35 Burst results for "Business Rockstars"

Aether Beauty's Rose Quartz Crystal Palette is Cruelty Free

Best of Business Rockstars

01:06 min | 6 months ago

Aether Beauty's Rose Quartz Crystal Palette is Cruelty Free

"Our guest is Tyler Abbott. She is the founder of a third beauty. Good to have you back. Thank you for having me. So you make vegan cosmetics? What are they exactly? Their cosmetics that don't use any animal derived ingredients by animals. You mean no. No animals, no furry animals, no insects, correct. Anything that's ever been alive that ever breathed and moved whatsoever. And when I say insects, I mean things like bees, wax and whatnot. Right? And there's definitely, um pigments that are derived from Beatles. So you cannot use that in your pigments. Interesting. Okay, so we actually have a palette here. This is here. Your first big product. Tell me a little bit about it. This is the rose quartz Crystal gemstone palette, So it's completely vegan cruelty free and then we use organic and fair trade ingredients as well. And it's the rose quartz palette, so each shade is infused with actual rose quartz, and not just because crystals are cool and trending. But there's a reason so rose Quartz actually helps. Prevent against fine lines and wrinkles and

Tyler Abbott
How to leverage social media for business

Business Rockstars

01:18 min | 11 months ago

How to leverage social media for business

"Mistakes, so to speak, that people are making when it comes to online because, you know, I always say that there's literally like newborn babies on social media. All we have to, you know, you've got your older people who are just starting Tonto catch up to the trends of social media is starting to really learn about it. And so we've got everybody from the whole spectrum of ages from all over the world over a billion people alone. Just use Facebook. So what are some of the mistakes you see people making and what are some things that people should be there? When it comes to leveraging social media for their businesses. Well, I think it goes back to being culturally aware. So one mistake that springs to mind is coke that sent a bunch of you know young white kids to Mexico to launch a new type of coke. When you bottle. I don't remember the exact thing there. But that was seen as being very ingratiating to the Mexicans that they needed. These, you know, white kids from the US to come and show them how to do something. Was making really know exactly so I think he really got to do still the deep research and now there's a lot of information available about audiences, different cultures, how those things are going to be received. So just because somebody else made something go viral doesn't mean it will translate very well. And typically, if you try to replicate somebody else's viral campaign, it'll fall flat. Second time round and the good news is is that in the if

Coke Facebook Mexico United States
"We can't go home for Christmas if we do not do this," says McConnell

Business Rockstars

01:05 min | 1 year ago

"We can't go home for Christmas if we do not do this," says McConnell

"Going home for the holidays until some form of a stimulus packages in place. USA Radio News Dan Iraqi explains. Congressional leaders met again on Tuesday to try and hammer out a deal on a coronavirus stimulus package and a spending bill to fund the government passed this week. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he felt there was progress of that meeting at the group would meet again soon. He told reporters that Congress would not leave for a holiday break without a deal on a covert relief bill. Shots have been administered. Hope is on the way, and our job here is to guarantee that just enough money to facilitate the delivery as well as to do other things that we can agree on. And as I've said repeatedly number one. We're not leaving here without a covert attack. It's not gonna happen. The group is negotiating over to Bill's released this week by a bipartisan group one that contains money for small businesses, unemployment insurance extensions. Rules and vaccine distribution. The other contains the more contentious proposals with $160 billion in aid for state and local governments and liability protections for businesses against covert related lawsuits from the USA Radio News, Ohio Bureau I'm Dan Iraqi. The first cares Act was signed into law by President Trump On March

Dan Iraqi Usa Radio Mitch Mcconnell Senate Congress Government Bill Usa Radio News Ohio President Trump
John le Carré, author of 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy,' dies at 89

Business Rockstars

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

John le Carré, author of 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy,' dies at 89

"Folks around the world are mourning the death of a popular author acclaimed British by author John le Carre, according to his literary agency, the car. It was the author of more than 20 novels and was best known for his stories featuring British intelligence Officer George Smiley. Many of those Cold War spy thrillers have been adapted for film and television. Most famously tinker, Tailor, Soldier Spy, the Russia House and the Tailor of Panama. His latest novel agent running in the field, was released last October. McCarey was

John Le Carre George Smiley Russia Panama Mccarey
Belichick makes it clear: 'Cam's our quarterback'

Business Rockstars

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Belichick makes it clear: 'Cam's our quarterback'

"Rams stop the searching New England Patriots 24 to 3 was about 10 minutes left in the game. Patriots head coach Bill Belichick polled quarterback Cam Newton out of the game. Asked after the game Bill made it clear Cam is still his guy can record a Cam Newton after their seventh loss this season, the first time since 2002. The Patriots have lost this many games in a season. He knew exactly what they were gonna do. We just gotta be better, and it starts to me personally set to make more plays and Sort of calm down. So just do what? I'm asked that the necessary go on station every week with the mentality that keep getting better, and that's what I plan on doing. So we just have to be better collectively, and he's right. I think you know we didn't play a good style of Brandon football tonight, and they did, and they made my place and us something That's them. Winning. Next. The Patriots play Miami on the 20th and the Rams host the winless Jets.

Patriots Cam Newton Bill Belichick Rams New England CAM Bill Football Miami Jets
Winter Covid surge is the 'worst event that this country will face,' White House health advisor Birx says

Business Rockstars

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Winter Covid surge is the 'worst event that this country will face,' White House health advisor Birx says

"Coronavirus Response coordinator, Dr Deborah Birds called out governors and mayors for not putting enough restrictions and Americans were not doing what they have been asked on NBC's Meet the Press this fall winter surge is combining everything that we saw in the spring. With everything that we saw in the summer. This is not just the worst public health event. This is the worst event that this country will face not just from a public house side yet. We know what behaviors spread the virus and we know how to change those behaviors to stop spreading the virus. There's

Coronavirus Response Dr Deborah Birds Meet The Press NBC
Champion Ken Jennings will be first interim 'Jeopardy!' host

Business Rockstars

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Champion Ken Jennings will be first interim 'Jeopardy!' host

"Holder King Jennings will be the first in a series of interim host when the long running game show resumes production next Monday, Jennings 1 74 games in a row and cleaned the show's greatest of all time title and a competition last year. Host episodes that will air in January. A permanent host to replaced. Longtime host Alex Trebek will be named later. Trebek died of pancreatic cancer earlier this month in

Holder King Jennings Jennings Alex Trebek Trebek Pancreatic Cancer
UK to impose new rules to limit tech giants' power

Business Rockstars

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

UK to impose new rules to limit tech giants' power

"Is fighting back against Big tech United Kingdom will oppose new rules next year to prevent Google and Facebook from using their dominance to push out smaller firms and disadvantage consumers. The code will be enforced by a dedicated unit within the competition and markets Authority or CMA. The sea may wants to crack down on Internet giants swallowing up smaller firms, and it's set to issue detailed plans in December. The

Competition And Markets Author United Kingdom Facebook Google CMA
Dallas Cowboys Strength And Conditioning Coordinator Markus Paul Passes Away At 54

Business Rockstars

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas Cowboys Strength And Conditioning Coordinator Markus Paul Passes Away At 54

"Conditioning coordinator for the Dallas Cowboys passed away on Wednesday. The 54 year old collapsed Tuesday in his office at Team headquarters. He was treated by team medical staff and transported to a hospital in placed on life support. He was surrounded by family as he passed Marcus Paul was in his 21st season, is a strength and conditioning coach before he joined Dallas in 2018. He spent 11 years in the roll with the Giants prior to coaching. He played for Syracuse, where he was team captain and a two time all American defensive back market. Paul's cause of death is still pending from the Texas USA Radio News Bureau. I'm Val d'Or. US radio

Marcus Paul Dallas Cowboys Dallas Giants Syracuse Texas Usa Radio News Bureau Paul United States
Prominent Sled Dog Races Event In Boston Area Canceled Due To COVID Concerns

Business Rockstars

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Prominent Sled Dog Races Event In Boston Area Canceled Due To COVID Concerns

"International dog sled race that draws thousands of Spectators to northern New England for 30 years will not take place in 2021 because of the pandemic organizer said the event and Fort Kent, Maine. The can am Crown International dog sled races wouldn't be safe to hold this year. Plus the races would have also been complicated by border restrictions in place between The United States and Canada.

Fort Kent New England Maine United States Canada
Anthony Edwards Drafted No. 1 by the Minnesota Timberwolves

Business Rockstars

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Anthony Edwards Drafted No. 1 by the Minnesota Timberwolves

"Month away, the MBA finally held his draft Wednesday night with the University of Georgia's Anthony Edwards going first overall to the Minnesota Timberwolves. Edwards at 6 FT five guard from Atlanta was the Southeastern Conference freshman of the year last season and let all freshmen in the nation averaging 19.1 points a game. Memphis center James Wiseman went second to the Golden State Warriors and low mellow ball went third to the Charlotte Hornets after playing in Lithuania and Australia last season for

Anthony Edwards University Of Georgia Minnesota Timberwolves James Wiseman Edwards Atlanta Memphis Golden State Warriors Hornets Charlotte Lithuania Australia
Biden calls Trump's refusal to concede an "embarrassment" as he moves ahead with transition

Business Rockstars

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Biden calls Trump's refusal to concede an "embarrassment" as he moves ahead with transition

"Presidents trumps refusal to concede the election and embarrassment which will hurt the president's legacy. Biden said that at this time, he doesn't see a need for legal action to force the administration to start funding the transition. And he said that the continued backing of Trump by most of congressional Republicans is because GOP lawmakers are mildly intimidated by Trump. Use a radio news.

Biden Donald Trump GOP
Republicans add record number of women to Congress

Business Rockstars

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Republicans add record number of women to Congress

"Republican women are joining the 117th US Congress after dominating the 2020 elections, making history for the highest number of women in the House of Representatives. Republicans have been watching their numbers in the House rise, and six of the eight seats flipped red. We were owed two women regarding the huge gains. Republican Senator from Louisiana, Steve Scalise says. You know, we got some great great new members coming in this freshman class. They really organized well. And then they went up against the stream of the media projections that Nancy Pelosi was going to gain another 10 seats. Instead, the opposite happened. We were probably up by about 10. On our side and their few races on the West Coast that still haven't been called that are leaning our way. College football

Steve Scalise Us Congress House Of Representatives Louisiana House Nancy Pelosi The West Coast Football
Al Roker to take time off work to battle prostate cancer

Business Rockstars

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Al Roker to take time off work to battle prostate cancer

"Morning show. Personalities is facing a health battle Lance. Surprising US Phase West Coast Bureau, NBC weatherman L. Rooker on the Today show Friday revealed he has cancer. Turns out I have prostate cancer on ditz. Good news. Bad news. Kind of thing and good news is we caught it early. Not great news is that it's a little aggressive, So I'm going to be taking some time off to take care of this. The 66 year old wanted to

West Coast Bureau L. Rooker NBC Prostate Cancer Cancer United States
Happy birthday, ISS! The International Space Station turns 20

Business Rockstars

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Happy birthday, ISS! The International Space Station turns 20

"Entered the international space Station for the first time on November 2nd 2000, they became the first of many to shack up in the orbiting laboratory, 227 miles above Earth Scientific research and a proving ground for future space exploration for 20 years now. From the West Coast to use a radio news bureau. I'm Lance Pride and Norwegian Cruise Line says they won't set sail again in 2020, The Miami based

Lance Pride The West Coast Miami
Prince William tested positive for coronavirus in April, British media reports

Business Rockstars

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Prince William tested positive for coronavirus in April, British media reports

"A member of the British royal family was reportedly hit hard by the Corona virus. Dan Iraqi has the story from the Ohio Valley USA Radio News Bureau. According to media reports out of Britain principle in contracted covert 19 back in April, about the same time as his father, Prince Charles William, was treated by palace doctors and quarantined from the rest of his family for two weeks. While experiencing serious symptoms. The sun reports he was having trouble breathing. At one point during his sickness. William, who was second in line to the British stone behind his father wanted to keep his illness quiet as to not alarm the

Dan Iraqi Ohio Valley Usa Radio News Bur Prince Charles William Britain Palace The Sun William
Murkowski to vote to confirm Barrett to the Supreme Court

Business Rockstars

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Murkowski to vote to confirm Barrett to the Supreme Court

"Senator Lisa Murkowski says she'll vote to confirm Judge Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court Monday when the nomination comes to the floor. Alaska Republican had previously said she didn't believe the Senate should be taking off the Supreme Court nomination so close to the election. Murkowski's announcement all the guarantees that judge Bear will be confirmed. With the vote expected to switch along party lines.

