39 Burst results for "Business School"

Fresh update on "business school" discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

00:37 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "business school" discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Of the church that are open and you know. We had seating for two fifty. They all this. We ran out of seats. There's probably about four hundred people. There are some of the you say well. Why did you do that well. There's a little bit of. Ocd there or that. We have the forget me successful. We gotta be pigheaded about the gathering of people and jason. You're working out a lot of people. Said i'm working out but another pandemic i don't work out right now. Twenty twenty. i'm not gonna work out this year. Abrek you know it's bad for your immune system to not work out. What's bad psychological. Psychologically i'm not saying you're a psychologist but jason. What's bad for us. Psychologically if you were to take a week off oh dude. I would be in a very dark place. I love getting to train. And even though i only do it three days a week. It's great because my schedule's monday. Friday saturday so monday. Everybody always has a case of you know moon news moon. I worked at a great place. So i don't feel that but even then like my mondays are back to back from the second. Get in the off. You're busy gut exactly and so When when my first training session starts at the first day of the week all that business. I now get to throw into my workout. And i get to kind of clear my head which sets me up for tuesday wednesday thursday and then i'm ready to go and then friday and saturday that release again. All of that time spent focusing on everybody else's needs. I now get to kind of just release in in throwing weights around it You know my epp is epinephrine. Epinephrine epinephrine levels go up. My body feels great. I feel so much mentally more clear. When i'm working out. Did you say effort whenever you finish working out. You're up effort levels go. This is a real thing breakfast. He making this up. Well yeah. I mean absolutely definitely plays a factor but the endorphins and kathleen releases really more. Why kathleen Wait a wedding. You guys are using many syllables. Let's okay no what endorphins endorphins..

Friday Saturday Monday Mondays Friday Saturday Jason This Year Two Fifty Twenty Twenty Epinephrine Second About Four Hundred People Three Days A Week First Day Tuesday Wednesday Thursday First Training Session A Week Kathleen News
Culture Myths and a New Science of Culture  Dr. David White - burst 04

A New Direction

05:14 min | 2 d ago

Culture Myths and a New Science of Culture Dr. David White - burst 04

"At the top. Okay david. Help me out here wool. You mean culture doesn't are you saying culture doesn't start at the top so the prevailing wisdom is that the leader says the culture right. This has been true. And it's the most complicated mantha one eyed about the most inc to Because it's the one that's most pervasive is most entrenched in our in our society and for good reason right. I go into a lot of his historical lot of it. Is this country. America founded on this sort of faith of the individual of pia rugged individualist myth right Quaker cavernous Protestant settlers from europe in england. Who came over in the seventeenth century. You know believed firmly in the in the power of the individual leader to make change happen. All that carried forward into our society today The problem is that there is almost zero evidence in anthropology and other related social sciences. That supports the idea. The leaders somehow set culture create culture cultures. Form perfectly well without leaders. Any group tasked with any any task though cultural form generally speaking of the former around the task. The the the thing that you're doing now i as i get into in the book. The this myth about leadership came became super prominent in the late seventies early eighties. Because corollary to that. I mean along What was going on that time. Is that Folks in the business schools were discovering researching that this idea that basically humans in organizations are unmotivated people. Basically don't need you know need to be directed and manipulated in cajole to work to get work. Done that idea which had been around. Since you started the twentieth century was debunked in the late late sixties early seventies mid seventy s by researchers at mit and other universities in the idea the new idea of management. Was that essentially. If you could unlock the human potential of the individual you know and let them flourish in organization. Great things will come. You don't need to sort of manipulating coercing control and direct people to do work because people actually need their creativity unleashed so that was the famous so-called theory of motivation of organizations talk. The douglas mcgregor stuff like three x three x theory. Why right was the was the whole idea. So theory why. When theory y became the de facto new way of thinking about management in organizations culture became the convenient vehicle to enable theory y so in other words if you just let if you just create the right culture in the organization good things will happen and that's the simplest way of saying the most most predominant Myth that has lived with us to this day. That if you just make make the right. Climate make the right environment. Good things will happen in the organization. A very compelling myth. It's very well intended and got a lot of. There's a lot of good to there's no question there is. it doesn't support it right so huge you list five problems with why this myth that culture starts at the top is an issue problem. You leaders of overestimate thrown influence problem. Too complex change is not happy through individual influence problem. Three for leaders beliefs take hold in the organization. They have to be there to begin with and four cultures not the summer personalities and problem five language alone does not change culture and your research the research that well not just your research with research. That's been done here in cognitive anthropology has kind of blown open this idea that you know as leaders. We probably don't have nearly as much influence as we think we do. When it comes to culture because culture is going to exist with the leader. That i am i in that well said Because i think i think i consult businesses to and every because we need to change your culture. You change you your culture your culture you. You didn't create it. It happened right. It's kind of an organic thing. Isn't it in reality. Well as i as. I write about the book. It culture is as we'd like to say culture follows task right. The common way of thinking about it is that castles culture might just set. The culture in the task will actually goes the other way around what you do. This is the cognitive science of culture in on the brain. What you do shape how you think and to some extent you know. We talked about this cognitive science and culture being kind of academic kind of newfangled but in some ways. It's incredibly intuitive. You know this is culture shapes how you think so.

Mantha Douglas Mcgregor David England MIT Europe America
Fresh update on "business school" discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

01:07 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "business school" discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"A lot not. Just hey billy billy. Where were you going this weekend on hanging out with my good friend jeffrey. Epstein's incredible. I mean did you travel on the plane with them did you did you did you. What would you do. Why would you do that. Billy billy why would you do that. I i think he's kind of guy. Epsteins got a good guy. So again i would just throw it out there. Folks you become the average of the five people you spend the most time with and people try. Make excuses for it to like you know. It's not it's not all that bad. They have redeeming qualities. So kind of like The bill gates example one of the stand up comedians. I really respect Hannibal birth his joke. Where he's like. Can you imagine being the best friend of a serial killer when you have to give the eulogy one expecting people show up to the funeral anyway but you walk up. And you're like you know. Karl he wasn't always killing people like like. How do you follow up to that. That's the one thing you can say. And so people get caught up in the gay. He's my cat. i mean. I'm just saying i want people to know this proverbs thirteen twenty. Somebody should write this down proverbs. Thirteen twenty somebody should write it down. He that walk with the wise chubby wise but a companion of fools shall suffer harm. This is so important so important. Somebody should write this down. You say clayton. Ocd about yes. Do not let idiots into your life. If you put an idiot in your life everything will fall apart. And i read this book back in the day called think and grow rich and this book called thinking grow rich by napoleon hill. If you want to mispronounce his name you could say it's naperville leeann. But his name is napoleon hill i need. They want to mispronounce for naples. Leon want to mispronounce this at home. The you can say nato leon says burning desire is what he says. Napoleon hill wrote in an thinking grow rich. He writes a burning desire to be able to do. Is the starting point from which the dreamer must take off. Dreams are not born of indifference. Laziness or lack of ambition. You've got to have a burning desire and when you have a burning desire. Does it seem like you might just have an obsession. Dr brek absolutely yeah. When did you decide that you'd become a chiropractor. Oh goodness that would've been Back in nineteen ninety nine. How long did it take you to graduate. How many years So i actually kinda accelerated the process. So i got my undergrad done in three years and then carpet school in about three and a half. So is about six and a half altogether. So i'm gonna do is i'm going to recalibrate on today's show The definition of what phd in ocd. Me i want to give him a good definition. Sure i wanna rebranded them a little bit here but then took you in how many years again was about six and a half just year round. So it's kind of obsessive. Did you have to have some obsession. You yeah i mean. I i tell people still you know did could've slowed down could enjoy the process But i took classes on every break. So i would take like class over christmas break or you know many masters. They were called like at the end of the semester. You take like two weeks and still take a class. You'd come back from the Summer break i would take summer classes and then have another mini mestre and so i was always trying to exercise gonna oklahoma state the undergrad and then parker university in dallas for chiropractic jason. We're going to go through six powerful principles in. I think seven minutes. I'm ready. We ready yeah repertoire. Phd pigheaded discipline. That's what's required period. I mean you can make all the goals you want for your f- six life your faith your family finances. Your fitness your friendship and your fun. But you've got to have pigheaded disciplined period through. That's three principles. Right there pigheaded discipline if you if you don't have pigheaded discipline i mean i don't. I don't care what your goals are. Oh and it's so fun to set goals you don't achieve isn't that isn't that fun for just a moment you get the new calendar how great you could be would be. Do you get that new book. Going on it's the new journal and it's the know nothings in it cover. It says amazing. And you're like or you get a new one. It's like a new journalists like ball and out of control twenty twenty alleged journalist twenty twenty but it's like it was out the windows. I like balling a certain people. Get these calendars these day. Planners live like yeezy and twenty twenty day. One you fill that out. Set your goals for the day day. One your life. How you put a picture of yourself on instagram facebook at five or six in the morning on my grand. Now the next day you overslept so you take a photo jason. The backup photo from the day before. Like how my grind. Sorry to post this guys day three. You're going to post it saying that's what happens. Is the meal photo from three days ago. You just flip it around. Put a different filter on still on my and we had a lady in our office back in the day she worked with me years ago and she decided that she was going to be boji. Fantastic dress to impress. I don't know what she went to. But all of a sudden she went to some women's seminar some sort of thing she comes back and i'm going to dress up every day and that went till tuesday monday. Yes twos wisdom sweatpants And i'm just say pigheaded discipline. How do you get pigheaded disciplined. I would say this is what you do. You get yourself some partners. Some accountability we record. We recorded today at six in the morning on a sunday kind of fun. You guys were here before i was here. I was the officer according to the audio version. I'm working on it in the audio. Here it echoes differently here in the studio. There's less echo. The other one is more. So i wanted to finish it there. But there's a certain understanding that we're going to record it six so you want to be here i want to here. We all want to be here because our listeners love it we love it. We learn stuff we teach stuff. It's good times good fellowship. Yeah but we've committed to doing it. There's that accountability it's true it's in the camera. There's a strength in numbers. There's a certain power then. I mean he personally. If we don't record it feels really weird. I miss you guys that that a little bit of you know like the camaraderie. The intellectual jive is like missing for that day. But then the rest of the week is something off you. I didn't get a chance to say hello to you at that. A prayer event but it was. It was a lot going on sure. Oh yeah you got a ton going on. So many people were telling me they're like a church. What is this thing. I said no and is a lot of churches are closed. And so we've turned the thrive time show world headquarters into a modified thursday night church service and we didn't on thursdays that way doesn't interfere with a wednesday.

