he jumps in this car. And those dissolve the whole thing dissolves and so the cars in the exact same place and it's in front of his girlfriend's house and then he goes inside and asked her to marry him. She misunderstands a little bit. He's dejected. he comes back gets in the car. There's another dissolve in the cars back in front of the business and it's just like this is such a strange thing we're talking about. How surreal some of it is. This is completely surreal. The car never moves by manages to change locations and just stays the exact same space on the screen and it was just gorgeous that he was able to do that. There's this whole eight. Great sort of secrets resent the country club is loading his. Yeah the firm. He's a part of our third. They're about to go really big in the weeds financially in his partner is really late. Okay we gotta get you married. And there's this amazing lawyer. I love this law. Your character ahead look at this actor because he was phenomenal. You wanna talk about a mug. The guy's got the best mug. Best phase snits edwards who who was from austria great. What a great character actor but they basically join forces trying to get him married in like a whole list of women and it's it's hilarious because poor poor buster gets rejected. Why girl after another worker literally. The first girl laughs at him so loudly that other girls are laughing the pointing yadda finally the one girl. You think is gonna go. They her mother comes up and yanks burke out off of her enhancer like a raggedy ann and all the girls like other girls are like the grown women will start laughing at him. One of them's even make it like a little baby rocking thing like yeah you cradle robber. I love this film I do think this is one. We probably wanna give anybody listening. If you haven't seen it a little bit of a warning there is. There is a minor character. That's at after a black phase is a couple of moments through. So he's looking around to see who he's going to marry this. Actually i think two characters in black-faced but the a policeman who's stopping traffic is another minute with its.

two tracks two trucks sixty minutes jackie chan seven pm Seven million dollars Keaton two features twenty seventh birthday two characters one two james bond seven chances one point eight third One one girl first girl
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

05:17 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"It just looked awful and then you see the next short and it had been restored and was like oh my god. This is such a breath of fresh air. Definitely your mileage may vary depending on where you get these things from like if you go out and watch them on youtube who knows what you're gonna get but there are good versions of these around so if you start to watch one and it's not good turn it off. Go find the good version because it does. Exist is a beautiful eureka. Box said of over short films highly. Recommend that one yeah. I think it can't be stressed enough that it's really good to support companies like eureka and keno especially because keno you're right. My keynote is exquisite work. Because it's companies like that that help keep a lot of silent films not only kind of better preserved but also out there circulating anybody listening. You're probably aware that the bulk of silent films that existed are no longer here. We've lost a large part of our of our history as a cinema in this country because of things ranging from prince literally exploding from nitrate. Too bad upkeep fill for a long time was viewed as disposable media it was not viewed as an art form was just viewed as something fund entertaining. Not keep any more. That's why it's important for the prints that we still have these films to you to take care of them and keep them circulating and its support companies. That are doing that. Another thing that. I really liked about some of these prints as well as tinting there would be some. That were just so beautifully tinted. I was watching. I think seven chances last night and the tinting at the beginning there's a montage of Buster in the woman and her dog and each time that go back. The dog is bigger outside of this place where the woman lived. It was tinted and it looked almost like they had tinted the roses and the rose bushes. It almost looked like it was color. Film looked so gorgeous. And then the use of tinting to show us outside nighttime. Different lighting schematics. Just all of this stuff that you can really see how thought out the tinting was and how much brings to the black and white. It was just some of these. Things were breathtaking to see these beautifully. Restored hand tinted or tinted films Just really will knock your socks off. Especially in general there is some ten and also just some of the lighting in that movie. I just thought was cordial us. It really makes you just lay out our tiny. My husband actually the comment. He's like you know it's so refreshing to see something not made. Currently it's a different kind of i candy for you especially like you know when we all get so used to things that are digital or cgi or whatever like it's good to it's good and healthy to kinda go back and see that attention to detail. Because that's the thing way with silent film having dialogue you could hear there was so much more of an emphasis put on the visual too. And that's why you tend to see a lot of actors in that era that visually you have some of them might not even been like the best actors but they have this. These faces these amazing faces. And i i love that i also love visually in these films they frame set up a how a shot is gonna look in is just amazing that in this very early i am. I think he was speaking. Before about the influence. Beyond the physicality that busting must've head on future generations of filmmakers while outside. He probably has much to do with feature film. Mike is thinking about how they frame a shot and it was often for the psychic gag. So for instance. You know spoiler One week that gag set up with the train as it. A house set up on the track. We see the triangle passed in. It's on a different tracks. That doesn't go through the house and then a second light retry from the opposite direction that we never say the house. So it's beautifully set up visual cue. Full the gag. And that's something that he realized. The cinema was a medium that he couldn't use in vaudeville. I think army bachelor rating in this biography. That rid of him by merion made that his father who ended up appearing in his films was Very standoffish about the whole idea of films. I'm not sure if it is. Because he thought it was a passing fad or he it was beneath him that in the playing quite a few roles in design but best realize how you presented. Something was exceptionally important. And i mean. I'm sure there are a lot of other directors who we could credit with that sort of thing. Just there was so much going on in all of these phones that we watched that just looked beautiful and there was a moment in shell junior. And i'm sure we'll talk more about this when we get to the film but is the moment which i'm sure woody. Allen was paying strong attention to for the the projectionist.

Allen youtube Mike seven chances last night One week each time Buster eureka one second light keno ten
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

05:28 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Constantly doesn't seem like the best place to have a kid especially back then like being an actor and performer was not glamorous profession at all i mean you it was still kind of view. Just maybe a few notches above like being a prostitute or a thief lake. Viewed is very very low. The obviously people still enjoyed it. But just the fact that like buster developed live is physical acumen as a small child by being thrown around on stage literally to the point where like his parents were accused of child. Abuse like shit. It's a miracle he only had he really gone to have a bit of a drinking problem. Like the fact that he didn't end up on opium you know are are some shit given just everything. He put his body. I mean how. How did he not die. Like some watching some of these movies. Some of those stunts. That was an era where a lot of stuff people died. Laud people died making literally died making movies back thing because a really renault loss. It was so new it was kind of especially in california viewed as like the wild west at that point. Silent film was the wild west by creatively but also kind of literally. 'cause you know there are no lost. Protect stunt people are actors. So it's kind of like good luck. I could tell certain times where there was padding put down like a few times where he would like especially in I think it's one week where he walks out of a doorway. That's happens to be on the second floor into the first floor. And i could see. There's a little bit of padding underneath the dirt below but yeah he just completely falls out of there. Probably twenty feet almost lands on his head. He knows how to take a fall. To make a fall really funny especially. He'll do that thing where he kind of like land a little bit on his head and his neck twist around so he he makes a fall into like seventeen points of movement is just incredible to see him fall into just move him his body around. We need to talk about this persona that he as we talked about the little tramp a little bat and buster had his thing like the little tramp. He's got his mustache and his campaign and has big shoes and his hat and all that kind of stuff will buster had big pants and this little pork pie hat that he would wear but it was almost all the face and it was just so much about that face which was both incredibly expressive and not expressive at the same time. The way that he could move his head he was just such a great master of the double take he could do double takes like nobody's business and he just like the tramp is kind of that. It was it's almost like bugs. Bunny versus daffy duck you know like bugs bunny's in control of things and he's always the one that's pulling the strings making other people look like is that's a very much the tramp to me whereas daffy duck is acted upon and that was buster for me was he was always upon even when he was playing like a rich person. Somebody in the lines of society. Those kind of things bad things would happen to him and it was always a matter of how ridiculous situations would get and he never was in the films that i've seen. Anyway he was never really a villain he was always just this guy who shit happens to any root for him because you know that he's been wronged and you're trying you know you really feel for his character to your point how the you really care about the characters that buster played even when he was wearing that pork pie hat and just kind of out there. In the to reeler's. I saw one where he was. A blacksmith and his boss was just a complete dick to them. So you're just like okay great. Let's watch sky. Hopefully you could just come up and you always felt for this character. That he played he has such a vulnerability about him. You totally nailed it. Because he's so he's even recalled it the great stone face. he's so his eyes are expressive. And just like when he's longing for love you long with him and you want him to get the girl and there's a few films were so much shit batch. It happens to him. I get like uncomfortable. I gotta be honest. There's there's at least. There's one moment sure like junior. I had to go to kitchen. Spirit people out you know. There's nobody else in the world. Like buster keaton. There's a lot. There's a lot of people that are influential. A lot of artists who influential and and you could see bits of them and others like oh. That's this generation's equivalent to sell in south and even though busters influence a lot of people. I don't think anybody can touch exactly what he does like. Jackie chan can do the physicality and he's brilliant at it and i love janke on. But he shanke chan- like he's his own thing As he should be you know in my notes actually came up with an amazing title if somebody wanted to do like saucy fan fiction on buster keaton acrobatic right. He's climbing on surfaces. All this and so. I figured it should be called climbing daddy but also the fact that key into this day has such a huge fan base for silent film. Actor is still have that kind of relevant. I mean he. His fan base are.