Supreme Court Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Senator Lisa Murkowski Alaska Senate Bear
Wichita mayor talks about man arrested for threatening him over mask mandate

Business Rockstars

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Wichita mayor talks about man arrested for threatening him over mask mandate

"Firefighter has been arrested in Wichita, Kansas, for threatening to kidnap and kill the city's mayor. Police say the 59 year old suspect text of the city official asking for mayor of rain and Whipple's address and threatening to murder in. Authorities say the man displayed anger over the city's masked mandate and now could face criminal threat charges for

Wichita Whipple Kansas Murder Official
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Business rockstars from the nasdaq market site in Times Square I'm Jeannie are men and our guest today is Gino Pereira he is the co founder and CEO of NXT ID nice to see you nice to see you too thank you very much for having me tuning that's nice nice to have you here so your company basically authenticates users on mobile devices in that world of the internet of things of course we'll get to the the deeper details about the actual product and service but for now let's focus on you as an entrepreneur this is not your first company not your first rodeo as they say in fact it's about your fourth or fifth start up can you tell us about that yes certainly I used to work for large corporations I had a pretty traditional start early in my career in finance became a certified accountant in England had gotten MBA in in business and finance another number of years of working for a larger larger corporations I just found them stifling and in fact the CEO of a pharmaceutical company that I work for said to me when I was leaving he said one day you'll run your own company and I was about twenty two at the time and I thought I was I thought he was joking but it actually turned out to be true so it was a drive that I had that he recognized early on even before I did and so I said what I can about probably fifteen to twenty years ago someone may fifteen sixteen years ago I decided that's it and I left a very large corporation and I co founded a medical device company and I went from a palatial office to a really small little tiny office with the broken windows in an industrial area with pretty correct we can close that was the first step so you know I'm I imagine in those early days going from the security of that big company and and doing that there must have been plenty of times when you said yourself oh my god what am I doing absolutely that first day so different like to think so but you know it was something that I had to drive to do and I kept that there's some really difficult times and I think we'll start ups are really difficult times in challenging times and you just have to you know if you have a real business plan and and a viable a potential business you've just gotta buckle down and you know push through it when you were first getting started what were some of the resources that you drew on and in order to get yourself up and running and you said you co founded it so you were working with somebody else right yes I was working with I was really responsible for structuring the company raising the finance and you know in those early days you do everything so I was doing business development as well as doing sales but the world's engineers that and develop the devices that we were selling so they were you know four of us that was found is there was myself the CEO a ands and an engineer in the marketing individual okay now I had read that of year for a five start ups none of them have failed and that is really extraordinary what do you attribute that to really perseverance you know timing is the one thing.

Jeannie
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This business rockstars from the nasdaq market site in Times Square I'm Jeannie are men and our guest today is Maria nurse LaMotta she is the co founder and CEO of Sanford nice to see you thank you tell so sunbird it is a subscription fragrance business car and you tell us about sure so the way it works actually really simple somebody would come to our site fifteen dollars a month and they would get a thirty day supply of a design a fragrance of their choice so we have a portfolio of about five hundred different fragrances no name brand and also needs fragrances but you can select from and the way we think about the concept it's almost like a date fragrances before marrying down I love I love that concept and that really crystallizes that all right let's let's kind of start at the beginning and how you got into this so your background includes assisting a CEO for prepaid mobile phone company yeah currently work for a speed reading company yeah tell me a little bit about your early days how early days I'm I mean there were jobs before those jobs to my original my first work or job if you well was going make up I was an Avon representative and I loved it I was twelve years old wait while then you're supposed to be you know I'm able to even find the name on or is that even legal now five I really wanted to do it and so I convinced the mom of my best friend to kind of like the the name on the document and she was kind enough to agree to do that my own mom said that I don't need a job at twelve and she's happy to provide for me I love that it was so much fun the job of an executive assistant it was a start up company with some finding out it was challenging very fast paced I had to learn on the spot was also one of my very first job in the west so.

co founder Sanford CEO representative executive assistant Avon
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:58 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is a business rockstars I'm pretty lame and my guest today is Gail backers founder of call of power and then solution Mary sues Gail thanks so much for joining us today thanks so much for having me so for those are in familiar with you in your brand to tell us a little bit about your entrepreneurial journey and what led you to this point well let me start by saying I had zero food experience when I started I worked in corporate America I work for one of the largest PR firms in the world PR and marketing firm but more importantly I was a mom of two boys with daily activities and they were diagnosed at such a young age that there was no gluten free food in the store if they needed a birthday cake I'd have to make it from scratch including the frosting and what I began to notice over the years was how much junk the industry was putting in gluten free food more fat more sugar more cell and more calories and I sort of like everybody else waited for them to fix it surely someone would notice it and do something about it no one ever did so I suppose you could say that Colin Powell was born out of frustration for waiting so I quit my job in corporate America and I decided to do something about it and what was the first step you talk after you you know you realize I'm quitting my job I am full blown starting this business yeah so the very first thing I did was I sat my two boys down at the kitchen table they had been with me as I made the very first my very first call empire Christy said there were five hundred sixty nine thousand recipes online I didn't invent it I made it one night it was okay they asked me if I would make it again I said there's no way it did ninety minutes to make the peace of Christ after I got home from a full day of work yeah but I I'll tell you what I'll find it for you and I looked everywhere and I couldn't find it and that's when I decided to leave my job but I needed to explain all this to my sons so we sat down at the kitchen table and I wanted them to cheer me make the the first call to the only person I knew in the food industry because I wanted them to hear if this were ever to become something I wanted them to know that they were there at the very first step that's amazing I love that and call powers now the number one gluten free pizza and number one fastest growing pizza brand in the US I have availability in over eighteen thousand stores were you expecting when you first started first to get this huge in short no yeah can I add a few more on there were we're actually the number one better for you pizza in America which was a much higher bars in gluten free and I started the company because of my gluten free sometimes but people don't buy it because it's going for we don't even marketed that way and a day we are the eighth largest pizza brand in America of that we just broke into the top ten so we're thank you so that's sort of a long way of answering no not in a million years how could I ever thought of something so crazy is being one in the top ten to present the difference so what did you you know how did you get to this point what were some of the challenges that you weren't expecting to face that kind of popped up along the yeah I'm sure there are many there is a a challenging day that were bigger than others but certainly I challenge a day I think one of the challenges I faced early on was that for for some reason I guess lack of not knowing better I decided to enter an industry that was filled with multi billion dollar companies and brands and the freezer door is actually the hardest space in the grocery store to get into because it's the most limited and so for me too for a small brand to break into that frozen cheese the door was really really hard and I think early on I was very daunted by the fact that ha I'm up against all of these huge corporations how can I possibly get in the door and when I began to realize that they were there a lot of people long the way in the industry who here on the date of the world to cheer on you know the new start ups and really wanted me to succeed and help guide me on and so I went from sort of pretending to be bigger than I want is to celebrating the fact that I was a young entrepreneur just trying to make the freezer door it's a little bit better and how did you get into that first grocery store was that process like so the very first one was it was whole foods in in in in the southern Pacific region which was my home region I'm in southern California and for anyone to bring nor is out there let me stay on you can get into a whole foods in the region where you live so you can you can you can enter the process that way so that's what I did I went on there I didn't even get a meeting all I could do was drop off my samples so I I I dropped off my samples as though I was dropping off my first born child and I waited while they tried it and you know you never forget where you are when you get the answer and I just happened to be in Washington DC see at a Starbucks and I got an email from the the buyer and whole foods other Pacific region he said we love them more accepting your P. says and I wanted to buy a latte for everybody in the place it was you know eight it was everything it was really prove that this idea this crazy crazy idea might actually be something it was a fantastic day that's amazing and now you have sweet potato I don't know if I'm pronouncing start but sweet potato toaster sweet potatoes while it just rolls off the tongue so yeah so are pieces today or twenty thousand stores which is very exciting the sweet potatoes or is out so what we did if you think about the spirit behind the cauliflower crust pizza is how can we take meal hacks the people are spending time because they can't find alternatives how can we make them easier for folks in that same spirit when you look at one of my colleagues are Chris pieces became popular another meal hacked it's quite popular on the internet is a sweet potatoes I'm the only problem is it takes a long time to cook and a lot of people's lives their finger so so we said Hey takes an hour forty five minutes never be able to let's make it easier so we've done everything we found the great potatoes we slice them we roasted them with frozen and put him in a back hoe and we gave it a cute name sweet potatoes and is now in stores just coming into stores now it's in Simon and and coming into a lot more within the next month and we've put that it's a sister brands do Kali power under the mother brand because coverage of missionary service and we do that because what do we do with what we do with vegetables we revolutionized them I love that until the unprecedented success that you've had with Colin power so today Kali power is the number one better for you peace in America where the number eight top by selling frozen pizza also in America but I think the real determinant of success is that is the notes that we received from our customers and it's funny I started the company because I saw it soon I figured I did some research but I couldn't be alone in my frustrations and what all these notes and calls and I get cards tells me is that the people have been while waiting for this and they say you your change our lives and I and I sort of laughed because present pizza I mean how can a frozen pizza change people's lives but you know what it does it gives people more time to either spend with their family feel good about what they're giving their families feel good about what they're giving themselves and and they feel nourished and and they feel like they have more time to do what they really want to do and that is the real determinant of success we had a great financial year and our first year but there is no bigger you know reason to celebrate and how we are impacting people's lives amazing don't go anywhere will be right back this is a business rockstars this is my amazing Gaskill backer CEO and founder of call power and budget Lucien what are some dumb things smart.