Karl Three Years Epsteins Seven Minutes Facebook Epstein Jeffrey Two Weeks Instagram Oklahoma Five People Napoleon Hill Leon Hannibal Three Days Ago Billy Billy Parker University Tuesday Monday Thursdays Thursday Night
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 4 d ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
Fresh update on "business school" discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

01:02 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "business school" discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Your back adjusted to get their spine. They show up for a mac adjustment. Do you have certain routines you repeat. Repeatedly maybe compulsions that you obsess about that. Have to be done a certain way. In order for the patient to receive the quality care that find people who have chosen to become patients of dr break dot com. Come to enjoy what kind of what kind of you know. We have certain scripts that we use with every first caller. We have Definite routines So that we don't let things slip through the cracks so that we make sure we get all the information that we need to have that. We're able to help every patient And when you're seeing a higher volume of patients you've got to be able to keep everything straight and so the more crazy deviations you get into the more you're gonna miss something. How long is your larry. Strict for new patients. It's about six weeks very strict. Six weeks waiting list. It's interesting six week waiting list for new patients. I mean as an existing patient. We can get you in a little quicker you know but on a new patient takes longer. We gotta do an exam xrays. There's extra steps that go into it so we're six weeks up now. Let me tell you a sad stories about three examples. I can think of people that have jacked up. Faiths jacked up and jacked up finances right faith individual. I can think of right now. Who's really into faith when things get really bad. Sure there's an. I think this person in any details at all is. This person always goes Out to the ocean floating around getting caught up in the current of living crazy and then once they get lost a then the coastguard. The helicopter looks for them star. Sir sir what were were senator guy down and then they send down the guy and it's scene. They rescue the person for drugs jackassery. Whatever but recently it's like the fifth or sixth pass through leaving their their their their their principles and leaving their faith. now they're so far out at sea. The can't be helped family. Let me tell you a story. I can think of a gentleman right now. My mind won't mention any details about this person. This person's a lot of kids and this person was like i'm to be faithful for my to my wife. Most of the time. I mean most of the time. Yeah i mean mexican start i will be but sometimes not right. Seventeen work out well. It didn't work out. Well write it finances. Let me tell you about. I noticed one one lady this lady who again these are people that didn't have certain routines They they would do repeatedly didn't have obsessive routines that work. She wouldn't look at her bank account until a card got declined right but she had a lot of business and business on a revenue. I remember meeting this person thinking. Wow this particular coffee. Business is doing a lot of business not in tulsa coffee business. A lot of lot of lot of revenue. Wow how is it possible that. This person is bouncing bouncing checks. Debit cards declined. How are they working so much. Making a little jays not going to be possible for somebody have such gross revenue high numbers but low prophets or. They're not taking a look at it. They don't know where the systems are. They don't know where the pricing structure is. They're not going over the finances. They don't know what the overhead is because they didn't have a professor had a professor that taught them that. You know you don't need to do the same thing over and over. You know it's like you're obsessive. I have found that the great people out there board down and mediocre people suffer from boredom. I've just found this to be true all the time. So what happens is is. We need to sit down today right all of us. We just sit down and say what am i going to do for my faith. What's my routine that. I am going to perform repeatedly for my faith right. What is my routine for my family. What does my routine for my finances. What is my routine for my fitness routine for my friendship. What is my routine for my fun. Brek fitness that your thing twenty or things. Your business is a thing your family's a thing. Your thing fitness is something that for you as a thing. Or how often do you do the thing every day. What time Well so start early in the morning by four thirty in the morning you work not right now so right now i'm working out Usually by five five days a week though currently i'm at five five days a week. Dude you have. Ocd bro. i do see. How can i say it comes across but let me say it. How most people say it to me and to all successful people go. You're just so. Ocd.

Six Week Six Weeks Fifth Five Today Sixth Seventeen ONE Five Five Days A Week Four Thirty In The Morning Five Days A Week One Lady Three Examples Tulsa First Caller MAC Mexican Dr Break Dot COM
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 4 d ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
Fresh update on "business school" discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

00:36 min | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "business school" discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Not always better. The asked me why were might bring estimated that self releasing artists earned more than two billion dollars. Last year i love the creative freedom that have as an independent artists. That's anthony patterson ak call me as he's an independent hip hop artists based in the bay area who the traditional path to success of rap about stuff i really am a married first generation jamaican american immigrant. That is one of the first to go to college in his family. The i go to business school have worked at these fortune. Five hundred companies has been homeless. Eighth graduated from business school in twenty sixteen and took on a consulting job. That's also when he sat back into his old passion wrapping three years later as released his breakout album airplane mode which all the way to number fifty on the billboard chart as like whoa okay wild to because as soon as the album was done i told my wife i was like yeah. I want to hit the billboard charts with this case scott to work on the next album. That's the hustle of being independent. Is latest release out of office. Just.

Last Year Anthony Patterson Scott Five Hundred Companies More Than Two Billion Dollars Three Years Later Twenty Sixteen Eighth First Generation ONE Jamaican American Number Fifty First
Opinion: Being successful is about more than pursuing a good idea

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Opinion: Being successful is about more than pursuing a good idea

"Et. al say was up the fire nation. And what's something that you believe about becoming successful. Most people disagree with many believe nothing. In order to be successful. You need only passion for good idea but the reality is much more ashen is one. Listen gregan except enough in order to be a real success through. I really do need passion for the idea. That's obvious determination. Focus and patients most successful business. People who have been more abuses. I'd be there are many obstacles. one has to overcome great something new. You know especially if you are the first thing that feed over. The cost of my life is great. Tree comes owning the factory business which is a former finance. Each company was unique in the first of its kind in the seed amount of projection. One gets from new ideas. These enormous one doesn't believe in his or her idea. More than one hundred percent simply wants work in any new ideas. I you have to educate the market which is very hard are always suspicious affinity new then you have to persuade the investors. The people around view and the list goes on and on. You feel you're going up in most of the times you'll be a low and the loneliness is very hard to accept. Stein goes on in get more experienced. Then it becomes easier and you learn to build on and fix your mistakes from the negative remarks. Along the way you'll be enriched for capricorn's like me into his naturally because rare. Houston it's always about enforce. There's a lot that i want to focus on throughout this entire interview fire nation. But the one thing i wanna pull out about. What a alger said is patients. I mean all of them were brilliant but patients. It is such as something that today. I see more than ever people. Just don't have an seems like the younger generation. The less patience. I have so many people all the time coming up and saying. Hey john like. I've been doing this for two months and i'm not seeing any returns. Think any success and like it's been two months. Where's your patients. Where's your persistence. Wears your you gotta keep at that thing. Fire nation so in doing some research on ual. I saw that you were chosen to be a mentor at the harvard. Business school of. I mean this is top of the top. Why were you chosen. I was invited to comment there at harvard. Business school interpreters enterpreneurial program during two thousand thirteen. I spent on her the per person recognized and identified the Me after by lifestyle Lecture action lecturer. I approach the Was approaching the podium and the right the way after are presenting center students raise their hand. Us meet who is interpreting. Though i had my lecture plan i wanted to follow with students entering pro in prague improvise and said without hesitation that was born today or over the world is it potentially becoming in their furniture but the system. We live in prohibits most of them to become one why because of the barriers that society puts in front of us when the baby was born starts to crotone tone touching breaking things. The current say. Don't do that then. He's babies go through nursery and school and approach daily by new regulations of what they could or couldn't do then that news when they grow and enrolling through diversities and then it lasts. Even when they get married they fiend. The rules are filed on them. The handcuffs are placed on their hands and brains is additional rules imposed or their lives better directed in buxton through what they can't do this. Fact of life interferes in some Sometimes sabres independence and free thoughts of many of us. So my advice to you all. I said to be group is right. Now get hold of the keys. And i threw the keys to them. Release the handcuffs. Allow your brain to think without restrictions feel free to go with any idea thought you may have even if it seems ridiculous or unrealistic at the moment. Thank your dreams to the limit and interpret noor within. You will erupt like the genie out of the bottle. One hundred forty students stood up and they're up with laughter. I knew then but they got the message. I love that genie in a bottle analogy. I mean fire nation. Can't you just picture that. I mean it is such a great analogy. It's so true and it's something that you need to be striving towards and forward

Gregan Harvard Stein AL UAL Houston Prague John United States
US business schools opt to sit out of some MBA rankings this year

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 2 weeks ago

US business schools opt to sit out of some MBA rankings this year

"Several top American business schools have decided not to participate in MBA rankings this year. The Wall Street Journal. Reports Harvard Business School, the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School Columbia Business School in the Stanford Graduate School of Business there among those who have opted out, they declined to provide data to the economist in the financial times, because they say the pandemic has made it difficult to gather that

Wharton School Columbia Busine Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal University Of Pennsylvania Stanford Graduate School Of Bu
Viggo Mortensen on new movie 'Falling'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

07:40 min | 3 weeks ago

Viggo Mortensen on new movie 'Falling'

"This is popcorn when we talk about. What's out there at the movies. There's a movie out there now. Called falling vigo mortenson. My guest is starring in it with this time in this movie falling. He also directs. It's the first time it's his feature directing debut and it's in many ways at top story but it's vigo to me. It's him saying. I'm going to take this on and see what happens. And what happens is so incredibly moving so figo. Welcome good to have you. Thanks is wonderful to see again. What i can't say. What attracted you to this because you wrote. This is something that came out of your own head and it feels very personal to me. But i don't know just help personnel. This it is personal but it's also I mean it's largely a fiction fictional family but the foundation of it is feelings. I have for my mother especially but by connection to my father as well into my childhood and adolescence so there are elements of truth. As far as i remember an memory subjected that after do with my upbringing and even with the aspect of dementia that that's dealt within the story. I've had a lot of experience with that. Both my parents stepfather grandparents. I've seen it up close in a caregiver. And it's something i wanted to explore. I wanted to explore the limits if there are any communication especially with people that you have a hard time communicating with other. I wanted to just more than anything asks questions. Rather than give answers. Ask myself questions and maybe half the audience are the people that you can't communicate with our the people. Obviously there are people that want to communicate with are there. People don't deserve to be communicated with or listen to i personally. Don't think so. But as person makes their own decision about that. It's i wanted to look fine. I wanted to explore the idea of empathy of communication and closer. We've gotten to the release of this movie. Which is february fifth. Us canada unexpectedly an away. Unfortunately this movie and the polarization the conflicts with this family that it deals with problems of communication are more timely than ever. Well i mean we come in the way i see admit point even low. Your movie is there's a great many flashbacks. And i should just say up front. That basically you're playing a gay man with a father who is suddenly hit by the ravages of dementia. It may even early onset and yet through the flashbacks in what we say we see. This man has always been difficult. He's been more than a handful. You know he's a racist in him. There's a person who can be a bowling and yet through the flashbacks to we see that he's capable of love. He's hard to take and yet we feel that we haven't seen except toward the end of the movie. What it was like when your character decides. I'm not gonna play at his wet. I'm going to try to give something. That is empathetic rather than something. That's hostile john. Is that yard. You're in sub it in your own life when you dealt with now in. My father wasn't anywhere near as difficult to deal with. We had better communication than john willis do in this story though sunan father but but my father was a man of his generation. He was not american use denmark but he was raised on a farm born during the depression went through the german occupation during world. War two ran away from home when he was fourteen You know self taught person who then eventually after he married. My mother moved the united states. He somehow got into business. School finished it in half the time by doing night courses nine. Just a determined person. Very self reliant. But like many men of that generation he was kind of even in his gentlest moments. A my way or the highway kind of guy. And that's just the way it was. And then you didn't adapt to changing times that well either the sixties the seventies is like what the hell's going on from their point of view. Why can't things just be the way they should be in. Men and women are women all that stuff and so there was a bit of that on my dad but but he was nowhere near as it was not as much of a conflict as you as i depicted in the movie. It's a fiction as i say this story. Even those became a father son story a basically the moral conscience to like the the the the fulcrum emotionally morally of the story really is is the mother for me. Is gwen by hannah. Gross the inspiration and the reason that they argue a lot. You know both father and son and also father and daughter. My sister played by laura. Linney the bone of contention. Is gwen a lot. So that was an important role and i. I guess that character resembles my mother and my relationship with that character in in the movie is more like my relationship with my mother than than the relationship with the father's like my own father. There's there's a lot of you that i see in this character in terms of how you play it and also how you directed wrote it which is nature of you know we see this man. He grew up in loved the farm. He loved it. He related to the horses to the answers like you. you know. there's something about nature where the best of him somehow is shown when he's with these animals he can't seem to rang. The embassy has them to is actual family which people in general yeah. It's just kind of tragic when it is said it is said and you know it's no accident that the first third of the movie threaded through it is this sequence that has to do with the duck the sequence of events right from seeing it shooting it bathing when it's sleeping with plucking cooking it and then finally you know eating it sharing it that way. let's that john that grows up to be your character of sleep. Was the dead duck. He lets him do that. He does some well. Yeah that whole thing. The story was away to introduce among things. What you're talking about the relationship that that family has with nature expos with life and death and all that would nature you. You all grow up for time on on a farm. I grew up in part. I bo bo cities and farms. I mean i learned to ride horses. When i was really little when i when i could walk and And my dad was someone who was raised on a farm And he introduced me and my brothers at the earliest possible age to campaign to know how to make a fire to forests and rivers and animals and fishing and hunting. And all those things. So i was very much part of my