twenty feet second floor first floor california Jackie chan one week seventeen points janke shanke chan both buster keaton daffy one moment double take double takes daffy duck one buster films daddy
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

08:07 min | 6 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"The first time i got to see any of his films and this will be explained a little bit more in the interview that you here in the middle of the show was back a thinking not in ninety nine or two thousand. Yeah probably would have been about two thousand way. A local band called the blue grassy knoll had a performance on at alec elastic theater here in melbourne like food several years. They unsan for boston films. And a think on that screening max. I'm always bringing him into the story and we went to see alice. Metality and one week at the cinema was a double fate in the cinema has a capacity of about eight hundred people. I filled up every session over the two week. Run of does films this puts paid to the lie. That old film is hard to watch. solid foam his hat to watch because eight hundred people absolutely wetting themselves as to how funny these films were and the blue grassy knoll Really films really really well and it was just wonderful was with my two and a half to three year old son and he was absolutely pissing himself We always think will a lot of parents think. I'm not gonna to shy to my kids because hide. I can't deal with him. But i convinced that busted put mex- on the road to a lifelong love of cinema. That was just absolutely magnificent. Time side yet but probably Twenty years ago was by intradex to actually watching films. And i wouldn't say i'm what's tons and tons over the years but i have saying quite a few including i think it all except one that we're talking about today I had saying before either. The is i got this. Beautiful boxful was short films which still yet to catch up on all of them. But this is a lotta goldie. How about you heather. Buster keaton's a fake yurt. That i feel like i would see images out of dating back to when i was real little because my mom would always check out books on film history and when we got cable channels like ant back when it actually was like arts and entertainment and not like pond truckers or whatever but show now that actually show late late old documentaries on classic hollywood silent cinema so i would see clips of keen and images and i was just always like that guys. He so beautiful like such a face such a presence and i finally got to see like a whole buster keaton film and when eighteen in college. My film professor. Frank shied showed us the general. Of course i loved it and found out a professor shied actually for years there used to be a bis buster keaton Festival in wanna say iowa. Kansas which is where keating i think was born is born on the area and for a few years they would put on like a little little film festival and delay. Qna's and professor shied actually hosted these events. You can go to the buster keaton society's website and see old pictures of these Do any more and it's like. Oh wow there's professor sitting next to you know. Norma talmadge is great. Great granddaughter is so it's so cool. And what's funny incident later on. The bluegrass dole to talk about this from melbourne. To arkansas actually did a performance at the walmart center in fayetteville were. They did a live accompaniment to sherlock junior. Some friends of mine took into that. Because i know how much film and how much i love bester keaton and it's just been love the i just love it for cy young. He's one of films Best architects as. I'm concerned could just add something they in the interview that you'll be lighted with gus. Mcmillan of the blue he no. He has very vivid recollections of applying playing in the states and particularly playing console out. God like there's this horrible redhead in the said it was the cute one with the red head. What was your first interaction to the great world. Buster keaton mike. He seemed like one of those presents. That have been around while obviously it was around my whole life. I'm more remember. Charlie chaplin and i remember that really caring for chaplain in the whole tramp character and so learning about. Keaton was kind of a revelation for me because i thought all silent comedies were charlie chaplin. I think it was an eighty seven. P. s. was doing a fundraiser. And they showed the documentary series. Buster keaton a hard act to follow which was strict by kevin brownlow. Who we talked about on the. It happened here. Episode and david gill and this was a three parter. It was narrowly by lindsay anderson. And luckily thank you. Morris who sent me links to that and i re watched it and everything was like i just seen it. I remembered lindsay. Anderson's voice narrating everything. It just all came flooding back to me so there were things that i was looking for while we re watching these films that i was like okay. Which one is this. Which one is that and just trying to put all this stuff together. I was really dismayed about the general. Because i had seen the general before but i thought that that gag from the re- while some people say it's a remake of the general. Some people say that it was inspired by the general. There's a red skelton movie called a southern yankee and there's this gag that he does always got half of his uniform blue and half of it's gray and he's got a flag that's the american flag on one side of the confederate flag on the other and he's there these marching between two groups of troops and then at one point the wind changes in the flag changes so that they all start hating on him because he's carrying basically the wrong flag. I thought that was in the general so when it ended the other night. I was like wait a second. Where was that gag. Yeah i saw doc. I was just like oldest buster. Keaton guy seems pretty awesome. And i think i actually saw more of the influence of keaton before. Actually get to see his work itself. I was very into jackie chan films in the early nineties and saw a lot of the gags that he would do in honor of keaton. And as well as harold boyd. And then i would see them in the keaton films and be like. Oh my god. He did this ninety plus years ago. This is so crazy to think that all of this stuff had already been done and just the inventiveness of it all my god. It just floored me how great these movies were in rewatching the general the other day. There was that brief moment my created a gift for they just to emphasize the jackie chain relationship. I mean we're always sort of making these comparisons And jackie chan in terms of physicality of movement. But this one moment way austin's character in the general type of the train and he just beats the stopping at a three guys at once including throwing a real gripe backwards. Kick at one of the guys. He's trying to get on top of him. And i saw my god if nothing else said Had appeal to jackie chan. That bip certainly would if that is so mash. Lots the first match. Lots may be keaton some print. It's just everywhere. It's it's even in places that you wouldn't even think 'cause like jackie chan things obvious but i actually A preparation for this. There's a really cool. Youtube video called the art of the gag. And it's only like eight minutes long but it's about buster and it actually like has side by side comparison of some of wes anderson's films keaton dot granted. I can't being like you know. Hey pick a better filmmaker.