founder Gail Mary
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This business rockstars from the nasdaq market site in Times Square I'm Jeannie are men and our guest today is Mike Rothman he is the co founder and CEO of fatherly great to see you thanks for coming in brigadier fatherly content site for dad right that's right tell me a little bit about it so we combined journalism with emotional honesty to provide product recommendations advice first person perspectives on how to raise great kids and ultimately how to live more filling adult lives all right we're gonna step back in time you grew up in northern New Jersey or don't injures in do you come from an entrepreneurial family my grandfather was a bit of an entrepreneur actually and on both sides one started the bike shop in Minneapolis the other started a distributor for consumer electronics in northern New Jersey my dad was a wolf biologists what by all and they exist starting at the university of Minnesota even to this day his email addresses and Jay will dad edgy mail dot com please don't email him will be very but that's yeah that's that ma'am how interesting where did you go to college went to Brown University and at that time what did you imagine as an undergrad student that you be doing when you got out of school so I started a magazine with another friend the college roommate and that became the focus of our entire senior year was a magazine about celebrations not who's out with what he's out with whom wearing what it was more of a collection of human interest stories that have this through line of celebrations in the front of the book was focused on bars restaurants events in big cities this is a print magazines that assisted us in two and we also got involved in the Brown University entrepreneurship program so had an inkling very early especially my senior year that I wanted to build a career in media and then that involved into into digital media after it became less feasible to build a business on print magazines yeah right no let's so tell me a little bit about that experience that you had and digital media diet also we had this print magazine we realized very quickly that to circumvent all of the newsstand cost associate with watching the print book that we had lunch with a a partner distribution partner and so we focused on a boutique hotel group initially we our pitching W. hotels to try to get distribution through their rooms and lobbies as a way to build an installed base of readers right away and then after that didn't but I became less feasible after we we are ultimately asking for probably a third of their entire marketing budget kind of going in the house at a company called his shot which was ultimately sold into hers doing business development for them and then very quickly realized wanted to move from print publishing in traditional publishing and that's what I ended up meeting then right the friend and partner in crime band leader US now group nine media all right how does first money media into those so that was a consulting entity that I created after seven years and thrill us yeah now part of group nine I want to kind of take a step back and figure out what I want to do next after having my head in the sand for seven years focused on building revenue advertising revenue you commerce revenue Thrillist I was doing a lot of coffee consulting I would call it like consulting for friends and people in the you know the entrepreneurship that community in New York and realize very quickly that I can actually make this a paid gig awhile figuring out what I want to do full time and so the shingle that I how long was your first money media so effectively referencing the fact that I was working with early stage companies in media and technology that we're looking for there's no first money yeah early stage revenue and so focused on early stage revenue in operations for those types of companies right down but helping these early stage companies figure things out from the ground up and running the ins and outs of really making it a profitable business right yeah but it will becoming a bit of like a business school where I got paid ultimate I selected the other different gigs based on what was interesting to me worked at a company called beta works which has become a big early staging container for different media technology companies I work at the folks of bark box us understood the dynamics of the commerce and subscription commerce worked with a couple other data focus businesses and so will learn as much from them as they probably extracted from me in terms of what I knew from previous experience and it felt like a really healthy exchange and all the while started building the concept of fatherly probably three four days a week soon to be seven days a week and and then just real quickly how to throw a fit into this of course Thrillist being this website with a white student travel information it's an online media side as well yes it we we started to listen to thousand five I joined shortly thereafter focused on building revenue so as you know the first business employee and then by the time I left to right about maybe two hundred people and the focus of thrill as you know strongly at the time is focusing on bettering the lives of young single people and major cities around the world and what I what I notice is that that audience that original cohort for whom we created Thrillist was quickly aging into this new life stage they're becoming parents and recognize that no one is really speaking to this audience as parents in yeah but the tone and in the you know through the kind of the digital media forms that they were kind of a custom to consuming information often and and parenting I found that there were only two different polls of digital content you have this web one point oh universe of it more like kind of desktop optimize media sites like BabyCenter WebMD near this vast long tail of mom blogs and so the commonality are the opportunity that I saw was that no one is speaking to men first and foremost and we knew even from early days it's realist was which initially was really focused almost entirely on men that by creating content for men inevitably you would also gathered audiences of women we thought that that would also be the case in the parenting category or where most of the the kind of the primary consumers of online parenting content tended to be female and so by creating a product fatherly that was aimed specifically towards men we could ultimately captured both sides of the parenting market so you actually answered one of my questions did you know with these other businesses in your other roles that you were going to build fatherly and you've kind of answered that they needed was brewing while you were at these other places that being the case so when you finally did take the lead with your partner and start fatherly what were you not prepared for you you kind of we're building your arsenal of knowledge and experience but what what couldn't you prepare for as much more well I think the dynamics of the media landscapers changing very quickly so when we are building Thrillist were almost entirely focused on just an email newsletter and monetizing the audience we had on that email newsletter we started fatherly officially was April twenty fifteen this is a universe we are kind of all media companies really leveraging social or older leveraging social media to build audience and so.

Mike
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:35 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is business rockstars and we're joined today by cold semen CMO and co founder of need to call thanks so much for joining us today thank you so I'm not familiar with you give our audience some background so you helped out with Randall early on you produce commercials for beats by Dr how did that lead you to starting a high tech baby monitors those crazy I was shooting different commercials el all over the world and one time I was shooting ads in Asia and I was over there and that some people that were wanting to kind of develop this new technology and when they told me about it I thought it was black magic so I bought a flight from Hong Kong right to New Jersey to see the new tax and then as soon as they showed it to me I was like I'll stop everything I'm doing to bring this to the world because it's so revolutionary wow so what did you do what was your first step did you quit producing reading on the side how did it kind of need to well all right yeah I was doing some commercials there and there across the country and then when I got involved with me too I was like I need to stop everything I'm doing do this full time really like to sit down and develop the brand the name the style the look and take a real good look at the industry and how we can like changes awesome so what is me tell our audience yes me she was a revolutionary baby monitor that can see your child's breeding and high accuracy all in real time no delay we have a Qualcomm chipset inside so we don't rely on the cloud computing so after you said that your device up it can work off the router so if the internet goes down you still see your breathing in real time and sleep reports wow that's amazing and first step after you kind of create the prototype how long did it really takes from proto type market well actually the the pro typing was done awhile back my business partner Erica is he he's like the true genius behind this technology he developed a lot of different wireless sensing technologies for la defense firms I could actually see breeding medically great accurate from far distances away or close and when he had a baby four and half years ago you look at the Khan solution and bought the most expensive baby Bonner on the market for three hundred dollars yeah brought it home took a look at it standard SD video like bad quality no reliability and into breathing it was like I can make this better so he was tested for years before I even met him and he uses actually his own baby as a Guinea pig like Hey I'm gonna use my own kids like this out and that's when I met him in it when I met him is just a box with wires coming out of it from there we sat down named it need to design a product and brought it to life and why me need unions beautiful sky in Japanese and actually the very first baby monitor ever invented was by summoning can she is like one of most prolific art deco architects and designers ever wow and after that came out in nineteen thirty seven PMR is kind of took a step towards back and backwards and backwards in design so we take it from the very first baby modern nineteen thirty seven design is really ecstatically pleasing baby monitor now and how was it or how is it disrupting the baby monitor space confused again trust of parents a lot of people are first time parents how do you kind of game that trust and also disrupt the market yeah so when you first launch of course your online sure kind of the year new to this technology new to this space so you have to build trust that that doesn't come overnight that coming after like six months really building the trust of parents and building that word of mouth of people actually use and save and really works right this is crazy and also looking at the space now and and the baby industry really developed a real brand Dyson a baby products something that's like yeah you're gonna pay more for but it works its trusted and it's tested at the end of the day too many people come into this industry saying Hey here's a technology that I made work in a lab for one second and rush to parent anxiety in teaching people and having severe based marketing we're kind of taking a whole different approach like our things been tested and tested and tested and from there are markings all about having you as parents have better sleep and how the device works whenever telling you your baby's gonna die work every single company is taking that approach and right it's not the way to go in marketing what challenges did you face first starting out and how did you guys have it and kind of work around those challenges challenges where every tech company has challenges challenges of the right messaging the right branding to even look really nailing the tax and the design of that because you can just take the product and run with it but our challenges were like that were fun challenges where how do we make it better how do we take a look at every single competitor in the space and see what they're doing wrong how we need to improve it from the design of a custom faceplate to actually having cord safety so nothing falls on the trip and string allies a baby to custom conduit that goes down the wall in the can can grab it to custom stand that's waited that if a kid hits it will fall over to anyone and will be held by the trip wow and how did you guys come up with the branding because if you go on your website brings really clean and neat and you guys have really conveyed your message awesome the branding is done by and our team well I instead of going to an out source agency I actually built my own internal ad agency and house with a great creative director Scott came over from our PA was one of the least creative directors and our team of like marketing social people and us really sat down for like looked at brands we really loved and we want to emulate that into the baby industry but also build a brand that parents contrast and how do you make sure that you're staying on top of customer service because that's obviously some ports shows customer service we actually hired Nick to France was like one that had a customer service the ring doorbell how yeah we so we took a real serious approach that because everyone else that we call over competitors as well in their systems yeah there were how they function how their family right realize no one had this like true white glove service like when you call and we built a whole back and that we can solve and diagnose problems right away in your device is having that Hey there someone should we're going on our hair on old firmware or your app is old you want to solve this stuff right away so you're not because like look your parents if your device stops working yeah can you tell lies not time for that so we want to all those things right away and if something happens we will replace the unit right away and we give the response in thirty days of someone's not happy with it because we want to make sure everyone has a great experience when buying a new and you can go back in time when you're first starting out me to what would be the one piece of advice you would give yourself a man things take a lot longer than expected that's my biggest thing I realize like when you're you're going into this kind of tech world you're likely to get it done in a month right plan to three months to do what everyone else is like done done done and you can get things done quickly but it's not you it's all the different vendors the people you're working with that everyone's a little slower than expected amazing I'll be right back and dive into how we need to is different than all the other baby monitors out there this is business rockstars this is my amazing Gaskell Siemens CMO and co founder of me to one step away from homelessness being at paychecks that was that was the one paycheck away so when I got there on Friday no paycheck there's another fourteen people standing outside the front door at the same.

co founder three hundred dollars three months thirty days one second six months
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:02 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is business rockstars and this is my rock star Joe McCann he's the CEO and co founder of nodes source thanks for being here thanks for having me let's dive right into it what is known source so no source is the no J. S. companies so the obvious next question is will what is no J. **** no GS is an open source technology that powers software development and it's kind of sweeping the nation it's been adopted by about a hundred percent of the fortune five hundred today and we are the commercial vendors for no J. **** amazing and you sure that's awesome analogy to help me wrap my head around it share it with everyone watching and listening so they understand too sure so you know no jazz is a very technical project is an open source technology like I said but the easiest way to think about it is is it's kind of like an engine for a car that powers of software development right so if you think about sort of the past twenty years of software development it's analogous to say the unleaded gasoline combustion engine in a car right so you've been driving a Ford F. one fifty for the past twenty years to get you from point a to point B. and works just fine it might be a couple of issues with it and now there's this new car the Tesla which has does the same thing get you from point a to point B. but it's a fundamentally different engine that's kind of what we do with with no J. **** no GS is kind of the task of software development it's the new way that's more efficient performant and scalable for building software so called so how did you come up with this idea so I can't take all the credit because no Jess is actually an open source technology and what that means is that there are multiple contributors and clobbered collaborators to the actual project itself so in late two thousand nine a guy by the name of Ryan doll incentive no J. **** and kind of gave it away because that's what open source is about it's about collaboration and contributing to that the technology I and my co founder of the time we're not we're not doing anything commercially together but we saw an opportunity that no J. S. could be a radically transform transformational technology so I kind of contributed to the open source project started speaking at conferences and doing meet ups and stuff to kind of garner some grassroots support for the project and it's just taken off by about twenty thirteen we started to see a demand for professional services around no J. S. lot of fortune five hundred's what kind of dope dipping their toe in the water but little uneasy to just be using something so new so we help them you know by some consulting work and doing some things to make sure that they were using know the proper way and then we kind of recent collection point in twenty fourteen with the market for no J. **** really started to explode and we started to see companies like Walmart and paid how these massive organization is starting to make she use bets on no J. **** and so we created no source to to be that no J. S. company to provide them with the tooling the support services etcetera to ensure that they were successful with no call and your background is fascinating you were a DJ then you worked on Wall Street or in the fashion industry definitely a serial entrepreneur let's go back to the beginning when your entrepreneurial journey actually started as a child tell me about your first a little and don't is it I love to tell this story so back in in fifth grade my user I. my bike to school and every morning I would stop at the local Kmart and I would buy these ten packs of gum and that each pack had five six accompanies one in the entire thing was just a dollar some might be dating myself a little bit here but I will go to school and of course you weren't really supposed to have gone at school but I found a market and kids wanted to buy right zero you can't do that's right that's right so so yeah I would I would have these ten packs it would cost me a dollar and I would go to school and sell each pack for a dollar apiece netting nine dollars your margin for that and so I just I I've always kind of had this you know this fascination with markets in understanding how to how to still certain market boys and whatnot and obviously at at ten years old I didn't realize that there was this market but I was kind of exploiting something or or leveraging something to my benefit and it's just kind of been that way ever since do you think the entrepreneurial spirit to something that you're born west or is that something that you can catch yeah it's it's not that's a great question I mean I can only speak from my own personal experience but I other entrepreneurs that I have met there is a consistency around grants and having to termination and just sort of being motivated to do things in a different way I'm not sure if that is is by environmental factors or if it's genetic it could be a combination of both you know I'm that you meet people from all around the world that have very big ideas and are huge believers and dreamers and entrepreneurs and then some folks that are more localized level that are just doing things in their local community as on snores I'm not sure if it's something that can be taught or if it's something that is picked up and went and got that great if he got the great and when you're in college you started your first fish all entrepreneurial endeavors right and you find is it in a very unique way story yes so so I was going to college in Portland Oregon and I actually qualified for Pell grant money to to use that to subsidize the cost of going to school and I had a full time job at the time as well I was shot at a restaurant and I took that poll grant money to actually use that not only also buy books but also I start a an event production companies so my self and my younger brother we started putting on electronic rave hip hop events in Portland Seattle and actually in LA as well and it was a ton of fun it's taught me a lot about the entertainment industry but also just business in general right thinking about things from insurance to you know meeting with the fire Marshall to make sure we can do these types of events at at the age of eighteen nineteen it's a very unique thing to be able to do yeah okay so a lot of our own snores watching and listening there at that place right now so what did you learn in those first couple years of being an entrepreneur that you would really like to share with these entrepreneurs yeah great question so for me you know my my approach is really ready fire aim unfortunately I moved really really fast and I think if I could have taken a step back and kind of try to digest things a little bit slower anymore little more comprehensively some of the the the some of the losses whatever's financial or time a resource or opportunity cost I probably would have been minimized have you taken a little bit more time to focus on maybe the bigger picture as opposed to your execution because as much as for you're excited and you want to go out and change the world or just you know throw a music event but doing it sort of the right way takes a lot of patience which I'm still learning today I think patience is one of the hardest things is not entrepreneur because as you sad you have so much passion and you know where you want to be and so you just want to be there now but there are steps you have to take especially just do it the right way and to create that foundation right I agree yes so did you go to Wall Street knacks after the J. world interestingly enough and I'm sure my mother is laughing now with the first book I ever checked out of a public library was actually on the stock market I was about eight years old and with his wife yeah I know it's a most fire trucks and you know sports athletes stars were not I'm fascinated with map I'm fascinated with numbers and pattern recognition and we back when I was doing the production company I taught myself equities options and forex trading now how that back then I might be dating myself again and that the only way to get a real time data feed of of a ton of data to be processing in doing information informational houses with was from the capital markets and so I taught myself this district mechanism to kind of scratch my own age and eventually ended up moving to New York City and working on a trading desk on Wall Street oh my gosh that's amazing so tell me a little bit about that time and how it's influenced you as an entrepreneur yes so you know I mention the pattern recognition piece I think you know the seas do this they see you know thousand deals a year and they start to recognize certain patterns traders actually if they're not algorithmics meeting all computer based human beings will start to see patterns in the markets for example and and benefit from this I think that's the thing that I learned the most about from the trading aspect was with no source for example this technology right I mentioned had a shot at at the very earliest radically transformational because I saw the pattern I saw the opportunity for something to really kind of blow up now you have to hedge against that as well and I think that's the other thing that you start to learn as a traitor is being a trainer is extremely competitive it is it requires strong intestinal fortitude as well but it is it is something that teaches you how to manage risk as well and we are one of my tattoos is actually risk on my race is something that if costly reminds me of it how can you actually sort of export market or benefit from something that's growing or or that you see this potential pattern but you hedge against your your risk of from that as well and I think that's one of the biggest things I learned on the trading desk so much I want to ask you about risk when we come back with my gastro McCann CEO and co founder of nodes source the biggest entrepreneur destination on the planet this is business rockstars I don't care if you work hard.