Vigo Mortenson Dementia Sunan John Willis Gwen Bowling United States Denmark Canada Linney John Depression Hannah Laura
Wisconsin governor issues new mask mandate after GOP repeal

All Things Considered

00:29 sec | Last month

Wisconsin governor issues new mask mandate after GOP repeal

"NPR NEWS Washington In Wisconsin, a tug of war over masks the state's GOP controlled legislature voting to repeal a mask mandate. Imposed by Democratic Governor Tony Evers. Lawmakers voted to end the statewide mass mandate despite warnings from health experts that master the most effective way to slow the spread of the Corona virus that would make Wisconsin one of only 10 states without a mass mandate in place. Less than an hour later, Evers issued a new mask mandate. Even with the repeal, businesses, schools, health clinics and churches. Consistory

Tony Evers Wisconsin NPR GOP Legislature Washington Evers
GameStop Reddit-rally sends Wall Street tumbling to its worst week in months

PBS NewsHour

05:37 min | Last month

GameStop Reddit-rally sends Wall Street tumbling to its worst week in months

"In late January, a handful of unlikely Wall Street stocks began to skyrocket in value. It has led to big market volatility, and that will be the subject of a special meeting tomorrow with Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and other government regulators. As Paul Solman reports, the spike in these stocks was driven. By an unconventional group of traders who banded together on a buying spree determined to take on the market for their own reasons. It is the latest in our economic Syriza's making sense. The frenzy. Obviously, this thesis is based largely on the fundamentals, Internet chatters hyping and buying stock and seemingly more a bun companies and you're right. It doesn't make any sense at all. AMC Bed, bath and beyond, and the bubble Gamestop crazy, and we're not as dominant as everyone thinks we are. We know what we're looking for. Is the regular Joes versus Wall ST Joe's using the free app Robin Hood to buy Gamestop, a money losing brick and mortar monger of video game disks that seems obsolete now that games are bought and downloaded online. And yet the stock skyrocketed last month, we're going to try to explain what's been happening with Alex Seamus from the University of Chicago Business School and my grandson show violas 17. So Alex set the scene for us What's been going on? There's people on this platform called Reddit, who decided to buy up a lot off the stock a lot of shares, partly because people hedge funds on Wall Street started short selling it. Okay, before we get into that, Joe, So I remember taking you to game stop when you were younger to buy you video games as kind of nostalgic appeal. Absolutely. And I think a lot of people my age in a little bit older grew up with Gamestop and I'm seeing a lot of people on platforms such as red It were saying isn't bye Bye Bye and Gamestop Two reasons one to make money, and the other was to stick it to the rich elite of the hedge funds. Hedge funds that have been betting against retro games stop by shorting its stock that is Now. In keeping with the retro theme, Alex suggested a retro product to visualize short selling. So here I've got an iPod, which I scrounged from somewhere in my basement, right, so on iPods kind of late game stop, it was very popular in the two thousands. And, you know it's not a bit obsolete because you know everybody's got music on their cell phones. So how do you short sell an iPod? So let's say I'm a hedge fund, and I think that the iPod is worth less than what it's being currently sold for. I go to you, Paul and I say, Can I borrow your iPod? So what I do is I sell the iPod that I just borrowed from you. And then buy it back for the future price. So if the price goes down, I make money because I'm basically getting the difference between that You just want me to lend it to you. I'm gonna borrow your your iPod. And I promise I'm gonna give you a little bit extra money whenever I return it. And to promise contractually to return my iPod by a certain date or whenever I ask for it back, So now you get wind of this short selling Joe. And what do you do? Okay. I grew up with this product. It's got a certain nostalgic value. I'm going to tell lots of my friends on social media may be read it to go out and buy iPod so we can all get in on the trend. What happens to you The hedge fund, Alex so because I Embedding that the price as actually going to go down in the future. If it ends up going up. I end up losing money because I have to buy it for Maura than what I sold it for initially and as you buy it, you're driving up the price even higher. Exactly, And that's what happened with game stop. $18 a share just last month. My grandson bought one share last Wednesday. And what price $293 I want to point out that I did not advise on this trade. I'm thinking that as more people are saying on social media that they're going to buy the value is going to go extremely high. Well is that I want to continue to stick it to the man, these people in Wall Street who have been running everything. And sure enough out on the street. I think it's great that rich people are losing money because capitalism is destroying this world. I look at the whole game stop with stocks is a revenge of the nerds. Kind of attack. This is one of the most complex attempts to coordinate on a single strategy that I think we've ever seen a sort of people's hedge fund says he must coordinating on the Reddit Forum. Wall Street bets. Urging one another to buy with rocket ship Emoji is which is to say, Look, this asset is going to keep going up so everybody should buy and toe hold with diamond hands. We are not going to break. We are going to keep the price up, and there's even a buy and hold sea shanty with diamond hands. They knew they profit if they could only hold But hold on most Wall Street. Hedge funds aren't short sellers. They bet on stock's going up. And in this case, some hedge funds have actually profited hugely from the so called revenge of the nerds, as have Robin Hood's paying customers, big investors, many of them hedge funds, who, by information from Robin Hood, about what people there are trading As for short sellers, are they bad actors? Sure, they bet against a parent losers like Gamestop, but also against frauds like the infamous end Ron, which short sellers helped take down nearly 20 years ago. By exposing its phony

Gamestop Treasury Secretary Janet Yelle Syriza St Joe Alex Seamus University Of Chicago Business Paul Solman Alex Reddit JOE Maura Emoji Paul Robin Hood
Democrats kick off process to fast-track COVID relief package

the NewsWorthy

01:45 min | Last month

Democrats kick off process to fast-track COVID relief package

"There are now two proposals for the next covid. Nineteen relief package one from the democratic white house. One from republicans in congress and it seems lawmakers on both sides are now moving forward with their own. Plans without a lot of bipartisan support first. Let's talk about the republican plan. It's worth about six hundred. Eighteen billion dollars it includes money for covid nineteen vaccines testing treatment and medical equipment. Also more direct payments this time worth a thousand dollars for americans who make less than forty thousand a year and it also includes billions of dollars for small businesses schools and childcare. But it's not clear if this plan stands shot at passing since democrats who now hold the majority in congress say it's not enough overall. President biden wants to covid nineteen relief package three times the size of that one at one point nine trillion dollars but republicans have called his plan too costly on top of almost everything in the republican proposal. Biden also wants to see aid for state and local governments larger direct payments for more americans and a fifteen dollar an hour. Federal minimum wage just to name a few sticking points president biden met with some moderate republicans at the white house yesterday. Several of them left the meeting saying they got the impression biden was open to negotiating some elements of his plan. But it looks like some of his fellow. Democrats in congress are ready to move forward. Without their republican colleagues top dams in both the house and senate released a separate budget resolution. It basically unlocks special rules allowing biden's package to pass with a simple majority vote in the senate so that essentially means fifty one votes instead of sixty votes usually need it or another words. They can passage even if every republican votes against it. The ap says the goal is to have a relief deal approved by next month since. That's when extra unemployment assistance and other past pandemic aid

Congress President Biden White House Biden Senate House AP
Transforming Patient Access Through Technology with Emily Tyson

Outcomes Rocket

04:18 min | Last month

Transforming Patient Access Through Technology with Emily Tyson

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket saw marquez here and today i have the outstanding emily tyson joining us as the chief operating officer emily. Tyson drives rakes health's efforts to scale rapidly while building a high performance. Culture committed to improving patient access. Emily joined the company in january of twenty nineteen and from a functional perspective. She leads strategy client experience finance and operations in addition to the ever changing category of other. Say that in air quotes that early stage companies demand prior to join and ratings. Emily served as vice president of product for naveh health recently acquired by optum where she was responsible for the vision and direction of naveh health's product offerings across the health plan and health system businesses. Emily began her career in healthcare technology when she joined a fina health after various roles in the financial services industry in new york and hong kong. Emily holds her business. Administration summa cum laude from washington and lee university and our mba from harvard. Business school. today. We're going to spend a good amount of time talking about this digital front door. And what practices and large-scale health systems could be doing to do a better job of addressing the current area that were in healthcare so Emily such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Great thank you. So i'm looking forward to the conversation. Yeah likewise likewise and so before we dive into rate health and what you guys are doing. Why don't you tell us a little bit more about you. And the things that inspire your work in healthcare. Sure i i would say for me personally. There's there's no debate about whether the health care system is broken and it's really not the patient care itself that's lacking it's it's the back end at the administrative side of healthcare. That's really this nightmare of complex regulations and poorly designed incentives and outdated technology all of which actually negatively impact the cost patient experience and ultimately in many cases the outcomes. You know. I never personally wanted to be a doctor. But i've long been passionate about exciting this side of healthcare trying to make the pipes in the information flow in this pieces work by should really does require reaching beyond just technology alone so this desire instead of my focus on sobbing. The complex administrative challenges can be non-sexist ahead of healthcare but that do impact patient cares. What has led me on my career paths and ultimately now terrific celts of it. Yeah you know. There's there's a ton that needs fixing and optimizing maybe even overhauling in some instances and so having a unique approach that is focused on on on making things better on the back. End of the house is key talked to us about health. What exactly are you guys doing. And how are you. Adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Are we are focused on transforming patient access so Helped mission our mission is to make it easier for patients to see their doctors. It sounds simple but it's much harder in practice on. You know you shouldn't have to know someone who knows someone to know someone to get a quick doctor's appointment and yet that's often how it works in reality today. Deferred care is a really big issue and the industry even setting aside the global pandemic and the dynamics that's created the average. Wait time for someone to see. A provider is almost three weeks in the us at the same time on any given day. Many providers actually have availability in their schedules. So a lot of what we're focused on is how do you bridge that gap and there's a significant amount of complexity underlying yet so it's really idea of improving access. Which is every part of health focused on is about much more than providing digital layer for consumers. That's absolutely part of it. It's also about addressing this underlying operational challenges within a healthcare practice. Your system does that make it hard to manage patient access in the first place so we do both from a market perspective at comes in the form of products around central scheduling work slap locations and self scheduling communication platforms in check in along with best practices for how to think about optimizing patient access in the clinic beyond the technology itself.