kevin brownlow lindsay anderson lindsay charlie chaplin Anderson harold boyd Charlie chaplin Morris david gill melbourne ninety plus years ago eight minutes Youtube fayetteville Frank shied eight hundred people Twenty years ago Kansas three guys arkansas
"buster keaton" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

07:52 min | 7 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Caning his way over to his record player where he listens to our podcast. Who smashing wax cylinder with a giants. Anyway so the general was rated by the american film institute among the twenty greatest movies ever made. Yeah that being said. The american film institute says the greatest movie ever made is citizen kane terrible. It's on zero babies in that one. So i could see why i m whatever that's nice citizen kane. That's a movie that tries to make you feel bad when rich people feel sad. It's not getting a action on twenty twenty saying that's not about it's it's like it had new techniques exactly that's from a technical perspective put it said it it absolutely does not use those techniques and make a good movie around it right listed with those techniques. Sure they just didn't do it at the same time. Nine new techniques share dead and they've they've managed to leave that up okay but so at the time of its release. The general wasn't exactly hailed as the masterpiece that we now recognize it to be First of all the movie takes place during the civil war and buster's heroic characters fighting for the south now. He said that that was because otherwise he'd be picking on the loser but so what totally allowed when the losers are fucking lewis right. I'm still with difficult. That was not the problem at the time though. The big issue in nineteen twenty six was that it was just too heavy for comedy and also it made jokes about soldiers dying now. Those gags are nowhere near problematic by today sensibilities but at the time. It was very much taboo. Come on dead. Confederate bodies were landing on sheets. Stage i mean come on now good all right so the general was also crazy expensive to film the movies most famous symbols of wooden bridge collapsing under the weight of a train and the israel trained for that scene. They didn't use a minister. There's people moving around in the foreground in every mazing. what's more it was a period piece. So they used this old ass train so they ended. They built an entire bridge just so they could blow up an anti catrine but that was the most expensive aspects of the movie. Buster insisted on using the type of train that they would have back in the eighteen sixties. Which meant that. His train was chucking out burning embers. The whole was happening right so so old. Trains were just throwing hot chick into for all the time. They ran on wood and shit forests. Weren't those trains go so well. They knew how to handle it a little better back in the day. Not so much here. Because one of those embers caught the the forest that they were in on fire and his production company up on the hook for the putting that shit out. Bill yeah well. Oregon needs to swiffer up those leaves. That's mostly and the real unanswered question is what gender was the reveal time. United artists was distributing his movies and after the generals middling box office return. They put buster on a leash so they gave him a fulltime production manager who monitored as expenses. Danny was furious when he took a look at the. First watt. no expense line item for forest fires. This whole Yeah well that's the thing that they vetoed most of more outlandish ideas and we would make two more features with you. A which in my opinion actually are his worst and his best films but by all accounts he hated making him and he felt creatively stifled by as new policies at the same time. Mgm was offering a fucking scrooge mcduck vault signed a deal with them so in nineteen twenty eight. He signed with metro-goldwyn-meyer a decision. He would later call the worst one of his life. Yeah you can't swim in coins. It just hurts. i've been there. I can't dive in so another decision but people who've tried that we're like okay. How a four way not would so but another decision that competed for worst of his life was his first wife. Buster married natalie talmadge in nineteen twenty one just as his career was starting to take off at natalie's family was damn near hollywood royalty. Her sister's norman. Constants were both silent erase stars and honestly. It's obvious why. I challenge anyone alive to watch. Dwi griffith's intolerance without falling in love with constant talmadge. I also challenged anybody to sit through that three hour. Self pitying pieces shit all but but that's beside the point is the marriage wasn't a happy one buster was cheating on her for pretty much the use sound and i do as you and she reportedly got back and by spending about one third of his salary per month on her words. Wrong natty are buckle. Ask he's just like oh not sure why my marriages failing anyway you want to suck my dick or what. Hey look of course. It's an open bar. It's a wedding my mother-in-law you really have a actually real close yeah professionally people professionally so by nineteen twenty six buster and his wife were sleeping in separate bedrooms because his bedroom was already full no room at the end the wrong with separate more comfortable have your own might be all right so but at the same time that is personalized apart. Critics are panning his latest bill. Despite it being legitimately one of the greatest movies ever made in fact if you go by af is list. It was the greatest movie ever made at the time because the other seventeen rank above. It hasn't been made yet so i decided to try his head. Alcoholism is off the stage. Like ed norton data point. This is fun during this so okay so it was at this point that he did a couple of most dangerous and most famous stunts made a career out of hurting himself. Of course it up to including breaking his neck during a scene in junior that would make the final cut. Its in the movie you can watch and break his neck. But if you've only ever seen buster keaton once in your life. The clip you will have seen is his most famous and most dangerous stunt comes from the hurricane. Seen in steamboat built junior is the classic gag out monumental scale where he runs out of the house and then the facade of a two story house falls away up buddy emerges unscathed. 'cause he's standing exactly where the open attic window is now. This is a stunt with the way that they did it at the time where he misses his mark by more than six inches in any direction. He has like a couple of seconds to run to it. He would get crushed he would almost certainly die causes so later on an interviews. They'd ask hey. Were you scared when you did this. And he would say i was blackout drunk grabbed..

Dwi griffith natalie natalie talmadge two story Danny zero babies more than six inches twenty greatest first wife american film institute eighteen sixties Nine new techniques today three hour First both Bill hollywood twenty twenty two more features
"buster keaton" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

07:03 min | 7 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Citation Needed