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:28 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is business rockstars my guest today is Kerry Krampus C. L. as is our USA Kerry thanks so much for joining us today familiar with his lawyer can you give us a little background one of America's original steak houses it got its name for the founder when he first put steaks on the grill it here the sizzle sound and thought what an incredible name and to go with the incredible sound to it they kinda highlighted what we're all about this is a concept is really designed to be opportunity for community to get together family to get together to have a great meal it's also been a place for a lot of people's first jobs came from so not only did we participate in introducing stakes to to the whole industry but we also a lot of people have a lot of first jobs as well so a lot of people that I meet along the way either tell me about Hey I went to Sizzler with my grandparents and my parents are was my first job or so it's really kind of cool to have that kind of a connection with consumers and a bunch of different ways absolutely and what is your role as C. E. O. and what's most exciting thing about being the CEO says well I well I think when I get an opportunity to do every day is just help empower people to do and be the best that they can be so that's the fun part about the job there's this typical CEO things that you have to do with the administrative things but where I really get my energy and my passion is going out into the restaurant being in the kitchens when people are doing the prep work and being out in the dining room or taking care of gas so I guess my job is to kind of be a cheerleader and some respects to be out there acknowledging and recognizing the job that our crew does and then also being a face of Sizzler to the gas and really listening to them finding out how we're doing are the things that we can do differently in order to be able to stay relevant in their lives is a lot of choices out there for people so our goal is to stay relevant but stay true to kind of who says Loras and what we've been known for for sixty years absolutely and started as a small converted office trailer and turn into a family steak house in operating a hundred thirty one locations throughout the U. S. been the biggest challenge you faced a Sizzler continues to grow sure I think the hard part a little bit is staying relevant to the original intent so so don't Johnson created this concept because he wanted to but people have the opportunity to get out of their homes and go have a dining experience somewhere and he thought that having a great steak meal kind of in a community location was a good thing so I think that's the core of what started us so it's tempting to want to change and be something different over the period of time but but staying true to what you really were in the beginning well the same same time staying relevant so we had a salad bar about forty years ago because we thought that we needed more of a compliment to the stakes besides just a steak and a great baked potato and since then we've added shrimp and salmon and ribs and some other things to the to the menu so I think the biggest challenge is to try to stay true to who you were in the original days and and why you were created and then also try to stay very relevant to the changing consumer tastes that are that are prevalent today absolutely and how this is our connection to the consumer and how are you adapting I your business to the changing consumer screwed up absolution critical I think that we need to stay connected with them the consumers not only age differently so we have the generation baby boomers generation X. and Z. and millennials and we have names for all the different categories of gas and all their preferences change so we have to figure out how we stay true to the people who were you know I'm coming to Sizzler for years and yet appeal to to new groups of people that want to have food like I like we'd like to be able to deliver to them so we've done a lot working on adapting I not only just a basic core foods we have in the offerings we have but even looking at credibility lose you know new seasonings new flavorings a new products and then there's also you know looking for sustainability looking for all natural looking for ways that we can stay relevant to the to the way people want to eat and then the biggest thing we seen as people want to customize so our whole I intent is to find ways that you can come in and then basically build your own meal whether that's a steak and a baked potato or whether it's salmon with vegetables salad the you can either indulgent input blue cheese over the top of that or healthy salad so try to stay relevant to the consumers and then make changes based on how they basically want us to be able to deliver that experience for them and are you always trying to enter in a beat or would you say that consistency is kind of cute beautiful double edged sword yeah you want to be innovative so that you can appeal to people but if you're innovative and people can't depend on you and you lose that consistency then you're kind of fail and I think that's the biggest challenge today is how do you stretch the limits a little bit to allow people have new flavors new ways to eat and there's always an evolution the way people want experience you sell we've been fast casual our whole existence so when you come in there's a menu board you see the menu board figure out what you want to eat you pay at the cash register and then basically at that point you're free to either help yourself to salad and soup and a Sunday or wait for your entree to be delivered to you so I think you need to be able to deliver that experience on a consistent basis so that your dependable so when people come and they know the stakes gonna be cooked right in other baked potatoes gonna be absolutely perfect nice house going to be fresh but the same time you have to have a little twist so we kind of try to take the familiar and add a little twist to it so that people still feel like there's a new way to be able to experiences were but depend on the consistent consistency that we've delivered all these years absolutely and there is a multi generational culture meaning that people stay with you guys for a long time what do you attribute your company culture success to but it's a part that I found love with Sizzler about was I'd meet I'd meet employees who had been with the company for twenty five or thirty years and not only that which is a little bit surprising in an industry where going from job to job is so is so prevalent then they say oh by the way my sister works of the other restaurant in my daughter's getting ready she's almost old enough to start working for us so it's it's what's interesting I think is people look for a place where they get acknowledge they get rewarded recognize they have a filling job and so when you think about how much time you spend at your job if we can create an environment where they really are thrilled to come to work almost feel bad about leaving all that we wanted to leave to go be with their families and their families can see that and understand that you really like your job don't yeah then it's easy to attract them to come into the system and and it's been that way we're we've been able to really have not only just friends and family continue to work but then people that meet them on the street that they don't know and say wow you look really happy you must really love your job and so that's a great way to do recruiting and we've been very successful at that as well your management style is like and what you want to work for you I guess I love people and I love food so I I like hanging around people a lot of people a lot of food so we don't really work for each other it's kind of an interesting environment we all my job is to support people I am a servant later my job is to make sure that you have all the tools you need and the opportunity to do a phenomenal job I do that every day then you're going to work really hard so yeah I had somebody which I do and I have in my career people and said Hey I really have an interest in you and I want you to be successful how could you not want to work with somebody like that so that's what my goal and objective is to try to be that same way absolutely and at the restaurant business the competitive space what you guys doing to stay ahead of the competition I think the biggest part for us is we need to stay relevant in a number of different ways and so need to be relevant on some of the things we talked about being innovative being creative but portability in value of taking a different different place in our lives I guess so if we have steak and lobster for twenty two ninety nine that is a phenomenal value but if you only have ten dollars in your pocket it's an irrelevant values to affordability plays an important part also so we try to have kind of an a barbell approach to our to our menu so if you don't have a lot of money come to us because we have great food for that if you have a lot of money you one and all that you really want to have a great experience when a glass of wine and soup and salad anyone of steak and lobster were the perfect place to come so I think our whole approach is bound to try to be available to anybody to come and have an experience with us no matter how much money they have in their pocket and then be able to execute that experience every time that they come in absolutely and what advice would you give to entrepreneurs who are looking to break into the restaurant space may I love food love people it's what's funny about our business as you work when everyone else place which is why people go out the the is about to me to be able to have a great time so you have to really have kind of a hospitality service attitude but you really want to be there to please people and make them happy so the restaurant business is centered around food and execution of that food you know to the to the perfect degree in hospitality to have fun with that so I think that basic core thing we can find people they're happy and teach them the restaurant business but we can't teach people are happy to be happy right so our biggest challenge is to find people that really love the industry and so if you love the industry there's a lot of opportunity find a niche that's not failed when days get long and it's a tough job if you love what you do you kind of motor through that if you don't love what you do in the days get long the days get long and so so I think the big thing is to really have a passion for serving people being around food being around people that love food and people and then you don't even really work a day in your life.