Emily Emily Tyson Naveh Health Marquez Lee University Tyson Harvard Hong Kong Washington New York United States
Interview With Dr. Laura Huang

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:54 min | Last month

Interview With Dr. Laura Huang

"My wife is retired banker and She reads different things than i do. I'm going to pastor seminary professor and we tend to have this morning routine where we get our coffee and we go to respective wings of the house and we just start going through the news. One day in january. My wife comes to me which he never does and she shoves this article in front of me from the harvard business school. That's hard work isn't enough how to find your edge. And she says you need to get lower wong edged turning adversity into need to get on your podcast and this is coming from a spouse who never to my podcast. And so i go. This is unusual. And i read the article and let me tell you i was fascinated. My guest today is dr laura wong. She is an associate professor at the harvard. Business school before that she was assistant professor at University of pennsylvania's wharton business school. I am so delighted that we're actually having this conversation. I scored major points with my wife. Will i have your wife to think. Then here i was thinking that you wanted me on your podcast but thank you tour. Well i didn't know about you. let your book. But i teach leadership i'm entrepreneurial we're recording this in september while this ongoing pandemic and shutdown is going on and my wife and i one of the conversations we do have is. We're trying to kind of understand how different groups and individuals can thrive going forward. And i think that's what really caught her attention in this. That's one of the lessons. We've been married almost forty years. And i learned that listen very early. So who did you write this book for and why did you. Yeah i actually. I actually didn't intend to write this book. I mean it wasn't one of the things i mean in the back of my mind i was like. Oh maybe someday. I'll write a book but it wasn't actually something that i consciously thought about intil. Because i had been doing research for a really long time unsettling studying like disadvantage inequality and people who are underestimated. And i had been presenting a lot of this research. And i'm kept coming up to people coming up to me and saying you know like this is sort of. What can we do about this right because a lot of my research is is a little bit depressed right. He's like talk about disparity disadvantages. And how people have an how there's all this inequality bias in the workplace and entrepreneurship and just sort of been lies and so people would say like. Hey will this is depressing. What do we do about this and you know. How do we sort of level the playing deals and the thing is all the solutions that i that that that were out there that that i knew about from from research were all these sort of structural solution the system level solutions things. What i what. I mean by that is like you know. Let's have more nerdy critic. Hiring practice or west diversified the top management teams or have more diversity in terms of who gets to be mentors and and so it was like all these solutions where we had this sort of wait around for things to change right for the for the for the structures insistence more meritocratic so it was found that it like leaving people frustrated still because there were these outside in solutions of there were a lot of things that individuals could do as they were waiting around for for things to get better as they were waiting around for things to get more meritocratic and so the last couple of years of my research has been has has all been around like what can individuals do to sort of slip things for themselves to to empower themselves so that they can turn the perceptions stereotypes and the bias that have about them how they could flip them in their favor and create their own edge. And so that's really ridley. The thought behind this book came from and then as writing it was really very much more. I mean i kept thinking about you know people who do people who have sort of gotten to shutdown over and over and over again and people who just keep putting in the hard work by me because we've been taught from a young age like we're work hard work hard moving working hard but yet for whatever reason they're frustrated because they're hard work isn't leading them to the success in outcome that they were promised that they thought that they would achieve. And so how do we actually make our hardware requirements for us. Recognizing that accepts outcomes aren't really about hard work level there about the perceptions in signals in stereotypes of others. While

Dr Laura Wong University Of Pennsylvania's W Harvard Business School Wong Harvard Ridley
Reduce No-shows, Fill the Schedule, and Improve Patient Experience with Michele Perry

Outcomes Rocket

04:10 min | Last month

Reduce No-shows, Fill the Schedule, and Improve Patient Experience with Michele Perry

"Back to the outcomes rockets. All marquez here. Today i have the privilege of having michelle. Perry on the podcast. She is. The ceo of relations has sast based patient centered. Engagement company that utilizes a modern and mobile first approach to improve patient and provider communication. Michelle perry has almost thirty years of experience in software and health technology an undergraduate degree from the wharton school at the university of pennsylvania and her nda from harvard business school. Just the the important topic around how we communicate patients effectively. And how do we do that at scale. It's going to be a great talk and michelle super excited to have you join us today. Thanks for having me excited to be here absolutely and and so before we dive into the awesome way. You guys engage patients at relations. Talk to us a little bit more about you. Michelle wu spires your work and healthcare the patient. You know really. This truly has to be about the patience to have been easier way to access healthcare This pandemic has shed light on. The fact that truth helped get a truly is about the patients. And that's why you know. I joined a company named relation relating to the patient and focusing on the patient. How do we make it easier for the patient because anything related to health care is high and so why don't we make it easy. Yeah and i think the nature of kind of how healthcare works and fortunately that it's complex And the need for that expertise of simplifying and getting a message to the right person at the right time is critical so michelle talked to us about how relations is adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Exactly what you just said you still my words saw. It's all about getting the right Right message to the right person at the right time. And you know the industry's been a little too focused on patient portals and just dumping information they're figuring out the patient would find the information and it's just not working you know we need to make it easier both for the practices and health systems to make it easy for their patients to access healthcare. And we need to do it in a way. That patients are use to communicate. Say and we all carry this phone You know there are a few people in the country maybe not for the most part people have a phone kind. You know in their pants pocket or in the hand of something all day. So how can we make it very easy using that mobile device to get them just that right information and not a data dump just the right information at the right time. Yeah and so there's a flow you know. There's there's a step by step process that kind of we go through when we get care. There's a scheduling. There's there's actually going to see the clinician where you wait. I guess there's a lot of waiting and cars now with with the pandemic reminders etc. So there's a lot of touch points that potentially league we could miss and so talked a little bit about what you feel makes relations special and different than what's there today. Yeah so you know. Unfortunately healthcare has so many rules and regulations Starting with that introducing some of this technology to be patient facing can be really non thing and then you add all all the communications laws which tcp a of the can spam and. This really seems way too. Risky move forward and health care. So that's where many practice of just put it in puerto new best enough but the adoption and usage of portals. It's just really low. So what we focused on is making it just easy to get the critical information at that point in time. Whether it's about an appointment to make sure that you know it and confirm it and we have best practices where we combine own email and chat messages over the course of five three one day to get the best response rate and to get people if they can't make it you know to cancel reschedule and get them back on the calendar that you can get waitlist filled spots that they laughed and moving all of that so really combining all these with one platform that can make this really productive for the practice which would make it productive for the practice can make it easy for their patients totally.

Michelle Michelle Perry Michelle Wu Marquez Wharton School Harvard Business School University Of Pennsylvania Perry
Food Activism with Jenny Dorsey

Model Majority Podcast

05:50 min | Last month

Food Activism with Jenny Dorsey

"Jimmy dorsey welcome to the model majority. Podcast today thank you for being one of our very first episodes to record in the year. Twenty twenty one which is a very exciting for so many people that we are here at this point but before we get into all that one actually start from the very beginning to get to know your personal story a little bit. i love to hear about. Where did you grow up. how did you grow up. And if anything during that time leads you become who. You are today as a chef but also has an activists usc for sure so i was born in shanghai china and my parents moved to the us when i was around to pursue their both of them are scientists and so they moved to new york. They went to a school in the bronx. And so i followed them when i was up three and a half with grandparents so i was really raised by my grandparents growing up And lived in new york until about eight. Yeah that's i think that's right. I moved to seattle so i. I set my larger chunk of my childhood in seattle washington and ended up going to school College in seattle as well so like good decade plus in seattle cut the no it and during that time also like learned. I think that seattle is not the place for me. I really really wanted to go back to new york so right after college and making that switch back to new york i i. started in management consulting after college. I was a finance major in school. Originally marketing major switched over to finance was not doing so great. Marketing and very quickly knew that finance. It's fine but it was something that is not naturally good at it. You know. I think everyone kind of has their own talents and you can tell you a talented something when it's really yes you're still gonna have to work hard and there's times where you're not doing great job or what. Not but for the most part. Like in makes just intuitively makes sense to you and tell. The numbers intuitively. Don't make sense to me the way that they did to other people And i hate like the serota asian being good at math and talk about that maybe later on but at least it was like a way to get my foot in the door ever since i was young. Who was always a big part of my life. But i didn't even think about it in college or honestly dion for a while because it was never really encouraged by my family. My family going up with more traditional than they are now I'm chinese american and like and we kind of because they were scientists. They were very wary of Career or they felt that. I cannot get ahead because they were you know they were in our lab. They were always the ones that were doing all the work. If you've just look at lab dynamic it's always usually by hawk. Individuals a lot of them. Asian east asian or south asian. Doing all the research all the were all the writing but who is the main like name on the paper that you see who's getting nobel peace prize for their work in science. It's usually white men and that dynamic played out throughout my childhood. I never really consciously understood it but now looking back it was. You know my parents had these bosses. And i'd be like but you do everything and they get all the credit. I'll get it. You know so anyway. I think my parents really wanted me to find a career where i could succeed and not have to be under someone's thumb so to speak and they really wanted you know they've really encouraged less ultra prenatal careers for more careers where you can make money and you can be independent so business. Definitely they definitely encouraged. I was an undergrad business school and they were like yeah. You can now go out as a console. You do make a lot more money like you know so. They just wanted that stability they wanted to non you know. Be a lab technician salary for me Even if they really loved the sciences sciences so anyway with that kind of mind food never really felt like a real clear path. Never really thought about. I never really even explored at. I had no idea what to do right. I think a lot of people who are interested in food don't really know how many years pm and starting my career absolutely hated it. I was in the fashion and luxury division. So i usually work with clients in your fashion and luxury so i spent a lot of time By clothes being obsessed with clothes and shoes and being skinny and it was like a really tough period of time because everyone around me really encourage that behavior as well. It was always about how you lose more way out of your book. Nice you know there was a lot of judgement and it. I think it really came to a head. there was one time at At work where our partner came in and she was very fashionable. Amazing like wealthy Woman and she had brought in a bunch of clothes she had purchased at a sample sale. We We work in chelsea in new york city and chelsea market. Has this like if you've been. There was kind of large area in the center of the market. That always has sampled feels. And i guess she had gone to hurry and she just said that she would just buy everything that basically that was in her size and just figure it out later and it was. I mean there was a lot of things but let's about. But i just remember thinking of this woman coming ahead at all. You know she was. She was such a bath right and the fact that she would come in with a garbage bag full of new clothes designer clothes. It's like it's never ending hole in your heart that you're just trying to fill with dot and you can't ever fill it like spoil alert for anyone who's over there you can't feel it it's impossible it doesn't matter how much money you out you can't feel it because that's not something that can be so thing

Seattle New York Jimmy Dorsey USC Bronx Shanghai Dion China Washington United States Chelsea New York City
Roblox Valued at $30 Billion