"So while. I pour another layer of concrete over that fatty arbuckle essay was a little apropos of nothing very mustache. Pete fatty has it co. You're ready to make another movie. Yeah about that in this. One guy fatty he gets a job. He gets a job and a korean. Sorry sorry fatty one. one little. He he happened cross a one day he sees this dame right. She works down and then korean section and he meets her by fallen off the railing. Okay given the current climate. That doesn't seem like a great idea. But then he's like. oh no. i squished right in the cream. So he runs around getting role his friends to say that she was already creaming when he founded like that. I feel like this is like this isn't about the movie but he still cream on his hand cream. That never comes off. No matter how hard he scrubs no matter how often he sees cream wherever he goes it follows them uncomfortable. He hit his head on a dog. What do you think yeah. I think i'm gonna do my own thing. Probably pass buster but the only movie yoga going to be able to make his drop at a house on yourself and trying to stay alive. So what are you say. Wanna join me in the kellogg cream pie. I think i'm gonna go with the house thing. Okay man i'm murdered a lady. Yup got it audience. We are returning. I want you to look very closely into this pan. I took from. Tommy lee jones men in black there. We go fatty who anyway. No what you were talking about. Buster keaton completely guy absolutely. Okay so considering. When we're recording this. I should start by reminding people. That movie theaters were these big rooms. We use burn host. We'd watch superheroes make things explode. It was loud back donna cinema. It was a much different experience. Consider what they were replaced by enlarge. This was vaudeville. Theatres vaudeville gets its name from a french theatrical style but it wound up being almost nothing like that ultimately but it was very generic general audience variety show stuff often heavy physical comedy like juggling acrobatics lot of music but there were also be poem recitals one act plays magicians lecturers strongmen dancers and they would all duly short act. So that if he didn't like what you were watching at the moment you just had to wait a few minutes for some both roll. Baby poetry's dumb. Today we call that tiktok. Everybody tick right late. Nineteen tiktok exactly. So when movie theaters. I started become hours long destinations they kinda mimicked the vaudeville variety show style to a certain degree. He didn't go to see a two hour movie. Rather you went to see a feature film that was going to be like forty five to sixty minutes or so. But that would be preceded by several shorter films. Newsreels action serials cartoons and most notably for this story comedy shorts and generally speaking could watch all of that quicker than you could watch puck and patty jenkins shit. The bed with wonder woman eighty four. Oh if only wonder woman eighty four been about wonder woman having bad thai food and shitting the bad. No allusions better moving right okay. So buster got start doing these comedy shorts which were often the highlight of a night at the theater right. And when you watch the features of the time you'll see why dramatic stuff didn't work nearly as well under the constraints of silent film especially early and dramatic actors. Took a while to figure out how to make the transition from the states. You get a lot of these. like over. Large flourishes clearly designed to show emotion. Somebody twenty four rows back. But it's a fucking close out great so as often as not the feature was just a way to make going to watch buster. Keaton get kicked in the nuts. Sound like it was an intellectual pursuit. Welcome back to america's funniest silent video but eventually we realized it's all about the porn and not the articles. So now we have the pinnacle of buster keaton's art form jackass seasonal yeah. He's not speaking to him anymore. I'll about later on the phone. Yes i would buster. Keaton beating the shit four somehow. If you've never seen a buster. Keaton short. I strongly recommend you correct that you can find most of his stuff for free on youtube and even though it's like nearly one hundred years older over one hundred years old and some instances the comedy by enlarge stance up personally. I recommend you start with one week. Which is over one hundred years old. And his first short that he started Also the electric house neighbors or the balloon tick all all great flex up now. What you'll notice immediately is the racist portrayal of native americans. Have you seen the balloon and take the next thing you're going to notice is that buster didn't just have a great mind for comedy. In a great. I for cinematography. He was also insanely athletic and talented. His movies are just chock full of impressive and often extremely dangerous stunt work and gags include crazy levels of coordination and physical dexterity. There is no modern parallel to the shit that he did. But the closest we've ever been in my lifetime. I would say was like jackie chan and his heyday glimpse into the future. What the new short the electric house and cancer to new comic shorts pooping indoors. And the wife. Who wall pants. It's so funny. The ideas they had of what an electrified house puckett buster trying to go down the up escalator in that house. Funniest things in the history of motion. So good he broke his leg doing that. Oh anyway so eventually. The popularity of his shorts coupled with successive feature films by charlie chaplin. Keaton quickly moved onto multi flicks and while the difference between the modern audience expectations in the film. Techniques of the day are way more apparent in these longer movies. Several of his features are still really accessible. Even if you're not a big fan of old movies a stuff like the navigator. Sherlock junior and steamboat bill. Junior will crack up a modern audience from time to time. And the general which many people consider to be his magnum opus. It's not steamboat. Build better sherlock. Junior was controversial from time to time. Show some guys waddling.

charlie chaplin two hour youtube Today one week Tommy lee jones jackie chan Keaton sixty minutes Junior One guy Pete fatty first short one act forty five over one hundred years old wonder woman eighty four america sherlock one hundred years older
"buster keaton" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

08:30 min | 7 months ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Citation Needed

"House could pull the chain a couple of seconds later and then all four walls was had to like bossed out the fuck and the blueprints in the days before the whoopie wealth is pretty good. But i was hoping he'd make a trap door open in the ceiling of the house. And you'd get shit. Dropped on your head at that magical. You'd be like wh what's going on. Yeah so busters career as an entertainer began at the age of three and that is not one of the according to legend thing. That's a for real thing. His parents were vaudeville. Comedians that did a slapstick act so as soon as he was big enough to fall over they incorporated him into the show. And you know how slapstick isn't funny. When it's a three-year-old. I do not know that neither did eight hundred ninety eight. So the crux of the act is that his parents would put little handles on buster with so little suitcase outfits not with the you pick them up by the handelman chuck him off stage into a sheet more or less harmless objectively funny than a now switch. They added handles. They were like okay. We're not pretty good now. But what about how we get a little more torque if we had a handle also. This is objectively better than american. Handles your luggage to all right. So you may be thinking to yourself who the buck wants to watch a kid get tossed dangerously around and nocco prince shit keith. It's exactly yeah. I wrote it before. He made that confession but it turns out nobody was he and everyone else alive. Make america great again so the actually the abuse that his parents were willing to put him through became the chief selling point for their act pretty soon his parents were feeling buster as the little boy who can't be damned no itself as the roughest act that was ever in the history of the state. Pornhub gonna say that's like a glory hole disclaim with long and short of it. So i wrote that before he medical rise short of it though is that buster grew up knowing how to take a fall. It turned out that was going to help him out both professionally. And personally yeah. Join us for child abuse the musical or is it would later be called the mickey mouse club. Show choir practice for thing. Hashtag freebritney like that joe ping for you thank you. That essay is in our graveyard. If you're thinking to yourself hold on wooden like that lead to allegations of child abuse and arrested the answer to that one's yes from time to time it did but since buster could always show the cops. It wasn't actually hurt very often. They kept letting his dad do it. Of course the physical abuse wasn't the only problem with lifestyle. There was also the issue of buster. Not going to school which turned out. Legal no. Not if you could pretend it's virtual right no. I didn't yeah and figured that out yet eventually. The state of new york forced him to go to school. Though biolo- kelsey just attended for like part of a day whenever they'd make a fuss about it as a result he didn't learn to read and write into lateness. Childhood of course to be fair the falling down practice would prove much more important to his career and not learning to read or write definitely helped move him towards the. I'll probably be fine career path thing. Okay but i think after making his early fame falling down a flight of stairs perhaps reading and writing. We're always going to be like aspirational goal. So by the time he was eighteen. Buster was a rising star in the vaudeville world. But that meant that pretty soon. The sun was upstaging. The father who was surprise surprise a violent drunk compa now eventually decided that his dad's alcoholism was holding it back so the age of twenty one buster and his mother moved to new york from wherever the hell they were at that point and they revamped their act to work without us. See people this is why you don't bring your work home with you. He's like mom. I'm gonna need you to in an alcoholic rage. Throw me into toss me. He's like do seem motivated by not funny. Cancel going through gone too far all right. So after a brief and uneventful stint in world war one. Well excuse me. An eventful stint in world war. That says this is a guy who grew up being thrown around a stage by nine. He's in the trenches bombs man. He's gotta go over the wall. They just grabbed the handle guys mustard gas. I need to. I need to know handle very good. Very good all right honey. The poor buster winds up meeting a man who is going to change his life year is nineteen. Seventeen and roscoe fatty arbuckle was one of the biggest names medium of fix on the there. He was also one of the biggest people in that burgeoning medium to thirteen pounds at birth. That's debut twice the average and didn't get thinner as he got older but despite his size he was a remarkably agile guy and it made him really popular. I involved ville and then as one of hollywood's first superstars now. Eventually fatty arbuckle would go on to be accused of rape and manslaughter. He'd fuck up a whole citation needed episode and he would become industry poison and i should point out that every history i've ever read seems pretty sure he wasn't guilty. But all the histories. I've read were also written. Pre me too so we don't know what happened. What we do know is that fatty was ultimately acquitted. Along with a prodigious apology by the jury for all the shit. He went through along the way so the feeling at the time that it was a false accusation. We have a pretty good idea of what happened. Though i would say okay but but given what we know about hollywood like. I don't know if that tells us if we if we buried that essay in a pet cemetery would it come back as a good version of itself. You think. Jon benet not pet cemetery. I wrote well before all of that in nineteen. Seventeen fatty was a meal ticket. For buster at the time that they met our buckle was under contract with joseph m schenck who is one of the most influential producers in the early film industry and because of their shared past in vaudeville the first time. Buster and fatty fatty was like man. You wanna do this scene with me in this filmmaking. And they did and it's goddamn hilarious. It's more or less improvised. And it's this bit. Where busters by molasses from fatty. You can find it on youtube. The movie is called butcher boy. busters for three and a half minutes in in that three and a half minutes. You can immediately tell the dispute as a star who absolutely understands the medium and also butcher boy the silent film. Absolutely not to be confused with the nineteen ninety-seven film of the same name about an abused young boy with an alcoholic. Father totally finding confused. Yeah batty now. I mean it's depressing to now in. All buster would go on to appear and fourteen of our buckle shorts and the two became close friends but their professional collaboration ended in nineteen twenty one which is when the aforementioned rape accusation. Broken the news now at that point buster was outta comedy partner and fads boss was out of comedy star so shake gave busters own production unit buster keaton productions and set them to work. This would set off one of the most exceptional decades into career of any director in the history of film. Okay.