Kerry Krampus C. L. America founder thirty years forty years sixty years ten dollars
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

11:21 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Is Business Rockstars. I, Pat O'Brien welcome to the show checking in with Mark lack this Business Rockstars. I'm Mark lack and we're here to inspire inform. And connect the community of entrepreneurs Alison thousands joining us. Of am I gonna show? I'm so glad to be here. Thanks for having me. Am I know it's your first and your last name and international? Yeah, what do you do? We run a business coaching agency. And we mentor business owners all over the world to help them take their business to the next level and beyond. So how'd you get in that space, because we're in similar spaces? We actually share the stage together and ironically, now you're here. I know I know I love it. Grease of separation fried, always. So how did you get an space? I mean everyone gets in their day care, so you got into it. I never sat out to be in the business coaching world. I am an entrepreneur. I built ten companies of my own from the ground death since I was nineteen years old started young started. John and I couldn't hold a job for more than two weeks. So I figured I have to figure out this entrepreneurial thing or forget it and I grew up in a very entrepreneurial family. My father. Other built the largest chain of women's clothing stores in the United States that were privately owned, and he had such a passion for his work. So I said I wanted to do that. And so I've just been building companies for over thirty years, and people started asking me. How do you do this? Can you teach me? And so one thing led to another. And now I have a whole chain of coaches, and I love it actually crazy, how many people in this space, just built successful companies and then avidly start being interviewed about that. And then start being speaking about that. And then maybe bond you have a book, and then you find yourself being a business coach consultant, author speaker and essentially sometimes info market or something education products online, what did you do before, though, I know you said, you can keep a job. He's trying to businesses. I want to hear some of those. Definitely. Tell us that didn't work. Well, so I started out in college writing personalized poems for people for birthdays, and anniversaries, and that was expressions of I- alley. I don't even count that as one of the tended, but that's how I started. And then people would say, you know, Alison, I don't need a poem. I don't need a greeting card, but do you do brochures? Do you do radio television and one thing that I learned from my dad is, if someone asks you to do something, even if you don't know how to do it just say, yes. And so I just kept saying, yes. And I would walk out of their office going. Oh my God. I have no idea how to do this, a true entrepreneur, exactly. But it's amazing what you can do when you're back against the wall, and I had great mentors from early on. So I really believe in that. And then by the time I was twenty five I had a full service advertising and PR firm. And we have clients, like Ben and Jerry's and super pets in Charlotte russe and, and that Bill. Very fast. I was making a lot of money flying all over the country building these brands. But it looked at me and thought, wow. This woman is so successful, and I was financially that internally I was falling apart. And I didn't understand back then how to build the foundation, how to have a strong logistic to support all of this growth and it really grew so fast that I fell apart, physically emotionally, spiritually, and I ended up walking away from that business with nothing and made a decision from that point on that I was going to do only things that I was passionate about and excited about. So then I went on to build nine more companies that I've loved, but with the understanding of how to build a strong foundation, how to build a team to support you in delegate, and all those crucial things when you scale and it's awesome that you brought that up because I feel like some people. When they have adversity when they have pain, when they fail sometimes it cripples Emmett. Sometimes they never bounced back from it use that as a learning tool, and it helps you build another nine successful companies. She E L, A, M, I, Allison thousands. Joining us this is Business Rockstars. I'm Mark lack and we're here to inspire inform and connect to community of entrepreneurs five through out of the nine that you built which one was one of your favorites. Probably the homeopathic practice. I've been a homeopathic physician for twenty years. So when I fell apart back, then I wanted to find a way to heal myself as well. And I discovered homeopathic medicine changed my life. I decided, okay, I want to do this work using. And then I built the largest homeopathic college in the country, as well all Pathak academy of southern California for cool and then back in ninety nine and then I sold that two thousand five so yeah, I mean, I've, I've loved them all I've had a scuba dive certification company. I've had to learn anything you like I went scuba diving one. Let's go to scuba dive pretty much. But you it has to your business has to have a deeper, meaning to you. If you're only going after because of money you're not going to stick with it when you get rejected or times get tough. And so for me, I learned from that. Early on business experience even though I was successful. Add, it didn't fill me up. And when you can emerge the two, you have something that you can really monetize and make very profitable and you love and that there's a need for it in the marketplace. You haven't winner. Don't just make a dollar making difference. And that's something that I try to not only live by for my businesses, but help others do as well. As a business culture. Right. You've been doing this for quite some time. We've obviously experienced a lot of people out there. I think that one of the most deadly things in businesses. The six words, we've always done it this way. So when you're doing consulting when you're working with all these different businesses around the world. Of all shapes and sizes and profitability. What do you see is the common reasons why they're not as excessive as they could be? There's a couple of reason. And I love exactly what you said, I find number one they're not revenue focus. They get very caught up in the passion and the product, which is very important. But how are we going to monetize this? And are we focused on sales every single day? I'm not good at hillsdale. I'm not good at marketing is what I hear all the time. Well, then with. Right. Yeah. We get clients the yes buts. Right. And that doesn't work in business. So you've got to always be open to learn. We knew may be a great shoemaker and have the, the best shoe invention in the world. But if people don't know about it and your shoes aren't out there. You know, taking care of people hate then you're not going to be long sides of the cobbler's, son. Never has shoes trail. I asked you maker. They're so busy making all those shoes, but you really have to be focused on revenue I always tell our clients from eight thirty to eleven thirty all you're doing is sales. That's it nothing else. And if you can get your mind to focus that way, even at the CEO of the company pay hundreds of employees, the most successful companies are where the CEO the founder's are focused on revenue and involved with the fail. A mutual friend of ours. John astroturf taught me and he calls it. Focus, the first, like four hours of your day on the highest income and impact generating activities, same just same thing in a different way. That's changed. My business for me. And what's crazy is like, kind of, like, Tim Ferriss. It's four hour workweek. It's more like the four hour day. He's been those four hours just on the highest income and impact activities. And usually you're done. If you did it from eight to twelve you're done. Yeah. And I've tested it. And I would just work from like eight to twelve or nine to one, whatever I wanted, and I would stop working the rest of the day and just read stop working on making money and people like pretend that they're working during low income low impact trivial activities. I tested another. Let's just see if I work less, but only focus my activities on the income, generating stuff, and I double triple quadruple, my income in that period of time that I did that. And I was like this is insane. Yeah, no one of our clients. This is just an example. Liz Papago any who runs in marketing agency, and she hated sales, and she was nervous to pick up the phone. She had a great product and service, offering so by teaching her to be revenue focus. She just let me know recently that she closed at two hundred and fifty thousand dollar contract to client, right? So, you know, there's people out there that need you there waiting for you. So, you know, you gotta show up to ask for. The sale and then the second thing he said, what are things? The second thing is that I find the difference between successful people and those struggle the ones that are successful. When you get knocked down your much faster getting back up from any disappointment. So if you count, if you measure the time, the person, that's troubles wallows in that disappointment days. Paralyzed from the fear takes it personally the successful person says, you know what I'm going to learn from this, and I'm just going to move on and do better the next time I love you brought that up because I feel like that is one of the biggest reasons why most people don't achieve not only the financial abundance. They're capable of, but the quality of life is that they take rejection and failure personally when in reality for Jackson is feedback. And there's no such thing as failure was only results I love that. You brought that up. I'm curious what's next for you is another book as a new company. What? I promised by that. There's no more companies right now. Now, I get to pay it forward and help other business owners grow their business, and we have a mastermind called the pinnacle of global network, and we've been running it for seven years. We have business owners all over the world, and it's an amazing opportunity to work side by side with a coach to hold your hand and guide you to success. So besides me other people out there say that sounds awesome. I want to be a part of that. How can they get in touch with three hundred more definitely just go to my website, which is Alison Maslin dot com. And then I also have a gift take it away. Yeah. This is brand new. I'm actually pretty excited about it, and it's hard millionaires CEO blueprint. And it's a series of five videos, where I do some very indepth teaching some of the things we talked about, but no more in depth and handouts and all of that. And you just go to Alison Maslin dot com forward slash CEO fantastic. Well, I'm sure. Our audience appreciate that. They'll plug that in here somewhere. But I appreciate you coming on the show. So great for having me very well. I'm Mark lack. This Business Rockstars. We connect the community of entrepreneurs, you can join us on Facebook, Twitter and online at Business Rockstars dot com..

Alison Maslin CEO John astroturf Pat O'Brien United States Business Rockstars Mark Tim Ferriss California Pathak academy consultant Emmett Allison Facebook Charlotte russe Liz Papago Bill Ben Jackson
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Entrepreneur destination on the planet. This is Business Rockstars. You shouldn't have to choose a random lawyer charges expensive hourly rates when you need legal help, but the legal system is so complicated, what of the choice, do you have when you need help with your business or want to protect your family start with legalzoom? They make it easy for more than a decade, they provided away for regular people like you and me to confidently navigate the legal system, legalzoom's not a law firm, and that's how they provide such value. They don't rely on charging you by the hour. Instead, you'll get transparent pricing and customer reviews. So, you know exactly what you're getting up front, if you need help with Inc, LLC's, trademarks, last, wills living, trust more, legalzoom's the Smart Choice. They've got the right people on hand to answer your questions. And if you need legal advice, their network of independent attorneys can provide the street forward guidance, you need most dates, don't let legal hurdles become an excuse. Go to legalzoom dot com today. Disturb building your own future. The right way to save even more. Enter. Rockstar in the referral box checkout. That's legalzoom dot com. What's in store for your business this week at Staples? Rewarding relationship Staples wants to thank you for your business..

business rockstars
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Business Rockstars dot com. Do you or your business? Need a better social media presence? Use these few tips to help harness the power of social media. I'm twirling with a Business Rockstars minute. Number one quality over quantity. The goal isn't about embarking users with post ensuring that the POS are targeted towards your market will help you to gain the most traction. Well, also, adding more followers number to comment share and like often genuinely like and share others. Post every single day developing relationships with people over time now let's won't happen overnight if you don't get people to time of day, you can't expect them to do the same for you. Number three. Don't always be south promoting. It's not always about promoting. If you want to leverage social media to grow your business, you have to spend a lot of time delivering value. Don't always trying to sell people something every chance you get otherwise, you might be putting them out. I'm Alex wehrley and this has been a Business Rockstars minute. I'm pretty handy around the house. But now that I have kids, I don't want to spend my Saturday, installing toilet or fixing air conditioner. But thankfully, there's home advisor. Homeadvisor helps me find the best home pros in my area to handle any kind of project. You can read reviews of the pros, check their ability, even book appointments online, and what my wife loves most is at home advisor is completely free to use. Go to homeadvisor dot com or.