The Business of Esports

09:35 min | 2 months ago

Roblox Valued at $30 Billion

"Roadblocks raises five hundred and twenty million dollars led by ultimate or capital and dragonair investment group so They announced today that they raised their five hundred. Twenty million dollars in a series h a purchase price of forty five dollars per share. If you do the math and all that sort of stuff it values the company at twenty nine point. Five billion dollars. Let's call it thirty right. The i don't know why they priced it. So it's twenty nine point five thirty sound so much pathetic. Let's call it. Thirty billion dollar valuation House spot on where we kind of wish we could sort of You know splice in the conversation. We had honorable extra because not only. Did we say this would happen right. That they would do private round where they've announced that they're going to do a direct thing not an ipo. So this is essentially their ipo fundraise right. That's how it directly thing works you raise the money privately and then you avoid sort of the the raise you do. That's part of the ipo on there for you. Avoid the show you avoid having the price shares and things like that so the has now been priced. It's effectively an ipo. it's not publicly traded. Yet they're gonna do public listing but this is the financing and we called the valuation. Right now i think we said based on unity's valuation. I you know. I think we agree to was probably going to be in this thirty billion dollar bar ballpark and we have longer. It's insane how close they Called it. I'm also surprised at this point. They don't round it up like like i just weird like you could call it a thirty. It's twenty nine point five. You can bow out that up like what who thought that sounded better lake. Like what's half a billion dollars point by. We're joking around. But yeah. I mean this is humongous. It's humongous your particularly william the the quote from the ceo of one of the funds that invested. Because i think this is telling. And maybe you have some thoughts on this it listen to the subtleties in the language here. He says while once viewed as a gaming platform roadblocks has emerged as the definitive global community connecting millions of people through communication entertainment and commerce said. Brad gerstner ceo. Tim under if you didn't know better what would he be describing a social network right. Yes like you don't even have to wait. I was literally like an listening to you. I'm like this. Sounds like facebook like this and most social networks go through that branding period where they get past their initial audience. Right think of facebook. Facebook used to be just for college. Kids right am i mean literally it was supposed to be like this is common knowledge but be supposed to be like the facebook that you've got as a freshman to meet new people right like that's why it's called facebook And now it's now. And i'm sure at the time they were describing themselves as a great platform for college age students to discover each other and forge friendships. And it's the same thing here. They are talking about like they would have said previously were gaming. Now wear something. We've expanded where social platform and that's insane because it. This is first of all what i think. We said. We felt like i think should have done. Ns feels like messaging. That should have come from epic from. This is how they should have been describing fortnight. So it's very it's surprising to see it from rob blocks. it's refreshing because i'm glad somebody has this messaging. Somebody is looking at games as social networks and trying to turn a game into a social network which is really potential right. And i'll see this last like for longtime ever since. I wrote the harvard business school case or co wrote. I should say on world of warcraft. I felt games are social networks. I'm not alone. i mean pretty much. Everybody who's thought about it realizes they're pretty much the same thing Right but it's interesting. To see this. Crossover into an investment thesis with this much money behind. And i think given the success of this. It won't be long before we see other dame's and game companies realize their social networks. Still think it's gone too far right like i was. I'm i've been so pro. Roadblocks right called the valuation called. This move loved the big number here right. it's own good for the industry. There's there's really no downside to any of this right in fact now thirty billion dollars again in kind of the context we're talking in. The context of a social network is a pretty cheap social network. Right when you're talking about the facebook and the twitter like where you're talking valuations in the hundreds of billions This is a pretty cheap social network and so super cheap for the number of users. I'm sure it has in the monetization per user. I bet it's it's bargain-basement steel which is probably part of why they want to calm themselves again. Social networks but like. There's a question of does this go too far right. Where the investor says while once views viewed as a gaming platform as if the daming days are like ancient history when you walk into rox. You're not playing a game right now. Either to be fair. Like i think this is okay like i really think mrs okay. Because like it's fair to say that their social and commerce activity going on and that their primary drivers and i've always been kind of a believer that raw blocks was not and i don't disparage anything here. Blake pound for pound. It's not the best game out there right. I'm sure there are many young kids and fans. That would just be with me. But i think fundamentally the reason why it's been successful is a game is not that the underlying game or game mechanics itself for so incredible or so unique Was because it was a social and ecommerce platform hooked into a game and the game was fun to play because of the socialization features in the commerce hawks. So you don't think language goes too far. I don't think it does in this case. No no like. I and i'll put it this way like if fortnight were describing itself that way without some major changes. I'd say i appreciate the aspiration but that's reaching right now but it's really does have other hooks in it. You know it really does right. So i i mean it's death. Look it's definitely like definitely you know a vanguard language right like it's somebody trying to change perception of the business but as long as the strategy meets the attempt to change perception. I think it's good for them. You know what. Let me let me push this one step further because the article ends with you know. Typical of a press release about blacks about altimeter capital right. There's always like the about sections for the the companies mentioned in the press release. Right and roadblocks. Let me just read the first sentence again. It's like there's a question mark here is this to have we gone too far right and the and the sentence here is roadblocks mission is to build a human co experience platform that enables shared experiences among billions of users so no game gaming in that sense but experience twice human once shared once billions once. You know it's a lot of good word into a lot of good words. No i mean. Look i mean. Clearly clearly it will remain to be seen whether or not their messaging this way to get a great valuation or if they're messing this way because they generally believe the platform can grow into that mission right. I feel like borderline disingenuous in the messaging. I like i said i'm the biggest fan of roadblocks. I love what they're doing. I think they've achieved and probably will achieve what fortnight should have in terms of growing outside of being a game. It's just like when you don't even mention it at all. I would like. I would like somebody who say like most users download custom levels and it would be like reading. A tesla press release and the word car is not used or automobile. Like is why don't they read that way anyway. Toby start with. Tesla is the future of human transportation or something. But i actually really don't know. But i mean i agree but like i mean the end of the day like i'd rather i. I think it's great for gaming e sports. Because i know sometimes we got a little bit of criticized for doing gaming news on east but the reality is this is so core to what's happening in interact entertainment like we can't discuss this right so it's the first then. The second piece is like okay. So you know i get that flake i get. This might be reach. And i think probably internally they're going to say it's a reach but i again i appreciate the fact that the market is recognizing that games can be more than games right. The games can be a bridge into something and fundamentally what games are about like interactive worlds. Can be a lot more than just half life in street fighter. Rife and i think whether or not they execute this change so fully as to earn that mission. I think it's going to make it easier for the next business to message. We're gonna see more businesses messaging mess name as a result will see the games media mature into more

Facebook Ultimate Or Capital Dragonair Investment Group Brad Gerstner Rob Blocks Mrs Okay Commerce Hawks Harvard Business School William TIM Blake Twitter Tesla Press
A Conversation with Whitney Johnson

Accelerate!

06:05 min | 2 months ago

A Conversation with Whitney Johnson

"Whitney. Welcome to the show andy. I am delighted to be here. I'm excited to to talk to you. Because i liked your book a lot. So you know some and we didn't write for sales audience per se but as a lot of very sales specific stuff in there. I thought at least maybe the lens. I read it so i can't wait to chat with you about it but one thing i wanted to ask sign. Hopefully you're well. Were recording this in the midst of the the lockdown sidano omit the formalities. But we are well for asking. I mean it's one of those questions that it used to be just a nice city but it's now a real question is a real question right. What's good and you're joining us from where we live in lexington virginia so my my husband is a professor at southern virginia university which is also near virginia military institute and washington and lee. So we're about three hours driving south west of washington dc. So is that out neuronal them. Yes yes that's our closest airport is about fifty miles away. Wow okay so having lived in big cities or served doing a little more not so rural but smaller city living. It's definitely rural. We completely disrupted ourselves. I mean why give you look outside of our window in the morning we can see deer and there are cows next door to us in fact when we very first moved here. Because we've lived in boston in manhattan in large cities when we first moved here. I remember waking up one morning. And i like hitting hitting but like you know pulling my honey honey. Turn off your phone. Because it was buzzing buzzing any turnover. And he's like those. Are the cows unbend an adjustment for us. I find one. I'm away from manhattan anywhere. I go but like my visit. My sister in wisconsin. And both my wife and i get woken up by the quiet. It's like it's too quiet and it's like wait. Why are we going every week. And you're accustomed to having the noise outside all the time that are. Do you know at some level that that it's too quiet attack keeps me up. I love that looking at by the quiet. So i was gonna ask you. Are you follow soccer fan. Because you wrote that you are going to produce a reality. Tv show about sauerland america and listeners. To show that. I'm a avid soccer fan. Oh i wish. I could say that i am. I got really excited. So this This is actually almost fifteen years ago. Now where i. I was a huge american idol. Fan in a huge. So you think you can dance fan. And and i was doing a lot of work in latin america was equity analyst. And so you know. I've been to mexico fifty times to spend a lot of my doing work a lot. American one of our companies that we followed on as equity analyst was televisa which time was basically abc cbs nbc and fox combined and again this is fifteen years ago and so we thought wait. We have an opportunity here to basically do you know. Soccer meets american idol and just got so excited about the stories of that could have produced on so while. I'm not a soccer fan per se. I am a cinderella story fan and i just thought that that could have been an amazing august show to have produced. I wanna watch for sure. So the regular listeners. Get accustomed going off on soccer stuff here. Tangents everything relates to soccer. Soccer explains the world. There was a book that wrote that. So about that so I think i read that book. Actually it was a good book. Yeah yeah so Pet the author on the show. So so we're talking about transformation personal transformation you. I've really enjoyed your book. Which you've just updated and re released disrupt yourself masterless change and speed up your learning curve. So what was the original impetus. Write the book you know. That's one of those questions that its you can answer many different ways on. But let me see. If i can streamline so that we're not here all day on you know as i just mentioned i was equity analyst. Were keep merrill lynch In a focusing on stocks in latin america like televisa so like america melville and this is back in two thousand three two thousand four. I read the book. The innovators dilemma by christian at harvard. Business school and i remember reading that book and it just was in many a transformative experience. If you will. Because i was looking at wireless at the time in every single quarter america. Mobile was beating my numbers like just every time and and telmex numbers weren't so that was the wireline company. In american mobile was the wireless i read. I read innovators dilemma. I said oh. That's what's going on. Is that wireless is disrupting wireline. And i was just fascinated. That there was a s- theory that could explain to me the world and help me understand what was happening And the more. I read that book it more i started. I think maybe just because of my own personal bent started thinking. Well how does this apply to me. Like i understand. It's explained products and services in companies in countries. But i also remember having this moment in just two thousand four. And i had just had this conversation with Someone in management saying you know what really liked to try something else. I'd like to do something else attorney. I'd like to go into management kind of laughed at me. Kind of snickered. Like ov- outs nice. That's never going to happen. And i remember coming back to that book and being you know what if i wanna do whatever it is. I think i'm meant to do which i had a very vague notion. I think many of us do I'm going to have to disrupt myself. I'm gonna have to leave wall street and go do something else.

Soccer Southern Virginia University Televisa Manhattan Virginia Military Institute Washington Whitney Lexington Andy Latin America America DC Virginia LEE Boston Wisconsin NBC CBS ABC
Unlocking the Black Box of Pricing: Why Pricing is So Easy in Theory but Not in Real Life with Alessandro Monti

Impact Pricing

04:34 min | 2 months ago

Unlocking the Black Box of Pricing: Why Pricing is So Easy in Theory but Not in Real Life with Alessandro Monti

"On march diving to his allesandro. Monte here are three things you wanna know about allesandro before we start. He is a professor for corporate management and organization at cologne business school. He's done stints at both s. Kp and wolters kluwer two companies. That i truly respect in rural the pricing and he went to uc. Berkeley as did i. Welcome alessandro i'm mark. Thanks for having me on the show. It's to be here they. How'd you get into pricing in the first place. Yeah we all have Have a story That we can tell and it's always interesting to know how we kind of entered into this adventure now. The first touch boy was of course during studies microeconomics on the train. Sort of a communist. Of course you get the standard pricing approach the supply and demand things there but the real id say management world touch point with pricing. Ause my first job which was at a skippy. and since then this s- topic while yeah caught my attention and all in topic. So that's that's the that's the story. So why do you stay. You're all in but why it's I think prices. In general. They i once i think once read wasn't article into quote woes welded the central hinges of the economy so the price at the end of the day clears markets. Price is something that you feel as a consumer immediately. it's sometimes pain and sometimes pleasure. So it has the behavioral component and yet. That's i think that's. That's what makes prices annual dealing with. I sing quite fascinating for me. At least so. I'll buy into the fact that it touches almost everything so it's so powerful and yet i love the fact that so few people understand it and which means that when we can advise them we can have huge impacts in their lives and their businesses. So definitely i that nice. So you got a phd in business history. I have never heard of that before. And then you went to work for escapee. How did a phd in business history. Help you in escapee while it helps out first of all from the let's say methodological perspective you know learning the same more scientific tools and techniques. So it really does help in then tackling all those pressing questions. that of course should be tackled from. Let's say a more profound way. Okay so i always go the fundamental way when it comes to pricing so it helps you know to to have the tools and techniques sort of this research perspective had so definitely helped while just on a side note when when i talked to my escape you partners because i actually did the phd wild being escapees. So they kind of allowed me on sabbatical end. When when i talk project say while hd and has a history component. Yeah i I i saw some some question marks there say well how does that now. Kind of translate into our everyday business and dan. I think at the end. The research the businesses. Phd helps you to understand. Probably the president and also get sort of a a hint on what will come eventually in the future and so is it a quantitative phd when you do business history. you're still doing a bunch of stats and quantitative research and things like that. Yeah while you can do both ways. You can approach both waist. Now what i did actually is i. I went into historical archives. So i really dig deep into the documents from the. Let's say early seventeenth century and had to research him and had to read them and had to understand how much let's say executive spec at that time decided on pricing pricing strategies. Of course you can do to quantitative approach. You need to have the data said so you need to have some numbers eventually for that period in history. It's already like a jackpot. Having documents at all so the point here was really to understand the decision making at that time. So it's a more qualitative. Approach the

Allesandro Cologne Business School Wolters Alessandro Berkeley DAN
Sherwin Williams Fires Tik-Tok Sensation, Painting a Cautionary Tale