joseph m schenck youtube two three and a half minutes three-year-old thirteen pounds eighteen new york nine Seventeen world war nineteen fourteen twenty one vaudeville Pornhub first time twice world war one both
'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:57 sec | 9 months ago

'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

"Today is public domain day. As of january first thousands of books movies songs and other material from nineteen twenty five are no longer under copyright protection including the great gatsby. Npr's neda ulaby has more besides the f. scott fitzgerald masterpiece books entering the public domain now. Include mrs dalloway by virginia woolf and classics by sinclair lewis franz kafka ernest hemingway and agatha christie so are other works from nineteen twenty five like buster. Keaton silent film go west and the songs week toward brown now community. Orchestras can play music in the public domain for free scholars will not have to get permission to study. This material and books on the public domain can appear online without charge all part of living cultural conversation that anyone can join netto lippi. Npr news both

Neda Ulaby Mrs Dalloway Scott Fitzgerald Sinclair Lewis NPR Virginia Woolf Franz Kafka Ernest Hemingway Agatha Christie Keaton Netto Lippi Npr News
Kid-Friendly TV Show Recommendations

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

09:29 min | 1 year ago

Kid-Friendly TV Show Recommendations

"I think it's important to clarify. We're doing these recommendations are for very little kids and everything that we are talking about all of the recommendations on this episode our TV and I think there are parents of very young children and people who give advice to parents have very young children who tend to obsess over screen time and how much screen time a toddler should have look. These are unusual times and the first thing that I want to say before I even start doling out recommendations is just to remember that you're doing the best you can. You're doing fine if you need to put your toddler in front of a TV or a tablet and that is what needs to happen for you to stay sane for you to get your work done then so be it. Your kid is going to be fine. Your kid has you. That's what's important wanted to get that out there. I will also go so far. As to say as a person who obsessed about this didn't obsess about it goes back and forth the important part of the best you can is the you can part so if you are stuck on the fact well. The best is only two hours. It's the best that you can do. Given your circumstances your doing great exactly so. My first recommendation is something that my parents put in front of me. When I was very small child back in the seventies which has been fairly recently rebooted for new generations the electric company. The Electric Company is a educational children's program in the seventies it featured such wonderful luminaries as Rita Moreno. It has an extraordinarily charming kids show. That is really focused on education. But does it in such a warm and inviting and pleasant way so the original seventies electric company you can stream it via Amazon? It does cost money. You can find pretty lengthy excerpts of it on Youtube floating around and you know a lot of us who grew up in the seventies. We'll have you know like individual favorite moments from the electric company. I just remember that that was something that my parents really love to have on and around because though it was geared very very much too little kids and they say online. They say that it's geared toward five to nine but I think you can really go younger than that. My parents didn't go nuts watching it now. They recently rebooted the electric company from two thousand nine to twenty eleven. Those three seasons you can stream for free at PBS DOT ORG and As an incentive for parents who listen to this show and have not checked out the rebooted electric company one of the CAST members is William Jackson Harper. Who Played Chidi on the good place incentive to watch the new electric company Occasional guest spots and occasional music composition from one Lin. Manuel Miranda. I'LL AL. Obviously we could go back and forth. Comparing the quality of the two there is no way to compare something. You were nostalgic for as a child with something that is trying to duplicate that magic but that is a marvelous piece of educational programming. That is still entertaining. And that is right up there with stuff like Mister Rogers neighborhood and sesame street and all sorts of wonderful stuff that you can find on PBS kids. Electric Company is just a gorgeous piece of that puzzle. And I don't think it gets as much recognition as it should get especially compared to some of those other classic pieces of programming love it. Excellent Pack Loved Electric Company Berry. What is your first recommendation? We in our family when my oldest was younger and I was pregnant with my second son. It was really imperative for me to be sitting down lying down pretending that I didn't have a child for like two or three hours a day but I also had already watched so much Daniel Tiger which is wonderful and other. Pbs Kids thing. That probably taught me a lot about parenting but I wanted something that I also really liked from the creators of Wallace and GROMIT. Shaun the sheep which I have so many I mean I literally have photographs of both my husband and my then three year old watching. Shaun the sheep and both laughing at exactly the same amount because it is genuinely funny. It is the first thing that I think our family all liked the same amount where we really all were engaged in it in the same way. I you know you're not pretending to love you know Mom Tiger or whatever you're not pretending to be like Mom Tiger. I'm really actually mom. Tigers really haunted me over the years but I will say that Shaun. The sheep is both adorable in terms of its slapsticky laps. But it also looks gorgeous. So if you're not familiar with Wallace and gromit they created these these beautiful claymation sort of handmade aesthetic from our animations and Wallace and gromit. I also highly recommend but it's more of a sophisticated storyline. What's Great About Shaun? The sheep is that they are sort of snack. -able basically it is a brilliant sheep named Sean and the adventures of him and his farmer and his friends and it is genuinely funny. They're all of these little references. That are incredibly sophisticated without going over the head of your little ones. There's a kind of buster Keaton ask quality to it and I can watch them all the time. I really truly do not get sick of Shaun the sheep and my kids who are now as we said six nine still really love them. It's about that and maybe the British bake off are the only things that the entire family can agree on. If you've missed out on it please go back and watch it and you may find yourself watching it even without your children and where we find it. You can find it in a myriad of places. It is on Amazon prime. It is on Netflix. The Shaun the sheep extended universe of both movies and also the Wallace and gromit from the same animation studio are in many streaming places so if you just search Shaun the sheep you will find a gorgeous claymation that will make you. Giggle is a great pick and man. My kids now are nine thousand nine hundred sixteen and at no point in their lives. Has there been more than like a small handful of things that everyone in the family can enjoy at the same level at the exact same time so when you find one of those the love that you experience as a parent for that piece of entertainment is intense. I feel you on this one in a big way. Very very nice excellent. Pick Berry Hartman Steven. You'RE GONNA give us your second pick and This is not surprise. Me Buddy well. This one is specific to one of my kids particularly my older kid my son. Jona when he was little he obsessed over a cartoon that I watched as a kid called the wacky races and the wacky races were a very short lived. Hanna barbera cartoon aired in late. Nineteen sixty eight and a little bit in early sixty nine and then has kind of lived on in reruns. There's a DVD set that has like the complete collection of the wacky races. Hanna barbera cartoons are pretty primitive. You're talking about children's TV in the late sixties. You have some kind of squeaky gender stuff. There's like one female racer penelope pitstop. Who's like more concerned with her makeup than with racing? It has that name is amazing. Insert pitstop into my middle name. Very pitstop hardiman stuff hardiman The thing is though there's something about the way. This particular cartoon was structured where each episode of the show all of these goofy characters. They were the same characters. The plot couldn't be simpler. They're racing and at the end of each episode. One of the racers wins. There's a bad guy racer named Dick Dastardly. And his side kick Mutley. Who has that famous? Little wheezy laugh and my son who was obsessed with numbers kind of obsessed a certain amount of scorekeeping managed to latch into it. Not only as a piece of like fun cartoony entertainment but kind of latched onto it as like a statistician almost and really got obsessed with it. Even though there were only seventeen episodes he just watched them over and over and over again. Now the wacky races have existed in a couple of different forms. There's a wacky racist game for the we. The kids also played. This is also like electric company is one that got rebooted and it got rebooted a few years ago and once again if you're obsessed with the nineteen sixty eight version you're gonNA watch the version from twenty seventeen or two thousand eighteen and roll your eyes because it's not the exact entertainment that you grew up with but you look at the voice cast on this rebooted wacky races. It's Tom Kenny WHO's TV. Spongebob Jill Talley who's also voiced from. Spongebob she's also from Mister. Show like Tom. Kenny and Billy West. Who was stimpy. He was fry in Futurama. You have some really lovable voice. Cast working with this show. So lucky races isn't necessarily the top of very many people's list as far as like high quality children's programming but it was really important in my house and really had this nice kind of cross generational appeal where I got to feel nostalgia watching it and my kids hooked into it in ways that even I never did