advisor Homeadvisor Alex wehrley
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This Business Rockstars, and we are joined today by Colt semen CMO and co-founder of metoo Colt. Thanks so much for joining us today. Thank you. So for those familiar with you, give her audience some background. So you helped out with red Bill early on you produce commercials for beats by dre. How did that lead you to starting a high tech baby monitor? It was crazy. I was shooting different commercials. L all over the world. And one time I was shooting ads in Asia. And over there. I met some people that were wanting to kind of develop this new technology. And when they told me about it. I thought it was black magic. So I bought a flight from Hong Kong right to New Jersey to see the new tech. And then as soon as they showed it to me. I was like stop everything I'm doing to bring this to the world because it's so revolutionary. Wow. So what did you do? What was your first step? Did you quit producing or doing that on the side? How did it kind of lead? Well. Yeah. I was doing some commercials. They're and they're across the country. And then when I got involved with me, I was like I need to stop everything. I'm doing do this fulltime really like sit down and develop the brand the name the style. The look and take a real good look at the industry and how we can like change it. Awesome. So what is me to tell our audience? So was revolutionary baby monitor that can see your child's breathing and high actress sees all in real time. No delay. We have a Qualcomm chipset set inside. So we don't rely on the cloud computing. So after you said, the your device up it can work off your router. So if internet goes down, you still see you're bleeding in real time and sleep reports. Wow. That's amazing. And most the first step after you kind of created the prototype. How long did it really take from prototype to market will actually the prototyping was done a while back my business partner? Erica, he he's like the shoe genius behind. The technology. He developed a lot of different wireless sensing technologies for defense firms that could actually see breathing medically. Great accurate from far distances away or close and when he had a baby four and a half years ago. He looked at the current solution and bought the most expensive baby monitor on the market for three hundred dollars. Yeah, brought it home took a look at it. Standard ST video by bad quality, no reliability and into breathing Was like. like I can make this better. So he was tested for years before I even met him and he used his actually his own baby as a Guinea pig. Like, hey, I'm gonna use my own kids. I like this out. And that's when I met him in when I met him. It was just a box with wires coming out of it from there. We sat down named it Nico designed the product and brought it to life, and why Meco Nicomedes beautiful sky Japanese and actually the very first baby monitor ever invented was by summoned Gucci. Who's like one of the most prolific art deco architects and produce designers ever. And after that came out in nineteen thirty seven being maters kinda took a step boards back and backwards and backwards design. So he took it from the very first baby monitor nineteen thirty seven and design this really statically pleasing baby monitor. Wow. And how was it or how is it disrupting the baby monitor space 'cause he has to gain. Trust of parents. A lot of people are first time. Parents had you kind of gain that trust and also disrupt the market. So when you first launch. Of course, launch your kind of your new to this technology new to this space. So a head build parent trust that that doesn't come over night that comments after like six months really building the trust of parents and building that word of mouth that people actually use an insane. Listen, really works. This is crazy and also looking at the space, no one in the baby industry, really developed a real brand a Dyson of baby product something. That's like, yeah. You're gonna pay more for it. But it works. It's trusted and it's tested at the end of the day. Chimney, people come into the industry saying, hey, here's a technology that I made work in the lab for one second and rush to parenting Zaidi, teaching people and having fear based marketing, we're kind of taking a whole different approach like are things been tested tested and tested and from there are Markley. It's all about having the US parents have better sleep, and how the device works. Whenever telling you your baby's gonna die where every single companies taken that approach. And right. It's not the way to go and marketing challenges did you face first starting out? And how did you guys have it and kind of work around those challenges? Challenges where every company has challenges challenges of the right messaging, the right branding to even really nailing the tech and the design of it because you could just take the product and run with it. But our challenges were like that were fun challenges were how do we make it better? How do we take look at every single competitor in this space and see what they're doing wrong? And how we need to improve it from the design of custom base plate to actually having poured safety so nothing in the Caribbean. String Elisa baby to custom conduit that goes on the wall and the kid can grab it to custom stand. That's waited that if a kid hits it won't fall over to anyone will be held by the crib. Wow. And how did you guys come up with the branding? Because if you go on your website, your brandings, really clean a neat. And you guys have really conveyed your message awesome. The branding is done by an art team by instead of going to an outsource agency. I actually Bill. My own internal ad agency in house with a break, creative directors Scott who came over from RPI was one of the lead creative directors and our team of like marketing and social people and us really sat down were like looked at brands. We really love and we want to emulate that into the baby industry, but also build a brand that parents can trust. And how do you make sure that you're staying on top of customer service because that's obviously important shows customer service. We actually hired Nick France, who's like one of the head of customer service ring doorbell. Yeah. We we took a real serious approach of that. Because everyone else we call competitors as well. Their systems. They were how they functioned how they're failing. Right. But we realized no one had this true white glove service like when you call in. We built a whole back end that we can solve and diagnose problems right away in your device. So like, hey, there's something weird going on or hey, Ron old firmware or your app is old want to solve this stuff right away. So you're not. 'cause like look your parent if your device stops working picks, you got a kid you got time for that. Exactly. So we want to solve those things right away. And if something happens we will replace unit right away, and we give refunds and thirty days. If someone's not happy with it because we wanna make sure everyone has a great experience when buying the meek you go back in time. When you're first starting out me, what would be the one piece of advice you'd give yourself. Oh, man. Things take a lot longer than expected. That's my biggest thing. I realized like when you're you're going into this kind of tech world, you're like I could get done in a month right plan to three months to do it everyone else's. I Dun, Dun Dun, and you can get things done quickly. But it's not you. It's all the different vendors and people you're working with. Everyone's a little slower than expected. Amazing amazingly right back in dive into how Nico is different than all the other baby monitors out there. This is Business Rockstars this is my amazing guests Colt semen CMO co-founder of Meco. One step away.

CMO and co-founder Business Rockstars Nico Asia Dun Dun Hong Kong Qualcomm New Jersey Caribbean Meco Nicomedes US Erica partner Guinea Zaidi head of customer service Meco co-founder
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Planet. This is Business Rockstars. You shouldn't have to choose a random lawyer charges expensive hourly rates when you need legal help, but the legal system is so complicated. One of the choice. You have when you need help with your business or want to protect your family start with legalzoom. They make it easy for more than a decade. They provided away for regular people. Like, you and me to confidently navigate the legal system. Legalzoom's not a law firm, and that's how they provide such value. They don't rely on judging you by the hour, instead, you'll get transparent pricing and customer reviews. So you know, exactly what you're getting up front. If you need help with Inc. LLC's trademarks last wills living. Trust more, legalzoom's Smart Choice. They've got the right people on hand to answer your questions, and if you need legal advice their network of independent attorneys can provide the straightforward guidance. You need most dates don't let legal hurdles become an excuse. Go to legalzoom dot com today. Disturb building your own future the right way to save even more. Enter rockstar in the referral box checkout. That's legalzoom dot com. Stay on our motorcycle. And this is they say off her motorcycle have. On our motorcycle. From over cycle. At sat around not accent..

business rockstars
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:52 min | 3 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is Business Rockstars, my guest today is Audrey Belus. She's the founder of startup DCLA as well. As the founder of or the women. It's great to have you on the show great to be here. So we both know as entrepreneurs, right? The down the failures that success is the lessons learned from all of those the biggest fear of all of us. Got inside is our fear of not being worthy. And one of the things. I think holds people back from becoming an entrepreneur or from really living the life that they're capable of their full potential and having the quality of life in the abundance in their life that they're all all capable of achieving the thing that really holds us back. I think is our fear of success because. If we fail achieving success in anything we're going to fail. Meaning we're gonna learn on our way. But reason why we're afraid of failure is because if we fail it means, we're not worthy. And so self worth is something that I know both of us has struggled with at some point in our life. And when we finally gave ourselves to gift of knowing that we're worthy. No matter. What that was when it all changed for us. And we've both been on rocket ships to success in how businesses and so I'm curious from your perspective. I know you have an amazing story about how you over the adversity of not feeling worthy in just kind of diversity that comes along with the entrepreneurship, so take us to that point in your life. And you know, what I'm talking about about when you had that challenge. He had that adversity. And how you triumphed over that. Because I think it's really incredible actually had a broken engagement six fears in debt, and the only way I was ever going to pay that off was by becoming an entrepreneur now by getting a J O V, I wouldn't be paying it off forever. And I had to really dig deep and find myself worse for that. Because I was embarrassed and ashamed at the amount of money that I owed the situation that I put myself in. And what did that mean for me as an entrepreneur and my worthy of going out and asking for people's business when I had gotten myself into such a predicament, and thankfully that journey of discovering myself worth really helped me to get to where I am today. And now against teach people how to find their. So why do you think I kind of touched on in my own opinion? Why I think it is? But why do you think most people struggle with self worth? Why don't you think most people beat themselves down the biggest person that's kind of putting them down in life is themselves. Right. And then it's a reflection of how they see the world. Why do you think most people do that? Why do you think most people don't feel worthy? I think most people don't feel were they because they've internalize beliefs about what they think actually brings value to them and determines. How were they are? And oftentimes what happens is people put that outwardly and think if I have this then I won't be worthy. When I have this job when boyfriend when I closed this deal, I will be worthy of love. Belonging. I will be in the world. The reality is as you are worthy. No one else. Can assign your worth only you can get too often people put that outside and assumed that other people Walstein not. I love that. I think that's so true. And I'm always curious to know Wendy's you give yourself a gift of knowing that you're worthy because that's a tipping point in all of our lives that if we do get to that place where we give ourselves. That's really what you're doing. You can give it to yourself. Right. But we try to reach out. We try to get other people if this happens, then I'll give it to me. But when did it happen for you? When did you give yourself a gift feeling more? They actually happened to me last year. And it wasn't something. I found for myself. Somebody else illuminated that for me. Good friend of mine that I've known for many years to show me since high school me through all this experience right of falling down rebuilding. And she played on that you've been working really hard for a long time. When are you going to stop fighting and realize you're over the hump here already? They're just gonna learn to actually enjoy what you have. Why does it have to always be so hard? Take a look around me, and I did some moral inventory. And I said, you're right. It doesn't have to be this hard. I'm fighting for things because I've been stuck in fight mode for so long. I don't have to fight for anymore. And that's when I really started giving my permission giving myself permission. Okay. I've got this. Good. Up with a good friends. Right. Audrey Belus is my guest right now. She's of startup DT LA as well as the founder of worthy women. I'm Mark lack on Business Rockstars. We're here to inspire inform and connect a community entrepreneurs. Again, Audrey ballots is joining me right now we're talking about feeling worthy. And it's something that maybe some people are kind of like, I'm a man feel worthy. But deep down inside of us. I think the reason why most of us don't fulfill architectural in life is because we're afraid that if we reach for it, and we don't get it. We aren't worthy. Right. And I think most people would rather subtle for a life of comfort and security than to reach for their deepest biggest dreams and not achieve them. Because if you don't and you reach for your dreams, and you don't achieve on your failure ranger not worthy, and that's the real stuff right there. So what do you think is the key to recognizing that no matter what you are worthy in life. So that people. I can get it to themselves because that's all that you can have you can go out, and you can leave anything you want. But if you don't give yourself a gift a feeling worthy. You look at someone like, Robin Williams and the guy had achieved all of his wildest dreams. Had an incredible family was able to make anyone laugh in any context was such an amazing role model. Getting took his own life. Yeah. So feeling worthy is is a science. It's an art. And I'm just curious from your perspective. What do you think it takes people to recognize their own self worth? So I like the line the relationship that I have with you is a direct reflection of the relationship that I have with myself powerful. What is the relationship that? I have with myself. How do I shop at work? How do I show them my life, you touched on this idea of people are too scared to go out and get it? And so they play small live small, and we look at that. And we say, oh, man, you're just you're just staying there in the comfort zone. The reality is that comfort zone eats them alive. It's the one thing that sends people into midlife crisis or whatever crisis that they're having it makes them drink too much and makes them fight too much with our partners. It makes it makes the reasons why they cheat lie. Steal control manipulate. It doesn't not show up in their lives. It shows up every way and tortures them daily Audrey. You're amazing. I think the segments really hard without touching because sure it's going to move a lot of people in weight in some of our other segments. I appreciate you for opening up sharing your story with us. Thank you for..

Audrey Belus founder Business Rockstars DCLA Robin Williams Wendy
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is Business Rockstars. And this is our CEO round table segment. And joining me today are two rocks are CEO's give us a quick elevator pitch. You are you. And what do you do? I'm angel Anderson. I'm the CEO and co founder of nail snaps Nelson apps. Let's you transform any social image into a salon quality nail wrap. You can apply yourself in minutes. No time. No mass. No talks. Of course. Very cool AJ shark co-founder dotty digital. We are an augmented reality company, we do enterprise level solutions in full three d for augmented reality, which isn't really done today. Very cool. We're gonna have some fun conversation. As the CEO round table segment. I personally linked to get started with failures and mistakes. I think that in life everybody at some point can relate to failures and mistakes. More sudden, they can't successes. Achievements. So I'd love to know personally from you guys. All of course, you're my own. But ladies first what's been one of the biggest mistakes or failures you've made so far on your entrepreneurial journey, and what was the lesson? I'll say a big failure. I made was. Taking on a partnership that I thought was going to take down a certain road. And it turned out that that road had a very very abrupt dead end. And I learned that I need to do a much better job of trusting my gut when I get into partnership relationships with other whether it's an advisor or a marketing firm anything there's definitely on a gut level. There was something kind of tingling, my Spidey sense. And I turned it off because I thought all of the launch vehicle things here in this contract makes sense from business. But there was something in my guts. And maybe not and I should have listened to that insane. I just wanna say insane. How many times we have people on our show that see virtually the exact same thing? My intuition told me, no. But the logic in the thing saying, this is gonna be a great partnership, a great decision agreed investor whatever that thing crazy. How many people say the gut? Intuition told me, no, but the logic. And the reason said do it anyways. That being a bad decision. So I guess the lesson from that is something we've heard a few times on this show. Follow your intuition. What was the point of contention? What made it a Nautica decision? I actually can't go into because we've signed an agreement thing. I can't talk about. I will say I will say as a woman, you're always taught that you have a certain higher level of intuition one of my unfair natural advantages. I'll admit, but as a CEO I tried to sometimes distance myself from qualities that are traditionally feminine and really like pay attention to the numbers and the data and the logical side of things. And this was a really clear example of when I needed to be most often I needed to really really listen tonight, deep voice inside. And I didn't and I learned a hard lesson. And I will never make mistake again. Hey, jay. So so mine was was definitely not pivoting quick enough. You know, anytime you do a startup you have the brainchild of an idea that you think is going to be amazing at the world will adopts, and then you quickly find out that the world doesn't see the same thing you see and instead of taking the feedback from the world, you try to have this up mentality of I'll show you that. I could be right, and you could be wrong, and it's actually much smarter to potentially pivot and listen to the smartest people in the room. Because usually not out of ten times, you're not so I should have pivoted much quicker than than I did. But it's a it's a tough thing because you know, part of you is listening to your gut saying, no, I can keep going. I can I can make this work. And you know, where my story is listening to yourself. Your story is listen to other people, and there's always that tension as a CEO you have so many people giving you advice and people who've been down similar roads. And there is no right path. Most of the time you're faced with a lot of hard decisions. Very true. And it's like okay in this instance, who I listened to my gut or listen to this morning. Was not. So I think on this one with pivoting. We're got may be like, hey, I think the cigarette idea. It's the fact that when you hear other people consistently say the same thing, it's like, okay, I need to take that advice of holding onto my own pre helpless because you're so biased eurod idea that you wanted to work. Do you think that you are better than he wants to think their babies ugly? I personally one of the things that we do is free the environment. Allows people to grow consists do a similar thing where we give people the opportunity to take on training and go to workshops to grow and to expand their skill set. I think people really naturally like to invest their time in a place that feels like they're actually getting an investment back the investment that they're putting into the company is also being put into them like I'm gonna pay for you to get smarter. So that. Who doesn't want to be environment? We also offer free manicures..