Business Wars Daily

04:28 min | 2 months ago

Sherwin Williams Fires Tik-Tok Sensation, Painting a Cautionary Tale

"Listen up. It's a great lesson for any business leader or marketer and a whole lot of schadenfreude of fun. well sherwin williams america's biggest paint company. Just got its comeuppance from a tiny florida rival and tiktok loving college kid and embarrassing. Faux pas by sherwin williams is the very example of a culture clash between behind the times corporate america and gen z creativity. Now perhaps like millions of us stuck at home. You've been on a painting. Bench come on admitted. Maybe you've even seen tony. Pilo pilarcitos tiktok channel tone. Stir paints until. Recently the ohio university business student worked at an athens. Ohio sherwin williams store a job loved in fact he so excited about paint that he started a tiktok channel on which he simply mixes paint typically with hip hop music playing in the background watching pillow saito. Mix paint whether it's a gray for sherwin williams shopper or the viral video in which he tints paint by mixing in real. Blueberries has proven to be oddly mesmerizing and incredibly popular. The paint mixing artists has more than one point. Two million tiktok followers. His short videos routinely receive half a million likes even more in fact it took pilarcitos tone stir paints virtually no time to go viral. According to buzzfeed the sixth video asano ever posted got more than a million views. So pilo saint did what any enterprising college senior might do. He whipped up a presentation for sherwin williams marketing department with such a huge following. Figured he could show the eighteen billion dollar company a thing or two about using tiktok to attract younger gen z shoppers. Alas his plan backfired for a while. Anyway rather than using enthusiasm about the million plus followers sherwin williams could have for free. The company fired him according to peel asano. The student told his story. On where else tiktok. He says sherwin williams marketing department. I ignored him but later they called the loss prevention department. Which accused peeler say no of stealing paint and making the videos on company time. He admitted to making some videos. While on the job at says he purchased the paint. He used no matter. Sherwin williams accused him of gross misconduct including quote seriously embarrassing. The company or its products at age reported one could easily argue that sherwin williams has its marketing covered and doesn't need any rogue creatives on its payroll. The paint giant suffered a bit during the early pandemic lockdowns but since then has surged with home sales renovations and diy decorating projects on the upswing. We all seem to be buying paint along with flour booze and toilet paper the today show points out. That's pushed sherwin williams sales up about five percent. The companies also persuading more and more customers to purchase premium paints as a result profits soared twenty one percent in the third quarter according to the motley fool. But this sort of publicity. Well that's not something. Any company would want news appeal. Santos firing elicited disdain on social media on twitter. One observer said some not so nice things about the presumed age of the marketing department. Staffers hello baby boomers and added that they quote missed out on a cutting edge marketing campaign for your products. That's why bear painting. Kelly moore paint or going to outsell. Y'all close quote an industry publication at age quoted. Pr executive andrew cross of agency walker sands cross said sherwin williams sent a signal as loud as it was unintentional that employees. Who do what they're told or more valuable than employees who think outside the box out cross added that the company had quote stifled ingenuity sherwin. Williams are the biggest beneficiaries of the outrage. And they were quick to take advantage of an opportunity. Lost pilo says he received job offers from bear. Benjamin moore and other major paint brands but he chose a role with regional chain. Florida paints the ohio university senior plans to finish studies online provided. He's not too busy. Establishing what will be his very own custom line of paint colors. Oh and keeping that tiktok channel up featuring colors only from florida paints saint story is now a marketing. Fabled should be repeated in entrepreneurship classes at business schools everywhere and perhaps quickly forgotten on purpose the boardroom sherwin williams

Sherwin Williams Tiktok Pilo Pilarcitos Pilo Peel Asano Ohio University America Saito Athens Tony Peeler Florida Ohio Andrew Cross Walker Sands Cross Kelly Moore
Interview With Marla Beck of bluemercury

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

05:46 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Marla Beck of bluemercury

"Everyone welcome superwomen. Today's guest. I'm very excited. Talk you a superfan. And i haunt her location near my office frequently marla who is the co founder and ceo behind plumer the nation's largest and fastest growing luxury beauty retailer and spa in the country. So hello and welcome. I thank you for having me. I am super fan of you. Also so the feeling is mutual. So i would love to kind of go back to the beginning because i know you were acquired but i would love to go through kind of the initial idea that you had for blue mercury and your skin care lines but where did you start off. So i actually grew up in. California was a junkie. There were little beauty shops. Where people made handmade things in berkeley which is about five minutes from where i grew up and when i was in high school is a new brand called german logica and so i always knew what was new on what was going on in beauty When i moved east to go to graduate school in boston a chance to drive forty five minutes. Divide act lipstick which was only sold at bengals in one place and on top of that it was the beginning of the i e commerce bom in fact we had just gotten our own email addresses and google and all the search and all the businesses that are here today did not exist. There was an obscure moore came to business school to talk about his business. He was talking about how he was going to bring books to the internet. And i was completely floored. jeff bezos. Only thirty people came to his talk. I was inspired by this new potential world out there that i couldn't even imagine and so started to think about what products i could bring to. The internet moved to dc after grad school and started blue mercury to bring luxury beauty products to the internet so initially inspired by jeff bezos in my obsession with beauty and we were one of the first to bring brands to the internet. Act of nineteen ninety. Nine week quickly realized that were too early. Not everybody was shopping online in fact everybody was on. Aol dial up and it used to take forever to get online and so we were just too early with that idea and so we pivoted and i laugh because were pivot didn't exist then we we were actually. Almost bankrupt realized we needed to do something different. And so we opened our first beauty store in washington. Dc georgetown back then you could only buy cosmetics at drugstores or department stores. There was no such thing as a free standing beauty store and We thought why not create this environment. Where staff were trained in all france where you could touch and feel products and that You could get makeup application and spa services in one place if you think back to them and i know a lot of people up did not shout back then who may be listening but everything was behind glass counters at department stores and you go up to the counter and ask someone to touch things to try things and i was in my twenties and i felt like no one really wanted to help me because i will spend money so this idea. The freestanding neighborhood beauty store was revolutionary at the time. And i remember i was so happy. Our first clients used to come in and screaming that they could touch products find find obscure brands get advice on a bunch of brands in their beauty problems and also get spa services in the same location as so now is the start of blue mercury. We wrote a bunch of different ways. The ecommerce wave and this move from buying beauty products at at department stores to buy beauty products in specialty stores so it was really the beginning and it took us a long time to build business. I've been at it for twenty one years so excited to have been building blue mercury for all that time. I love that. What seems as an overnight success to people when they read about your acquisition is like oh no. I've been doing this for twenty one years. I almost went bankrupt. You know it just goes to show you. And i and i. I like to talk about that. Because i think people think that i'm an overnight success and i've been doing this for twenty years. Now there's a lot of blocking and tackling around and usually your initial idea is completely wrong right. I think you have to have humility to realize that you're wrong. You need to change directions and we were humble in the first year pretty quickly and made. It's really sort of try to deal in truth and build a real business that had value for customer saying i think we got caught up in the first internet craze and it was exciting and fun and then we realized that we had to spend our time knowing and understanding what people want what they need and beauty and then just really took our time building the business and building an enduring company so when you were faced with bankruptcy being too early to the e com days how did you guys have the bravery or even funds to open your first brick and mortar. It's it's a great question. In fact we had received investment for the e commerce business and our investors hated the idea of doing a store because back then all value was pure play e commerce. And so my husband. I barry actually used our own money to do the first store.

Plumer Jeff Bezos Marla Bengals Berkeley Grad School Moore Boston AOL California Georgetown DC Google France Washington Barry
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

07:42 min | 2 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"I wanna i wanna tell you Quick story and get your feedback on. Because i'm seeing a lot more of this kind of today's Watch jets and yachts and social media world right into so fascinating. So i was recently a former like a year ago. Pre code at a friend's house in he's done done business deals together and both on like on chat on his phone like the basque green wallpaper of his on his phone and on a poster on his wall on the screen here on his computer he had this fifty five slash fifty five. And i was like i generally don't like to things like that because their personal for people but i see a lot of solid multiple places and i had done business dealing. I'm like hey man. Just if you don't mind me asking you can say. Give them the permission to say no. Don't let me ask you. What is this fifty five slash fifty five and he says to me chad. He's like well And he's forty one right and he says to me Sharana i wanna have a fifty five million dollar net worth before. I'm fifty five okay. Why is that well You know that's that's my vision. I go okay is like i'm just curious like let's say you don't hit it until you're fifty six. I guess that's okay. And i'm like well i don't understand. Why does it matter then. He's like well. I'm not just waiting from your goals. When was the last time you hit a life mate. Two million dollar a year. He's like. I've never had a million dollar okay so i didn't wanna press it but i think it's In we're not the business of dissuading or a making people stunt that. I'm actually super glad that he had doug much specificity associated with it but when someone comes like walks into your office and says while cam forty one and i want thirty million dollar network before i'm fifty five whether it seems rational or not. I heard you think that's extremely exacerbated by like today's social media. Especially like i get. I you probably get direct messages from kids all over the place saying he. I wanna be. I wanna be a billionaire. And i'm like do you're sixteen like cool but you know i that's the i wanted to know crush someone's dreams so if i know that it's not our jobs to judge but i'm asking you for some coaching here. If i if someone walks in a shared this goal or seems it seems like a bee hag. How do you is this. How do you approach it in a time. Where you say okay. Well let's build plan forward or what's your process. We're going through two things number. One always all of our questions that are team. Ask in the initial goals. Conversation are followed up with a so that similar to your wine question. So if someone says i want to have twenty thousand a month in rental real estate income i to know why so. We're gonna say so. That what i don't know i just heard that's like a good amount to have at passive income this that it doesn't really make sense. So we're gonna we're gonna push people to give us that y and frankly once they identified a wider more motivated to actually reach goal anyways. So we go to so that eventually like we had some Too so that. I'm not worried about taking care of my special needs daughter in my old age because i know the medical costs are going to skyrocket and i just wanna have if i lose my job or something has to be. I wanna have some investments that pay this much because she'll never have to worry about your medical care and man that's motivating feel that in the art. Because he had a goal say my special needs daughter is going to be taken care of. No matter what the second point i would say is. You're focused on the wrong number. Get fifty five million are net worth. Is it's meaningless in chapter. I'll go back to the book. Your chapter chapter three obstacle three focusing on the wrong number literally the chapter so it it talks about the two things that people all focus on number one just the total the total value of your financial accounts or your net worth either one. That's a wrong number that does that's that's not as meaningful as just like a scorecard for someone's ego secondly it's the roi. What was my return last year. What was when. I returned this court. I got eleven percent. All you got fifteen or i got nine was my return when really wanna talk about the book is the number you've got to be focusing on. Is your cash flow money going in money coming in winning going out so the two reasons to invest our because he wants to get cash flow now or you want to get cash flow later if it's cash flow later you've gotta grow your investments your in growth phase your accumulation phase rights your buildings on some point. Turn on that faucet and started taking about or your income now investor. That's different so. I really think the the total net worth like you said the social media focus of dislike gonna have this net worth. I need to have five million or ten million. Whatever the number is that meaningful. We've gotta look at what you're doing in your life. What your goals are with purposes. And how much does it cost like. Where's that cash flow coming in so that you can be comfortable really financial. Freedom is the absence of worry about money. So absence of worry about money comes when that cash flow is positive. And you're passive income far exceed your expenses. That's really that simple. Yeah that's that's that's so good I i had this this. I call this When you're in my time with goldman one of my mentors told me he goes all these. I will built these crazy. Successful businesses. don't have money coach. And i said well. What do you mean by money coach. He's like no no no not the kind of person that tells them what to do with their money. Not the kind of tells the person tells them where to spend and how not to spend and where to invest in house like what he goes is amazing thing that he said most of these entrepreneurs don't have anybody that they can open up to and just Just talk about freely about monday true and in he was telling me he's like shawn he mentored me. The business news like toronto. Let's when we go to meetings. Like when i ask when you ask a question to one of the people like say the spouse say the wife and look at the husband's face. There's most often a lot of times. There is incongruency and so much that even partners and business partners they're like oh my gosh if not equal partners. Let's chad seventy percents. Toronto thirty percent. We've got a ten thousand dollar game now chides thinking well if i got seven thousand. She's gonna feel weird that he's only going to get three like he goes. These games are seen and if someone can talk if you have a forum to talk about money freely. Dot itself becomes a lot more familiar and less stressful in. What are your thoughts around around that. That's a great point on. That really is actually. I know this often. People clients have confided in me basically said like Celebrate your winds brag to us. We love it like we're celebrating. You were were excited for your wins and like you said often times they have. No one can really bragging celebrate with.