Electric Company Shaun Wallace Amazon Loved Electric Company Berry Tom Kenny Hanna Barbera Mister Rogers Cast Youtube Rita Moreno Buster Keaton Daniel Tiger Netflix Jill Talley Manuel Miranda LIN Berry Hartman Hardiman William Jackson Harper
Electronic Television: The Great Depression And The World's Fair

American Innovations

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Electronic Television: The Great Depression And The World's Fair

"It's nineteen thirty. The world is stuck in the early stages the great depression many Americans lift their spirits at the new moving picture shows in theaters and nickelodeon 's Buster Keaton Charlie Chaplin comedies. These films are often introduced with Mickey mouse cartoons or newsreels one newsreel in particular dazzles the audience with the promise of soon bringing these new moving picture shows into their very own homes presents. A backstage preview television the newest miracle of modern Electrical Engineering Mr penalty shown shown at the right is working on the image dissect to photoelectric camera. Tube of his own invention that distinguishes his system of television from others. It is said to be responsible for the most clearly defined television pictures placed in the second of this receiving system is a funnel shaped cattle due the round flat surface of its bulb becomes the picture screen in Studio Monitor. It does it as well. As in home receiving sense the image detector Tube and the Cathode Ray tube are the heart and brain system. Television Vilo Farnsworth's image to sector tube and camera system had finally brought the long anticipated picture radio into being station equipment. The electrons become radio impulses to broadcast and picked up by receiving sense where the routine is with us. The radio impulsive becoming points of light that appear on the screen as picture thirty pictures. I completed every second. These earliest television programming was live performance music and sound accompanied. The OBAMAS was action both visible and audible elements going on the air in perfect synchronization battling with the speed of light to amaze of tubes and equipment. The show leaves the station send the towers viewed by the television public and audience as yet small and comparatively ignorant of the research and experiment. That makes it possible rush to see and hear people many miles away watching this newsreel in the movie theater. The audience is intrigued but sceptical. The most fanciful dream of mankind is day startling reality destined to become the world's most popular science in one thousand nine thirty in San Francisco. Two years have passed since Filo funds worth with help from his wife. Pam Gardner and her brother cliff triumphantly showed off off a working prototype of electronic television. Violence picture was on the front page of the San Francisco Chronicle under a headline that called him a genius is name was being being mentioned in newsreels magazines journals and the Associated Press but he hadn't yet found a manufacturer to partner with so financially files fortunes agents hadn't changed Penn gave birth to their first son. Filo T farnsworth third the previous year and a second son. Kenny would follow in nineteen thirty one but now a curious envelope in the days male brings a new possibility. You got a letter here. Filo says it's from New York I can't believe. RCA is offering one hundred thousand dollars for the image sector would. That's wonderful that exactly pam they want to own it outright i. It's not ideal but one hundred thousand dollars is a lot of money. Not compared to what television will eventually be worth. It's a mistake to cash in too soon like this. We have to keep the faith. I understand. Filo it's your invention that's Pammy. It's not it it never was. It's it's all of the great minds that have come before to make this possible. And it's you it's cliff. All of us were a team but they wanna buy our work and call it. There's it's just not fair. They can license it if they like. I've spent my entire life working towards this Pam. It's like it's like trying to sell one of our children. The Lord will provide Filo a a few weeks later. The farnsworth's receive another big opportunity with visit to the lab from United Artists. The Film Production Company was Silent Age Film Stars like Charlie the chaplain. Douglas Fairbanks D W Griffith and Mary. PICKFORD PICKFORD is especially enthusiastic. We just had to see this amazing new television system. We've heard so much about it. But when the time comes the image to sector won't cooperate Filo is rattled. I I'm sorry folks. This is humiliating million chaplain smiles. Don't sweat it. I've seen worse like Douglas's latest picture a few hours later. After the stars leave cliff finds the problem on a wire wasn't plugged in it. Was that simple Dan. How did I not see that Pam tries to reassure him? Mary Pickford was here. We were all a bit distracted. It did keep the faith Filo when a third opportunity knocks a few weeks later Filo is determined to answer the call this time. FILC who radio in Philadelphia. They they they want to license the Patents Fund our research. But it'll still be ours with some help Vilo at Phil Co so in Philadelphia moving from the bay area to the city of brotherly love. What do you think it sounds great? And so the Farnsworth family packed packed their bags with their belongings precious equipment and board a train to head across the country to Philadelphia Pennsylvania. His family counting on him. Kylo could only pray he was making the right decision.