CEO angel Anderson Nelson co-founder advisor co founder jay
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

11:26 min | 3 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Welcome back to Business Rockstars now. Let's go to Mark lack. Rockstars. I'm Mark lack and we're here to inspire inform and connect the community of entrepreneurs. Jasper wears joining us right now, he's the president and co founder of task us. Thanks. So task us. What did you company do something new tasks something to do with tasks task us does customer support for a high growth internet companies? Okay. Seven thousand people across the world. And so when you Email or tax twenty your favorite services with the customer support problem, you're probably getting someone from task us. So give me a contextual example say you messages, actual person using task us talk about Tinder, for example. Let's say you're on Tinder, you and tender. No, okay. Let's say you were on tender, and you were having a problem in tender and you wanted to contact and ask about this problem. Maybe you were getting any matches say Email tender. Hey, any matches? What's the problem and someone response back? Be someone from tasks so any company that's like reaching out to their customer support of their info or anything like that. That's potentially being done by task us. That's right. Okay. How do you guys I'm assuming it's all independent contractors? No, all full-time, employees, fulltime employees responsible for doing all of this. I'm assuming they go through some type of training process. That's why they're fulltime awful time. They go through training there. So acted individually for each program that we do. And so it's kind of like you build a team here, and we're banker Santa Monica anywhere where you're operate a startup or company, and instead of hiring an additional one hundred people to answer these sometimes early basic questions inexpensive office space, you might use to build and train a team Qasim to exactly what it is that you guys did. So my question for you is there's a lot of artificial intelligence. Two and a and actually, but what if they ask you questions, it's not built in artificial intelligence down at smart enough to formulate its own responses and one or two or three years that's the future of this. I have friends that are at the leading edge of having that type of technology replace people to answer basic questions right now, there's already technology. We even use this in my own SMS texting businesses where you opt into our service, and based on what you say automated response, if this then that if it's not this, then maybe this, and it sends you text messages back or even emails back based on what's happening. Are you guys on the railroad listening to this and getting prepared for that? Yeah. We're staying super close to that. My personal view is that it's moving a little bit slower than people might say. Right. So it's not going to happen next month. Not going to happen next year. So for the really basic questions over the next two years. What I think will happen is the super basic questions. Yes. Or no questions that a computer can answer computer should answer. And we want to be able to empower people to move up the value chain and to be able to answer questions or engage with customers more sensitive issues that are better suited for humans and not computers. I got you. So how did you get into this space? What what to this was like something in a text based before yours and you wanted to be an entrepreneur. So my co-founder Bryce Matt Allen. I started the company eight and a half years ago, we've been business partners since we were in high school since we're seventeen years old pasta. We had different businesses together throughout throughout high school and Africa college we knew we wanted to start a business. This is before being author was cool, by the way. And so we started at Houston. You didn't have a job. I mean, really we were just unemployable. We had to start a business because there really wasn't a whole lot outs. And it was two thousand and eight not the best of times for the economy. And so our initial idea which makes sense as to why the name is task was a virtual personal assistant company. You're familiar with Tim Ferriss book for hour workweek? I'm sure of course, right? And so of the four hour series. And so we thought that was a big thing. And we thought that as part of that virtual systems would be take off every busy professional or spying entrepreneur would have a virtual assistant. That was our thesis is that the book because of the book, right? And this is like the movement at the time, and then people that read ten fares book tarp people that read that movement. I wanted the entrepreneur, but I wanna be traveling in a hammock half the time. Right. So we thought virtual systems who's going to be a big thing. And so we set out to build a company that a lot of people's outsource one task at a time. So we had tested service providers from twelve different countries before realizing that the Philippines was a really great place to work and. So we've hired a few people on our own in this opinions who would fulfil his basic tasks that we had coming in from the clients that we had that business model. I don't know if you can tell was born. Oh. Working for ten bucks an hour. And you're trying to meet the demands of all of these very finicky clients, and then you would outsource work to someone in another country. We get the work back. We ended up fixing it ourselves. So great value to the customers have Bryson I doing work for ten dollars an hour, really hard as a business model, but through that we had a team in the Philippines. And then we went to other people that we knew who were building startups just having identified ourselves to startup founders in Santa Monica, and we said, hey, how can we help you guys outsource different functions? Your business got his great team in the Philippines. And then we got our first line, which did voice mount attacks transcription that entrepreneur Jamie Semenov went off to other companies. He's not running ring which video doorbell, which is doing really well. And we went overnight from having five people to one hundred listening to voice mails, and then transcribing them in a Google voice. Type service also known as amazing. So you like so many other entrepreneurs out there had experiences in your case a company that failed. But. Ultimately lead you to where you're at. Now, we've got the president co founder of task us. Jasper joining us Business Rockstars, I'm Mark lack and we're here to inspire inform and connect the community of entrepreneurs. I wanna know what you feel like one of your biggest lessons as an entrepreneur. So early on Bryce, and I would sit there in our office. We get there earlier. We'd stay later, and we would say to ourselves like, hey, this is how it's gonna be you, and I are always going to work harder than everybody else. We're the owners of the business, right? That's what's going to happen. That was a big mistake. And that was that was the wrong mindset why? Because it's not true. We just didn't hire the right people. And so all it took was one employee that we hired him still with us today. I remember and. Early and he worked at his job with as much passion as we did. And so took only one person for us to realize. Hey, we're we're not giving people enough credit other people the right people in the right? Roles will really be. Instrumental in helping us build this business, and those people are out there, which seemed to be really really careful and make sure we find the right, folks. And how do you do that though? Because it's one thing to say, it's a whole nother thing to go out there and have done. So many of these interviews people in there like some say finding towns, easy, keeping it's hard. Some people say finding towns the tough part, keeping it's easy parts. How do you go about finding this amazing talent? How do you keep it? Well, it's both art is is what I would say to know soup. So the first thing I would say is have a process have a hiring process. And we were early on we hire different sorts of small business consultants as soon as we could afford it. And they just taught us a really simple kind of time-tested very boring process to interviewing my question is for the aspiring entrepreneurs somebody like yourself you fail. You've made it rations pivoted. You've learned a lot. I wanna take him. I wanna share with the aspiring entrepreneurs the person who says look, I got a job still. I really really really wanna quit it soon. I want to follow my passion. I want to start a business. I'm listening to this show. I want to put the pieces together, I want people like Jasper and help me what you feel like are three things that aspirated entrepreneur needs to know as soon as they get in the game or before they even get them. So I'll start first with picking a co founder 'cause a lot of people do want co-founders. He's there's not so many sold honors. So somebody to start the business the business with right? If you don't want to do it a lot that is something that people don't spend enough time with most partnerships are very hard and ended in failure. I'm super lachey tour with somebody like Bryce, we know each other since high school we've been working together for over a decade over twelve years. I've known my business partners kindergarten. You gotta speed there. So we haven't been business partners will only been business partners for four years. Okay. So talk community there you go. So, but it's so important and some some people be like, oh, I like this person or they will be able to you know, just like for themselves into thinking because they have the skill that. That means they could spend the rest of their lives working with this person. Yes, it is such an important decision. And so there's a lot of ways you can choose it. But my my advice would be be really careful and go take a trip together before if you don't know this person very well feeling on through work setting go go camping for the weekend. Or Bryce I did when we were eighteen we backpacked around Europe together for for for six weeks. That's how we knew that we did get along and be partners was in kind of travel. So that's one little hat that. I think excuse me, if you're going to pick a co-founder try that that's that's that's number one. Yeah. Advice? Number two, I would have is embrace being small. So when you're starting a company if you're starting an agency citing is a good time. It's a good time. Yeah. And if you're in a service business like I am. It's so funny to me, you probably see this. When you go to website and every every time when he describes himself as the leading this and that, right? Well, not everybody to lead every single category. Yeah. So. There's a room there's room for boutique and there's room for small if you're if you're web development company and you're five guys in the garage talk about being five guys in the garage because I guarantee there are companies that want to hire five guys in a garage. And they don't want the big expensive website company turned off by the leading whatever. That's right. And so so embrace who you are embrace who you are. Because there's the right buyer for you and not everybody's going to be your buyers. That's okay. And then the last one which I think is the most important, which is I buying entrepreneurs. And something I continue to tell myself today is if you do not ask you will not receive. I think that is something that people really get tripped up on. And this could be asking for funding asking for advice asking for sale all of these things you have to do if you're going to start a company, you gotta get uncomfortable. And so the sooner you start asking for things and getting outside your conference on the better. It's going to be an ultimately nothing bad's gonna happen from asking the worst that can happen is you're back to where you are. And maybe the answer is no. And task is my simple advice, but at the same time common sense common practice, and I think some of the best coaches and mentors and consultants in the world help their people that they're coaching and rising apply. The basics. Because sometimes it's the basics to get us to where we want to be. And then we get there, and we stopped doing what got us. They're thinking that now it needs to be complex. So I love that you brought that up go back to the basics and ask. I'm Mark lack this Business Rockstars we connect a community of entrepreneurs. And if you'd like to be a part of it you can go to Facebook Twitter or online at Business Rockstars dot.