doug goldman shawn toronto Toronto
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"Hey today got something cool for you. Today's actually a reverse podcast. And what happened. Was i recently did an interview with my friend. Jared gets who is an awesome entrepreneur and also runs the modern soul. Podcast so what i want you do. Right now is hit pause and go and subscribe to the modern soul podcasts. check out the last few interviews. And he's putting out to insane content. You will love his energy his inquisitiveness and his influence. And he's thinking about older completely different way. Some really excited for that. And went. Jared and i went through this the first thing i have can emailed them after like. Hey would you be okay. If i actually shared our entire interview on my show. Could i just because what we did what we went through the storytelling. The insights was so on point. Because of jared energy and more importantly because of the topics that we covered we covered the topics we cover were about focus about productivity about being intentional. About how you actually get stuff done without creating stress and overwhelm all the stuff. They actually do not teach you in business school which is exactly what my show and my mission is all about today with jared's permission and What is also going to be featured on. The modern soul is a An interview that. I did with my friend jerry guts. So get ready for that and it starts right now. One thing is.

Jared jared jerry
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

01:51 min | 4 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"One thing is for certain just because it's tried-and-true doesn't mean it's working right now. So the question is this where can you learn? What is working right now? The strategies the tactics the psychology and the exact how to how to grow your business how to blow up your personal break and supercharged your personal growth. That is the question and this podcast will give you the answer. My name is Sharon Travolta and welcome to Business School..

Sharon Travolta Business School
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

03:33 min | 5 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"Right? And so we break it down real small 52 themes. I'm all about themes, huh, right? There's fifty two weeks in a year and I guarantee you you can you know, fifty two things that you wish your people were doing if you just sit down take the time to write it out. So we take it we set a theme for the week and that's what we trained on all week. Yeah throughout that throughout that meeting right? So first one in the room and I always set the tone some type of encouraging music don'ts don't start with heavy metal Metallica Slayer Ozzy Osbourne, like you don't want to start your meeting with kill music. So let's start with crazy like sexual. Music or crazy cuss word music like that. You're just you're you're messing with people's minds man. You don't start with something positive and encouraging like that's uplifting that gets the body moving slow. And so we set some music. I'm the first one in the room and part another part of the reason. I'm the first one in the room is now I can listen and people are coming in dude. That's where the Gold's at grow. So long Sharon walks in the room and he's talking to Josephine and I hear him mentioning his grandfather sick, right or Thomas comes in the room and he's hanging out with Terence. I hear them talking about how they were playing fortnite until 3:30 in the morning last night. Right? Like that's where you catch the good stuff and then later I can come to you outside of the meeting and Hayes Hayes wrong. And how's your how's your grandfather Yeah, how you doing with that has that going right and I can show you that I care about the things that you care about or I can go to Terrance and go. Hey Terrance, bro. You probably shouldn't be up till 3:30 in the morning wage. Fortnite. Did you only got six sales over here on the board? But like dude, I'll buy you a PlayStation 4 with the whole Fortnight package..

Hayes Hayes Terrance Ozzy Osbourne Thomas Terence Sharon Josephine
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

05:54 min | 5 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"One thing is for certain just because it's tried-and-true doesn't mean it's working right now. So the question is this where can you learn? What is working right now? The strategies the tactics the psychology and the exact how to how to grow your business how to blow up your personal life and supercharged your personal growth. That is the question and this podcast will give you the answer. My name is Sharon Travolta and welcome to Business School. So glad you got to tell me about this 800% club thing man. We're that's the person who's recording hit play on this episode. They're like 800% What is that song? What's the state hundred percent? So the 800% club is my way of working with owners and general managers of car dealerships all across the country and really where it came from is I worked at a small dealership in a small town. I started there in 2011 and we were able to grow that dealership 800% off over a period of just under six years..

Sharon Travolta Business School
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

03:10 min | 5 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"One thing is for certain just because it's tried-and-true doesn't mean it's working right now. So the question is this where can you learn? What is working right now? The strategies the tactics the psychology and the exact how to how to grow your business how to blow up your personal life and supercharged your personal growth. That is the question and this podcast will give you the answer. My name is Sharon Travolta and welcome to Business School. So glad you got to tell me about this 800% club thing man. We're that's the person who's recording hit play on this episode. They're like 800% What is that song? What's the state hundred percent? So the 800% club is my way of working with owners and general managers of car dealerships all across the country and really where it came from is I worked at a small dealership in a small town. I started there in 2011 and we were able to grow that dealership 800% off over a period of just under six years..

Sharon Travolta Business School
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

05:04 min | 8 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"Don't go in there alone. and. That's so it's so crazy when I hear that right like it's totally true because for high achievers. A that's literally kind of what you're saying is so which is so amazing. So. Let me ask you a transitionary question here so what you did. This brings me to kind of why we're here. Business School. What you did was. You took you launched your book. A lot of people say hey. You know what I have this message in story to share with the world I'm Gonna I'm gonNA write this piece of this body of work, and then I'm going to spend the rest of my life promoting it and getting it in the hands of people, but you're able to completely compress that curve because you. Whether it was by accident or whether it was by design. You did it in a very thoughtful way meaning what you did was you launched the book on top of a platform that you already built where you could? Instantly after you wrote the book, You were able to get it in the hands of people, you able to get the message out and I think. You and I. Are you and I know. How many messages do you and I know that are beautiful well written, but they'll never see the light of day because people just don't have the platform for it. And and and So many conversations that we've had you know you've shared. Hey, one of the primary ways in which you really went from zero, actually having nothing from a social presence perspective or a platform perspective. To, today is on Lincoln. And how you've leveraged their platform, and you'd literally you knew nothing about when you when you started, but what I love about it is is mark when you. The order, in which you built this body of work I actually don't think that in this short amount of time you would have been able to reach this many people without that platform. Yeah no hands down. One hundred percent like I tend to think that. The biggest reasons for my professional success are my internal success first and foremost obviously, but then also lengthen, and also my podcast to, and I totally agree with you. There's that hope there's like that whole quote that says. If you build it. They will come and I think that that might have applied like twenty thirty forty fifty years ago, but the reality is is like you said there are so many people out there. That have amazing meaningful, heartfelt messages, but. They're not getting out there and personally for me. That's what's enabled me to like. Make my book a bestseller. I've had people like Dan. Pink endorsed my book interest like the craziest amount of praise and accolades and numbers in terms of selling and getting this idea out there that there's no way disorder been possible and. You know for me I got on Lincoln in two thousand and seventeen I always kind of had Lincoln. I remember I was in some like tech class in high school and they're like. Hey, you gotta make Lincoln because it's like how you get a job and you put your resume up there right I just always kinda use it as A. Member in two thousand seventeen when I had started my podcast, I interviewed. A friend of mine. Who Said Oh? Wait, you're before we start this podcast you mind if I post on Lincoln real quick and I was like wait. You can post on link. Is Up to that time I didn't know they had a content feed right like facebook or Instagram I thought that it was like this online resume and I like began to to look around out experiment data and the first.

Lincoln facebook Business School Pink Dan A. Member
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

04:04 min | 9 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"He gave me the three who dance. He's nailed it and I took that recording on. I shared with my mastermind group. And that was the beginning of my relationship with Seth Godin. Now That was I could have easily said anything else, but I didn't at an ask for anything else after that. I'd already invested in hundreds of books at argued invested in the time he saw that and he was able to allow me that gift. There are times when I've done something similar to people. Were they never even responded? Where have gotten a lot of no, not interested? No, I'm not ready for it. In fact I offered a author that are really like just a super smart guy that lives in San Francisco in fact I. was introduced to him by our advisor, meaning him and I share the same adviser like. Legal, adviser. and. He took my call, but he literally did not want. To engage with me. Support me for whatever reason. He was probably busy, and he says hey I'm busy with my team. I can't do this right now. Now I have literally taken that personally but I didn't. I, took it personally for a little bit. But, but it didn't. I didn't let it bother me too much so number ten. Don't take it personally because. By the time you've gotten to this point, you've already done all the work. That is insanely amazing for you. That is my ten step blueprint on how to find a mentor how to find a mentor. That can get you the upgrade the result that you want. I'm going to give you a quick recap of my ten steps, and if this is helpful to you, you know, pass it on share with someone because I, I hope that you can take this and installed this framework into your life, and then to your business, so it can help you grow and change dramatically. Number One. Be a metric I number to get crystal. Clear on what you want right now because we're just in time, learners and Even, if that clarity is just getting clarity..

Seth Godin San Francisco advisor
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

04:53 min | 9 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"Imagine if I got that literally what you're telling me is hey sean. I've been. Following you read everything that you put out a dedicated a whole month to you I made a shrine on of everything that you've done. Based on all of that. I have a bunch of these questions I literally I looked at everything that you've done can't find answers to these questions. I would be super appreciative if you would. If I can interview you for those seven questions because it'll be a really thoughtful interview in fact, if you don't want to give me that time, I'll send you the seven questions in advance, and you can just answer them. In your own time. If I got that I would feel deeply compelled to take that interview if I got that I would feel deeply. Inspired to give you that time because of your symbol of seriousness that you put in everything that you've already done to create this body of work so far. Dot How you make the ask. You don't say hey. Sean I love Your Work I. WanNa, make billions. Can You be my mentor like? What that means right. This method is way easier. That's how you ask for an interview. Because once you ask for an interview, it becomes way better for that right. It becomes way better after that. Because now that person already knows that you are serious. That person already knows that you're an action taker. Those are the two things those are the two things that people always want to know that. Are you serious and are you an action taker? Every mentors, every mentor and coaches. Worst nightmare is having someone. That's not serious frivolous. And who is all talk and no action because all their time is insanely wasted in this entire process. This allows you to show that you're deeply serious and I call it the symbol seriousness. And also shows that you're an action taker. Pretty Amazing Right. All right number that was number eight asked for the interview would ask for it intelligently number nine..

Sean
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

05:48 min | 9 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"Five number six number seven Marie. Imagine you've built this digital shrine of this person. How Amazing Guts Shrine now stands the test of time, other people can benefit from it. Other people will tag that person. Other people will look at that now, not only. Have you learned from the work? Not only have you dedicated a piece of shrine that person, but you've created A. Encompassing body of work that the world can learn from, and that is the true gift that you're giving to the mentor even before the relationship starts. Make a digital shrine, a Lotta Times people I have one of my. Private clients. Email and asked me he's like Sean. How can I help you and I'm like? I have no idea that's that's a weird question. That's like saying. Will you be my mentor? But I said you know if WANNA support somebody every day for five ten fifteen days. Do and instagram story about them. Tell other people to follow them tag them on it. Don't we can see the consistency and the cadence of how you're creating this ongoing digital shrine of this person because now I know that you've done way more than Gimme a mentioned linked post. I know what you've done. Is You've done it with cadence and consistency and courage? In collaboration that I can learn from and as A. As a as a mentor I'm like wow, that's awesome if he is also serious that he do that if he reached out I would totally help this person. Mega digital shrine and you'd be shocked as to how amazing amazing that will be. Numbers number seven. Right up ten questions, you would ask them if you had to interview them. Right up ten questions. You would ask them if you had to interview them. And these ten questions get can be three. It can be ten I'm asking you to do ten. Because tend to nice fun number, but right at the ten questions. You would ask them if you had to interview them like. Let's say you're talking you. Read about something, and you want to go deeper and it right that let's say you read about something you saw them. Say something, and it has a different perspective on. On Your Life that you needed them to go deeper with a specific situation in your life or in your business, maybe you have a business partner struggle, maybe you. Maybe you have a philosophical struggle whether you should keep your.