Filo Vilo Farnsworth Cliff Filo T Pam Gardner Mary Pickford Philadelphia Charlie Chaplin Pickford Pickford Buster Keaton San Francisco Chronicle San Francisco Nickelodeon Obamas New York Pennsylvania
List of copyrighted works entering the public domain in 2020

The Takeaway

04:16 min | 1 year ago

List of copyrighted works entering the public domain in 2020

"As the clock strikes midnight on new year's eve get this thousands of copyrighted works will finally entered the public domain and that includes books movies music all sorts of creative works that were first published in the U. S. in nineteen twenty four and if you're a little hazy on came out that year here's one the first movie adaptation of Peter Pan okay yeah we would have had a clip for that but that one was a silent film but also one of the things coming out this year blues legend of ma Rainey song CC right I'm enters the public domain it means it's no longer protected by copyright and the public can use and consume it without permission and at no cost and without the public domain we wouldn't have so much art that rests on the work of authors like Charles Dickens and William Shakespeare and these mass expirations used to happen every year in nineteen ninety eight though Congress passed the copyright term extension act it extended copyright protections for existing works for twenty years January first twenty nineteen so the first public domain dump since nineteen ninety eight for more on this host and you have a your recently spoke to Jennifer Jenkins a clinical professor of law and director of the center for the study of public domain at Duke University Jennifer thanks for joining me thanks so much for having me on the show tunes in so give us a couple of examples of maybe more of the popular works in the public domain and that some of our listeners might be familiar with well works from before copyright existed such as the works of Shakespeare the works of Mozart the works of Beethoven the works of Charles Dickens all of these are in the public domain and your listeners might be familiar with them because if you think think about the contributions of Shakespeare to our culture because Romeo and Juliet was in the public domain letter bursting was free to write West Side Story the movie's Gnomeo and Juliet and for me unless di did not have to get in touch with his errors and they were not subject to a veto and Shakespeare himself through in the public domain before him Romeo and Juliet you on Arthur Brooks the tragical history of Romeo and Juliet which in turn on all of its Pyramus and Thisbe and so your audience may be able to think of you know scores of works that drew on public domain material when something is not in the public domain what happens then because I understand that the song Happy Birthday was not in the public domain isn't that interesting it is now when something's not in the public domain that means that if you want to use the work you have to locate the copyright holder and you have to get permission from the copyright holder is welcome to say no are they can charge you a fair fee or they can charge you an exorbitant fee now this is a good thing copy rights are very important the public coming in as the yen to the gang of copyright protection so the design of the copyright system is there will be a term of copyright protection when you meet any of us you know enjoy exclusive rights over creative works then after a certain period of time that copyright expires in those works go into the public domain where anyone else is free to use and build upon them so there's some work entering the public domain and twenty twenty what might people be excited about what's coming into our public domain wonderful music so my favorite musical piece going to public domain is George Gershwin's Rhapsody in blue some literary works Thomas Mann's the magic mountain EM Forster's passage to India wonderful children's book a a Milne when we were very young there are also some wonderful silent films works featuring Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd silent film called Dante's inferno which itself to a public domain works Dante's divine comedy of course but also intermixing that with elements from Charles Dickens and the Christmas Carol so they're really great works going to the public domain next year and I know a lot of us are very excited about that so if

"buster keaton" Discussed on Couples Therapy

Couples Therapy

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Couples Therapy

"It's like Marx brothers. Well, those aren't we love even here Paul. We love Chaplin and Buster Keaton, and those you know, he hates chaplain, but I like chaplain I get into. Keating more. Keep more doesn't mean. I hate to. I love Chaplin. No. But it's true. It's it's true. We do we do like penalty origins of modern comedy at technicians and a lot of ways love the the the actual structures skills. We have we have definitely a love of physical comedy. You don't not a lot of people think that way. Yeah anymore. I don't think. Yeah. As much as they used to, you know. Yeah. The struck the really good physical gag is beautifully structured perfect craving. Yes. Because it translates everywhere in and people don't know that it's not just falling down. It is about is about building attention to the fall. And. Yeah. And what comes after the fall? It's like, it's a very it's a very beautifully structured thing. A good fall. Yes. And if you knew how hard those guys used to work on that perfect timing of that thing. And it's like, it's a lost thing doesn't really I don't think people really do it very much anymore. Don't think about it. You know, except for those. Is there any physical comedy Johnny Knoxville? That's the west. But that was like, yeah. That's almost as the world game to physical comedy. Make you laugh and jackass. Yeah. I'm too squeamish to watch it. I never watched it. I don't like people getting hurt too pathetic. Because then I feel it in my body again hugging himself with his hoodie actually worked on jackass the movie That the. the the routes things for the second season than they ended up in the movie, and yeah, so thinking of hey, let's see what happens when this guy hits himself in the nuts with a sledgehammer. Oh, the wait is that real to that actually happening much worse than no? Okay. Who still has not we got more. Exactly him sweating. Johnny Knoxville's all over the bogdonovich. Buster Keaton documentary would he really is? Is he He is is he he. in fan? I think I think it was also wait for bugged on its to try and bring the young folk kin folk. In their forties. If. Knoxville? That's the young young people weren't dead yet, folks. And that's young folks to me. Wow. That's amazing. The other guy Harold Lloyd says name was the third of the great, gene third. Loyd was an absolute genius. He was he was missing some digits. You had people don't off in a in a gag any wore fake, we're fake hand. So he's the original jackass yet pretty much index finger off well doing a like a gag in one of his movies. So a lot of people might know the image of a guy hanging off the clock over a city street. That's him. But he was doing that with a fake hand. Oh, so he was an amazing guy. Netted dedicated to the cause because a comedy. It's a cause it is would you? We're wrapping up, but would you give anywhere? Would you give a finger for comedy? Now. It's funny because I actually did a show recently with a comic who was missing a finger and she talked about, but she like didn't tell it didn't talk about the end, and then was kind of vague. And I was like give me the full finger story. I went into the mole story of how you lost this Bangor. And I thought about it, and like your stories one, my favorite porn film. What What I I said. said. And I was like, yeah. It's kind of tasted. Yeah. And yet, you know, you gotta jump in. I mean, she and I thought it was like I got finger story. My first night in prison meant to prison law. I'm sorry. It happened a lot that you kept going to prison. I'd only paying taxes. Who does tax season is now let's right in it. You gotta stay in the US. You gotta stay in the US. Thank you so much for being thanks. Oh. How do you feel? She said retire..