Business Rockstars Bryce Matt Allen Jasper co founder Philippines Tinder co-founder president Mark Tim Ferriss Santa Monica Africa Houston Facebook Google virtual assistant
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:42 min | 3 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Is Business Rockstars. I'm Pat O'Brien. Welcome to the show. Now, let's check in with Alex Worley for good reason. She's always got somebody. Great, alex. How and when to hire freelancers. We're here to inspire inform and connect the community of entrepreneurs. I'm Alex wirley. This is Business Rockstars and Michelle McClain CEO and co founder of Pablo is here to help us answer that question. So Michelle, obviously when you're a newer company, and you have a tight budget times, hiring fulltime employees is not an option, right? Yeah. Exactly. So sometimes you need to turn to freelance work, fulltime employees. We have two full time developers are in Cairo Egypt, which is where our co founder and CTO is also, but we have still needed to bring in extra help. A lot of work to develop an app. Yeah. Approximately how many freelancers are you currently working with or maybe have worked with total say we've probably worked with total three to four over the last. Here are close a year, and we're currently working with one right now we. Definitely used freelancers for different types of jobs and one of them is QA testing. And that's been a really great role to hire a freelancer. Next thing with that is that is basically like quality control going through and doing a deep dive into your product testing, all the ins and outs and putting together a very comprehensive list that we can hand off to our developers. If something not, you know, my co-founder, and we also do all the testing ourselves. But having a dedicated QA person is has been really valuable. So what are some of the other areas that you've hired freelancers far? So we are working with like a freelancer who's kind of also an intern and doing our social media. That's another really great area to get health. And we also have another freelancer who is helping on the development side. So our full-time developers. They do all of the the big vein sobbed and all the day to day, but we have some areas that are maybe on a tighter time line that we want to get taken care of. So we bring in a freelance Alford. Come and help us move a little quickly with some items and you've hired freelancers. It sounds like from the lower skill to that higher skill level. Social media for. Hasn't really made for you to have someone full-time. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. So how do you direct them to make sure for instance, that you are having that quality control, and that you on brand as well? So we so my co-founder Ryan who runs all of our marketing and the social side, I we work directly with the freelancers. We have weekly meetings where we brainstorm the content. We also have all of our branding docks, which we always sick too. We have certain rules that we always stick to with our social media at how we're posting. He's a couple of example. And that's a great idea document. I yeah. On one of our biggest roles for Instagram account is because we are a video and photo app. We're only actually posting videos. So we do not allow any photo like still photographs honor Instagram. So that's just one little canoeing. Yeah. Continuity, and it's also just a little more visual. What are you guys are all about? And then you've also like you mentioned hire hired someone with more of a higher level because you really just wanted them to do a great job. Yeah. I didn't have to go back and pay more. You were on a deadline when in fact, the better thing to do to maybe higher the more expensive. So I think the way we did it was basically had a fulltime line and budget for what we could spend money on. And when we needed to get something accomplished, and there's definitely areas that you can kind of cut corners on. And you don't have to go extremely expensive with freelance freelancer that you're hiring. But there are also areas that might be the core of your business or the core of your products that you've really. Yeah. You don't wanna up if you really wanna make sure someone you're working with someone who is knowledgeable. So these were the areas that we brought in someone to help with our development team just achieve what we were trying to accomplish in the time frame that we were. This Business Rockstars here to inspire inform and connect the community of entrepreneurs. I'm Alex wehrley. Try Michelle McClain CEO and co founder of Pavlo now, some people might be washing go. Okay. Great. But how do I find these people and you find them very easily, thanks to two websites. But are they? Yeah. So we use a code and work, and they've been really great both are a little different. How are they different? So up work is purely for hiring an angel. Call has a whole other side to it. You can find other co-founders if you're looking to bring on a co-founder, you can meet investors if it's a whole different type of networking platform. So hire freelancers as well. Whereas up work is solely focused on freelance work have you had different or similar sex with. I would say similar success with each and we found our toaster shoe at four and we've worked with him multiple times now, and we found one of our developers that we bring on their angel. Call we've also worked with him several times. And so the first time you go to these. I've used effort dot com. I'm familiar with that it can feel overwhelming 'cause there. Yeah. So many Korean thing. But again can feel overwhelming they do do a good job of making recommendations and having a system for finding the right people. But what have you found to be helpful for finding the right people really similar to yelp going based off of that the stars that they have and the other comments left by clients previous clients, they've worked with that has proven to be the best way to find someone really do a deep dive the rating farm and all of that anything else that goes into finding freelancers. I would just say take your time. I know like it took us a very long time to find someone that we thought was a a right fit and famous startup time. It's kind of the essence by choice to take your time and see all the options as many as you can claiming the research process. Yeah. And do you interview them? Okay. Over over sky. Yes. We we always interview. I thank you so much Swain CEO and co founder of five love her hair on fire, inform and connect the community of entrepreneurs. I'm Alex Worley and Business Rockstars. This is an urgent health notice for all residents suffering from back, neck, knee and respecting you may qualify for pain relieving brace.

Business Rockstars co founder co-founder Michelle McClain Alex Worley CEO Alex wirley Pat O'Brien Alex wehrley Instagram Pablo Cairo Egypt Alford intern Swain Ryan who development team CTO Pavlo
"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

11:04 min | 3 years ago

"business rockstars" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"I'm Mark lack in this is Business Rockstars, my guest today is my dear friends Ubon Langford. He's an international speaker. And he's a man's empowerment coach. And he is a phenomenal one. At that. Devante surrogate it'd be in house so real quick just kind of tell us what this man a little bit of everything traveling. Now, you're speaking. Yeah. I'm being a Business Rockstars. I'm ben. That's that's why I got invited. But just truly traveling the world right now and trading community, creating content. It really conversations as support all people specifically men and bring into the challenges that mental various they can live their legacy and truly create some place a purpose. I love that. And you do an amazing job at senior videos senior workshops, I've seen the testimonies from people you do an amazing job. And that's why you're here on the shelf. So let's talk about the hardest thing about starting a business. What would you say are three traits or three tips every entrepreneur getting started needs to know, go first. That goes for the biggest thing for me is waiting for permission. And I was I thought so I thought that was a certain point someone's going to tap on the shoulder and say, hey, it's your turn realize it's always my turn. You gotta do. It is my turn and waiting. For permission is is the worst thing you can do a lot of us have these visions. These goals these emissions for our lives. And if we don't have the right people around us our supporting pushing us forward, then we sit stuck a lot of sitting. We should be standing and changing and transforming lives, and so I really stepped into something that's truly morning is fulfilling, and it's also been something. That's I mean, it's like a dream. Honestly, you've stepped into your dream. That's number one. Is you gotta just do it. Right. You gotta give yourself permission to get started. And go the dream so two more things for getting started in bit. Absolutely is passion passion is an. The GPS of gopher first PSA passionate. Biggest thing is if you're not passionate about it. As places you will go in life. Passion can show up after I am passionate show up before five. Passion, gives you up when you get knocked down passionate gives you use you the guts to go into Rome and say, listen, this is why you should be in business with me. This is why I'm choosing right? Passion, gives you the feel to go places that the normal. The average person wouldn't go get something that's truly pushing forward. I created a workshop in LA twelve guys in a room. And now, I'm traveling the globe with this workshop passion and love that. I it's just it's just something that I can't really explain to you got to be a little delusional. We have a little crazy. Nobody, you know. So is big thing. You know? Okay. So go first passion number three as is. This is something. This is this is something that is so important. This is one of the secret ingredient, the secret ingredients any success personally side of the business, a huge part of it. Specificity is being specific specificity support you in knowing where you don't have to go anymore. So we're going to lane. We know we don't need this. We stay the course specific university honor specificity things will come. I wanna make more money. Okay. Or someone will say have a coaching client who said I wanna make enough money enough money for what what's been my bills in my house and as wanna make enough to do this. And I'm like are you bills paid? Is your family safe or you're getting exactly what you're asking for specificity nother story? Young lady who is dying to be married. She said I've been asking psychologist goes I've been asking for wanna get married. One doesn't every guy that I meet every guy. Go a date with thrall Mary. Asking for. So it's important that we be specific. And know that what we asked for it will come and it'll come expeditiously. And so I think getting clear and being specific and his pointed directed as possible with your vision with your mission is going to support your really getting to arriving at that place. How do you find your purpose and in your business though, because yeah, you can be passionate about something? But I see people that have passion. They don't have purpose. So how'd you find your purpose? I think personally the foundation of everybody's purpose should be built on two pillars growth in contribution growth, meeting constantly finding ways to serve your clients in a greater way. And always figuring out how you can become a better version of yourself contribution. Meaning how can you figure out how you can constantly give back in serve somebody or something that's bigger than yourself. And I think that's the foundation of purpose. And then you can get really clear on what your specific purposes you're talking about specificity right tied it in. How do you get specific on what your purposes I think it's discovering an employing in the realm of what lights? Me up for me. I love traveling. I love getting on planes and buses and taxes and horses. Love though, because I'm learning. I'm such a student of lies. I also love people love connecting with people one of my greatest fears growing up as connecting with men because I had no dad. No brothers. It was all females. And so I didn't know how to really establish this relationship. And so I've taken all three of those things that I've created a workshop, but allows me to travel the globe connect with men. Wow. Right. So like me up I got super specific. But it's a journey as well as being gentle with yourself along the journey and for me getting getting specific and really creating that passion and really going. I going the distance. It's about relationships. And when I want to say anybody's watching is a lot of people are focusing on the money. It's not about the money. Focus on the movement. Focus on the people focus on the impact focus on the service and everything else will come rushing for me. That's exactly what I'm Spanish right now. I've been so focused outward on southern people in increasing my capacity, creating products services workshops, the support people and safe spaces where they go. They wouldn't normally go another discovering who they are they digging deeper clarity of mind. Probably they're building the awareness. They have more choices than ultimately producing results. But what I'm doing right now from ourselves and also to others is living life based on. And love edgy. Von says, look inward, I become your best self and everything outside of that will take care of south. You've on Langford is my guest right now. He's a men's empowerment coach phenomenal international speaker. I'm Mark Lacombe Business Rockstars we're here to inspire inform and connect a community of entrepreneurs. Again, my guest right now you've on Langford. It's good to have it on the show, brother. So entrepreneurship it's something that I feel like everybody's trying to do nowadays. It's like this trendy thing. It used to not be used to mean, you didn't have a job. Entrepreneurship is. Hey, I'm an entrepreneur. I'm gonna start my own business. I'm gonna try to raise money to get a valuation on my Matangi everyone's trying to become a coach or do. So everyone nowadays is trying to get into the space. But what do you think how important do you think it is to be authentic as an entrepreneur were nowadays everyone's trying to have false valuations pretended. They're Agoura an expert when during their first year of business and all this other falseness of being an entrepreneur nowadays with Instagram accounts, and pictures, and all of this only showing you the stuff they want you to see the highlight reels, how important is authenticity. It's everything. Honestly, it won't last anybody who's out there trying to become something that they're not built to become it always fell apart. We'll always fall apart people always find their way at the exit. They don't belong in the room. That's in your life. There was in business don't belong there. It won't happen. Another thing is authenticity authentic happen is some people have a strong will and others have trouble. Well, those who don't have that will to go the distance within their room. They don't have the tools and tips throughout the wherewithal to push through they'll make their way out the first. Okay, I learned to EDNA beginning for me. I used to be like what are they doing? Here isn't feel good should be here. And I was always projecting focusing on them. But I've learned to stay in my own lane. So I don't worry about anybody else being authentic. I focus on me and didn't diving deep really discovering who I am. And how I can be better or bigger contribution to other people. I love that brother. We got a guy. Steve Steve's with us right now. Steve says I've got a nine to five job. I've got an idea I've got passionate I've got purpose. But how can I get started? How can I go out and make this a reality because I've got my nine to five job. It's what pays my bills? And I'm barely surviving financially. Maybe a couple of hundred bucks or a couple thousand bucks in the Bank right now. I don't really like what I do it pays the bills. But I've got this beep burning desire to go out in turn this idea in my passion into a monetary business. But I'm uncertain. I'm frayed of what happens if I cut the cord, Steve and I say well, commit Stevie. Steve. What lights you up asking the tell me that at that point? I would tell him. What are the prices pay by living? We go deeper into that people don't understand how much they've robbing the people in their life by not being in alignment with why they're here, we don't fully comprehend the prices people in our lives in that. We are personally paying by not being in alignment were missing. A lot of things we're not having we came for as a direct result of not doing the work. It takes to discover the gift of the purpose. I didn't know that I want to be a men's apartment coach international agreement. Household in foster care where it was more months than money. We never really struggled a wants to provide a, but we didn't have much. I never thought that I could travel that someone would care what I'm doing in eighteen months. That would be the case. But I stood. The course I did the things that producers as daily I surround myself with champions put in the work. I wait within myself. I learned how to be alone and knowing that without 'em with myself everywhere that I go I'm never lonely because I bring me everywhere, I go, and so I've learned little tips and tools in Dougie's read books, and I've thrown us up which champions with Rockstars in business analyze supported me in transforming this thing called the mind. The mind is so precious in what we tell it what we speak to it influences, how shop in the world, and I have learned to be gentle with myself, and to be able to be understanding into come from compassion versus confusion, which is confusion. So we have to do anything about it. I know a lot of people I think for me it's about living life based on results as about growing my awareness. What I have more choices out similarly can change interest from the world everybody,.

Steve Steve Ubon Langford Business Rockstars Mark Lacombe Business Rockstar Rome LA Dougie Instagram Agoura Stevie eighteen months