Amazing Guts Shrine Marie instagram Sean partner
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

05:30 min | 9 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"It hit pause on the Youtube in it I think Malcolm's going to answer this way and I'd I'd on pause it and of course I would be pretty close, and it's amazing, because now you really hardwired. They're learning into yours you you've you've collapsed decade worth experience into days. And you've downloaded them into. You literally played the Matrix her. You've downloaded the program. India super powerful. and. That alone will give you such a leg up. Nobody does that level of deep dive. People just want to. Just you know their influence, or they follow influencers all day, and they think that they're going to get this fragmented knowledge, but when you go deep on somebody with a very specific, if x could mentor me to learn why that I can accomplish chief, you know that format powerful powerful things start to happen. That's number four. Do a deep dive on each of them, and you'll know right away. Which one of them is going to be the right fit for you? All right now, let's assume that. Malcolm loud was the right fit for me and fact the one of the other people that I you know from a storytelling perspective that I that I singled out and put on my radar was Seth Godin Seth Godin is an amazing author writer, thinker, teacher, and he I love his I. Love his ability to tell stories and seth was one of those people. That I did a deep dive on? And what I decided to do after I did that was like okay. What do we do next I really like seventy south is a right mentor here. What do I do next? And here's step five of this process. Let me recap steps one through four for you. One More Time Number One be a mentor I number to get clear on your goals. Number three finish the sentence if X. Could Mentor ME TO LEARN WHY. I can accomplish the number four do a deep dive on each of them number five. Appreciate, and recognize them in public. Right, appreciate and recognize them in public. So I went on a mad almost twenty thirty day where I would read an article about Seth Godin Post about him. I would share something about him. I would I would recognize his article. I would share my the his emails with my friends. I would put them on my blog I would send out to my left. I actually did a series of the find my five best quotes from Seth. Godin into my you know to. My email is richest which has tens of thousands of people. I literally recognize them in public, and I tagged them on every post on Lincoln I wanted them to know that I wanted to get on their radar. I just wanted to get on their radar, not from a perspective of I want you to mentor me, but more from the perspective of appreciation and recognition, because once data's the way someone connects with you. then. Everything else becomes.

Seth Godin Seth Godin Seth Godin Malcolm Youtube Lincoln India x writer
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

03:32 min | 9 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"To learn why then I can accomplish, see see it again of X. could mentor me to learn why then I can accomplish see right? Once you pick three people that can help you accomplish that goal. Now it gets interesting now. It gets interesting, because now you know the exact result that you want. Number One be a mentor I number to get clear on your goals. Number three finish the sentence Ev- could mentor me to learn why then I can accomplish. See. You picked three people who can do that. Number four once I picked these three people. Here's what I do I. Do a deep dive on each of them. I do a straight up deep dive on each of them, so let's say. I believe that Warren Buffett could be a great mentor to me I do a deep dive, but I do it with the filter of that sentence. A fill in the blank X. could mentor me learn why that I can accomplish. See I. do it with that in mind. Because once I do that in mind. My deep dive makes a lot of sense by deep dive has a lot of perspective. Deep dive is a lot more clear. I'm not just reading. Their biography I'm not is listening to their blog their podcast. I'm not just watching their interviews. I'm not just watching their youtube videos. I am doing something a lot more specific I am. My my brain is now like a heat seeking missile, and it's trying to help me get this upgrade, so that I can get the specific result. That's when I started to a deep dive on each of them, and let me give you the process of doing a deep dive on each of them. I pick. A three month period and I take each mentor a dig each personality at each person on I just go deep on them for a month. When I say, go deep on them for a month. What I'm trying to tell you is that I literally deep dive meaning. I read everything that they've put out..

Warren Buffett Ev
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

05:42 min | 9 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"You don't know the gap. You don't know what is between you and that goal. And it's really hard to figure out the support system coaches, the mentors. The advisers that you need to help you get you there. You're literally. Don't know whether you need somebody tactical. You'd literally don't know what you need. Someone of the connection you're literally. Don't know who can compress that gap for you. So you absolutely need clarity on goals before you get a mentor now. There's a caveat to this and let me explain this. You absolutely need clarity on your goals before you find a mentor because it allows them to kind of jump into the slipstream of conversation with you so that they can support you. But even if your goal is to get clarity with your goals, that is still good clarity that needs clarity. It's a tongue twister right there, even if the entire goal is to get clarity. That's good clarity. That just means that you're unsure of. What path to take in life? That's okay. Let's call that out because someone can help you with that. I can help you with that. There's a lot of people that can help you with that. But I need to know that you have clarity and what you're trying to accomplish, even if that clarity is getting clarity, you're starting to see a little pattern here. Because a lot of people put the cart before the Horse, a lot of people just want the mentor, and they think they can outsource the success to the mentor, but that's not the point. The point is you want this. You WanNa slot up mentor in the right in the right place so that you can dramatically collapsed time to get you the result that you want. To number one be a metric I number to get crystal clear on your goals, even if the entire goal is getting clarity number three. I want you to finish this sentence. I want you to finish the sentence. If X person if. Experts. Could Mentor me to learn why I can accomplish Z. X. Person Could Mentor me to learn why I can accomplish Z. All right if experts. Could help me..

"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

04:57 min | 9 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"Learn to be a coach to someone else really quickly you learn the mechanics of coaching learn the mechanics of mentoring learn the mechanics of staying open. You learn the mechanics of holding the space. There's a lot to being a coach and a mentor that most people don't know about just because you're good, something doesn't mean. You can be good at teaching it, and just because you're good. Opening up doesn't mean you could be coach able. If, you took nothing away from today, and you wanted to shut this podcast down right now. I will tell you this be a mentor I, and who can I be a mentor to make that commitment and I would say if you're looking for a timeframe. You got to do that for six months to a year. Because only Dan does it really kinda come to life, but that just that dude once that makes you gives you insane perspective, and you open up the valves of being coach. -able. Having the right mental in your life having the right perspective, because until then until then you're going to have this entitled attitude of Hey I'm happy to write a check or I want someone else to be a mentor. That just doesn't work. Be a mentor first and then everything else starts to happen all right. Let's go to number two. I. Want you to get really clear on your goals. Because most mentors can't help Byu if they don't know what the goal is, so I'll give you a simple example. There's a wrong way to do it right. I get drunk messages or on instagram emails often in my list. Saying Hey Sharon. I love your story I. Want To make billions. Will you mentor me? All thanks but I I literally have no idea what that means. The problem has nothing to do that. This is coming from a stranger the problem. has nothing to do with the script. It has nothing to the goal of making billions of dollars. Either I appreciate all of that. The problem is I have no idea what this request even means. When someone says, will you mentor me? The guy have no idea what it means. So. We have to clarify that very specifically. Right. Because, nobody has any clue because it means something different to each person based on their own experience of the concept of mentorship. Maybe, you're asking someone to mentor you. WHO's had a very bad relationship with mentorship they denver would naturally want want to help you. Maybe someone like me. WHO's at a very positive relationship? But then I don't know how to even start the relationship. So my suggestion to you is this I please don't ask that question to anyone right? Will you mentor me a very bad question to ask that question of anyone because they don't know what it means, and it has the lack of clarity, and you're starting to relationship out on a terrible foot on the wrong. Literally, it's an awkward question to ask, and it's an even more awkward question to be asked that. And most importantly. Has Ever Gotten a worthy mentor by asking that question. So let's not ask that question all right. Let's ask the question so without solving this I. Want to tell you this without solving this. You will never actually be able dukes. Get your step in the right direction. I like the score lot, which says nothing great ever happened without it being written down nothing great ever happened without it. Being written down the first step to doing anything is to figure out..

Byu instagram Dan
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

01:47 min | 9 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"It may be any of those. But until we can create. A mentoring relationship until we can be mentor I until you can be a mentor I. You don't really know what it takes and let me tell you what I mean by that. When you have your meetings. Do they come prepared? And how frustrated do you get when they don't? When you have your meetings and you have a conversation and you give them a piece of advice that you know that you know in your bones to be true. But they don't follow it. How does it make you feel? When, they tell you that they're going to do something they don't, and you have to hold them accountable to it and he's still brush it off. How does it make you feel? Learning to be a mentor I learned to be a coach. I is very very powerful thing. I was very fortunate that. After. We sold our first business. I spent five years. On helping build several tennis and golf programs around the world. That's where I actually met my first business partner on the tennis court. and. I spent I'll tell you this spent time learning to teach tennis I was a good tennis player. I play on the pro tour. Good tennis player, not amazing, but it was good. I was better than better than ninety nine percent of them so I thought I could teach. And My. M I C of my company at that time. WHO IS You Know Amazing Tennis Teaching Professional told me this, he said. I want you to do one hundred unpaid. Coaching. Tennis, Lessons. That are critiqued to literally he said have somebody that is really good. Watch you teach a lesson..

tennis partner
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

05:35 min | 9 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"Hey, this is Sharon and in this episode I breakdown one of the most common questions that I get asked. In fact, it is so important that if I had had this ten fifteen twenty years ago, it would have changed my life forever and that is. How do I find a mentor in fact? I breakdown eight ten step blueprint on how you can find a mentor, and most importantly it talks about exactly the first step to finding a mentor how to not attract the wrong mentors and the magic question that every meant. He should ask all this wrapped up into a really tactical episode for you to kick off this episode of the Business School Show enjoy. One thing is for certain. Just because it's tried and true doesn't mean it's working right now, so the big question is this. Where can you learn what is working right now? The strategies the tactics psychology the exact how to how to grow your business. How to blow up your personal brand and supercharge your personal growth. That is the question and this podcast will give you the answer. My name is Sharon tree, butter and welcome to business school..

Sharon tree
"business school" Discussed on Business School

Business School

02:10 min | 10 months ago

"business school" Discussed on Business School

"Thousands of entrepreneurs on every single day. On I'm an investor and adviser to some amazing companies. In fact entrepreneurship is in my blood as both. My parents started a business out of our one bedroom apartment and grew it over many years, so you can see I literally lived in like a business school. and. That's one of the many reasons why I'm super excited to launch. My New podcast called the business school show very simple. I wanted to do this short trailer episode to to share with you why this is a a must listen show for you and more importantly how this can be. Continuous business mind that you have and you've always wanted to stay plugged into so every week. I'll be sharing episodes specifically designed to help. You do these three big things. Got To find a way number one to grow your business strategically number two to build your brand. elegantly a number three. Most importantly to integrate the prophets in your business to hopefully have an overall joyful life, right? Listen. You don't have any time for fluff. And if you've been with me in my universe for any amount of time, you know that I'm no fluff. No gimmicks straight up truth Kinda Guy. This is about a new kind of business school that I wanNA share with you where we literally bring everything to life, it's about like actual strategies and tactics about the technology psychology, and even the exact scripts that we use. Look I went to business school I get it, but what I've learned outside of business school has helped me tremendously and I. Really Want that same thing for you. I'm also going to be bringing on brilliant minds for my personal advisory board, my personal network to help you get the most from this podcast as well so do me a favor. Be Sure to subscribe wherever you're listening to this from, so you don't miss out on any of the upcoming episode just smashed that button and I would be super super thankful if you shared this link to the show on social media and just tack me that way I know. Keep an eye out for episode one. That's coming very soon right here until then. My name is shree signing off on the brand new business.

advisory board