Johnny Knoxville Buster Keaton Loyd Chaplin US Knoxville Keating Marx Paul Harold Lloyd Bangor
"buster keaton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Are. You know? Thirty or something or Buster Keaton. Probably I came up with. Yeah. He moved to piano or two in his day. You want to talk about the in Soviet Georgia yogurt campaign real quick. Yeah. I actually did not get to see that. So you can teach me. Okay. So in nineteen seventy seven Dannon who really is almost single handedly responsible for bringing yogurt in making it popular in America in the seventies. They came out with an ad campaign called in Soviet Georgia where they went to Georgia one of the Soviet Union's republics at the time and found like hundred plus year old people who were still vital inactive and said, hey, can we film you like bailing hay? And then afterward you'll eat like a nice Cup of Danan yogurt and people will say, hey, that's great. I want to be bailing hay at one hundred five like this person. And it was kind of risky at the time. Because this is the cold bore the late seventies the Soviet Union. The United States. We're not friends but to advertise to the United States the sent their add people to the Soviet Union. And it just went off. It was total hit like Danan their sales were in the gutter and all of a sudden there's just back on top, and it's actually credited with kicking off this. But we think of now is like normal, but the yogurt craze that started in late seventies early eighties and continued on in his finally gotten to the point where we're actually starting to eat healthy yogurt that was that commercial in Soviet Georgia. Crazy. Yeah. They found one guy who was eighty nine. And they said his mother was one hundred and fourteen and they film them in one of the commercials. And they said he he ate two cups in a made his mother, very proud. But he's eighty nine was the big joke hundred fourteen men all from eating yogurt and need to get on it. Anything else if I wanna live to be one hundred and fourteen you gotta start eating some younger in don't forget the Honey God, could you imagine me at one hundred and fourteen. Yeah. Actually, I can now that you mentioned nobody wants that. I could totally see that. You'd be like I'm back to the whole pizza in whole thing. Ice cream thing. Scream. I wanna stay in back. Well, this one had a lot of farting poop jokes. Yeah. Well, I'd happens. Well, if you wanna know more about yogurt, go eat some yogurt, you'd think good stuff. Learn to love it in your stomach will be happy. Whether science can prove that it is or not. And since I said that it's time for listener mail. All right. I'm gonna call this self profess medieval list sky, Stephen gray wrote in and he's from Melbourne Australia but living in London now..

Soviet Union Soviet Georgia Buster Keaton Georgia United States Danan Stephen gray Dannon London America Melbourne Australia two cups
Jesse Widener of Klamath Film

Herald

05:40 min | 3 years ago

Jesse Widener of Klamath Film

"Heralded news news learn is now. Empowering the community base, slow the news, your news with falls, Oregon. Empowering the community and serving mclamb basin. This is the the news facing us pop. Greetings and welcome to base views heralded news podcast featuring interviews with local experts discussing issues important to the climate basin. I'm kirtland key with the herald news this week. We're joined by Jesse Widener Klamath film here to discuss one of my favorite topics, movies, upcoming events, such as the annual climate independent film festival and a special screening with a very special guest coming soon. Jesse, thank you so much for taking the time out of your schedule to join us here. Well, we will get into everything that Clem film entails and just a little bit. But I always like to start these things off a little bit of background on our guests themselves. Can you educate us a little bit more about who Jesse Widener? Sure. So I've actually got a fairly wide arts back there used to work as a draftsman architect California for about seven years before I moved up here, I've studied music composition, do some drawing some writing. I practiced photography for several years before I started getting into the film thing. So the film thing actually really comes from being the sort of great medium. It's an amalgamation of all these other disciplines that you. You can do kind of throw all these different dispirit interests into one thing. So what was the first video project that you worked on? The first project was probably the first project I did with Klamath film, and it was on one of those old. I don't say hold the nineties hand held nineties early two, thousands of Devi Cam with the digital video tape. And one of the first things I learned was that the screen on it is not as it shows brighter than what the actual film was. So I was exposing to the screen and when I actually took the footage home to work on, it was so dark. I had to crank everything is still looked nasty and black, and it was horrible. I'm from Hollywood is well, I grew up in Eugene, but I spent a long time in Hollywood and those Devi cameras there fuzzy because when I was working on a lot of projects, some of those cameras were fifty thousand eight hundred thousand dollars now that everything's gone digital. They're selling those things on EBay for one hundred bucks. People can't get rid of them. Yeah, yeah, ours, ours is more of a consumer grade one though that we were. We're using it was, you know, like something you'd pick up Fred Meyer or whatnot, and it just wasn't that hot and me not knowing what I was doing with it was even worse. So well, one thing that I have found fascinating being involved in film is the number of people like yourselves that got involved in simply by doing, didn't have formal Bagger. There are film schools that people can go to, but lots of times people just get involved when it for the sake of having an idea grabbing a camera and giving a try and kind of learning as you go. Right. That's a funny thing because I think you know, obviously the film industry is still young, maybe one hundred years, old hundred twenty years old. Just you know, it's not like painting or something like that, and it's been a master apprentice industry for a long, long time. You know, you start working on a film as gopher basically, and work your way up. And then at some point you did start getting into the film school stuff with that sort of seemed to be the advice path go to films go, go to USC, go to southern California, whatever the case maybe and then it not in the last probably twenty years with the advance. In technology with the internet, having all of these YouTube videos, and there's several channels that teach you how to do all these filmmaking techniques or whatnot. I think it's really democratized and commodities that industry where you can just from your house, you'll get a five hundred dollar camera. It's amazing compared to anything from, you know, ten twenty years ago and then sit on YouTube for your to do stuff. You know, the technology's advanced, but what's really fascinating to me as just a fan of film in general. I love going back to the old silent film era, the little black Charlie Chaplin Buster Keaton and stuff like that. And you look at the things that they were doing. They were inventing how films are made then. And while the technology may have changed the method for creating film really hasn't and over the course of a century, right? Yeah. The structure is generally isn't actually, I have a slight complaint about structure of fill. You know, when when film for start out, you're talking late, eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds and nobody really knew what to do with it. You know there was this massive creativity of, you know. What? What wild things can I do? You know what weird effects can I do? How can I freak people out that never seen something on screen like this and somewhere in the teens, the nineteen teens. It's sort of took on this the purpose of films to tell a story. And I think it's really been pigeonholed in that one hundred years. You know, it's it's like saying the purpose of painting before there was photography. The purpose of painting was to be as realistic as possible and the medium geared towards that realism until in the eighteen hundreds of the camera came out and they realize somebody could just snap a picture. So you know what was the point of painting now that's when you saw painting expand into, you know, pression ISM and surrealism and Dada. ISM cubism and Jackson Pollock jap- technique and all this kind of wild stuff. And

Klamath Klamath Falls Oregon Portland Ralph Dr Ralph L Las Vegas Writer Eccles New York Siskiyou County Tula Lake James Ivory San Francisco Steve Buscemi Jesse Widener Reisen
"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"buster keaton" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"And they're predictable and he's he's has a legacy you know i think jim carrey's elect more of a legacy of jerry lewis than charlie chaplin sure yeah absolutely and that's too bad that there aren't legacies i can't think of one legacy of charlie chaplin can you guys i can't think of one person that now you know i mean it was zoos tatty but nobody since no absolutely not knowing and i would say jackie chan was more a student of buster keaton yes charlie chaplin yes you know the only means for these are the dancers these for ballet dancers these precision diamond cutting perfectionists i just think they revision arrogance and i'm not saying the jerry was there wasn't because i do think there was something that he saw and i do think that he loved comedy mike i've said i'm i'm i'm in better lover of the guy uh uh also you know what i was really touching uh i i used to be one of the people who make pundit of you know the idea of the david clown cried but i then i saw footage of somebody did you see this right japan buddy yeah it came out and say here's the order right yes a few years ago they released him footage but but somebody to festival actually asked hammond said why when will you ever released with all your fans who love you so much all we are is suria's queen love you and he said i will answer this question i've never answer it before because i'm ashamed i'm ashamed this was not a bad comedy about a company that is in trouble this was a bad comedy about the worst black hist moment in history and i missed and we have to be allowed to miss and and you don't have to share a bad record you don't have to release and you shouldn't have to release a bad movie in but i did was bad yeah and it was the most nakedly honest and this was recently.

jim carrey jerry lewis charlie chaplin jackie chan buster keaton hammond suria mike i japan